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Sample records for active species generated

  1. Generation and remote delivery of plasma activated species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Rutherford, David; Mariotti, Davide; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Diver, Declan

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interactions with microdroplets offer new opportunities to deliver active chemical agents and nanoparticles to remote substrates downstream with many potential applications from cancer theranostics and wound healing in biomedicine, gentle food decontamination and seed germination in plasma agriculture to catalyst production and photonic structures fabrication, among others. We demonstrate plasma-liquid based pristine nanomaterials synthesis in flight and subsequent delivery up to 120mm from the atmospheric pressure plasma source. Monosized and non-aggregating metal nanoparticles are formed in the rf plasma in less than 100us, representing an increase in precursor reduction rate that is many (>4) orders of magnitude faster than that observed with standard colloidal chemistry or via high energy radiolytic techniques. Also the collection and purification limitations of the latter are avoided. Plasma activated liquid including OH radicals and H2O2 are transported over 120mm and have demonstrated high efficacy bacterial decontamination. These results will be compared with charge species and radical transport from the rf plasma without microdroplets. Reaction models based on high solvated surface electron concentrations will be presented. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  2. Active Oxygen Species Generator by Low Pressure Silent Discharge and its Application to Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ikeda, Akira; Tanimura, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Koji; Yoshiyasu, Hajimu

    We have proposed the new water treatment using the active oxygen species such as an atomic oxygen with the oxidation power that is stronger than ozone. Based on the results of simulations we designed the silent discharge type active oxygen generator with a water ejector, which is operated on the discharge conditions of low pressure of 6.6kPa. and high temperature of about 200°C. The experimental results are as follows. (1) The yield of the active oxygen increases with the increase of the discharge tube temperature and the decrease of the gas pressure. (2) The life time of active oxygen is tens msec. (3) The active oxygen oxidizes efficiently the formic acid compared with ozone. It is assumed from these results that the active oxygen species having a strong oxidation power is generated.

  3. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  4. Promoting Active Species Generation by Electrochemical Activation in Alkaline Media for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution in Neutral Media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Liu, Linqi; Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Xiaojun; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-11

    In this study, by using dicobalt phosphide nanoparticles as precatalysts, we demonstrated that electrochemical activation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media (comparing with directly electrochemical activation in neutral media) could significantly promote the OER catalysis in neutral media, specifically realizing a 2-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile showing a greatly decreased overpotential of about 100 mV at 10 mA cm(-2). Compared directly with electrochemical activation in neutral media, the electrochemical activation in harsh alkaline media could easily break the strong Co-Co bond and promote active species generation on the surface of metallic Co2P, thus accounting for the enhancement of neutral OER activity, which is also evidenced by HRTEM and the electrochemical double-layer capacitance measurement. The activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media enhanced neutral OER catalysis could also be observed on CoP nanoparticles and Ni2P nanoparticles, suggesting this is a generic strategy. Our work highlights that the activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media would pave new avenues for the design of advanced neutral OER electrocatalysts.

  5. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Reactive Species Generation of N-Benzenesulfonyl Derivatives of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Sol Romina; Miana, Gisele Emilse; Albesa, Inés; Mazzieri, María Rosa; Becerra, María Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Two N-benzenesulfonyl (BS) derivatives of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) were designed, prepared, and screened for antibacterial activity. This approach was based on combining the two privileged structures, BS and THQ, which are known to be active. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BS-THQ and its analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ, and to investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in their lethality. Both showed bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300, with transmission electron microscopy revealing a disturbed membrane architecture. Furthermore, an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in strains treated with BS-THQ with respect to the control was detected when fluorescent microscopy and spectrophotometric techniques were used. The analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ demonstrated a broader spectrum of activity than BS-THQ, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL against reference strains of S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The assayed compounds represent promising structures for the development of new synthetic classes of antimicrobials.

  6. Inorganic Polyphosphates Regulate Hexokinase Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Mitochondria of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Amanda; Moraes, Jorge; da Silva, José Roberto; Costa, Evenilton P.; Menezes, Jackson; da Silva Vaz Jr, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Campos, Eldo

    2013-01-01

    The physiological roles of polyphosphates (poly P) recently found in arthropod mitochondria remain obscure. Here, the possible involvement of poly P with reactive oxygen species generation in mitochondria of Rhipicephalus microplus embryos was investigated. Mitochondrial hexokinase and scavenger antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase were assayed during embryogenesis of R. microplus. The influence of poly P3 and poly P15 were analyzed during the period of higher enzymatic activity during embryogenesis. Both poly Ps inhibited hexokinase activity by up to 90% and, interestingly, the mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase activity was stimulated by the hexokinase reaction product, glucose-6-phosphate. Poly P increased hydrogen peroxide generation in mitochondria in a situation where mitochondrial hexokinase is also active. The superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were higher during embryo cellularization, at the end of embryogenesis and during embryo segmentation, respectively. All of the enzymes were stimulated by poly P3. However, superoxide dismutase was not affected by poly P15, catalase activity was stimulated only at high concentrations and glutathione reductase was the only enzyme that was stimulated in the same way by both poly Ps. Altogether, our results indicate that inorganic polyphosphate and mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase regulation can be correlated with the generation of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria of R. microplus embryos. PMID:23983617

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  8. ARSENIC SPECIES THAT CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN AND GENERATION OF ACTIVATED OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    The in vitro effects of four different species of arsenic { arsenate, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in mobilizing iron from horse spleen ferritin under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were investigated. Dimethylarsinicacid {DMA(V...

  9. Pentosidine in advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) during UVA irradiation generates active oxygen species and impairs human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Okano, Y; Masaki, H; Sakurai, H

    2001-08-01

    Our previous study reported that advanced glycation end-products (AGE)-modified BSA produced active oxygen species, *O2-, H2O2, and *OH under UVA irradiation and enhanced the cytotoxicity of UVA light. We examined whether pentosidine in AGE-modified BSA was involved in one of the mechanisms generating the active oxygen species. In biological investigations, fibroblasts exposed to UVA (20 J/cm2) in the presence of pentosidine-rich compounds (PRCs), which were prepared with L-arginine, L-lysine and glucose, showed a time-dependent leakage of the cytosolic enzyme LDH. In addition, release of LDH was suppressed by addition of DMSO and deferoxamine under UVA irradiation. From these results, it was determined that PRCs exposed to UVA damaged the plasma membrane of human dermal fibroblasts due to the conversion of *OH from H2O2 via a Fenton-like reaction. These features of PRCs exposed to UVA were consistent with those of AGE-modified BSA. In an ESR study, PRCs under UVA irradiation yielded DMPO-OH (DMPO-OH adduct) using DMPO as a spin-trapping reagent. *O2- generation from UVA-irradiated PRCs was also indicated by the combination of NBT reduction and SOD. When PRCs were exposed to UVA light controlled with a long-pass filter, WG-360, it was found that their production of *O2- was prohibited less than 50% in the NBT reduction assay. The *O2- production profile of PRCs depending on the wavelength of UVA light was similar to that of AGE-modified BSA. Furthermore, it was found that the H2O2 level was increased by PRCs exposed to UVA. These results indicated that pentosidine is an important factor of AGE-modified BSA in active oxygen generation under UVA irradiation.

  10. Synthesis of SiC/Ag/Cellulose Nanocomposite and Its Antibacterial Activity by Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Cłapa, Tomasz; Szala, Mateusz; Gąsiński, Arkadiusz; Selwet, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of nanocomposites, based on nanofibers of silicon carbide, silver nanoparticles, and cellulose. Silver nanoparticle synthesis was achieved with chemical reduction using hydrazine by adding two different surfactants to obtain a nanocomposite with silver nanoparticles of different diameters. Determination of antibacterial activity was based on respiration tests. Enzymatic analysis indicates oxidative stress, and viability testing was conducted using an epifluorescence microscope. Strong bactericidal activity of nanocomposites was found against bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus, which were used in the study as typical Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. It is assumed that reactive oxygen species generation was responsible for the observed antibacterial effect of the investigated materials. Due to the properties of silicon carbide nanofiber, the obtained nanocomposite may have potential use in technology related to water and air purification. Cellulose addition prevented silver nanoparticle release and probably enhanced bacterial adsorption onto aggregates of the nanocomposite material. PMID:28335299

  11. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  12. Combustion-derived flame generated ultrafine soot generates reactive oxygen species and activates Nrf2 antioxidants differently in neonatal and adult rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urban particulate matter (PM) has been epidemiologically correlated with multiple cardiopulmonary morbidities and mortalities, in sensitive populations. Children exposed to PM are more likely to develop respiratory infections and asthma. Although PM originates from natural and anthropogenic sources, vehicle exhaust rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) can be a dominant contributor to the PM2.5 and PM0.1 fractions and has been implicated in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objectives Current studies of ambient PM are confounded by the variable nature of PM, so we utilized a previously characterized ethylene-combusted premixed flame particles (PFP) with consistent and reproducible physiochemical properties and 1) measured the oxidative potential of PFP compared to ambient PM, 2) determined the ability of PFPs to generate oxidative stress and activate the transcription factor using in vitro and ex vivo models, and 3) we correlated these responses with antioxidant enzyme expression in vivo. Methods We compared oxidative stress response (HMOX1) and antioxidant enzyme (SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and PRDX6) expression in vivo by performing a time-course study in 7-day old neonatal and young adult rats exposed to a single 6-hour exposure to 22.4 μg/m3 PFPs. Results We showed that PFP is a potent ROS generator that induces oxidative stress and activates Nrf2. Induction of the oxidative stress responsive enzyme HMOX1 in vitro was mediated through Nrf2 activation and was variably upregulated in both ages. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme expression had age and lung compartment variations post exposure. Of particular interest was SOD1, which had mRNA and protein upregulation in adult parenchyma, but lacked a similar response in neonates. Conclusions We conclude that PFPs are effective ROS generators, comparable to urban ambient PM2.5, that induce oxidative stress in neonatal and adult rat lungs. PFPs upregulate a select set of antioxidant enzymes in

  13. Humic acid effect on catalase activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species in corn (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Flávio Couto; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Silveira, Vanildo; de Souza, Sonia Regina

    2011-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) have positive effects on plant physiology, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially understood. The induction of root growth and emission of lateral roots (LRs) promoted by exogenous auxin is a natural phenomenon. Exogenous auxins are also associated with HA. Gas nitric oxide (NO) is a secondary messenger produced endogenously in plants. It is associated with metabolic events dependent on auxin. With the application of auxin, NO production is significantly increased, resulting in positive effects on plant physiology. Thus it is possible to evaluate the beneficial effects of the application of HA as an effect of auxin. To investigate the effects of HA the parameters of root growth, Zea mays was studied by evaluating the application of 3 mM C L⁻¹ of HA extracted from Oxisol and 100 µM SNP (sodium nitroprusside) and the NO donor, subject to two N-NO₃⁻, high dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻) and low dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻). Treatments with HA and NO were positively increased, regardless of the N-NO₃⁻ taken, as assessed by fresh weight and dry root, issue of LRs. The effects were more pronounced in the treatment with a lower dose of N-NO₃⁻. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo and catalase activity were evaluated; these tests were associated with root growth. Under application of the bioactive substances tested, detection of ROS and catalase activity increased, especially in treatments with lower doses of N-NO₃⁻. The results of this experiment indicate that the effects of HA are dependent on ROS generation, which act as a messenger that induces root growth and the emission of LRs.

  14. Generation of reactive species and fate of thiols during peroxidase-catalyzed metabolic activation of aromatic amines and phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.; Moldeus, P.

    1985-12-01

    The horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed oxidation of p-phenetidine and acetaminophen was investigated. Studies using the spin probe 2-ethyl-1-hydroxy-2,5,5-trimethyl-3-oxazolidine (OXANOH) suggested these oxidations involve the generation of substrate-derived free radicals. This was confirmed by using glutathione (GSH) in these incubations in the presence of the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), DMPO-glutathionyl radical adducts were observed using EPR spectroscopy during HRP-catalyzed oxidation of both p-phenetidine and acetaminophen. Investigations of oxygen uptake and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) formation during HRP-catalyzed oxidations of p-phenetidine and acetaminophen suggested that further reactions of the glutathionyl radical involve glutathione peroxysulfenyl radical and glutathione sulfenyl hydroperoxide production. Quinonoid products of the peroxidatic oxidations of p-phenetidine and acetaminophen, and their interaction with GSH via both conjugation and redox mechanisms are described. The relevance of these reactions of GSH with reactive species as detoxification mechanisms is discussed. 29 references.

  15. Ca2+-dependent generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species serves as a signal for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activation during glutamate excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yuntao; Gross, Robert A; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation are both required for glutamate-induced excitotoxic neuronal death. Since activation of the glutamate receptors can induce increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated the relationship of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and ROS generation, and the possibility that ROS increase is a required signal for PARP-1 activation in cultured striatal neurons. Based on the spatial profile of NMDA-induced ROS generation, we found that only mitochondria showed a significant ROS increase within 30 min after NMDA receptor activation. This ROS increase was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex inhibitors rotenone and oligomycin, but not by the cytosolic phospholipase A2 or xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Mitochondrial ROS generation was also inhibited by both removal of Ca2+ from extracellular medium and blockage of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by either a mitochondrial uncoupler or a Ca2+ uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, both DNA damage and PARP-1 activation induced by NMDA treatment was inhibited by blocking mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake or by antioxidants. Our results demonstrate that ROS production during the early stage of acute excitotoxicity derives primarily from mitochondria and is Ca2+-dependent. More importantly, the increase of mitochondrial ROS serves as a signal for PARP-1 activation, suggesting that concomitant mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and PARP-1 activation constitute a unified mechanism for excitotoxic neuronal death. PMID:17947304

  16. Study on 1,3,5-triazine chemistry in dehydrocondensation: gauche effect on the generation of active triazinylammonium species.

    PubMed

    Kunishima, Munetaka; Ujigawa, Takae; Nagaoka, Yoshie; Kawachi, Chiho; Hioki, Kazuhito; Shiro, Motoo

    2012-12-03

    The reaction of 2-chloro-4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazine (CDMT) with various nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly tertiary amines (tert-amines), has been studied for the preparation of 2-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazinyl)trialkylammonium salts [DMT-Am(s)]. DMT-Ams derived from aliphatic tert-amines exhibited activity for the dehydrocondensation between a carboxylic acid and an amine to form an amide in a model reaction. Based on a conformational analysis of DMT-Ams and tert-amines by NMR and X-ray diffraction methods, we concluded that a β-alkyl group maintained in a gauche relationship with the nitrogen lone pair of tert-amines significantly hinders the approach of CDMT to the nitrogen. Thus, trimethylamine and quinuclidine without such alkyl groups readily react with CDMT whereas triethylamine, possessing two or three such gauche β-alkyl groups in the stable conformations, does not react at all. The theory of "gauche β-alkyl group effect" proposed here provides useful guidelines for the preparation of DMT-Ams possessing various tertiary amine moieties. An investigation of the dehydrocondensation activity of tert-amines in a CDMT/tert-amine system that involves in situ generation of DMT-Am, showed that the gauche effect of the β-alkyl group becomes quite pronounced; the yield of the amide decreases significantly with tert-amines possessing an unavoidable gauche β-alkyl group. Thus, the tert-amine/CDMT systems are useful for judging whether tert-amines can readily react with CDMT without isolation of DMT-Ams.

  17. Macrophages generate reactive oxygen species in response to minimally oxidized LDL: TLR4- and Syk-dependent activation of Nox2

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yun Soo; Lee, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, Sunah; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a causative role in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) stimulates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in macrophages through NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91phox/Nox2), which in turn induces production of RANTES and migration of smooth muscle cells. Peritoneal macrophages from gp91phox/Nox2−/− mice or J774 macrophages in which Nox2 was knocked down by siRNA failed to generate ROS in response to mmLDL. Because mmLDL-induced cytoskeletal changes were dependent on TLR4, we analyzed ROS generation in peritoneal macrophages from wild type, TLR4−/−, or MyD88−/− mice and found that mmLDL-mediated ROS was generated in a TLR4-dependent, but MyD88-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that ROS generation required the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that mmLDL also induced PLCγ1 phosphorylation and PKC membrane translocation. Importantly, the PLCγ1 phosphorylation was reduced in J774 cells expressing Syk-specific shRNA. Nox2 modulated mmLDL activation of macrophages by regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and RANTES. We showed that purified RANTES was able to stimulate migration of mouse aortic smooth muscle cells (MASMC) and addition of neutralizing antibody against RANTES abolished the migration of MASMC stimulated by mmLDL-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that mmLDL induces generation of ROS through sequential activation of TLR4, Syk, PLCγ1, PKC, and gp91phox/Nox2 and thereby stimulates expression of proinflammatory cytokines. These data help explain mechanisms by which endogenous ligands, such as mmLDL, can induce TLR4-dependent, proatherogenic activation of macrophages. PMID:19096031

  18. Nebivolol prevents ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the rat kidney by regulating NADPH oxidase activation and expression.

    PubMed

    do Vale, Gabriel T; Gonzaga, Natália A; Simplicio, Janaina A; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2017-03-15

    We studied whether the β1-adrenergic antagonist nebivolol would prevent ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the rat renal cortex. Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol (20% v/v) for 2 weeks. Nebivolol (10mg/kg/day; p.o. gavage) prevented both the increase in superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration induced by ethanol in the renal cortex. Ethanol decreased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration in the renal cortex, and nebivolol prevented this response. Nebivolol did not affect the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration induced by ethanol. Nebivolol prevented the ethanol-induced increase of catalase (CAT) activity. Both SOD activity and the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected by treatment with nebivolol or ethanol. Neither ethanol nor nebivolol affected the expression of Nox1, Nox4, eNOS, nNOS, CAT, Nox organizer 1 (Noxo1), c-Src, p47(phox) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms in the renal cortex. On the other hand, treatment with ethanol increased Nox2 expression, and nebivolol prevented this response. Finally, nebivolol reduced the expression of protein kinase (PK) Cδ and Rac1. The major finding of our study is that nebivolol prevented ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the kidney by a mechanism that involves reduction on the expression of Nox2, a catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. Additionally, we demonstrated that nebivolol reduces NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species by decreasing the expression of PKCδ and Rac1, which are important activators of NADPH oxidase.

  19. Malonate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in rat striatum depends on dopamine release but not on NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ferger, B; Eberhardt, O; Teismann, P; de Groote, C; Schulz, J B

    1999-09-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate produces both energy depletion and striatal lesions similar to that seen in cerebral ischemia and Huntington's disease. The mechanisms of neuronal cell death involve secondary excitotoxicity and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigated the effects of dopamine on malonate-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals and striatal lesion volumes. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that malonate induced a 94-fold increase in extracellular striatal dopamine concentrations. This was paralleled by an increase in the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Prior unilateral lesioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway by focal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine blocked the malonate-induced increase in dopamine concentrations and the generation of hydroxyl radicals and attenuated the lesion volume. In contrast, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated malonate-induced lesion volumes but did not block the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Thus, the dopaminergic and glutamatergic pathways are essential in the pathogenesis of malonate-induced striatal lesions. Our results suggest that the malonate-induced release of dopamine but not NMDA receptor activation mediates hydroxyl radical formation.

  20. Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; He, Hong S.; Palik, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species distribution models require selection of species, study extent and spatial unit, statistical methods, variables, and assessment metrics. If absence data are not available, another important consideration is pseudoabsence generation. Different strategies for pseudoabsence generation can produce varying spatial representation of species. Methodology We considered model outcomes from four different strategies for generating pseudoabsences. We generating pseudoabsences randomly by 1) selection from the entire study extent, 2) a two-step process of selection first from the entire study extent, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from areas with predicted probability <25%, 3) selection from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, 4) a two-step process of selection first for pseudoabsences from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from the areas with predicted probability <25%. We used Random Forests as our statistical method and sixteen predictor variables to model tree species with at least 150 records from Forest Inventory and Analysis surveys in the Laurentian Mixed Forest province of Minnesota. Conclusions Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution models and may be one of the most influential determinants of models. All the pseudoabsence strategies produced mean AUC values of at least 0.87. More importantly than accuracy metrics, the two-step strategies over-predicted species presence, due to too much environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences, whereas models based on random pseudoabsences under-predicted species presence, due to too little environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences. Models using pseudoabsences from surveyed plots produced a balance between areas with high and low predicted probabilities and the strongest relationship between

  1. Induction of Apoptosis by [8]-shogaol via Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Glutathione Depletion and Caspase Activation in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Po-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Own; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chang, Ing-Shing; Wu, Hou; Sang, Shengmin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, is a traditional medicine with carminative effect, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. This study examined the growth inhibitory effects of [8]-shogaol, one of pungent phenolic compounds in ginger, on human leukemia HL-60 cells. It demonstrated that [8]-shogaol was able to induce apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with [8]-shogaol caused a rapid loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, and subsequent induction of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3 processing. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that ROS production and depletion of the glutathione that committed to [8]-shogaol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. PMID:20163181

  2. Bamboo Vinegar Decreases Inflammatory Mediator Expression and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Protein Kinase C-α/δ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Tasi, Yu-Ling; Liu, May-Lan; Chiu, Yi-Chich; Hua, Kuo-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo vinegar (BV), a natural liquid derived from the condensation produced during bamboo charcoal production, has been used in agriculture and as a food additive, but its application to immune modulation has not been reported. Here, we demonstrated that BV has anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. BV reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide levels in, and interleukin-6 secretion by, lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages without affecting tumor necrosis factor-α secretion and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. The mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of BV involved decreased reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C-α/δ activation. Furthermore, creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) was indentified as the major anti-inflammatory compound in BV. Impaired cytokine expression and NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation was seen in mice treated with creosol. These findings provide insights into how BV regulates inflammation and suggest that it may be a new source for the development of anti-inflammatory agents or a healthy supplement for preventing and ameliorating inflammation- and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases, including metabolic syndrome. PMID:24124509

  3. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  4. Catha edulis Extract Induces H9c2 Cell Apoptosis by Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Activation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Syam, Suvitha; Al-Zubairi, Adel S.; Al-Sanousi, Rashad; Oraiby, Magbool Essa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen shrub or small tree, traditionally used by various peoples of the Arabian Peninsula and Africa as an integral component of the socioeconomic traditions. It is believed that the psychostimulant nature and toxic nature of khat is primarily due to the presence of cathinone and cathine respectively. Studies have shown that khat chewing is closely associated with cardiac complications, especially myocardial infarction. Hence in this study, we exposed cathine-rich khat extract in a cardiomyoblast H9c2 (2-1) cell line to check the cell death mechanism. Materials and Methods: Extraction of Catha edulis leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with LC-MS-MS. The anti-proliferative activity was assayed using MTT and apoptosis detection by acridine orange/propidium iodide assay. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein and caspase-3/7 expression were analyzed. The level of reactive oxygen species generation was also evaluated. Results: The khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 hours treatment. We have observed significant early apoptosis events by intervened acridine orange within the fragmented DNA with bright green fluorescence upon treatment. The Bcl-2 expression in the treatment with IC50 concentration of khat extract for 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation significantly decreased with increase in bax level. The increased activation of caspase-3/7 was significantly observed upon treatment together with significant increase of ROS was detected at 24 and 48 hours treatment. Conclusion: Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanisms by which Catha edulis leaves mediate cell death in cardiomyocytes. SUMMARY Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen psychotropic shrub or small treeExtraction of khat leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometryThe khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 h treatment in

  5. Non-transferrin bound iron, cytokine activation and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation in hemodialysis patients receiving intravenous iron dextran or iron sucrose.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Conner, Todd; McQuade, Charles R; Olp, Jonathan; Hicks, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Intravenous (IV) iron supplementation is widely used to support erythropoeisis in hemodialysis patients. IV iron products are associated with oxidative stress that has been measured principally by circulating biomarkers such as products of lipid peroxidation. The pro-oxidant effects of IV iron are presumed to be due at least in part, by free or non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI). However, the effects of IV iron on intracellular redox status and downstream effectors is not known. This prospective, crossover study compared cytokine activation, reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress after single IV doses of iron sucrose and iron dextran. This was a prospective, open-label, crossover study. Ten patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis and four age and sex-matched healthy were assigned to receive 100 mg of each IV iron product over 5 min in random sequence with a 2 week washout between products. Subjects were fasted and fed a low iron diet in the General Clinical Research Center at the University of New Mexico. Serum and plasma samples for IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 and NTBI were obtained at baseline, 60 and 240 min after iron infusion. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at the same time points and stained with fluorescent probes to identify intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) by flow cytometry. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by plasma F(2) isoprostane concentration. Mean ± SEM maximum serum NTBI values were significantly higher among patients receiving IS compared to ID (2.59 ± 0.31 and 1.0 ± 0.36 µM, respectively, P = 0.005 IS vs. ID) Mean ± SEM NTBI area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) was 3-fold higher after IS versus ID (202 ± 53 vs. 74 ± 23 µM*min/l, P = 0.04) in ESRD patients, indicating increased exposure to NTBI. IV iron administration was associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased most

  6. In vitro effect of copper chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complex activities of mitochondria isolated from broiler liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Rongsheng; Wang, Rongmei; Guo, Shining; Cao, Huabin; Pan, Jiaqiang; Li, Chengmei; Shi, Dayou; Tang, Zhaoxin

    2011-12-01

    This study is to examine if Cu(2+) can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated broiler hepatic mitochondria were exposed to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (10, 30, 50 μM). Respiratory chain complex activities, ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed, which coincided with decreasing RCR both with glutamate + malate or succinate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by rhodamine 123 release decreased after CuCl(2) exposure at 30 and 50 μM. In addition, the effects of the antioxidants NAC (200 μM) and GSH (200 μM) were studied at 50 μM Cu(2+). The results indicate that Cu can induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose and the effect of Cu(2+) exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free radicals.

  7. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase acts to dampen the generation of active oxygen species during a period of rapid respiration induced to support a high rate of nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Yip, Justine Y. H.; Vanlerberghe, Greg C.

    2001-07-01

    When wild type (wt) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) suspension cells were grown under phosphate (P) limitation, they contained large amounts of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX). When these cells were resupplied with P, there was a large, immediate and sustained stimulation of respiration to support a period of rapid P uptake. Two lines of evidence suggest that the abundant level of AOX present in wt cells contributed to this stimulated rate of respiration. First, when P-limited transgenic antisense tobacco cells (AS8) lacking AOX were resupplied with P, the stimulation of respiration was much less dramatic even though these cells displayed similar rates of P uptake. Second, while the stimulated rate of respiration in AS8 cells was insensitive (as expected) to the AOX inhibitor n-propyl gallate (nPG), much of the stimulated rate of respiration in wt cells could be inhibited by nPG. Given the non-phosphorylating nature of AOX respiration, wt cells required higher rates of electron transport to O2 than AS8 cells to support similar rates of P uptake. The utilization of AOX by wt cells during P uptake was apparently not occurring because the cytochrome (Cyt) pathway alone could not fully support the rate of P uptake, as the respiration of cells lacking AOX (either untreated AS8 cells or wt cells treated with nPG) supported similar rates of P uptake as wt cells with abundant AOX. Rather, we provide in vivo evidence that the utilization of AOX during the period of high respiration supporting P uptake was to dampen the mitochondrial generation of active oxygen species (AOS).

  8. Active Nitrogen Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Project Officer FOR THE COMMANDER GERALD A. HASEN HARROACKERMANN Major, USAF Lt Col, USAF Chief, Advanced Chemical Laser Br Chief, Laser Science...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATI CODES I. SUJIECT TERMS lCntilnale o nnreqre if neetmay and identiy by Nocb awnubr) FlO GROUP Sue. n. Chemical lasers ...evalua- tion of the H + NF2 flame as a potential N2(A) generator for a high energy chemical laser . llAccesii For NTIS CRA&I l V IC TAR_

  9. Dopamine mediates striatal malonate toxicity via dopamine transporter-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and D2 but not D1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, X G; Schmidt, N; Teismann, P; Ferger, B; Schulz, J B

    2001-10-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate results in both chemically induced hypoxia and striatal lesions that are similar to those seen in Huntington's disease and cerebral ischaemia. The mechanisms leading to neuronal death involve secondary excitotoxicity, the release of dopamine from nigrostriatal fibres and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radicals. Here, we further investigated the contribution and mechanism of dopamine on malonate-induced striatal lesions. Prior lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway with 6-OHDA or the depletion of striatal dopamine stores by pretreatment with reserpine, an inhibitor or the vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), in combination with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine resulted in a significant reduction of malonate-induced striatal lesion volumes. This was paralleled by block or reduction of the malonate-induced generation of ROS, as measured by the conversions of salicylate to 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) using microdialysis. Systemic or intrastriatal application of L-DOPA or dopamine, respectively, reconstituted malonate toxicity and the generation of ROS in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR12909 did not result in a reduction of malonate-induced dopamine release, but significantly reduced the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The D2 receptor agonist lisuride and the mixed D1 and D2 receptor agonist apomorphine, but not the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393, partially restored malonate toxicity in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without increasing the generation of ROS. In line with these results sulpiride, an inhibitor of D2 receptors, reduced the malonate-induced lesion volume, whereas SCH23390, an inhbitor of D1 receptors, was ineffective. Our data suggest that malonate-induced dopamine toxicity to energetically impaired neurons is mediated by two independent pathways: (i) dopamine transporter uptake

  10. Synergistic anticandidal activity of pure polyphenol curcumin I in combination with azoles and polyenes generates reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Manoharlal, Raman; Negi, Arvind Singh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-08-01

    We have shown previously that pure polyphenol curcumin I (CUR-I) shows antifungal activity against Candida species. By employing the chequerboard method, filter disc and time-kill assays, in the present study we demonstrate that CUR-I at non-antifungal concentration interacts synergistically with azoles and polyenes. For this, pure polyphenol CUR-I was tested for synergy with five azole and two polyene drugs - fluconazole (FLC), miconazole, ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITR), voriconazole (VRC), nystatin (NYS) and amphotericin B (AMB) - against 21 clinical isolates of Candida albicans with reduced antifungal sensitivity, as well as a drug-sensitive laboratory strain. Notably, there was a 10-35-fold drop in the MIC(80) values of the drugs when CUR-I was used in combination with azoles and polyenes, with fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) values ranging between 0.09 and 0.5. Interestingly, the synergistic effect of CUR-I with FLC and AMB was associated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which could be reversed by the addition of an antioxidant such as ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the combination of CUR-I and FLC/AMB triggered apoptosis that could also be reversed by ascorbic acid. We provide the first evidence that pure CUR-I in combination with azoles and polyenes represents a novel therapeutic strategy to improve the activity of common antifungals.

  11. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-07

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup.

  12. Antiproliferative activity of Alisol B in MDA-MB-231 cells is mediated by apoptosis, dysregulation of mitochondrial functions, cell cycle arrest and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aifeng; Sheng, Yuqing; Zou, Mingchang

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Alisol B has inhibitory activity in cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism through which inhibition is achieved is still poorly understood. In the present study, the authors examined the effects of Alisol B in human breast cancer cells. Alisol B showed significant anticancer activity in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by Alisol B was mediated by induction of apoptosis, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest, activation of caspases and accumulation of ROS (reactive oxygen species) level. Interestingly, pretreatment of cells with the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK significantly prevented Alisol B-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed the upregulation of p-p38 and downregulation of p-AKT, p-p65 and p-mTOR. Taken together, the above results suggest that Alisol B suppresses the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells mainly through induction of apoptosis; this outcome may represent the major mechanism of Alisol B-mediated apoptosis.

  13. Subabul: A wood species for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    In view of energy and environmental considerations, efforts have been made in this article to suggest the use of biomass as a renewable and nonpolluting source of energy for power generation. This article presents the results of the proximate analyses and energy contents of various components of the Subabul tree and their impact on land requirements to generate necessary biomass for small-scale electricity generation units. The results have shown that for the Subabul-wood-based thermal power plant, approximately 400 ha of land are required to generate 2,000 kWh/d.

  14. Proposed formation mechanism and active species of hydrogen molecules generated from a novel magnesium-citric acid-hydroxypropyl cellulose coating (MgCC) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Hirai, Tomomitsu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of acids is known to accelerate the reaction (Mg + 2H2O = Mg(OH)2 + H2). We developed a novel Mg-citric acid coating (MgCC) material produced by milling Mg powder coated with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC); because of its H2 generation, this material could be used in antioxidant therapy and antiaging applications. After milling in the presence of citric acid, this material produced H2-rich water upon addition to cooled water. Although the reaction was considered to involve a two-electron transfer from Mg to 2H2O, the role of the acid in H2 generation remains incompletely understood. To clarify the reaction mechanism, we performed studies on the deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We observed differences in the concentration ratios, such as H2/D2 > 1 and H2/(H2 + D2 + HD) > 1, involved in H2, D2, and (H2 + D2 + HD) production, and found that adducts with hydrogen atoms (Hrad) were not obtained from the spin-trapping reaction between 5-(2, 2-Dimethyl-1,3-propoxy cyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO) and the MgCC material. The H2, D2, and HD produced from MgCC were identified by using a gas chromatograph connected to a mass spectrometer. The spin-trapping techniques showed that the Hrad adducts formed by the reaction of NaBH4 with CYPMPO could not be observed from reaction of MGCC with CYPMPO in H2O. The data suggest that the rate-controlling step and proposed transition state (TS) exist in the reaction pathway of the O-H bond cleavage and H-H bond formation. A TS of a structure such as [Mg(OH2)2]∗ could be expected in the reaction pathway between Mg and 2H2O by density functional theory calculations. Also, these results show that H2 generation is accelerated in the presence of acids because the activation energy of the TS is significantly smaller than that of H2O.

  15. Batch mode grid generation: An endangered species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-interactive grid generation schemes should thrive as emphasis shifts from development of numerical analysis and design methods to application of these tools to real engineering problems. A strong case is presented for the continued development and application of non-interactive geometry modeling methods. Guidelines, strategies, and techniques for developing and implementing these tools are presented using current non-interactive grid generation methods as examples. These schemes play an important role in the development of multidisciplinary analysis methods and some of these applications are also discussed.

  16. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  17. C-H activation on a diphosphine and hydrido-bridged diiridium complex: generation and detection of an active IrII-IrII species [(Cp*Ir)2(micro-dmpm)(micro-H)]+.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshinori; Nonogawa, Mitsuru; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Ryohei

    2008-07-21

    Reaction of [Cp*Ir(micro-H)](2) (5) (Cp* = eta(5)-C(5)Me(5)) with bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (dmpm) gives a new neutral diiridium complex [(Cp*Ir)(2)(micro-dmpm)(micro-H)(2)] (3). Treatment of 3 with methyl triflate at -30 degrees C results in the formation of [(Cp*Ir)(H)(micro-dmpm)(micro-H)(Me)(IrCp*)][OTf] (6). Warming a solution of above 0 degrees C brings about predominant generation of 32e(-) Ir(II)-Ir(II) species [(Cp*Ir)(micro-dmpm)(micro-H)(IrCp*)][OTf] (7). Further heating of the solution of 7 up to 30 degrees C for 14 h leads to quantitative formation of a new complex [(Cp*Ir)(H)(micro-Me(2)PCH(2)PMeCH(2))(micro-H)(IrCp*)][OTf] (8), which is formed by intramolecular oxidative addition of the methyl C-H bond of the dmpm ligand. Intermolecular C-H bond activation reactions with 7 are also examined. Reactions of 7 with aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, furan, and pyridine) at room temperature result in the smooth sp(2) C-H activation to give [(Cp*Ir)(H)(micro-dmpm)(micro-H)(Ar)(IrCp*)][OTf] (Ar = Ph (9); Ar = m-Tol (10a) or p-Tol (10b); Ar = 2-Fur (11)) and [(Cp*Ir)(H)(micro-dmpm)(micro-C(5)H(4)N)(H)(IrCp*)][OTf] (12), respectively. Complex also reacts with cyclopentene at 0 degrees C to give [(Cp*Ir)(H)(micro-dmpm)(micro-H)(1-cyclopentenyl)(IrCp*)][OTf] (13). Structures of 3, 8 and 12 have been confirmed by X-ray analysis.

  18. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. we consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength Of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. We shall present simulation results of an oscillating plate at various Reynolds numbers and Strouhal frequencies.

  19. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells by cross-linking of CD70 is dependent upon generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of p38 MAPK and JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Hyunkeun; Cho, Dae-Ho; Lee, Wang Jae; Hur, Dae Young

    2010-12-15

    CD70 is expressed in normal activated immune cells as well as in several types of tumors. It has been established that anti-CD70 mAb induces complement-dependent death of CD70(+) tumor cells, but how anti-CD70 mAb affects the intrinsic signaling is poorly defined. In this report, we show that ligation of CD70 expressed on EBV-transformed B cells using anti-CD70 mAb induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent apoptosis. We observed an early expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes that preceded the release of apoptotic molecules from the mitochondria and the cleavage of caspases. CD70-induced apoptosis was inhibited by pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal, ROS quencher N-acetylcysteine, and Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. We supposed that ROS generation might be the first event of CD70-induced apoptosis because N-acetylcysteine blocked increases of ROS and Ca(2+), but BAPTA did not block ROS generation. We also found that CD70 stimulation activated JNK and p38 MAPK. JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 effectively blocked upregulation of ER stress-related genes and cleavage of caspases. Inhibition of ROS generation completely blocked phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK and induction of ER stress-related genes. Taken together, we concluded that cross-linking of CD70 on EBV-transformed B cells triggered ER stress-mediated apoptosis via ROS generation and JNK and p38 MAPK pathway activation. Our report reveals alternate mechanisms of direct apoptosis through CD70 signaling and provides data supporting CD70 as a viable target for an Ab-based therapy against EBV-related tumors.

  1. Inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human lung epithelial cells via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Hoon; Yang, Eun Sun; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2012-12-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play an important role in inflammatory response, angiogenesis and tumor progression. Butein (tetrahydroxychalcone) is a small molecule from natural sources, known to be a potential therapeutic drug with anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antioxidant activities. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced adhesion molecule expression and its molecular mechanism of action. Butein significantly decreased TNF-α-induced monocyte (U937) cell adhesion to lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein also inhibited the protein and mRNA expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein inhibited TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in A549 cells; it also inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, suggesting that the MAPK/Akt signaling pathway may be involved in the butein-mediated inhibition of TNF-α-induced leukocyte adhesion to A549 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that butein affects cell adhesion through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression by inhibiting the NF-κB/MAPK/Akt signaling pathway and ROS generation, thereby, elucidating the role of butein in the anti-inflammatory response.

  2. Generating Cu(II)-Oxyl / Cu(III)-Oxo Species from Cu(I)-α-Ketocarboxylate Complexes and O2: In silico Studies on Ligand Effects and C-H-activation Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stefan M.; Ertem, M. Zahid; Aquilante, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism for the oxygenation of Cu(I) complexes with α-ketocarboxylate ligands is elaborated that is based on a combination of density functional theory and multireference second-order perturbation theory (CASSCF/CASPT2) calculations. The reaction proceeds in a manner largely analogous to those of similar Fe(II) α-ketocarboxylate systems, i.e. by initial attack of a coordinated oxygen molecule on a ketocarboxylate ligand with concomitant decarboxylation. Subsequently, two reactive intermediates may be generated, a Cu-peracid structure and a [CuO]+ species, both of which are capable of oxidizing a phenyl ring that is a component of the supporting ligand. Hydroxylation by the [CuO]+ species is predicted to proceed with a smaller activation free energy. The effects of electronic and steric variatons on the oxygenation mechanisms were studied by introducing substituents at several positions of the ligand backbone and by investigating various N-donor ligands. In general, more electron-donation by the N-donor ligand leads to increased stabilization of the more Cu(II)/Cu(III)-like intermediates (oxygen adducts and [CuO]+ species) relative to the more Cu(I)-like peracid intermediate. For all ligands investi-gated, the [CuO]+ intermediates are best described as Cu(II)-O•- species having triplet ground states. The reactivity of these compounds in C-H abstraction reactions decreases with more electron-donating N-donor ligands, which also increase the Cu-O bond strength, although the Cu-O bond is generally predicted to be rather weak (with a bond order of about 0.5). A comparison of several methods to obtain singlet energies for the reaction intermediates indicates that multireference second-order perturbation theory is likely more accurate for the initial oxygen adducts, but not necessarily for subsequent reaction intermediates. PMID:19322769

  3. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Mammalian Endangered Species.

    PubMed

    Ben-Nun, Inbar Friedrich; Montague, Susanne C; Houck, Marlys L; Ryder, Oliver; Loring, Jeanne F

    2015-01-01

    For some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent their extinction. Cellular reprogramming is a means to capture the genomes of individual animals as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations. Here, we describe a method for generating iPSCs from fibroblasts of mammalian endangered species.

  4. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  5. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVIE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES. CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON , FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). R...

  6. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  7. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the faecal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the aetiology of a range of human diseases and there is increasing interest in their role in the development of cancer.
AIM—To develop a suitable method for the detection of reactive oxygen species produced by the faecal matrix.
METHODS—A refined high performance liquid chromatography system for the detection of reactive oxygen species is described.
RESULTS—The method allows baseline separation of the products of hydroxyl radical attack on salicylic acid in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol. The increased efficiency and precision of the method has allowed a detailed evaluation of the dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the faecal matrix. The data show that the faecal matrix is capable of generating reactive oxygen species in abundance. This ability cannot be attributed to the bacteria present, but rather to a soluble component within the matrix. As yet, the nature of this soluble factor is not entirely clear but is likely to be a reducing agent.
CONCLUSIONS—The soluble nature of the promoting factor renders it amenable to absorption, and circumstances may exist in which either it comes into contact with either free or chelated iron in the colonocyte, leading to direct attack on cellular DNA, or else it initiates lipid peroxidation processes whereby membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids are attacked by reactive oxygen species propagating chain reactions leading to the generation of promutagenic lesions such as etheno based DNA adducts.


Keywords: colorectal cancer; faecal matrix; hypoxanthine; phytic acid; reactive oxygen species; xanthine oxidase PMID:10644317

  8. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: a possible role in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K J; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25-200μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE2 production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease.

  9. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  10. Bilirubin inhibits the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by scavenging reactive oxygen species generated by the toll-like receptor 4-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Idelman, Gila; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2015-08-01

    It has been previously shown that bilirubin prevents the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to LPS. The present study examines whether this effect is exerted through modulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling. LPS-stimulated iNOS and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages was assessed by measuring cellular nitrate and superoxide ( [Formula: see text] ) production, respectively. The generation of both nitrate and [Formula: see text] in response to LPS was suppressed by TLR4 inhibitors, indicating that activation of iNOS and Nox is TLR4-dependent. While treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and bilirubin effectively abolished LPS-mediated [Formula: see text] production, hydrogen peroxide and nitrate release were inhibited by bilirubin and PEG-catalase, but not SOD, supporting that iNOS activation is primarily dependent upon intracellular H2O2. LPS treatment increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α), an effect that was abolished by bilirubin. Cells transfected with murine iNOS reporter constructs in which the HIF-1α-specific hypoxia response element was disrupted exhibited a blunted response to LPS, supporting that HIF-1α mediates Nox-dependent iNOS expression. Bilirubin, but not SOD, blocked the cellular production of interferon-β, while interleukin-6 production remained unaffected. These data support that bilirubin inhibits the TLR4-mediated up-regulation of iNOS by preventing activation of HIF-1α through scavenging of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species. Bilirubin also suppresses interferon-β release via a ROS-independent mechanism. These findings characterize potential mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of bilirubin.

  11. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K.J.; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  12. Biologically-Generated Turbulence by Two Krill Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catton, Kimberly; Webster, Donald; Yen, Jeannette

    2007-11-01

    Large schools of krill have been observed to generate turbulence at levels that contribute to both local and global mixing of the ocean. In these studies, estimates of krill-induced turbulence were determined with in situ acoustic profilers and calculated from krill swimming speeds; however, the turbulence level was not directly measured from krill-generated flow fields. In our study, we measured the flow fields around free swimming individual specimens of two species of krill, Euphausia pacifica and Euphausia superba, using an infrared Particle Image Velocimetry system. The krill-generated flow was characterized by a jet directed downward and to the rear with relatively large velocity magnitude in the core. Persistent vortices formed in the wake and eventually dissipated due to viscous effects. Regions of large energy dissipation rate were found near the body and in the wake of the krill at a maximum value of 1.5 W m-3 for Euphausia superba and 1.0 W m-3 for Euphausia pacifica. An estimate of biologically-generated turbulence will be calculated for each species of krill and compared to the field measurements of previous researchers.

  13. Generation of reactive oxygen species from silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor-liquid-solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals.

  14. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals. PMID:25452695

  15. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  16. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  17. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  18. Can trans-generational experiments be used to enhance species resilience to ocean warming and acidification?

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Leela J; Jarrold, Michael D; Gibbin, Emma M; Christen, Felix; Massamba-N'Siala, Gloria; Blier, Pierre U; Calosi, Piero

    2016-10-01

    Human-assisted, trans-generational exposure to ocean warming and acidification has been proposed as a conservation and/or restoration tool to produce resilient offspring. To improve our understanding of the need for and the efficacy of this approach, we characterized life-history and physiological responses in offspring of the marine polychaete Ophryotrocha labronica exposed to predicted ocean warming (OW: + 3°C), ocean acidification (OA: pH -0.5) and their combination (OWA: + 3°C, pH -0.5), following the exposure of their parents to either control conditions (within-generational exposure) or the same conditions (trans-generational exposure). Trans-generational exposure to OW fully alleviated the negative effects of within-generational exposure to OW on fecundity and egg volume and was accompanied by increased metabolic activity. While within-generational exposure to OA reduced juvenile growth rates and egg volume, trans-generational exposure alleviated the former but could not restore the latter. Surprisingly, exposure to OWA had no negative impacts within- or trans-generationally. Our results highlight the potential for trans-generational laboratory experiments in producing offspring that are resilient to OW and OA. However, trans-generational exposure does not always appear to improve traits and therefore may not be a universally useful tool for all species in the face of global change.

  19. Chimeric Protein Complexes in Hybrid Species Generate Novel Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowska, Elzbieta M.; Naseeb, Samina; Knight, David; Delneri, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization between species is an important mechanism for the origin of novel lineages and adaptation to new environments. Increased allelic variation and modification of the transcriptional network are the two recognized forces currently deemed to be responsible for the phenotypic properties seen in hybrids. However, since the majority of the biological functions in a cell are carried out by protein complexes, inter-specific protein assemblies therefore represent another important source of natural variation upon which evolutionary forces can act. Here we studied the composition of six protein complexes in two different Saccharomyces “sensu stricto” hybrids, to understand whether chimeric interactions can be freely formed in the cell in spite of species-specific co-evolutionary forces, and whether the different types of complexes cause a change in hybrid fitness. The protein assemblies were isolated from the hybrids via affinity chromatography and identified via mass spectrometry. We found evidence of spontaneous chimericity for four of the six protein assemblies tested and we showed that different types of complexes can cause a variety of phenotypes in selected environments. In the case of TRP2/TRP3 complex, the effect of such chimeric formation resulted in the fitness advantage of the hybrid in an environment lacking tryptophan, while only one type of parental combination of the MBF complex allowed the hybrid to grow under respiratory conditions. These phenotypes were dependent on both genetic and environmental backgrounds. This study provides empirical evidence that chimeric protein complexes can freely assemble in cells and reveals a new mechanism to generate phenotypic novelty and plasticity in hybrids to complement the genomic innovation resulting from gene duplication. The ability to exchange orthologous members has also important implications for the adaptation and subsequent genome evolution of the hybrids in terms of pattern of gene loss. PMID

  20. Laboratory Apparatus Generates Dual-Species Cold Atomic Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Klipstein, William; Kohel, James; Maleki, Lute; Lundblad, Nathan; Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Aveline, Dave; Yu, Nan; Enzer, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    A laser cooling apparatus that generates a cold beam of rubidium and cesium atoms at low pressure has been constructed as one of several intermediate products of a continuing program of research on laser cooling and atomic physics. Laser-cooled atomic beams, which can have temperatures as low as a microkelvin, have been used in diverse applications that include measurements of fundamental constants, atomic clocks that realize the international standard unit of time, atom-wave interferometers, and experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation. The present apparatus is a prototype of one being evaluated for use in a proposed microgravitational experiment called the Quantum Interferometric Test of Equivalence (QuITE). In this experiment, interferometric measurements of cesium and rubidium atoms in free fall would be part of a test of Einstein s equivalence principle. The present apparatus and its anticipated successors may also be useful in other experiments, in both microgravity and normal Earth gravity, in which there are requirements for dual-species atomic beams, low temperatures, and low pressures. The apparatus includes a pyramidal magneto-optical trap in which the illumination is provided by multiple lasers tuned to frequencies characteristic of the two atomic species. The inlet to the apparatus is located in a vacuum chamber that contains rubidium and cesium atoms at a low pressure; the beam leaving through the outlet of the apparatus is used to transfer the atoms to a higher-vacuum (lower-pressure) chamber in which measurements are performed. The pyramidal magneto-optical trap is designed so that the laser cooling forces in one direction are unbalanced, resulting in a continuous cold beam of atoms that leak out of the trap (see figure). The radiant intensity (number of atoms per unit time per unit solid angle) of the apparatus is the greatest of any other source of the same type reported to date. In addition, this is the first such apparatus capable of producing

  1. Generation of Energetic Species by RF Microplasma Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, W. T.; Lee, S.; Fenner, D. B.; Davis, S. J.; Hoskinson, A. R.; Hopwood, J.

    2012-10-01

    We present preliminary results from the first implementation of a prototype single-board RF micro-discharge, linear array device in a discharge-flow reactor for quantitative determinations of ozone and singlet-oxygen production from microplasmas in O2 and air at 1 atm. The ultimate objective is to develop compact, portable low-power micro-discharge based systems to generate energetic species for atmospheric-pressure applications including decontamination and disinfection. The technology uses application of low DC voltages and low applied powers (˜25 W) at ˜1 GHz frequencies, across small gaps in arrays of resonators to ignite and sustain highly energetic microplasmas at elevated pressures. A set of 15-resonator micro-discharge assemblies was designed, fabricated, and tested in static and flowing environments for O2, air, and Ar flows at pressures of 20 Torr to 1 atm. O3 production was measured by UV absorption spectrometry, and O2(a^1delta-g) (``singlet-oxygen'') concentrations were determined by absolute near-infrared emission spectroscopy. Near-infrared emission spectra from an argon plasma were also recorded, and showed extensive excitation of the Ar(I) 3p^54p -- 3p^54s emission system near 12 eV.

  2. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-07

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  4. Generativity as a Route to Active Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Andreas; Schmitt, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We elucidate the significance of active ageing from an individual as well as from a societal perspective. Taking an individual perspective, maintaining activity in later years is linked to successful ageing because of empirical relationships to positive self-perception, satisfaction with life, and development of competences, whereas from a societal perspective, active ageing implies usage of older people's life competences as a human capital of society—a societal imperative, particularly in times of demographic change but also more basically substantiated in an ethics of responsibility, intergenerational solidarity, and generation equity. We focus on the psychological construct of generativity which is interpreted as an aspect of the philosophical-anthropological category of joint responsibility. Our own research in Mexico and the Baltic States supports the notion that maintaining access to the public sphere and active engagement for others is a more basic individual concern than a life-stages specific developmental task. We report background and results of a Dialogue Forum Project Funding, a research cooperation between our institute and the Foundation Remembrance, Responsibility, and Future aimed to improve generativity in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine by implementing and supporting local initiatives offering opportunities for intergenerational dialogue. PMID:22919378

  5. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  6. Template-free generation of RNA species that replicate with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, C K; Luce, R

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of different RNA species that are replicated by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 have been generated by incubating high concentrations of this enzyme with substrate for extended time periods. The products differed from sample to sample in molecular weight and sequence, their chain lengths ranging from 60 to 120. The mechanism of autocatalytic amplification of RNA by T7 RNA polymerase proved to be analogous to that observed with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (replicases): only single-stranded templates are accepted and complementary replica strands are synthesized. With enzyme in excess, exponential growth was observed; linear growth resulted when the enzyme was saturated by RNA template. The plus strands, present at 90% of the replicating RNA species, were found to have GG residues at both termini. Consensus sequences were not found among the sequences of the replicating RNA species. The secondary structures of all species sequenced turned out to be hairpins. The RNA species were specifically replicated by T7 RNA polymerase; they were not accepted as templates by the RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli or bacteriophage SP6 or by Qbeta replicase; T3 RNA polymerase was partially active. Template-free production of RNA was completely suppressed by addition of DNA to the incubation mixture. When both DNA and RNA templates were present, transcription and replication competed, but T7 RNA polymerase preferred DNA as a template. No replicating RNA species were detected in vivo in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:8670848

  7. Targeting and Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Nox Family NADPH Oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Stanislas; Hurt, Darrell; Ueyama, Takehiko

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Nox family NADPH oxidases serve a variety of functions requiring reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, including antimicrobial defense, biosynthetic processes, oxygen sensing, and redox-based cellular signaling. We explored targeting, assembly, and activation of several Nox family oxidases, since ROS production appears to be regulated both spatially and temporally. Nox1 and Nox3 are similar to the phagocytic (Nox2-based) oxidase, functioning as multicomponent superoxide-generating enzymes. Factors regulating their activities include cytosolic activator and organizer proteins and GTP-Rac. Their regulation varies, with the following rank order: Nox2 > Nox1 > Nox3. Determinants of subcellular targeting include: (a) formation of Nox-p22phox heterodimeric complexes allowing plasma membrane translocation, (b) phospholipids-binding specificities of PX domain-containing organizer proteins (p47phox or Nox organizer 1 (Noxo1 and p40phox), and (c) variably splicing of Noxo1 PX domains directing them to nuclear or plasma membranes. Dual oxidases (Duox1 and Duox2) are targeted by different mechanisms. Plasma membrane targeting results in H2O2 release, not superoxide, to support extracellular peroxidases. Human Duox1 and Duox2 have no demonstrable peroxidase activity, despite their extensive homology with heme peroxidases. The dual oxidases were reconstituted by Duox activator 2 (Duoxa2) or two Duoxa1 variants, which dictate maturation, subcellular localization, and the type of ROS generated by forming stable complexes with Duox. Antioxid Redox Signal. 11, 2607–2619. PMID:19438290

  8. Generation of reactive species by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The role of gas mixing in reactive species delivery to treatment surfaces for an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled plasma helium jet is investigated by numerical modelling. Atomic oxygen in the jet effluent is shown to quickly convert to ozone for increasing device to surface separation due to the molecular oxygen present in the gas mixture. Surface profiles of reactive oxygen species show narrow peaks for atomic oxygen and broader surface distributions for ozone and metastable species. Production efficiency of atomic oxygen to the helium plasma jet by molecular oxygen admixture is shown to be dependent on electro-negativity. Excessive molecular oxygen admixture results in negative ion dominance over electrons which eventually quenches the plasma. Interaction of the plasma jet with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface. Gas heating by the plasma is found to be dominated by elastic electron collisions and positive ion heating. Comparison with experimental measurements for atomic oxygen shows good agreement.

  9. Swim pressure: stress generation in active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Yan, W; Brady, J F

    2014-07-11

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries-this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton.

  10. The Economics of Saving Endangered Species: A Teaching Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Shaw, Jane S.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that well-intentioned government policies, such as the Endangered Species Act, can actually cause harm to endangered species by creating disincentives to preserving the habitat for endangered species. Maintains that the use of incentives can lead to voluntary species protection. Includes instructions for an in-class teaching activity. (MJP)

  11. Active Ageing: Intergenerational Relationships and Social Generativity.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanna; Boccacin, Lucia; Bramanti, Donatella; Meda, Stefania G

    2014-01-01

    This contribution is a reflection on the concept of active ageing from the perspective of relational sociology. At the same time, it offers practical implications and outlines possible future courses of action, in the face of demographic and relational scenarios rapidly changing, and the challenges that each day people of all generations are called to cope with. Active ageing is quite a recent concept and indicates an attitude towards ageing that enhances the quality of life as people become older. The goal of active ageing is to enable people to realise their potential for physical, social and mental well-being and to participate in social life also in the last stage of the life cycle. In this phase, the presence of a network of support, security and care adequate to the possible onset of problems and criticalities is crucial. Relational sociology frames the phenomenon of an ageing population in a dense network of social relations, primarily at the level of family and community. For this reason, as supported by the most recent sociological literature and evidence from studies conducted in Italy and abroad (cf. SHARE), it is extremely important to investigate the link between active ageing, intergenerational orientation (solidarity and exchanges) and practices of prosociality (i.e. engagement in third-sector activities and volunteering in later life).

  12. Cytoplasmic Drosha activity generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lisheng; Chen, Kevin; Youngren, Brenda; Kulina, Julia; Yang, Acong; Guo, Zhengyu; Li, Jin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    RNase III enzyme Drosha interacts with DGCR8 to form the Microprocessor, initiating canonical microRNA (miRNA) maturation in the nucleus. Here, we re-evaluated where Drosha functions in cells using Drosha and/or DGCR8 knock out (KO) cells and cleavage reporters. Interestingly, a truncated Drosha mutant located exclusively in the cytoplasm cleaved pri-miRNA effectively in a DGCR8-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that in vitro generated pri-miRNAs when transfected into cells could be processed to mature miRNAs in the cytoplasm. These results indicate the existence of cytoplasmic Drosha (c-Drosha) activity. Although a subset of endogenous pri-miRNAs become enriched in the cytoplasm of Drosha KO cells, it remains unclear whether pri-miRNA processing is the main function of c-Drosha. We identified two novel in-frame Drosha isoforms generated by alternative splicing in both HEK293T and HeLa cells. One isoform loses the putative nuclear localization signal, generating c-Drosha. Further analysis indicated that the c-Drosha isoform is abundant in multiple cell lines, dramatically variable among different human tissues and upregulated in multiple tumors, suggesting that c-Drosha plays a unique role in gene regulation. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation on the miRNA pathway and provide novel insights into the ever-evolving functions of Drosha. PMID:27471035

  13. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  14. Khz-cp (crude polysaccharide extract obtained from the fusion of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) induces apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium levels and activating P38 and NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in SNU-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Khz-cp is a crude polysaccharide extract that is obtained after nuclear fusion in Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia (Khz). It inhibits the growth of cancer cells. Methods Khz-cp was extracted by solvent extraction. The anti-proliferative activity of Khz-cp was confirmed by using Annexin-V/PI-flow cytometry analysis. Intracellular calcium increase and measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed by using flow cytometry and inverted microscope. SNU-1 cells were treated with p38, Bcl-2 and Nox family siRNA. siRNA transfected cells was employed to investigate the expression of apoptotic, growth and survival genes in SNU-1 cells. Western blot analysis was performed to confirm the expression of the genes. Results In the present study, Khz-cp induced apoptosis preferentially in transformed cells and had only minimal effects on non-transformed cells. Furthermore, Khz-cp was found to induce apoptosis by increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and activating P38 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria. Khz-cp-induced apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred via a mitochondrial pathway. ROS generation by NADPH oxidase was critical for Khz-cp-induced apoptosis, and although mitochondrial ROS production was also required, it appeared to occur secondary to ROS generation by NADPH oxidase. Activation of NADPH oxidase was shown by the translocation of the regulatory subunits p47phox and p67phox to the cell membrane and was necessary for ROS generation by Khz-cp. Khz-cp triggered a rapid and sustained increase in [Ca2+]i that activated P38. P38 was considered to play a key role in the activation of NADPH oxidase because inhibition of its expression or activity abrogated membrane translocation of the p47phox and p67phox subunits and ROS generation. Conclusions In summary, these data indicate that Khz-cp preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells and that the

  15. Reactive oxygen species generation is not different during isometric and lengthening contractions of mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Darcée D; Brooks, Susan V

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by lengthening contractions, when the muscles are stretched while activated. Lengthening contractions produce structural damage that leads to the degeneration and regeneration of damaged muscle fibers by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated at the time of injury may initiate degenerative or regenerative processes. In the present study we hypothesized that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle would generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. To test our hypothesis, we subjected muscles of mice to lengthening contractions or isometric contractions and simultaneously monitored intracellular ROS generation with the fluorescent indicator 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-DCFH), which is oxidized by ROS to form the fluorescent product CM-DCF. We found that CM-DCF fluorescence was not different during or shortly after lengthening contractions compared with isometric controls, regardless of the amount of stretch and damage that occurred during the lengthening contractions. The only exception was that after severe stretches, the increase in CM-DCF fluorescence was impaired. We conclude that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle do not generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. The implication is that ROS generated at the time of injury are not the initiating signals for subsequent degenerative or regenerative processes.

  16. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  17. 20 CFR 627.225 - Employment generating activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... generating activities, economic development activities, investment in revolving loan funds, capitalization of... activities, economic development activities, or similar activities. (b) JTPA funds may be used for normal... chambers of commerce); JTPA staff participation on economic development boards and commissions, and...

  18. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  19. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  20. Moraxella Species Are Primarily Responsible for Generating Malodor in Laundry

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Asako; Niwano, Yu; Takeuchi, Kohei; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Hitomi, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Many people in Japan often detect an unpleasant odor generated from laundry that is hung to dry indoors or when using their already-dried laundry. Such an odor is often described as a “wet-and-dirty-dustcloth-like malodor” or an “acidic or sweaty odor.” In this study, we isolated the major microorganisms associated with such a malodor, the major component of which has been identified as 4-methyl-3-hexenoic acid (4M3H). The isolates were identified as Moraxella osloensis by morphological observation and biochemical and phylogenetic tree analyses. M. osloensis has the potential to generate 4M3H in laundry. The bacterium is known to cause opportunistic infections but has never been known to generate a malodor in clothes. We found that M. osloensis exists at a high frequency in various living environments, particularly in laundry in Japan. The bacterium showed a high tolerance to desiccation and UV light irradiation, providing one of the possible reasons why they survive in laundry during and even after drying. PMID:22367080

  1. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.

  2. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; ...

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniquesmore » with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.« less

  3. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure. PMID:26594264

  4. Theory of second harmonic generation in randomly oriented species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Allcock, Philip; Demidov, Andrey A.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that second harmonic generation (SHG) is a process forbidden within atomic and molecular fluids. Nonetheless recent experimental observations of second harmonic evolution in suspensions of randomly oriented Halobacterium halobium purple membranes have raised new questions about the precise criteria which determine prohibition of the second harmonic. To address the problem a theoretical framework for SHG is developed that specifically deals with molecular systems, and is therefore cast in terms of molecular properties with more regard to the influence of the local structure. This contrasts with the classical approach based on bulk susceptibilities, which has not proved adequate to explain the conflicting experimental results. By properly formulating the detailed procedure for dealing with the necessary orientational averages, the present theory discloses a relationship between the coherent process of second harmonic generation and a directed component of its incoherent counterpart, hyper-Rayleigh scattering. Inter alia, the theory explains the SHG detected in purple membrane suspensions. The polarisation features of the harmonic evolution are also considered more generally, and in particular it is shown that the SHG signal will persist under conditions of circularly polarised pumping. This specific polarisation feature will allow experimental validation of the theory.

  5. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  6. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  7. Electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammells, Anthony F.; Semkow, Krystyna W.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature electrolytic cell which simultaneously generates oxygen at the anode and liquid alkali metals at the cathode is electrochemically characterized. The electrolytic technology being investigated utilizes the oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria stabilized zirconia, which effectively separates the oxygen evolving (at La0.89Sr0.10MnO3) and alkali metal (Li, Na) reducing (from a molten salt at either Pt or FeSi2) half cell reactions. In the finally engineered cell liquid alkali metal would be continuously removed from the cathode compartment and used as an effective reductant for the direct thermochemical refining of lunar ores to their metallic state with simultaneous oxidation of the alkali metal to its oxide. The alkali metal oxide would then be reintroduced into the electrolytic cell to complete the overall system cycle.

  8. Electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammells, Anthony F.; Semkow, Krystyna W.

    1987-09-01

    A high temperature electrolytic cell which simultaneously generates oxygen at the anode and liquid alkali metals at the cathode is electrochemically characterized. The electrolytic technology being investigated utilizes the oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria stabilized zirconia, which effectively separates the oxygen evolving (at La0.89Sr0.10MnO3) and alkali metal (Li, Na) reducing (from a molten salt at either Pt or FeSi2) half cell reactions. In the finally engineered cell liquid alkali metal would be continuously removed from the cathode compartment and used as an effective reductant for the direct thermochemical refining of lunar ores to their metallic state with simultaneous oxidation of the alkali metal to its oxide. The alkali metal oxide would then be reintroduced into the electrolytic cell to complete the overall system cycle.

  9. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  10. The electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Kan J.; Kuchynka, Daniel J.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1989-01-01

    Electrochemical cells have been fabricated for the simultaneous generation of oxygen and lithium from a Li2O containing molten salt (Li2O-LiCl-LiF). The cell utilizes an oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), to effect separation between oxygen evolving and lithium reduction half-cell reactions. The cell, which operates at 700 to 850 C, possesses rapid electrode kinetics at the lithium-alloy electrode with exchange current density (i sub o) values being greater than 60mA sq cm. When used in the electrolytic mode, lithium produced at the negative electrode would be continuously removed from the cell for later use (under lunar conditions) as an easily storable reducing agent (compared to H2) for the chemical refining of lunar ores. Because of the high reversibility of this electrochemical system, it has also formed tha basis for the lithium oxygen secondary battery system which possesses the highest theoretical energy density yet investigated.

  11. NO accounts completely for the oxygenated nitrogen species generated by enzymic L-arginine oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Mülsch, A; Vanin, A; Mordvintcev, P; Hauschildt, S; Busse, R

    1992-01-01

    We have assessed the stoichiometry of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase reaction by using a novel e.p.r. technique. NO generated by crude and partially purified NO synthase from endothelial cells and Escherichia coli-lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages was trapped by a ferrous diethyldithiocarbamate complex dispersed in yeast. The paramagnetic ferrous mononitrosyl dithiocarbamate complex formed exhibited a characteristic e.p.r. signal at g perpendicular = 2.035 and g parallel = 2.02 with a triplet hyperfine structure (hfs) at g perpendicular. NO, 3-morpholinosydnonimine and S-nitroso-L-cysteine, but not nitrite or hydroxylamine, generated a similar e.p.r. signal. NO generated by NO synthase and by SIN-1 accumulated at a constant rate for 1 h, as measured by continuous e.p.r. registration at 37 degrees C. The formation of e.p.r.-detectable NO by NO synthases was inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine. Incubation with [15N]NG-L-arginine caused an e.p.r. signal with doublet hfs, indicating that the nitrosyl nitrogen derived exclusively from the guanidino nitrogen. The amount of NO generated by NO synthase as measured by e.p.r. technique was compared with formation of L-[3H]citrulline from L-[3H]arginine. NO and L-citrulline were detected at a 1:1 ratio with both NO synthase preparations. GSH and thiol depletion did not significantly affect NO synthase activity, excluding S-nitrosothiols as intermediates in the NO synthase reaction. We conclude that NO fully accounts for the immediate oxygenated nitrogen species derived from the enzymic oxygenation of L-arginine. PMID:1281408

  12. Calcium-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in brain mitochondria is mediated by permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus J; Månsson, Roland; Morota, Saori; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Kallur, Thérese; Sumi, Tetsuo; Ishii, Nagao; Shimazu, Motohide; Keep, Marcus F; Jegorov, Alexandr; Elmér, Eskil

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial uptake of calcium in excitotoxicity is associated with subsequent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and delayed cellular calcium deregulation in ischemic and neurodegenerative insults. The mechanisms linking mitochondrial calcium uptake and ROS production remain unknown but activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) may be one such mechanism. In the present study, calcium increased ROS generation in isolated rodent brain and human liver mitochondria undergoing mPT despite an associated loss of membrane potential, NADH and respiration. Unspecific permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane by alamethicin likewise increased ROS independently of calcium, and the ROS increase was further potentiated if NAD(H) was added to the system. Importantly, calcium per se did not induce a ROS increase unless mPT was triggered. Twenty-one cyclosporin A analogs were evaluated for inhibition of calcium-induced ROS and their efficacy clearly paralleled their potency of inhibiting mPT-mediated mitochondrial swelling. We conclude that while intact respiring mitochondria possess powerful antioxidant capability, mPT induces a dysregulated oxidative state with loss of GSH- and NADPH-dependent ROS detoxification. We propose that mPT is a significant cause of pathological ROS generation in excitotoxic cell death.

  13. Catalytic Coupling of Oxidative Phosphorylation, ATP Demand, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Bazil, Jason N.; Beard, Daniel A.; Vinnakota, Kalyan C.

    2016-01-01

    Competing models of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the heart are highly disputed. In addition, the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging are not well understood. To deepen our understanding of these processes, a computer model was developed to integrate the biophysical processes of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS generation. The model was calibrated with experimental data obtained from isolated rat heart mitochondria subjected to physiological conditions and workloads. Model simulations show that changes in the quinone pool redox state are responsible for the apparent inorganic phosphate activation of complex III. Model simulations predict that complex III is responsible for more ROS production during physiological working conditions relative to complex I. However, this relationship is reversed under pathological conditions. Finally, model analysis reveals how a highly reduced quinone pool caused by elevated levels of succinate is likely responsible for the burst of ROS seen during reperfusion after ischemia. PMID:26910433

  14. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40phox and p47phox) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  15. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  16. Does diet influence salivary enzyme activities in elephant species?

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Carolin; Pötschke, Sandra; Behringer, Verena; Hannig, Christian; Zierau, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are herbivore generalists; however, Asian elephants might ingest a higher proportion of grasses than Africans. Although some studies have investigated nutrition-specific morphological adaptations of the two species, broader studies on salivary enzymes in both elephant species are lacking. This study focuses on the comparison of salivary enzymes activity profiles in the two elephant species; these enzymes are relevant for protective and digestive functions in humans. We aimed to determine whether salivary amylase (sAA), lysozyme (sLYS), and peroxidase (sPOD) activities have changed in a species-specific pattern during evolutionary separation of the elephant genera. Saliva samples of 14 Asian and eight African elephants were collected in three German zoos. Results show that sAA and sLYS are salivary components of both elephant species in an active conformation. In contrast, little to no sPOD activity was determined in any elephant sample. Furthermore, sAA activity was significantly higher in Asian compared with African elephants. sLYS and sPOD showed no species-specific differences. The time of food provision until sample collection affected only sAA activity. In summary, the results suggest several possible factors modulating the activity of the mammal-typical enzymes, such as sAA, sLYS, and sPOD, e.g., nutrition and sampling procedure, which have to be considered when analyzing differences in saliva composition of animal species.

  17. PKCα promotes generation of reactive oxygen species via DUOX2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiajun; Shao, Miaomiao; Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Li, Lili; Wu, Weicheng; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Zhang, Mingming; Song, Shushu; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-08-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have long been considered as a hallmark of almost all types of cancer including HCC. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), a serine/threonine kinase among conventional PKC family, is recognized as a major player in signal transduction and tumor progression. Overexpression of PKCα is commonly observed in human HCC and associated with its poor prognosis. However, how PKCα is involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis remains not fully understood. In this study, we found that among the members of conventional PKC family, PKCα, but not PKCβI or βII, promoted ROS production in HCC cells. PKCα stimulated generation of ROS by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. Depletion of DUOX2 abrogated PKCα-induced activation of AKT/MAPK pathways as well as cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC cells. Moreover, the expression of DUOX2 and PKCα was well positively correlated in both HCC cell lines and patient samples. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that PKCα plays a critical role in HCC development by inducing DUOX2 expression and ROS generation, and propose a strategy to target PKCα/DUOX2 as a potential adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. - Highlights: • PKCα promotes the generation of ROS in hepatocellular carcinoma. • PKCα induces ROS production by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. • DUOX2 is required for PKCα-induced AKT/MAPK activation and tumor progression in HCC. • The expression of PKCα is positively correlated with DUOX2 in HCC.

  18. Cadmium induces apoptosis and genotoxicity in rainbow trout hepatocytes through generation of reactive oxygene species.

    PubMed

    Risso-de Faverney, C; Devaux, A; Lafaurie, M; Girard, J P; Bailly, B; Rahmani, R

    2001-06-01

    Cadmium poses a serious environmental threat in aquatic ecosystems but the mechanisms of its toxicity remain unclear. The purpose of this work was first to determine whether cadmium induced apoptosis in trout hepatocytes, second to determine whether or not reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity. Hepatocytes exposed to increasing cadmium concentrations (in the range of 1-10 microM) showed a molecular hallmark of apoptosis which is the fragmentation of the nuclear DNA into oligonucleosomal-length fragments, resulting from an activation of endogenous endonucleases and recognized as a 'DNA ladder' on conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Exposure of hepatocytes to cadmium led clearly to the DEVD-dependent protease activation, acting upstream from the endonucleases and considered as central mediators of apoptosis. DNA strand breaks in cadmium-treated trout hepatocytes was assessed using the comet assay, a rapid and sensitive single-cell gel electrophoresis technique used to detect DNA primary damage in individual cells. Simultaneous treatment of trout hepatocytes with cadmium and the nitroxide radical TEMPO used as a ROS scavenger, reduced significantly DNA fragmentation, DEVD-related protease activity and DNA strand breaks formation. These results lead to a working hypothesis that cadmium-induced apoptosis and DNA strand breaks in trout hepatocytes are partially triggered by the generation of ROS. Additional studies are required for proposing a mechanistic model of cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity in trout liver cells, in underlying the balance between DNA damage and cellular defence systems in fish.

  19. Identification of the haemolytic activity of Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Mekaprateep, Malee; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Malassezia species are part of the normal skin flora and are associated with a number of human and animal skin diseases. However, the mechanisms that mediate infection and host-fungal interactions are poorly understood. The haemolytic activity of several microorganisms is considered a factor that contributes to pathogenicity of the organism to humans and animals. This virulence factor was previously identified in several pathogenic fungi that cause systemic mycoses, such as Aspergillus and Candida. In this study, the haemolytic activity of six major Malassezia species, including M. furfur, M. globosa, M. pachydermatis, M. restricta, M. slooffiae and M. sympodialis, was investigated. The haemolytic activity of these species was tested on tryptone soya agar with 5% sheep blood. All the examined Malassezia species produced a halo zone of complete haemolysis. A quantitative analysis of the haemolytic activity was performed by incubating sheep erythrocytes with the extraction from culture of each Malassezia species. Interestingly, M. globosa and M. restricta showed significantly high haemolytic activity compared with the other Malassezia species. In addition, M. globosa also exhibited stable haemolytic activity after treatment at 100 °C and in the presence of some proteases, indicating that this haemolytic factor is different from those of other fungi.

  20. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity.

  1. Influence of Anode Potentials on Current Generation and Extracellular Electron Transfer Paths of Geobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2017-01-01

    Geobacter species are capable of utilizing solid-state compounds, including anodic electrodes, as electron acceptors of respiration via extracellular electron transfer (EET) and have attracted considerable attention for their crucial role as biocatalysts of bioelectrochemical systems (BES’s). Recent studies disclosed that anode potentials affect power output and anodic microbial communities, including selection of dominant Geobacter species, in various BES’s. However, the details in current-generating properties and responses to anode potentials have been investigated only for a model species, namely Geobacter sulfurreducens. In this study, the effects of anode potentials on the current generation and the EET paths were investigated by cultivating six Geobacter species with different anode potentials, followed by electrochemical analyses. The electrochemical cultivation demonstrated that the G. metallireducens clade species (G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens) constantly generate high current densities at a wide range of anode potentials (≥−0.3 or −0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl), while the subsurface clades species (G. daltonii, G. bemidjensis, G. chapellei, and G. pelophilus) generate a relatively large current only at limited potential regions (−0.1 to −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The linear sweep voltammetry analyses indicated that the G. metallireducens clade species utilize only one EET path irrespective of the anode potentials, while the subsurface clades species utilize multiple EET paths, which can be optimized depending on the anode potentials. These results clearly demonstrate that the response features to anode potentials are divergent among species (or clades) of Geobacter. PMID:28067820

  2. No Effect of Host Species on Phenoloxidase Activity in a Mycophagous Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincent; Chan, Amanda Kar-Men

    2015-01-01

    Ecological immunology is an interdisciplinary field that helps elucidate interactions between the environment and immune response. The host species individuals experience have profound effects on immune response in many species of insects. However, this conclusion comes from studies of herbivorous insects even though species of mycophagous insects also inhabit many different host species. The goal of this study was to determine if fungal host species as well as individual, sex, body size, and host patch predict one aspect of immune function, phenoloxidase activity (PO). We sampled a metapopulation of Bolitotherus cornutus, a mycophagous beetle in southwestern Virginia. B. cornutus live on three species of fungus that differ in nutritional quality, social environment, and density. A filter paper phenoloxidase assay was used to quantify phenoloxidase activity. Overall, PO activity was significantly repeatable among individuals (0.57) in adult B. cornutus. While there was significant variance among individuals in PO activity, there were surprisingly no significant differences in PO activity among subpopulations, beetles living on different host species, or between the sexes; there was also no effect of body size. Our results suggest that other factors such as age, genotype, disease prevalence, or natal environment may be generating variance among individuals in PO activity. PMID:26513243

  3. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  4. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-10-29

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug.

  5. Genotoxicity of volatile and secondary reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Camoirano, A.; De Flora, S.; Dahl, T.A. Tufts Univ. Veterinary, Boston, MA )

    1993-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species were generated in the gas phase by photosensitization involving illumination of Rose Bengal. Depending on whether the chromophore is dry or solubilized, this system produces either energy-transfer reactions leading to generation of singlet oxygen specifically, or a combination of energy-transfer and electron-transfer reactions, providing both singlet oxygen and reduced forms of oxygen, such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. In neither case were the reactive species mutagenic in strain TA104 of Salmonella typhimurium, which had been previously shown to be reverted by oxygen species generated by the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system in aqueous medium. However, mixed oxygen species induced an increased lethality in a variety of DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli strains. This genotoxic effect, mainly reparable by the uvrA and recA mechanisms, was efficiently prevented by the thiol N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Singlet oxygen itself failed to exert direct genotoxic effects, although secondary reactants produced by its reaction with cell components enhanced lethality in some repair-deficient bacteria. Distance-dependence analyses provided measurements of the lifetimes of the oxygen species generated in the gas phase. 35 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Comparison of cytotoxic activities of extracts from Selaginella species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Lei, Xiang; Chen, Ke-li

    2014-01-01

    Background: Selaginella species are resurrection plants, which are known, possess various molecular bioactivities depending on species, but only a few species have been detailed observe in the advanced research. Objective: The objective of the following study is to compare the chemical profiles of different species of Selaginella and to investigate cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis activities of some species of Selaginella. Materials and Methods: The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for chemical analysis. Ethyl acetate, ethanol and water-soluble extracts from seven Selaginella species were submitted to 3-(4,5-dimenthyl thizol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) laddering analysis and caspase-3 expression using Bel-7402, HT-29 and HeLa cells. Results: The HPLC analysis revealed two major common peaks, which were identified as amentoflavone and robustaflavone and another three main peaks in their chromatograms. The results showed that S. labordei, Selaginella tamariscina and Selaginella uncinata had relatively stronger activities on Bel-7402 and HeLa cells and Selaginella moellendorfii had moderate antiproliferation activities, but Selaginella remotifolia and Selaginella pulvinata had almost no inhibitory activities. The main active components were in the ethyl acetate extracts which had abundant biflavonoids. The effects of these extracts on cell proliferation and apoptosis in different cells were not the same, they were more apparent on HeLa cells than on HT-29 cells. The assay of DNA laddering analysis and caspase-3 expression further confirmed that inducing cell apoptosis was one of antitumor mechanisms and antitumor activities of Selaginella species were related to apoptosis induced by caspase family. Conclusion: S. labordei, S. tamariscina and S. uncinata would be potential antitumor agents. PMID:25422557

  7. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  8. Caspase-independent cell death without generation of reactive oxygen species in irradiated MOLT-4 human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Kubo, Yoshiko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Hayashi, Ikue; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Seyama, Toshio; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    To improve our understanding of ionizing radiation effects on immune cells, we investigated steps leading to radiation-induced cell death in MOLT-4, a thymus-derived human leukemia cell. After exposure of MOLT-4 cells to 4 Gy of X-rays, irradiated cells sequentially showed increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and eventually apoptotic cell death. In the presence of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, irradiated cells exhibited necrotic characteristics such as mitochondrial swelling instead of apoptosis. ROS generation was not detected during this necrotic cell death process. These results indicate that radiation-induced apoptosis in MOLT-4 cells requires elevation of intracellular ROS as well as activation of a series of caspases, whereas the cryptic necrosis program--which is independent of intracellular ROS generation and caspase activation--is activated when the apoptosis pathway is blocked.

  9. HVCN1 modulates BCR signal strength via regulation of BCR-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Melania; Bhamrah, Mandeep K; Henley, Tom; Boyd, Robert S; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; Dinsdale, David; Pulford, Karen; Kan, Mahmood; Musset, Boris; Cherny, Vladimir V; Morgan, Deri; Gascoyne, Randy D; Vigorito, Elena; DeCoursey, Thomas E; MacLennan, Ian C M; Dyer, Martin J S

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton currents regulate generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytic cells. In B cells, stimulation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the production of ROS that participate in B cell activation, but the involvement of proton channels is unknown. We report here that the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 associated with the BCR complex and was internalized together with the BCR after activation. BCR-induced generation of ROS was lower in HVCN1-deficient B cells, which resulted in attenuated BCR signaling via impaired BCR-dependent oxidation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. This resulted in less activation of the kinases Syk and Akt, impaired mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and diminished antibody responses in vivo. Our findings identify unanticipated functions for proton channels in B cells and demonstrate the importance of ROS in BCR signaling and downstream metabolism. PMID:20139987

  10. arNOX: generator of reactive oxygen species in the skin and sera of aging individuals subject to external modulation.

    PubMed

    Morré, Dorothy M; Meadows, Christiaan; Morré, D James

    2010-01-01

    An aging-related cell-surface oxidase (aging-related NADH oxidase, arNOX) generating superoxide and other reactive oxygen species is shed from the cell surface and is found in saliva, urine, perspiration, and interstitial fluids that surround the collagen and elastin matrix underlying dermis. arNOX activity correlates with age and reaches a maximum at about age 65 in males and 55 in females. arNOX activities are highly correlated with values of human skin where a causal relationship is indicated. Ongoing efforts focus on cloning arNOX proteins and development of antiaging formulas based on arNOX inhibition (intervention).

  11. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  12. Differences in ATP Generation Via Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation and Relationships with Sperm Motility in Mouse Species*

    PubMed Central

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse sperm produce enough ATP to sustain motility by anaerobic glycolysis and respiration. However, previous studies indicated that an active glycolytic pathway is required to achieve normal sperm function and identified glycolysis as the main source of ATP to fuel the motility of mouse sperm. All the available evidence has been gathered from the studies performed using the laboratory mouse. However, comparative studies of closely related mouse species have revealed a wide range of variation in sperm motility and ATP production and that the laboratory mouse has comparatively low values in these traits. In this study, we compared the relative reliance on the usage of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation as ATP sources for sperm motility between mouse species that exhibit significantly different sperm performance parameters. We found that the sperm of species with higher oxygen consumption/lactate excretion rate ratios were able to produce higher amounts of ATP, achieving higher swimming velocities. Additionally, we show that the species with higher respiration/glycolysis ratios have a higher degree of dependence upon active oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, we characterize for the first time two mouse species in which sperm depend on functional oxidative phosphorylation to achieve normal performance. Finally, we discuss that sexual selection could promote adaptations in sperm energetic metabolism tending to increase the usage of a more efficient pathway for the generation of ATP (and faster sperm). PMID:26048989

  13. Differences in ATP Generation Via Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation and Relationships with Sperm Motility in Mouse Species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-08-14

    Mouse sperm produce enough ATP to sustain motility by anaerobic glycolysis and respiration. However, previous studies indicated that an active glycolytic pathway is required to achieve normal sperm function and identified glycolysis as the main source of ATP to fuel the motility of mouse sperm. All the available evidence has been gathered from the studies performed using the laboratory mouse. However, comparative studies of closely related mouse species have revealed a wide range of variation in sperm motility and ATP production and that the laboratory mouse has comparatively low values in these traits. In this study, we compared the relative reliance on the usage of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation as ATP sources for sperm motility between mouse species that exhibit significantly different sperm performance parameters. We found that the sperm of species with higher oxygen consumption/lactate excretion rate ratios were able to produce higher amounts of ATP, achieving higher swimming velocities. Additionally, we show that the species with higher respiration/glycolysis ratios have a higher degree of dependence upon active oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, we characterize for the first time two mouse species in which sperm depend on functional oxidative phosphorylation to achieve normal performance. Finally, we discuss that sexual selection could promote adaptations in sperm energetic metabolism tending to increase the usage of a more efficient pathway for the generation of ATP (and faster sperm).

  14. Non-additive increases in sediment stability are generated by macroinvertebrate species interactions in laboratory streams.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Lindsey K; Cardinale, Bradley J; Sklar, Leonard S

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  15. Non-Additive Increases in Sediment Stability Are Generated by Macroinvertebrate Species Interactions in Laboratory Streams

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Lindsey K.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  16. Pathophysiological and pharmacological implications of mitochondria-targeted reactive oxygen species generation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jou, Mei-Jie

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytes, in addition to passively supporting neurons, have recently been shown to be actively involved in synaptic transmission and neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system (CNS). This review summarizes briefly our previous observations using fluorescent probes coupled with laser scanning digital imaging microscopy to visualize spatio-temporal alteration of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) generation in intact astrocytes. mROS formation is enhanced by exogenous oxidants exposure, Ca2+ stress and endogenous pathological defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In addition, mROS formation can be specifically stimulated by visible light or visible laser irradiation and can be augmented further by photodynamic coupling with photosensitizers, particularly with mitochondria-targeted photosensitizers. "Severe" oxidative insult often results in massive and homogeneous augmentation of mROS formation which causes cessation of mitochondrial movement, pathological fission and irreversible swelling of mitochondria and eventually apoptosis or necrosis of cells. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and protectors such as MitoQ, melatonin and nanoparticle C(60) effectively prevent "severe" mROS generation. Intriguingly, "minor" oxidative insults enhance heterogeneity of mROS and mitochondrial dynamics. "Minor" mROS formation-induced fission and fusion of mitochondria relocates mitochondrial network to form a mitochondria free gap, i.e., "firewall", which may play a crucial role in mROS-mediated protective "preconditioning" by preventing propagation of mROS during oxidative insults. These mROS-targeted strategies for either enhancement or prevention of mitochondrial oxidative stress in astrocytes may provide new insights for future development of therapeutic interventions in the treatment of cancer such as astrocytomas and gliomas and astrocyte-associated neurodegeneration, mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  17. Elevated Cytoplasmic Free Zinc and Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in the Context of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular zinc release and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to be common ingredients in numerous toxic signaling mechanisms in neurons. A key source for intracellular zinc release is its liberation from metallothionein-III (MT-III). MT-III binds and regulates intracellular zinc levels under physiological conditions, but the zinc-binding thiols readily react with certain ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to result in intracellular zinc liberation. Liberated zinc induces ROS and RNS generation by multiple mechanisms, including the induction of mitochondrial ROS production, and also promotes ROS formation outside the mitochondria by interaction with the enzymes NADPH oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. Of particular relevance to neuronal injury in the context of ischemia and prolonged seizures, the positive feedback cycle between ROS/RNS generation and increasing zinc liberation will be examined.

  18. Cryptococcus neoformans capsule protects cell from oxygen reactive species generated by antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R.; Kato, Ilka T.; Fuchs, Beth; Mylonakis, Eleytherios; Simões Ribeiro, Martha; Tegos, George

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) is based on the utilization of substances that can photosensitize biological tissues and are capable of being activated in the presence of light. Cryptococcus neoformans is an yeast surrounded by a capsule composed primarily of glucoronoxylomannan that plays an important role in its virulence. This yeast causes infection on skin, lungs and brain that can be associated with neurological sequelae and neurosurgical interventions, and its conventional treatment requires prolonged antifungal therapy, which presents important adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Cryptococcus neoformans capsule against reactive oxygen species generated by APDI. Cryptococcus neoformans KN99α, which is a strain able to produce capsule, and CAP59 that does not present capsule production were submitted to APDI using methylene blue (MB), rose bengal (RB), and pL-ce6 as photosensitizers (PS). Then microbial inactivation was evaluated by counting colony form units following APDI and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) illustrated localization as well as the preferential accumulation of PS into the fungal cells. C. neoformans KN99α was more resistant to APDI than CAP59 for all PSs tested. CLSM showed incorporation of MB and RB into the cytoplasm and a preferential uptake in mitochondria. A nuclear accumulation of MB was also observed. Contrarily, pL-ce6 appears accumulated in cell wall and cell membrane and minimal florescence was observed inside the fungal cells. In conclusion, the ability of C. neoformans to form capsule enhances survival following APDI.

  19. Variation in structure of proteins by adjusting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated from dielectric barrier discharge jet

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Minsup; Shiratani, Masaharu; Cho, Art. E.; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, the variation in liquid chemistry due to the development of radicals generated by cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has played an important role in plasma medicine. CAP direct treatment or CAP activated media treatment in cancer cells shows promising anticancer activity for both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, the anticancer activity or antimicrobial activity varies between plasma devices due to the different abilities among plasma devices to generate the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) at different ratios and in different concentrations. While the generation of RONS depends on many factors, the feeding gas plays the most important role among the factors. Hence, in this study we used different compositions of feeding gas while fixing all other plasma characteristics. We used Ar, Ar-O2 (at different ratios), and Ar-N2 (at different ratios) as the working gases for CAP and investigated the structural changes in proteins (Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)). We then analyzed the influence of RONS generated in liquid on the conformations of proteins. Additionally, to determine the influence of H2O2 on the Hb and Mb structures, we used molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:27779212

  20. Variation in structure of proteins by adjusting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated from dielectric barrier discharge jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Minsup; Shiratani, Masaharu; Cho, Art. E.; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    Over the last few years, the variation in liquid chemistry due to the development of radicals generated by cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has played an important role in plasma medicine. CAP direct treatment or CAP activated media treatment in cancer cells shows promising anticancer activity for both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, the anticancer activity or antimicrobial activity varies between plasma devices due to the different abilities among plasma devices to generate the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) at different ratios and in different concentrations. While the generation of RONS depends on many factors, the feeding gas plays the most important role among the factors. Hence, in this study we used different compositions of feeding gas while fixing all other plasma characteristics. We used Ar, Ar-O2 (at different ratios), and Ar-N2 (at different ratios) as the working gases for CAP and investigated the structural changes in proteins (Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)). We then analyzed the influence of RONS generated in liquid on the conformations of proteins. Additionally, to determine the influence of H2O2 on the Hb and Mb structures, we used molecular dynamic simulation.

  1. Hemolytic Activities of the Candida Species in Liquid Medium

    PubMed Central

    Malcok, Hilal Kuzucu; Aktas, Esin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet; Yigit, Nimet; Yazgi, Halil

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemolytic activities of 107 Candida strains isolated from different clinical samples in liquid medium, and to examine the impact of glucose on this activity. Materials and Methods A total of 107 Candida isolates representing seven species (C. albicans, n=28; C. glabrata, n=23; C. tropicalis, n=17; C. parapsilosis, n=16; C. kefyr, n=14; C. krusei, n=5; C. guilliermondii, n=4) were included in the study. The hemolytic activities of the strains were tested on two different Sabouraud dextrose liquid media (SDB) containing 7% defibrinated human blood, one of which is supplemented with 3% glucose and the other without glucose. Cultures were evaluated at the end of a 48-hour incubation. The hemolysis in the media was detected spectrophotometrically by measuring the amount of released hemoglobin and compared with a standard hemolysate which was prepared prior to testing. The degree of hemolysis (percentage value) by an individual strain was calculated according to the following formula below: (Absorbance of supernatant media at 540 nm / Absorbance of standard hemolysate at 540 nm X 100). Results In the liquid medium without glucose, strains generally produced hemolysis at low levels. The degree of hemolysis produced by all species increased noticeably in the liquid medium with glucose. Strains of C. albicans and C.kefyr had demonstrated significant hemolytic activity, whereas others had lower activity. C. parapsilosis exerted very little hemolytic activity in the medium with glucose and showed no activity in the medium without glucose. Conclusion The hemolytic activities of most Candida species was found to be higher in the human blood-enriched SDB medium containing 3% additive glucose than in the one free from additives. This result indicates that increased blood glucose concentration may contribute to increased hemolytic activity in Candida species, and it suggests a parallel with possible pathogenesis of

  2. Threatened and Endangered Species Evaluation for Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Generating Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2004-01-15

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 requires that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered (T&E) species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) staff have performed appropriate assessments of potential impacts to threatened or endangered species, and consulted with appropriate agencies with regard to protection of such species in authorizing the construction, operation, and relicensing of nuclear power generating facilities. However, the assessments and consultations concerning many facilities were performed during the 1970's or early 1980's, and have not been re-evaluated in detail or updated since those initial evaluations. A review of potential Endangered Species Act issues at licensed nuclear power facilities was completed in 1997. In that review 484 different ESA-listed species were identified as potentially occurring near one or more of the 75 facility sites that were examined. An update of the previous T&E species evaluation at this time is desired because, during the intervening 6 years: nearly 200 species have been added to the ESA list, critical habitats have been designated for many of the listed species, and significantly more information is available online, allowing for more efficient high-level evaluations of potential species presence near sites and the potential operation impacts. The updated evaluation included searching the NRC's ADAMS database to find any documents related to T

  3. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  4. Study of the photochemically generated of oxygen species by fullerene photosensitized CoS{sub 2} nanocompounds

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhu, Lei; Ullah, Kefayat; Ye, Shu; Sun, Qian; Jang, Won Kweon; Oh, Won-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Reactive oxygen species was detected through oxidation reaction from DPCI to DPCO. • Generated reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radicals can be analysis by DPCI degradation. • C{sub 60} has good effect during the photo-degradation processes. • Photocatalytic activity attributed to photo-absorption effect by C{sub 60} and cooperative effect of CoS{sub 2}. - Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be produced by interactions between sunlight and light-absorbing substance in natural water environment and can completely destroy various organic pollutants in wastewaters. In this study, CoS{sub 2} and CoS{sub 2}–fullerene were irradiated by visible light respectively. The generation of reactive oxygen species were detected through the oxidation reaction from 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) to 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO). In comparison with the separate effects of CoS{sub 2} and fullerene nanoparticles, the photochemically effect of the fullerene photosensitized CoS{sub 2} composites is increased significantly due to the synergetic effect between the fullerene and the CoS{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  5. Light Emitting Diode-Generated Blue Light Modulates Fibrosis Characteristics: Fibroblast Proliferation, Migration Speed, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Garcha, Manveer; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Blue light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate harmful DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging, and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode (LED) red and infrared light inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. Moreover, different wavelengths of light can produce different biological effects. Furthermore, the effects of LED blue light (LED-BL) on human skin fibroblasts are not well characterized. This study investigated the effects of LED-BL on human skin fibroblast proliferation, viability, migration speed, and reactive oxygen-species (ROS) generation. Methods and Materials Irradiation of adult human skin fibroblasts using commercially-available LED-BL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, migratory speed was assessed using time-lapse video microscopy, and intracellular ROS generation was measured using the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Statistical differences between groups were determined by ANOVA and Student s t-test. Results Human skin fibroblasts treated with LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45, and 80 J/cm2 demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation of 8.4%, 29.1%, 33.8%, 51.7%, and 55.1%, respectively, compared to temperature and environment matched bench control plates, respectively. LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45 and 80 J/cm2 decreased fibroblast migration speed to 95 ± 7.0% (p = 0.64), 81.3 ± 5.5% (p = 0.021), 48.5 ± 2.7% (p < 0.0001), and 32.3 ± 1.9% (p < 0.0001), respectively, relative to matched controls. LED fluences of 5, 10, 30, and 80 J/cm2 resulted in statistically significant increases in reactive oxygen species of 110.4%, 116.6%, 127.5%, and 130%, respectively, relative to bench controls. Conclusion At

  6. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of five lichen species.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Comić, Ljiljana; Dačić, Dragana; Curčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells.

  7. [L-lysine-alpha-oxidase activity of some Trichoderma species].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Khaduev, S Kh

    1984-01-01

    Trichoderma cultures were tested for their ability to produce L-lysine-alpha-oxidase. The highest enzyme activity was manifested by T. harzianum (MGU), T. longibrachiatum Rifai VKM F-2025 and T. aureoviride Rifai VKM F-2026. The biosynthesis of the enzyme did not depend on the growth of the cultures and did not vary among the species.

  8. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Đačić, Dragana; Ćurčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  9. Metabolomic profiling and antioxidant activity of some Acacia species

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Farid, I.B.; Sheded, M.G.; Mohamed, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling of different parts (leaves, flowers and pods) of Acacia species (Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal and Acacia laeta) was evaluated. The multivariate data analyses such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate the distribution of plant metabolites among different species or different organs of the same species. A.nilotica was characterized with a high content of saponins and A.seyal was characterized with high contents of proteins, phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins. A.laeta had a higher content of carbohydrates than A. nilotica and A. seyal. On the basis of these results, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of the methanolic extracts of studied parts were evaluated. A.nilotica and A.seyal extracts showed less inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) compared to A.laeta extracts which means that these two species have the strongest radical scavenging activity whereas A. laeta extracts have the lowest radical scavenging activity. A positive correlation between saponins and flavonoids with total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed. Based on these results, the potentiality of these plants as antioxidants was discussed. PMID:25313274

  10. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  11. Multifaceted, Cross-Generational Costs of Hybridization in Sibling Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Erin M.; Harwell, Tiffany I.; Yale, Elizabeth L.; Lamb, Abigail M.; Frankino, W. Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Maladaptive hybridization, as determined by the pattern and intensity of selection against hybrid individuals, is an important factor contributing to the evolution of prezygotic reproductive isolation. To identify the consequences of hybridization between Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis, we estimated multiple fitness components for F1 hybrids and backcross progeny and used these to compare the relative fitness of parental species and their hybrids across two generations. We document many sources of intrinsic (developmental) and extrinsic (ecological) selection that dramatically increase the fitness costs of hybridization beyond the well-documented F1 male sterility in this model system. Our results indicate that the cost of hybridization accrues over multiple generations and reinforcement in this system is driven by selection against hybridization above and beyond the cost of hybrid male sterility; we estimate a fitness loss of >95% relative to the parental species across two generations of hybridization. Our findings demonstrate the importance of estimating hybridization costs using multiple fitness measures from multiple generations in an ecologically relevant context; so doing can reveal intense postzygotic selection against hybridization and thus, an enhanced role for reinforcement in the evolution of populations and diversification of species. PMID:24265807

  12. NASA/NREN: Next Generation Internet (NGI) Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, Richard; Freeman, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation internet (NGI) and the NREN (NASA Research and Education Network) activities are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) NREN architecture; 2) NREN applications; and 3) NREN applied research.

  13. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases Differentially Regulate Agonist-Receptor Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Huzoor; Duan, Xin; Saleem, Saima; Davis, Ashley K.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Agonist induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases (NOX) enhances platelet aggregation and hence the risk of thrombosis. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases are involved in ROS generation by NOX in a variety of cells, but their roles in platelet ROS production remain unclear. In this study we used platelets from RhoA and Rac1 conditional knockout mice as well as human platelets treated with Rhosin and NSC23767, rationally designed small molecule inhibitors of RhoA and Rac GTPases, respectively, to better define the contributions of RhoA and Rac1 signaling to ROS generation and platelet activation. Treatment of platelets with Rhosin inhibited: (a) U46619 induced activation of RhoA; (b) phosphorylation of p47phox, a critical component of NOX; (c) U46619 or thrombin induced ROS generation; (d) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC); (e) platelet shape change; (f) platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen; and (g) release of P-selectin, secretion of ATP and aggregation. Conditional deletion of RhoA or Rac1 gene inhibited thrombin induced ROS generation in platelets. Addition of Y27632, a RhoA inhibitor, NSC23766 or Phox-I, an inhibitor of Rac1-p67phox interaction, to human platelets blocked thrombin induced ROS generation. These data suggest that: (a) RhoA/ROCK/p47phox signaling axis promotes ROS production that, at least in part, contributes to platelet activation in conjunction with or independent of the RhoA/ROCK mediated phosphorylation of MLC; and (b) RhoA and Rac1 differentially regulate ROS generation by inhibiting phosphorylation of p47phox and Rac1-p67phox interaction, respectively. PMID:27681226

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam-Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-13

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6750--11-9333 Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in ...Pulsed Electron Beam–Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures May 13, 2011 Approved for public release...PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam

  15. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  16. Activation mechanism of Gi and Go by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Motohiro; Schey, Kevin L; Takagahara, Shuichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagao, Taku; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2002-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species are proposed to work as intracellular mediators. One of their target proteins is the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Galpha(i) and Galpha(o)), leading to activation. H(2)O(2) is one of the reactive oxygen species and activates purified Galpha(i2). However, the activation requires the presence of Fe(2+), suggesting that H(2)O(2) is converted to more reactive species such as c*OH. The analysis with mass spectrometry shows that seven cysteine residues (Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), Cys(287), Cys(326), and Cys(352)) of Galpha(i2) are modified by the treatment with *OH. Among these cysteine residues, Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), and Cys(352) are not involved in *OH-induced activation of Galpha(i2). Although the modification of Cys(287) but not Cys(326) is required for subunit dissociation, the modification of both Cys(287) and Cys(326) is necessary for the activation of Galpha(i2) as determined by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, conformation-dependent change of trypsin digestion pattern or guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding. Wild type Galpha(i2) but not Cys(287)- or Cys(326)-substituted mutants are activated by UV light, singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, and nitric oxide, indicating that these oxidative stresses activate Galpha(i2) by the mechanism similar to *OH-induced activation. Because Cys(287) exists only in G(i) family, this study explains the selective activation of G(i)/G(o) by oxidative stresses.

  17. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of nine Salvia species.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Abouali, Morteza; Salehi, Peyman; Sonboli, Ali; Kanani, Mohammad; Menichini, Francesco; Tundis, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a growing increase of scientific research attesting the health properties of salvia species, we have decided to investigate nine Salvia namely Salvia sclarea, Salvia atropatana, Salvia sahendica, Salvia hydrangea, Salvia xanthocheila, Salvia macrosiphon, Salvia glutinosa, Salvia chloroleuca and Salvia ceratophylla species for their antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. In order to correlate the bioactivity with their phytochemical content, the total phenol and total flavonoid contents were also determined. S. ceratophylla exhibited the strongest activity against C32 cells with an IC50 value of 20.8 μg mL(- 1), while S. glutinosa exhibited an IC50 value of 29.5 μg mL(- 1) against ACHN cell line. Interestingly, S. glutinosa displayed also the highest DPPH radical-scavenging activity with an IC50 of 3.2 μg mL(- 1). These species are characterised by the highest total phenol and flavonoid contents. The obtained results suggest that Salvia species are healthy plant foods.

  18. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10/sup 10/ 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10/sup 10/ neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output.

  19. Radical scavenging, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of halophytic species.

    PubMed

    Meot-Duros, Laetitia; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Magné, Christian

    2008-03-05

    For the first time, both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities are simultaneously reported in halophytic plants, particularly on polar fractions. Chloroformic and methanolic extracts of the halophytes Eryngium maritimum L., Crithmum maritimum L. and Cakile maritima Scop. were tested for their antimicrobial activities against 12 bacterial and yeast strains. In addition, radical scavenging and antioxidant activities were assessed, as well as total phenol contents. Only one bacterial strain (Listeria monocytogenes) was not inhibited by plants extracts, and apolar (chloroformic) fractions were generally more active than polar (methanolic) ones. Eryngium maritimum presented the weakest radical scavenging activity (ABTS IC(50)=0.28 mg ml(-1)), as well as the lowest total phenol content (16.4 mg GAE g(-1) DW). However, the three halophytic species had relatively strong total antioxidant activities (from 32.7 to 48.6 mg ascorbate equivalents g (-1) DW). Consequences on the potential use of these plants in food or cosmetic industry are discussed.

  20. NADPH oxidase activity in allergenic pollen grains of different plant species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Takai, Toshiro; Kamijo, Seiji; Gunawan, Hendra; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

    2009-09-25

    Pollen is an important trigger of allergic diseases. Recent studies have shown that ragweed pollen NAD(P)H oxidase generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of allergies in mouse models. Here, we demonstrated that allergenic pollen grains showed NAD(P)H oxidase activity that differed in intensity and localization according to the plant families. The activity occurred at the surface or in the cytoplasm in pollen of grasses, birch, and ragweed; in subpollen particles released from ragweed pollen; and at the inner surface or in the cytoplasm but not on the outer wall, which was sloughed off after the rupture, of pollen of Japanese cedar and Japanese cypress. The activity was mostly concentrated within insoluble fractions, suggesting that it facilitates the exposure of tissues to ROS generated by this enzyme. The extent of exposure to pollen-generated ROS could differ among the plant families.

  1. Identifying Activity Cliff Generators of PPAR Ligands Using SAS Maps.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Pérez-Villanueva, Jaime; Castillo, Rafael; Medina-Franco, José L

    2012-12-01

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) of compound databases play a key role in hit identification and lead optimization. In particular, activity cliffs, defined as a pair of structurally similar molecules that present large changes in potency, provide valuable SAR information. Herein, we introduce the concept of activity cliff generator, defined as a molecular structure that has a high probability to form activity cliffs with molecules tested in the same biological assay. To illustrate this concept, we discuss a case study where Structure-Activity Similarity maps were used to systematically identify and analyze activity cliff generators present in a dataset of 168 compounds tested against three peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes. Single-target and dual-target activity cliff generators for PPARα and δ were identified. In addition, docking calculations of compounds that were classified as cliff generators helped to suggest a hot spot in the target protein responsible of activity cliffs and to analyze its implication in ligand-enzyme interaction.

  2. System and method for generating current by selective minority species heating

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1983-01-01

    A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of low-frequency waves into the plasma by means of phased antenna arrays or phased waveguide arrays. The plasma is prepared with a minority ion species of different charge state and different gyrofrequency from the majority ion species. The wave frequency and wave phasing are chosen such that the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by minority species ions traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

  3. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing for Rodent Barcoding: Species Identification from Fresh, Degraded and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Maxime; Pagès, Marie; Cosson, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive species identification

  5. Next-generation sequencing for rodent barcoding: species identification from fresh, degraded and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Galan, Maxime; Pagès, Marie; Cosson, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive species identification.

  6. Similarities and differences in the wake structure generated by different species of bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Tatjana; Hristov, Nickolay; Swartz, Sharon; Breuer, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Flight kinematics and morphology differ greatly between the approx. 1200 bat species and the goal of our project is to understand how these differences affect the flight mechanisms, the generation of aerodynamic forces, and the resultant wake structures. Multiple individuals of three diverse species of bat were flown in the wind tunnel. The three species have different morphology, wing aspect ratio and wing loading, and exhibit different flight behaviors appropriate to their different ecologies. Particle Image Velocimetry in the cross-stream (Trefftz) plane acquired at 200 Hz was used to map the time-resolved wake velocities behind the bat, while three synchronized high-speed cameras monitored the wing motion. The measurements were taken at several flight speeds. Early predictions based on kinematic measurements suggest the development of discrete vortex rings as well as the generation of negative circulation in the wing tip area during the end of the downstroke. These hypotheses are tested and discussed, and the results show distinct differences between the species and as functions of flight speed.

  7. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  8. Active Generations: An Intergenerational Approach to Preventing Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Holtgrave, Peter L.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the last 3 decades, US obesity rates have increased dramatically as more children and more adults become obese. This study explores an innovative program, Active Generations, an intergenerational nutrition education and activity program implemented in out-of-school environments (after school and summer camps). It utilizes older…

  9. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-04

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  10. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  11. Elevated Generation of Reactive Oxygen/Nitrogen Species in Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ian C.; Zajac, Allan J.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Botten, Jason; Hjelle, Brian; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a life-threatening respiratory disease characterized by profound pulmonary edema and myocardial depression. Most cases of HCPS in North America are caused by Sin Nombre virus (SNV), which is carried asymptomatically by deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The underlying pathophysiology of HCPS is poorly understood. We hypothesized that pathogenic SNV infection results in increased generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS), which contribute to the morbidity and mortality of HCPS. Human disease following infection with SNV or Andes virus was associated with increased nitrotyrosine (NT) adduct formation in the lungs, heart, and plasma and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lungs compared to the results obtained for normal human volunteers. In contrast, NT formation was not increased in the lungs or cardiac tissue from SNV-infected deer mice, even at the time of peak viral antigen expression. In a murine (Mus musculus) model of HCPS (infection of NZB/BLNJ mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13), HCPS-like disease was associated with elevated expression of iNOS in the lungs and NT formation in plasma, cardiac tissue, and the lungs. In this model, intraperitoneal injection of 1400W, a specific iNOS inhibitor, every 12 h during infection significantly improved survival without affecting intrapulmonary fluid accumulation or viral replication, suggesting that cardiac damage may instead be the cause of mortality. These data indicate that elevated production of RONS is a feature of pathogenic New World hantavirus infection and that pharmacologic blockade of iNOS activity may be of therapeutic benefit in HCPS cases, possibly by ameliorating the myocardial suppressant effects of RONS. PMID:12134039

  12. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  13. Generic nitric oxide (NO) generating surface by immobilizing organoselenium species via layer-by-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Welby, Jenna L; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2008-09-16

    A universal nitric oxide (NO) generating surface is assembled via Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition of sodium alginate (Alg) and organoselenium modified polyethyleneimine (SePEI) on quartz and polymeric substrates. The immobilized SePEI species is capable of catalytically decomposing S-nitrosothiol species (RSNO) to NO in the presence of thiol reducing agents (e.g., glutathione, cysteine, etc.). The stepwise buildup of the multilayer films is monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy, SEM and surface contact angle measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the stoichiometry between the polyanion and polycation, and also the presence of Se in the catalytic LbL film. A reductive annealing process is necessary to improve the stability of freshly coated multilayer films via chain rearrangement. Chemiluminescence measurements illustrate the ability of the LbL films to generate NO from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). Enhanced NO fluxes can be achieved by increasing the number of catalytic (SePEI/Alg) bilayers coated on the substrates. Nitric oxide generation is observed even after prolonged contact with sheep whole blood. Preliminary applications of this LbL on silicone rubber tubings and polyurethane catheters reveal similar NO generation behavior from these biomedical grade polymeric substrates.

  14. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation depends on metabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Brookes, Paul S

    2009-06-12

    The mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a central role in many cell signaling pathways, but debate still surrounds its regulation by factors, such as substrate availability, [O2] and metabolic state. Previously, we showed that in isolated mitochondria respiring on succinate, ROS generation was a hyperbolic function of [O2]. In the current study, we used a wide variety of substrates and inhibitors to probe the O2 sensitivity of mitochondrial ROS generation under different metabolic conditions. From such data, the apparent Km for O2 of putative ROS-generating sites within mitochondria was estimated as follows: 0.2, 0.9, 2.0, and 5.0 microM O2 for the complex I flavin site, complex I electron backflow, complex III QO site, and electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase of beta-oxidation, respectively. Differential effects of respiratory inhibitors on ROS generation were also observed at varying [O2]. Based on these data, we hypothesize that at physiological [O2], complex I is a significant source of ROS, whereas the electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase may only contribute to ROS generation at very high [O2]. Furthermore, we suggest that previous discrepancies in the assignment of effects of inhibitors on ROS may be due to differences in experimental [O2]. Finally, the data set (see supplemental material) may be useful in the mathematical modeling of mitochondrial metabolism.

  15. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  16. Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were harvested shortly after release from sporangia, incubated under...Dec-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 spores, Bacillus , spore dormancy, 3-phosphoglycerate REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  17. Development of genomic resources for Nothofagus species using next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    El Mujtar, V A; Gallo, L A; Lang, T; Garnier-Géré, P

    2014-11-01

    Using next-generation sequencing, we developed the first whole-genome resources for two hybridizing Nothofagus species of the Patagonian forests that crucially lack genomic data, despite their ecological and industrial value. A de novo assembly strategy combining base quality control and optimization of the putative chloroplast gene map yielded ~32,000 contigs from 43% of the reads produced. With 12.5% of assembled reads, we covered ~96% of the chloroplast genome and ~70% of the mitochondrial gene content, providing functional and structural annotations for 112 and 52 genes, respectively. Functional annotation was possible on 15% of the contigs, with ~1750 potentially novel nuclear genes identified for Nothofagus species. We estimated that the new resources (13.41 Mb in total) included ~4000 gene regions representing ~6.5% of the expected genic partition of the genome, the remaining contigs potentially being nongenic DNA. A high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms resource was developed by comparing various filtering methods, and preliminary results indicate a strong conservation of cpDNA genomes in contrast to numerous exclusive nuclear polymorphisms in both species. Finally, we characterized 2274 potential simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci, designed primers for 769 of them and validated nine of 29 loci in 42 individuals per species. Nothofagus obliqua had more alleles (4.89) on average than N. nervosa (2.89), 8 SSRs were efficient to discriminate species, and three were successfully transferred in three other Nothofagus species. These resources will greatly help for future inferences of demographic, adaptive and hybridizing events in Nothofagus species, and for conserving and managing natural populations.

  18. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-12-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma.

  19. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma. PMID:26656857

  20. Development of Species-Specific Ah Receptor-Responsive Third Generation CALUX Cell Lines with Increased Sensitivity and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jennifer C.; He, Guochun; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Zhao, Jing; Wirth, Ed; Fulton, Michael H.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Ah receptor (AhR)-responsive CALUX (chemically-activated luciferase expression) cell bioassay is commonly used for rapid screening of samples for the presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin), dioxin-like compounds, and AhR agonists/antagonists. By increasing the number of AhR DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements), we previously generated a novel third generation (G3) recombinant AhR-responsive mouse CALUX cell line (H1L7.5c3) with significantly enhanced sensitivity and response to DLCs compared to existing AhR-CALUX cell bioassays. However, the elevated background luciferase activity of these cells and the absence of comparable G3 cell lines derived from other species have limited their utility for screening purposes. Here, we describe the development and characterization of species-specific G3 recombinant AhR-responsive CALUX cell lines (rat, human, and guinea pig) that exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and dramatically increased TCDD induction response. The low background luciferase activity, low minimal detection limit (0.1 pM TCDD) and enhanced induction response of the rat G3 cell line (H4L7.5c2) over the H1L7.5c3 mouse G3 cells, identifies them as a more optimal cell line for screening purposes. The utility of the new G3 CALUX cell lines were demonstrated by screening sediment extracts and a small chemical compound library for the presence of AhR agonists. The increased sensitivity and response of these new G3 CALUX cell lines will facilitate species-specific analysis of DLCs and AhR agonists in samples with low levels of contamination and/or in small sample volumes. PMID:26366531

  1. Pleiotrophin-induced endothelial cell migration is regulated by xanthine oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsirmoula, Sotiria; Lamprou, Margarita; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Kieffer, Nelly; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2015-03-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor that induces cell migration through binding to its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) and integrin alpha v beta 3 (ανβ3). In the present work, we studied the effect of PTN on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human endothelial cells and the involvement of ROS in PTN-induced cell migration. Exogenous PTN significantly increased ROS levels in a concentration and time-dependent manner in both human endothelial and prostate cancer cells, while knockdown of endogenous PTN expression in prostate cancer cells significantly down-regulated ROS production. Suppression of RPTPβ/ζ through genetic and pharmacological approaches, or inhibition of c-src kinase activity abolished PTN-induced ROS generation. A synthetic peptide that blocks PTN-ανβ3 interaction abolished PTN-induced ROS generation, suggesting that ανβ3 is also involved. The latter was confirmed in CHO cells that do not express β3 or over-express wild-type β3 or mutant β3Y773F/Y785F. PTN increased ROS generation in cells expressing wild-type β3 but not in cells not expressing or expressing mutant β3. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or Erk1/2 inhibition suppressed PTN-induced ROS production, suggesting that ROS production lays down-stream of PI3K or Erk1/2 activation by PTN. Finally, ROS scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibition completely abolished both PTN-induced ROS generation and cell migration, while NADPH oxidase inhibition had no effect. Collectively, these data suggest that xanthine oxidase-mediated ROS production is required for PTN-induced cell migration through the cell membrane functional complex of ανβ3 and RPTPβ/ζ and activation of c-src, PI3K and ERK1/2 kinases.

  2. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-02

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants.

  3. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  4. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  5. Surface functionalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Photo-stability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Kacie M.

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly prevalent in society for applications of sunscreens, cosmetics, paints, biomedical imaging, and photovoltaics. Due to the increased surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles compared to bulk materials, it is important to know the health and safety impacts of these materials. One mechanism of toxicity of nominally "safe" materials such as TiO 2 is through the photocatalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production and ligand degradation can affect the bioavailability of these particles in aqueous organisms. We have investigated ROS generation by functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles and its influence on aggregation and bioavailability and toxicity to zebrafish embryos/larvae. For these studies we investigated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. For application purposes and solution stability, the TiO2 nanoparticles were functionalized with a variety of ligands such as citrate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and ascorbate. We quantitatively examined the amount of ROS produced in aqueous solution using fluorescent probes and see that more ROS is produced under UV light than in the dark control. Our measurements show that TiO2 toxicity reaches a maximum for nanoparticles with smaller diameters, and is correlated with surface area dependent changes in ROS generation. In an effort to reduce toxicity through control of the surface and surface ligands, we synthesized anatase nanoparticles of different sizes, functionalized them with different ligands, and examined the resulting ROS generation and ligand stability. Using a modular ligand containing a hydrophobic inner region and a hydrophilic outer region, we synthesized water-stable nanoparticles, via two different chemical reactions, having much-reduced ROS generation and thus reduced toxicity. These results suggest new strategies for making safer nanoparticles while still retaining their desired properties. We also examine the degradation of the different ligands

  6. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  7. Magnetically active biosorbent for chromium species removal from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Osmam, Maher M; Ahmed, Somia B

    2014-01-01

    A magnetically active composite as adsorbent was synthesized via a facile in situ one-pot impregnation of magnetic nano-iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) on the surface of activated carbon (AC) for the formation of AC-Fe₃O₄. Baker(')s yeast was physically loaded on the resultant adsorbent AC-Fe₃O₄ to form a novel yeast coated magnetic composite AC-Fe₃O₄-Yst as biosorbent. The two synthesized adsorbents were characterized by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and assessed using Langmuir, the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. The validity and applicability of these two sorbents in adsorptive removal of chromium species, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), from aqueous solutions under the effect of a magnetic field were studied and evaluated in the presence of various controlling parameters in order to identify the optimal pH, contact time, mass dose and chromium concentrations for such adsorption process. Also, single and multi-stage micro-column techniques were used to study the potential applications of AC-Fe₃O₄ as magnetically active adsorbents and AC-Fe₃O₄-Yst as magnetically active biosorbents, for the removal of chromium species from various real water samples.

  8. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level.

  9. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species.

    PubMed

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-07-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles.

  10. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  11. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for

  12. Photochemical generation and kinetic studies of a putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Vanover, Eric; Luo, Weilong; Newcomb, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Photo-disproportionation of a bis-porphyrin-diruthenium(IV) μ-oxo dimer gave a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) species and a putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species that can be detected and studied in real time via laser flash photolysis methods. As determined by its spectral and kinetic behavior, the same oxo transient was also formed by photolysis of a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) N-oxide adduct. Second-order rate constants for reactions with several substrates at 22 °C were determined; representative values of rate constants were kox = 6.6 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for diphenylmethanol, kox = 2.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for styrene, and kox = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for cyclohexene. The putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo transient reacted 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than the corresponding trans-dioxoruthenium(VI) porphyrins, and the rate constants obtained in this work were similar to those of the corrole-iron(V)-oxo derivative. The high reactivity for the photochemically generated ruthenium-oxo species in comparison to other porphyrin-metal-oxo intermediates suggests that it is a true ruthenium(V)-oxo species.

  13. Plumbagin induces apoptosis via the p53 pathway and generation of reactive oxygen species in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linqiang; Yin, Delong; Ren, Ye; Gong, Chen; Chen, Anmin; Guo, Feng-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma, which is the most common primary bone tumor, occurs most frequently in adolescents. A number of studies have indicated that plumbagin (PL) (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1, 4-naphthoquinone), a compound found in the plants of the Plumbaginaceae and Droseraceae families, possesses anticancer activity. However, its anticancer effects and mechanisms against osteosarcoma have not been explored. To determine the anticancer effect of PL on osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63 and U2OS, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured, and Western blot analyses were performed. PL significantly inhibited the growth of osteosarcoma cells, particularly U2OS cells. PL up-regulated the expression of p53 in U2OS cells and p21 in the two osteosarcoma cell lines causing cell cycle arrest by decreasing the expression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2)/cyclin B1 and cyclin D1. Furthermore, PL altered the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, and may have triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, resulting in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. We also found that PL induced the generation of ROS in osteosarcoma cell lines. To conclude, PL exerted anticancer activity on osteosarcoma cells by inducing pro-apoptotic signaling and modulating the intracellular ROS that causes induction of apoptosis. These effects may relate to the p53 status.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of some Clerodendrum species from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abouzid, Sameh F; Wahba, Haytham M; Elshamy, Ali; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Shahat, Abdelaaty A

    2013-01-01

    Chloroformic and methanolic extracts of four Clerodendrum species cultivated in Egypt were screened for antimicrobial activities. Chloroformic extracts of the flowers of Clerodendrum chinense and Clerodendrum splendens were active against Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 < 10 µg mL(-1)). Chloroformic extracts of the stem and flowers of C. chinense were active against Trypanosoma cruzi (IC50 = 1.21 and 1.12 µg mL(-1), respectively) with marginal cytotoxicity. Chloroformic extracts of the leaves of C. chinense and C. splendens showed promising activities against T. cruzi (IC50 = 3.39 and 1.98 µg mL(-1), respectively) without cytotoxic effect on a human cell line. None of the selected plants showed significant activity against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria or Candida albicans. Verbascoside, a phenyl propanoid glycoside isolated from the leaves of C. chinense, showed marginal activity against T. cruzi. Rengyolone, a cyclohexyl ethanoid isolated from the leaves of C. chinense, showed a broad but not specific activity against the tested organisms.

  15. UVB dependence of quantum dot reactive oxygen species generation in common skin cell models

    PubMed Central

    MORTENSEN, LUKE J.; FAULKNOR, RENEA; RAVICHANDRAN, SUPRIYA; ZHENG, HONG; DELOUISE, LISA A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  16. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  17. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  18. The HemQ coprohaem decarboxylase generates reactive oxygen species: implications for the evolution of classical haem biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Charlie; Dailey, Harry A.; Shepherd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria require a haem biosynthetic pathway for the assembly of a variety of protein complexes, including cytochromes, peroxidases, globins, and catalase. Haem is synthesised via a series of tetrapyrrole intermediates, including non-metallated porphyrins, such as protoporphyrin IX, which is well known to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of light and oxygen. Staphylococcus aureus has an ancient haem biosynthetic pathway that proceeds via the formation of coproporphyrin III, a less reactive porphyrin. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that HemY of S. aureus is able to generate both protoporphyrin IX and coproporphyrin III, and that the terminal enzyme of this pathway, HemQ, can stimulate the generation of protoporphyrin IX (but not coproporphyrin III). Assays with hydrogen peroxide, horseradish peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase confirm that this stimulatory effect is mediated by superoxide. Structural modelling reveals that HemQ enzymes do not possess the structural attributes that are common to peroxidases that form compound I [FeIV==O]+, which taken together with the superoxide data leaves Fenton chemistry as a likely route for the superoxide-mediated stimulation of protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase activity of HemY. This generation of toxic free radicals could explain why HemQ enzymes have not been identified in organisms that synthesise haem via the classical protoporphyrin IX pathway. This work has implications for the divergent evolution of haem biosynthesis in ancestral microorganisms, and provides new structural and mechanistic insights into a recently discovered oxidative decarboxylase reaction. PMID:27597779

  19. Generator of chemically active low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Demirov, N. A.; Spector, N. O.

    2016-11-01

    A new generator of high enthalpy (H 0 > 40 kJ/g), chemically active nitrogen and air plasmas was designed and constructed. Main feature of the generator is an expanding channel of an output electrode; the generator belongs to the class of DC plasma torches with thermionic cathode with an efficiency of 80%. The generator ensures the formation of a slightly divergent plasma jet (2α = 12°) with a diameter of D = 10-12 mm, an electric arc maximum power of 20-50 kW, plasma forming gas flow rate 1.0-2.0 g/s, and the average plasma temperature at an outlet of 8000-11000 K.

  20. Relationship between peptide membrane curvature generation and bactericidal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Lee, Michelle; Kuo, David; Ouellette, Andre; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Many amphipathic peptides and amphipathic domains in proteins can restructure biological membranes. Two examples are host defense antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which disrupt and destabilize the cell membranes of microbes, and apolipoproteins which help stabilize nanoscale lipid aggregates. We use complementary x-ray and bacterial cell assays to elucidate the molecular length scale membrane deformations generated by amphipathic peptides with different structural motifs and relate these deformations to their activities on bacteria. Small angle x-ray scattering is used to study the interactions of model membranes with prototypical AMPs and consensus peptides from the amphipathic domains in apolipoproteins. By characterizing the nanoscale curvature deformations induced by these two distinct classes of membrane restructuring peptides we will discuss the role of amino acid composition on curvature generation. Bactericidal assays are used to access the in vivo activities of different amphipathic peptide motifs in order to understand the relationships between cell viability and membrane curvature generation.

  1. Antiinflammatory activities of Hungarian Stachys species and their iridoids.

    PubMed

    Háznagy-Radnai, Erzsébet; Balogh, Ágnes; Czigle, Szilvia; Máthé, Imre; Hohmann, Judit; Blazsó, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    The antiinflammatory activities of aqueous extracts prepared from the aerial parts of ten Hungarian Stachys species were investigated in vivo in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test after intraperitoneal and oral administration to rats. Some of the extracts were found to display significant antiphlogistic effects when administered intraperitoneally and orally; in particular, the extracts of S. alpina, S. germanica, S. officinalis and S. recta demonstrated high activity following intraperitoneal administration. At the same dose of 5.0 mg/kg, these extracts exhibited similar or greater potency than that of the positive control diclofenac-Na. The main iridoids present in the investigated extracts, ajugoside, aucubin, acetylharpagide, harpagide and harpagoside, were also assayed in the same test, and high dose-dependent antiphlogistic effects were recorded for aucubin and harpagoside. These results led to the conclusion that most probably iridoids are responsible for the antiinflammatory effect of Stachys species, but other active constituents or their synergism must also be implicated in the antiinflammatory effect.

  2. Income Generation Activities among Academic Staffs at Malaysian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Abd Rahman; Soon, Ng Kim; Ting, Ngeoh Pei

    2015-01-01

    Income generation activities have been acquainted among public higher education institutions (HEIs) in Malaysia. Various factors that brought to insufficient of funding caused Higher Education Institutions(HEIs) to seek for additional income as to support the operation expenses. Financial sustainability issues made up the significant impact…

  3. Density of Plutonium Turnings Generated from Machining Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, John Robert; Vigil, Duane M.; Jachimowski, Thomas A.; Archuleta, Alonso; Arellano, Gerald Joseph; Melton, Vince Lee

    2016-10-20

    The purpose of this project was to determine the density of plutonium (Pu) turnings generated from the range of machining activities, using both surrogate material and machined Pu turnings. Verify that 500 grams (g) of plutonium will fit in a one quart container using a surrogate equivalent volume and that 100 grams of Pu will fit in a one quart Savy container.

  4. Fungal variegatic acid and extracellular polysaccharides promote the site-specific generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Mahaney, James; Jellison, Jody; Cao, Jinzhen; Gressler, Julia; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Goodell, Barry

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to clarify the role of variegatic acid (VA) in fungal attack by Serpula lacrymans, and also the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the fungus. VA promotes a mediated Fenton reaction to generated ROS after oxalate solubilizes oxidized forms of iron. The fungal extracellular matrix (ECM) β-glucan scavenged ROS, and we propose this as a mechanism to protect the fungal hyphae while ROS generation is promoted to deconstruct the lignocellulose cell wall. A relatively high pH (4.4) also favored Fe(III) transfer from oxalate to VA as opposed to a lower pH (2.2) conditions, suggesting a pH-dependent Fe(III) transfer to VA employed by S. lacrymans. This permits ROS generation within the higher pH of the cell wall, while limiting ROS production near the fungal hyphae, while β-glucan from the fungal ECM scavenges ROS in the more acidic environments surrounding the fungal hyphae.

  5. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  6. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations.

  7. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  8. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization: Carbon nanohorn-induced reactive oxygen species generation and toxicity by this neglected mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mei; Zhang, Minfang; Tahara, Yoshio; Chechetka, Svetlana; Miyako, Eijiro; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxic effects of carbon nanomaterials is important for their future biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubular materials induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes cell death; however, the exact details of this process are still unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism of ROS generation that is involved in the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages caused by excess uptake of carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a typical type of carbon nanotubule. CNH accumulated in the lysosomes, where they induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and the subsequent release of lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsins, which in turn caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered the generation of ROS in the mitochondria. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase was not directly involved in CNH-related ROS production, and the ROS generation cannot be regulated by mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS fed back to amplify the mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and cell apoptosis. Carbon nanotubules commonly accumulate in the lysosomes after internalization in cells; however, lysosomal dysfunction has not attracted much attention in toxicity studies of these materials. These results suggest that LMP, a neglected mechanism, may be the primary reason for carbon nanotubule toxicity. - Highlights: • We clarify an apoptotic mechanism of RAW264.7 cells caused by carbon nanohorns. • In the meantime, the mechanism of CNH-induced ROS generation is identified. • LMP is the initial factor of CNH-induced ROS generation and cell death. • Cathepsins work as mediators that connect LMP and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Improved ex vivo method for microbiocidal activity across vertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    French, Susannah S.; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The field of ecoimmunology is currently undergoing rapid expansion, whereby biologists from a wide range of ecological disciplines are increasingly interested in assessing immunocompetence in their study organisms. One of the key challenges to researchers is determining what eco-immune measures to use in a given experiment. Moreover, there are limitations depending on study species, requirements for specific antibodies, and relevance of the methodology to the study organism. Here we introduce an improved ex vivo method for microbiocidal activity across vertebrate species. The utility of this assay is that it determines the ability of an organism to remove a pathogen that could be encountered in the wild, lending ecological relevancy to the technique. The applications of this microbiocidal assay are broad, as it is readily adaptable to different types of microbes as well as a wide variety of study species. We describe a method of microbiocidal analysis that will enable researchers across disciplines to effectively employ this method to accurately quantify microbial killing ability, using readily available microplate absorbance readers. PMID:23213440

  10. Anticancer activities of selected species of North American lichen extracts.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Gajendra; El-Naggar, Atif M; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of human deaths in the USA. Despite continuous efforts to treat cancer over the past 50 years, human mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Natural products, such as lichens, have been good sources of anticancer drugs. This study reports the cytotoxic activity of crude extracts of 17 lichen species against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells. Out of the 17 lichen species, extracts from 14 species showed cytotoxicity against Raji cells. On the basis of IC50 values, we selected Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa and Tuckermannopsis ciliaris to study the mechanism of cell death. Viability of normal lymphocytes was not affected by the extracts of X. chlorochroa and T. ciliaris. We found that extracts from both lichens decreased proliferation, accumulated cells at the G0 /G1 stage, and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Both lichen extracts also caused upregulation of p53. The T. ciliaris extract upregulated the expression of TK1 but X. chlorochroa did not. We also found that usnic, salazinic, constictic, and norstictic acids were present in the extract of X. chlorochroa, whereas protolichesterinic acid in T. ciliaris extracts. Our data demonstrate that lichen extracts merit further research as a potential source of anticancer drugs.

  11. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  12. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  13. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)-capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters. PMID:28208642

  14. Cross-Species, Amplifiable EST-SSR Markers for Amentotaxus Species Obtained by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Chiuan-Yu; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Hsin-Mei; Ge, Xue-Jun; Huang, Chi-Chun; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Hung, Kuo-Hsiang

    2016-01-07

    Amentotaxus, a genus of Taxaceae, is an ancient lineage with six relic and endangered species. Four Amentotaxus species, namely A. argotaenia, A. formosana, A. yunnanensis, and A. poilanei, are considered a species complex because of their morphological similarities. Small populations of these species are allopatrically distributed in Asian forests. However, only a few codominant markers have been developed and applied to study population genetic structure of these endangered species. In this study, we developed and characterized polymorphic expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) from the transcriptome of A. formosana. We identified 4955 putative EST-SSRs from 68,281 unigenes as potential molecular markers. Twenty-six EST-SSRs were selected for estimating polymorphism and transferability among Amentotaxus species, of which 23 EST-SSRs were polymorphic within Amentotaxus species. Among these, the number of alleles ranged from 1-4, the polymorphism information content ranged from 0.000-0.692, and the observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.000-1.000 and 0.080-0.740, respectively. Population genetic structure analyses confirmed that A. argotaenia and A. formosana were separate species and A. yunnanensis and A. poilanei were the same species. These novel EST-SSRs can facilitate further population genetic structure research of Amentotaxus species.

  15. Characterization and chillproofing activity of two enzymes from Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Etok, C A; Eka, O U

    1996-01-01

    Two enzymes, amylase and protease of Streptomyces species were purified by a combination of ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration and characterized. The amylase had an exoaction on starch yielding maltose as a major end product and was identified as beta-amylase. The purified amylase had a molecular weight of 48,000 and was maximally active at 35 degrees C and at pH 6.0. On the other hand, protease had a molecular weight of 21,000 and was most active at pH 10.0 and at a temperature of 30 degrees C. The Km or MICHAELIS constant of amylase for maize starch was 0.333 mg/ml while that of protease for casein was 2.5 mg/ml. The feasibility of using the purified protease for various industrial application especially in the chillproofing of beer is discussed.

  16. ALDH2 Mediates 5-Nitrofuran Activity in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linna; Ishizaki, Hironori; Spitzer, Michaela; Taylor, Kerrie L.; Temperley, Nicholas D.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Brear, Paul; Gautier, Philippe; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Mitchell, Amy; Narayan, Vikram; McNeil, Ewan M.; Melton, David W.; Smith, Terry K.; Tyers, Mike; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Summary Understanding how drugs work in vivo is critical for drug design and for maximizing the potential of currently available drugs. 5-nitrofurans are a class of prodrugs widely used to treat bacterial and trypanosome infections, but despite relative specificity, 5-nitrofurans often cause serious toxic side effects in people. Here, we use yeast and zebrafish, as well as human in vitro systems, to assess the biological activity of 5-nitrofurans, and we identify a conserved interaction between aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 and 5-nitrofurans across these species. In addition, we show that the activity of nifurtimox, a 5-nitrofuran anti-trypanosome prodrug, is dependent on zebrafish Aldh2 and is a substrate for human ALDH2. This study reveals a conserved and biologically relevant ALDH2-5-nitrofuran interaction that may have important implications for managing the toxicity of 5-nitrofuran treatment. PMID:22840776

  17. Entanglement generation between unstable optically active qubits without photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Solinas, Paolo

    2011-09-15

    We propose a robust deterministic scheme to generate entanglement at high fidelity without the need for photodetectors even for quantum bits (qubits) with extremely poor optically active states. Our protocol employs stimulated Raman adiabatic passage for population transfer without actually exciting the system. Furthermore, it is found to be effective even if the environmental decoherence rate is of the same order of magnitude as the atom-photon coupling frequency. Our scheme has the potential to solve entanglement generation problems, e.g., in distributed quantum computing.

  18. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-07

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction.

  19. Relationship between short activated partial thromboplastin times, thrombin generation, procoagulant factors and procoagulant phospholipid activity.

    PubMed

    Mina, Ashraf; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Koutts, Jerry

    2012-04-01

    Short activated partial thromboplastin times (APTTs) are associated with thrombosis. However, what short APTTs actually represent in terms of possible mechanistic pathways is not well characterized. We have assessed thrombin generation as compared with levels of procoagulant factor (fibrinogen, V, VIII, IX, XI and XII) activities, von Willebrand factor level and activity using collagen binding, as well as procoagulant phospholipid activity, in 113 consecutive samples exhibiting a short APTT compared with an equal number of age-matched and sex-matched samples yielding a normal APTT. We found a significant difference in peak thrombin generation, velocity index and area under the curve between the two groups, and that thrombin generation markers correlated with the APTT, procoagulant phospholipid activity and several procoagulant clotting factors. We conclude that short APTTs represent a procoagulant milieu, as represented by heightened thrombin generation and several other heightened procoagulant activities, which may help explain the association with thrombosis.

  20. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-08

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10-100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  1. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  2. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  3. Anticholinesterase and Antityrosinase Activities of Ten Piper Species from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Wan; Hashim, Nur Athirah; Ahmad, Farediah; Heng Yen, Khong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and antityrosinase activities of extracts from ten Piper species namely; P. caninum, P. lanatum, P. abbreviatum, P. aborescens, P. porphyrophyllum, P. erecticaule, P. ribesioides, P. miniatum, P. stylosum, and P. majusculum. Methods: Anticholinesterase and antityrosinase activities were evaluated against in vitro Ellman spectroscopy method and mushroom tyrosinase, respectively. Results: The EtOAc extract of P. erecticaule showed the highest AChE and BChE inhibitory with 22.9% and 70.9% inhibition, respectively. In antityrosinase activity, all extracts of P. porphyrophyllum showed the highest inhibitory effects against mushroom tyrosinase, compared to standard, kojic acid. Conclusion: This study showed that P. erecticaule and P. porphyrophyllum have potential AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibition activities. The respective extracts can be explored further for the development of novel lead as AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibitors in therapeutic management of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25671185

  4. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  5. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  6. Re-creating ancient hybrid species' complex phenotypes from early-generation synthetic hybrids: three examples using wild sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David M; Rieseberg, Loren H; Donovan, Lisa A

    2005-07-01

    Can the complex phenotypes that characterize naturally occurring hybrid species be re-created in early-generation artificial hybrids? We address this question with three homoploid hybrid species (Helianthus anomalus, Helianthus deserticola, Helianthus paradoxus) and their ancestral parents (Helianthus annuus, Helianthus petiolaris) that are phenotypically distinct and ecologically differentiated. These species, and two synthetic hybrid populations of the ancestral parents, were characterized for morphological, physiological, and life-history traits in greenhouse studies. Among the synthetic hybrids, discriminant analysis identified a few individuals with the multitrait phenotype of the natural hybrid species: 0.7%-1.1% were H. anomalus-like, 0.5%-13% were H. deserticola-like, and only 0.4% were H. paradoxus-like. These relative frequencies mirror previous findings that genetic correlations are favorable for generating the hybrid species' phenotypes, and they correspond well with phylogeographic evidence that demonstrates multiple natural origins of H. deserticola and H. anomalus but a single origin for H. paradoxus. Even though synthetic hybrids with hybrid species phenotypes are rare, their phenotypic correlation matrices share most of the same principal components (eigenvectors), setting the stage for predictable recovery of hybrid species' phenotypes from different hybrid populations. Our results demonstrate past hybridization could have generated hybrid species-like multitrait phenotypes suitable for persistence in their respective environments in just three generations after initial hybridization.

  7. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  8. Aloe-emodin induced DNA damage through generation of reactive oxygen species in human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Zin; Lin, Ching-Ju; Yang, Wen-Hui; Leung, Wing-Cheung; Chang, Shen-Pen

    2006-07-28

    The DNA aggregation was found in aloe-emodin-induced H460 cell apoptosis in this study. Aloe-emodin (40microM)-induced DNA single strand breaks were observed by comet assay. Aloe-emodin induced decreases in the mRNA of DNA repair enzymes such as hMTH1, hOGG1 and APE. Although the activity of the radical-scavenging enzyme SOD was enhanced by aloe-emodin, the effects of aloe-emodin on H460 cell apoptosis were suspected to result from the prooxidant. These results suggest that aloe-emodin induced DNA damage through generation of reactive oxygen species in human lung carcinoma cells.

  9. Income-generating activities for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    The Income Generating Activities program for Family Planning Acceptors was introduced in Indonesia in 1979. Capital input by the Indonesian National Family Planning Coordination Board and the UN Fund for Population Activities was used to set up small businesses by family planning acceptors. In 2 years, when the businesses become self-sufficient, the loans are repaid, and the money is used to set up new family planning acceptors in business. The program strengthens family planning acceptance, improves the status of women, and enhances community self-reliance. The increase in household income generated by the program raises the standards of child nutrition, encourages reliance on the survival of children, and decreases the value of large families. Approximately 18,000 Family Planning-Income Generating Activities groups are now functioning all over Indonesia, with financial assistance from the central and local governments, the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, the UN Population Fund, the Government of the Netherlands, and the Government of Australia through the Association of South East Asian Nations.

  10. Enhanced ionospheric plasma bubble generation in more active ITCZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guozhu; Otsuka, Yuichi; Ning, Baiqi; Abdu, M. A.; Yamamoto, M.; Wan, Weixing; Liu, Libo; Abadi, Prayitno

    2016-03-01

    A close link between the atmospheric Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and ionospheric plasma bubble has been proposed since the last century. But this relationship has often appeared to be less than convincing due to the simultaneous roles played by several other factors in shaping the global distribution of ionospheric bubbles. From simultaneous collaborative radar multibeam steering measurements at Kototabang (0.2°S, 100.3°E) and Sanya (18.4°N, 109.6°E), conducted during September-October of 2012 and 2013, we find that the total numbers of nights with bubble (i.e., occurrence rates) at the two closely located longitudes (Kototabang and Sanya) are comparable. But interestingly, the total number of nights with locally generated bubble (i.e., generation rate) over Kototabang is clearly more than that over Sanya. Further analysis reveals that a more active ITCZ is situated around the longitude of Kototabang. We surmise that the enhanced ionospheric bubble generation at Kototabang longitude could be caused by a higher gravity wave activity associated with the more active ITCZ.

  11. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. No more non-model species: the promise of next generation sequencing for comparative immunology.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Adema, Coen; Raftos, David A; Gourbal, Benjamin; Grunau, Christoph; Du Pasquier, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for the rapid, comprehensive and cost effective analysis of entire genomes and transcriptomes. NGS provides approaches for immune response gene discovery, profiling gene expression over the course of parasitosis, studying mechanisms of diversification of immune receptors and investigating the role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating immune gene expression and/or diversification. NGS will allow meaningful comparisons to be made between organisms from different taxa in an effort to understand the selection of diverse strategies for host defence under different environmental pathogen pressures. At the same time, it will reveal the shared and unique components of the immunological toolkit and basic functional aspects that are essential for immune defence throughout the living world. In this review, we argue that NGS will revolutionize our understanding of immune responses throughout the animal kingdom because the depth of information it provides will circumvent the need to concentrate on a few "model" species.

  13. No more non-model species: The promise of Next Generation Sequencing for Comparative Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Coen, Adema; Raftos, David A; Benjamin, Gourbal; Christoph, Grunau; Louis, Du Pasquier

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for the rapid, comprehensive and cost effective analysis of entire genomes and transcriptomes. NGS provides approaches for immune response gene discovery, profiling gene expression over the course of parasitosis, studying mechanisms of diversification of immune receptors and investigating the role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating immune gene expression and/or diversification. NGS will allow meaningful comparisons to be made between organisms from different taxa in an effort to understand the selection of diverse strategies for host defence under different environmental pathogen pressures. At the same time, it will reveal the shared and unique components of the immunological toolkit and basic functional aspects that are essential for immune defence throughout the living world. In this review, we argue that NGS will revolutionize our understanding of immune responses throughout the animal kingdom because the depth of information it provides will circumvent the need to concentrate on a few “model” species. PMID:24508980

  14. Physalis angulata induces death of promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis via the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, B J M; Da Silva, R R P; Rodrigues, A P D; Farias, L H S; Do Nascimento, J L M; Silva, E O

    2016-03-01

    Leishmaniasis are a neglected group of emerging diseases that have been found in 98 countries and are caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. The therapy for leishmaniasis causes several side effects and leads to drug-resistant strains. Natural products from plants have exhibited activities against Leishmania in various experimental models. Physalis angulata is a widely used plant in popular medicine, and in the literature it has well-documented leishmanicidal activity. However, its mechanism of action is still unknown. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the mechanism driving the leishmanicidal activity of an aqueous extract of P. angulata root (AEPa). AEPa was effective against both promastigotes and intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis. This effect was mediated by an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not of nitric oxide (NO). The increased production of ROS induces cell death by phenotypes seems by apoptosis cell death in Leishmania, but not autophagy or necrosis. In addition, morphological analysis of macrophages showed that AEPa induced a high number of cytoplasmic projections, increased the volume of cytoplasm and number of vacuoles, caused cytoskeleton alterations and resulted in high spreading ability. AEPa also promoted superoxide anion (O2(-)) production in both uninfected macrophages and those infected with Leishmania. Therefore, these results revealed that AEPa causes cell death by phenotypes seems by apoptosis cell death in L. amazonensis and modulates macrophage activation through morphofunctional alterations and O2(-) generation to induce Leishmania death.

  15. Coverage recommendation for genotyping analysis of highly heterologous species using next-generation sequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is being applied to an increasing number of non-model species and has been used as the primary approach for accurate genotyping in genetic and evolutionary studies. However, inferring genotypes from sequencing data is challenging, particularly for organisms with a high degree of heterozygosity. This is because genotype calls from sequencing data are often inaccurate due to low sequencing coverage, and if this is not accounted for, genotype uncertainty can lead to serious bias in downstream analyses, such as quantitative trait locus mapping and genome-wide association studies. Here, we used high-coverage reference data sets from Crassostrea gigas to simulate sequencing data with different coverage, and we evaluate the influence of genotype calling rate and accuracy as a function of coverage. Having initially identified the appropriate parameter settings for filtering to ensure genotype accuracy, we used two different single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling pipelines, single-sample and multi-sample. We found that a coverage of 15× was suitable for obtaining sufficient numbers of SNPs with high accuracy. Our work provides guidelines for the selection of sequence coverage when using NGS to investigate species with a high degree of heterozygosity and rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium. PMID:27760996

  16. Antigenic diversity is generated by distinct evolutionary mechanisms in African trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew P; Berry, Andrew; Aslett, Martin; Allison, Harriet C; Burton, Peter; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Brown, Robert; Browne, Hilary; Corton, Nicola; Hauser, Heidi; Gamble, John; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Marcello, Lucio; McQuillan, Jacqueline; Otto, Thomas D; Quail, Michael A; Sanders, Mandy J; van Tonder, Andries; Ginger, Michael L; Field, Mark C; Barry, J David; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Berriman, Matthew

    2012-02-28

    Antigenic variation enables pathogens to avoid the host immune response by continual switching of surface proteins. The protozoan blood parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness") across sub-Saharan Africa and is a model system for antigenic variation, surviving by periodically replacing a monolayer of variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) that covers its cell surface. We compared the genome of Trypanosoma brucei with two closely related parasites Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax, to reveal how the variant antigen repertoire has evolved and how it might affect contemporary antigenic diversity. We reconstruct VSG diversification showing that Trypanosoma congolense uses variant antigens derived from multiple ancestral VSG lineages, whereas in Trypanosoma brucei VSG have recent origins, and ancestral gene lineages have been repeatedly co-opted to novel functions. These historical differences are reflected in fundamental differences between species in the scale and mechanism of recombination. Using phylogenetic incompatibility as a metric for genetic exchange, we show that the frequency of recombination is comparable between Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei but is much lower in Trypanosoma vivax. Furthermore, in showing that the C-terminal domain of Trypanosoma brucei VSG plays a crucial role in facilitating exchange, we reveal substantial species differences in the mechanism of VSG diversification. Our results demonstrate how past VSG evolution indirectly determines the ability of contemporary parasites to generate novel variant antigens through recombination and suggest that the current model for antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei is only one means by which these parasites maintain chronic infections.

  17. The occurrence of second generation anticoagulant rodenticides in non-target raptor species in Norway.

    PubMed

    Langford, Katherine H; Reid, Malcolm; Thomas, Kevin V

    2013-04-15

    Second generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) are commonly used for rodent pest control in Norway resulting in the potential exposure of non-target raptor species. In this study the occurrence of flocoumafen, difethialone, difenacoum, bromadiolone and brodifacoum was determined in the livers of five species of raptors found dead in Norway between 2009 and 2011. The SGARs brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum and flocoumafen were detected in golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) and eagle owl (Bubo bubo) livers at a total SGAR concentration of between 11 and 255 ng/g in approximately 70% of the golden eagles and 50% of the eagle owls examined in this study. In the absence of specific golden eagle and eagle owl toxicity thresholds for SGARs, a level of >100 ng/g was used as a potential lethal range, accepting that poisoning may occur below this level. Thirty percent (7/24) of the golden eagle and eagle owl livers contained total SGAR residue levels above this threshold. Further estimation of the potential mortality impact on the sampled raptor populations was not possible.

  18. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  19. SELECTION ON LEAF ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN A DESERT HYBRID HELIANTHUS SPECIES AND EARLY-GENERATION HYBRIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Fulco; Rosenthal, David M.; Johnston, Jill A.; Kane, Nolan; Gross, Briana L.; Lexer, Christian; Dudley, Susan A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Donovan, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Leaf ecophysiological traits related to carbon gain and resource use are expected to be under strong selection in desert annuals. We used comparative and phenotypic selection approaches to investigate the importance of leaf ecophysiological traits for Helianthus anomalus, a diploid annual sunflower species of hybrid origin that is endemic to active desert dunes. Comparisons were made within and among five genotypic classes: H. anomalus, its ancestral parent species (H. annuus and H. petiolaris), and two backcrossed populations of the parental species (designated BC2ann and BC2pet) representing putative ancestors of H. anomalus. Seedlings were transplanted into H. anomalus habitat at Little Sahara Dunes, Utah, and followed through a summer growing season for leaf ecophysiological traits, phenology, and fitness estimated as vegetative biomass. Helianthus anomalus had a unique combination of traits when compared to its ancestral parent species, suggesting that lower leaf nitrogen and greater leaf succulence might be adaptive. However, selection on leaf traits in H. anomalus favored larger leaf area and greater nitrogen, which was not consistent with the extreme traits of H. anomalus relative to its ancestral parents. Also contrary to expectation, current selection on the leaf traits in the backcross populations was not consistently similar to, or resulting in evolution toward, the current H. anomalus phenotype. Only the selection for greater leaf succulence in BC2ann and greater water-use efficiency in BC2pet would result in evolution toward the current H. anomalus phenotype. It was surprising that the action of phenotypic selection depended greatly on the genotypic class for these closely related sunflower hybrids grown in a common environment. We speculate that this may be due to either phenotypic correlations between measured and unmeasured but functionally related traits or due to the three genotypic classes experiencing the environment differently as a result of

  20. Selection on leaf ecophysiological traits in a desert hybrid Helianthus species and early-generation hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Fulco; Rosenthal, David M; Johnston, Jill A; Kane, Nolan; Gross, Briana L; Lexer, Christian; Dudley, Susan A; Rieseberg, Loren H; Donovan, Lisa A

    2004-12-01

    Leaf ecophysiological traits related to carbon gain and resource use are expected to be under strong selection in desert annuals. We used comparative and phenotypic selection approaches to investigate the importance of leaf ecophysiological traits for Helianthus anomalus, a diploid annual sunflower species of hybrid origin that is endemic to active desert dunes. Comparisons were made within and among five genotypic classes: H. anomalus, its ancestral parent species (H. annuus and H. petiolaris), and two backcrossed populations of the parental species (designated BC2ann and BC2pet) representing putative ancestors of H. anomalus. Seedlings were transplanted into H. anomalus habitat at Little Sahara Dunes, Utah, and followed through a summer growing season for leaf ecophysiological traits, phenology, and fitness estimated as vegetative biomass. Helianthus anomalus had a unique combination of traits when compared to its ancestral parent species, suggesting that lower leaf nitrogen and greater leaf succulence might be adaptive. However, selection on leaf traits in H. anomalus favored larger leaf area and greater nitrogen, which was not consistent with the extreme traits of H. anomalus relative to its ancestral parents. Also contrary to expectation, current selection on the leaf traits in the backcross populations was not consistently similar to, or resulting in evolution toward, the current H. anomalus phenotype. Only the selection for greater leaf succulence in BC2ann and greater water-use efficiency in BC2pet would result in evolution toward the current H. anomalus phenotype. It was surprising that the action of phenotypic selection depended greatly on the genotypic class for these closely related sunflower hybrids grown in a common environment. We speculate that this may be due to either phenotypic correlations between measured and unmeasured but functionally related traits or due to the three genotypic classes experiencing the environment differently as a result of

  1. Cadmium induces reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation in cortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    López, E; Arce, C; Oset-Gasque, M J; Cañadas, S; González, M P

    2006-03-15

    Cadmium is a toxic agent that it is also an environmental contaminant. Cadmium exposure may be implicated in some humans disorders related to hyperactivity and increased aggressiveness. This study presents data indicating that cadmium induces cellular death in cortical neurons in culture. This death could be mediated by an apoptotic and a necrotic mechanism. The apoptotic death may be mediated by oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation which could be induced by mitochondrial membrane dysfunction since this cation produces: (a) depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential and (b) diminution of ATP levels with ATP release. Necrotic death could be mediated by lipid peroxidation induced by cadmium through an indirect mechanism (ROS formation). On the other hand, 40% of the cells survive cadmium action. This survival seems to be mediated by the ability of these cells to activate antioxidant defense systems, since cadmium reduced the intracellular glutathione levels and induced catalase and SOD activation in these cells.

  2. Regulatory mechanisms of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation and their role in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Mase, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Miki; Kobayashi, Michie; Asai, Shuta

    2011-08-01

    Rapid production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in diverse physiological processes, such as programmed cell death, development, cell elongation and hormonal signaling, in plants. Much attention has been paid to the regulation of plant innate immunity by these signal molecules. Recent studies provide evidence that an NADPH oxidase, respiratory burst oxidase homolog, is responsible for pathogen-responsive ROS burst. However, we still do not know about NO-producing enzymes, except for nitrate reductase, although many studies suggest the existence of NO synthase-like activity responsible for NO burst in plants. Here, we introduce regulatory mechanisms of NO and ROS bursts by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, calcium-dependent protein kinase or riboflavin and its derivatives, flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and we discuss the roles of the bursts in defense responses against plant pathogens.

  3. Enterovirus 71 Induces Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation That is Required for Efficient Replication

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mei-Ling; Weng, Shiue-Fen; Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ho, Hung-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is an important host factor determining the outcome of infectious disease. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection has become an important endemic disease in Southeast Asia and China. We have previously shown that oxidative stress promotes viral replication, and progeny virus induces oxidative stress in host cells. The detailed mechanism for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in infected cells remains elusive. In the current study, we demonstrate that mitochondria were a major ROS source in EV71-infected cells. Mitochondria in productively infected cells underwent morphologic changes and exhibited functional anomalies, such as a decrease in mitochondrial electrochemical potential ΔΨm and an increase in oligomycin-insensitive oxygen consumption. Respiratory control ratio of mitochondria from infected cells was significantly lower than that of normal cells. The total adenine nucleotide pool and ATP content of EV71-infected cells significantly diminished. However, there appeared to be a compensatory increase in mitochondrial mass. Treatment with mito-TEMPO reduced eIF2α phosphorylation and viral replication, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS act to promote viral replication. It is plausible that EV71 infection induces mitochondrial ROS generation, which is essential to viral replication, at the sacrifice of efficient energy production, and that infected cells up-regulate biogenesis of mitochondria to compensate for their functional defect. PMID:25401329

  4. Detecting, visualizing and quantitating the generation of reactive oxygen species in an amoeba model system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2013-11-05

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) comprise a range of reactive and short-lived, oxygen-containing molecules, which are dynamically interconverted or eliminated either catalytically or spontaneously. Due to the short life spans of most ROS and the diversity of their sources and subcellular localizations, a complete picture can be obtained only by careful measurements using a combination of protocols. Here, we present a set of three different protocols using OxyBurst Green (OBG)-coated beads, or dihydroethidium (DHE) and Amplex UltraRed (AUR), to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively various ROS in professional phagocytes such as Dictyostelium. We optimised the beads coating procedures and used OBG-coated beads and live microscopy to dynamically visualize intraphagosomal ROS generation at the single cell level. We identified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli as a potent stimulator for ROS generation in Dictyostelium. In addition, we developed real time, medium-throughput assays using DHE and AUR to quantitatively measure intracellular superoxide and extracellular H2O2 production, respectively.

  5. Factors influencing the study of peroxidase-generated iodine species and implications for thyroglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jack; Obinger, Christian; Eales, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    A key issue in the mechanism of thyroglobulin (Tg) iodination by thyroperoxidase (TPO) is whether a TPO-bound iodine intermediate directly iodinates Tg-incorporated tyrosines (specific iodination) or whether reactive iodine species released from TPO effectuate Tg iodination (nonspecific iodination). We addressed these alternatives by (a) determining the aqueous equilibria of the iodine species potentially involved in the kinetic studies of TPO-mediated iodination, and (b) reviewing the structure of the substrate channel in mammalian peroxidases. Redox-potentiometric analysis of aqueous iodine combined with integrated mathematical modelling demonstrates that I2 reacts with water to form several iodine species including hypoiodious acid (HOI). The HOI/I2 ratio depends on time, iodide concentration, buffering agents, and pH varying dramatically from pH 4 to 7.4. These factors may confound the use of Michaelis-Menten kinetics to determine the mechanism of TPO-catalyzed iodination since both I2 and HOI iodinate tyrosine but with different specificities and reaction rates. Consequently there is as yet no conclusive kinetic evidence that iodination occurs via formation of a TPO-bound iodinated intermediate. Furthermore, knowledge of TPO structure, gained from X-ray crystallographic studies indicates that access of Tg-bound tyrosyl groups to the active site of TPO is not possible. Thus the emerging conclusion is that the mechanism of Tg iodination is nonspecific. This is consistent with the occurrence of thyroid hormone formation in prevertebrate ascidians which exhibit TPO-like activity but lack the Tg gene.

  6. Anthelmintic activity of the latex of Ficus species.

    PubMed

    de Amorin, A; Borba, H R; Carauta, J P; Lopes, D; Kaplan, M A

    1999-03-01

    The latex of some species of Ficus (Moraceae) has been traditionally used as vermifuge in Central and South America. It has been accepted that anthelmintic activity is due to a proteolytic fraction called ficin. In the present study, the anthelmintic activity of the latex of Ficus insipida Willd. and Ficus carica L. has been investigated in NIH mice naturally infected with Syphacia obvelata, Aspiculuris tetraptera and Vampirolepis nana. The latex of F. insipida, administered by intragastric route in doses of 4 ml/kg/day during three consecutive days, were effective in the removal of 38.6% of the total number of S. obvelata, being inexpressive in the removal of A. tetraptera (8.4%) and segments of V. nana (6.3%). The latex of F. carica, administered in doses of 3 ml/kg/day, during three consecutive days, was effective in the removal of S. obvelata (41.7%) and it did not produce significant elimination of A. tetraptera (2.6%) and V. nana (8.3%). The observed high acute toxicity with hemorrhagic enteritis, in addition to a weak anthelmintic efficacy, do not recommend the use of these lattices in traditional medicine.

  7. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  8. Hyperosmotic stress-dependent NFkappaB activation is regulated by reactive oxygen species and IGF-1 in cultured cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Verónica; Criollo, Alfredo; Quiroga, Clara; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Santibañez, Juan Francisco; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Chiong, Mario; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Foncea, Rocío; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-08-07

    We have recently shown that hyperosmotic stress activates p65/RelB NFkappaB in cultured cardiomyocytes with dichotomic actions on caspase activation and cell death. It remains unexplored how NFkappaB is regulated in cultured rat cardiomyocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress. We study here: (a) if hyperosmotic stress triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and in turn whether they regulate NFkappaB and (b) if insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) modulates ROS production and NFkappaB activation in hyperosmotically-stressed cardiomyocytes. The results showed that hyperosmotic stress generated ROS in cultured cardiac myocytes, in particular the hydroxyl and superoxide species, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Hyperosmotic stress-induced NFkappaB activation as determined by IkappaBalpha degradation and NFkappaB DNA binding. NFkappaB activation and procaspase-3 and -9 fragmentation were prevented by NAC and IGF-1. However, this growth factor did not decrease ROS generation induced by hyperosmotic stress, suggesting that its actions over NFkappaB and caspase activation may be due to modulation of events downstream of ROS generation. We conclude that hyperosmotic stress induces ROS, which in turn activates NFkappaB and caspases. IGF-1 prevents NFkappaB activation by a ROS-independent mechanism.

  9. Atmospheric wind field conditions generated by active grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, Pascal; Kittel, Achim; Peinke, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    An active grid for turbulence generation of several rotatable axes with surmounted vanes that can be driven via stepper or servo motors is presented. We investigate the impact of different excitation protocols for the grid. Using such protocols that already have the intermittent structure of turbulence, higher intermittent flows can be achieved. This concept can also be used to generate turbulent flows of high turbulence intensities (>25%) exhibiting integral length scales beyond the typical size of the test section of the wind tunnel. Similar two-point correlations measured by the intermittent statistics of velocity increments that are characteristic for flows of high Reynolds number, i.e. in the atmospheric boundary layer, can be reproduced.

  10. Discovering Engangered Species. A Learning and Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nancy; Machlis, Sally

    Up to 33 million species share the earth; no one knows the exact number for sure. All over the world, many species are becoming extinct. This workbook is designed to help children become more aware of the concept of extinction, and to develop personal strategies for helping with the problem of endangered species. Included are 31 activities…

  11. Analysis of reactive oxygen species generating systems in rat epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vernet, P; Fulton, N; Wallace, C; Aitken, R J

    2001-10-01

    Epididymal sperm maturation culminates in the acquisition of functional competence by testicular spermatozoa. The expression of this functional state is dependent upon a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated signal transduction cascade that controls the tyrosine phosphorylation status of the spermatozoa during capacitation. Analysis of superoxide anion (O2(-.)) generation by rat epididymal spermatozoa has revealed a two-component process involving electron leakage from the sperm mitochondria at complexes I and II and a plasma membrane NAD(P)H oxidoreductase. Following incubation in a glucose-, lactate-, and pyruvate-free medium (-GLP), O2(-.) generation was suppressed by 86% and 96% in caput and cauda spermatozoa, respectively. The addition of lactate, malate, or succinate to spermatozoa incubated in medium -GLP stimulated O2(-.) generation. This increase could be blocked by rotenone and oligomycin (R/O) in the presence of malate or lactate but not succinate. Stimulation with all three substrates, as well as spontaneous O2(-.) production in +GLP medium, was blocked by the flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium. Diphenylene iodonium, but not R/O, suppressed NAD(P)H-induced lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. This NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme resided in the sperm plasma membrane and its activity was regulated by zinc and uncharacterized cytosolic factors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the sperm NAD(P)H oxidoreductase complex is quite distinct from the equivalent leukocyte system.

  12. Neural representations for the generation of inventive conceptions inspired by adaptive feature optimization of biological species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Inventive conceptions amount to creative ideas for designing devices that are both original and useful. The generation of inventive conceptions is a key element of the inventive process. However, neural mechanisms of the inventive process remain poorly understood. Here we employed functional feature association tasks and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate neural substrates for the generation of inventive conceptions. The functional MRI (fMRI) data revealed significant activations at Brodmann area (BA) 47 in the left inferior frontal gyrus and at BA 18 in the left lingual gyrus, when participants performed biological functional feature association tasks compared with non-biological functional feature association tasks. Our results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47) is associated with novelty-based representations formed by the generation and selection of semantic relatedness, and the left lingual gyrus (BA 18) is involved in relevant visual imagery in processing of semantic relatedness. The findings might shed light on neural mechanisms underlying the inventive process.

  13. Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in the Activation of Cellular Signals, Molecules, and Function.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Hawkins, Clare L; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Davies, Michael J; St Clair, Daret K; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2017-02-08

    Mitochondria are a major source of intracellular energy and reactive oxygen species in cells, but are also increasingly being recognized as a controller of cell death. Here, we review evidence of signal transduction control by mitochondrial superoxide generation via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and GATA signaling pathways. We have also reviewed the effects of ROS on the activation of MMP and HIF. There is significant evidence to support the hypothesis that mitochondrial superoxide can initiate signaling pathways following transport into the cytosol. In this study, we provide evidence of TATA signal transductions by mitochondrial superoxide. Oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transfer chain, glycolysis, and generation of superoxide from mitochondria could be important factors in regulating signal transduction, cellular homeostasis, and cell death.

  14. Studies on antistreptolysin O activity generated in serum by microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K. C.; Kerr, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    An antistreptolysin factor (ASF) was generated in normal human serum by the growth of Staph, aureus and Pseud, aeruginosa. Alpha toxin producing strains of the former were usually positive but activity was not restricted to such strains. Positive strains produce cholesterol esterase which was obtained from DEAE-cellulose column fractions of 18 h broth cultures. Antistreptolysin factor develops slowly in serum, being maximal between the 5th and 10th days and is associated with alterations and disappearance of beta lipoproteins on gel electrophoresis. Activity also appeared in beta lipoproteins precipitated from normal serum with dextran sulphate and redissolved in nutrient broth before inoculation with Staph, aureus. The slow appearance of antistreptolysin activity in serum appears to be due to an esterase inhibitor which is present in high concentrations in some sera. Activity is also modified by the production of a staphylococcal fraction capable of binding to the antistreptolysin factor and reducing its activity. It is suggested that antistreptolysin factor which can be demonstrated in small amounts in normal human serum represents a readily available non-specific defence mechanism capable of binding to certain bacterial products and possible to other foreign protein molecules. Images Fig. 2 PMID:178333

  15. ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of metals in roadway particulate matter deposited in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Shafer, Martin M; Heo, Jongbae; Pardo, Michal; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Assaf; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated the possible causal role for soluble metal species extracted from roadway traffic emissions in promoting particulate matter (PM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activation. To this end, these responses have been evaluated in alveolar macrophage and epithelial lung cells that have been exposed to 'Unfiltered', 'Filtered' and 'Filtered+Chelexed' water extracts of PM samples collected from the roadway urban environments of Thessaloniki, Milan and London. Except for Thessaloniki, our results demonstrate that filtration resulted in a minor decrease in ROS activity of the fine PM fraction, suggesting that ROS activity is attributed mainly to water-soluble PM species. In contrast to ROS, ARE activity was mediated predominantly by the water-soluble component of PM present in both the fine and coarse extracts. Further removal of metals by Chelex treatment from filtered water extracts showed that soluble metal species are the major factors mediating ROS and ARE activities of the soluble fraction, especially in the London PM extracts. Finally, utilizing step-wise multiple-regression analysis, we show that 87% and 78% of the total variance observed in ROS and ARE assays, respectively, is accounted for by changes in soluble metal concentration. Using a statistical analysis we find that As, Zn and Fe best predict the ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of the near roadway particulate matter in the pulmonary cells studied. Collectively, our findings imply that soluble metals present in roadside PM are potential drivers of both pro- and anti-oxidative effects of PM in respiratory tract.

  16. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  17. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  18. Peroxisomes as cell generators of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Palma, José M; del Río, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous free radical with a wide range of direct and indirect actions in plant cells. However, the enzymatic sources of NO and its subcellular localization in plants are still under debate. Among the different subcellular compartments where NO has been found to be produced, peroxisomes are the best characterized since in these organelles it has been demonstrated the presence of NO and it has been biochemically characterized a L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity. This chapter summarizes the present knowledge of the NO metabolism and its derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in plant peroxisomes and how this gaseous free radical is involved in natural senescence, and is released to the cytosol under salinity stress conditions acting as a signal molecule.

  19. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar Hefny, Mohamed; Pattyn, Cedric; Lukes, Petr; Benedikt, Jan

    2016-10-01

    A remote microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (µAPPJ) with He, He/H2O, He/O2, and He/O2/H2O gas mixtures was used to study the transport of reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid and the following aqueous phase chemistry. The effects induced by the µAPPJ in water were quantitatively studied using phenol as a chemical probe and by measuring H2O2 concentration and pH values. These results were combined with the analysis of the absolute densities of the reactive species and the modeling of convective/diffusion transport and recombination reactions in the effluent of the plasma jet. Additionally, modified plasma jets were used to show that the role of emitted photons in aqueous chemistry is negligible for these plasma sources. The fastest phenol degradation was measured for the He/O2 plasma, followed by He/H2O, He/O2/H2O, and He plasmas. The modeled quantitative flux of O atoms into the liquid in the He/O2 plasma case was highly comparable with the phenol degradation rate and showed a very high transfer efficiency of reactive species from the plasma into the liquid, where more than half of the O atoms leaving the jet nozzle entered the liquid. The results indicate that the high oxidative effect of He/O2 plasma was primarily due to solvated O atoms, whereas OH radicals dominated the oxidative effects induced in water by plasmas with other gas mixtures. These findings help to understand, in a quantitative way, the complex interaction of cold atmospheric plasmas with aqueous solutions and will allow a better understanding of the interaction of these plasmas with water or buffered solutions containing biological macromolecules, microorganisms, or even eukaryotic cells. Additionally, the µAPPJ He/O2 plasma source seems to be an ideal tool for the generation of O atoms in aqueous solutions for any future studies of their reactivity.

  20. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  1. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Contributes to the Development of Carbon Black Cytotoxicity to Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Gwan; Noh, Won Jun; Kim, Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Carbon black, a particulate form of pure elemental carbon, is an industrial chemical with the high potential of occupational exposure. Although the relationship between exposure to particulate matters (PM) and cardiovascular diseases is well established, the cardiovascular risk of carbon black has not been characterized clearly. In this study, the cytotoxicity of carbon black to vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells were examined to investigate the potential vascular toxicity of carbon black. Carbon black with distinct particle size, N330 (primary size, 28~36 nm) and N990 (250~350 nm) were treated to A-10, rat aortic smooth muscle cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cell line, ECV304, and cell viability was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay. Treatment of carbon black N990 resulted in the significant reduction of viability in A-10 cells at 100 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, while N330 failed to cause cell death. Cytotoxicity to ECV304 cells was induced only by N330 at higher concentration, 200 μg/ml, suggesting that ECV304 cells were relatively resistant to carbon black. Treatment of 100 μg/ml N990 led to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) in A-10 cells. Pretreatment of antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sulforaphane restored decreased viability of N990-treated A-10 cells, and N-acetylcysteine, but not sulforaphane, attenuated N990-induced ROS generation in A-10 cells. Taken together, present study shows that carbon black is cytotoxic to vascular cells, and the generation of reactive oxygen contributes to the development of cytotoxicity. ROS scavenging antioxidant could be a potential strategy to attenuate the toxicity induced by carbon black exposure. PMID:24278567

  2. Evidence for the generation of reactive oxygen species from hydroquinone and benzoquinone: Roles in arsenite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenxiu; Wang, Yujun; Fang, Guodong; Wu, Tongliang; Liu, Cun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-05-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) significantly affects the fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In the present study, we investigated the oxidation of As(III) in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ), which were selected as model quinone moieties for NOM. It was found that As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in the presence of HQ or BQ at neutral conditions, and the oxidation efficiency of As(III) increased from 33% to 92% in HQ solutions and from 0 to 80% in BQ solutions with pH increasing from 6.5 to 8.5. The oxidation mechanism was further explored with electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The results showed that semiquinone radicals (SQ(-)) were generated from the comproportionation reaction between BQ and HQ, which mediated the formation of superoxide anion (O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH). Both the SQ(-), H2O2 and OH contributed to the oxidation of As(III). The increase of pH favored the formation of SQ(-), and thus promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as As(III) oxidation. Increasing concentrations of HQ and BQ from 0.1 to 1.0 mM enhanced As(III) oxidation from 65% to 94% and from 10% to 53%, respectively. The findings of this study facilitate our understanding of the fate and transformation of As(III) in organic-rich aquatic environments and highlight quinone moieties as the potential oxidants for As(III) in the remediation of arsenic contaminated sites.

  3. An exploratory propensity score matched comparison of second-generation and first-generation baroreflex activation therapy systems.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Rolf; Halbach, Marcel; Bakris, George L; Bisognano, John D; Haller, Hermann; Beige, Joachim; Kroon, Abraham A; Nadim, Mitra K; Lovett, Eric G; Schafer, Jill E; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2016-12-16

    Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) is a device-based therapy for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. In a randomized, controlled trial, the first-generation system significantly reduced blood pressure (BP) versus sham. Although an open-label validation study of the second-generation system demonstrated similar BP reductions, controlled data are not presently available. Therefore, this investigation compares results of first- and second-generation BAT systems. Two cohorts of first-generation BAT system patients were generated with propensity matching to compare against the validation group of 30 second-generation subjects. The first cohort was drawn from the first-generation randomized trial sham group and the second cohort from the active therapy group. Safety and efficacy were compared for the second-generation group relative to the first generation. At 6 months, second-generation BAT outperformed first-generation sham systolic BP reduction by 20 ± 28 mm Hg (mean ± standard deviation, P = .008), while BP reduction in first- and second-generation active groups was similar. At 12 months, efficacy was comparable between all three groups after the sham group had received 6 months of therapy; 47% of second-generation patients achieved goal systolic BP of 140 mm Hg or less after 12 months, comparable to 50% of patients at goal in the first-generation group (P > .999). Implant procedure time, system/procedural safety, and pulse generator longevity improved with the second-generation system. Propensity-matched cohort analysis of the first- and second-generation BAT systems suggests similar therapeutic benefit and superior BP reduction of the second-generation system relative to sham control. Implantation procedure duration and perioperative safety were improved with the second-generation device. These findings should be validated in a prospective randomized trial.

  4. "Invented Invaders": An Engaging Activity to Teach Characteristics Control of Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species, defined as exotic species that reach pest status, are major threats to global biodiversity. Although invasive species can belong to any taxonomic group, general characteristics such as rapid growth and reproduction are shared by many invasive species. "Invented Invaders" is a collaborative activity in which students…

  5. Antifungal activities of azole agents against the Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karla Carvalho; de Araujo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Passos, Xisto Sena; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we identified 95 Malassezia isolates by morphological and biochemical criteria and assessed the in vitro activity of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole by broth microdilution against these species using slightly modified Leeming-Notman medium. The Malassezia isolates were identified as M. furfur (74), M. sympodialis (11), M. obtusa (8) and M. globosa (2). The modified Leeming-Notman medium used for susceptibility testing allowed good growth of Malassezia spp. Visual reading of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was readily achieved until Day 5 of incubation at 32 degrees C. Although high MIC values of 16 microg/mL for fluconazole were observed in 9.5% of Malassezia isolates, in general these microorganisms were susceptible to all drugs studied. Interestingly, one M. globosa isolate showed high MIC values for voriconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole. For the 95 strains, the MIC ranges were <0.03-4 microg/mL for ketoconazole, <0.03 to >16 microg/mL for voriconazole, <0.125 to >64 microg/mL for fluconazole and <0.03-16 microg/mL for itraconazole. In summary, the good reproducibility and visual readings obtained using modified Leeming-Notman medium suggest that this medium should be proposed for antifungal testing of drugs against Malassezia spp.

  6. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  7. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  8. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  9. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  10. The combined effect of anthracene and cadmium on photosynthetic activity of three Desmodesmus (Chlorophyta) species.

    PubMed

    Pokora, Wojciech; Tukaj, Zbigniew

    2010-09-01

    Individual toxicity of heavy metals (HM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to plants living in water bodies is well-documented. In view of frequent joint occurrence of these compounds in the environment, plants are subjected to damage from their combined action. Cadmium and anthracene can generate production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have recently detected elevated activity of Fe- and Mn-SOD isoforms, indicating chloroplast and mitochondrion as the main sites of combined toxicity of HM and PAH. In the present paper, short-term (1-24 h) experiments on the mechanism of combined toxicity of anthracene and cadmium to the photosynthesis of three Desmodesmus species are reported. Inhibition, stimulation or no effect on the oxygen evolution was observed following the treatment with the contaminants when applied either separately or jointly. The response pattern was both strongly species- and time-dependent. In contrast, the photosynthetic activity of cells, expressed by chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, was substantially unaffected, since no effect or, in several cases, a slight stimulation of PS II quantum efficiency (Phi PS II) were noted. A characteristic relationship between the SOD activity and the qN values was observed. The treatment of Desmodesmus cells with anthracene or cadmium had either no effect or slightly enhanced either the SOD activity or the qN value, whereas the mixture of the contaminants resulted in a multifold increase in both the SOD activity and the qN values. The results suggest that chloroplasts of algae are well protected against the combined action of the two contaminants the toxicity of which should be attributed to nucleocytoplasmic compartments and reproductive processes of the cell cycle.

  11. Heavy metals generate reactive oxygen species in terrestrial and aquatic ciliated protozoa.

    PubMed

    Rico, Daniel; Martín-González, Ana; Díaz, Silvia; de Lucas, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Juan-Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction by exposure to heavy metals (Cd, Cu or Zn) in diverse free-living ciliated protozoa (Tetrahymena sp. and three strains of Colpoda steinii, isolated from freshwater and soils with different level of metal pollution) has been evaluated. Using specific fluorophores, such as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, hydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine 123, and a fluorescence microscope with the program MetaMorph Imaging System 4.0, we have analyzed both the average fluorescence emission and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorescence in control and treated cells. This is the first time that these fluorophores are used to detect ROS production in ciliated protozoa. All metals generate ROS, mainly superoxide and peroxides, showing a remarkable inter- and intra-specific variations. Likewise, resistance against each metal was also very diverse. Cu and specially Cd, the most toxic heavy metal for these ciliates, are the best oxidative stress inducers. However, a correlation between fluorescence emission intensity and cellular metal sensitivity for each strain cannot be established. Results are discussed and compared with similar findings previously published in other unicellular and pluricellular organisms.

  12. Applications and challenges of next-generation sequencing in Brassica species.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lijuan; Xiao, Meili; Hayward, Alice; Fu, Donghui

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) produces numerous (often millions) short DNA sequence reads, typically varying between 25 and 400 bp in length, at a relatively low cost and in a short time. This revolutionary technology is being increasingly applied in whole-genome, transcriptome, epigenome and small RNA sequencing, molecular marker and gene discovery, comparative and evolutionary genomics, and association studies. The Brassica genus comprises some of the most agro-economically important crops, providing abundant vegetables, condiments, fodder, oil and medicinal products. Many Brassica species have undergone the process of polyploidization, which makes their genomes exceptionally complex and can create difficulties in genomics research. NGS injects new vigor into Brassica research, yet also faces specific challenges in the analysis of complex crop genomes and traits. In this article, we review the advantages and limitations of different NGS technologies and their applications and challenges, using Brassica as an advanced model system for agronomically important, polyploid crops. Specifically, we focus on the use of NGS for genome resequencing, transcriptome sequencing, development of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers, and identification of novel microRNAs and their targets. We present trends and advances in NGS technology in relation to Brassica crop improvement, with wide application for sophisticated genomics research into agronomically important polyploid crops.

  13. A Universal Method for Species Identification of Mammals Utilizing Next Generation Sequencing for the Analysis of DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Andreas O.; Dell'Amico, Barbara; Welander, Jenny; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Species identification can be interesting in a wide range of areas, for example, in forensic applications, food monitoring and in archeology. The vast majority of existing DNA typing methods developed for species determination, mainly focuses on a single species source. There are, however, many instances where all species from mixed sources need to be determined, even when the species in minority constitutes less than 1 % of the sample. The introduction of next generation sequencing opens new possibilities for such challenging samples. In this study we present a universal deep sequencing method using 454 GS Junior sequencing of a target on the mitochondrial gene 16S rRNA. The method was designed through phylogenetic analyses of DNA reference sequences from more than 300 mammal species. Experiments were performed on artificial species-species mixture samples in order to verify the method’s robustness and its ability to detect all species within a mixture. The method was also tested on samples from authentic forensic casework. The results showed to be promising, discriminating over 99.9 % of mammal species and the ability to detect multiple donors within a mixture and also to detect minor components as low as 1 % of a mixed sample. PMID:24358309

  14. Contact system activation and high thrombin generation in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Gu, Ja-Yoon; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Han, Se Eun; Kim, Young Il; Nam-Goong, Il Seong; Kim, Eun Sook; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2017-01-30

    Background Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Since contact system activation through formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) has emerged as an important trigger of thrombosis, we hypothesized that the contact system is activated along with active NET formation in hyperthyroidism and that their markers correlate with disease severity. Materials and Methods In 61 patients with hyperthyroidism and 40 normal controls, the levels of coagulation factors (fibrinogen, and factor VII, VIII, IX, XI, and XII), D-dimer, thrombin generation assay (TGA) markers, NET formation markers (histone-DNA complex, double-stranded DNA, neutrophil elastase), and contact system markers (activated factor XII [XIIa], high-molecular-weight kininogen [HMWK], prekallikrein, and bradykinin) were measured. Results Patients with hyperthyroidism showed higher levels of fibrinogen [median (interquartile range), 315 (280-344) versus 262 (223-300), P=0.001], D-dimer [103.8 (64.8-151.5) versus 50.7 (37.4-76.0), P<0.001], peak thrombin [131.9 (102.2-159.4) versus 31.6 (14.8-83.7), P<0.001] and endogenous thrombin potential [649 (538-736) versus 367 (197-1147), P=0.021] in TGA with 1 pM tissue factor, neutrophil elastase [1.10 (0.39-2.18) versus 0.23 (0.20-0.35), P<0.001], factor XIIa [66.9 (52.8-87.0) versus 73.0 (57.1-86.6), P<0.001], HMWK [6.11 (4.95-7.98) versus 3.83 (2.60-5.68), P<0.001], prekallikrein [2.15 (1.00-6.36) versus 1.41 (0.63-2.22), P=0.026], and bradykinin [152.4 (137.6-180.4) versus 118.3 (97.1-137.9), P<0.001] than did normal controls. In age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis, fibrinogen, factor VIII, IX, and XIIa, D-dimer, peak thrombin, neutrophil elastase, HMWK, and bradykinin showed significant odds ratios representing hyperthyroidism's contribution to coagulation and contact system activation. Free T4 was significantly correlated with factors VIII and IX, D-dimer, double-stranded DNA, and bradykinin. Conclusion This study

  15. Asbestos-derived reactive oxygen species activate TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Derek A; Sime, Patricia J; Brody, Arnold R

    2004-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent peptide that inhibits epithelial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and stimulates the synthesis of extracellular matrix components. This cytokine is produced in a biologically latent complex bound to a latent-associated peptide (LAP), and it is the disassociation of this complex that regulates TGF-beta activity. A number of mechanisms have been shown to activate TGF-beta1. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by the iron in chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos, mediate the biological activity of TGF-beta1. Recombinant human latent TGF-beta1 was activated in a cell free system in the presence of asbestos and ascorbic acid. Latent TGF-beta1 was overexpressed in both A549 and mink lung epithelial cell lines through an adenovirus vector containing the full-length construct for porcine TGF-beta1. This latent TGF-beta1 was activated in a concentration-dependant fashion by introducing asbestos into the cell cultures. This activation was reduced significantly through the use of superoxide dismutase, catalase or deferoxamine. Amino-acid constituents of the LAP were oxidized as demonstrated by the appearance of carbonyls detected by Western analysis. The oxidized LAP could no longer form a complex with TGF-beta1. Our data support the postulate that ROS derived from asbestos provide a mechanism for activating TGF-beta1 in the alveolar environment by oxidizing amino acids in LAP.

  16. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Junghwa; Jung, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  17. Connection between solar activity cycles and grand minima generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Lepreti, F.; Laurenza, M.; Alberti, T.; Carbone, V.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The revised dataset of sunspot and group numbers (released by WDC-SILSO) and the sunspot number reconstruction based on dendrochronologically dated radiocarbon concentrations have been analyzed to provide a deeper characterization of the solar activity main periodicities and to investigate the role of the Gleissberg and Suess cycles in the grand minima occurrence. Methods: Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) has been used to isolate the time behavior of the different solar activity periodicities. A general consistency among the results from all the analyzed datasets verifies the reliability of the EMD approach. Results: The analysis on the revised sunspot data indicates that the highest energy content is associated with the Schwabe cycle. In correspondence with the grand minima (Maunder and Dalton), the frequency of this cycle changes to longer timescales of 14 yr. The Gleissberg and Suess cycles, with timescales of 60-120 yr and 200-300 yr, respectively, represent the most energetic contribution to sunspot number reconstruction records and are both found to be characterized by multiple scales of oscillation. The grand minima generation and the origin of the two expected distinct types of grand minima, Maunder and longer Spörer-like, are naturally explained through the EMD approach. We found that the grand minima sequence is produced by the coupling between Gleissberg and Suess cycles, the latter being responsible for the most intense and longest Spörer-like minima (with typical duration longer than 80 yr). Finally, we identified a non-solar component, characterized by a very long scale oscillation of 7000 yr, and the Hallstatt cycle ( 2000 yr), likely due to the solar activity. Conclusions: These results provide new observational constraints on the properties of the solar cycle periodicities, the grand minima generation, and thus the long-term behavior of the solar dynamo.

  18. TNFα-induced apoptosis enabled by CCN1/CYR61: pathways of reactive oxygen species generation and cytochrome c release.

    PubMed

    Juric, Vladislava; Chen, Chih-Chiun; Lau, Lester F

    2012-01-01

    Although TNFα is a strong inducer of apoptosis, its cytotoxicity in most normal cells in vitro requires blockade of NFκB signaling or inhibition of de novo protein synthesis, typically by the addition of cycloheximide. However, several members of CCN (CYR61/CTGF/NOV) family of extracellular matrix proteins enable TNFα-dependent apoptosis in vitro without inhibiting NFκB or de novo protein synthesis, and CCN1 (CYR61) is essential for optimal TNFα cytotoxicity in vivo. Previous studies showed that CCN1 unmasks the cytotoxicity of TNFα by binding integrins α(v)β(5), α(6)β(1), and the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan 4 to induce the accumulation of a high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to a biphasic activation of JNK necessary for apoptosis. Here we show for the first time that CCN1 interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in a protein complex, and that binding to LRP1 is critical for CCN1-induced ROS generation and apoptotic synergism with TNFα. We also found that neutral sphingomyelinase 1 (nSMase1), which contributes to CCN1-induced ROS generation, is required for CCN1/TNFα-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, CCN1 promotes the activation of p53 and p38 MAPK, which mediate enhanced cytochrome c release to amplify the cytotoxicity of TNFα. By contrast, LRP1, nSMase1, p53, and p38 MAPK are not required when TNFα-dependent apoptosis is facilitated by the presence of cycloheximide, indicating that they function in the CCN1 signaling pathway that converges with TNFα-induced signaling events. Since CCN1/CYR61 is a physiological regulator of TNFα cytotoxicity at least in some contexts, these findings may reveal important mediators of TNFα-induced apoptosis in vivo and identify potential therapeutic targets for thwarting TNFα-dependent tissue damage.

  19. Insulin reverses D-glucose-increased nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    González, Marcelo; Rojas, Susana; Avila, Pía; Cabrera, Lissette; Villalobos, Roberto; Palma, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio; Peña, Eduardo; Gallardo, Victoria; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Sáez, Tamara; Salsoso, Rocío; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tone is controlled by the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway, and NO bioavailability is strongly affected by hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. Insulin leads to high expression and activity of human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1), NO synthesis and vasodilation; thus, a protective role of insulin on high D-glucose-alterations in endothelial function is likely. Vascular reactivity to U46619 (thromboxane A2 mimetic) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was measured in KCl preconstricted human umbilical vein rings (wire myography) incubated in normal (5 mmol/L) or high (25 mmol/L) D-glucose. hCAT-1, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), 42 and 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44mapk), protein kinase B/Akt (Akt) expression and activity were determined by western blotting and qRT-PCR, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) level was determined by HPLC, and L-arginine transport (0-1000 μmol/L) was measured in response to 5-25 mmol/L D-glucose (0-36 hours) in passage 2 human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Assays were in the absence or presence of insulin and/or apocynin (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase [NADPH oxidase] inhibitor), tempol or Mn(III)TMPyP (SOD mimetics). High D-glucose increased hCAT-1 expression and activity, which was biphasic (peaks: 6 and 24 hours of incubation). High D-glucose-increased maximal transport velocity was blocked by insulin and correlated with lower hCAT-1 expression and SLC7A1 gene promoter activity. High D-glucose-increased transport parallels higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anion (O2•-) generation, and increased U46619-contraction and reduced CGRP-dilation of vein rings. Insulin and apocynin attenuate ROS and O2•- generation, and restored vascular reactivity to U46619 and CGRP. Insulin, but not apocynin or tempol reversed high D-glucose-increased NO synthesis; however, tempol and Mn(III)TMPyP reversed the high D-glucose-reduced BH4 level. Insulin and

  20. Assessment of total phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities of Passiflora species.

    PubMed

    Ramaiya, Shiamala Devi; Bujang, Japar Sidik; Zakaria, Muta Harah

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaves and stems of Passiflora quadrangularis, P. maliformis, and P. edulis extracted using three solvents: petroleum ether, acetone, and methanol. The maximum extraction yields of antioxidant components from the leaves and stems were isolated using methanol extracts of P. edulis (24.28%) and P. quadrangularis (9.76%), respectively. Among the leaf extracts, the methanol extract of P. maliformis had the significantly highest TPC and the strongest antioxidant activity, whereas among the stem extracts, the methanol extract of P. quadrangularis showed the highest phenolic amount and possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. The antibacterial properties of the Passiflora species were tested using the disc diffusion method against 10 human pathogenic bacteria. The largest inhibition zone was observed for the methanol extract of P. maliformis against B. subtilis. Generally, extracts from the Passiflora species exhibit distinct inhibition against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Based on the generated biplot, three clusters of bacteria were designated according to their performance towards the tested extracts. The present study revealed that methanol extracts of the Passiflora contain constituents with significant phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical uses.

  1. Assessment of Total Phenolic, Antioxidant, and Antibacterial Activities of Passiflora Species

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiya, Shiamala Devi; Bujang, Japar Sidik; Zakaria, Muta Harah

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaves and stems of Passiflora quadrangularis, P. maliformis, and P. edulis extracted using three solvents: petroleum ether, acetone, and methanol. The maximum extraction yields of antioxidant components from the leaves and stems were isolated using methanol extracts of P. edulis (24.28%) and P. quadrangularis (9.76%), respectively. Among the leaf extracts, the methanol extract of P. maliformis had the significantly highest TPC and the strongest antioxidant activity, whereas among the stem extracts, the methanol extract of P. quadrangularis showed the highest phenolic amount and possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. The antibacterial properties of the Passiflora species were tested using the disc diffusion method against 10 human pathogenic bacteria. The largest inhibition zone was observed for the methanol extract of P. maliformis against B. subtilis. Generally, extracts from the Passiflora species exhibit distinct inhibition against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Based on the generated biplot, three clusters of bacteria were designated according to their performance towards the tested extracts. The present study revealed that methanol extracts of the Passiflora contain constituents with significant phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical uses. PMID:25028673

  2. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  3. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  4. Enumerating Minimal Active Metabolic Pathways by Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Takehide; Inoue, Katsumi

    In systems biology, identifying vital functions like glycolysis from a given metabolic pathway is important to understand living organisms. In this paper, we particularly focus on the problem of enumerating minimal active pathways producing target metabolites from source metabolites. We represent the problem in propositional formulas and solve it through minimal model generation. An advantage of our method is that each solution satisfies qualitative laws of biochemical reactions. Moreover, we can calculate such solutions for a cellular scale metabolic pathway within a few seconds. In experiments, we have applied our method to a whole Escherichia coli metabolic pathway. As a result, we found a minimal set of reactions corresponding to the conventional glycolysis pathway described in a biological database EcoCyc.

  5. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  6. Microfluidic platform generates oxygen landscapes for localized hypoxic activation.

    PubMed

    Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T

    2014-12-21

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes.

  7. Anti-prion activity generated by a novel vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Pilon, John; Loiacono, Christina; Okeson, Danelle; Lund, Sharon; Vercauteren, Kurt; Rhyan, Jack; Miller, Lowell

    2007-12-18

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of domestic and wild cervids in North America. To address possible prevention regimens for CWD, we have used a mouse model system and the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) mouse-adapted scrapie prion strain to screen efficacy of potential vaccine candidates. Three peptides derived from the primary amino acid sequence of the prion protein were conjugated to blue carrier protein (BCP) and formulated in an adjuvant containing M. avium subsp. avium. CL57/BL6 mice were vaccinated and boosted with 50 microg of the carrier protein-peptide conjugate formulation; all vaccines produced a humoral immune response as measured by ELISA. Disease challenge with the RML scrapie prion strain revealed anti-prion activity was generated by the vaccine formulations as measured by a delay in clinical disease onset and prolonged survivorship.

  8. Systems Biology of Coagulation Initiation: Kinetics of Thrombin Generation in Resting and Activated Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Manash S.; Denney, William S.; Jing, Huiyan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Blood function defines bleeding and clotting risks and dictates approaches for clinical intervention. Independent of adding exogenous tissue factor (TF), human blood treated in vitro with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, to block Factor XIIa) will generate thrombin after an initiation time (Ti) of 1 to 2 hours (depending on donor), while activation of platelets with the GPVI-activator convulxin reduces Ti to ∼20 minutes. Since current kinetic models fail to generate thrombin in the absence of added TF, we implemented a Platelet-Plasma ODE model accounting for: the Hockin-Mann protease reaction network, thrombin-dependent display of platelet phosphatidylserine, VIIa function on activated platelets, XIIa and XIa generation and function, competitive thrombin substrates (fluorogenic detector and fibrinogen), and thrombin consumption during fibrin polymerization. The kinetic model consisting of 76 ordinary differential equations (76 species, 57 reactions, 105 kinetic parameters) predicted the clotting of resting and convulxin-activated human blood as well as predicted Ti of human blood under 50 different initial conditions that titrated increasing levels of TF, Xa, Va, XIa, IXa, and VIIa. Experiments with combined anti-XI and anti-XII antibodies prevented thrombin production, demonstrating that a leak of XIIa past saturating amounts of CTI (and not “blood-borne TF” alone) was responsible for in vitro initiation without added TF. Clotting was not blocked by antibodies used individually against TF, VII/VIIa, P-selectin, GPIb, protein disulfide isomerase, cathepsin G, nor blocked by the ribosome inhibitor puromycin, the Clk1 kinase inhibitor Tg003, or inhibited VIIa (VIIai). This is the first model to predict the observed behavior of CTI-treated human blood, either resting or stimulated with platelet activators. CTI-treated human blood will clot in vitro due to the combined activity of XIIa and XIa, a process enhanced by platelet activators and which proceeds in the

  9. Reaction pathways for bio-active species in a He/H2O atmospheric pressure capacitive discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Helium/trace gas atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (rf) capacitive discharges have increasing biomedical applications. We have performed a principal pathway analysis for a chemically complex, bounded He/H2O atmospheric pressure, planar capacitive discharge, with a discharge gap of 0.5 mm and a power of 0.85 W cm-2 at 13.56 MHz (ne ≈ 1.6 × 1017 m-3). The discharge is embedded in a larger volume in which the H2O fraction is controlled to be 0.001. The generation and loss pathways for eleven species of interest for discharge maintenance and biomedical applications have been determined. The production and consumption pathways of He*, H2O, {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ and electrons are found to be tightly coupled. The metastable He* generated by electron impact excitation of He is mostly consumed by Penning reactions with H2O, followed by subsequent three-body association reactions with H2O, to form the dominant positive ion, {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ . The main loss pathways for {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ are ion cluster fragmentations at the wall, which are important generation pathways for H2O. The generation and loss pathways for electrons are almost the same as for {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ . OH and H2O2 generation and loss are strongly coupled, and they are important intermediate species in the generation pathways for the purely O-containing bio-active species: O2(a), O, O3 and O*. The generation and loss pathways for the latter four species were found to be strongly coupled by volume and surface processes, with O2 as an important precursor. The generation of O2 from H2O involves H2O2 as a key long-lived intermediate.

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in mononuclear leukocytes of 13 mammalian species correlates with species-specific life span.

    PubMed Central

    Grube, K; Bürkle, A

    1992-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a eukaryotic posttranslational modification of proteins that is strongly induced by the presence of DNA strand breaks and plays a role in DNA repair and the recovery of cells from DNA damage. We compared poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP; EC 2.4.2.30) activities in Percoll gradient-purified, permeabilized mononuclear leukocytes from mammalian species of different maximal life span. Saturating concentrations of a double-stranded octameric oligonucleotide were applied to provide a direct and maximal stimulation of PARP. Our results on 132 individuals from 13 different species yield a strong positive correlation between PARP activity and life span (r = 0.84; P << 0.001), with human cells displaying approximately 5 times the activity of rat cells. Intraspecies comparisons with both rat and human cells from donors of all age groups revealed some decline of PARP activity with advancing age, but it was only weakly correlated. No significant polymer degradation was detectable under our assay conditions, ruling out any interference by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity. By Western blot analysis of mononuclear leukocytes from 11 species, using a crossreactive antiserum directed against the extremely well-conserved NAD-binding domain, no correlation between the amount of PARP protein and the species' life spans was found, suggesting a greater specific enzyme activity in longer-lived species. We propose that a higher poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in cells from long-lived species might contribute to the efficient maintenance of genome integrity and stability over their longer life span. Images PMID:1465394

  11. Ni-, Pd-, or Pt-catalyzed ethylene dimerization: a mechanistic description of the catalytic cycle and the active species.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dipankar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2010-03-07

    Two key mechanistic possibilities for group 10 transition metal [M(eta(3)-allyl)(PMe(3))](+) catalyzed (where M = Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II)) ethylene dimerization are investigated using density functional theory methods. The nature of the potential active catalysts in these pathways is analyzed to gain improved insights into the mechanism of ethylene dimerization to butene. The catalytic cycle is identified as involving typical elementary steps in transition metal-catalyzed C-C bond formation reactions, such as oxidative insertion as well as beta-H elimination. The computed kinetic and thermodynamic features indicate that a commonly proposed metal hydride species (L(n)M-H) is less likely to act as the active species as compared to a metal-ethyl species (L(n)M-CH(2)CH(3)). Of the two key pathways considered, the active species is predicted to be a metal hydride in pathway-1, whereas a metal alkyl complex serves as the active catalyst in pathway-2. A metal-mediated hydride shift from a growing metal alkyl chain to the ethylene molecule, bound to the metal in an eta(2) fashion, is predicted to be the preferred route for the generation of the active species. Among the intermediates involved in the catalytic cycle, metal alkyls with a bound olefin are identified as thermodynamically stable for all three metal ions. In general, the Ni-catalyzed pathways are found to be energetically more favorable than those associated with Pd and Pt catalysts.

  12. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  13. Diabetes-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species: Mechanism of Their Generation and Role in Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fakhruddin, Selim; Alanazi, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes induces the onset and progression of renal injury through causing hemodynamic dysregulation along with abnormal morphological and functional nephron changes. The most important event that precedes renal injury is an increase in permeability of plasma proteins such as albumin through a damaged glomerular filtration barrier resulting in excessive urinary albumin excretion (UAE). Moreover, once enhanced UAE begins, it may advance renal injury from progression of abnormal renal hemodynamics, increased glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness, mesangial expansion, extracellular matrix accumulation, and glomerulosclerosis to eventual end-stage renal damage. Interestingly, all these pathological changes are predominantly driven by diabetes-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and abnormal downstream signaling molecules. In diabetic kidney, NADPH oxidase (enzymatic) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (nonenzymatic) are the prominent sources of ROS, which are believed to cause the onset of albuminuria followed by progression to renal damage through podocyte depletion. Chronic hyperglycemia and consequent ROS production can trigger abnormal signaling pathways involving diverse signaling mediators such as transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and vasoactive substances. Persistently, increased expression and activation of these signaling molecules contribute to the irreversible functional and structural changes in the kidney resulting in critically decreased glomerular filtration rate leading to eventual renal failure. PMID:28164134

  14. Identification and characterization of gushing-active hydrophobins from Fusarium graminearum and related species.

    PubMed

    Sarlin, Tuija; Kivioja, Teemu; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Linder, Markus B; Nakari-Setälä, Tiina

    2012-04-01

    Fungal infection of barley and malt, particularly by the Fusarium species, is a direct cause of spontaneous overfoaming of beer, referred to as gushing. We have shown previously that small fungal proteins, hydrophobins, act as gushing-inducing factors in beer. The aim of our present study was to isolate and characterize hydrophobins from a gushing-active fungus, Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae) and related species. We generated profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) for the hydrophobin classes Ia, Ib and II from the multiple sequence alignments of their known members available in public domain databases. We searched the published Fusarium graminearum genome with the Markov models. The best matching sequences and the corresponding genes were isolated from F. graminearum and the related species F. culmorum and F. poae by PCR and characterized. One each of the putative F. graminearum and F. poae hydrophobin genes were expressed in the heterologous host Trichoderma reesei. The proteins corresponding to the genes were purified and identified as hydrophobins and named GzHYD5 and FpHYD5, respectively. Concentrations of 0.003 ppm of these hydrophobins were observed to induce vigorous beer gushing.

  15. Curcumin induces ER stress-mediated apoptosis through selective generation of reactive oxygen species in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boyun; Kim, Hee Seung; Jung, Eun-Ji; Lee, Jung Yun; K Tsang, Benjamin; Lim, Jeong Mook; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged accumulation of misfolded or unfolded proteins caused by cellular stress, including oxidative stress, induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, which then activates an unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress is usually maintained at higher levels in cancer cells as compared to normal cells due to altered metabolism in cancer. Here, we investigated whether curcumin is ER stress-mediated apoptosis in cervical cancer cells, and ROS increased by curcumin are involved in the process as an upstream contributor. Curcumin inhibited proliferation of cervical cancer cells (C33A, CaSki, HeLa, and ME180) and induced apoptotic cell death. Curcumin activated ER-resident UPR sensors, such as PERK, IRE-1α, and ATF6, and their downstream-signaling proteins in cervical cancer cells, but not in normal epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). CHOP, a key factor involved in ER stress-mediated apoptosis, was also activated by curcumin. CHOP decreased the ratio of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 to pro-apoptotic protein Bax expression, and subsequently increased the apoptotic population of cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, curcumin elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cervical cancer cells, but not in normal epithelial cells. Scavenging ROS resulted in inhibition of ER stress and partially restored cell viability in curcumin-treated cancer cells. Collectively, these observations show that curcumin promotes ER stress-mediated apoptosis in cervical cancer cells through increase of cell type-specific ROS generation. Therefore, modulation of these differential responses to curcumin between normal and cervical cancer cells could be an effective therapeutic strategy without adverse effects on normal cells.

  16. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  17. Identification of conserved genomic regions and variation therein amongst Cetartiodactyla species using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has created an opportunity to genetically characterize an individual both inexpensively and comprehensively. In earlier work produced in our collaboration [1], it was demonstrated that, for animals without a reference genome, their Next Generation Sequence data ...

  18. Generation mechanism of hydroxyl radical species and its lifetime prediction during the plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Dae Hoon; Park, Ji Hoon; Hong, Young J.; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-01-01

    Through this work, we have elucidated the mechanism of hydroxyl radicals (OH•) generation and its life time measurements in biosolution. We observed that plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis were responsible for the continues generation of OH• species, that resulted in OH• to be major reactive species (RS) in the solution. The density and lifetime of OH• species acted inversely proportional to each other with increasing depth inside the solution. The cause of increased lifetime of OH• inside the solution is predicted using theoretical and semiempirical calculations. Further, to predict the mechanism of conversion of hydroxide ion (OH−) to OH• or H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) and electron, we determined the current inside the solution of different pH. Additionally, we have investigated the critical criterion for OH• interaction on cancer cell inducing apoptosis under effective OH• exposure time. These studies are innovative in the field of plasma chemistry and medicine. PMID:25790968

  19. Generation mechanism of hydroxyl radical species and its lifetime prediction during the plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Dae Hoon; Park, Ji Hoon; Hong, Young J.; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    Through this work, we have elucidated the mechanism of hydroxyl radicals (OH•) generation and its life time measurements in biosolution. We observed that plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis were responsible for the continues generation of OH• species, that resulted in OH• to be major reactive species (RS) in the solution. The density and lifetime of OH• species acted inversely proportional to each other with increasing depth inside the solution. The cause of increased lifetime of OH• inside the solution is predicted using theoretical and semiempirical calculations. Further, to predict the mechanism of conversion of hydroxide ion (OH-) to OH• or H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) and electron, we determined the current inside the solution of different pH. Additionally, we have investigated the critical criterion for OH• interaction on cancer cell inducing apoptosis under effective OH• exposure time. These studies are innovative in the field of plasma chemistry and medicine.

  20. The in vitro pharmacological activities and a chemical investigation of three South African Salvia species.

    PubMed

    Kamatou, G P P; Viljoen, A M; Gono-Bwalya, A B; van Zyl, R L; van Vuuren, S F; Lourens, A C U; Başer, K H C; Demirci, B; Lindsey, K L; van Staden, J; Steenkamp, P

    2005-12-01

    Salvia species (sage) are well known in folk medicine throughout the world. In South Africa sage is used against fever and digestive disorders. Three closely related South African species (Salvia stenophylla, Salvia repens and Salvia runcinata) were investigated for their anti-oxidant (DPPH assay); anti-inflammatory (5-lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase assays); antimalarial (tritiated hypoxanthine incorporation assay); antimicrobial (disc diffusion and micro-dilution assays) properties and toxicity profile (tetrazolium-based assay). The solvent extracts exhibited anti-oxidant, antimalarial and antibacterial and poor anti-inflammatory properties. The essential oils exhibited anti-inflammatory and antimalarial properties, but displayed poor anti-oxidant and antimicrobial activity. The extract of Salviastenophylla and the essential oil of Salvia runcinata displayed the highest toxicity profile. Overall, Salvia runcinata displayed the most favorable activity of all three taxa tested with an IC(50) value of 6.09 (anti-oxidant); 29.05 (antimalarial) and 22.82 microg/ml (anti-inflammatory). Analytical procedures (GC-MS and HPLC-UV) were employed to generate chromatographic profiles for the essential oils and solvent extracts respectively. The HPLC analysis revealed the presence of rosmarinic acid in all three taxa while carnosic acid was only present in Salvia repens and Salvia stenophylla. The GC-MS analysis showed that oils were qualitatively and quantitatively variable. beta-Caryophyllene was present in large amounts in all three taxa. Other components present include camphor, alpha-pinene and alpha-bisabolol. The results of the in vitro pharmacological activities provide a scientific basis to validate the use of these Salvia species in traditional medicine in South Africa.

  1. Mosquito larvicidal activity of active constituent derived from Chamaecyparis obtusa leaves against 3 mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young-Su; Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2005-12-01

    Mosqutio larvicidal activity of Chamaecyparis obtusa leaf-derived materials against the 4th-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti (L.), Ochlerotatus togoi (Theobald), and Culex pipiens pallens (Coquillett) was examined in the laboratory. A crude methanol extract of C. obtusa leaves was found to be active (percent mortality rough) against the 3 species larvae; the hexane fraction of the methanol extract showed a strong larvicidal activity (100% mortality) at 100 ppm. The bioactive component in the C. obtusa leaf extract was characterized as beta-thujaplicin by spectroscopic analyses. The LC50 value of beta-thujaplicin was 2.91, 2.60, and 1.33 ppm against Ae. aegypti, Oc. togoi, and Cx. pipiens pallens larvae. This naturally occurring C. obtusa leaves-derived compound merits further study as a potential mosquito larval control agent or lead compound.

  2. A Rich Morphological Diversity of Biosaline Drying Patterns Is Generated by Different Bacterial Species, Different Salts and Concentrations: Astrobiological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Gómez, José María; Medina, Jesús; Rull, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Biosaline formations (BSFs) are complex self-organized biomineral patterns formed by "hibernating" bacteria as the biofilm that contains them dries out. They were initially described in drying biofilms of Escherichia coli cells + NaCl. Due to their intricate 3-D morphology and anhydrobiosis, these biomineralogical structures are of great interest in astrobiology. Here we report experimental data obtained with various alkali halide salts (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, LiCl, KCl, CsCl) on BSF formation with E. coli and Bacillus subtilis bacteria at two saline concentrations: 9 and 18 mg/mL. Our results indicate that, except for LiCl, which is inactive, all the salts assayed are active during BSF formation and capable of promoting the generation of distinctive drying patterns at each salt concentration. Remarkably, the BSFs produced by these two bacterial species produce characteristic architectural hallmarks as the BSF dries. The potential biogenicity of these biosaline drying patterns is studied, and the astrobiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Salinomycin simultaneously induces apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species in osteosarcoma U2OS cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hun; Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Yu, Sun-Nyoung; Seo, Young-Kyo; Chun, Sung-Sik; Noh, Kyung-Tae; Suh, Jeung-Tak; Ahn, Soon-Cheol

    2016-04-29

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, acts as a highly selective potassium ionophore. It was reported to anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines. In this study, salinomycin was examined on apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Apoptosis, autophagy, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ROS were analyzed using flow cytometry. Also, expressions of apoptosis- and autophagy-related proteins were determined by western blotting. As a result, salinomycin triggered apoptosis of U2OS cells, which was accompanied by change of MMP and cleavage of caspases-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. And salinomycin increased the expression of autophagy-related protein and accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO). Salinomycin-induced ROS production promotes both apoptosis and autophagy, as evidenced by the result that treatment of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, attenuated both apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3 MA) enhanced the salinoymcin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggested that salinomycin-induced autophagy, as a survival mechanism, might be a potential strategy through ROS regulation in cancer therapy.

  4. Heat shock protein 75 (TRAP1) antagonizes reactive oxygen species generation and protects cells from granzyme M-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Zhang, Qixiang; Fan, Zusen

    2007-07-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate immunity against virally infected or transformed cells as the first defense line. Granzyme M (GzmM) is an orphan granzyme that is constitutively highly expressed in NK cells and is consistent with NK cell-mediated cytolysis. We recently demonstrated that GzmM induces caspase-dependent apoptosis with DNA fragmentation through direct cleavage of inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD). However, the molecular mechanisms for GzmM-induced apoptosis are unclear. We found GzmM causes mitochondrial swelling and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, GzmM initiates reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytochrome c release. Heat shock protein 75 (HSP75, also known as TRAP1) acts as an antagonist of ROS and protects cells from GzmM-mediated apoptosis. GzmM cleaves TRAP1 and abolishes its antagonistic function to ROS, resulting in ROS accumulation. Silencing TRAP1 through RNA interference increases ROS accumulation, whereas TRAP1 overexpression attenuates ROS production. ROS accumulation is in accordance with the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and enhances GzmM-mediated apoptosis.

  5. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  6. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and HPLC Fingerprinting Profiles of Three Pyrola Species from Different Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; He, Fengyuan; Lv, Zhenjiang; Li, Dengwu

    2014-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the variation of phytochemical composition, antioxidant activity and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fingerprinting profiles of three Pyrola species. Thirteen samples (eight P. decorata, three P. calliantha and two P. renifolia) were collected from different regions in China. The tannin, hyperoside and quercetin contents of all samples were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and varied within the range 9.77–34.75, 0.34–2.16 and 0.062–0.147 mg/g dry weigh, respectively. Total flavonoid content was evaluated and varied within the range 16.22–37.82 mg/g dry weight. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH assay, with IC50 ranging from 7.96 to 50.33 µg/ml, ABTS•+ and FRAP assay, within the range 612.66–1021.05 and 219.64–398.12 µmol equiv. Trolox/g, respectively. These results revealed that there were significant variations in phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity among all samples. Due to the higher phytochemical content and significant antioxidant activity, P. calliantha was selected as the most valuable species, and the P. calliantha sample from Left banner of Alxa even possessed the strongest antioxidant activity among all the thirteen samples. Futhermore, Emei Mountain was proved to be the most suitable region for producing P. decorata. Moreover, in order to further evaluate the diversities and quality of Pyrola, HPLC fingerprint analysis coupled with hierarchical cluster and discrimination analyses were introduced to establish a simple, rapid and effective method for accurate identification, classification and quality assessment of Pyrola. Thirteen samples were divided into three groups consistent with their morphological classification. Two types of discriminant functions were generated and the ratio of discrimination was 100%. This method can identify different species of Pyrola and the same species from different regions of origin. Also, it can be used to compare and

  7. Changes in GDPase/UDPase enzymatic activity in response to oxidative stress in four Candida species.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Carmona, Jenny Daniela; Ramírez-Quijas, Mayra Denisse; Vega-González, Arturo; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2015-07-01

    The terminal processing of proteins and lipids occurs in the Golgi apparatus and involves the transport of sugar nucleotides into the Golgi lumen by specific carriers and the accumulation of nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) as a result of oligosaccharide-protein glycosyltransferase activity. NDPs are converted into the corresponding nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) by nucleoside diphosphatases (NDPases), thus relieving inhibition of sugar transferases. In addition, NMPs are then exchanged for equimolecular amounts of cytosolic sugar nucleotides by antiport transport systems. NDPases, commonly GDPase and UDPase, thus play a critical role in glycoprotein maturation and may influence fungal pathogenesis, morphogenesis, and cell wall properties. Interest of this laboratory has recently focused on the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on enzymes involved in detoxification of these oxidants and on the metabolism of biomolecules such as lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins in human pathogenic Candida species. We therefore consider it important to extend these studies to determine how GDPase and UDPase are affected after exposure of cells to oxidants such as menadione, a superoxide (O2 (•-))-generator, and H2O2. Results indicate that activity of both enzymes decrease in response to these agents suggesting that ROS may also affect other critical cell functions such as protein glycosylation.

  8. Genotypic variation in foundation species generates network structure that may drive community dynamics and evolution.

    PubMed

    Lau, Matthew K; Keith, Arthur R; Borrett, Stuart R; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2016-03-01

    Although genetics in a single species is known to impact whole communities, little is known about how genetic variation influences species interaction networks in complex ecosystems. Here, we examine the interactions in a community of arthropod species on replicated genotypes (clones) of a foundation tree species, Populus angustifolia James (narrowleaf cottonwood), in a long-term, common garden experiment using a bipartite "genotype-species" network perspective. We combine this empirical work with a simulation experiment designed to further investigate how variation among individual tree genotypes can impact network structure. Three findings emerged: (1) the empirical "genotype-species network" exhibited significant network structure with modularity being greater than the highly conservative null model; (2) as would be expected given a modular network structure, the empirical network displayed significant positive arthropod co-occurrence patterns; and (3) furthermore, the simulations of "genotype-species" networks displayed variation in network structure, with modularity in particular clearly increasing, as genotypic variation increased. These results support the conclusion that genetic variation in a single species contributes to the structure of ecological interaction networks, which could influence eco-ogical dynamics (e.g., assembly and stability) and evolution in a community context.

  9. A highly efficient method for extracting next-generation sequencing quality RNA from adipose tissue of recalcitrant animal species.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Davinder; Golla, Naresh; Singh, Dheer; Onteru, Suneel Kumar

    2017-04-13

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) based RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and transcriptome profiling offers an opportunity to unveil complex evolutionary processes. Successful RNA-Seq and transcriptome profiling requires a large amount of high-quality RNA. However, NGS-quality RNA isolation is extremely difficult from recalcitrant adipose tissue (AT) with high lipid content and low cell numbers. Further, the amount and biochemical composition of AT lipid varies depending upon the animal species which can pose different degree of resistance to RNA extraction. Currently available approaches may work effectively in one species but can be almost unproductive in another species. Herein, we report a two step protocol for the extraction of NGS quality RNA from AT across a broad range of animal species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. An Analysis of Generational Differences Among Active Duty Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    political , and racial lenses. Therefore, it may be difficult to point to an absolute generational group that is defined by a set of shared...group as those born between 1965 and 1978. Finally, the newest generation born after 1979, the Millennials , often given the label Generation Y or Echo...computer technology. Howe and Strauss (2000) define the Millennials as the generation born between 1982 and 2000. The Millennial Cohort, as defined by

  11. Speciation of mercury by hydrostatically modified electroosmotic flow capillary electrophoresis coupled with volatile species generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiu-Ping; Yin, Xue-Bo; Jiang, Dong-Qing; He, Xi-Wen

    2003-04-01

    A novel method for speciation analysis of mercury was developed by on-line hyphenating capillary electrophoresis (CE) with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The four mercury species of inorganic mercury Hg(II), methymercury MeHg(I), ethylmercury EtHg(I), and phenylmercury PhHg(I) were separated as mercury-cysteine complexes by CE in a 50-cm x 100-microm-i.d. fused-silica capillary at 15 kV and using a mixture of 100 mmol L(-1) of boric acid and 12% v/v methanol (pH 9.1) as electrolyte. A novel technique, hydrostatically modified electroosmotic flow (HSMEOF) in which the electroosmotic flow (EOF) was modified by applying hydrostatical pressure opposite to the direction of EOF was used to improve resolution. A volatile species generation technique was used to convert the mercury species into their respective volatile species. A newly developed CE-AFS interface was employed to provide an electrical connection for stable electrophoretic separations and to allow on-line volatile species formation. The generated volatile species were on-line detected with AFS. The precisions (RSD, n = 5) were in the range of 1.9-2.5% for migration time, 1.8-6.3% for peak area response, and 2.3-6.1% for peak height response for the four mercury species. The detection limits ranged from 6.8 to 16.5 microg L(-1) (as Hg). The recoveries of the four mercury species in the water samples were in the range of 86.6-111%. The developed technique was successfully applied to speciation analysis of mercury in a certified reference material (DORM-2, dogfish muscle).

  12. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  13. Helium Generated Cold Plasma Finely Regulates Activation of Human Fibroblast-Like Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be

  14. Variable phase sine wave generator for active phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, W. M.

    1992-09-01

    A waveform generator is provided for generating a high frequency waveform. A pulse generator provides a pulse train at a low frequency. A pulse converter converts the pulse train into an alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses. A bandpass filter passes the alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses in a frequency band centered at the high frequency to output the generated waveform at the high frequency. When the groups of pulses are a pair of pulses, a sine wave is output from the bandpass filter. A pulse delay circuit can be used to variably delay the pulse train and thereby cause a phase change in the generated waveform.

  15. Antitrypanosomal activity of some pregnane glycosides isolated from Caralluma species.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; Shehab, Naglaa G; Ichino, Chikara; Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Ishiyama, Aki; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Omura, Satoshi; Yamada, Haruki

    2009-06-01

    Pregnane glycosides previously isolated from genus Caralluma (C. Penicillata, C. tuberculata and C. russelliana) were tested for their antitrypanosomal activity. Penicilloside E showed the highest antitrypanosomal activity (IC(50) 1.01 microg/ml) followed by caratuberside C (IC(50) 1.85 microg/ml), which exhibited the highest selectivity index (SI 12.04). It was noticed that acylation is required for the antitrypanosomal activity while glycosylation at C-20 has no significant effect on the activity.

  16. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  17. On the aerodynamics and performance of active vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Ron; Farokhi, Saeed

    1993-01-01

    As a building block in the development of smart lift-enhancement devices, a new concept for flow control using active vortex generators (AVGs) is presented. Ramp, wedge, and doublet wedge (Wheeler) VG configurations are investigated. The AVGs are designed to conform to the surface of the wing section at low alpha. As the section approaches the stall, they are deployed and accordingly, alpha(stall) and C(lmax) are increased. A qualitative analysis of the flow around the various VG configurations was conducted in a low speed wind tunnel at 1.6 ft/s and a Reynolds number of approximately 3400. The results demonstrate that ramp VGs produce vortices that have the longest distance at breakdown. The VGs were also applied to a 25-in. span, 8-in. chord NACA 4415 wing section. Optimization studies were conducted on the spanwise spacing, chordwise position, and size of statically deployed VGs. The test results demonstrate a 14-percent increase in C(lmax) while increasing alpha (stall) by up to 3.

  18. Control of Reactive Species Generated by Low-frequency Biased Nanosecond Pulse Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    The control of hydroxyl radical and the other gas phase species generation in the ejected gas through air plasma (air plasma effluent) has been experimentally studied, which is a key to extend the range of plasma treatment. Nanosecond pulse discharge is known to produce high reduced electric field (E/N) discharge that leads to efficient generation of the reactive species than conventional low frequency discharge, while the charge-voltage cycle in the low frequency discharge is known to be well-controlled. In this study, the nanosecond pulse discharge biased with AC low frequency high voltage is used to take advantages of these discharges, which allows us to modulate the reactive species composition in the air plasma effluent. The utilization of the gas-liquid interface and the liquid phase chemical reactions between the modulated long-lived reactive species delivered from the air plasma effluent could realize efficient liquid phase chemical reactions leading to short-lived reactive species production far from the air plasma, which is crucial for some plasma agricultural applications.

  19. Peroxiredoxin-3 Is Involved in Bactericidal Activity through the Regulation of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sena; Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prdx3) is a mitochondrial protein of the thioredoxin family of antioxidant peroxidases and is the principal peroxidase responsible for metabolizing mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide. Recent reports have shown that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) contribute to macrophage-mediated bactericidal activity in response to Toll-like receptors. Herein, we investigated the functional effect of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity. The mitochondrial localization of Prdx3 in HEK293T cells was confirmed by cell fractionation and confocal microscopy analyses. To investigate the functional role of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity, Prdx3-knockdown (Prdx3KD) THP-1 cells were generated. The mROS levels in Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly higher than those in control THP-1 cells. Moreover, the mROS levels were markedly increased in response to lipopolysaccharide. Notably, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection assay revealed that the Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly resistant to S. Typhimurium infection, as compared with control THP-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Prdx3 is functionally important in bactericidal activity through the regulation of mROS. PMID:28035213

  20. Copper compound induces autophagy and apoptosis of glioma cells by reactive oxygen species and jnk activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive of the primary brain tumors, with a grim prognosis despite intensive treatment. In the past decades, progress in research has not significantly increased overall survival rate. Methods The in vitro antineoplastic effect and mechanism of action of Casiopeina III-ia (Cas III-ia), a copper compound, on rat malignant glioma C6 cells was investigated. Results Cas III-ia significantly inhibited cell proliferation, inducing autophagy and apoptosis, which correlated with the formation of autophagic vacuoles, overexpression of LC3, Beclin 1, Atg 7, Bax and Bid proteins. A decrease was detected in the mitochondrial membrane potential and in the activity of caspase 3 and 8, together with the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased activity of c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). The presence of 3-methyladenine (as selective autophagy inhibitor) increased the antineoplastic effect of Cas III-ia, while Z-VAD-FMK only showed partial protection from the antineoplastic effect induced by Cas III-ia, and ROS antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine) decreased apoptosis, autophagy and JNK activity. Moreover, the JNK –specific inhibitor SP600125 prevented Cas III-ia-induced cell death. Conclusions Our data suggest that Cas III-ia induces cell death by autophagy and apoptosis, in part due to the activation of ROS –dependent JNK signaling. These findings support further studies of Cas III-ia as candidate for treatment of human malignant glioma. PMID:22540380

  1. Efficient cross-species capture hybridization and next-generation sequencing of mitochondrial genomes from noninvasively sampled museum specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Victor C.; Li, Gang; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to uncover the phylogenetic history of recently extinct species and other species known only from archived museum material has rapidly improved due to the reduced cost and increased sequence capacity of next-generation sequencing technologies. One limitation of these approaches is the difficulty of isolating and sequencing large, orthologous DNA regions across multiple divergent species, which is exacerbated for museum specimens, where DNA quality varies greatly between samples and contamination levels are often high. Here we describe the use of cross-species DNA capture hybridization techniques and next-generation sequencing to selectively isolate and sequence partial to full-length mitochondrial DNA genomes from the degraded DNA of museum specimens, using probes generated from the DNA of a single extant species. We demonstrate our approach on specimens from an enigmatic gliding mammal, the Sunda colugo, which is widely distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We isolated DNA from 13 colugo specimens collected 47–170 years ago, and successfully captured and sequenced mitochondrial DNA from every specimen, frequently recovering fragments with 10%–13% sequence divergence from the capture probe sequence. Phylogenetic results reveal deep genetic divergence among colugos, both within and between the islands of Borneo and Java, as well as between the Malay Peninsula and different Sundaic islands. Our method is based on noninvasive sampling of minute amounts of soft tissue material from museum specimens, leaving the original specimen essentially undamaged. This approach represents a paradigm shift away from standard PCR-based approaches for accessing population genetic and phylogenomic information from poorly known and difficult-to-study species. PMID:21880778

  2. Detection of oxygen species generated by WO{sub 3} modification fullerene/TiO{sub 2} in the degradation of 1,5-diphenyl carbazide

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhu, Lei; Ullah, Kefayat; Ye, Shu; Oh, Won-Chun

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Reactive oxygen species were detected through oxidation reaction from DPCI to DPCO. • Generated reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radicals can be analysed by DPCI degradation. • C{sub 60} have good effect in photo/ultrasonic degradation process. • Enhanced adsorption capacity can increase the degradation effect. • Photocatalytic activity attributed to photo-absorption effect by C{sub 60} and cooperative effect of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: In the present work, powders with different relative mole ratios of WO{sub 3}-fullerene/TiO{sub 2} were irradiated by visible light and ultrasonic. The composite obtained was characterized by BET surface area measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis analysis. A methylene blue (MB) solution under visible light and ultrasonic irradiation was used to determine the catalytic activity. The generation of reactive oxygen species were detected through the oxidation reaction from 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) to 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO). Finally, we performed experiments to find the optimum relative mole ratio of fullerene for the degradation of MB.

  3. Diversity and enzyme activity of Penicillium species associated with macroalgae in Jeju Island.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Seobihn; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Cho, Ga Youn; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-10-01

    A total of 28 strains of 19 Penicillium species were isolated in a survey of extracellular enzyme-producing fungi from macroalgae along the coast of Jeju Island of Korea. Penicillium species were identified based on morphological and β-tubulin sequence analyses. In addition, the halo-tolerance and enzyme activity of all strains were evaluated. The diversity of Penicillium strains isolated from brown algae was higher than the diversity of strains isolated from green and red algae. The commonly isolated species were Penicillium antarcticum, P. bialowiezense, P. brevicompactum, P. crustosum, P. oxalicum, P. rubens, P. sumatrense, and P. terrigenum. While many strains showed endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, and protease activity, no alginase activity was detected. There was a positive correlation between halo-tolerance and endoglucanase activity within Penicillium species. Among 19 Penicillium species, three species-P. kongii, P. olsonii, and P. viticola-have not been previously recorded in Korea.

  4. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  5. Two-Photon or Higher-Order Absorbing Optical Materials for Generation of Reactive Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  6. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  7. Methylcitrate cycle activation during adaptation of Fusarium solani and Fusarium verticillioides to propionyl-CoA-generating carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Domin, Nicole; Wilson, Duncan; Brock, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Propionyl-CoA is an inhibitor of both primary and secondary metabolism in Aspergillus species and a functional methylcitrate cycle is essential for the efficient removal of this potentially toxic metabolite. Although the genomes of most sequenced fungal species appear to contain genes coding for enzymes of the methylcitrate cycle, experimental confirmation of pathway activity in filamentous fungi has only been provided for Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study we demonstrate that pathogenic Fusarium species also possess a functional methylcitrate cycle. Fusarium solani appears highly adapted to saprophytic growth as it utilized propionate with high efficiency, whereas Fusarium verticillioides grew poorly on this carbon source. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of propionyl-CoA detoxification, we first identified the genes coding for methylcitrate synthase from both species. Despite sharing 96 % amino acid sequence identity, analysis of the two purified enzymes demonstrated that their biochemical properties differed in several respects. Both methylcitrate synthases exhibited low K(m) values for propionyl-CoA, but that of F. verticillioides displayed significantly higher citrate synthase activity and greater thermal stability. Activity determinations from cell-free extracts of F. solani revealed a strong methylcitrate synthase activity during growth on propionate and to a lesser extent on Casamino acids, whereas activity by F. verticillioides was highest on Casamino acids. Further phenotypic analysis confirmed that these biochemical differences were reflected in the different growth behaviour of the two species on propionyl-CoA-generating carbon sources.

  8. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  9. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  10. The Trichoptera barcode initiative: a strategy for generating a species-level Tree of Life.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Frandsen, Paul B; Holzenthal, Ralph W; Beet, Clare R; Bennett, Kristi R; Blahnik, Roger J; Bonada, Núria; Cartwright, David; Chuluunbat, Suvdtsetseg; Cocks, Graeme V; Collins, Gemma E; deWaard, Jeremy; Dean, John; Flint, Oliver S; Hausmann, Axel; Hendrich, Lars; Hess, Monika; Hogg, Ian D; Kondratieff, Boris C; Malicky, Hans; Milton, Megan A; Morinière, Jérôme; Morse, John C; Mwangi, François Ngera; Pauls, Steffen U; Gonzalez, María Razo; Rinne, Aki; Robinson, Jason L; Salokannel, Juha; Shackleton, Michael; Smith, Brian; Stamatakis, Alexandros; StClair, Ros; Thomas, Jessica A; Zamora-Muñoz, Carmen; Ziesmann, Tanja; Kjer, Karl M

    2016-09-05

    DNA barcoding was intended as a means to provide species-level identifications through associating DNA sequences from unknown specimens to those from curated reference specimens. Although barcodes were not designed for phylogenetics, they can be beneficial to the completion of the Tree of Life. The barcode database for Trichoptera is relatively comprehensive, with data from every family, approximately two-thirds of the genera, and one-third of the described species. Most Trichoptera, as with most of life's species, have never been subjected to any formal phylogenetic analysis. Here, we present a phylogeny with over 16 000 unique haplotypes as a working hypothesis that can be updated as our estimates improve. We suggest a strategy of implementing constrained tree searches, which allow larger datasets to dictate the backbone phylogeny, while the barcode data fill out the tips of the tree. We also discuss how this phylogeny could be used to focus taxonomic attention on ambiguous species boundaries and hidden biodiversity. We suggest that systematists continue to differentiate between 'Barcode Index Numbers' (BINs) and 'species' that have been formally described. Each has utility, but they are not synonyms. We highlight examples of integrative taxonomy, using both barcodes and morphology for species description.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'.

  11. Sequential reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species in early programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a physiological process commonly defined by alterations in nuclear morphology (apoptosis) and/or characteristic stepwise degradation of chromosomal DNA occurring before cytolysis. However, determined characteristics of PCD such as loss in mitochondrial reductase activity or cytolysis can be induced in enucleated cells, indicating cytoplasmic PCD control. Here we report a sequential disregulation of mitochondrial function that precedes cell shrinkage and nuclear fragmentation. A first cyclosporin A-inhibitable step of ongoing PCD is characterized by a reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, as determined by specific fluorochromes (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine++ + iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide). Cytofluorometrically purified cells with reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential are initially incapable of oxidizing hydroethidine (HE) into ethidium. Upon short-term in vitro culture, such cells acquire the capacity of HE oxidation, thus revealing a second step of PCD marked by mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This step can be selectively inhibited by rotenone and ruthenium red yet is not affected by cyclosporin A. Finally, cells reduce their volume, a step that is delayed by radical scavengers, indicating the implication of ROS in the apoptotic process. This sequence of alterations accompanying early PCD is found in very different models of apoptosis induction: glucocorticoid-induced death of lymphocytes, activation-induced PCD of T cell hybridomas, and tumor necrosis factor-induced death of U937 cells. Transfection with the antiapoptotic protooncogene Bcl-2 simultaneously inhibits mitochondrial alterations and apoptotic cell death triggered by steroids or ceramide. In vivo injection of fluorochromes such as 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide; or HE allows for the detection of

  12. Protective activity of propofol, Diprivan and intralipid against active oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby-Dupont, G; Hans, P; Deby, C; Lamy, M

    1998-01-01

    We separately studied the antioxidant properties of propofol (PPF), Diprivan (the commercial form of PPF) and intralipid (IL) (the vehicle solution of PPF in Diprivan) on active oxygen species produced by phorbol myristate acetate (10(-6) M)-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN: 5 x 10(5) cells/assay), human endothelial cells (5 x 10(5) cells/assay) or cell-free systems (NaOCl or H2O2/peroxidase systems), using luminol (10(-4) M)-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL). We also studied the protective effects of Diprivan on endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress induced by H2O2/MPO system: cytotoxicity was assessed by the release of preincorporated 51Cr. Propofol inhibited the CL produced by stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (until 5 x 10(-5) M, a clinically relevant concentration), while Diprivan and IL were not dose-dependent inhibitors. The CL produced by endothelial cells was dose-dependently inhibited by Diprivan and PPF, and weakly by IL (not dose-dependent). In cell free systems, dose-dependent inhibitions were obtained for the three products with a lower effect for IL. Diprivan efficaciously protected endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress, while IL was ineffective. By HPLC, we demonstrated that PPF was not incorporated into the cells. The drug thus acted by scavenging the active oxygen species released in the extracellular medium. IL acted in the same manner, but was a less powerful antioxidant. PMID:9883967

  13. Identification and characterization of a highly variable region in mitochondrial genomes of fusarium species and analysis of power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, Haider Mousa

    In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) project, power generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was analyzed looking for a novel system for both energy generation and sustainability. The results suggest the possibility of generating electricity from different organic substances, which include agricultural and industrial by-products. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates usable electrons at 30°C using both submerged and solid state cultures. In the MFC biocathode experiment, most of the CO2 generated at the anodic chamber was converted into bicarbonate due the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) of the Gluconobacter sp.33 strain. These findings demonstrate the possibility of generation of electricity while at the same time allowing the biomimetic sequestration of CO2 using bacterial CA. In the mitochondrial genomes project, the filamentous fungal species Fusarium oxysporum was used as a model. This species causes wilt of several important agricultural crops. A previous study revealed that a highly variable region (HVR) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of three species of Fusarium contained a large, variable unidentified open reading frame (LV-uORF). Using specific primers for two regions of the LV-uORF, six strains were found to contain the ORF by PCR and database searches identified 18 other strains outside of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. The LV-uORF was also identified in three isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex. Interestingly, several F. oxysporum isolates lack the LV-uORF and instead contain 13 ORFs in the HVR, nine of which are unidentified. The high GC content and codon usage of the LV-uORF indicate that it did not co-evolve with other mt genes and was horizontally acquired and was introduced to the Fusarium lineage prior to speciation. The nonsynonymous/synonymous (dN/dS) ratio of the LV-uORFs (0.43) suggests it is under purifying selection and the putative polypeptide is predicted to be located in the mitochondrial membrane. Growth assays

  14. The effect of the copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine on reactive oxygen species generation by human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Prus, Eugenia; Fibach, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Clinical observations suggest that copper (Cu) plays a role in regulating hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) development. Cu is known to generate oxidative stress in cells which in turn affects proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. To study this role of Cu, we used double staining flow cytometry to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neonatal cord blood-derived CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. ROS was increased by Cu and was decreased by the Cu chelator tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). Previously, we showed that TEPA reduces the free Cu content of HPCs and stimulates their ex vivo expansion. The present results suggest that TEPA affects expansion of HPCs by lowering their oxidative stress.

  15. Plant species richness belowground: higher richness and new patterns revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Opik, Maarja; Metsis, Madis; Lilje, Liisa; Davison, John; Vasar, Martti; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Wilson, Scott D; Pärtel, Meelis

    2012-04-01

    Variation in plant species richness has been described using only aboveground vegetation. The species richness of roots and rhizomes has never been compared with aboveground richness in natural plant communities. We made direct comparisons of grassland plant richness in identical volumes (0.1 × 0.1 × 0.1 m) above and below the soil surface, using conventional species identification to measure aboveground richness and 454 sequencing of the chloroplast trnL(UAA) intron to measure belowground richness. We described above- and belowground richness at multiple spatial scales (from a neighbourhood scale of centimetres to a community scale of hundreds of metres), and related variation in richness to soil fertility. Tests using reference material indicated that 454 sequencing captured patterns of species composition and abundance with acceptable accuracy. At neighbourhood scales, belowground richness was up to two times greater than aboveground richness. The relationship between above- and belowground richness was significantly different from linear: beyond a certain level of belowground richness, aboveground richness did not increase further. Belowground richness also exceeded that of aboveground at the community scale, indicating that some species are temporarily dormant and absent aboveground. Similar to other grassland studies, aboveground richness declined with increasing soil fertility; in contrast, the number of species found only belowground increased significantly with fertility. These results indicate that conventional aboveground studies of plant richness may overlook many coexisting species, and that belowground richness becomes relatively more important in conditions where aboveground richness decreases. Measuring plant belowground richness can considerably alter perceptions of biodiversity and its responses to natural and anthropogenic factors.

  16. Animal Related Activities as Determinants of Species Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has established a relationship between knowledge and environmental concern. Different factors may contribute to this knowledge and animal-related leisure activities may also contribute to this knowledge. 390 participants in Leipzig, Germany were interviewed to assess their animal-related leisure activities, their demographic status…

  17. Antimicrobial activity of some Salvia species essential oils from Iran.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadi, Morteza; Sonboli, Ali; Karimic, Farah; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Asghari, Behvar; Zeinalia, Amineh

    2007-01-01

    The aerial parts of Salvia multicaulis, S. sclarea and S. verticillata were collected at full flowering stage. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC and GC-MS. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oils were studied against eight Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumulis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and three fungi (Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger). The results of antibacterial activity tests of the essential oils according to the disc diffusion method and MIC values indicated that all the samples have moderate to high inhibitory activity against the tested bacteria except for P. aeruginosa which was totally resistant. In contrast to antibacterial activity, the oils exhibited no or slight antifungal property, in which only the oil of S. multicaulis showed weak activity against two tested yeasts, C. albicans and S. cerevisiae.

  18. Airborne particulate matter PM2.5 from Mexico City affects the generation of reactive oxygen species by blood neutrophils from asthmatics: an in vitro approach

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Vargas, Martha Patricia; Guzman-Grenfell, Alberto Martin; Blanco-Jimenez, Salvador; Sepulveda-Sanchez, Jose David; Bernabe-Cabanillas, Rosa Maria; Cardenas-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Ceballos, Guillermo; Hicks, Juan Jose

    2009-01-01

    Background The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is densely populated, and toxic air pollutants are generated and concentrated at a higher rate because of its geographic characteristics. It is well known that exposure to particulate matter, especially to fine and ultra-fine particles, enhances the risk of cardio-respiratory diseases, especially in populations susceptible to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fine particles on the respiratory burst of circulating neutrophils from asthmatic patients living in Mexico City. Methods In total, 6 subjects diagnosed with mild asthma and 11 healthy volunteers were asked to participate. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral venous blood and incubated with fine particles, and the generation of reactive oxygen species was recorded by chemiluminescence. We also measured plasma lipoperoxidation susceptibility and plasma myeloperoxidase and paraoxonase activities by spectrophotometry. Results Asthmatic patients showed significantly lower plasma paraoxonase activity, higher susceptibility to plasma lipoperoxidation and an increase in myeloperoxidase activity that differed significantly from the control group. In the presence of fine particles, neutrophils from asthmatic patients showed an increased tendency to generate reactive oxygen species after stimulation with fine particles (PM2.5). Conclusion These findings suggest that asthmatic patients have higher oxidation of plasmatic lipids due to reduced antioxidant defense. Furthermore, fine particles tended to increase the respiratory burst of blood human neutrophils from the asthmatic group. On the whole, increased myeloperoxidase activity and susceptibility to lipoperoxidation with a concomitant decrease in paraoxonase activity in asthmatic patients could favor lung infection and hence disrupt the control of asthmatic crises. PMID:19563660

  19. Spatio-temporal optimization of a laser produced Al-plasma: Generation of highly ionized species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smijesh, N.; H. Rao, Kavya; Klemke, N.; Philip, R.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    Laser produced plasmas are transient in nature, and their properties, which depend on the laser parameters as well as the material properties and the irradiation conditions, can be tailored for different applications. Highly ionized Al plasmas generated using 7 ns and negatively chirped 60 ps pulses are optimized for the purpose of generating Al IV and Al III, respectively. The plasma is optimized spatio-temporally for Al IV or Al III with irradiation energy as the control parameter using time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Plasmas attuned for higher charged states could be utilized as a good alternative source for the generation of high order harmonics.

  20. The Trichoptera barcode initiative: a strategy for generating a species-level Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Paul B.; Holzenthal, Ralph W.; Beet, Clare R.; Bennett, Kristi R.; Blahnik, Roger J.; Bonada, Núria; Cartwright, David; Chuluunbat, Suvdtsetseg; Cocks, Graeme V.; Collins, Gemma E.; deWaard, Jeremy; Dean, John; Flint, Oliver S.; Hausmann, Axel; Hendrich, Lars; Hess, Monika; Hogg, Ian D.; Kondratieff, Boris C.; Malicky, Hans; Milton, Megan A.; Morinière, Jérôme; Morse, John C.; Mwangi, François Ngera; Pauls, Steffen U.; Gonzalez, María Razo; Rinne, Aki; Robinson, Jason L.; Salokannel, Juha; Shackleton, Michael; Smith, Brian; Stamatakis, Alexandros; StClair, Ros; Thomas, Jessica A.; Zamora-Muñoz, Carmen; Ziesmann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding was intended as a means to provide species-level identifications through associating DNA sequences from unknown specimens to those from curated reference specimens. Although barcodes were not designed for phylogenetics, they can be beneficial to the completion of the Tree of Life. The barcode database for Trichoptera is relatively comprehensive, with data from every family, approximately two-thirds of the genera, and one-third of the described species. Most Trichoptera, as with most of life's species, have never been subjected to any formal phylogenetic analysis. Here, we present a phylogeny with over 16 000 unique haplotypes as a working hypothesis that can be updated as our estimates improve. We suggest a strategy of implementing constrained tree searches, which allow larger datasets to dictate the backbone phylogeny, while the barcode data fill out the tips of the tree. We also discuss how this phylogeny could be used to focus taxonomic attention on ambiguous species boundaries and hidden biodiversity. We suggest that systematists continue to differentiate between ‘Barcode Index Numbers’ (BINs) and ‘species’ that have been formally described. Each has utility, but they are not synonyms. We highlight examples of integrative taxonomy, using both barcodes and morphology for species description. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481793

  1. Mental Arithmetic Activates Analogic Representations of Internally Generated Sums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallai, Arava Y.; Schunn, Christian D.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    The internal representation of numbers generated during calculation has received little attention. Much of the mathematics learning literature focuses on symbolic retrieval of math facts; in contrast, we critically test the hypothesis that internally generated numbers are represented analogically, using an approximate number system. In an fMRI…

  2. Activating Generative Learning in Organizations through Optimizing Relational Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mary Kay

    2010-01-01

    Using a grounded theory method, this dissertation seeks to discover how relationships impact organizational generative learning. An organization is a socially constructed reality and organizational learning is situated in the process of co-participation. To discover the link between relationships and generative learning this study considers the…

  3. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Zhi

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors.

  4. Comparative Toxicity Assessment of Nanosilver on Three Daphnia Species in Acute, Chronic and Multi-Generation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Völker, Carolin; Boedicker, Cathinka; Daubenthaler, Jan; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial properties of nanosilver have led to a versatile application spectrum including medical purposes and personal care products. However, the increasing use of nanosilver has raised concerns about its environmental impacts. Long-term exposure studies with aquatic invertebrates are essential to assess possible adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, acute (48 h), chronic (21 d) and long-term effects of nanosilver (primary size 15 nm) on five successive generations of three Daphnia species (D. magna, D. pulex, and D. galeata) were investigated. Acute EC50 values of nanosilver were 121 µg Ag L−1 for D. magna being the least sensitive species and 8.95 and 13.9 µg Ag L−1 for D. pulex and D. galeata, respectively. Chronic exposure provided EC10 values of 0.92 µg Ag L−1 for D. magna showing the most sensitive chronic reaction and 2.25 and 3.45 µg Ag L−1 for D. pulex and D. galeata, respectively. Comparative exposure to AgNO3 revealed a generally higher toxicity of the soluble form of silver. The multi-generation experiments resulted in effects on the population level for all tested species. Exposure of D. magna indicated an increased toxicity of nanosilver in the fifth generation of animals exposed to 10 µg Ag L−1. Neonates from pre-exposed parental daphnids did not completely recover when transferred into clean water. Exposure of D. pulex and D. galeata revealed not only increasing toxicity in some generations, but also greater tolerance to nanosilver. This study contributes to the assessment of the risk potential of nanosilver on aquatic ecosystems. It shows that effects of nanosilver vary within one genus and change with exposure duration. Therefore, long-term studies considering different aquatic species are needed to better understand the possible effects of nanosilver on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24116021

  5. Comparative toxicity assessment of nanosilver on three Daphnia species in acute, chronic and multi-generation experiments.

    PubMed

    Völker, Carolin; Boedicker, Cathinka; Daubenthaler, Jan; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial properties of nanosilver have led to a versatile application spectrum including medical purposes and personal care products. However, the increasing use of nanosilver has raised concerns about its environmental impacts. Long-term exposure studies with aquatic invertebrates are essential to assess possible adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, acute (48 h), chronic (21 d) and long-term effects of nanosilver (primary size 15 nm) on five successive generations of three Daphnia species (D. magna, D. pulex, and D. galeata) were investigated. Acute EC50 values of nanosilver were 121 µg Ag L(-1) for D. magna being the least sensitive species and 8.95 and 13.9 µg Ag L(-1) for D. pulex and D. galeata, respectively. Chronic exposure provided EC10 values of 0.92 µg Ag L(-1) for D. magna showing the most sensitive chronic reaction and 2.25 and 3.45 µg Ag L(-1) for D. pulex and D. galeata, respectively. Comparative exposure to AgNO3 revealed a generally higher toxicity of the soluble form of silver. The multi-generation experiments resulted in effects on the population level for all tested species. Exposure of D. magna indicated an increased toxicity of nanosilver in the fifth generation of animals exposed to 10 µg Ag L(-1). Neonates from pre-exposed parental daphnids did not completely recover when transferred into clean water. Exposure of D. pulex and D. galeata revealed not only increasing toxicity in some generations, but also greater tolerance to nanosilver. This study contributes to the assessment of the risk potential of nanosilver on aquatic ecosystems. It shows that effects of nanosilver vary within one genus and change with exposure duration. Therefore, long-term studies considering different aquatic species are needed to better understand the possible effects of nanosilver on aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Study of the radiation effect of 99Mo/99mTc generator on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus species.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, Neuza T O; Endo, Erica M M; Felgueiras, Carlos F; Matsuda, Margareth M N; Osso Junior, João A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, molybdenum-99 loaded columns were challenged with Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells and Bacillus pumilus spores inside and outside the alumina column, and microbial recovery and radiation effect were assessed. Alumina was a barrier for the passage of microorganisms regardless the species, whilst spores were more retained than vegetative cells with a lower microbial recovery, without significant differences between 9.25 and 74 GBq generators. Bacillus pumilus biological indicator showed lower recoveries, suggesting a radiation inactivating effect on microorganisms.

  7. Comparison of compounds of three Rubus species and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Caidan, Rezeng; Cairang, Limao; Pengcuo, Jiumei; Tong, Li

    2015-12-01

    Rubus amabilis, Rubus niveus Thunb., and Rubus sachalinensis are three Rubus species that are alternatively found in Manubzhithang, a Tibetan medicine, in different areas of China. The current study analyzed HPLC/UV chromatograms and it compared compounds of these three Rubus species in contrast to reference substances such as 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, procyanidin B4, and isovitexin-7-O-glucoside. The three Rubus species produced similar peaks in chromatograms. The antioxidant activity of the three Rubus species was determined using an assay for DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Results indicated that the three Rubus species extracts had almost the same level of free radical scavenging activity. Thus, findings indicated the rationality of substituting these species for one another as an ingredient in Manubzhithang.

  8. UV-B-Induced PR-1 Accumulation Is Mediated by Active Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Green, R.; Fluhr, R.

    1995-02-01

    Depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer may result in an increase in the levels of potentially harmful UV-B radiation reaching the surface of the earth. We have found that UV-B is a potent inducer of the plant pathogenesis-related protein PR-1 in tobacco leaves. UV-B fluences required for PR-1 accumulation are similar to those of other UV-B-induced responses. The UV-B-induced PR-1 accumulation was confined precisely to the irradiated area of the leaf but displayed no leaf tissue specificity. A study of some of the possible components of the signal transduction pathway between UV-B and PR-1 induction showed that photosynthetic processes are not essential, and photoreversible DNA damage is not involved. Antioxidants and cycloheximide were able to block the induction of PR-1 by UV-B, and treatment of leaves with a generator of reactive oxygen resulted in the accumulation of PR-1 protein. These results demonstrate an absolute requirement for active oxygen species and protein synthesis in this UV-B signal transduction pathway. In contrast, we also show that other elicitors, notably salicylic acid, are able to elicit PR-1 via nonreactive oxygen species-requiring pathways.

  9. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets: Effect of gas flow, active species, and snake-like bullet propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Tan, X.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-02-15

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets have recently attracted enormous interest owing to numerous applications in plasma biology, health care, medicine, and nanotechnology. A dedicated study of the interaction between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes revealed that the active species (electrons, ions, excited OH, metastable Ar, and nitrogen-related species) generated by the upstream plasma plume enhance the propagation of the downstream plasma plume. At gas flows exceeding 2 l/min, the downstream plasma plume is longer than the upstream plasma plume. Detailed plasma diagnostics and discharge species analysis suggest that this effect is due to the electrons and ions that are generated by the upstream plasma and flow into the downstream plume. This in turn leads to the relatively higher electron density in the downstream plasma. Moreover, high-speed photography reveals a highly unusual behavior of the plasma bullets, which propagate in snake-like motions, very differently from the previous reports. This behavior is related to the hydrodynamic instability of the gas flow, which results in non-uniform distributions of long-lifetime active species in the discharge tube and of surface charges on the inner surface of the tube.

  10. Flow cytometric assessment of reactive oxygen species generations that are directly related to cellular ZnO nanoparticle uptake.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple flow cytometry protocol to evaluate nanoparticle associated biological response was proposed. Particularly, we have evaluated the effect of surface charge on the cellular nanoparticle associations and nanoparticle-induced apoptosis. Significant enhancement in side scattering intensity was observed for the HeLa cells treated with positively charged (PLL)ZnO nanoparticles, suggesting that the (PLL)ZnO nanoparticles may induce cell death via adsorption and endocytosis of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, the negatively charged (PAA)ZnO nanoparticle seems to cause cell death process indirectly via the released Zn ions, with less contribution from cellular association of nanoparticles. Time- and dose-dependent studies on cellular association of ZnO nanoparticles, and ZnO associated reactive oxygen species generation were also performed for the HeLa cells exposed to the (PLL)ZnO nanoparticle. For those cells associated with (PLL)ZnO nanoparticle, a significant enhancement in reactive oxygen species generation was observed even at a lower concentration (10 ppm), which was not observable for the results with the whole cell population. By using this approach, we are able to distinguish biological responses (e.g., reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation) directly related to the cellular associations of NPs from those indirectly related to the cellular associations of NPs, such as the cytotoxicity caused by the NP released metal ions.

  11. Emotion at Work: A Contribution to Third-Generation Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    Second-generation cultural-historical activity theory, which drew its inspiration from Leont'ev's work, constituted an advance over Vygotsky's first-generation theory by explicitly articulating the dialectical relation between individual and collective. As part of an effort to develop third-generation-historical activity theory, I propose in this…

  12. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingyong; Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  13. Fullerene (C60) nanoparticles exert photocytotoxicity through modulation of reactive oxygen species and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the MCF-7 cancer cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Fei-long; Wang, Zhiyuan; Pan, Li-li; Shen, Ying-ying; Zhang, Zhen-zhong

    2013-12-01

    The photocytotoxicity of water-dispersed 100-300 nm fullerene amino acid derivatives nanoparticles was studied. The nanoparticle solution of fullerene derivatives, l-phenylalanine (C60-phe) and glycine (C60-gly), suppressed the in vitro growth of MCF-7 cells lines, induced cancer cells apoptosis, and caused a perturbation of the cell cycle. These nanoparticle solutions increased intracellular reactive oxygen species after irradiation. C60-phe or C60-gly upregulated the expression of phosphorylated (p)p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). N-Acetyl- l-cysteine significantly depressed the composite-induced activation of p38MAPK, and the kinase inhibitor SB203580 significantly prevented C60 derivative-induced cell apoptosis. This study revealed that p38MAPK is activated by C60 nanoparticles through triggering reactive oxygen species generation, leading to cancer cell injuries.

  14. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  15. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity of 3 Umbilicaria species.

    PubMed

    Kosanić, Marijana; Ranković, Branislav; Stanojković, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity of the acetone extracts of the lichens Umbilicaria crustulosa, U. cylindrica, and U. polyphylla. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by 5 separate methods: free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds, and determination of total flavonoid content. Of the lichens tested, U. polyphylla had largest free radical scavenging activity (72.79% inhibition at a concentration of 1 mg/mL), which was similar as standard antioxidants in the same concentration. Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. Total content of phenol and flavonoid in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent, and as rutin equivalent, respectively. The strong relationships between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant effect of tested extracts were observed. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was extract of U. polyphylla with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 1.56 to 12.5 mg/mL. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. All extracts were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC₅₀ values ranging from 28.45 to 97.82 μg/mL. The present study shows that tested lichen extracts demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. That suggests that lichens may be used as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer agents.

  16. Biodegradable Plastic-degrading Activity of Various Species of Paraphoma.

    PubMed

    Koitabashi, Motoo; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Koike, Hideaki; Sato, Toyozo; Moriwaki, Jouji; Morita, Tomotake; Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The fungal strain B47-9, isolated from barley, was previously selected as an effective degrader of various biodegradable plastic (BP) films such as poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS). The strain has not been identified based on mycological methods because it does not form fruiting bodies, which are the key to morphological identification. Here, we performed molecular phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene regions and their internal transcribed spacer region of B47-9 and related fungi. The results suggest that B47-9 is closely related to the genus Paraphoma. Investigation of the abilities of six strains belonging to the genus Paraphoma to degrade BPs indicated that all strains could degrade PBSA and PBS films to varying degrees. Based on our approach, we conclude that strain B47-9 is a species belonging to the genus Paraphoma.

  17. Selection of rodent species appropriate for mtDNA transfer to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice expressing mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Shunkei; Shimizu, Akinori; Hayashi, Chisato; Imanishi, Hirotake; Hashizume, Osamu; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that transmitochondrial mito-mice with nuclear DNA from Mus musculus and mtDNA from M. spretus do not express respiration defects, whereas those with mtDNA from Rattus norvegicus cannot be generated from ES cybrids with mtDNA from R. norvegicus due to inducing significant respiration defects and resultant losing multipotency. Here, we isolated transmitochondrial cybrids with mtDNA from various rodent species classified between M. spretus and R. norvegicus, and compared the O2 consumption rates. The results showed a strong negative correlation between phylogenetic distance and reduction of O2 consumption rates, which would be due to the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and the resultant incompatibility between the nuclear genome from M. musculus and the mitochondrial genome from the other rodent species. These observations suggested that M. caroli was an appropriate mtDNA donor to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice with nuclear DNA from M. musculus. Then, we generated ES cybrids with M. caroli mtDNA, and found that these ES cybrids expressed respiration defects without losing multipotency and can be used to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice expressing mitochondrial disorders.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of four Bolivian Baccharis species (Compositae).

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bessa, A L; Ballarin, B; Aragón, O; Gonzales, E; Bermejo, P

    2006-02-20

    Hexanic, dichloromethanic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts from Baccharis obtusifolia HBK, Baccharis latifolia (R. et P.) Pers., Baccharis pentlandii D.C. and Baccharis subulata Wedd., plants used in the traditional medicine of South America have been studied for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity in cellular systems. Calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages were validated as a source of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) (prostaglandin E2, PGE2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) (leukotriene C4, LTC4), and mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used for testing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activity. Most of the extracts tested were active in all assays.

  19. Antifungal Activity of Eugenol against Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Fusarium Species.

    PubMed

    Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2010-06-01

    The antifungal activity of eugenol in a model system against aspergilli (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Emericella nidulans), penicilli (Penicillium expansum, Penicillium glabrum, and Penicillium italicum), and fusaria (Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium avenaceum) was investigated. Minimum detection time (time to attain a colony diameter of 1 cm) and the kinetic parameters were evaluated. The effectiveness of the active compound seemed to be strain or genus dependent; 100 mg/liter represented a critical value for P. expansum, P. glabrum, P. italicum, A. niger, and E. nidulans because a further increase of eugenol resulted in fungistatic activity. The radial growth of A. terreus and F. avenaceum was inhibited at 140 mg/liter, and growth of F. oxysporum was completely inhibited at 150 mg/liter.

  20. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  1. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen ( 1O 2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  2. Genome-wide gene regulation of biosynthesis and energy generation by a novel transcriptional repressor in Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species play important roles in bioremediation of contaminated environments and in electricity production from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. To better understand physiology of Geobacter species, expression and function of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in the TCA cycle that is important for organic acid oxidation in Geobacter species, was investigated. Geobacter sulfurreducens did not require citrate synthase for growth with hydrogen as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor. Expression of the citrate synthase gene, gltA, was repressed by a transcription factor under this growth condition. Functional and comparative genomics approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical assays, identified a novel transcription factor termed HgtR that acts as a repressor for gltA. Further analysis revealed that HgtR is a global regulator for genes involved in biosynthesis and energy generation in Geobacter species. The hgtR gene was essential for growth with hydrogen, during which hgtR expression was induced. These findings provide important new insights into the mechanisms by which Geobacter species regulate their central metabolism under different environmental conditions.

  3. Genome-wide gene regulation of biosynthesis and energy generation by a novel transcriptional repressor in Geobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species play important roles in bioremediation of contaminated environments and in electricity production from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. To better understand physiology of Geobacter species, expression and function of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in the TCA cycle that is important for organic acid oxidation in Geobacter species, was investigated. Geobacter sulfurreducens did not require citrate synthase for growth with hydrogen as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor. Expression of the citrate synthase gene, gltA, was repressed by a transcription factor under this growth condition. Functional and comparative genomics approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical assays, identified a novel transcription factor termed HgtR that acts as a repressor for gltA. Further analysis revealed that HgtR is a global regulator for genes involved in biosynthesis and energy generation in Geobacter species. The hgtR gene was essential for growth with hydrogen, during which hgtR expression was induced. These findings provide important new insights into the mechanisms by which Geobacter species regulate their central metabolism under different environmental conditions. PMID:19939938

  4. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  5. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Z G; Buhl, K; Bartell, S E; Schoenfuss, H L

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption-as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration-than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered Rio

  6. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption—as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration—than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered

  7. Generation of Volatile Cadmium and Zinc Species Based on Solution Anode Glow Discharge Induced Plasma Electrochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Liu, Zhifu; Zhu, Zhenli; He, Dong; Yao, Siqi; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2017-02-27

    In this study, a novel high efficiency vapor generation strategy was proposed on the basis of solution anode glow discharge for the determination of Cd and Zn by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. In this approach, a glow discharge microplasma was acted as a gaseous cathode to initiate the plasma electrochemical vapor generation of Cd and Zn. Cadmium/zinc ions could be converted into molecular species efficiently at the plasma-liquid interface from a supporting electrolyte (HCl, pH = 3.2). It was found that the overall efficiency of the plasma electrochemical vapor generation (PEVG) system was much higher than the conventional electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) and HCl-KBH4 system. With no requirement for other reducing reagents, this new approach enabled us to detect Cd and Zn with detection limits as low as 0.003 μg L(-1) for Cd and 0.3 μg L(-1) for Zn. Good repeatability (relative standard deviation (RSD), n = 5) was 2.4% for Cd (0.1 μg L(-1)) and 1.7% for Zn (10 μg L(-1)) standard. The accuracy of the proposed method was successfully validated through analysis of cadmium in reference material of stream sediment (GBW07311), soil (GBW07401), rice (GBW10045), and zinc in a simulated water sample (GSB 07-1184-2000). Replacing a metal electrode with a plasma offers the advantage of eliminating potential interactions between the species in liquid and the electrode, which solves the issues associated with electrode encountered in conventional EcHG. The ability to initiate electrochemical vapor generation reactions at the plasma-liquid interface opens a new approach for chemical vapor generation based on interactions between plasma gas-phase electrons and solutions.

  8. Ozone killing action against bacterial and fungal species; microbiological testing of a domestic ozone generator.

    PubMed

    Dyas, A; Boughton, B J; Das, B C

    1983-10-01

    The action of ozone generated from a small domestic device was examined with a view to using it in clinical isolation units accommodating immunosuppressed patients. Over a six-hour period in an average size room the device did not generate sufficient ozone to suppress bacterial and fungal growth. A useful bactericidal action, against a variety of human pathogens was achieved with ozone concentrations between 0.3 to 0.9 ppm. Bactericidal ozone concentrations are close to the limit permitted for human exposure however and further experiments are indicated.

  9. Enzyme activities in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle of five avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Murray, H.C.; Bunck, C.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle from five species of captive birds. Few differences occurred in plasma activities between sexes but considerable differences occurred between species. All five enzymes were detected in each of the tissues sampled. Relative enzyme activities in liver, kidney, and muscle were similar for each species. CPK activity was much higher in muscle than in liver or kidney and, of the five enzymes studied, may be the best indicator of muscle damage. Most of the other enzymes were more evenly distributed among the three tissues, and no organ-specific enzyme could be identified for liver or kidney. Because of interspecific variations in plasma enzyme activities, it is important to establish baseline values for each species to ensure accurate interpretation of results.

  10. Characterization of Serum Phospholipase A2 Activity in Three Diverse Species of West African Crocodiles

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Mark; Juneau, Kate; Gemillion, Jared; Falconi, Rodolfo; Doucet, Aaron; Shirley, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2, an enzyme that exhibits substantial immunological activity, was measured in the serum of three species of diverse West African crocodiles. Incubation of different volumes of crocodile serum with bacteria labeled with a fluorescent fatty acid in the sn-2 position of membrane lipids resulted in a volume-dependent liberation of fluorescent probe. Serum from the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) exhibited slightly higher activity than that of the slender-snouted crocodile (Mecistops cataphractus) and the African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis). Product formation was inhibited by BPB, a specific PLA2 inhibitor, confirming that the activity was a direct result of the presence of serum PLA2. Kinetic analysis showed that C. niloticus serum produced product more rapidly than M. cataphractus or O. tetraspis. Serum from all three species exhibited temperature-dependent PLA2 activities but with slightly different thermal profiles. All three crocodilian species showed high levels of activity against eight different species of bacteria. PMID:22110960

  11. Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations

    PubMed Central

    San-Jose, Luis M.; Peñalver-Alcázar, Miguel; Milá, Borja; Gonzalez-Jimena, Virginia; Fitze, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Rock-paper-scissors (RPS) dynamics, which maintain genetic polymorphisms over time through negative frequency-dependent (FD) selection, can evolve in short-lived species with no generational overlap, where they produce rapid morph frequency cycles. However, most species have overlapping generations and thus, rapid RPS dynamics are thought to require stronger FD selection, the existence of which yet needs to be proved. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two cumulative selective episodes, FD sexual selection reinforced by FD selection on offspring survival, generate sufficiently strong selection to generate rapid morph frequency cycles in the European common lizard Zootoca vivipara, a multi-annual species with major generational overlap. These findings show that the conditions required for the evolution of RPS games are fulfilled by almost all species exhibiting genetic polymorphisms and suggest that RPS games may be responsible for the maintenance of genetic diversity in a wide range of species. PMID:24943372

  12. Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations.

    PubMed

    San-Jose, Luis M; Peñalver-Alcázar, Miguel; Milá, Borja; Gonzalez-Jimena, Virginia; Fitze, Patrick S

    2014-08-07

    Rock-paper-scissors (RPS) dynamics, which maintain genetic polymorphisms over time through negative frequency-dependent (FD) selection, can evolve in short-lived species with no generational overlap, where they produce rapid morph frequency cycles. However, most species have overlapping generations and thus, rapid RPS dynamics are thought to require stronger FD selection, the existence of which yet needs to be proved. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two cumulative selective episodes, FD sexual selection reinforced by FD selection on offspring survival, generate sufficiently strong selection to generate rapid morph frequency cycles in the European common lizard Zootoca vivipara, a multi-annual species with major generational overlap. These findings show that the conditions required for the evolution of RPS games are fulfilled by almost all species exhibiting genetic polymorphisms and suggest that RPS games may be responsible for the maintenance of genetic diversity in a wide range of species.

  13. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  14. Hydrazide derivatives produce active oxygen species as hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna Maria; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello

    2005-12-01

    It is well documented that some hydrazines are quite sensitive to oxidation and may serve as the electron donor for the reduction of oxygen, whereas hydrazides are not believed to react directly with oxygen. Data presented in this paper show that both hydrazides and hydrazines share an N-N moiety, which is assumed to react with atmospheric oxygen and produce oxygen radicals, at various degrees of efficiency. Since spectrometric measurements of hydrazide just after solubilization showed that the molecular mass remains constant in the absence of oxygen, we can conclude that hydrazides do not react with the oxygen through a slow spontaneous hydrolytic release of hydrazine. However, hydrazine is more reactive than hydrazide, which requires hours rather than minutes to produce measurable quantities of radical species. Differences were also apparent for various substituted derivatives. The reaction was significantly enhanced by the presence of metal ions. Data reported here demonstrate that hydrazides cause irreversible damage to the prosthetic group of proteins as well as causing degradation of the polypeptide chain into small fragments.

  15. Short-term hybridisation activates Tnt1 and Tto1 Copia retrotransposons in wild tuber-bearing Solanum species.

    PubMed

    Paz, R C; Rendina González, A P; Ferrer, M S; Masuelli, R W

    2015-07-01

    Interspecific hybridisation in tuber-bearing species of Solanum is a common phenomenon and represents an important source of variability, crucial for adaptation and speciation of potato species. In this regard, the effects of interspecific hybridisation on retrotransposon families present in the genomes, and their consequent effects on generation of genetic variability in wild tuber-bearing Solanum species, are poorly characterised. The aim of this study was to analyse the activity of retrotransposons in inter- and intraspecific hybrids between S. kurtzianum and S. microdontum, obtained by controlled crosses, and the effects on morphological, genetic and epigenetic variability. For genetic and epigenetic analysis, S-SAP (sequence-specific amplification polymorphism) and TMD (transposon methylation display) techniques were used, respectively, with specific primers for Tnt1 and Tto1 retrotransposon families (Order LTR, Superfamily Copia). The results indicate that at morphological level, interspecific hybrid genotypes differ from their parental species, whereas derived intraspecific hybrids do not. In both cases, we observed significant reductions in pollen grain viability, and a negative correlation with Tnt1 mobility. Both retrotransposons, Tto1 and Tnt1, were mobilised in the genotypes analysed, with mobility ranging from 0 to 7.8%. Furthermore, at the epigenetic level, demethylation was detected in the vicinity of Tnt1 and Tto1 in the hybrids compared with the parental genotypes. These patterns were positively correlated with the activity of the retrotransposons. The results suggest a possible mechanism through which hybridisation events generate genetic variability in tuber-bearing species of Solanum through retrotranposon activation.

  16. Effect of plasma jet diameter on the efficiency of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kakuta, Maito; Furuta, Hiroshi; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-06-01

    The plasma jet generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in solution is important in biology, medicine, and disinfection. Studies using a wide variety of plasma jet devices have been carried out for this purpose, making it difficult to compare the performance between devices. In this study, we compared the efficiency of RONS generation in deionized (DI) water between 3.7-mm- and 800-µm-sized helium (He) plasma jets (hereafter mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively) at different treatment distances and times. The efficiency of RONS generation was determined by considering the total amount of RONS generated in DI water with respect to the input energy and gas consumption. We found that the mm-jet generated 20% more RONS in the DI water than the µm-jet at the optimized distance. However, when the input power and He gas consumption were taken into account, we discovered that the µm-jet was 5 times more efficient in generating RONS in the DI water. Under the parameters investigated in this study, the concentration of RONS continued to increase as a function of treatment time (up to 30 min). However treatment distance had a marked effect on the efficiency of RONS generation: treatment distances of 25 and 30 mm were optimal for the mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively. Our method of comparing the efficiency of RONS generation in solution between plasma jets could be used as a reference protocol for the development of efficient plasma jet sources for use in medicine, biology, and agriculture.

  17. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Hannah M.; Ungerer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia. Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius. We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  18. Malassezia globosa tends to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia globosa is a major pathogen of Malassezia folliculitis (MF) and the predominant species on human skin. The aim of this study was to clarify the differences between M. globosa and other cutaneous Malassezia species, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis and M. furfur. The optimum growth temperature, effects of compounds of sweat and free fatty acids on growth, and lipase activities of five cutaneous Malassezia species were determined. The growth of M. globosa was promoted strongly by the compounds of sweat and high temperature unlike that of other cutaneous Malassezia species. This result clarified that M. globosa tended to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species. Furthermore, M. globosa showed high lipase activity. We consider these characteristics of M. globosa to relate to the pathogenesis of MF.

  19. Life-history traits and effective population size in species with overlapping generations revisited: the importance of adult mortality.

    PubMed

    Waples, R S

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between life-history traits and the key eco-evolutionary parameters effective population size (Ne) and Ne/N is revisited for iteroparous species with overlapping generations, with a focus on the annual rate of adult mortality (d). Analytical methods based on populations with arbitrarily long adult lifespans are used to evaluate the influence of d on Ne, Ne/N and the factors that determine these parameters: adult abundance (N), generation length (T), age at maturity (α), the ratio of variance to mean reproductive success in one season by individuals of the same age (φ) and lifetime variance in reproductive success of individuals in a cohort (Vk•). Although the resulting estimators of N, T and Vk• are upwardly biased for species with short adult lifespans, the estimate of Ne/N is largely unbiased because biases in T are compensated for by biases in Vk• and N. For the first time, the contrasting effects of T and Vk• on Ne and Ne/N are jointly considered with respect to d and φ. A simple function of d and α based on the assumption of constant vital rates is shown to be a robust predictor (R(2)=0.78) of Ne/N in an empirical data set of life tables for 63 animal and plant species with diverse life histories. Results presented here should provide important context for interpreting the surge of genetically based estimates of Ne that has been fueled by the genomics revolution.

  20. Remarkably high activities of testicular cytochrome c in destroying reactive oxygen species and in triggering apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Lin, Hao; Ye, Sheng; Liu, Qin-ying; Meng, Zhaohui; Zhang, Chuan-mao; Xia, Yongjing; Margoliash, Emanuel; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Xiang-jun

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the major reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in sperm. High concentrations of H2O2 in sperm induce nuclear DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation and result in cell death. The respiratory chain of the mitochondrion is one of the most productive ROS generating systems in sperm, and thus the destruction of ROS in mitochondria is critical for the cell. It was recently reported that H2O2 generated by the respiratory chain of the mitochondrion can be efficiently destroyed by the cytochrome c-mediated electron-leak pathway where the electron of ferrocytochrome c migrates directly to H2O2 instead of to cytochrome c oxidase. In our studies, we found that mouse testis-specific cytochrome c (T-Cc) can catalyze the reduction of H2O2 three times faster than its counterpart in somatic cells (S-Cc) and that the T-Cc heme has the greater resistance to being degraded by H2O2. Together, these findings strongly imply that T-Cc can protect sperm from the damages caused by H2O2. Moreover, the apoptotic activity of T-Cc is three to five times greater than that of S-Cc in a well established apoptosis measurement system using Xenopus egg extract. The dramatically stronger apoptotic activity of T-Cc might be important for the suicide of male germ cells, considered a physiological mechanism that regulates the number of sperm produced and eliminates those with damaged DNA. Thus, it is very likely that T-Cc has evolved to guarantee the biological integrity of sperm produced in mammalian testis. PMID:16757556

  1. Identification of endangered or threatened Costa Rican tree species by wood anatomy and fluorescence activity.

    PubMed

    Moya, Róger; Wiemann, Michael C; Olivares, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    A total of 45 native Costa Rican tree species are threatened or in danger of extinction, but the Convention on International Trade Endangered Species (CITES) includes only eight of these in its Appendices. However, the identification of other species based on their wood anatomy is limited. The present study objective was to describe and to compare wood anatomy and fluorescence activity in some endangered or threatened species of Costa Rica. A total of 45 (22 endangered and 23 threatened with extinction) wood samples of these species, from the xylaria of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica and the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin, were examined. Surface fluorescence was positive in eight species, water extract fluorescence was positive in six species and ethanol extract fluorescence was positive in 24 species. Almost all species were diffuse porous except for occasional (Cedrela odorata, C. fissilis, Cordia gerascanthus) or regular (C. salvadorensis and C. tonduzii) semi-ring porosity. A dendritic vessel arrangement was found in Sideroxylon capari, and pores were solitary in Guaiacum sanctum and Vantanea barbourii. Vessel element length was shortest in Guaiacum sanctum and longest in Humiriastrum guianensis, Minquartia guianensis and Vantanea barbourii. Finally, anatomical information and fluorescence activity were utilized to construct an identification key of species, in which fluorescence is a feature used in identification.

  2. Gas dilution system using critical flow Venturi nozzles for generating primary trace-moisture standards in multiple gas species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Minami; Abe, Hisashi

    2017-02-01

    Gas dilution systems are commonly used to generate calibration gas mixtures for secondary gas standards. However, if a gas dilution system is used to generate gas mixtures for primary trace-moisture standards in multiple gas species, difficulty arises; flow control with relative stability of better than 0.009% is required although the relative uncertainty of the best gas flow meter to date is around 0.3%. In this study, we developed a novel gas dilution system using critical flow Venturi nozzles to address this problem. The developed dilution system can measure and control the flow rates of gases in the range of approximately 0.05 l min-1 to 7 l min-1 (when converted to those measured at 101 325 Pa and 273.15 K) with relative stability of better than 0.007%. Using the dilution system, we developed a magnetic suspension balance/diffusion-tube humidity generator capable of generating trace moisture in N2 in the range of approximately 10 nmol mol-1 to 5 µmol mol-1 in amount fraction. The accuracy of the generated trace-moisture standard was verified by measurement with cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

  3. Copper chelation by D-penicillamine generates reactive oxygen species that are cytotoxic to human leukemia and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Anshul; Mumper, Russell J

    2007-11-01

    Serum and tumor copper levels are significantly elevated in a variety of malignancies including breast, ovarian, gastric, lung, and leukemia. D-Penicillamine (D-pen), a copper-chelating agent, at low concentrations in the presence of copper generates concentration-dependent cytotoxic hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The purpose of these studies was to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the reduction in intracellular thiol levels due to H(2)O(2) and other ROS generated from copper-catalyzed D-pen oxidation in human breast cancer cells (BT474, MCF-7) and human leukemia cells (HL-60, HL-60/VCR, HL-60/ADR). D-pen (< or = 400 microM) in the presence of cupric sulfate (10 microM) resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity. Catalase was able to completely protect the cells, substantiating the involvement of H(2)O(2) in cancer cell cytotoxicity. A linear correlation between the D-pen concentration and the intracellular ROS generated was shown in both breast cancer and leukemia cells. D-pen in the presence of copper also resulted in a reduction in intracellular reduced thiol levels. The H(2)O(2)-mediated cytotoxicity was greater in leukemia cells compared to breast cancer cells. These results support the hypothesis that D-pen can be employed as a cytotoxic copper-chelating agent based on its ROS-generating ability.

  4. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namita; Patil, C. R.; Chaudhari, K. B.; Wagh, J. P.; Surana, S. J.; Jadhav, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes) are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA) Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE) (Ders.) Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects. PMID:21808540

  5. Calcium and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation: How to Read the Facts

    PubMed Central

    Adam-Vizi, Vera; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2011-01-01

    A number of recent discoveries indicate that abnormal Ca2+ signaling, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the neuronal damage in Alzheimer’s disease. However, the literature on the interactions between these factors is controversial especially in the interpretation of the cause-effect relationship between mitochondrial damage induced by Ca2+ overload and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, we survey the experimental observations on the Ca2+-induced mitochondrial ROS production, explain the sources of controversy in interpreting these results, and discuss the different molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of Ca2+ on the ROS emission by brain mitochondria. PMID:20421693

  6. Two-species ion arrays for quantum logic spectroscopy and entanglement generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David B.

    The quantum states of trapped atomic ions can be highly isolated from external perturbation, and precisely manipulated with applied laser fields. This makes them an excellent medium for quantum-limited experiments such as quantum information processing and precision spectroscopy. A relatively small number of ion species have been used for these types of experiments because most species are difficult to laser cool and detect directly. This thesis demonstrates a way to overcome this limitation by use of sympathetic cooling and state detection based on quantum logic. We apply these techniques to mixed-species arrays of 27Al+ and 9Be + ions. A mathematical model for the motion of such a two-species array is presented in order to explore some features of the ion dynamics that are relevant for the experiments. Repetitive quantum nondemolition measurements of the electronic states of a 27Al+ ion show detection fidelities as high as 99.94%. We also demonstrate the simultaneous detection of two 27Al+ ions and observe a detection fidelity of 99.8%. The basic ideas behind the detection strategy are extended to potentially enable similar experiments on a more general class of atomic and molecular ions. We have also investigated, theoretically and experimentally, a method for preparing entangled Dicke states in trapped atomic ions. We consider a linear chain of N ion qubits that is prepared in a particular Fock state of motion, |m>. The m phonons are removed by applying a laser pulse globally to the N qubits, and converting the motional excitation to m flipped spins. The global nature of this pulse ensures that the m flipped spins are shared by all the target ions in a state that is a close approximation to the Dicke state | DmN >. We calculate numerically the fidelity limits of the protocol and find small deviations from the ideal state for m = 1 and m = 2. We have demonstrated the basic features of this protocol by preparing the Bell state | D1 2 > in two 25Mg+ target ions

  7. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  8. The study of gas species on THz generation from laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, YiJian; Wu, Tong; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2015-08-01

    Intense Terahertz waves generated from air-induced plasma and serving as broadband THz source provide a promising broadband source for innovative technology. Terahertz generation in selected gases has attracted more and more researchers' interests in recent years. In this research, the THz emission from different atoms is described, such as nitrogen, argon and helium in Michelson. The THz radiation is detected by a Golay Cell equipped with a 6-mm-diameter diamond-inputting window. It can be seen in the first time that when the pump power lies at a stable level, the THz generation created by the femtosecond laser focusing on the nitrogen is higher than which focusing on the helium, and lower than that produced in the argon gas environment. We believe that the THz intensity is Ar > N > Ne because of its atomic mass, which is Ar > N > Ne as well. It is clear that the Gas molecular decides the release of free electrons ionized from ultra short femtosecond laser through the electronic dynamic analysis. The higher the gas mass is, the stronger the terahertz emission will be. We further explore the THz emission at the different laser power levels, and the experimental results can be commendably quadratic fitted. It can be inferred that THz emission under different gas medium environment still complies with the law of four-wave mixing (FWM) process and has nothing to do with the gas environment: the radiation energy is proportional to the quadratic of incident laser power.

  9. Daily activity and light exposure levels for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G; Jones, Geoffrey E; Glander, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of all biological rhythms, yet little is known about the role of the 24-hour luminous environment on nonhuman primate circadian patterns, making it difficult to understand the photic niche of the ancestral primate. Here we present the first data on proximate light-dark exposure and activity-rest patterns in free-ranging nonhuman primates. Four individuals each of five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center (Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta, Propithecus coquereli, Varecia rubra, and Varecia variegata variegata) were fitted with a Daysimeter-D pendant that contained light and accelerometer sensors. Our results reveal common as well as species-specific light exposure and behavior patterns. As expected, all five species were more active between sunrise and sunset. All five species demonstrated an anticipatory increase in their pre-sunrise activity that peaked at sunrise with all but V. rubra showing a reduction within an hour. All five species reduced activity during mid-day. Four of the five stayed active after sunset, but P. coquereli began reducing their activity about 2 hours before sunset. Other subtle differences in the recorded light exposure and activity patterns suggest species-specific photic niches and behaviors. The eventual application of the Daysimeter-D in the wild may help to better understand the adaptive evolution of ancestral primates.

  10. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  11. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    PubMed Central

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviours after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to reveal the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. Correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst. PMID:27671143

  12. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover`s Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  13. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover's Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  14. Hemiparasites generate environmental heterogeneity and enhance species coexistence in salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Grewell, Brenda J

    2008-07-01

    Tidal inundation and salinity are considered to be controlling factors in salt marsh species distributions. Parasitic plants may also influence community organization as parasite-host interactions may play a functional role in stress amelioration due to physiological mechanisms for salinity tolerance and resource acquisition. Endangered root hemiparasites (Cordylanthus maritimus ssp. palustris and Cordylanthus mollis ssp. mollis) occupy unique habitat within fragmented northern California tidal wetlands. My objective was to examine the effects of these root hemiparasites on soil salinity, aeration, and community composition. I compared experimentally established bare patches, shaded and unshaded, and parasite removal patches to controls with hemiparasites across intertidal elevation gradients. Plant community composition, soil salinity, and redox potential were measured as response variables. In this field removal experiment, I demonstrated that parasite-host associations can enhance the amelioration of physical stress conditions in the salt marsh exceeding the passive role of shading by vegetation. Consumer-driven reduction of physical stress resulted in increased plant species richness, and the effect was most pronounced with elevated salinity and hypoxia stress. Although previous studies have demonstrated that removal of dominant plant biomass by herbivores can increase physical stress in salt marshes, this is one of the first examples of a positive indirect effect of a consumer on community diversity through physical stress relief. Greater understanding of biological interactions coupled with abiotic factors may improve rare plant conservation and salt marsh restoration success.

  15. Species-Specific Differences and Structure-Activity Relationships in the Debromination of PBDE Congeners in Three Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Simon C.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there may be species-specific differences in the metabolism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) among different fish species. In this study, we investigated the in vitro hepatic metabolism of eleven individual PBDE congeners (tri- through decaBDEs) in three different fish species: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), and Chinook salmon (O. tschwatcha). In addition, we evaluated the influence of PBDE structural characteristics (i.e., bromine substitution patterns) on metabolism. Six of the eleven congeners we evaluated, BDEs 99, 153, 183, 203, 208, and 209, were metabolically debrominated to lower brominated congeners. All of the congeners that were metabolized contained at least one meta-substituted bromine. Metabolites were not detected for congeners without one meta-substituted bromine (e.g., BDEs 28, 47, and 100). Metabolite formation rates were generally 10–100 times faster in carp than in trout and salmon. BDEs 47, 49, 101, 154, and 183 were the major metabolites observed in all three species with the exception of BDE 47, which was only detected in carp. Carp demonstrated a preference towards meta-debromination, while trout and salmon debrominated meta- and para- bromine atoms to an equal extent. We compared glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and deiodinase (DI) activity among all three species as these enzyme systems have been hypothesized to play a role in PBDE debromination among teleosts. Carp exhibited a preference for meta-deiodination of the thyroid hormone thyroxine, which was consistent with the preference for meta-debromination of PBDEs observed in carp. PMID:21291240

  16. Some dinophycean red tide plankton species generate a superoxide scavenging substance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Emiko; Niwano, Yoshimi; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Kim, Daekyung; Nakashima, Takuji; Oda, Tatsuya; Kohno, Masahiro

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that some raphidophycean red tide flagellates produce substances able to scavenge superoxide, whereas there have been no reports on superoxide scavenger production by dinophycean red tide flagellates. In this study, we examined the superoxide-scavenging activity of aqueous extracts from dinophycean red tide flagellates, Gymnodinium spp., Scrippsiella trochoidea, and Karenia sp., by a luminol analog L-012-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method and an electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method, and compared the activity to that of raphidophycean red tide flagellates, Chattonella spp., Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica. In the experiment applying the L-012-dependent CL method, only the aqueous extracts from raphidophycean red tide flagellates showed superoxide-scavenging activity. On the other hand, applying the ESR-spin trapping method, we found that the aqueous extracts from dinophycean red tide flagellates also showed superoxide-scavenging activity. This is the first report on the production of a superoxide-scavenger by dinophycean red tide flagellates.

  17. Cortical hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current takes part in the generation of focal paroxysmal activities

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence; Steriade, Mircea

    2002-01-01

    During paroxysmal neocortical oscillations, sudden depolarization leading to the next cycle occurs when the majority of cortical neurons are hyperpolarized. Both the Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IK(Ca)) and disfacilitation play critical roles in the generation of hyperpolarizing potentials. In vivo experiments and computational models are used here to investigate whether the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (Ih) in cortical neurons also contributes to the generation of paroxysmal onsets. Hyperpolarizing current pulses revealed a depolarizing sag in ≈20% of cortical neurons. Intracellular recordings from glial cells indirectly indicated an increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) during paroxysmal activities, leading to a positive shift in the reversal potential of K+-mediated currents, including Ih. In the paroxysmal neocortex, ≈20% of neurons show repolarizing potentials originating from hyperpolarizations associated with depth-electroencephalogram positive waves of spike-wave complexes. The onset of these repolarizing potentials corresponds to maximal [K+]o as estimated from dual simultaneous impalements from neurons and glial cells. Computational models showed how, after the increased [K+]o, the interplay between Ih, IK(Ca), and a persistent Na+ current, INa(P), could organize paroxysmal oscillations at a frequency of 2–3 Hz. PMID:12089324

  18. UV Light-Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Antimicrobial Properties of Cellulose Fabric Modified by 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone Tetracarboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Aiqin; Feng, Guanchen; Zhuo, Jingyuan; Sun, Gang

    2015-12-23

    3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA) could directly react with hydroxyl groups on cellulose to form ester bonds. The modified cotton fabrics not only provided good wrinkle-free and ultraviolet (UV) protective functions, but also exhibited important photochemical properties such as producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under UV light exposure. The amounts of the produced hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide were measured, and photochemical reactive mechanism of the BPTCA treated cellulose was discussed. The results reveal that the fabrics possess good washing durability in generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The cotton fabrics modified with different concentrations of BPTCA and cured at an elevated temperature demonstrated excellent antimicrobial activities, which provided 99.99% antibacterial activities against both E. coli and S. aureus. The advanced materials have potential applications in medical textiles and biological material fields.

  19. In vitro antiplasmodial and phytochemical study of five Artemisia species from Iran and in vivo activity of two species.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Ali; Sardari, Soroush; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Vaziri, Behrouz

    2010-08-01

    The extract from Artemisia annua, containing artemisinin, has been proven active against multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum in previous studies. The purpose of this paper was to study five Artemisia species from Iran for their in vitro and in vivo antimalarial property and detection of artemisinin in the active species by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Dried plants were extracted by 80% ethanol, and total extracts were investigated for antiplasmodial property and artemisinin content by TLC, HPLC, and (1)H-NMR techniques. Two plants (A. annua L. and Artemisia absinthium L.) showed good antiplasmodial activity against multidrug resistant and sensitive strain of P. falciparum. A. absinthium and A. annua at concentrations of 200 mg/kg for 4 days reduced parasitemia in BALB/C mice infected with Plasmodium bergei by 94.28% and 83.28%, respectively, but we could not detect artemisinin in all plants studied in this research. The antiplasmodial property of these two herbs is possibly related to essential oils that present in high amounts in their extracts.

  20. Two new iridoids from selected Penstemon species--antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Sybilla M; Graikou, Konstantia; Sotiroudis, Georgios; Głowniak, Kazimierz; Chinou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen secondary metabolites, belonging to three different chemical groups, were isolated from the methanolic extracts of the aerial parts of selected penstemon plants [Penstemon fruticosus (Pursh) Greene var. fruticosus, Penstemon palmeri Gray and Penstemon venustus Doug. ex Lindl.], and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral evidence. Six iridoid glucosides (1-6), three phenylpropanoid glucosides (13-15) and two acetophenone derivatives (16,17), obtained from P. fruticosus, five iridoids (2, 7-10), one phenylpropanoid glucoside (15) and two acetophenones (16, 18), isolated from P. palmeri while three iridoids (2, 11, 12) and three phenylpropanoids (13-15) were identified in P. venustus. Two of the iridoid glucosides (4, 5) from P. fruticosus are new natural products named accordingly as cis- and trans- forms of 10-O-p-methoxycinnamoylaucubin. All isolated compounds, as well as crude methanolic extracts, were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against six Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three human pathogenic fungi.

  1. Fhit interaction with ferredoxin reductase triggers generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Pichiorri, Flavia; Gaspari, Marco; Palumbo, Tiziana; Aqeilan, Rami I; Gaudio, Eugenio; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Di Leva, Giampiero; Fabbri, Muller; Birk, David E; Raso, Cinzia; Green-Church, Kari; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Venuta, Salvatore; Huebner, Kay; Croce, Carlo M

    2008-05-16

    Fhit protein is lost in most cancers, its restoration suppresses tumorigenicity, and virus-mediated FHIT gene therapy induces apoptosis and suppresses tumors in preclinical models. We have used protein cross-linking and proteomics methods to characterize a Fhit protein complex involved in triggering Fhit-mediated apoptosis. The complex includes Hsp60 and Hsp10 that mediate Fhit stability and may affect import into mitochondria, where it interacts with ferredoxin reductase, responsible for transferring electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450 via ferredoxin. Viral-mediated Fhit restoration increases production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, followed by increased apoptosis of lung cancer cells under oxidative stress conditions; conversely, Fhit-negative cells escape apoptosis, carrying serious oxidative DNA damage that may contribute to an increased mutation rate. Characterization of Fhit interacting proteins has identified direct effectors of the Fhit-mediated apoptotic pathway that is lost in most cancers through loss of Fhit.

  2. Deconvoluting Mixtures ofEmissions Sources to Investigate PM2.5's Ability to Generate Reactive Oxygen Species and its Associations with Cardiorespiratory Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Bates, J.; Abrams, J.; Verma, V.; Fang, T.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) inhalation can catalytically generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of the body's antioxidant capacity, leading to oxidative stress and ultimately adverse health. PM2.5 emissions from different sources vary widely in chemical composition, with varied effects on the body. Here, the ability of mixtures of different sources of PM2.5 to generate ROS and associations of this capability with acute health effects were investigated. A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay that integrates over different sources was used to quantify ROS generation potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in Atlanta from June 2012 - June 2013. PM2.5 source impacts, estimated using the Chemical Mass Balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles, were related to DTT activity using a linear regression model, which provided information on intrinsic DTT activity (i.e., toxicity) of each source. The model was then used to develop a time series of daily DTT activity over a ten-year period (1998-2010) for use in an epidemiologic study. Light-duty gasoline vehicles exhibited the highest intrinsic DTT activity, followed by biomass burning and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Biomass burning contributed the largest fraction to total DTT activity, followed by gasoline and diesel vehicles (45%, 20% and 14%, respectively). These results suggest the importance of aged oxygenated organic aerosols and metals in ROS generation. Epidemiologic analyses found significant associations between estimated DTT activity and emergency department visits for congestive heart failure and asthma/wheezing attacks in the 5-county Atlanta area. Estimated DTT activity was the only pollutant measure out of PM2.5, O3, and PM2.5 constituents elemental carbon and organic carbon) that exhibited a significant link to congestive heart failure. In two-pollutant models, DTT activity was significantly associated with asthma/wheeze and congestive heart failure while PM2

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  4. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  5. Effect of electron-transport inhibitors on the generation of reactive oxygen species by pea mitochondria during succinate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Popov, V N; Ruuge, E K; Starkov, A A

    2003-07-01

    The effect of inhibitors of the cytochrome pathway and alternative oxidase on the rate of respiration and generation of reactive oxygen species by pea mitochondria was studied. Respiration of mitochondria from pea cotyledons was inhibited by 70-80% by salicylhydroxamate (SHAM). The rate of hydrogen peroxide production by pea cotyledon mitochondria during succinate oxidation was 0.15 nmol/min per mg protein. SHAM considerably accelerated the hydrogen peroxide production. The SHAM-dependent H2O2 production was stimulated by 2 micro M antimycin A and inhibited by 5 mM KCN and 1 micro M myxothiazol. The study of the rate of O2*- generation by pea mitochondria using EPR spin traps and epinephrine oxidation showed that H2O2 accumulation can be accounted for by a significant increase in the rate of O2*- production.

  6. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radical (HO.), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO. (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma.

  7. Fucoidan protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via normalization of reactive oxygen species generation through the Ca²⁺-dependent ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Qingfa; Liang, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) and it is the main cause of loss of vision. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of marine organisms has intensified. The effect of fucoidan from the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus on the molecular mechanisms of numerous diseases has been studied, while to date, its effect on DR was yet to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of fucoidan in DR. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE‑19 was exposed to high D‑glucose in the presence or absence of fucoidan. Cell viability was monitored using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Ca2+ influx was measured with a calcium imaging system and the activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) protein was evaluated using western blot analysis. The non‑toxic fucoidan protected ARPE‑19 cells from high glucose‑induced cell death and normalized high glucose‑induced generation of ROS. Fucoidan also inhibited high glucose‑induced cell apoptosis, as well as the Ca2+ influx and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in ARPE‑19 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that fucoidan protects ARPE‑19 cells against high glucose‑induced oxidative damage via normalization of ROS generation through the Ca2+‑dependent ERK signaling pathway.

  8. Does changing from a first generation antipsychotic (perphenazin) to a second generation antipsychotic (risperidone) alter brain activation and motor activity? A case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In patients with schizophrenia, altered brain activation and motor activity levels are central features, reflecting cognitive impairments and negative symptoms, respectively. Newer studies using nonlinear methods have addressed the severe disturbances in neurocognitive functioning that is regarded as one of the core features of schizophrenia. Our aim was to compare brain activation and motor activity in a patient during pharmacological treatment that was switched from a first- to a second-generation antipsychotic drug. We hypothesised that this change of medication would increase level of responding in both measures. Case presentation We present the case of a 53-year-old male with onset of severe mental illness in adolescence, ICD-10 diagnosed as schizophrenia of paranoid type, chronic form. We compared brain activation and motor activity in this patient during pharmacological treatment with a first-generation (perphenazin), and later switched to a second-generation (risperidone) antipsychotic drug. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activation and wrist worn actigraphy to measure motor activity. Conclusion Our study showed that brain activation decreased in areas critical for cognitive functioning in this patient, when changing from a first to a second generation antipsychotic drug. However the mean motor activity level was unchanged, although risperidone reduced variability, particularly short-term variability from minute to minute. Compared to the results from previous studies, the present findings indicate that changing to a second-generation antipsychotic alters variability measures towards that seen in a control group, but with reduced brain activation, which was an unexpected finding. PMID:23648137

  9. TGF-β1 stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and generation of reactive oxygen species in cultured mouse podocytes, mediated in part by the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Sakairi, Toru; Beeson, Craig; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2013-11-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has been associated with podocyte injury; we have examined its effect on podocyte bioenergetics. We studied transformed mouse podocytes, exposed to TGF-β1, using a label-free assay system, Seahorse XF24, which measures oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR). Both basal OCR and ATP generation-coupled OCR were significantly higher in podocytes exposed to 0.3-10 ng/ml of TGF-β1 for 24, 48, and 72 h. TGF-β1 (3 ng/ml) increased oxidative capacity 75%, and 96% relative to control after 48 and 72 h, respectively. ATP content was increased 19% and 30% relative to control after a 48- and 72-h exposure, respectively. Under conditions of maximal mitochondrial function, TGF-β1 increased palmitate-driven OCR by 49%. Thus, TGF-β1 increases mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP generation in the presence of diverse energy substrates. TGF-β1 did not increase cell number or mitochondrial DNA copy number but did increase mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which could explain the OCR increase. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased by 32% after TGF-β1 exposure for 48 h. TGF-β activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and rapamycin reduced the TGF-β1-stimulated increases in OCR, ECAR, ATP generation, cellular metabolic activity, and protein generation. Our data suggest that TGF-β1, acting, in part, via mTOR, increases mitochondrial MMP and OCR, resulting in increased ROS generation and that this may contribute to podocyte injury.

  10. Contrasting activity patterns of two related octopus species, Octopus macropus and Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Daniela V; Byrne, Ruth A; Kuba, Michael; Mather, Jennifer; Ploberger, Werner; Reschenhofer, Erhard

    2006-08-01

    Octopus macropus and Octopus vulgaris have overlapping habitats and are exposed to similar temporal changes. Whereas the former species is described as nocturnal in the field, there are conflicting reports about the activity time of the latter one. To compare activity patterns, the authors tested both species in the laboratory. Octopuses were exposed to a light-dark cycle and held under constant dim light for 7 days each. O. macropus showed nocturnal and light-cued activity. According to casual observations, O. vulgaris started out nocturnal but had switched to mostly diurnal when the experiment began. Individual variation of its activity was found. The different activity patterns of O. macropus and O. vulgaris might reflect their lifestyles, the latter species being more generalist.

  11. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  12. Protection of mammalian cells by o-phenanthroline from lethal and DNA-damaging effects produced by active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    de Mello Filho, A C; Meneghini, R

    1985-10-30

    Active oxygen species are suspected as being a cause of the cellular damage that occurs at the site of inflammation. Phagocytic cells accumulate at these sites and produce superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. The ultimate killing species, the cellular target and the mechanism whereby the lethal injury is produced are unknown. We exposed mouse fibroblasts to xanthine oxidase and acetaldehyde, a system which mimics the membrane of phagocytic cells in terms of production of oxygen species. We observed that the generation of these species produced DNA strand breaks and cellular death. The metal chelator o-phenanthroline completely abolished the former effect, and at the same time it effectively protected the cells from lethal injuries. Because complexing iron o-phenanthroline prevents the formation of hydroxyl radical by the Fendon reaction (Fe(II) + H2O2----Fe(III) + OH- + OH.), it is proposed that most of the cell death and DNA damage are brought about by OH radical, produced from other species by iron-mediated reactions.

  13. Biological activity of photoproducts of merocyanine 540 generated by laser-light activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Chanh, Tran C.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Harriman, Anthony; Matthews, James Lester

    1992-08-01

    Controlled exposure of photoactive compounds to light prior to their use in biological targets results in the formation of heretofore unknown photoproducts. This process of photoproduct generation, termed "preactivation," renders the photactive compound capable of systemic use without further dependence on light. Preactivation of mercyanin 540 (MC540) and several other photoactive compounds is achievable by exposure to CW and pulse laser radiation. The singlet oxygen generated at excited states attacks the dye molucule itself, resulting in the formation of biologically active photoproducts. For preactivated MC540 (photoproducts of MC540) generated by exposure to argon laser light (514 nm) and light from free-electron laser, we have demonstrated its effectiveness in selective killing of certain types of cultured tumor cells as well as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with very low, if any, damage to normal cells and tisues. For example, approximately 90% of the Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells and HL-60 leukemic cells are killed by preactivated MC540 at a concentration of 120 μg/ml. A two-hour treatment of cultured cells with buthionine sulfoxamine followed by the treatement with preactivated MC540 reults in 99.99% inhibition of clonogenic tumor stem cell growth. We also have demonstrated that preactivated MC540 is very effective in killing cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1. It also is very effective in killing HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in virus-infected blood in vitro as determined by reverse transcriptase, P24, P17, core antigen expression and synctium formation. Treatment of HIV-1 with preactivated MC540 renders the treated HIV-1 incapable of binding to CD4 target molecules on T cells as determined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation assays. In vivo toxicology studies show that preactivated MC540 is very well tolerated and does not produce any signs of adverse reaction at the therapeutic doses, as determined by

  14. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna).

    PubMed

    Takao, L K; Imatomi, M; Gualtieri, S C J

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum). Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI) by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract) and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL-1), with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL-1). The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24-8.75 µg·mL-1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants.

  15. Digestive enzyme activity of two stonefly species (Insecta, Plecoptera) and their feeding habits.

    PubMed

    de Figueroa, J M Tierno; Trenzado, C E; López-Rodríguez, M J; Sanz, A

    2011-11-01

    The digestive enzymes of two stoneflies species, Hemimelaena flaviventris and Isoperla morenica, were studied for the first time. These species are temporary water inhabitants and exhibit great feeding plasticity. Although they are traditionally referred to as predators, a previous study revealed that H. flaviventris incorporates some diatoms into its diet in addition to feeding usually on several prey, and I. morenica (in that study under the name of I. curtata) only feeds on animals occasionally. The enzymatic activities of digestive amylase, lipase, protease, trypsin and chymotrypsin were determined for each species at the same developmental stage. The results show that H. flaviventris has a greater digestive enzymatic pool and higher relative and absolute protease, lipase and trypsin activities than I. morenica. The latter has a relative higher amylase activity. As higher amylase activity is typical of phytophagous species and higher protease activity typical of carnivorous species; these results reveal that H. flaviventris is a more efficient zoophagous species than I. morenica. The ecological implications of these findings, including the higher secondary production of H. flaviventris in its habitat, are discussed.

  16. Metformin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced renal tubular cell injury by suppressing reactive oxygen species generation via reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S

    2012-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in tubulointerstitial damage in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, metformin has been shown to ameliorate tubular injury both in cell culture and diabetic animal model. However, effects of metformin on AGEs-induced tubular cell apoptosis and damage remain unknown. We examined here whether and how metformin could block the AGEs-RAGE-elicited tubular cell injury in vitro. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured with dihydroethidium staining. Apoptosis was evaluated by DNA fragmentation and annexin V expression level. AGEs upregulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently increased ROS generation and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in human renal proximal tubular cells, all of which were significantly blocked by the treatment of 0.01 and 0.1 mM metformin. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase significantly blocked the effects of metformin on RAGE gene expression and ROS generation in AGEs-exposed tubular cells. Furthermore, metformin dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced apoptotic cell death of tubular cells; 1 mM metformin completely suppressed the pro-apoptotic effects of AGEs in 2 different assay systems. Our present study suggests that metformin could inhibit the AGEs-induced apoptosis and inflammatory and fibrotic reactions in tubular cells probably by reducing ROS generation via suppression of RAGE expression through AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Metformin may protect against tubular cell injury in diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGEs-RAGE-ROS axis.

  17. The pepper calmodulin gene CaCaM1 is involved in reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation required for cell death and the defense response.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2009-11-01

    Calcium signaling has emerged as an important signal transduction pathway of higher plants in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Ca2+-bound calmodulin (CaM) plays a critical role in decoding and transducing stress signals by activating specific targets. Here, we isolated and functionally characterized the pathogen-responsive CaM gene, Capsicum annuum calmodulin 1 (CaCaM1), from pepper (C. annuum) plants. The cellular function of CaCaM1 was verified by Agrobacterium spp.-mediated transient expression in pepper and transgenic overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Agrobacterium spp.-mediated transient expression of CaCaM1 activated reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in pepper leaves, ultimately leading to local acquired resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. CaCaM1-overexpression (OX) Arabidopsis exhibited enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora parasitica, which was accompanied by enhanced ROS and NO generation and HR-like cell death. Treatment with the calcium-channel blocker suppressed the oxidative and NO bursts and HR-like cell death that were triggered by CaCaM1 expression in pepper and Arabidopsis, suggesting that calcium influx is required for the activation of CaCaM1-mediated defense responses in plants. Upon treatment with the CaM antagonist, virulent P. syringae pv. tomato-induced NO generation was also compromised in CaCaM1-OX leaves. Together, these results suggest that the CaCaM1 gene functions in ROS and NO generation are essential for cell death and defense responses in plants.

  18. Trial of Growth Control of Farm-raised Fish by Plasma-generated Reactive Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Hideki; Kubota, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Ryo; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    As one of the biological applications of plasmas, growth control of agricultural products attracts attentions. There are many papers on growth enhancement of crops by plasma treatment. However, there are few published papers concerning growth enhancement of fishery products excepting reports of goldfish growth enhancement in 1980s. In this study, growth characteristics of edible fish (tilapia) under the plasma treatment has been investigated. An arc discharge reactor was employed and plasma treated air was introduced to two aquariums with a flow rate of 2.5 L/min. Measured concentrations of main reactive species were 43 ppm for NO, 23 ppm for NO2 and 7.5 ppm for O3. Each aquarium had 60 L capacity and contained 15 tilapia fish. The plasma treated air was supplied to an aquarium once a day and to the other aquarium twice a day with total duration of 10 min. Compared to no plasma treatment case, the growth rate decreased by 18% by once a day plasma treatment, whereas almost same growth rate was observed by twice a day plasma treatment. A possible reason of growth suppression is excess concentrations of nitrite and nitrate in water. The relationship between their concentrations and growth characteristics under several treatment conditions will be shown at the conference. Tirapia fish was supplied from SEFREC of Ehime University.

  19. Colloidal gold nanorings for improved photodynamic therapy through field-enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yue; Yang, Yamin; Wang, Hongjun; Du, Henry

    2013-02-01

    Au nanostructures that exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have excellent potential for photo-medicine, among a host of other applications. Here, we report the synthesis and use of colloidal gold nanorings (GNRs) with potential for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer. The GNRs were fabricated via galvanic replacement reaction of sacrificial Co nanoparticles in gold salt solution with low molecular weight (Mw = 2,500) poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a stabilizing agent. The size and the opening of the GNRs were controlled by the size of the starting Co particles and the concentration of the gold salt. UV-Vis absorption measurements indicated the tunability of the SPR of the GNRs from 560 nm to 780 nm. MTT assay showed that GNRs were non-toxic and biocompatible when incubated with breast cancer cells as well as the healthy counterpart cells. GNRs conjugated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) photosensitizer precursor led to elevated formation of reactive oxygen species and improved efficacy of photodynamic therapy of breast cancer cells under light irradiation compared to 5-ALA alone. These results can be attributed to significantly enhance localized electromagnetic field of the GNRs.

  20. Impact of reactive oxygen species generation on Helicobacter pylori-related extragastric diseases: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kountouras, Jannis; Boziki, Marina; Polyzos, Stergios A; Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Gavalas, Emmanouel; Zeglinas, Christos; Tzivras, Dimitri; Romiopoulos, Iordanis; Giorgakis, Nikolaos; Anastasiadou, Kyriaki; Vardaka, Elizabeth; Kountouras, Constantinos; Kazakos, Evangelos; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Deretzi, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that contribute to pathogenesis of a variety of H. pylori-related gastric diseases, as shown in animal and human studies. Helicobacter pylori infection is also associated with variety of systemic extragastric diseases in which H. pylori-related ROS production might also be involved in the pathogenesis of these systemic conditions. We proposed that Hp-related ROS may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of Hp-related systemic diseases including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and other relative neurodegenerative diseases, thereby suggesting introduction of relative ROS scavengers as therapeutic strategies against these diseases which are among the leading causes of disability and are associated with a large public health global burden. Moreover, we postulated that H. pylori-related ROS might also be involved in the pathogenesis of extragastric common malignancies, thereby suggesting that H. pylori eradication might inhibit the development or delay the progression of aforementioned diseases. However, large-scale future studies are warranted to elucidate the proposed pathophysiological mechanisms, including H. pylori-related ROS, involved in H. pylori-associated systemic and malignant conditions.

  1. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  2. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  3. A novel synthetic protoapigenone analogue, WYC02-9, induces DNA damage and apoptosis in DU145 prostate cancer cells through generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Ya-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Hsieh, Kun-Chou; Tsai, Lih-Min; Lin, An-Shen; Wu, Yang-Chang; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou

    2011-05-01

    The protoapigenone analogue WYC02-9, a novel synthetic flavonoid, has been shown to act against a variety of experimental tumors. However, its effects on prostate cancer and its mechanism of action are unknown. Thus, WYC02-9 was investigated for its cytotoxicity against DU145 prostate cancer cells, as was the underlying mechanisms by which WYC02-9 might induce DNA damage and apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species (ROS). WYC02-9 inhibited the cell growth of three prostate cancer cell lines, especially DU145 cells. In DU145 cells, WYC02-9 increased the generation of intracellular ROS, followed by induction of DNA damage and activation of the ATM-p53-H2A.X pathway and checkpoint-related signals Chk1/Chk2, which led to increased numbers of cells in the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Furthermore, WYC02-9 induced apoptotic cell death through mitochondrial membrane potential decrease and activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP. The above effects were all prevented by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Administration of WYC02-9 in a nude mouse DU145 xenograft model further identified the anti-cancer activity of WYC02-9. These findings therefore suggest that WYC02-9-induced DNA damage and mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis in DU145 cells are mediated via ROS generation.

  4. Educating for Political Activity: A Younger Generational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a response to Professor Chitty's "Educational Review" Guest Lecture article, "Educating for political activity". I address the three sections of his paper: a global and national-based politics of war, corporate manipulation and parliamentary scandals. This provides a basis to draw upon empirical material from a…

  5. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates☆

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Casey L.; Perevoshchikova, Irina V.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Orr, Adam L.; Brand, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First, the overall rates differed by an order of magnitude between substrates. Second, the relative contribution of each site was very different with different substrates. During succinate oxidation, most of the superoxide production was from the site of quinone reduction in complex I (site IQ), with small contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF) and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo). However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF) was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo), and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo. PMID:24024165

  6. GONe: Software for estimating effective population size in species with generational overlap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, J.A.; Letcher, B.H.; Nislow, K.H.

    2012-01-01

    GONe is a user-friendly, Windows-based program for estimating effective size (N e) in populations with overlapping generations. It uses the Jorde-Ryman modification to the temporal method to account for age structure in populations. This method requires estimates of age-specific survival and birth rate and allele frequencies measured in two or more consecutive cohorts. Allele frequencies are acquired by reading in genotypic data from files formatted for either GENEPOP or TEMPOFS. For each interval between consecutive cohorts, N e is estimated at each locus and over all loci. Furthermore, N e estimates are output for three different genetic drift estimators (F s, F c and F k). Confidence intervals are derived from a chi-square distribution with degrees of freedom equal to the number of independent alleles. GONe has been validated over a wide range of N e values, and for scenarios where survival and birth rates differ between sexes, sex ratios are unequal and reproductive variances differ. GONe is freely available for download at. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. GONe: software for estimating effective population size in species with generational overlap.

    PubMed

    Coombs, J A; Letcher, B H; Nislow, K H

    2012-01-01

    GONe is a user-friendly, Windows-based program for estimating effective size (N(e) ) in populations with overlapping generations. It uses the Jorde-Ryman modification to the temporal method to account for age structure in populations. This method requires estimates of age-specific survival and birth rate and allele frequencies measured in two or more consecutive cohorts. Allele frequencies are acquired by reading in genotypic data from files formatted for either GENEPOP or TEMPOFS. For each interval between consecutive cohorts, N(e) is estimated at each locus and over all loci. Furthermore, N(e) estimates are output for three different genetic drift estimators (F(s) , F(c) and F(k) ). Confidence intervals are derived from a chi-square distribution with degrees of freedom equal to the number of independent alleles. GONe has been validated over a wide range of N(e) values, and for scenarios where survival and birth rates differ between sexes, sex ratios are unequal and reproductive variances differ. GONe is freely available for download at https://bcrc.bio.umass.edu/pedigreesoftware/.

  8. Demethylation of Methylated Arsenic Species during Generation of Arsanes with Tetrahydridoborate(1-) in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2016-06-21

    Demethylation during generation of volatile hydrides (HG), i.e. formation of noncorresponding arsanes from monomethylarsonic acid (MAs(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)), and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAs(V)O) by the reaction of sodium tetrahydridoborate(1-) (THB) with different acids under analytical conditions, was investigated and characterized. Pronounced demethylation of MAs(V), DMAs(V), and TMAs(V)O was found during the reaction of THB with HCl, H2SO4, and HClO4, while HG from CH3COOH or TRIS buffer after prereduction with l-cysteine resulted in the formation of only the corresponding hydrides. In the case of HNO3 formation of corresponding hydrides was preserved for MAs(V) and DMAs(V) but not for TMAs(V)O. The extent of demethylation strongly depends on concentration of the acid and THB. It can be strongly suppressed in HCl medium by partial hydrolysis of THB with optimal concentration of acid before it reacts with MAs(V), DMAs(V), or TMAs(V)O. It appears that the demethylation is due to the action of specific hydrolytic products of THB (most probably by the first and second one).

  9. The evolution of protected species studies to determine effects of offshore oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Fairfield, C. )

    1990-01-09

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) Environmental Studies Program (ESP) was initiated in 1973 to help ensure that the environmental information on which Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development decisions are based is the most definitive that can be assembled at the time. The majority of ESP studies are designed to provide information on the status of the environment, and to identify the extent of potential impact of OCS development activities. Federal OCS activities must comply with several environmental' acts, including the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act. In response to these acts, MMS has funded a significant amount of research on protected species. The basic intent of these studies is to determine if proposed OCS activities will affect protected species and whether means exist to mitigate any effects found. Over the 15 years of the ESP, protected species studies have evolved from literature syntheses and relatively simple survey efforts, to more complex studies attempting to understand complicated behavioral and physiological responses to OCS effects (e.g. noise, spilled oil), and to evaluate protected species within the context of habitat characterization. This last goal has produced a need for multidisciplinary field research. Two major field efforts have been undertaken in the Beaufort Sea and Georges Bank areas. The question of if' protected species are present has generally been answered for key OCS regions; the next step for effective environmental decision making is to understand why' protected species are present.

  10. Mold-inhibitory activity of different yeast species during airtight storage of wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Adel Druvefors, Ulrika; Schnürer, Johan

    2005-02-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 inhibits spoilage by Penicillium roqueforti in laboratory and pilot studies with high-moisture wheat in malfunctioning airtight storage. We tested the biocontrol ability of an additional 57 yeast species in a grain mini silo system. Most yeast species grew to CFU levels comparable to that of P. anomala J121 after 14 days of incubation (>10(6) CFU g(-1)). Of the 58 species, 38 (63 strains) had no mold-inhibitory effects (Pen. roqueforti levels >10(5) CFU g(-1)). Among these were 11 species (18 strains) that did not grow on the wheat grain. Several of the non-inhibiting yeast species have previously been reported as biocontrol agents in other postharvest environments. Weak inhibitory activity, reducing Pen. roqueforti levels to between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU g(-1), was observed with 11 species (12 strains). Candida silvicola and Pichia guillermondii reduced Pen. roqueforti to <10(4) CFU g(-1). Candida fennica, Candida pelliculosa, Candida silvicultrix, P. anomala (29 strains), Pichia burtonii, Pichia farinosa and Pichia membranifaciens strongly inhibited Pen. roqueforti (<10(3) CFU g(-1)) in the mini silos, but none had higher biocontrol activity than P. anomala strain J121. This report is the first of biocontrol activity of C. fennica and C. silvicultrix. The ability of 27 yeast species to grow to high CFU values without inhibiting mold growth suggests that nutrient competition may not be the main mode of action of P. anomala J121.

  11. Measurement of reactive species generated by dielectric barrier discharge in direct contact with water in different atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačević, Vesna V.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of hydroxyl radical and long-living chemical species (H2O2, O3, \\text{NO}3- and \\text{NO}2- ) generated in the liquid phase of a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge in dependence on the gas atmosphere (air, nitrogen, oxygen, argon and helium) was studied. The chemical molecular probe dimethyl sulfoxide was employed for quantification of ˙OH, and the influence of hydroxyl radical scavenging on formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species was investigated. In addition to liquid analysis, plasma diagnostics was applied to indicate possible reaction pathways of plasma–liquid interaction. The highest ˙OH production rate of 1.19  ×  10‑5 mol l‑1 s‑1 was found when water was treated in oxygen, with a yield of 2.75  ×  10‑2 molecules of ˙OH per 100 eV. Formation of hydrogen peroxide in air, nitrogen and argon discharges is determined by recombination reaction of hydroxyl radicals, reaching the highest yield of about 0.7 g kWh‑1 when distilled water was treated in argon discharge. Ozone formation was dominant in oxygen and air discharges. Strong acidification along with formation of reactive nitrogen species was detected in water treated in air and nitrogen discharges.

  12. Morphological Transformation and Force Generation of Active Cytoskeletal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Maruri, Daniel; Kamm, Roger D.

    2017-01-01

    Cells assemble numerous types of actomyosin bundles that generate contractile forces for biological processes, such as cytokinesis and cell migration. One example of contractile bundles is a transverse arc that forms via actomyosin-driven condensation of actin filaments in the lamellipodia of migrating cells and exerts significant forces on the surrounding environments. Structural reorganization of a network into a bundle facilitated by actomyosin contractility is a physiologically relevant and biophysically interesting process. Nevertheless, it remains elusive how actin filaments are reoriented, buckled, and bundled as well as undergo tension buildup during the structural reorganization. In this study, using an agent-based computational model, we demonstrated how the interplay between the density of myosin motors and cross-linking proteins and the rigidity, initial orientation, and turnover of actin filaments regulates the morphological transformation of a cross-linked actomyosin network into a bundle and the buildup of tension occurring during the transformation. PMID:28114384

  13. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  14. Scientific and legal perspectives on science generated for regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Henry, Carol J; Conrad, James W

    2008-01-01

    This article originated from a conference that asked "Should scientific work conducted for purposes of advocacy before regulatory agencies or courts be judged by the same standards as science conducted for other purposes?" In the article, which focuses on the regulatory advocacy context, we argue that it can be and should be. First, we describe a set of standards and practices currently being used to judge the quality of scientific research and testing and explain how these standards and practices assist in judging the quality of research and testing regardless of why the work was conducted. These standards and practices include the federal Information Quality Act, federal Good Laboratory Practice standards, peer review, disclosure of funding sources, and transparency in research policies. The more that scientific information meets these standards and practices, the more likely it is to be of high quality, reliable, reproducible, and credible. We then explore legal issues that may be implicated in any effort to create special rules for science conducted specifically for a regulatory proceeding. Federal administrative law does not provide a basis for treating information in a given proceeding differently depending on its source or the reason for which it was generated. To the contrary, this law positively assures that interested persons have the right to offer their technical expertise toward the solution of regulatory problems. Any proposal to subject scientific information generated for the purpose of a regulatory proceeding to more demanding standards than other scientific information considered in that proceeding would clash with this law and would face significant administrative complexities. In a closely related example, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considered but abandoned a program to implement standards aimed at "external" information.

  15. Electrochemical generation of volatile lead species using a cadmium cathode: Comparison with graphite, glassy carbon and platinum cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, María; Fernández, Lenys; Domínguez, José; Alvarado, José

    2012-05-01

    Working electrodes made out of pyrolytic graphite, glassy carbon, platinum and cadmium were compared for the electrochemical generation of volatile lead species. The same electrolytic cell, using each of the different working electrodes was coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer and the experimental conditions were optimized in each case, using a univariate approach, to produce the maximum possible amount of volatile lead species. The experiments were focused on the variation of cathode hydrogen overvoltage by the application of a constant current during analysis. Under optimum conditions the performance of the electrochemical hydride generator cell should depend on the cathode material selected due to the different hydrogen overpotential of each material. The lead absorbance signal was taken as a measure of the efficiency of volatile lead species production. Best results were obtained using the Cd cathode, due to its relatively highest hydrogen overpotential, a carrier gas (Ar) flow rate of 55 mL min- 1 an electrolytic current of 0.8 A and a catholyte (HCl) concentration 0.05 mol L- 1. The analytical figures of merit of the method using the Cd electrode were evaluated and the susceptibility of the method to interferences was assessed by its application to the determination of trace amounts of lead in the presence of the most significant interferents. The calibration curve was linear between 0.5 and 15 μg L- 1 Pb. Detection limits and characteristic mass values were 0.21 μg L- 1 and 0.26 μg L- 1 respectively. A bovine liver standard reference material and a spiked urine sample were analyzed to check accuracy.

  16. Exposure to low- vs iso-osmolar contrast agents reduces NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species generation in a cellular model of renal injury.

    PubMed

    Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Prattichizzo, Clelia; Montemurno, Eustacchio; Simone, Simona; Cafiero, Cesira; Rascio, Federica; Stallone, Giovanni; Ranieri, Elena; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2014-03-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy represents the third cause of hospital-acquired acute renal failure. This study investigated the effects of low- vs iso-osmolar contrast medium (CM) exposure on NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by tubular cells. X-ray attenuation of iohexol, iopamidol, and iodixanol was assessed at equimolar iodine concentrations and their effects on human renal proximal tubular cells (PTCs) were evaluated with equally attenuating solutions of each CM. Cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and necrosis were investigated by trypan blue exclusion, MTT assay, and annexin V/propidium iodide assay, respectively. ROS production was assessed by DCF assay, NADPH oxidase activity by the lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence method, and Nox4 expression by immunoblot. Yielding the same X-ray attenuation, CM cytotoxicity was assessed in PTCs at equimolar iodine concentrations. More necrosis was present after incubation with iohexol and iopamidol than after incubation with equal concentrations of iodixanol. Iohexol and iodixanol at low iodine concentrations induced less cytotoxicity than iopamidol. Moreover, both iohexol and iopamidol induced more apoptosis than iodixanol, with a dose-dependent effect. ROS generation was significantly higher with iopamidol and iohexol compared to iodixanol. NADPH oxidase activity and Nox4 protein expression significantly increased after exposure to iopamidol and iohexol, with a dose-dependent effect, compared with iodixanol. CM-induced Nox4 expression and activity depended upon Src activation. In conclusion, at angiographic concentrations, iodixanol induces fewer cytotoxic effects on cultured tubular cells than iohexol and iopamidol along with a lower induction of Nox4-dependent ROS generation. This enzyme may, thus, represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent iodinated CM-related oxidative stress.

  17. Dissolution and reactive oxygen species generation of inhaled cemented tungsten carbide particles in artificial human lung fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniak, A. B.; Leonard, S. S.; Hoover, M. D.; Virji, M. A.; Day, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of both cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC) particles is associated with development of hard metal lung disease (HMD) via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas Co alone is sufficient to cause asthma via solubilization and hapten formation. We characterized bulk and aerodynamically size-separated W, WC, Co, spray dryer (pre-sintered), and chamfer grinder (post-sintered) powders. ROS generation was measured in the murine RAW 264.7 cell line using electron spin resonance. When dose was normalized to surface area, hydroxyl radical generation was independent of particle size, which suggests that particle surface chemistry may be an important exposure factor. Chamfer grinder particles generated the highest levels of ROS, consistent with the hypothesis that intimate contact of metals is important for ROS generation. In artificial extracellular lung fluid, alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (ABDC), added to prevent mold growth during experiments, did not influence dissolution of Co (44.0±5.2 vs. 48.3±6.4%) however, dissolution was higher (p<0.05) in the absence of phosphate (62.0±5.4 vs. 48.3±6.4%). In artificial macrophage phagolysosomal fluid, dissolution of Co (36.2±10.4%) does not appear to be influenced (p=0.30) by the absence of glycine (29.8±2.1%), phosphate (39.6±8.6%), or ABDC (44.0±10.5%). These results aid in assessing and understanding Co and W inhalation dosimetry.

  18. Cellular adaptation to anthrax lethal toxin-induced mitochondrial cholesterol enrichment, hyperpolarization, and reactive oxygen species generation through downregulating MLN64 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ha, Soon-Duck; Park, Sangwook; Han, Chae Young; Nguyen, Marilyn L; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2012-12-01

    Cellular adaptation to different stresses related to survival and function has been demonstrated in several cell types. Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) induces rapid cell death, termed "pyroptosis," by activating NLRP1b/caspase-1 in murine macrophages. We and others (S. D. Ha et al., J. Biol. Chem. 282:26275-26283, 2007; I. I. Salles et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 100:12426 -12431, 2003) have shown that RAW264.7 cells preexposed to sublethal doses of LeTx become resistant to subsequent high cytolytic doses of LeTx, termed toxin-induced resistance (TIR). To date, the cellular mechanisms of pyroptosis and TIR are largely unknown. We found that LeTx caused NLRP1b/caspase-1-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, including hyperpolarization and generation of reactive oxygen species, which was distinct from that induced by stimuli such as NLRP3-activating ATP. In TIR cells, these mitochondrial events were not detected, although caspase-1 was activated, in response to LeTx. We identified that downregulation of the late endosomal cholesterol-transferring protein MLN64 in TIR cells was involved in TIR. The downregulation of MLN64 in TIR cells was at least in part due to DNA methyltransferase 1-mediated DNA methylation. In wild-type RAW264.7 cells and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, LeTx caused NLRP1b/caspase-1-dependent mitochondrial translocation of MLN64, resulting in cholesterol enrichment, membrane hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and depletion of free glutathione (GSH). This study demonstrates for the first time that MLN64 plays a key role in LeTx/caspase-1-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Probabilistic Analysis of Activation Volumes Generated During Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient’s primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs. PMID:20974269

  20. Probabilistic analysis of activation volumes generated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2011-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient's primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs.

  1. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the inter-relationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPC(KD)) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers.

  2. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  3. Phospholipid-esterified eicosanoids are generated in agonist-activated human platelets and enhance tissue factor-dependent thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher P; Morgan, Lloyd T; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Murphy, Robert C; Kühn, Hartmut; Hazen, Stanley L; Goodall, Alison H; Hamali, Hassan A; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2010-03-05

    Here, a group of specific lipids, comprising phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)- or phosphatidylcholine (PC)-esterified 12S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12S-HETE), generated by 12-lipoxygenase was identified and characterized. 12S-HETE-PE/PCs were formed within 5 min of activation by thrombin, ionophore, or collagen. Esterified HETE levels generated in response to thrombin were 5.85 +/- 1.42 (PE) or 18.35 +/- 4.61 (PC), whereas free was 65.5 +/- 17.6 ng/4 x 10(7) cells (n = 5 separate donors, mean +/- S.E.). Their generation was stimulated by triggering protease-activated receptors-1 and -4 and signaling via Ca(2+) mobilization secretory phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase, src tyrosine kinases, and protein kinase C. Stable isotope labeling showed that they form predominantly by esterification that occurs on the same time scale as free acid generation. Unlike free 12S-HETE that is secreted, esterified HETEs remain cell-associated, with HETE-PEs migrating to the outside of the plasma membrane. 12-Lipoxygenase inhibition attenuated externalization of native PE and phosphatidylserine and HETE-PEs. Platelets from a patient with the bleeding disorder, Scott syndrome, did not externalize HETE-PEs, and liposomes supplemented with HETE-PC dose-dependently enhanced tissue factor-dependent thrombin generation in vitro. This suggests a role for these novel lipids in promoting coagulation. Thus, oxidized phospholipids form by receptor/agonist mechanisms, not merely as an undesirable consequence of vascular and inflammatory disease.

  4. Generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by a novel semiconductor catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, K. L.; Mak, N. K.; Wong, M. H.; Zhou, X. F.; Liang, Y.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate antimicrobial mechanisms of a new catalytic material (charge transfer auto oxidation-reduction type catalyst, CT catalyst) that may have great potential for application in water/wastewater treatment. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria-free solution, induction of ROS and oxidative damage in bacteria (including E. coli and S. aureus) were examined for the CT catalyst. The results showed that significantly higher ( p < 0.05, via t-test) amount of hydroxyl radicals was generated by the CT catalyst compared with the control, particularly after 6 h of contact time that more than twice of the amount of the control was produced. The generation of ROS in the bacteria was greater under higher pH and temperature levels, which closely related with the oxidative damage in cells. The results indicated that CT catalyst induced oxidative damage in the bacteria might serve as an important mechanism interpreting the anti-microbial function of the CT catalyst.

  5. Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at the Chicxulub Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, D. A.; Zurcher, L.; Abramov, O.

    2007-05-01

    Borehole samples recovered from PEMEX exploration boreholes and an ICDP scientific borehole indicate the Chicxulub impact event generated hydrothermal alteration throughout a large volume of the Maya Block beneath the crater floor and extending across the bulk of the ~180 km diameter crater. The first indications of hydrothermal alteration were observed in the crater discovery samples from the Yucatan-6 borehole and manifest itself in the form of anhydrite and quartz veins. Continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole reveal a more complex and temporally extensive alteration sequence: following a brief period at high temperatures, impact- melt-bearing polymict breccias and a thin, underlying unit of impact melt were subjected to metasomatism, producing alkali feldspar, sphene, apatite, and magnetite. As the system continued to cool, smectite-series phyllosilicates appeared. A saline solution was involved. Stable isotopes suggest the fluid was dominated by a basinal brine created mostly from existing groundwater of the Yucatan Peninsula, although contributions from down-welling water also occurred in some parts of the system. Numerical modeling of the hydrothermal system suggests circulation occurred for 1.5 to 2.3 Myr, depending on the permeability of the system. Our understanding of the hydrothermal system, however, is still crude. Additional core recovery projects, particularly into the central melt sheet, are needed to better evaluate the extent and duration of hydrothermal alteration.

  6. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  7. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; ...

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can bemore » modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.« less

  8. From Microbiology to Cancer Biology: The Rid Protein Family Prevents Cellular Damage Caused by Endogenously Generated Reactive Nitrogen Species

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Diana M.; Ernst, Dustin C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Rid family of proteins is highly conserved and broadly distributed throughout the domains of life. Genetic and biochemical studies, primarily in Salmonella enterica, have defined a role for RidA in responding to endogenously generated reactive metabolites. The data show that 2-aminoacrylate (2AA), a reactive enamine intermediate generated by some pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes, accumulates in the absence of RidA. The accumulation of 2AA leads to covalent modification and inactivation of several enzymes involved in essential metabolic processes. This review describes the 2AA hydrolyzing activity of RidA and the effect of this biochemical activity on the metabolic network, which impacts organism fitness. The reported activity of RidA and the consequences encountered in vivo when RidA is absent have challenged fundamental assumptions in enzymology, biochemistry and cell metabolism regarding the fate of transiently-generated reactive enamine intermediates. The current understanding of RidA in Salmonella and the broad distribution of Rid family proteins provide exciting opportunities for future studies to define metabolic roles of Rid family members from microbes to man. PMID:25620221

  9. Diel Patterns of Activity for Insect Pollinators of Two Oil Palm Species (Arecales : Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Auffray, Thomas; Frérot, Brigitte; Poveda, Roberto; Louise, Claude; Beaudoin-Ollivier, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The pollination of two oil palm species, Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and Elaeis oleifera Cortés (Arecales: Arecaceae), depends on a mutualistic relation with insects, which use male inflorescences as a brood site, and visits female inflorescences lured by the emitted odor, which is similar to that of males. Although the activity of visiting the inflorescences by these insects is critical for the adequate natural pollination of the host plant, their activity is poorly documented. In the present study, we determine the diel activity of two specialized pollinator weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on inflorescences of their respective host-palm: Elaeidobius kamerunicus Faust specialized on E. guineensis, and Grasidius hybridus O'Brien and Beserra specialized on E. oleifera. The average timing of activity was studied by using passive interception traps. Then the pattern and the duration were refined by using aspiration trapping within the active period for each insect species at the male and female inflorescences. All the experiments were conducted in an Ecuadorian oil palm plantation, located close to Amazonian forest. El. kamerunicus and G. hybridus were found to be the pollinators of E. guineensis and E. oleifera, respectively. The two species differed in their diel pattern of activity: E. kamerunicus was active in the morning and G. hybridus during a short period at dusk. For both palm species, insect visits were synchronous on both male and female inflorescences. The synchronicity is discussed as a strategy to maintain the relation mutualistic between partners. These findings increase our understanding of the oil palm pollination system.

  10. Compact and highly active next-generation libraries for CRISPR-mediated gene repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Adamson, Britt; Pak, Ryan A; Chen, Yuwen; Fields, Alexander P; Park, Chong Yon; Corn, Jacob E; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that nucleosomes directly block access of CRISPR/Cas9 to DNA (Horlbeck et al., 2016). Here, we build on this observation with a comprehensive algorithm that incorporates chromatin, position, and sequence features to accurately predict highly effective single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for targeting nuclease-dead Cas9-mediated transcriptional repression (CRISPRi) and activation (CRISPRa). We use this algorithm to design next-generation genome-scale CRISPRi and CRISPRa libraries targeting human and mouse genomes. A CRISPRi screen for essential genes in K562 cells demonstrates that the large majority of sgRNAs are highly active. We also find CRISPRi does not exhibit any detectable non-specific toxicity recently observed with CRISPR nuclease approaches. Precision-recall analysis shows that we detect over 90% of essential genes with minimal false positives using a compact 5 sgRNA/gene library. Our results establish CRISPRi and CRISPRa as premier tools for loss- or gain-of-function studies and provide a general strategy for identifying Cas9 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19760.001 PMID:27661255

  11. In vitro incubation of human spermatozoa promotes reactive oxygen species generation and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Cicaré, J; Caille, A; Zumoffen, C; Ghersevich, S; Bahamondes, L; Munuce, M J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative process associated with sperm capacitation and its impact on DNA fragmentation and sperm function. Redox activity and lipid peroxidation were analysed in human spermatozoa after 3, 6 and 22 h of incubation in Ham's F10 medium plus bovine albumin at 37° and 5% CO2 for capacitation. DNA status, tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and induced acrosome reaction were evaluated after capacitating conditions. At 22 h of incubation, there was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in oxygen-free radicals and lipid peroxidation, with no effect on sperm viability. There also was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in fragmented DNA in capacitated spermatozoa compared to semen values with higher rates being found after the occurrence of the induced acrosome reaction. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern confirms that capacitation took place in parallel with the occurrence of DNA fragmentation. These results indicate that when spermatozoa are incubated for several hours (22 h), a common practice in assisted reproductive techniques, an increase in oxidative sperm metabolism and in the proportion of fragmented DNA should be expected. However, there was no effect on any of the other functional parameters associated with sperm fertilising capacity.

  12. Removal of carbon contaminations by RF plasma generated reactive species and subsequent effects on optical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. K. Rai, S. K.; Modi, M. H.; Nayak, M.; Lodha, G. S.; Kumar, M.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2015-06-24

    Carbon contamination on optical elements is a serious issue in synchrotron beam lines for several decades. The basic mechanism of carbon deposition on optics and cleaning strategies are not fully understood. Carbon growth mechanism and optimized cleaning procedures are worldwide under development stage. Optimized RF plasma cleaning is considered an active remedy for the same. In present study carbon contaminated optical test surfaces (carbon capped tungsten thin film) are exposed for 30 minutes to four different gases, rf plasma at constant power and constant dynamic pressure. Structural characterization (thickness, roughness and density) of virgin samples and plasma exposed samples was done by soft x-ray (λ=80 Å) reflectivity measurements at Indus-1 reflectivity beam line. Different gas plasma removes carbon with different rate (0.4 to 0.65 nm /min). A thin layer 2 to 9 nm of different roughness and density is observed at the top surface of tungsten film. Ar gas plasma is found more suitable for cleaning of tungsten surface.

  13. Quantitation of toxic arsenic species and arsenobetaine in Pacific oysters using an off-line process with hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Huang, Chia-Wei

    2006-04-05

    An off-line process-based speciation technique was devised here to quantitatively determine toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and the dominant, albeit virtually nontoxic, arsenobetaine (AB) in Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). Oysters were extracted with fresh methanol-water (8+2), and this was replicated three times. They were then evaporated to near dryness and subsequently redissolved in pure water; defatting was then performed with a C18 cartridge. The trace hydride active arsenic species, that is, iAs, MA, and DMA, in the defatted solutions were determined with a sensitive hydride generation-packed coldfinger trap-atomic absorption spectrometric (HG-PCFT-AAS) coupled system. The arsenicals that were desorbed from the cation-exchange resin (Dowex 50W-X8) in the washings of 4 M NH3 were categorized on the basis of AB + DMA. The total quantity of arsenic in the recovered AB + DMA was determined with a commercial hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometric (HG-AAS) system, and finally, AB was calculated from (AB + DMA) - DMA. The average concentrations of iAs, MA, DMA, AB, and total arsenic (TAs) in the oysters collected from six aquacultural sites along the west coast of Taiwan were, respectively, 0.15, 0.06, 0.64, 6.93, and 13.74 mg kg(-1) of dry weight. AB was the major species, whereas iAs (arsenite + arsenate) were the most toxic species, although the iAs made up only approximately 1% of the TAs in the oysters. The lifetime target cancer risk, as determined by the concentration of iAs on a fresh weight basis in the oysters, was well below the ordinary health protection criteria (10(-6)).

  14. Reversible activation of the neutrophil superoxide generating system by hexachlorocyclohexane: correlation with effects on a subcellular superoxide-generating fraction.

    PubMed

    English, D; Schell, M; Siakotos, A; Gabig, T G

    1986-07-01

    gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane was found to exert profound effects on the phosphatidylinositol cycle, cytosolic calcium level, and the respiratory burst of human neutrophils. Exposure of neutrophils prelabelled with 32P to 4 X 10(-4) M gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane almost tripled radioactivity in phosphatidic acid and correspondingly decreased radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate. Under similar conditions, gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane evoked the generation of superoxide at a rate of over 11 nmol/min/10(6) cells and more than doubled cytosolic-free calcium concentration as monitored by Quin-2 fluorescence. Because intermediates of the phosphatidylinositol cycle, via increases in available calcium levels or activated protein kinase C, are considered potential second messengers for activation of the NADPH-dependent O-2-generating system, we compared neutrophil responses to gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane with responses to phorbol myristate acetate, an activator of protein kinase C with well known effects on neutrophils. Like phorbol myristate acetate, gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane induced neutrophil degranulation but was not an effective chemotactic stimulus. The ability of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane to induce a pattern of oxidative activation in neutrophil cytoplasts similar to that in intact cells indicated that concurrent degranulation was not required for sustained O-2 generation in response to this agent. When neutrophils or neutrophil cytoplasts exposed to gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane were centrifuged and resuspended in stimulus-free medium, O-2 generation ceased entirely but could be reinitiated by addition of the same stimulus. This finding was in contrast to the continued O-2 production by phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils similarly washed and resuspended in stimulus-free medium. Unlike subcellular fractions of phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils, corresponding fractions prepared from gamma

  15. Investigating Biofilm Production, Coagulase and Hemolytic Activity in Candida Species Isolated From Denture Stomatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Nimet; Aktas, Esin; Dagistan, Saadettin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Oral candidiasis, in the form of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, represents a common disease in a large percentage of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated species. In this study, we aimed to evaluate biofilm production, coagulase and hemolytic activity of Candida species isolated from denture stomatitis patients. Materials and Methods: This study included 70 patients (31 female, 39 male). Forty-eight of the patients were found to have a positive culture. A total of 48 Candida isolates representing five species, C. albicans (n=17), C. glabrata (n=10), C. krusei (n=9), C. kefyr (n=7) and C. parapsilosis (n=5), were tested. Their coagulase activities were evaluated by a classical tube coagulase test with rabbit plasma. A blood plate assay on 3% enriched sheep blood Sabouraud-dextrose agar (SDA) was used to determine their in vitro hemolytic activities. Biofilm production was determined by a visual tube method. Results: Twenty-one Candida isolates exhibited coagulase activity, and the coagulase activities of the C. albicans (64.7%) isolates were higher than other species. C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. kefyr and C. krusei species demonstrated beta hemolysis. C. parapsilosis strains failed to demonstrate any hemolytic activities. Fifteen (88.0%) of the C. albicans strains were biofilm positive. Six (35.2%) of these strains were strongly positive, 8 (47.0%) C. albicans strains were moderately positive and 1 (5.8%) C. albicans strain was weakly positive. Sixteen (51.6%) of the non-albicans Candida strains were biofilm positive while 15 (48.3%) did not produce biofilms. Conclusion: The results of this present study indicate coagulase, hemolytic activity and biofilm production by Candida spp. isolated from patients with denture stomatitis. Investigations of these virulence factors might be helpful in gaining information about the possible virulence of oral Candida species related to denture stomatitis. PMID:25610156

  16. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation triggers inflammatory response and tissue injury associated with hepatic ischemia-reperfusion: therapeutic potential of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horváth, Bėla; Zsengellėr, Zsuzsanna; Bátkai, Sándor; Cao, Zongxian; Kechrid, Malek; Holovac, Eileen; Erdėlyi, Katalin; Tanchian, Galin; Liaudet, Lucas; Stillman, Isaac E; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Pacher, Pál

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury; however, its exact role and its spatial-temporal relationship with inflammation are elusive. Herein we explore the spatial-temporal relationship of oxidative/nitrative stress and inflammatory response during the course of hepatic I/R and the possible therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, using a mouse model of segmental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Hepatic I/R was characterized by early (at 2 h of reperfusion) mitochondrial injury, decreased complex I activity, increased oxidant generation in the liver or liver mitochondria, and profound hepatocellular injury/dysfunction with acute proinflammatory response (TNF-α, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-2/CXCL2) without inflammatory cell infiltration, followed by marked neutrophil infiltration and a more pronounced secondary wave of oxidative/nitrative stress in the liver (starting from 6 h of reperfusion and peaking at 24 h). Mitochondrially targeted antioxidants, MitoQ or Mito-CP, dose-dependently attenuated I/R-induced liver dysfunction, the early and delayed oxidative and nitrative stress response (HNE/carbonyl adducts, malondialdehyde, 8-OHdG, and 3-nitrotyrosine formation), and mitochondrial and histopathological injury/dysfunction, as well as delayed inflammatory cell infiltration and cell death. Mitochondrially generated oxidants play a central role in triggering the deleterious cascade of events associated with hepatic I/R, which may be targeted by novel antioxidants for therapeutic advantage.

  17. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase signaling axis regulates diallyl trisulfide-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Marynowski, Stanley W; Singh, Shivendra V

    2006-05-15

    We have shown previously that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical event in G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest caused by diallyl trisulfide (DATS), which is a highly promising anticancer constituent of processed garlic. Using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model, we now report a novel mechanism involving c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling axis, which is known for its role in regulation of cell survival and apoptosis, in DATS-induced ROS production. The DATS-induced ROS generation, G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest and degradation, and hyperphosphorylation of Cdc25C were significantly attenuated in the presence of EUK134, a combined mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Interestingly, the DATS-induced ROS generation and G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest were also inhibited significantly in the presence of desferrioxamine, an iron chelator, but this protection was not observed with iron-saturated desferrioxamine. DATS treatment caused a marked increase in the level of labile iron that was accompanied by degradation of light chain of iron storage protein ferritin. Interestingly, DATS-mediated degradation of ferritin, increase in labile iron pool, ROS generation, and/or cell cycle arrest were significantly attenuated by ectopic expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of JNK kinase 2 and RNA interference of stress-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (SEK1), upstream kinases in JNK signal transduction pathway. In conclusion, the present study provides experimental evidence to indicate existence of a novel pathway involving JNK signaling axis in regulation of DATS-induced ROS generation.

  18. Enhancement of Limb Growth by Non-Thermal Plasma Generated Reactive Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shainsky, N.; Steinbeck, M.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Friedman, G.; Freeman, T.

    2013-09-01

    Introduction: The goal of this investigation was to examine the effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasma on mouse autopod differentiation and growth. In this study we hypothesized that NT-plasma can be used to promote redox dependent changes in differentiation pathways and enhance developmental signaling? Methods: Approximately 1 hour after isolation, NT-plasma or sham plasma treatment was applied to the right or left limb, respectively. The medium was changed daily thereafter for the 4-6 days of culture. NT-plasma treatment: pulsed (1000 Hz) voltage of 17 - 25 kV magnitude (peak to peak), a 1 μs pulse width and a rise time of 5 V/ns between the quartz-insulated high voltage electrode and the sample undergoing treatment. Results: A single 10 second NT-plasma treatment promoted development of mouse autopods as compared to the sham control contralateral limb. NT-plasma accelerated digit growth in both E14.5 and E12.5 autopods. Inhibitors were used to determine the role of ROS and RNS in mediating NT-plasma accelerated autopod development. Treatment with these agents stunted autopod morphogenesis NT-plasma treatment partially rescued development. Discussion: Our findings highlight the capability of NT-plasma to activate ROS-dependent cell signaling cascades within developing autopod tissue. In fact, the effect of NT-plasma may indeed extend beyond ROS sensitive signaling as NT-plasma exposure seems to stimulate some growth even in the presence of antioxidant induced stunting. This work was supported by NIH Grants 1 R01 EB 013011 - 01 (Freeman and G. Fridman).

  19. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron-Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Daifuku, Stephanie L; Kneebone, Jared L; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Neidig, Michael L

    2015-09-09

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η(6)-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)-SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings.

  20. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  1. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  2. Next-generation genome sequencing and assembly provides tools for phylogenetics and identification of closely related species of Spathius, parasitoids of Agrilus planipennis (emerald ash borer)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A crucial step in biological control programs is identification of candidates for introduction. This is often difficult when cryptic species are involved. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing allows whole genome sequencing in non-model species for the discovery and genotyping of ...

  3. Time and species dependent ambient air's effects on carbon clusters generated during femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenxia; Zhang, Nan; Feng, Peipei; Wu, Han; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2015-12-01

    Near infrared femtosecond laser is employed to ablate highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in ambient air and in vacuum respectively. The recorded transient emission spectra of the ablated plume with a time resolution of 2 ns indicate that the effects of air on the plume are dependent on both time and species. This finding provides important insights into the generation and decay mechanisms of different carbon radicals or clusters. At 1 or 2 ns after the laser pulse strikes the target, air weakens the Swan bands of C2 compared with the case in vacuum, an effect that may be caused by the quenching collisions between air molecules and C2 radicals. This result shows that C2 may be mainly generated by direct spallation from the target surface at the early stage of ablation. Emission spectra at large time delays present that the existence time of the Swan bands in air is longer than the lifetime of the upper electronic state of the Swan system, suggesting that the air-involved three-body recombination and collisional excitation that enhance the generation of emitting C2 overcome quenching collisions at large time delays. A spectral band at ~416 nm assigned to the transition from 1Σ u + to X 1Σ g + of C15 is more intense in air than in vacuum, indicating that C15 clusters are generated at least partially by the combination of smaller clusters in air. It is also found that air-assisted heat transfer makes the temperature of carbon clusters decrease more quickly in air than in vacuum, leading to a much shorter lifetime of the continuum in air.

  4. Salinity effects on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of three Perkinsus species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La, Peyre M.; Casas, S.; La, Peyre J.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the range of conditions in which many Perkinsus species may proliferate, making it difficult to predict conditions favorable for their expansion, to identify conditions inducing mortality, or to identify instances of potential cross-infectivity among sympatric host species. In this study, the effects of salinity on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki were determined. Specifically, this research examined the effects of 5 salinities (7, 11, 15, 25, 35???), (1) without acclimation, on the viability and metabolic activity of 2 isolates of each Perkinsus species, and (2) with acclimation, on the viability, metabolic activity, size and number of 1 isolate of each species. P. chesapeaki showed the widest range of salinity tolerance of the 3 species, with high viability and cell proliferation at all salinities tested. Although P. chesapeaki originated from low salinity areas (i.e. <15???), several measures (i.e. cell number and metabolic activity) indicated that higher salinities (15, 25???) were more favorable for its growth. P. olseni, originating from high salinity areas, had better viability and proliferation at the higher salinities (15, 25, 35???). Distinct differences in acute salinity response of the 2 P. olseni isolates at lower salinities (7, 11???), however, suggest the need for a more expansive comparison of isolates to better define the lower salinity tolerance. Lastly, P. marinus was more tolerant of the lower salinities (7 and 11???) than P. olseni, but exhibited reduced viability at 7???, even after acclimation. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  5. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  6. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen.

  7. Active fiber composites for the generation of Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Birchmeier, M; Gsell, D; Juon, M; Brunner, A J; Paradies, R; Dual, J

    2009-01-01

    Active fiber composites (AFC) are thin and conformable transducer elements with orthotropic material properties, since they are made of one layer of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. They are suitable for applications in structural health monitoring systems (SHM) with acoustic non-destructive testing methods (NDT). In the presented work the transfer behavior of an AFC as an emitter of transient elastic waves in plate-like structures is investigated. The wave field emitted by an AFC surface bonded on an isotropic plate was simulated with the finite-difference method. The model includes the piezoelectric element and the plate and allows the simulation of the elastic wave propagation. For comparison with the model experiments using a laser interferometer for non-contact measurements of particle velocities at different points around the AFC on the surface of the plate were performed. Transfer functions defined as the ratio of the electric voltage excitation signal and the resulting surface velocity at a specific point are separately determined for the two fundamental Lamb wave modes. In order to take the orthotropic behavior of the AFC into account the transfer functions are determined for several points around the AFC. Results show that the AFC is capable to excite the fundamental symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb wave mode. The antisymmetric mode is mainly radiated in the direction of the piezoelectric fibers, while the symmetric mode is spread over a larger angle. The amplitudes of the emitted waves depend on the frequency of the excitation as well as on the geometric dimensions of the transducer.

  8. First record of second-generation facultative parthenogenesis in a vertebrate species, the whitespotted bambooshark Chiloscyllium plagiosum.

    PubMed

    Straube, N; Lampert, K P; Geiger, M F; Weiß, J D; Kirchhauser, J X

    2016-02-01

    In this study, two parthenogenetic events within a family of the whitespotted bambooshark Chiloscyllium plagiosum are reported. A captive female produced multiple parthenogens. Unexpectedly, a single specimen of a total of nine parthenogens displayed external claspers characterizing the male sex in chondrichthyans. Upon dissection, internal sexual organs of this specimen were malformed or absent; however, the presence of claspers in this study challenges the as yet assumed sex determination system in this shark species. Even more remarkable was that one of the female parthenogens reproduced asexually again producing viable offspring. As far as is known, this is the first genetically confirmed evidence for second-generation facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates. These results support the evolutionary significance of parthenogenesis as an alternative to sexual reproduction.

  9. Multi-species analyses of direct activators of the constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Omiecinski, Curtis J; Coslo, Denise M; Chen, Tao; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Peffer, Richard C

    2011-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as an important xenochemical sensor and transcriptional modulator in mammalian cells. Upon chemical activation, CAR undergoes nuclear translocation and heterodimerization with the retinoid X receptor subsequent to its DNA target interaction. CAR is unusual among nuclear receptors in that it possesses a high level of constitutive activity in cell-based assays, obscuring the detection of ligand activators. However, a human splice variant of CAR, termed CAR3, exhibits negligible constitutive activity. In addition, CAR3 is activated by ligands with similar specificity as the reference form of the receptor. In this study, we hypothesized that similar CAR3 receptors could be constructed across various mammalian species' forms of CAR that would preserve species-specific ligand responses, thus enabling a more sensitive and differential screening assessment of CAR response among animal models. A battery of CAR3 receptors was produced in mouse, rat, and dog and comparatively evaluated with selected ligands together with human CAR1 and CAR3 in mammalian cell reporter assays. The results demonstrate that the 5-amino acid insertion that typifies human CAR3 also imparts ligand-activated receptor function in other species' CAR while maintaining signature responses in each species to select CAR ligands. These variant constructs permit in vitro evaluation of differential chemical effector responses across species and coupled with in vivo assays, the species-selective contributions of CAR in normal physiology and in disease processes such as hepatocarcinogenesis.

  10. Familiarity modulates motor activation while other species' actions are observed: a magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Amoruso, Lucia; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2016-03-01

    Observing other people's actions facilitates the observer's motor system as compared with observing the same individuals at rest. This motor activation is thought to result from mirror-like activity in fronto-parietal areas, which enhances the excitability of the primary motor cortex via cortico-cortical pathways. Although covert motor activation in response to observed actions has been widely investigated between conspecifics, how humans cope with other species' actions has received less attention. For example, it remains unclear whether the human motor system is activated by observing other species' actions, and whether prior familiarity with the non-conspecific agent modulates this activation. Here, we combined single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor-evoked potential recording to explore the impact of familiarity on motor activation during the observation of non-conspecific actions. Videos displaying actions performed either by a conspecific (human) or by a non-conspecific (dog) were shown to individuals who had prior familiarity or no familiarity at all with the non-conspecific agent. We found that, whereas individuals with long-lasting familiarity showed similar levels of motor activation for human and canine actions, individuals who had no familiarity showed higher motor activation for human than for canine actions. These findings suggest that the human motor system is flexible enough to resonate with other species, and that familiarity plays a key role in tuning this ability.

  11. Determination of the antibiofilm, antiadhesive, and anti-MRSA activities of seven Salvia species

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bakri, Amal G.; Othman, Ghadeer; Afifi, Fatma U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several Salvia species are indigenous to Jordan and are widely used as beverages and spices and for their medicinal properties. The objective of the study was to establish the antimicrobial activities, including the antiadhesive and antibiofilm effects of seven different Salvia species. Materials and Methods: Methods used for planktonic culture included agar diffusion, broth microdilution, and minimal biocidal concentration determination while viable count was used for the determination of the antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities. Overnight cultures of reference strains of Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus and clinical strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were used as test microorganisms. Results: An antimicrobial activity toward planktonic cultures demonstrated a significant bacteriocidal activity (≥4 log cycle reduction) for the S. triloba extract against S. aureus including MRSA. Its volatile oil exhibited an antimicrobial activity covering all tested microorganisms with the exception of P. aeruginosa. S. triloba extract and volatile oil were successful in preventing and controlling the biofilm, demonstrating antiadhesion and antibiofilm activities, respectively. Conclusion: These reported activities for S. triloba extract and volatile oil allows their listing as potential antibiofilm and anti-MRSA natural agents. This might suggest their use as an antiseptic in the prophylaxis and treatment of S. aureus-associated skin infections. The antimicrobial activity of the other tested Salvia species was negligible. PMID:21120026

  12. Transgenic mammalian species, generated by somatic cell cloning, in biomedicine, biopharmaceutical industry and human nutrition/dietetics--recent achievements.

    PubMed

    Samiec, M; Skrzyszowska, M

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell cloning technology in mammals promotes the multiplication of productively-valuable genetically engineered individuals, and consequently allows also for standardization of transgenic farm animal-derived products, which, in the context of market requirements, will have growing significance. Gene farming is one of the most promising areas in modern biotechnology. The use of live bioreactors for the expression of human genes in the lactating mammary gland of transgenic animals seems to be the most cost-effective method for the production/processing of valuable recombinant therapeutic proteins. Among the transgenic farm livestock species used so far, cattle, goats, sheep, pigs and rabbits are useful candidates for the expression of tens to hundreds of grams of genetically-engineered proteins or xenogeneic biopreparations in the milk. At the beginning of the new millennium, a revolution in the treatment of disease is taking shape due to the emergence of new therapies based on recombinant human proteins. The ever-growing demand for such pharmaceutical or nutriceutical proteins is an important driving force for the development of safe and large-scale production platforms. The aim of this paper is to present an overall survey of the state of the art in investigations which provide the current knowledge for deciphering the possibilities of practical application of the transgenic mammalian species generated by somatic cell cloning in biomedicine, the biopharmaceutical industry, human nutrition/dietetics and agriculture.

  13. [Effects of waterlogging on the growth and energy-metabolic enzyme activities of different tree species].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Cao, Fu-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wang-Xiang

    2010-03-01

    Aimed to understand the waterlogging tolerance and adaptation mechanisms of different tree species, a simulated field experiment was conducted to study the growth and energy-metabolic enzyme activities of one-year-old seedlings of Taxodium distichum, Carya illinoensis, and Sapium sebiferum. Three treatments were installed, i. e., CK, waterlogging, and flooding, with the treatment duration being 60 days. Under waterlogging and flooding, the relative growth of test tree species was in the order of T. distichum > C. illinoensis > S. sebiferum, indicating that T. distichum had the strongest tolerance against waterlogging and flooding, while S. sebiferum had the weakest one. Also under waterlogging and flooding, the root/crown ratio of the three tree species increased significantly, suggesting that more photosynthates were allocated in roots, and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities of the tree species als