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Sample records for active species generated

  1. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  2. Scavenging activity of "beta catechin" on reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Yoneda, T; Hiramatsu, M

    1996-05-01

    "beta CATECHIN", a preparation containing green tea extract, ascorbic acid, sunflower seed extract, dunaliella carotene and natural vitamin E, has been designed as a model "universal antioxidant" that offers protection via its scavenging action on a wide range of free radicals, both water-soluble and fat-soluble. Reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, are often generated in biological systems during photosensitized oxidation reactions. We report on the simultaneous effect of "beta CATECHIN" on active oxygen species generated during the photosensitized oxidation of riboflavin using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (TMPD) as a "spin-trapping" agent. The intensities of the resulting stable nitroxide radical adduct, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Results show simultaneous, nonspecific and complete scavenging action of reactive oxygen species generated in our in vitro model system by "beta CATECHIN". It is therefore suggested that "beta CATECHIN" could offer protection against free radical insult and in preventing cancer and other diseases that are mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:8739038

  3. Khat (Catha edulis) generates reactive oxygen species and promotes hepatic cell apoptosis via MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Abid, Morad Dirhem Naji; Chen, Juan; Xiang, Min; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xiaoping; Gong, Feili

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have suggested an association between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and acute liver lesions or chronic liver disease. However, little is known about the effects of khat on hepatic cells. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism behind khat-induced apoptosis in the L02 human hepatic cell line. We used cell growth inhibition assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining to measure hepatocyte apoptosis induced by khat. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of caspase-8 and -9, as well as those of Bax and Bcl-2. We also measured reactive oxygen species production. The results indicated that khat induced significant hepatocyte apoptosis in L02 cells. We found that khat activated caspase-8 and -9, upregulated Bax protein expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression levels, which resulted in the coordination of apoptotic signals. Khat-induced hepatocyte apoptosis is primarily regulated through the sustained activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and only partially via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Furthermore, the khat-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activation of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), attenuated the khat-induced activation of JNK and ERK. Our results demonstrate that khat triggers the generation of intracellular ROS and sequentially induces the sustainable activation of JNK, which in turn results in a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis. PMID:23708648

  4. Inactivation of Pathogenic Bacteria on Seeds by Active Oxygen Species Generated in Low-Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Reoto; Uchida, Shohei; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kosaka, Rina; Soeda, Yasutaka

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of bacteria on seeds by active oxygen species generated by a low-pressure oxygen plasma is investigated. Species of active oxygen contributing to the inactivation of bacteria are attempted to be identified. Cylindrical stainless chamber with the internal volume of 17 L is used and RF antenna is set inside the chamber. The oxygen gas pressure is 20-100 Pa. RF power of 13.56 MHz is supplied to RF antenna and CCP is generated. After irradiation, bacteria are extracted from seeds and cultivated on nutrient agars. The number of colonies on these agars is counted after 48 h incubation. The number of bacteria on seeds decreases to less than 10-3 after plasma irradiation for 45 min comparing with that of control. The tendency of the reduction rate of bacteria on seeds has positive correlation with that of the light emission intensity of the singlet excited oxygen molecule as the oxygen gas pressure is varied. It is supposed that the singlet excited oxygen molecule would be one of the major factors for the inactivation of bacteria on seeds.

  5. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  6. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  8. Genetic damage in CHO cells exposed to enzymically generated active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Phillips, B J; James, T E; Anderson, D

    1984-05-01

    The genetic toxicity of active oxygen species produced during the enzymic oxidation of xanthine has been investigated using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Incubation of cells with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase resulted in extensive chromosome breakage and sister-chromatid exchange and gave a small increase in frequency of thioguanine-resistant cells (HGPRT test). Inclusion of superoxide dismutase or catalase in the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system inhibited chromosome breakage, whereas only catalase prevented SCE and mutant induction. It is concluded that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for most of the genetic effects observed in CHO cells exposed to xanthine/xanthine oxidase but that superoxide plays a key role in chromosome breakage. PMID:6325900

  9. ARSENIC SPECIES THAT CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN AND GENERATION OF ACTIVATED OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    The in vitro effects of four different species of arsenic { arsenate, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in mobilizing iron from horse spleen ferritin under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were investigated. Dimethylarsinicacid {DMA(V...

  10. Copper ions strongly activate the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, Elena A; Lordnejad, Mohammad Reza; Schliess, Freimut; Sies, Helmut; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2002-01-15

    Copper is implicated in metabolic disorders, such as Wilson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of signaling pathways regulating cellular survival and function in response to a copper stress is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis of such diseases. Exposure of human skin fibroblasts or HeLa cells to Cu(2+) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent activation of the antiapoptotic kinase Akt/protein kinase B, starting at concentrations as low as 3 microM. Only Cu(II), but not Cu(I), had this effect. Activation of Akt was accompanied by phosphorylation of a downstream target of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3. Inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) completely blocked activation of Akt by Cu(2+), indicating a requirement of PI3K for Cu(2+)-induced activation of Akt. Indeed, cellular PI3K activity was strongly enhanced after exposure to Cu(2+). Copper ions may lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide. Activation of Akt by hydrogen peroxide or growth factors is known to proceed via the activation growth factor receptors. In line with this, pretreatment with inhibitors of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases blocked activation of Akt by hydrogen peroxide and growth factors, as did a src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor or the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Activation of Akt by Cu(2+), however, remained unimpaired, implying (i) that tyrosine kinase activation is not involved in Cu(2+) activation of Akt and (ii) that activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway by Cu(2+) is initiated independently of that induced by reactive oxygen species. Comparison of the time course of the oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein in copper-treated cells with that of Akt activation led to the conclusion that production of hydroperoxides cannot be an upstream event in copper-induced Akt activation. Rather, both activation of Akt and generation of ROS are proposed to occur in parallel, regulating cell survival after a

  11. Low-Level Laser Therapy Activates NF-kB via Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Saleem, Taimur; Mooney, David; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation at a cellular level remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810 nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NF-kB was observed at fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2 and was confirmed by Western blot analysis. NF-kB was activated earlier (1 hour) by LLLT compared to conventional lipopolysaccharide treatment. We also observed that LLLT induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production similar to mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat. Furthermore, we observed similar NF-kB activation with these mitochondrial inhibitors. These results, together with inhibition of laser induced NF-kB activation by antioxidants, suggests that ROS play an important role in the laser induced NF-kB signaling pathways. However, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that LLLT also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. Conclusion We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive NFkB signaling via generation of ROS. Expression of anti-apoptosis and pro-survival genes responsive to NFkB could explain many clinical effects of LLLT. PMID:21814580

  12. Promoting Active Species Generation by Plasmon-Induced Hot-Electron Excitation for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigao; Li, Peng; Zhao, Guixia; Wang, Xin; Kong, Jintao; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Huabin; Chang, Kun; Meng, Xianguang; Kako, Tetsuya; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-07-27

    Water splitting represents a promising technology for renewable energy conversion and storage, but it is greatly hindered by the kinetically sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, using Au-nanoparticle-decorated Ni(OH)2 nanosheets [Ni(OH)2-Au] as catalysts, we demonstrate that the photon-induced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) excitation on Au nanoparticles could significantly activate the OER catalysis, specifically achieving a more than 4-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile affording a markedly decreased overpotential of 270 mV at the current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and a small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec(-1) (no iR-correction), which is much better than those of the benchmark IrO2 and RuO2, as well as most Ni-based OER catalysts reported to date. The synergy of the enhanced generation of Ni(III/IV) active species and the improved charge transfer, both induced by hot-electron excitation on Au nanoparticles, is proposed to account for such a markedly increased activity. The SPR-enhanced OER catalysis could also be observed over cobalt oxide (CoO)-Au and iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH)-Au catalysts, suggesting the generality of this strategy. These findings highlight the possibility of activating OER catalysis by plasmonic excitation and could open new avenues toward the design of more-energy-efficient catalytic water oxidation systems with the assistance of light energy. PMID:27380539

  13. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  14. N2O decomposition over Fe/ZSM-5: reversible generation of highly active cationic Fe species.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Hensen, E J M; Mojet, B L; van Wolput, J H M C; van Santen, R A

    2002-06-01

    Fe-oxide species in Fe/ZSM-5 (prepared by chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3)--active in N2O decomposition--react with zeolite protons during high temperature calcination to give highly active cationic Fe species, this transformation being reversible upon exposure to water vapor at lower temperature. PMID:12109097

  15. Apogossypolone targets mitochondria and light enhances its anticancer activity by stimulating generation of singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yu; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Peng; Yang, Dajun; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Apogossypolone (ApoG2), a novel derivative of gossypol, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and to have antitumor activity in multiple types of cancer cells. Recent reports suggest that gossypol stimulates the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leukemia and colorectal carcinoma cells; however, gossypol-mediated cell death in leukemia cells was reported to be ROS-independent. This study was conducted to clarify the effect of ApoG2-induced ROS on mitochondria and cell viability, and to further evaluate its utility as a treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We tested the photocytotoxicity of ApoG2 to the poorly differentiated NPC cell line CNE-2 using the ROS-generating TL/10 illumination system. The rapid ApoG2-induced cell death was partially reversed by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), but the ApoG2-induced reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was not reversed by NAC. In the presence of TL/10 illumination, ApoG2 generated massive amounts of singlet oxygen and was more effective in inhibiting cell growth than in the absence of illumination. We also determined the influence of light on the anti-proliferative activity of ApoG2 using a CNE-2–xenograft mouse model. ApoG2 under TL/10 illumination healed tumor wounds and suppressed tumor growth more effectively than ApoG2 treatment alone. These results indicate that the ApoG2-induced CNE-2 cell death is partly ROS-dependent. ApoG2 may be used with photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat NPC. PMID:21192843

  16. Combustion-derived flame generated ultrafine soot generates reactive oxygen species and activates Nrf2 antioxidants differently in neonatal and adult rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urban particulate matter (PM) has been epidemiologically correlated with multiple cardiopulmonary morbidities and mortalities, in sensitive populations. Children exposed to PM are more likely to develop respiratory infections and asthma. Although PM originates from natural and anthropogenic sources, vehicle exhaust rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) can be a dominant contributor to the PM2.5 and PM0.1 fractions and has been implicated in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objectives Current studies of ambient PM are confounded by the variable nature of PM, so we utilized a previously characterized ethylene-combusted premixed flame particles (PFP) with consistent and reproducible physiochemical properties and 1) measured the oxidative potential of PFP compared to ambient PM, 2) determined the ability of PFPs to generate oxidative stress and activate the transcription factor using in vitro and ex vivo models, and 3) we correlated these responses with antioxidant enzyme expression in vivo. Methods We compared oxidative stress response (HMOX1) and antioxidant enzyme (SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and PRDX6) expression in vivo by performing a time-course study in 7-day old neonatal and young adult rats exposed to a single 6-hour exposure to 22.4 μg/m3 PFPs. Results We showed that PFP is a potent ROS generator that induces oxidative stress and activates Nrf2. Induction of the oxidative stress responsive enzyme HMOX1 in vitro was mediated through Nrf2 activation and was variably upregulated in both ages. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme expression had age and lung compartment variations post exposure. Of particular interest was SOD1, which had mRNA and protein upregulation in adult parenchyma, but lacked a similar response in neonates. Conclusions We conclude that PFPs are effective ROS generators, comparable to urban ambient PM2.5, that induce oxidative stress in neonatal and adult rat lungs. PFPs upregulate a select set of antioxidant enzymes in

  17. Histochemical evidence for generation of active oxygen species on the apical surface of cigarette-smoke-exposed tracheal explants.

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, J.; Wright, J.; Churg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is known to contain many types of free radicals, and solutions of smoke tar have been shown to liberate hydrogen peroxide as well as superoxide radical. To further investigate the relationship of smoke exposure and generation of active oxygen species, the authors exposed rat tracheal explants to varying amounts of smoke for 10 minutes in a humidified chamber. After smoke exposure was completed, tracheal segments were incubated in a modification of the ultrastructural cerium chloride technique that was devised by Briggs et al. to demonstrate hydrogen peroxide production. Smoke dose-dependent deposition of cerium-containing reaction product was found on the cilia and the apical membranes; with low-dose smoke, the reaction product appeared as individual dots along the apical surface, but with greater amounts of smoke, heavy linear deposits of reaction product were found along the apical membranes. Smoke produced focal dose-related cell damage with blebbing of the apical membranes, loss of cilia, and focal cell necrosis. Catalase prevented both the positive histochemical reaction and the cell damage; if the catalase was first boiled, its protective effect was destroyed. Similarly, after smoke exposure was completed, tracheal segments were covered with a solution of nitroblue tetrazolium to demonstrate production of superoxide anion. A positive reaction was observed by light microscopy on the surface of tracheas that was exposed to smoke but not that exposed to air; the reaction could be prevented by addition of superoxide dismutase. The authors conclude that exposure of tracheal explants to cigarette smoke in vitro is associated with histochemical evidence of continuing production of both hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion at the apical cell membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1653519

  18. Wear Particles Impair Antimicrobial Activity Via Suppression of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and ERK1/2 Phosphorylation in Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weishen; Li, Ziqing; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Yuhuan; Zhang, Yangchun; Luo, Guotian; Yang, Xing; Li, Chaohong; Liao, Weiming; Sheng, Puyi

    2015-01-01

    Implant-related infection (IRI) is closely related to the local immunity of peri-implant tissues. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in activated macrophages plays a prominent role in the innate immune response. In previous studies, we indicated that implant wear particles promote endotoxin tolerance by decreasing the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, it is unclear whether ROS are involved in the damage of the local immunity of peri-implant tissues. In the present study, we assessed the mechanism of local immunosuppression using titanium (Ti) particles and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate RAW 264.7 cells. The results indicate that the Ti particles induced the generation of a moderate amount of ROS through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-1, but not through catalase. Pre-exposure to Ti particles inhibited ROS generation and extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation in LPS-stimulated macrophages. These findings indicate that chronic stimulation by Ti particles may lead to a state of oxidative stress and persistent inflammation, which may result in the attenuation of the immune response of macrophages to bacterial components such as LPS. Eventually, immunosuppression develops in peri-implant tissues, which may be a risk factor for IRI. PMID:25577344

  19. Effect of glutaphen on generation of active oxygen species, photosynthetic electron transport, and the functional activity of photosystem 2 in Chlorella cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samovich, T. V.; Pshibytko, N. L.; Averina, N. G.

    2006-11-01

    Treatment of chlorella green algae (Chlorella sp.) for 2 h in the dark with the photodynamic herbicide glutaphen (GTP), consisting of 0.3 mM 1,10-phenanthroline and 0.6 mM glutamic acid, followed by illumination leads to efficient generation of active oxygen species (AOS). After 15 min of illumination, AOS accumulation reaches 200% compared with the level in cells of the control culture, then it decreases down to 130% and 115% after 1 day and 3 days of illumination. During the first few days after treatment, we observe inhibition of synthesis of a specific precursor of chlorophyll (Chl): 5-aminolevulinic acid molecules, and then we observe stimulation of the synthesis. The effect of GTP on the photosynthetic activity of chlorella does not depend on the AOS level but rather remains uniform, in contrast to its effect on the Chl biosynthesis system. GTP does not change the efficiency of light harvesting and charge separation at the reaction centers of photosystem (PS) 2, but significantly lowers the functional efficiency of the electron transport chain: the photochemical quenching constants for Chl a fluorescence and the effective quantum yield of photochemical reactions in photosystem 2 decrease. The major mechanism of action for GTP is probably displacement of the secondary quinone acceptor QB from its binding site on the D1 protein by the 1,10-phenanthroline, consequent inhibition of electron efflux from Q{A/-} and increase in the fraction of QB-nonreducing centers of PS 2. The active oxygen species generated in the cells have a photodegradative effect on the Chl biosynthesis system, in particular on its initial steps, and do not involve already formed pigment-protein complexes of PS 2.

  20. H2S Inhibits Hyperglycemia-Induced Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System Activation via Attenuation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Li, Chen; Shao, Decui; Liu, Jia; Shen, Yang; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yu; Yu, Chen; Wang, Rui; Lu, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Decrease in endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was reported to participate in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study is aimed at exploring the relationship between the abnormalities in H2S metabolism, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and the activation of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Cultured renal mesangial cells (MCs) and streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats were used for the studies. The expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type I receptor (AT1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen IV were measured by real time PCR and Western blot. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed by fluorescent probe assays. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay. Ang II concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. AGT, ACE and AT1 receptor mRNA levels and Ang II concentration were increased in high glucose (HG) -treated MCs, the cell proliferation rate and the production of TGF-β1 and of collagen IV productions were also increased. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylenechloride iodonium (DPI) was able to reverse the HG-induced RAS activation and the changes in cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Supplementation of H2S attenuated HG-induced elevations in ROS and RAS activation. Blockade on H2S biosynthesis from cystathione-γ-lyase (CSE) by DL-propargylglycine (PPG) resulted in effects similar to that of HG treatment. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, the changes in RAS were also reversed by H2S supplementation without affecting blood glucose concentration. These data suggested that the decrease in H2S under hyperglycemic condition leads to an imbalance between oxidative and reductive species. The increased oxidative species results in intrarenal RAS activation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. PMID:24058553

  1. Interaction of Platelet Activating Factor, Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Xanthine Oxidase, and Leukocytes in the Generation of Hepatic Injury After Shock/Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Yasuhiko; Takano, Manabu; Patel, Mayur; Tien, Nevin; Takada, Tadahiro; Bulkley, Gregory B.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the putative relation of platelet activating factor (PAF), xanthine oxidase, reactive oxidants, and leukocytes in the pathogenesis of hepatic injury after shock/resuscitation (S/R) in vivo. Background Reactive oxygen metabolites generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion have been found to trigger postischemic injury in many organs, including the liver. However, the precise linear sequence of the mechanism of consequent hepatic injury after S/R remains to be characterized. Methods Unheparinized male rats were bled to a mean blood pressure of 45 ± 3 mmHg. After 2 hours of shock, they were resuscitated by reinfusion of shed blood (anticoagulated with citrate-phosphate-dextrose) and crystalloid and observed for the next 6 or 24 hours. Results S/R caused the oxidation of hepatic glutathione and generated centrolobular leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours, followed by predominantly centrolobular hepatocellular injury at 24 hours. Each of these components was attenuated by PAF inhibition with WEB 2170, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol, antioxidant treatment with N-acetylcysteine, or severe leukopenia induced by vinblastine. In each case, the degree of leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours correlated with the hepatocellular injury seen at 24 hours. However, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol failed to attenuate further the small level of residual hepatocellular injury seen in leukopenic rats. Conclusion These findings suggest that reactive oxidants generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion, stimulated by PAF, mediate hepatocellular injury by triggering leukocyte accumulation, primarily within the centrolobular sinusoids. PMID:10714632

  2. Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; He, Hong S.; Palik, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species distribution models require selection of species, study extent and spatial unit, statistical methods, variables, and assessment metrics. If absence data are not available, another important consideration is pseudoabsence generation. Different strategies for pseudoabsence generation can produce varying spatial representation of species. Methodology We considered model outcomes from four different strategies for generating pseudoabsences. We generating pseudoabsences randomly by 1) selection from the entire study extent, 2) a two-step process of selection first from the entire study extent, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from areas with predicted probability <25%, 3) selection from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, 4) a two-step process of selection first for pseudoabsences from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from the areas with predicted probability <25%. We used Random Forests as our statistical method and sixteen predictor variables to model tree species with at least 150 records from Forest Inventory and Analysis surveys in the Laurentian Mixed Forest province of Minnesota. Conclusions Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution models and may be one of the most influential determinants of models. All the pseudoabsence strategies produced mean AUC values of at least 0.87. More importantly than accuracy metrics, the two-step strategies over-predicted species presence, due to too much environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences, whereas models based on random pseudoabsences under-predicted species presence, due to too little environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences. Models using pseudoabsences from surveyed plots produced a balance between areas with high and low predicted probabilities and the strongest relationship between

  3. Bamboo Vinegar Decreases Inflammatory Mediator Expression and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Protein Kinase C-α/δ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Tasi, Yu-Ling; Liu, May-Lan; Chiu, Yi-Chich; Hua, Kuo-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo vinegar (BV), a natural liquid derived from the condensation produced during bamboo charcoal production, has been used in agriculture and as a food additive, but its application to immune modulation has not been reported. Here, we demonstrated that BV has anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. BV reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide levels in, and interleukin-6 secretion by, lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages without affecting tumor necrosis factor-α secretion and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. The mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of BV involved decreased reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C-α/δ activation. Furthermore, creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) was indentified as the major anti-inflammatory compound in BV. Impaired cytokine expression and NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation was seen in mice treated with creosol. These findings provide insights into how BV regulates inflammation and suggest that it may be a new source for the development of anti-inflammatory agents or a healthy supplement for preventing and ameliorating inflammation- and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases, including metabolic syndrome. PMID:24124509

  4. Identification of differential anti-neoplastic activity of copper bis(thiosemicarbazones) that is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Christian; Al-Eisawi, Zaynab; Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2015-11-01

    Bis(thiosemicarbazones) and their copper (Cu) complexes possess unique anti-neoplastic properties. However, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the structure-activity relationships of twelve bis(thiosemicarbazones) to elucidate factors regarding their anti-cancer efficacy. Importantly, the alkyl substitutions at the diimine position of the ligand backbone resulted in two distinct groups, namely, unsubstituted/monosubstituted and disubstituted bis(thiosemicarbazones). This alkyl substitution pattern governed their: (1) Cu(II/I) redox potentials; (2) ability to induce cellular (64)Cu release; (3) lipophilicity; and (4) anti-proliferative activity. The potent anti-cancer Cu complex of the unsubstituted bis(thiosemicarbazone) analog, glyoxal bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) (GTSM), generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was attenuated by Cu sequestration by a non-toxic Cu chelator, tetrathiomolybdate, and the anti-oxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Fluorescence microscopy suggested that the anti-cancer activity of Cu(GTSM) was due, in part, to lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). For the first time, this investigation highlights the role of ROS and LMP in the anti-cancer activity of bis(thiosemicarbazones). PMID:26335599

  5. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  6. Catha edulis Extract Induces H9c2 Cell Apoptosis by Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Activation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Syam, Suvitha; Al-Zubairi, Adel S.; Al-Sanousi, Rashad; Oraiby, Magbool Essa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen shrub or small tree, traditionally used by various peoples of the Arabian Peninsula and Africa as an integral component of the socioeconomic traditions. It is believed that the psychostimulant nature and toxic nature of khat is primarily due to the presence of cathinone and cathine respectively. Studies have shown that khat chewing is closely associated with cardiac complications, especially myocardial infarction. Hence in this study, we exposed cathine-rich khat extract in a cardiomyoblast H9c2 (2-1) cell line to check the cell death mechanism. Materials and Methods: Extraction of Catha edulis leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with LC-MS-MS. The anti-proliferative activity was assayed using MTT and apoptosis detection by acridine orange/propidium iodide assay. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein and caspase-3/7 expression were analyzed. The level of reactive oxygen species generation was also evaluated. Results: The khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 hours treatment. We have observed significant early apoptosis events by intervened acridine orange within the fragmented DNA with bright green fluorescence upon treatment. The Bcl-2 expression in the treatment with IC50 concentration of khat extract for 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation significantly decreased with increase in bax level. The increased activation of caspase-3/7 was significantly observed upon treatment together with significant increase of ROS was detected at 24 and 48 hours treatment. Conclusion: Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanisms by which Catha edulis leaves mediate cell death in cardiomyocytes. SUMMARY Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen psychotropic shrub or small treeExtraction of khat leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometryThe khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 h treatment in

  7. In vitro effect of manganese chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complexes activities of mitochondria isolated from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Surong; Fu, Juanling; Zhou, Zongcan

    2004-02-01

    Manganese (Mn) is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose; however the mechanisms underlying its action are not elucidated clearly. To determine if Mn2+ can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated mitochondria were exposed to different concentration of Mn2+ (5, 50, 500, 1000 microM). ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and respiratory chain complexes activities were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed; these changes were paralleled by decreasing of respiratory control ratio (RCR) both with succinate or glutamate + malate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by Rhodamine123 release decreased after MnCl2 exposure at 1000 microM. In addition, effects of the antioxidants NAC (500 microM), GSH (500 microM) and Vitamin C (500 microM) were studied at 500 microM Mn2+. The results indicate that the effect of Mn2+ exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondria function by reducing the formation of free radicals. PMID:14630064

  8. Antifungal activity of some Cuban Zanthoxylum species.

    PubMed

    Diéguez-Hurtado, R; Garrido-Garrido, G; Prieto-González, S; Iznaga, Y; González, L; Molina-Torres, J; Curini, M; Epifano, F; Marcotullio, M C

    2003-06-01

    Ethanolic extracts of the trunk bark of Zanthoxylum fagara, Z. elephantiasis and Z. martinicense showed activity against different species of fungi. No antibacterial activity was detected. PMID:12781811

  9. Subabul: A wood species for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    In view of energy and environmental considerations, efforts have been made in this article to suggest the use of biomass as a renewable and nonpolluting source of energy for power generation. This article presents the results of the proximate analyses and energy contents of various components of the Subabul tree and their impact on land requirements to generate necessary biomass for small-scale electricity generation units. The results have shown that for the Subabul-wood-based thermal power plant, approximately 400 ha of land are required to generate 2,000 kWh/d.

  10. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup. PMID:26555381

  11. Proposed formation mechanism and active species of hydrogen molecules generated from a novel magnesium-citric acid-hydroxypropyl cellulose coating (MgCC) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Hirai, Tomomitsu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of acids is known to accelerate the reaction (Mg + 2H2O = Mg(OH)2 + H2). We developed a novel Mg-citric acid coating (MgCC) material produced by milling Mg powder coated with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC); because of its H2 generation, this material could be used in antioxidant therapy and antiaging applications. After milling in the presence of citric acid, this material produced H2-rich water upon addition to cooled water. Although the reaction was considered to involve a two-electron transfer from Mg to 2H2O, the role of the acid in H2 generation remains incompletely understood. To clarify the reaction mechanism, we performed studies on the deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We observed differences in the concentration ratios, such as H2/D2 > 1 and H2/(H2 + D2 + HD) > 1, involved in H2, D2, and (H2 + D2 + HD) production, and found that adducts with hydrogen atoms (Hrad) were not obtained from the spin-trapping reaction between 5-(2, 2-Dimethyl-1,3-propoxy cyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO) and the MgCC material. The H2, D2, and HD produced from MgCC were identified by using a gas chromatograph connected to a mass spectrometer. The spin-trapping techniques showed that the Hrad adducts formed by the reaction of NaBH4 with CYPMPO could not be observed from reaction of MGCC with CYPMPO in H2O. The data suggest that the rate-controlling step and proposed transition state (TS) exist in the reaction pathway of the O-H bond cleavage and H-H bond formation. A TS of a structure such as [Mg(OH2)2]∗ could be expected in the reaction pathway between Mg and 2H2O by density functional theory calculations. Also, these results show that H2 generation is accelerated in the presence of acids because the activation energy of the TS is significantly smaller than that of H2O.

  12. Batch mode grid generation: An endangered species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-interactive grid generation schemes should thrive as emphasis shifts from development of numerical analysis and design methods to application of these tools to real engineering problems. A strong case is presented for the continued development and application of non-interactive geometry modeling methods. Guidelines, strategies, and techniques for developing and implementing these tools are presented using current non-interactive grid generation methods as examples. These schemes play an important role in the development of multidisciplinary analysis methods and some of these applications are also discussed.

  13. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  14. Guanidino compounds generate reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Mori, A; Kohno, M; Masumizu, T; Noda, Y; Packer, L

    1996-09-01

    Methylguanidine, guanidinoacetic acid and guanidinosuccinic acid are endogenous substances in body tissues. Extremely high levels of these substances are known to be related to the pathogenesis of epilepsy and renal failure such as uremia. In this study it was demonstrated that methylguanidine, guanidinoacetic acid and guanidinosuccinic acid, and arginine generate hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution. These findings suggest that a high level of guanidino compounds accumulating near or within cells such as neurons (in an epileptogenic focus) or nephrons (in uremic patients) may cause free radical damage leading to these clinical disorders. Arginine may have a similar role in the pathogenesis of hyperarginemia. PMID:8886279

  15. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  16. Induction of benzo[a]pyrene Mono-oxygenase in liver cell culture by the photochemical generation of active oxygen species. Evidence for the involvement of singlet oxygen and the formation of a stable inducing intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Paine, A J

    1976-01-01

    1. The photochemical generation of excited states of oxygen in liver cell culture by the mild ilumination of culture medium containing riboflavin, results in stimulation of benzo[a]pyrene 3-mono-oxygenase, a cytochrome P-450-linked mono-oxygenase. 2. The same large increase in mono-oxygenase activity was found when medium containing riboflavin was illuminated in the absence of cells and then stored in the dark for 24h before contact with the cells. From this it may be inferred that stimulation is due to the formation of a stable inducer in the culture medium. Further experiments indicate that the stable inducer is due to the photo-oxidation of an amino acid. 3. Evidence that singlet oxygen is responsible for initiating the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase is based on the use of molecules that scavenge particular active oxygen species. Of all the scavengers tested, only those that scavenge single oxygen inhibited the stimulation. 4. A hypothesis is developed to relate the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase by singlet oxygen in cultured cells to the regulation of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system in vivo. It is suggested that single oxygen generation within cells may be a common factor linking the many structurally diverse inducers of the enzyme system. PMID:962887

  17. Induction of benzo[a]pyrene Mono-oxygenase in liver cell culture by the photochemical generation of active oxygen species. Evidence for the involvement of singlet oxygen and the formation of a stable inducing intermediate.

    PubMed

    Paine, A J

    1976-07-15

    1. The photochemical generation of excited states of oxygen in liver cell culture by the mild ilumination of culture medium containing riboflavin, results in stimulation of benzo[a]pyrene 3-mono-oxygenase, a cytochrome P-450-linked mono-oxygenase. 2. The same large increase in mono-oxygenase activity was found when medium containing riboflavin was illuminated in the absence of cells and then stored in the dark for 24h before contact with the cells. From this it may be inferred that stimulation is due to the formation of a stable inducer in the culture medium. Further experiments indicate that the stable inducer is due to the photo-oxidation of an amino acid. 3. Evidence that singlet oxygen is responsible for initiating the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase is based on the use of molecules that scavenge particular active oxygen species. Of all the scavengers tested, only those that scavenge single oxygen inhibited the stimulation. 4. A hypothesis is developed to relate the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase by singlet oxygen in cultured cells to the regulation of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system in vivo. It is suggested that single oxygen generation within cells may be a common factor linking the many structurally diverse inducers of the enzyme system. PMID:962887

  18. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVIE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES. CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON , FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). R...

  19. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  20. Wave activated power generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.

    1983-08-09

    A wave activated power generation system of the float type is disclosed, comprising at least one piston-cylinder device having an anchored cylinder and a piston slidable in the cylinder and cooperating with the cylinder to form a pumping chamber above the piston and a low pressure chamber below the piston. The cylinder has an intake port and an exhaust port both formed at an upper port thereof to communicate with the pumping chamber and each provided with a check valve. A float is connected through a cable to the piston of the piston- cylinder device. A pair of fluid storages are connected to the intake port and the exhaust port of the pumping chamber, respectively. A waterwheel generator is driven by the fluid flowing from one of the fluid storages to another. A pressure regulating device is connected to the low pressure chamber so as to maintain the low pressure chamber at a pressure lower than the pressure in the pumping chamber, the difference in pressure ceaselessly applying a downward force on the piston to keep the cable in a tensed condition.

  1. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: a possible role in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K J; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25-200μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE2 production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. PMID:24239652

  2. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K.J.; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  3. Antifungal activity of five species of Polygala

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Susana; Mendes, Beatriz G.; Missau, Fabiana C.; de Resende, Maria A.; Pizzolatti, Moacir G.

    2011-01-01

    Crude extracts and fractions of five species of Polygala – P. campestris, P. cyparissias, P. paniculata, P. pulchella and P. sabulosa – were investigated for their in vitro antifungal activity against opportunistic Candida species, Cryptococcus gattii and Sporothrix schenckii with bioautographic and microdilution assays. In the bioautographic assays, the major extracts were active against the fungi tested. In the minimal concentration inhibitory (MIC) assay, the hexane extract of P. paniculata and EtOAc fraction of P. sabulosa showed the best antifungal activity, with MIC values of 60 and 30 μg/mL, respectively, against C. tropicalis, C. gattii and S. schenckii. The compounds isolated from P. sabulosa prenyloxycoumarin and 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexanehexol displayed antifungal activity against S. schenckii (with MICs of 125 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively) and C. gattii (both with MICs of 250 μg/mL). Rutin and aurapten isolated from P. paniculata showed antifungal activity against C. gattii with MIC values of 60 and 250 μg/mL, respectively. In the antifungal screening, few of the isolated compounds showed good antifungal inhibition. The compound α-spinasterol showed broad activity against the species tested, while rutin had the best activity with the lowest MIC values for the microorganisms tested. These two compounds may be chemically modified by the introduction of a substitute group that would alter several physico-chemical properties of the molecule, such as hydrophobicity, electronic density and steric strain. PMID:24031724

  4. Antibacterial activity of some Artemisia species extract.

    PubMed

    Poiată, Antonia; Tuchiluş, Cristina; Ivănescu, Bianca; Ionescu, A; Lazăr, M I

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of ethanol, methanol and hexane extracts from Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia annua and Artemisia vulgaris were studied. Plant extracts were tested against five Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria and one fungal strain. The results indicated that Artemisia annua alcoholic extracts are more effective against tested microorganisms. However, all plants extracts have moderate or no activity against Gram-negative bacteria. The obtained results confirm the justification of extracts of Artemisia species use in traditional medicine as treatment for microbial infections. PMID:20191854

  5. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals. PMID:25452695

  6. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-01

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. PMID:19563875

  7. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro. PMID:25212818

  8. Photosensitizing Nanoparticles and The Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Dayane; Baptista, Mauricio

    2015-05-01

    The association of PhotoSensitizer (PS) molecules with nanoparticles (NPs) forming photosensitizing NPs, has emerged as a therapeutic strategy to improve PS tumor targeting, to protect PS from deactivation reactions and to enhance both PS solubility and circulation time. Since association with NPs usually alters PS photophysical and photochemical properties, photosensitizing NPs are an important tool to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Depending on the design of the photosensitizing NP, i.e., type of PS, the NP material and the method applied for the construction of the photosensitizing NP, the deactivation routes of the excited state can be controlled, allowing the generation of either singlet oxygen or other ROS. Controlling the type of generated ROS is desirable not only in biomedical applications, as in Photodynamic Therapy where the type of ROS affects therapeutic efficiency, but also in other technological relevant fields like energy conversion, where the electron and energy transfer processes are necessary to increase the efficiency of photoconversion cells. The current review highlights some of the recent developments in the design of Photosensitizing NPs aimed at modulating the primary photochemical events after light absorption.

  9. Antimicrobial activities of some Euphorbia species.

    PubMed

    Kirbag, Sevda; Erecevit, Pınar; Zengin, Fikriye; Guvenc, Ayşe Nilay

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts and latex of some Euphorbia species used for medical purposes in Turkey were investigated. The extracts of Euphorbia aleppica L., Euphorbia szovitsii Fisch.&Mey. var. harputensis Aznav. ex M. S. Khan, Euphorbia falcata L. sub. falcata var. falcata, Euphorbia denticulata Lam., Euphorbia macroclada Boiss., Euphorbia cheiradenia Boiss.&Hohen, Euphorbia virgata Waldst.&Kit., Euphorbia petiolata Banks&Sol. were prepared with methanol. The antimicrobial activities of these extracts were examined on test microorganisms as follows: Staphylococcus aureus COWAN 1, Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Proteus vulgaris FMC 1, Klebsiella pneumonia FMC 5, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSM 50071, Candida albicans FMC 17, Candida glabrata ATCC 66032, Epidermophyton sp. and Trichophyton sp. by the disc diffusion methods and well agar method. The MIC values of extracts were determined according to the broth microdulitions method. Results indicated that extracts of Euphorbia species inhibited the growth of tested microorganisms in the different ratio. Also, the MIC values of extracts were determined as 31,2-1000 µg. PMID:24311840

  10. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen species for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. S.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Tresp, H.; Duennbier, M.; Iseni, S.; Martin, V.; Puech, V.; Weltmann, K. D.; Reuter, S.

    2012-10-01

    To get a better insight into the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cellular components, fundamental studies are essential to determine the nature and concentration of plasma-generated ROS, and the chemistry induced in biological liquids by those ROS. In this context, we have measured the absolute density of the main ROS created in three different atmospheric pressure plasma sources: two geometrically distinct RF-driven microplasma jets (μ-APPJ [1] and kinpen [2]), and an array of microcathode sustained discharges [3]. Optical diagnostics of the plasma volumes and effluent regions have been performed: UV absorption for O3 and IR emission for O2(a^1δ) [4]. High concentrations of both ROS have been obtained (10^14--10^17cm-3). The effect of different parameters, such as gas flows and mixtures and power coupled to the plasmas, has been studied. For plasma biomedicine, the determination of the reactive species present in plasma-treated liquids is of great importance. In this work, we focused on the measurement of the concentration of H2O2 and NOX radicals, generated in physiological solutions like NaCl and PBS.[4pt] [1] N. Knake et al., J. Phys. D: App. Phys. 41, 194006 (2008)[0pt] [2] K.D. Weltmann et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 82, 1223 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 141502 (2010)[0pt] [4] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011502 (2008)

  11. Identification of Active Radical Species in Alkaline Persulfate Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Lei, Jung-Hsuan

    2015-07-01

    A proposed mechanism for alkaline activation of persulfate involves generation of sulfate (SO(4)(-)), hydroxyl (HO·), and superoxide radicals (O(2)(-)). The present study investigated the feasibility of chloroform (CF) degradation using alkaline activated persulfate and identified the active radical species using a radical inhibition technique. 2-propanol (PrOH) (preferentially reacted with HO·), phenol (preferentially reacted with both HO· and SO(4)(-)), and carbon tetrachloride (CT) (preferentially reacted with O(2)(-)) were used to inhibit the degradation of CF, and the extent of inhibited degradation was used to indicate the predominant radical species. Additions of PrOH and phenol appeared to significantly scavenge SO(4)(-) and HO· and resulted in inhibited CF degradation. Here, the authors demonstrated that SO(4)(-) and HO· were predominant radicals in the alkaline activated persulfate system. The presence of O(2)(-) scavengers (i.e., CT) resulted in a partial inhibition of CF degradation and, hence, one can speculate that O(2)(-) is a minor radical species. PMID:26163502

  12. Laboratory Apparatus Generates Dual-Species Cold Atomic Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Klipstein, William; Kohel, James; Maleki, Lute; Lundblad, Nathan; Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Aveline, Dave; Yu, Nan; Enzer, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    A laser cooling apparatus that generates a cold beam of rubidium and cesium atoms at low pressure has been constructed as one of several intermediate products of a continuing program of research on laser cooling and atomic physics. Laser-cooled atomic beams, which can have temperatures as low as a microkelvin, have been used in diverse applications that include measurements of fundamental constants, atomic clocks that realize the international standard unit of time, atom-wave interferometers, and experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation. The present apparatus is a prototype of one being evaluated for use in a proposed microgravitational experiment called the Quantum Interferometric Test of Equivalence (QuITE). In this experiment, interferometric measurements of cesium and rubidium atoms in free fall would be part of a test of Einstein s equivalence principle. The present apparatus and its anticipated successors may also be useful in other experiments, in both microgravity and normal Earth gravity, in which there are requirements for dual-species atomic beams, low temperatures, and low pressures. The apparatus includes a pyramidal magneto-optical trap in which the illumination is provided by multiple lasers tuned to frequencies characteristic of the two atomic species. The inlet to the apparatus is located in a vacuum chamber that contains rubidium and cesium atoms at a low pressure; the beam leaving through the outlet of the apparatus is used to transfer the atoms to a higher-vacuum (lower-pressure) chamber in which measurements are performed. The pyramidal magneto-optical trap is designed so that the laser cooling forces in one direction are unbalanced, resulting in a continuous cold beam of atoms that leak out of the trap (see figure). The radiant intensity (number of atoms per unit time per unit solid angle) of the apparatus is the greatest of any other source of the same type reported to date. In addition, this is the first such apparatus capable of producing

  13. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  14. The Economics of Saving Endangered Species: A Teaching Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Shaw, Jane S.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that well-intentioned government policies, such as the Endangered Species Act, can actually cause harm to endangered species by creating disincentives to preserving the habitat for endangered species. Maintains that the use of incentives can lead to voluntary species protection. Includes instructions for an in-class teaching activity. (MJP)

  15. Prooxidant action of knipholone anthrone: copper dependent reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, S; Dagne, E

    2009-07-01

    Knipholone (KP) and knipholone anthrone (KA) are natural 4-phenylanthraquinone structural analogues with established differential biological activities including in vitro antioxidant and cytotoxic properties. By using DNA damage as an experimental model, the comparative Cu(II)-dependent prooxidant action of these two compounds were studied. In the presence of Cu(II) ions, the antioxidant KA (3.1-200 microM) but not KP (6-384 microM) caused a concentration-dependent pBR322 plasmid DNA strand scission. The DNA damage induced by KA could be abolished by reactive oxygen species scavengers, glutathione and catalase as well as EDTA and a specific Cu(I) chelator bathocuproine disulfonic acid. In addition to Cu(II) chelating activity, KA readily reduces Cu(II) to Cu(I). Copper-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and the subsequent macromolecular damage may be involved in the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity of KA. PMID:19345716

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  17. Template-free generation of RNA species that replicate with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, C K; Luce, R

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of different RNA species that are replicated by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 have been generated by incubating high concentrations of this enzyme with substrate for extended time periods. The products differed from sample to sample in molecular weight and sequence, their chain lengths ranging from 60 to 120. The mechanism of autocatalytic amplification of RNA by T7 RNA polymerase proved to be analogous to that observed with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (replicases): only single-stranded templates are accepted and complementary replica strands are synthesized. With enzyme in excess, exponential growth was observed; linear growth resulted when the enzyme was saturated by RNA template. The plus strands, present at 90% of the replicating RNA species, were found to have GG residues at both termini. Consensus sequences were not found among the sequences of the replicating RNA species. The secondary structures of all species sequenced turned out to be hairpins. The RNA species were specifically replicated by T7 RNA polymerase; they were not accepted as templates by the RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli or bacteriophage SP6 or by Qbeta replicase; T3 RNA polymerase was partially active. Template-free production of RNA was completely suppressed by addition of DNA to the incubation mixture. When both DNA and RNA templates were present, transcription and replication competed, but T7 RNA polymerase preferred DNA as a template. No replicating RNA species were detected in vivo in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:8670848

  18. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  19. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  20. Palladium nanoparticles synthesized by reducing species generated during a successive acidic/alkaline treatment of sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amornkitbamrung, Lunjakorn; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Thammacharoen, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-03-01

    Uniform spherical palladium nanoparticles with an average particle size of 4.3 ± 0.5 nm were successfully synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with intermediates in situ generated during a successive acidic/alkaline treatment of sucrose. A successive acidic/alkaline treatment plays an important role on converting the non-reducing sucrose into efficient reducing species containing aldehyde functionality. The Benedict's test corroborates the development and vanishing of the in situ generated reducing species upon prolonged degradation. An increase in alkalinity drastically improves the reduction efficiency. ATR FT-IR spectroscopy indicated spontaneous development of carboxylate after the alkaline treatment. Under the employed condition, small organic species with carbonyl groups (aldehyde, acid, and acid salt) were generated through the sucrose degradation before being oxidized to carbonate after an hour of the treatment. Sucrose was completely decomposed into carbonate after a 24-h successive acidic/alkaline treatment. The synthesized palladium nanoparticles express a good catalytic activity in the decolorization process of Congo red by sodium borohydride.

  1. Overview of Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensi, P.; Aminou, D.; Bézy, J.-L.; Stuhlmann, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Tjemkes, S.

    2004-11-01

    Following the successful commissioning of the first satellite of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) series and its operational deployment in January 2004 as Meteosat-8, EUMETSAT and the European Space Agency (ESA) are actively preparing the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) mission to provide a future operational geostationary meteorological satellite system in the post 2015 time frame. This paper provides an overview of the MTG user consultation process, from the definition of the user needs up to the selection of mission concepts to be defined in the frame of dedicated system architecture studies carried out by ESA at pre-phase A level.

  2. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  3. Generativity as a Route to Active Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Andreas; Schmitt, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We elucidate the significance of active ageing from an individual as well as from a societal perspective. Taking an individual perspective, maintaining activity in later years is linked to successful ageing because of empirical relationships to positive self-perception, satisfaction with life, and development of competences, whereas from a societal perspective, active ageing implies usage of older people's life competences as a human capital of society—a societal imperative, particularly in times of demographic change but also more basically substantiated in an ethics of responsibility, intergenerational solidarity, and generation equity. We focus on the psychological construct of generativity which is interpreted as an aspect of the philosophical-anthropological category of joint responsibility. Our own research in Mexico and the Baltic States supports the notion that maintaining access to the public sphere and active engagement for others is a more basic individual concern than a life-stages specific developmental task. We report background and results of a Dialogue Forum Project Funding, a research cooperation between our institute and the Foundation Remembrance, Responsibility, and Future aimed to improve generativity in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine by implementing and supporting local initiatives offering opportunities for intergenerational dialogue. PMID:22919378

  4. Khz-cp (crude polysaccharide extract obtained from the fusion of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) induces apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium levels and activating P38 and NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in SNU-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Khz-cp is a crude polysaccharide extract that is obtained after nuclear fusion in Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia (Khz). It inhibits the growth of cancer cells. Methods Khz-cp was extracted by solvent extraction. The anti-proliferative activity of Khz-cp was confirmed by using Annexin-V/PI-flow cytometry analysis. Intracellular calcium increase and measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed by using flow cytometry and inverted microscope. SNU-1 cells were treated with p38, Bcl-2 and Nox family siRNA. siRNA transfected cells was employed to investigate the expression of apoptotic, growth and survival genes in SNU-1 cells. Western blot analysis was performed to confirm the expression of the genes. Results In the present study, Khz-cp induced apoptosis preferentially in transformed cells and had only minimal effects on non-transformed cells. Furthermore, Khz-cp was found to induce apoptosis by increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and activating P38 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria. Khz-cp-induced apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred via a mitochondrial pathway. ROS generation by NADPH oxidase was critical for Khz-cp-induced apoptosis, and although mitochondrial ROS production was also required, it appeared to occur secondary to ROS generation by NADPH oxidase. Activation of NADPH oxidase was shown by the translocation of the regulatory subunits p47phox and p67phox to the cell membrane and was necessary for ROS generation by Khz-cp. Khz-cp triggered a rapid and sustained increase in [Ca2+]i that activated P38. P38 was considered to play a key role in the activation of NADPH oxidase because inhibition of its expression or activity abrogated membrane translocation of the p47phox and p67phox subunits and ROS generation. Conclusions In summary, these data indicate that Khz-cp preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells and that the

  5. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response. PMID:24392654

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus blocks inflammatory signaling in vivo via reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Patricia W; Myers, Loren E S; Ray, Laurie; Song, Shuh-Chyung; Nasr, Tala R; Berardinelli, Andrew J; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Hansen, Jason M; Neish, Andrew S

    2009-10-15

    Uncontrolled inflammatory responses in the immature gut may play a role in the pathogenesis of many intestinal inflammatory syndromes that present in newborns or children, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), or infectious enteritis. Consistent with previous reports that murine intestinal function matures over the first 3 weeks of life, we show that inflammatory signaling in the neonatal mouse gut increases during postnatal maturation, with peak responses occurring at 2-3 weeks. Probiotic bacteria can block inflammatory responses in cultured epithelia by inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which inhibit NF-kappaB activation through oxidative inactivation of the key regulatory enzyme Ubc12. We now report for the first time that the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) can induce ROS generation in intestinal epithelia in vitro and in vivo. Intestines from immature mice gavage fed LGG exhibited increased GSH oxidation and cullin-1 deneddylation, reflecting local ROS generation and its resultant Ubc12 inactivation, respectively. Furthermore, prefeeding LGG prevented TNF-alpha-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation. These studies indicate that LGG can reduce inflammatory signaling in immature intestines by inducing local ROS generation and may be a mechanism by which probiotic bacteria can prevent NEC in premature infants or reduce the severity of IBD in children. PMID:19660542

  7. Swim pressure: stress generation in active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Yan, W; Brady, J F

    2014-07-11

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries-this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton. PMID:25062240

  8. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation Linked to Sources of Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cardiorespiratory Effects.

    PubMed

    Bates, Josephine T; Weber, Rodney J; Abrams, Joseph; Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Chang, Howard H; Mulholland, James A; Tolbert, Paige E; Russell, Armistead G

    2015-11-17

    Exposure to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We assess the hypothesis that PM2.5 induces oxidative stress in the body via catalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay was used to measure the ROS-generation potential of water-soluble PM2.5. Source apportionment on ambient (Atlanta, GA) PM2.5 was performed using the chemical mass balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles. Linear regression analysis was used to relate PM2.5 emission sources to ROS-generation potential and to estimate historical levels of DTT activity for use in an epidemiologic analysis for the period of 1998-2009. Light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGV) exhibited the highest intrinsic DTT activity, followed by biomass burning (BURN) and heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) (0.11 ± 0.02, 0.069 ± 0.02, and 0.052 ± 0.01 nmol min(-1) μg(-1)source, respectively). BURN contributed the largest fraction to total DTT activity over the study period, followed by LDGV and HDDV (45, 20, and 14%, respectively). DTT activity was more strongly associated with emergency department visits for asthma/wheezing and congestive heart failure than PM2.5. This work provides further epidemiologic evidence of a biologically plausible mechanism, that of oxidative stress, for associations of adverse health outcomes with PM2.5 mass and supports continued assessment of the utility of the DTT activity assay as a measure of ROS-generating potential of particles. PMID:26457347

  10. Ixodes ticks: serum species sensitivity of anticomplement activity.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, C H; Randolph, S E; Nuttall, P A

    1999-12-01

    Ixodid ticks feed for extended periods of up to 2 weeks or more. To complete engorgement, they must overcome their host's innate immune mechanisms of which the complement system is a major component. Using in vitro assays, salivary gland extracts of the ixodid ticks, Ixodes ricinus, I. hexagonus, and I. uriae, were shown to inhibit activity of the alternative pathway of complement. The ability of the different Ixodes species to inhibit complement activity varied with the animal species used as a complement serum source. Serum species sensitivity correlates to the reported host range of the tick species tested. PMID:10600446

  11. Nitrite attenuated peroxynitrite and hypochlorite generation in activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoming; Ding, Yun; Lu, Naihao

    2016-03-15

    Oxidative stress is usually considered as an important factor to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and hypochlorite (OCl(-)) are formed in immune cells as a part of the innate host defense system, but excessive reactive oxygen species generation can cause progressive inflammation and tissue damage. It has been proven that through mediating nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis, inorganic nitrite (NO2(-)) shows organ-protective effects on oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the effects of NO2(-) on the function of immune cells were still not clear. The potential role of NO2(-) in modulating ONOO(-) and OCl(-) generation in neutrophil cells was investigated in this study. As an immune cell activator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased both ONOO(-) and OCl(-) production in neutrophils, which was significantly attenuated by NO2(-). NO2(-) reduced superoxide (O2(·-)) generation via a NO-dependent mechanism and increased NO formation in activated neutrophils, suggesting a crucial role of O2(·-) in NO2(-)-mediated reduction of ONOO(-). Moreover, the reduced effect of NO2(-) on OCl(-) production was attributed to that NO2(-) reduced H2O2 production in activated neutrophils without influencing the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO), thus limiting OCl(-) production by MPO/H2O2 system. Therefore, NO2(-) attenuates ONOO(-) and OCl(-) formation in activated neutrophils, opening a new direction to modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:26854590

  12. Electrochemically active species and multielectron processes in ionic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, Viktor I.; Solov'ev, Veniamin V.; Malyshev, Viktor V.

    2001-02-01

    The model concepts for the mechanisms of formation of electrochemically active species and multielectron processes in ionic nitrate-, carbonate-, boron- and titanium-containing fluoride melts are generalised. The fundamental importance of the acid-base properties of a melt in the mechanism of formation of electrochemically active species is shown for nitrate- and carbonate-containing melts. This fact is confirmed by electrochemical measurements and by calculations of force constants for oxyanions. The optimum form of electrochemically active species has been established; their reduction abilities depend on the cationic composition of a melt, the adsorption properties of the electrode surface and the electric field strength. The bibliography includes 218 references.

  13. Generation of active immunotoxins containing recombinant restrictocin.

    PubMed

    Rathore, D; Batra, J K

    1996-05-01

    Restrictocin, a toxin produced by the fungus Aspergillus restrictus, is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis. Recombinant restrictocin was made in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in large amounts. The recombinant protein was found to be poorly immunogenic in mice with low toxicity, when injected intraperitoneally. Two immunotoxins were constructed by coupling the recombinant restrictocin to an antibody to the human transferrin receptor, using a cleavable and a stable linkage. The immunotoxins so generated showed specific cytotoxic activity toward receptor bearing cells in tissue culture. Immunotoxin with a cleavable linkage, however, was more active than that containing a stable linkage. Restrictocin appears to be a promising candidate to be developed as a chimeric toxin for targeted therapy. PMID:8630074

  14. Reactive Carbonyl Species In Vivo: Generation and Dual Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Semchyshyn, Halyna M.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive carbonyls are widespread species in living organisms and mainly known for their damaging effects. The most abundant reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are derived from oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Chemical modification of proteins, nucleic acids, and aminophospholipids by RCS results in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. In addition to their direct toxicity, modification of biomolecules by RCS gives rise to a multitude of adducts and cross links that are increasingly implicated in aging and pathology of a wide range of human diseases. Understanding of the relationship between metabolism of RCS and the development of pathological disorders and diseases may help to develop effective approaches to prevent a number of disorders and diseases. On the other hand, constant persistence of RCS in cells suggests that they perform some useful role in living organisms. The most beneficial effects of RCS are their establishment as regulators of cell signal transduction and gene expression. Since RCS can modulate different biological processes, new tools are required to decipher the precise mechanisms underlying dual effects of RCS. PMID:24634611

  15. Moraxella species are primarily responsible for generating malodor in laundry.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiromi; Mitani, Asako; Niwano, Yu; Takeuchi, Kohei; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Hitomi, Jun

    2012-05-01

    Many people in Japan often detect an unpleasant odor generated from laundry that is hung to dry indoors or when using their already-dried laundry. Such an odor is often described as a "wet-and-dirty-dustcloth-like malodor" or an "acidic or sweaty odor." In this study, we isolated the major microorganisms associated with such a malodor, the major component of which has been identified as 4-methyl-3-hexenoic acid (4M3H). The isolates were identified as Moraxella osloensis by morphological observation and biochemical and phylogenetic tree analyses. M. osloensis has the potential to generate 4M3H in laundry. The bacterium is known to cause opportunistic infections but has never been known to generate a malodor in clothes. We found that M. osloensis exists at a high frequency in various living environments, particularly in laundry in Japan. The bacterium showed a high tolerance to desiccation and UV light irradiation, providing one of the possible reasons why they survive in laundry during and even after drying. PMID:22367080

  16. Moraxella Species Are Primarily Responsible for Generating Malodor in Laundry

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Asako; Niwano, Yu; Takeuchi, Kohei; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Hitomi, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Many people in Japan often detect an unpleasant odor generated from laundry that is hung to dry indoors or when using their already-dried laundry. Such an odor is often described as a “wet-and-dirty-dustcloth-like malodor” or an “acidic or sweaty odor.” In this study, we isolated the major microorganisms associated with such a malodor, the major component of which has been identified as 4-methyl-3-hexenoic acid (4M3H). The isolates were identified as Moraxella osloensis by morphological observation and biochemical and phylogenetic tree analyses. M. osloensis has the potential to generate 4M3H in laundry. The bacterium is known to cause opportunistic infections but has never been known to generate a malodor in clothes. We found that M. osloensis exists at a high frequency in various living environments, particularly in laundry in Japan. The bacterium showed a high tolerance to desiccation and UV light irradiation, providing one of the possible reasons why they survive in laundry during and even after drying. PMID:22367080

  17. Reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide generation in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Rudzka, Dominika A; Cameron, Jenifer M; Olson, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell migration is a complex process that requires spatially and temporally co-ordinated regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In response to external cues, signals are transduced to elicit cytoskeletal responses. It has emerged that reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide, are important second messengers in pathways that influence the actin cytoskeleton, although the identities of key proteins regulated by hydrogen peroxide are largely unknown. We recently showed that oxidation of cofilin1 is elevated in migrating cells relative to stationary cells, and that the effect of this post-translational modification is to reduce cofilin1-actin binding and to inhibit filamentous-actin severing by cofilin1. These studies revealed that cofilin1 regulation by hydrogen peroxide contributes to directional cell migration, and established a template for discovering additional proteins that are regulated in an analogous manner. PMID:27066166

  18. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.

  19. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniquesmore » with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.« less

  20. Generation of Marked and Markerless Mutants in Model Cyanobacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Vasudevan, Ravendran; Howe, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are ecologically important organisms and potential platforms for production of biofuels and useful industrial products. Genetic manipulation of cyanobacteria, especially model organisms such as Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, is a key tool for both basic and applied research. Generation of unmarked mutants, whereby chromosomal alterations are introduced into a strain via insertion of an antibiotic resistance cassette (a manipulatable fragment of DNA containing one or more genes), followed by subsequent removal of this cassette using a negative selectable marker, is a particularly powerful technique. Unmarked mutants can be repeatedly genetically manipulated, allowing as many alterations to be introduced into a strain as desired. In addition, the absence of genes encoding antibiotic resistance proteins in the mutated strain is desirable, as it avoids the possibility of 'escape' of antibiotic resistant organisms into the environment. However, detailed methods for repeated rounds of genetic manipulation of cyanobacteria are not well described in the scientific literature. Here we provide a comprehensive description of this technique, which we have successfully used to generate mutants with multiple deletions, single point mutations within a gene of interest and insertion of novel gene cassettes. PMID:27286310

  1. Theory of second harmonic generation in randomly oriented species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Allcock, Philip; Demidov, Andrey A.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that second harmonic generation (SHG) is a process forbidden within atomic and molecular fluids. Nonetheless recent experimental observations of second harmonic evolution in suspensions of randomly oriented Halobacterium halobium purple membranes have raised new questions about the precise criteria which determine prohibition of the second harmonic. To address the problem a theoretical framework for SHG is developed that specifically deals with molecular systems, and is therefore cast in terms of molecular properties with more regard to the influence of the local structure. This contrasts with the classical approach based on bulk susceptibilities, which has not proved adequate to explain the conflicting experimental results. By properly formulating the detailed procedure for dealing with the necessary orientational averages, the present theory discloses a relationship between the coherent process of second harmonic generation and a directed component of its incoherent counterpart, hyper-Rayleigh scattering. Inter alia, the theory explains the SHG detected in purple membrane suspensions. The polarisation features of the harmonic evolution are also considered more generally, and in particular it is shown that the SHG signal will persist under conditions of circularly polarised pumping. This specific polarisation feature will allow experimental validation of the theory.

  2. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen species generation by cavitation incepted efficiently using nonlinear propagation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a treatment method that uses chemical bio-effect of cavitation bubbles. Reactive oxygen species that can kill cancerous tissue is induced by such chemical effect of cavitation bubbles and it is important to generate them efficiently for effective sonodynamic treatment. Cavitation cloud can be formed by an effect of nonlinear propagation and focus and in this study, it was experimentally investigated if cavitation cloud was useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, it was demonstrated that cavitation cloud would be useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species.

  3. The electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Kan J.; Kuchynka, Daniel J.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    Electrochemical cells have been fabricated for the simultaneous generation of oxygen and lithium from a Li2O-containing molten salt (Li2O-LiCl-LiF). The cell utilizes an oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), to effect separation between oxygen evolving and lithium reduction half-cell reactions. The cell, which operates at 700-850 C, possesses rapid electrode kinetics at the lithium-alloy electrode with exchange current density values being greater than 60 mA/sq cm. When used in the electrolytic mode, lithium produced at the negative electrode would be continuously removed from the cell for later use (under lunar conditions) as an easily storable reducing agent for the chemical refining of lunar ores. Because of the high reversibility of this electrochemical system, it has also formed the basis for the lithium-oxygen secondary battery system which possesses the highest theoretical energy density yet investigated.

  4. Electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammells, Anthony F.; Semkow, Krystyna W.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature electrolytic cell which simultaneously generates oxygen at the anode and liquid alkali metals at the cathode is electrochemically characterized. The electrolytic technology being investigated utilizes the oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria stabilized zirconia, which effectively separates the oxygen evolving (at La0.89Sr0.10MnO3) and alkali metal (Li, Na) reducing (from a molten salt at either Pt or FeSi2) half cell reactions. In the finally engineered cell liquid alkali metal would be continuously removed from the cathode compartment and used as an effective reductant for the direct thermochemical refining of lunar ores to their metallic state with simultaneous oxidation of the alkali metal to its oxide. The alkali metal oxide would then be reintroduced into the electrolytic cell to complete the overall system cycle.

  5. Electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammells, Anthony F.; Semkow, Krystyna W.

    1987-09-01

    A high temperature electrolytic cell which simultaneously generates oxygen at the anode and liquid alkali metals at the cathode is electrochemically characterized. The electrolytic technology being investigated utilizes the oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria stabilized zirconia, which effectively separates the oxygen evolving (at La0.89Sr0.10MnO3) and alkali metal (Li, Na) reducing (from a molten salt at either Pt or FeSi2) half cell reactions. In the finally engineered cell liquid alkali metal would be continuously removed from the cathode compartment and used as an effective reductant for the direct thermochemical refining of lunar ores to their metallic state with simultaneous oxidation of the alkali metal to its oxide. The alkali metal oxide would then be reintroduced into the electrolytic cell to complete the overall system cycle.

  6. Identification of the haemolytic activity of Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Mekaprateep, Malee; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Malassezia species are part of the normal skin flora and are associated with a number of human and animal skin diseases. However, the mechanisms that mediate infection and host-fungal interactions are poorly understood. The haemolytic activity of several microorganisms is considered a factor that contributes to pathogenicity of the organism to humans and animals. This virulence factor was previously identified in several pathogenic fungi that cause systemic mycoses, such as Aspergillus and Candida. In this study, the haemolytic activity of six major Malassezia species, including M. furfur, M. globosa, M. pachydermatis, M. restricta, M. slooffiae and M. sympodialis, was investigated. The haemolytic activity of these species was tested on tryptone soya agar with 5% sheep blood. All the examined Malassezia species produced a halo zone of complete haemolysis. A quantitative analysis of the haemolytic activity was performed by incubating sheep erythrocytes with the extraction from culture of each Malassezia species. Interestingly, M. globosa and M. restricta showed significantly high haemolytic activity compared with the other Malassezia species. In addition, M. globosa also exhibited stable haemolytic activity after treatment at 100 °C and in the presence of some proteases, indicating that this haemolytic factor is different from those of other fungi. PMID:24028702

  7. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  8. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  9. Nucleotide receptor signaling in murine macrophages is linked to reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Zachary A; Guerra, Alma N; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Prabhu, Usha; Aga, Mini; Hall, David J; Bertics, Paul J

    2007-05-15

    Macrophage activation is critical in the innate immune response and can be regulated by the nucleotide receptor P2X7. In this regard, P2X7 signaling is not well understood but has been implicated in controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by various leukocytes. Although ROS can contribute to microbial killing, the role of ROS in nucleotide-mediated cell signaling is unclear. In this study, we report that the P2X7 agonists ATP and 3'-O-(4-benzoyl) benzoic ATP (BzATP) stimulate ROS production by RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. These effects are potentiated in lipopolysaccharide-primed cells, demonstrating an important interaction between extracellular nucleotides and microbial products in ROS generation. In terms of nucleotide receptor specificity, RAW 264.7 macrophages that are deficient in P2X7 are greatly reduced in their capacity to generate ROS in response to BzATP treatment (both with and without LPS priming), thus supporting a role for P2X7 in this process. Because MAP kinase activation is key for nucleotide regulation of macrophage function, we also tested the hypothesis that P2X7-mediated MAP kinase activation is dependent on ROS production. We observed that BzATP stimulates MAP kinase (ERK1/ERK2, p38, and JNK1/JNK2) phosphorylation and that the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid strongly attenuate BzATP-mediated JNK1/JNK2 and p38 phosphorylation but only slightly reduce BzATP-induced ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation. These studies reveal that P2X7 can contribute to macrophage ROS production, that this effect is potentiated upon lipopolysaccharide exposure, and that ROS are important participants in the extracellular nucleotide-mediated activation of several MAP kinase systems. PMID:17448897

  10. The electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Kan J.; Kuchynka, Daniel J.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1989-01-01

    Electrochemical cells have been fabricated for the simultaneous generation of oxygen and lithium from a Li2O containing molten salt (Li2O-LiCl-LiF). The cell utilizes an oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), to effect separation between oxygen evolving and lithium reduction half-cell reactions. The cell, which operates at 700 to 850 C, possesses rapid electrode kinetics at the lithium-alloy electrode with exchange current density (i sub o) values being greater than 60mA sq cm. When used in the electrolytic mode, lithium produced at the negative electrode would be continuously removed from the cell for later use (under lunar conditions) as an easily storable reducing agent (compared to H2) for the chemical refining of lunar ores. Because of the high reversibility of this electrochemical system, it has also formed tha basis for the lithium oxygen secondary battery system which possesses the highest theoretical energy density yet investigated.

  11. No Effect of Host Species on Phenoloxidase Activity in a Mycophagous Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincent; Chan, Amanda Kar-Men

    2015-01-01

    Ecological immunology is an interdisciplinary field that helps elucidate interactions between the environment and immune response. The host species individuals experience have profound effects on immune response in many species of insects. However, this conclusion comes from studies of herbivorous insects even though species of mycophagous insects also inhabit many different host species. The goal of this study was to determine if fungal host species as well as individual, sex, body size, and host patch predict one aspect of immune function, phenoloxidase activity (PO). We sampled a metapopulation of Bolitotherus cornutus, a mycophagous beetle in southwestern Virginia. B. cornutus live on three species of fungus that differ in nutritional quality, social environment, and density. A filter paper phenoloxidase assay was used to quantify phenoloxidase activity. Overall, PO activity was significantly repeatable among individuals (0.57) in adult B. cornutus. While there was significant variance among individuals in PO activity, there were surprisingly no significant differences in PO activity among subpopulations, beetles living on different host species, or between the sexes; there was also no effect of body size. Our results suggest that other factors such as age, genotype, disease prevalence, or natal environment may be generating variance among individuals in PO activity. PMID:26513243

  12. The electrochemical generation of useful chemical species from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Kan J.; Kuchynka, Daniel J.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1989-01-01

    The current status of work on an electrochemical technology for the simultaneous generation of oxygen and lithium from a Li2O containing molten salt (Li2O-LiCl-LiF) is discussed. The electrochemical cell utilizes an oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolyte, yttria-stabilized zirconia, to effect separation between the oxygen evolving and lithium reduction half-cell reactions. The cell, which operates at 700 to 800 C, possesses rapid electrode kinetics at the lithium-alloy electrode with exchange current density values being greater than 60 mA/sq cm, showing high reversibility for this reaction. When used in the electrolytic mode, lithium produced at the negative electrode would be continuously removed from the cell for later use (under lunar conditions) as an easily storable reducting agent (compared to H2) for the chemical refining of lunar ores via the general reaction: 2Li + MO yields Li2O + M where MO represents a lunar ore. Emphasis to this time has been on the simulated lunar ore ilmenite (FeTiO3), which we have found becomes chemically reduced by Li at 432 C. Furthermore, both Fe2O3 and TiO2 have been reduced by Li to give the corresponding metal. This electrochemical approach provides a convenient route for producing metals under lunar conditions and oxygen for the continuous maintenance of human habitats on the Moon's surface. Because of the high reversibility of this electrochemical system, it has also formed the basis for the lithium-oxygen secondary battery. This secondary lithium-oxygen battery system posses the highest theoretical energy density yet investigated.

  13. Transient Thermoelectric Generator: An Active Load Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockholm, J. G.; Goupil, C.; Maussion, P.; Ouerdane, H.

    2015-06-01

    Under stationary conditions, the optimization of maximum power output and efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is a well-known subject. Use of a finite-time thermodynamics (FTT) approach to the description of TEGs has demonstrated that there exists a closed feedback effect between the output electrical load value and the entering heat current. From the practical point of view, this effect is strongly evidenced by the use of direct current (DC-to-DC) converters as active loads. Both transient conditions and FTT contribute to a complex landscape of the optimization of the power and efficiencies of a TEG. It has been claimed that the use of inductive load may lead to a strong enhancement of the efficiency, and the frequency response of a TEG as a band-pass filter has also been recently reported. We consider these results using a classical linear Onsager approach of a TEG operating under transient conditions. We show that a trans-admittance may be defined as a coupling element between the input and the output, leading to the observed electric-to-thermal feedback. We discuss recent experiments on a TEG connected to an active load, which is reported to boast an efficiency exceeding the usual stationary DC thermoelectric efficiency.

  14. Active transposable elements recover species boundaries and geographic structure in Madagascan coffee species.

    PubMed

    Roncal, Julissa; Guyot, Romain; Hamon, Perla; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Konan, Olivier N'Guessan; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Nowak, Michael D; Davis, Aaron P; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    The completion of the genome assembly for the economically important coffee plant Coffea canephora (Rubiaceae) has allowed the use of bioinformatic tools to identify and characterize a diverse array of transposable elements (TEs), which can be used in evolutionary studies of the genus. An overview of the copy number and location within the C. canephora genome of four TEs is presented. These are tested for their use as molecular markers to unravel the evolutionary history of the Millotii Complex, a group of six wild coffee (Coffea) species native to Madagascar. Two TEs from the Gypsy superfamily successfully recovered some species boundaries and geographic structure among samples, whereas a TE from the Copia superfamily did not. Notably, species occurring in evergreen moist forests of eastern and southeastern Madagascar were divergent with respect to species in other habitats and regions. Our results suggest that the peak of transpositional activity of the Gypsy and Copia TEs occurred, respectively, before and after the speciation events of the tested Madagascan species. We conclude that the utilization of active TEs has considerable potential to unravel the evolutionary history and delimitation of closely related Coffea species. However, the selection of TE needs to be experimentally tested, since each element has its own evolutionary history. Different TEs with similar copy number in a given species can render different dendrograms; thus copy number is not a good selection criterion to attain phylogenetic resolution. PMID:26231981

  15. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  16. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40phox and p47phox) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  17. [Nocturnal flight activities of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in Konya].

    PubMed

    Dik, Bilal; Ergül, Recep

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine the nocturnal flight activities of Culicoides species during July, 1997 in Konya. Light traps were used for the collection of Culicoides specimens. They were placed in or nearby pens of poultry, sheep and cattle between the hours 20:00-22:00, 22:00-24:00, 24:00-02:00, 02:00-04:00, 04:00-06:00, and 06:00-08:00. A total of 4084 specimens were caught. Twelve species (C. puncticollis, C. maritimus, C. circumscriptus, C. punctatus, C. newsteadi, C. flavipulicaris, C. obsoletus, C. pulicaris, C. simulator, C. gejgelensis, C. salinarius, and C. vexans) were identified. C. puncticollis, C. maritimus, C. circumscriptus and C. punctatus were the most abundant species. It was found that the Culicoides species fly at night and their numbers decrease in the morning. The different species were observed to have different flight activities. A maximum number of C. puncticollis was captured in between the hours 20:00-22:00. A relatively high number of C. maritimus were caught between the hours of 20.00-22.00. Flight activity of this species peaked between the hours 22:00-24:00. The maximum number of C. circumscriptus was captured between the hours of 22:00-24:00 and 24:00-02:00. Flight activity of C. punctatus increased regularly from the hours of 20:00-22:00 until 02:00-04:00. PMID:17160855

  18. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  19. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  20. Water-soluble fullerene materials for bioapplications: photoinduced reactive oxygen species generation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The photoinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from several water-soluble fullerenes was examined. Macromolecular or small molecular water-soluble fullerene complexes/derivatives were prepared and their 1O2 and O2•- generation abilities were evaluated by EPR spin-trapping methods. As a r...

  1. Cytochrome b Divergence between Avian Sister Species Is Linked to Generation Length and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Caroline E.; Gilbert, James D. J.; Brooke, M. de L

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly realised that the molecular clock does not tick at a constant rate. Rather, mitochondrial mutation rates are influenced by factors such as generation length and body mass. This has implications for the use of genetic data in species delimitation. It could be that speciation, as recognised by avian taxonomists, is associated with a certain minimum genetic distance between sister taxa, in which case we would predict no difference in the cytochrome b divergence of sister taxa according to the species' body size or generation time. Alternatively, if what taxonomists recognise as speciation has tended to be associated with the passage of a minimum amount of time since divergence, then there might be less genetic divergence between sister taxa with slower mutation rates, namely those that are heavier and/or with longer generation times. After excluding non-flying species, we analysed a database of over 600 avian sister species pairs, and found that species pairs with longer generation lengths (which tend to be the larger species) showed less cytochrome b divergence. This finding cautions against using any simple unitary criterion of genetic divergence to delimit species. PMID:24505250

  2. Comparison of Cas9 activators in multiple species.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alejandro; Tuttle, Marcelle; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Chari, Raj; Ter-Ovanesyan, Dmitry; Haque, Sabina J; Cecchi, Ryan J; Kowal, Emma J K; Buchthal, Joanna; Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert; Collins, James J; Church, George

    2016-07-01

    Several programmable transcription factors exist based on the versatile Cas9 protein, yet their relative potency and effectiveness across various cell types and species remain unexplored. Here, we compare Cas9 activator systems and examine their ability to induce robust gene expression in several human, mouse, and fly cell lines. We also explore the potential for improved activation through the combination of the most potent activator systems, and we assess the role of cooperativity in maximizing gene expression. PMID:27214048

  3. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOEpatents

    Lal, Amit; Li, Hui; Blanchard, James P.; Henderson, Douglass L.

    2002-01-01

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  4. PKCα promotes generation of reactive oxygen species via DUOX2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiajun; Shao, Miaomiao; Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Li, Lili; Wu, Weicheng; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Zhang, Mingming; Song, Shushu; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-08-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have long been considered as a hallmark of almost all types of cancer including HCC. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), a serine/threonine kinase among conventional PKC family, is recognized as a major player in signal transduction and tumor progression. Overexpression of PKCα is commonly observed in human HCC and associated with its poor prognosis. However, how PKCα is involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis remains not fully understood. In this study, we found that among the members of conventional PKC family, PKCα, but not PKCβI or βII, promoted ROS production in HCC cells. PKCα stimulated generation of ROS by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. Depletion of DUOX2 abrogated PKCα-induced activation of AKT/MAPK pathways as well as cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC cells. Moreover, the expression of DUOX2 and PKCα was well positively correlated in both HCC cell lines and patient samples. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that PKCα plays a critical role in HCC development by inducing DUOX2 expression and ROS generation, and propose a strategy to target PKCα/DUOX2 as a potential adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. - Highlights: • PKCα promotes the generation of ROS in hepatocellular carcinoma. • PKCα induces ROS production by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. • DUOX2 is required for PKCα-induced AKT/MAPK activation and tumor progression in HCC. • The expression of PKCα is positively correlated with DUOX2 in HCC.

  5. Generating Orally-Active Galanin Analogs with Analgesic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pruess, Timothy H.; Grussendorf, Erin; White, H. Steve; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous neuropeptide galanin has anticonvulsant and analgesic properties mediated by galanin receptors expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Our previous work showed that combination of truncation of the galanin peptide along with N-and C-terminal modifications afforded analogs that suppressed seizures or pain following intraperitoneal administration. To generate orally-active galanin analogs, the previously reported lead compound Gal-B2 (NAX 5055) was redesigned by (1) central truncation, (2) introduction of D-amino acids, (3) and addition of backbone spacers. Analog D-Gal(7-Ahp)-B2, containing 7-amino heptanoic acid as a backbone spacer and oligo-D-lysine motif at the C-terminus, exhibited anticonvulsant and analgesic activity post intraperitoneal administration. Oral administration of D-Gal(7-Ahp)-B2 demonstrated analgesic activity with reduction in both acute and inflammatory pain in the mouse formalin model of pain at doses as low as 8 mg/kg. PMID:22374865

  6. Environmental monitoring using next generation sequencing: rapid identification of macroinvertebrate bioindicator species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Invertebrate communities are central to many environmental monitoring programs. In freshwater ecosystems, aquatic macroinvertebrates are collected, identified and then used to infer ecosystem condition. Yet the key step of species identification is often not taken, as it requires a high level of taxonomic expertise, which is lacking in most organizations, or species cannot be identified as they are morphologically cryptic or represent little known groups. Identifying species using DNA sequences can overcome many of these issues; with the power of next generation sequencing (NGS), using DNA sequences for routine monitoring becomes feasible. Results In this study, we test if NGS can be used to identify species from field-collected samples in an important bioindicator group, the Chironomidae. We show that Cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and Cytochrome B (CytB) sequences provide accurate DNA barcodes for chironomid species. We then develop a NGS analysis pipeline to identifying species using megablast searches of high quality sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing against comprehensive reference libraries of Sanger-sequenced voucher specimens. We find that 454 generated COI sequences successfully identified up to 96% of species in samples, but this increased up to 99% when combined with CytB sequences. Accurate identification depends on having at least five sequences for a species; below this level species not expected in samples were detected. Incorrect incorporation of some multiplex identifiers (MID’s) used to tag samples was a likely cause, and most errors could be detected when using MID tags on forward and reverse primers. We also found a strong quantitative relationship between the number of 454 sequences and individuals showing that it may be possible to estimate the abundance of species from 454 pyrosequencing data. Conclusions Next generation sequencing using two genes was successful for identifying chironomid species. However, when detecting

  7. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  8. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  9. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Đačić, Dragana; Ćurčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  10. Metabolomic profiling and antioxidant activity of some Acacia species

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Farid, I.B.; Sheded, M.G.; Mohamed, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling of different parts (leaves, flowers and pods) of Acacia species (Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal and Acacia laeta) was evaluated. The multivariate data analyses such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate the distribution of plant metabolites among different species or different organs of the same species. A.nilotica was characterized with a high content of saponins and A.seyal was characterized with high contents of proteins, phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins. A.laeta had a higher content of carbohydrates than A. nilotica and A. seyal. On the basis of these results, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of the methanolic extracts of studied parts were evaluated. A.nilotica and A.seyal extracts showed less inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) compared to A.laeta extracts which means that these two species have the strongest radical scavenging activity whereas A. laeta extracts have the lowest radical scavenging activity. A positive correlation between saponins and flavonoids with total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed. Based on these results, the potentiality of these plants as antioxidants was discussed. PMID:25313274

  11. Microfluidic generation of acoustically active nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Martz, Thomas D; Bardin, David; Sheeran, Paul S; Lee, Abraham P; Dayton, Paul A

    2012-06-25

    A microfluidic approach for the generation of perfluorocarbon nanodroplets as the primary emulsion with diameters as small as 300-400 nm is described. The system uses a pressure-controlled delivery of all reagents and increased viscosity in the continuous phase to drive the device into an advanced tip-streaming regime, which results in generation of droplets in the sub-micrometer range. Such nanodroplets may be appropriate for emerging biomedical applications. PMID:22467628

  12. Effects of helium gas mixing on the production of active species in nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, M. A.; Qayyum, A.; Ali, Shujaat; Zakaullah, M.

    2006-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effects of helium gas mixing on the electron temperature and the production of active species in nitrogen plasma generated by 50 Hz pulsed-DC power source. The electron temperature is determined from He I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot method. The relative changes in the concentration of active species N2(C Πu3) and N+2(B Σu+2) are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of nitrogen (0 0) bands of the second positive and the first negative systems. It is found that the electron temperature can be raised considerably by mixing helium in nitrogen plasma, which in return plays a significant role in enhancing the concentration of active species through Penning effect of metastable states of the helium.

  13. Procyanidins from Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. Seedpod induce autophagy mediated by reactive oxygen species generation in human hepatoma G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuqing; Xu, Hui; Luo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, autophagic effect of procyanidins from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seedpod (LSPCs) on human hepatoma G2 (HepG2) cells, and the inherent correlation between autophagic levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were investigated. The results showed that LSPCs increased monodansylcadaverine (MDC) fluorescence intensity and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion in HepG2 cells. In addition, the typically autophagic characteristics (autophagosomes and autolysosomes) were observed in LSPCs-treated cells, but not found in the cells treated with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Furthermore, the elevated ROS level was in line with the increasing of autophagy activation caused by LSPCs, however, both 3-MA and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcyteine (NAC) inhibitors effectively suppressed the autophagy and ROS generation triggered by LSPCs. As a result, these results indicated that LSPCs induced HepG2 cell autophagy in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation on HepG2 cells. Moreover, we found that LSPCs caused DNA damage, S phase arrest and the decrement of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) which were associated with ROS generation. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the LSPCs-induced autophagy and autophagic cell death were triggered by the ROS generation in HepG2 cells, which might be associated with ROS generation through the mitochondria-dependent signaling way. PMID:27044822

  14. Distinguishing Candida Species by β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Kyoko; Shepherd, Maxwell G.; Cannon, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of fungi produce the hydrolytic enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (HexNAcase), which can be readily detected in assays by using p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminide as a substrate. In the present study we developed a microtiter plate-based HexNAcase assay for distinguishing Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis strains from other yeast species. HexNAcase activity was detected in 89 of 92 (97%) C. albicans strains and 4 of 4 C. dubliniensis strains but not in 28 strains of eight other Candida species, 4 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, or 2 Cryptococcus neoformans strains. The HexNAcase activity in C. albicans and C. dubliniensis was strain specific. All except three clinical C. albicans isolates among the C. albicans strains tested produced enzyme activity within 24 h. These strains did produce enzyme activity, however, after a prolonged incubation period. For two of these atypical strains, genomic DNA at the C. albicans HEX1 gene locus, which encodes HexNAcase, showed nucleotide differences from the sequence of control strains. Among the other Candida species tested, only C. dubliniensis had a DNA sequence that hybridized with the HEX1 probe under low-stringency conditions. The microtiter plate-based assay used in the present study for the detection of HexNAcase activity is a simple, relatively inexpensive method useful for the presumptive identification of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11376040

  15. Quality assessment and antiplasmodial activity of West African Cochlospermum species.

    PubMed

    Lamien-Meda, Aline; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Compaoré, Moussa; Meda, Roland N T; Bacher, Markus; Koenig, Karin; Pacher, Thomas; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Noedl, Harald; Willcox, Merlin; Novak, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    The present study focuses on development of phytochemical methods for quality assessment of two West-African Cochlospermum species (Cochlospermum planchonii and Cochlospermum tinctorium) traditionally used for malaria treatment in Burkina Faso. Antimalarial activity of preparations from dried rhizomes (decoction) was tested against the chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium strain 3D7 using the histidine-rich protein II (HRP2) drug susceptibility assay and compared with extract preparations using organic solvents of different polarity. Two main apocarotenoids were isolated from rhizomes of C. planchonii and unambiguously identified as dihydrocochloxanthine and cochloxanthine by spectroscopic methods. Comparative HPLC analyses of thirty-nine (39) samples from markets and from collections in natural habitats of both species showed a high variability in the accumulation of cochloxanthines and related carotenoids which were proven to be characteristic for rhizomes of both species and generally absent in leaves. Furthermore, content of total phenolics and antioxidant activities (DPPH and FRAP) as well as haemolytic activity of various extracts was tested. The HPLC method presented here was validated and provides a good separation of both compounds including 10 minor carotenoids. Extracts from both species and pure cochloxanthine offered pronounced antioxidant activities and weak haemolytic activity while, in contrast, dihydrocochloxanthine had a strong haemolytic effect at the highest concentration analysed. However, cochloxanthine as well as dihydrocochloxanthine showed erythroprotective effects against the haemolytic activity of the reference saponin. Moderate antiplasmodial activity between 16 and 63 μg/ml were observed with all tested extracts, and lower IC50 values were obtained with pure dihydrocochloxanthine (IC50=6.9 μg/ml), cochloxanthine (IC50=6.8 μg/ml), the DCM fraction (IC50=2.4 μg/ml) and the ethyl acetate fraction (IC50=11.5μg/ml) derived from a methanolic

  16. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures. PMID:25923709

  17. A Next Generation Semiconductor Based Sequencing Approach for the Identification of Meat Species in DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D’Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures. PMID:25923709

  18. NADPH Oxidase- and Mitochondria-derived Reactive Oxygen Species in Proinflammatory Microglial Activation: A Bipartisan Affair?

    PubMed Central

    Bordt, Evan A.; Polster, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain and play major roles in central nervous system development, maintenance, and disease. Brain insults cause microglia to proliferate, migrate, and transform into one or more activated states. Classical M1 activation triggers the production of proinflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species which, in excess, can exacerbate brain injury. The mechanisms underlying microglial activation are not fully understood, yet reactive oxygen species are increasingly implicated as mediators of microglial activation. In this review, we highlight studies linking reactive oxygen species, in particular hydrogen peroxide derived from NADPH oxidase-generated superoxide, to the classical activation of microglia. In addition, we critically evaluate controversial evidence suggesting a specific role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that mediates the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Finally, the limitations of common techniques used to implicate mitochondrial ROS in microglial and inflammasome activation, such as the use of the mitochondrially-targeted ROS indicator MitoSOX and the mitochondrially-targeted antioxidant MitoTEMPO, are also discussed. PMID:25091898

  19. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  20. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity. PMID:25818089

  1. Non-Additive Increases in Sediment Stability Are Generated by Macroinvertebrate Species Interactions in Laboratory Streams

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Lindsey K.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  2. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-01-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′ -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. PMID:26827127

  3. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-08-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7' -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. PMID:26827127

  4. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Youngjun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-10-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug.

  5. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  6. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  7. Nanopore formation process in artificial cell membrane induced by plasma-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated morphological change of an artificial lipid bilayer membrane induced by oxygen radicals which were generated by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. Neutral oxygen species, O((3)Pj) and O2((1)Δg), were irradiated of a supported lipid bilayer existing under a buffer solution at various conditions of dose time and distances, at which the dose amounts of the oxygen species were calculated quantitatively. Observation using an atomic force microscope and a fluorescence microscope revealed that dose of the neutral oxygen species generated nanopores with the diameter of 10-50 nm in a phospholipid bilayer, and finally destructed the bilayer structure. We found that protrusions appeared on the lipid bilayer surface prior to the formation of nanopores, and we attributed the protrusions to the precursor of the nanopores. We propose a mechanism of the pore formation induced by lipid oxidation on the basis of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:27216034

  8. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  9. Hemolytic activity of dermatophytes species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Aktas, E; Yıgıt, N

    2015-03-01

    Hemolytic activity was recently reported for several pathogenic fungal species, such as Aspergillus, Candida, Trichophyton, Penicillium and Fusarium. Based on a number of mechanistic and characterization studies, several fungal hemolysins have been proposed as virulence factors. Hemolysins lyse red blood cells resulting in the release of iron, an important growth factor for microbes especially during infection. The requirement of iron in fungal growth is necessary for metabolic processes and as a catalyst for various biochemical processes. Expression of a hemolytic protein with capabilities to lyse red blood cells has also been suggested to provide a survival strategy for fungi during opportunistic infections. The aims of this study were to investigate the hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species isolated from patients with dermatophytosis. Hair, skin and nail samples of patients were examined with direct microscopy using potassium hydroxide and cultivated on Mycobiotic agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar. To determine hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species, they were subcultured on Columbia Agar with 5% sheep blood and incubated for 7-14 days at 25°C in aerobic conditions. Media which displayed hemolysis were further incubated for 1-5 days at 37°C to increase hemolytic activity. In this study, 66 dermatophytes strains were isolated from clinical specimens and were identified by six different species: 43 (65.1%) Trichophyton rubrum, 7 (10.7%) Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 5 (7.6%) Microsporum canis, 5 (7.6%) Trichophyton tonsurans, 4 (6.0%) Epidermophyton floccosum and 2 (3.0%) Trichophyton violaceum. Twenty-one T. rubrum strains showed incomplete (alpha) hemolysis and nine T. rubrum strains showed complete (beta) hemolysis, whereas hemolysis was absent in 13 T. rubrum strains. Four T. mentagrophytes strains showed complete hemolysis and three T. tonsurans strains showed incomplete hemolysis. However, M. canis, E. floccosum and T. violaceum species had

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans capsule protects cell from oxygen reactive species generated by antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R.; Kato, Ilka T.; Fuchs, Beth; Mylonakis, Eleytherios; Simões Ribeiro, Martha; Tegos, George

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) is based on the utilization of substances that can photosensitize biological tissues and are capable of being activated in the presence of light. Cryptococcus neoformans is an yeast surrounded by a capsule composed primarily of glucoronoxylomannan that plays an important role in its virulence. This yeast causes infection on skin, lungs and brain that can be associated with neurological sequelae and neurosurgical interventions, and its conventional treatment requires prolonged antifungal therapy, which presents important adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Cryptococcus neoformans capsule against reactive oxygen species generated by APDI. Cryptococcus neoformans KN99α, which is a strain able to produce capsule, and CAP59 that does not present capsule production were submitted to APDI using methylene blue (MB), rose bengal (RB), and pL-ce6 as photosensitizers (PS). Then microbial inactivation was evaluated by counting colony form units following APDI and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) illustrated localization as well as the preferential accumulation of PS into the fungal cells. C. neoformans KN99α was more resistant to APDI than CAP59 for all PSs tested. CLSM showed incorporation of MB and RB into the cytoplasm and a preferential uptake in mitochondria. A nuclear accumulation of MB was also observed. Contrarily, pL-ce6 appears accumulated in cell wall and cell membrane and minimal florescence was observed inside the fungal cells. In conclusion, the ability of C. neoformans to form capsule enhances survival following APDI.

  11. Kinetics of phosphodiester cleavage by differently generated cerium(IV) hydroxo species in neutral solutions.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Ana L; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2005-08-01

    Neutral aqueous solutions of cerium ammonium nitrate obtained by dilution of their acetonitrile stock solution with imidazole buffer show high catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) and better reproducibility than other similar systems, but suffer from low stability. The kinetics of catalytic hydrolysis is second-order in Ce(IV), independent of pH in the range 5-8 and tentatively involves the Ce2(OH)7+ species as the active form. Attempts to stabilize the active species by different types of added ligands failed, but the use of Ce(IV) complexes pre-synthesized in an organic solvent with potentially stabilizing ligands as precursors of active hydroxo species appeared to be more successful. Three new Ce(IV) complexes, [Ce(Phen)2O(NO3)2], [Ce(tris)O(NO3)(OH)] and [Ce(BTP)2(NO3)4].2H2O (BTP = bis-tris propane, 1,3-bis[tris(hydroxymethyl)methylamino]propane), were prepared by reacting cerium ammonium nitrate with the respective ligands in acetonitrile and were characterized by analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Aqueous solutions of these complexes undergo rapid hydrolysis producing nearly neutral polynuclear Ce(IV) oxo/hydroxo species with high catalytic activity in BNPP hydrolysis. Potentiometric titrations of the solutions obtained from the complex with BTP revealed the formation of Ce4(OH)15+ species at pH > 7, which are protonated affording Ce4(OH)14(2+) and then Ce4(OH)13(3+) on a decrease in pH from 7 to 5. The catalytic activity increases strongly on going to species with a higher positive charge. The reaction mechanism involves first- and second-order in catalyst paths as well as intermediate complex formation with the substrate for higher charged species. PMID:16032364

  12. Vessel generator noise as a settlement cue for marine biofouling species.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J I; Wilkens, S L; Stanley, J A; Jeffs, A G

    2014-01-01

    Underwater noise is increasing globally, largely due to increased vessel numbers and international ocean trade. Vessels are also a major vector for translocation of non-indigenous marine species which can have serious implications for biosecurity. The possibility that underwater noise from fishing vessels may promote settlement of biofouling on hulls was investigated for the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Spatial differences in biofouling appear to be correlated with spatial differences in the intensity and frequency of the noise emitted by the vessel's generator. This correlation was confirmed in laboratory experiments where C. intestinalis larvae showed significantly faster settlement and metamorphosis when exposed to the underwater noise produced by the vessel generator. Larval survival rates were also significantly higher in treatments exposed to vessel generator noise. Enhanced settlement attributable to vessel generator noise may indicate that vessels not only provide a suitable fouling substratum, but vessels running generators may be attracting larvae and enhancing their survival and growth. PMID:24866988

  13. Generation of reactive oxidative species from thermal treatment of sugar solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyang; Durand, Erwann; Elias, Ryan J; Tikekar, Rohan V

    2016-04-01

    Sugars, prominently fructose, have been shown to accelerate the degradation of food components during thermal treatment. Yet, the mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood. Fructose and glucose have been reported to undergo autoxidation to generate reactive oxidative species (ROS) under physiological conditions; however, information on ROS generation during thermal treatment is limited. We observed that hydrogen peroxide was generated during thermal treatment (up to 70 °C) of aqueous solutions of fructose and glucose (up to 10% w/v), with significantly higher concentrations observed in fructose solutions. The rate of generation of hydrogen peroxide increased with temperature, pH, oxygen concentration and the presence of phosphate buffer. Singlet oxygen was also detected in fructose and glucose solutions prepared in phosphate buffer. Results of this study indicated that fructose and glucose undergo oxidation during thermal treatment resulting in generation of ROS that may have deleterious effects on food components. PMID:26593495

  14. Threatened and Endangered Species Evaluation for Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Generating Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2004-01-15

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 requires that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered (T&E) species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) staff have performed appropriate assessments of potential impacts to threatened or endangered species, and consulted with appropriate agencies with regard to protection of such species in authorizing the construction, operation, and relicensing of nuclear power generating facilities. However, the assessments and consultations concerning many facilities were performed during the 1970's or early 1980's, and have not been re-evaluated in detail or updated since those initial evaluations. A review of potential Endangered Species Act issues at licensed nuclear power facilities was completed in 1997. In that review 484 different ESA-listed species were identified as potentially occurring near one or more of the 75 facility sites that were examined. An update of the previous T&E species evaluation at this time is desired because, during the intervening 6 years: nearly 200 species have been added to the ESA list, critical habitats have been designated for many of the listed species, and significantly more information is available online, allowing for more efficient high-level evaluations of potential species presence near sites and the potential operation impacts. The updated evaluation included searching the NRC's ADAMS database to find any documents related to T

  15. Study of the photochemically generated of oxygen species by fullerene photosensitized CoS{sub 2} nanocompounds

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhu, Lei; Ullah, Kefayat; Ye, Shu; Sun, Qian; Jang, Won Kweon; Oh, Won-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Reactive oxygen species was detected through oxidation reaction from DPCI to DPCO. • Generated reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radicals can be analysis by DPCI degradation. • C{sub 60} has good effect during the photo-degradation processes. • Photocatalytic activity attributed to photo-absorption effect by C{sub 60} and cooperative effect of CoS{sub 2}. - Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be produced by interactions between sunlight and light-absorbing substance in natural water environment and can completely destroy various organic pollutants in wastewaters. In this study, CoS{sub 2} and CoS{sub 2}–fullerene were irradiated by visible light respectively. The generation of reactive oxygen species were detected through the oxidation reaction from 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) to 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO). In comparison with the separate effects of CoS{sub 2} and fullerene nanoparticles, the photochemically effect of the fullerene photosensitized CoS{sub 2} composites is increased significantly due to the synergetic effect between the fullerene and the CoS{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  16. Ion species control in high flux deuterium plasma beams produced by a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.-N.; Shu, W.M.; Nakamura, H.; O'Hira, S.; Nishi, M.

    2004-11-01

    The ion species ratios in low energy high flux deuterium plasma beams formed in a linear plasma generator were measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. And the species control in the plasma generator was evaluated by changing the operational parameters like neutral pressure, arc current, and axial magnetic confinement to the plasma column. The measurements reveal that the lower pressures prefer to form more D{sup +} ions, and the medium magnetic confinement at the higher pressures results in production of more D{sub 2}{sup +}, while the stronger confinement and/or larger arc current are helpful to D{sub 2}{sup +} conversion into D{sub 3}{sup +}. Therefore, the ion species can be controlled by adjusting the operational parameters of the plasma generator. With suitable adjustment, we can achieve plasma beams highly enriched with a single species of D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, or D{sub 3}{sup +}, to a ratio over 80%. It has been found that the axial magnetic configuration played a significant role in the formation of D{sub 3}{sup +} within the experimental pressure range.

  17. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  18. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  19. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level. PMID:27315378

  20. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for

  1. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  2. Light Emitting Diode-Generated Blue Light Modulates Fibrosis Characteristics: Fibroblast Proliferation, Migration Speed, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Garcha, Manveer; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Blue light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate harmful DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging, and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode (LED) red and infrared light inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. Moreover, different wavelengths of light can produce different biological effects. Furthermore, the effects of LED blue light (LED-BL) on human skin fibroblasts are not well characterized. This study investigated the effects of LED-BL on human skin fibroblast proliferation, viability, migration speed, and reactive oxygen-species (ROS) generation. Methods and Materials Irradiation of adult human skin fibroblasts using commercially-available LED-BL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, migratory speed was assessed using time-lapse video microscopy, and intracellular ROS generation was measured using the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Statistical differences between groups were determined by ANOVA and Student s t-test. Results Human skin fibroblasts treated with LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45, and 80 J/cm2 demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation of 8.4%, 29.1%, 33.8%, 51.7%, and 55.1%, respectively, compared to temperature and environment matched bench control plates, respectively. LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45 and 80 J/cm2 decreased fibroblast migration speed to 95 ± 7.0% (p = 0.64), 81.3 ± 5.5% (p = 0.021), 48.5 ± 2.7% (p < 0.0001), and 32.3 ± 1.9% (p < 0.0001), respectively, relative to matched controls. LED fluences of 5, 10, 30, and 80 J/cm2 resulted in statistically significant increases in reactive oxygen species of 110.4%, 116.6%, 127.5%, and 130%, respectively, relative to bench controls. Conclusion At

  3. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations. PMID:27254814

  4. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  5. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species.

    PubMed

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  6. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  7. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  8. System and method for generating current by selective minority species heating

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1983-01-01

    A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of low-frequency waves into the plasma by means of phased antenna arrays or phased waveguide arrays. The plasma is prepared with a minority ion species of different charge state and different gyrofrequency from the majority ion species. The wave frequency and wave phasing are chosen such that the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by minority species ions traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

  9. Caudatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in human glioma cells with involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang-Zhen; Hou, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Ming; Yang, Ming-Feng; Fu, Xiao-Ting; Sun, Jing-Yi; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Shao, Lu-Rong; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Fan, Cun-Dong; Gao, Hong-Li; Sun, Bao-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Caudatin as one species of C-21 steroidal from Cynanchum bungei decne displays potential anticancer activity. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In the present study, the growth suppressive effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma U251 and U87 cells were evaluated in vitro. The results indicated that caudatin significantly inhibited U251 and U87 cell growth in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that caudatin-induced cell growth inhibition was achieved by induction of cell apoptosis, as convinced by the increase of Sub-G1 peak, PARP cleavage and activation of caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-9. Caudatin treatment also resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction which correlated with an imbalance of Bcl-2 family members. Further investigation revealed that caudatin triggered U251 cell apoptosis by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through disturbing the redox homeostasis. Moreover, pretreatment of caspase inhibitors apparently weakens caudatin-induced cell killing, PARP cleavage and caspase activation and eventually reverses caudatin-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, caudatin significantly inhibited U251 tumour xenografts in vivo through induction of cell apoptosis involving the inhibition of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, which further validate its value in combating human glioma in vivo. Taken together, the results described above all suggest that caudatin inhibited human glioma cell growth by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis with involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation. PMID:27184666

  10. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. PMID:27237111

  11. Generation of reactive oxygen species and radiation response in lymphocytes and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Bhavani; Kumar, S Santosh; Sainis, K B

    2003-10-01

    Several types of lymphoid and myeloid tumor cells are known to be relatively resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis compared to normal lymphocytes. The intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species was measured in irradiated spleen cells from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and murine tumor cells (EL-4 and P388) by flow cytometry using dichlorodihydrofluoresceindiacetate and dihydrorhodamine 123 as fluorescent probes. The amount of reactive oxygen species generated per cell was low in the tumor cells compared to spleen cells exposed to 1 to 10 Gy of gamma radiation. This could be due to the higher total antioxidant levels in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Further, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ content were appreciable in lymphocytes even at a dose of 1 Gy. In EL-4 cells, no such changes were observed at any of the doses used. About 65% of spleen cells underwent apoptosis 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation. However, under the same conditions, EL-4 and P388 cells failed to undergo apoptosis, but they accumulated in G2/M phase. Thus the intrinsic radioresistance of tumor cells may be due to a decreased generation of reactive oxygen species after irradiation and down-regulation of the subsequent events leading to apoptosis. PMID:12968927

  12. Hypoxia induces adipocyte differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells by triggering reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Seok-Ho; Song, Seung Yong; Kim, Won-Serk; Song, Sun U; Yi, TacGhee; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Chung, Hyung-Min; Xia, Ying; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) induces the proliferation and migration of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). However, the functional role of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) generation in ASCs is unknown. Therefore, we have investigated whether hypoxia induces the differentiation of ASCs via ROS generation. We also have tried to identify the cellular mechanisms of ROS generation underlying adipocyte differentiation. Hypoxia (2%) and ROS generators, such as antimycin and rotenone, induced adipocyte differentiation, which was attenuated by an ROS scavenger. Although Nox4 generates ROS and regulates proliferation of ASCs, Nox4 inhibition or Nox4 silencing did not inhibit adipocyte differentiation; indeed fluorescence intensity of mito-SOX increased in hypoxia, and treatment with mito-CP, a mtROS scavenger, significantly reduced hypoxia-induced adipocyte differentiation. Phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR was induced by hypoxia, while inhibition of these molecules prevented adipocyte differentiation. Thus hypoxia induces adipocyte differentiation by mtROS generation, and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is involved. PMID:23956071

  13. Relationships among 3 Kochia species based on PCR-generated molecular sequences and molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Lee, B S; Kim, M Y; Wang, R R-C; Waldron, B L

    2005-12-01

    Forage kochia (Kochia prostrata ssp. virescens 'Immigrant' is native to the arid and semiarid regions of central Eurasia. It was introduced into the United States in 1966 as PI 314929 and released as a perennial forage shrub in 1984. Kochia americana is a perennial native to the United States, whereas Kochia scorparia is an introduced annual species that became a weed. To assess both the breeding potential and the possibility of genetic contamination, relationships among the 3 Kochia species were analyzed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, sequence tagged site (STS) marker sequences of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase gene (ndhF), genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (MC-FISH). Seventy decamer random primers yielded 458 polymorphic bands from 9 plants of K. americana, 20 plants of K. prostrata, and 7 plants of K. scoparia. Fifty-four and 55 species-specific RAPD markers were identified for K. americana and K. prostrata, whereas 80 RAPD markers were specific to K. scoparia. Based on the presence or absence of informative RAPD markers, the 3 species always grouped into 3 distinct clusters in a NTSYSpc2.01b-generated dendrogram. The same relationships were found among the 3 Kochia species based on ndhF DNA sequence divergence. Using a set of 7 STS markers that can identify each Kochia species, we did not find a single interspecific hybrid from artificial hybridizations among the 3 Kochia species. In GISH studies, chromosomes of 1 species fluoresced in green only when they were probed by genomic DNA of the same species. Cross-hybridization by genomic DNA of another species was not observed. In FISH studies using pTa71 (for 18S-5.8S-26S rDNAs) and pScT7 (for 5S rDNA) as probes, there were 1, 1 and 3 pTa71 sites and 2, 1, and 1 pScT7 sites in each haplome of K. prostrata, K. americana, and K. scoparia, respectively. It is concluded that these 3 Kochia species are so genomically distinct that gene

  14. Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence multigene families in de novo species.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Graham M; Gang, Li; Murphy, William J; Higgins, Desmond G; Teeling, Emma C

    2013-05-01

    The advent of Next Generation Sequencing Technology (NGST) has revolutionized molecular biology research, allowing for rapid gene/genome sequencing from a multitude of diverse species. As high throughput sequencing becomes more accessible, more efficient workflows must be developed to deal with the amounts of data produced and better assemble the genomes of de novo lineages. We combine traditional laboratory methods with Illumina NGST to amplify and sequence the largest mammalian multigene family, the Olfactory Receptor gene family, for species with and without a reference genome. We develop novel assembly methods to annotate and filter these data, which can be utilized for any gene family or any species. We find no significant difference between the ratio of genes within their respective gene families of our data compared with available genomic data. Using simulated data we explore the limitations of short-read sequence data and our assembly in recovering this gene family. We highlight the benefits and shortcomings of these methods. Compared with data generated from traditional polymerase chain reaction, cloning and Sanger sequencing methodologies, sequence data generated using our pipeline increases yield and sequencing efficiency without reducing the number of unique genes amplified. A cloning step is not required, therefore shortening data generation time. The novel downstream methodologies and workflows described provide a tool to be utilized by many fields of biology, to access and analyze the vast quantities of data generated. By combining laboratory and in silico methods, we provide a means of extracting genomic information for multigene families without complete genome sequencing. PMID:23480365

  15. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  16. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  17. Inferring the mode of origin of polyploid species from next-generation sequence data.

    PubMed

    Roux, Camille; Pannell, John R

    2015-03-01

    Many eukaryote organisms are polyploid. However, despite their importance, evolutionary inference of polyploid origins and modes of inheritance has been limited by a need for analyses of allele segregation at multiple loci using crosses. The increasing availability of sequence data for nonmodel species now allows the application of established approaches for the analysis of genomic data in polyploids. Here, we ask whether approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), applied to realistic traditional and next-generation sequence data, allows correct inference of the evolutionary and demographic history of polyploids. Using simulations, we evaluate the robustness of evolutionary inference by ABC for tetraploid species as a function of the number of individuals and loci sampled, and the presence or absence of an outgroup. We find that ABC adequately retrieves the recent evolutionary history of polyploid species on the basis of both old and new sequencing technologies. The application of ABC to sequence data from diploid and polyploid species of the plant genus Capsella confirms its utility. Our analysis strongly supports an allopolyploid origin of C. bursa-pastoris about 80 000 years ago. This conclusion runs contrary to previous findings based on the same data set but using an alternative approach and is in agreement with recent findings based on whole-genome sequencing. Our results indicate that ABC is a promising and powerful method for revealing the evolution of polyploid species, without the need to attribute alleles to a homeologous chromosome pair. The approach can readily be extended to more complex scenarios involving higher ploidy levels. PMID:25585898

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Amazonian oils against Paenibacillus species.

    PubMed

    Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; dos Santos Alves, Camilla Filippi; Schneider, Taiane; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Aurich, Carlos; Giongo, Janice Luehring; Brandelli, Adriano; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo

    2012-03-01

    The Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the primary bacterial pathogen of honeybee brood and the causative agent of American foulbrood disease (AFB). One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control of this disease is essential oils. In this study in vitro antimicrobial activity of Andiroba and Copaíba essential oils against Paenibacillus species, including P. larvae was evaluated. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Mueller-Hinton broth by the microdilution method was assessed. Andiroba registered MIC values of 1.56-25%, while the MICs values obtained for Copaíba oil were of 1.56-12.5%. In order to determine the time-response effect of essential oils on P. larvae, this microorganism was exposed to the oils for up to 48 h. After 24 h treatment with Andiroba oil and after 48 h treatment with Copaíba oil no viable cells of P. larvae ATCC 9545 were observed. The possible toxic effect of essential oils were assessed by the spraying application method of the same concentrations of MICs. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with Andiroba oil and the Copaíba oil shows no toxic effects after 10 days of observation. Taking together ours results showed for the first time that these oils presented a high activity against Paenibacillus species showing that Copaíba oil may be a candidate for the treatment or prevention of AFB. PMID:22200645

  19. NASA/NREN: Next Generation Internet (NGI) Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, Richard; Freeman, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation internet (NGI) and the NREN (NASA Research and Education Network) activities are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) NREN architecture; 2) NREN applications; and 3) NREN applied research.

  20. Comparative analysis of immunoglobulin A1 protease activity among bacteria representing different genera, species, and strains.

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    1997-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases cleaving human IgA1 in the hinge region are produced constitutively by a number of pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as by some members of the resident oropharyngeal flora. Whereas IgA1 proteases have been shown to interfere with the functions of IgA antibodies in vitro, the exact role of these enzymes in the relationship of bacteria to a human host capable of responding with enzyme-neutralizing antibodies is not clear. Conceivably, the role of IgA1 proteases may depend on the quantity of IgA1 protease generated as well as on the balance between secreted and cell-associated forms of the enzyme. Therefore, we have compared levels of IgA1 protease activity in cultures of 38 bacterial strains representing different genera and species as well as strains of different pathogenic potential. Wide variation in activity generation rate was found overall and within some species. High activity was not an exclusive property of bacteria with documented pathogenicity. Almost all activity of H. influenzae, N. meningitidis, and N. gonorrhoeae strains was present in the supernatant. In contrast, large proportions of the activity in Streptococcus, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga species was cell associated at early stationary phase, suggesting that the enzyme may play the role of a surface antigen. Partial release of cell-associated activity occurred during stationary phase. Within some taxa, the degree of activity variation correlated with degree of antigenic diversity of the enzyme as determined previously. This finding may indicate that the variation observed is of biological significance. PMID:9353019

  1. Emergent Public Spaces: Generative Activities on Function Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Guadalupe; Dominguez, Angeles; Krause, Gladys; Duran, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    This study highlights ways in which generative activities may be coupled with network-based technologies in the context of teacher preparation to enhance preservice teachers' cognizance of how their own experience as students provides a blueprint for the learning environments they may need to generate in their future classrooms. In this study, the…

  2. Electrical stimulation of human embryonic stem cells: cardiac differentiation and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Serena, Elena; Figallo, Elisa; Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Gerecht, Sharon; Elvassore, Nicola; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-12-10

    Exogenous electric fields have been implied in cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this work, we explored the effects of electrical field stimulation on ROS generation and cardiogenesis in embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, line H13), using a custom-built electrical stimulation bioreactor. Electrical properties of the bioreactor system were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and analysis of electrical currents. The effects of the electrode material (stainless steel, titanium-nitride-coated titanium, titanium), length of stimulus (1 and 90 s) and age of EBs at the onset of electrical stimulation (4 and 8 days) were investigated with respect to ROS generation. The amplitude of the applied electrical field was 1 V/mm. The highest rate of ROS generation was observed for stainless steel electrodes, for signal duration of 90 s and for 4-day-old EBs. Notably, comparable ROS generation was achieved by incubation of EBs with 1 nM H(2)O(2). Cardiac differentiation in these EBs was evidenced by spontaneous contractions, expression of troponin T and its sarcomeric organization. These results imply that electrical stimulation plays a role in cardiac differentiation of hESCs, through mechanisms associated with the intracellular generation of ROS. PMID:19720058

  3. Apoptosis induction of U937 human leukemia cells by diallyl trisulfide induces through generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is one of the major constituents in garlic oil and has demonstrated various pharmacological activities, including antimicrobial, antihyperlipidemic, antithrombotic, and anticancer effects. However, the mechanisms of antiproliferative activity in leukemia cells are not fully understood. In this study, the apoptotic effects of DATS were investigated in human leukemia cells. Results Results of this study indicated that treatment with DATS resulted in significantly inhibited leukemia cell growth in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by induction of apoptosis. In U937 cells, DATS-induced apoptosis was correlated with down-regulation of Bcl-2, XIAP, and cIAP-1 protein levels, cleavage of Bid proteins, activation of caspases, and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. The data further demonstrated that DATS increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of ROS. In addition, administration of NAC resulted in significant inhibition of DATS-induced apoptosis by inhibiting activation of caspases. Conclusions The present study reveals that the cytotoxicity caused by DATS is mediated by generation of ROS and subsequent activation of the ROS-dependent caspase pathway in U937 leukemia cells. PMID:22578287

  4. Antioxidant defence systems and generation of reactive oxygen species in osteosarcoma cells with defective mitochondria: effect of selenium.

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, Marta; Duszyński, Jerzy; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases originate from mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial proteome. Neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) syndrome is associated with the T8993G transversion in ATP6 gene which results in substitution at the very conservative site in the subunit 6 of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the ATPase are considered to be accompanied by changes in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study aimed to elucidate effects of selenium on ROS and antioxidant system of NARP cybrid cells with 98% of T8993G mutation load. We found that selenium decreased ROS generation and increased the level and activity of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Therefore, we propose selenium to be a promising therapeutic agent not only in the case of NARP syndrome but also other diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress. PMID:20138159

  5. Anticholinesterase and Antityrosinase Activities of Ten Piper Species from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Wan; Hashim, Nur Athirah; Ahmad, Farediah; Heng Yen, Khong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and antityrosinase activities of extracts from ten Piper species namely; P. caninum, P. lanatum, P. abbreviatum, P. aborescens, P. porphyrophyllum, P. erecticaule, P. ribesioides, P. miniatum, P. stylosum, and P. majusculum. Methods: Anticholinesterase and antityrosinase activities were evaluated against in vitro Ellman spectroscopy method and mushroom tyrosinase, respectively. Results: The EtOAc extract of P. erecticaule showed the highest AChE and BChE inhibitory with 22.9% and 70.9% inhibition, respectively. In antityrosinase activity, all extracts of P. porphyrophyllum showed the highest inhibitory effects against mushroom tyrosinase, compared to standard, kojic acid. Conclusion: This study showed that P. erecticaule and P. porphyrophyllum have potential AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibition activities. The respective extracts can be explored further for the development of novel lead as AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibitors in therapeutic management of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25671185

  6. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma. PMID:26656857

  7. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-12-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma.

  8. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  9. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  10. Laser Flash Photolysis Generation of High-Valent Transition Metal-Oxo Species: Insights from Kinetic Studies in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Newcomb, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus High-valent transition metal-oxo species are active oxidizing species in many metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions in both Nature and the laboratory. In homogeneous catalytic oxidations, a transition metal catalyst is oxidized to a metal-oxo species by a sacrificial oxidant, and the activated transition metal-oxo intermediate oxidizes substrates. Mechanistic studies of these oxidizing species can provide insights for understanding commercially important catalytic oxidations and the oxidants in cytochrome P450 enzymes. In many cases, however, the transition metal oxidants are so reactive that they do not accumulate to detectable levels in mixing experiments, which have millisecond mixing times, and successful generation and direct spectroscopic characterization of these highly reactive transients remain a considerable challenge. Our strategy for understanding homogeneous catalysis intermediates employs photochemical generation of the transients with spectroscopic detection on time-scales as short as nanoseconds and direct kinetic studies of their reactions with substrates by laser flash photolysis (LFP) methods. This Account describes studies of high-valent manganese- and iron-oxo intermediates. Irradiation of porphyrin-manganese(III) nitrates and chlorates or corrole-manganese(IV) chlorates resulted in homolytic cleavage of the O-X bonds in the ligands, whereas irradiation of porphyrin-manganese(III) perchlorates resulted in heterolytic cleavage of O-Cl bonds to give porphyrin-manganese(V)-oxo cations. Similar reactions of corrole- and porphyrin-iron(IV) complexes gave highly reactive transients that were tentatively identified as macrocyclic ligand-iron(V)-oxo species. Kinetic studies demonstrated high reactivity of the manganese(V)-oxo species, and even higher reactivities of the putative iron(V)-oxo transients. For example, second-order rate constants for oxidations of cis-cyclooctene at room temperature were 6 × 103 M−1 s−1 for a corrole

  11. Surface functionalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Photo-stability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Kacie M.

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly prevalent in society for applications of sunscreens, cosmetics, paints, biomedical imaging, and photovoltaics. Due to the increased surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles compared to bulk materials, it is important to know the health and safety impacts of these materials. One mechanism of toxicity of nominally "safe" materials such as TiO 2 is through the photocatalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production and ligand degradation can affect the bioavailability of these particles in aqueous organisms. We have investigated ROS generation by functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles and its influence on aggregation and bioavailability and toxicity to zebrafish embryos/larvae. For these studies we investigated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. For application purposes and solution stability, the TiO2 nanoparticles were functionalized with a variety of ligands such as citrate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and ascorbate. We quantitatively examined the amount of ROS produced in aqueous solution using fluorescent probes and see that more ROS is produced under UV light than in the dark control. Our measurements show that TiO2 toxicity reaches a maximum for nanoparticles with smaller diameters, and is correlated with surface area dependent changes in ROS generation. In an effort to reduce toxicity through control of the surface and surface ligands, we synthesized anatase nanoparticles of different sizes, functionalized them with different ligands, and examined the resulting ROS generation and ligand stability. Using a modular ligand containing a hydrophobic inner region and a hydrophilic outer region, we synthesized water-stable nanoparticles, via two different chemical reactions, having much-reduced ROS generation and thus reduced toxicity. These results suggest new strategies for making safer nanoparticles while still retaining their desired properties. We also examine the degradation of the different ligands

  12. Photochemical generation and kinetic studies of a putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Vanover, Eric; Luo, Weilong; Newcomb, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Photo-disproportionation of a bis-porphyrin-diruthenium(IV) μ-oxo dimer gave a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) species and a putative poprhyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species that can be detected and studied in real time via laser flash photolysis methods. As determined by its spectral and kinetic behavior, the same oxo transient was also formed by photolysis of a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) N-oxide adduct. Second-order rate constants for reactions with several substrates at 22 °C were determined; representative values of rate constants were kox = 6.6 × 103 M−1 s−1 for diphenylmethanol, kox = 2.5 × 103 M−1 s−1 for styrene, and kox = 1.8 × 103 M−1 s−1 for cyclohexene. The putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo transient reacted 5–6 orders of magnitude faster than the corresponding trans-dioxoruthenium(VI)-oxo porphyrins, and the rate constants obtained in this work were similar to those of corrole-iron(V)-oxo derivative. The high reactivity for the photochemically generated ruthenium-oxo species in comparison to other poprhyrin-metal-oxo intermediates suggests it is a true ruthenium(V)-oxo species. PMID:24770388

  13. Alkaloid profiling and anticholinesterase activity of South American Lycopodiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Ortega, María Gabriela; de Loreto Bordignon, Sérgio; Apel, Miriam Anders; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha; Cabrera, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    The alkaloid extracts of four Huperzia and one Lycopodiella species, from Brazilian habitats, were tested for their in vitro anticholinesterase activities. IC(50) values showed a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibition for H. reflexa (0.11 ± 0.05 μg/mL), followed by H. quadrifariata (2.0 ± 0.3 μg/mL), H. acerosa (5.5 ± 0.9 μg/mL), H. heterocarpon (25.6 ± 2.7 μg/mL) and L. cernua (42.6 ± 1.5 μg/mL). A lower inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase was observed for all species with the exception of H. heterocarpon (8.3 ± 0.9 μg/mL), whose alkaloid extract presented a selectivity for pseudocholinesterase. Moreover, the chemical study of the bioactive extracts performed by GC-MS, revealed the presence of a number of Lycopodium alkaloids belonging to the lycopodane, flabellidane and cernuane groups. Surprisingly, the potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors huperzines A and B were not detected in the extracts, suggesting that other alkaloids may be responsible for such an effect. PMID:22117191

  14. Organ- and species-specific biological activity of rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Iswandana, R; Pham, B T; van Haaften, W T; Luangmonkong, T; Oosterhuis, D; Mutsaers, H A M; Olinga, P

    2016-04-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA), a compound found in several plant species, has beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. We investigated the toxicity, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects of RA using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from human, mouse, and rat tissue. PCLS and PCIS were cultured up to 48h in the absence or presence of RA. Gene expression of the inflammatory markers: IL-6, IL-8/CXCL1/KC, and IL-1β, as well as the fibrosis markers: pro-collagen 1a1, heat shock protein 47, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin (Fn2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were evaluated by qPCR. RA was only toxic in murine PCIS. RA failed to mitigate the inflammatory response in most models, while it clearly reduced IL-6 and CXCL1/KC gene expression in murine PCIS at non-toxic concentrations. With regard to fibrosis, RA decreased the gene levels of Fn2 and PAI-1 in murine PCLS, and Fn2 in murine PCIS. Yet, no effect was observed on the gene expression of fibrosis markers in human and rat PCIS. In conclusion, we observed clear organ- and species-specific effects of RA. RA had little influence on inflammation. However, our study further establishes RA as a potential candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26804033

  15. Integration of molecular and enzymatic catalysts on graphene for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Teng; Peng, Bo; Xue, Min; Zhong, Xing; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Yang, Si; Qu, Yongquan; Ruan, Lingyan; Jiang, Shan; Dubin, Sergey; Kaner, Richard B.; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2014-02-01

    The integration of multiple synergistic catalytic systems can enable the creation of biocompatible enzymatic mimics for cascading reactions under physiologically relevant conditions. Here we report the design of a graphene-haemin-glucose oxidase conjugate as a tandem catalyst, in which graphene functions as a unique support to integrate molecular catalyst haemin and enzymatic catalyst glucose oxidase for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species. Monomeric haemin can be conjugated with graphene through π-π interactions to function as an effective catalyst for the oxidation of endogenous L-arginine by hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, glucose oxidase can be covalently linked onto graphene for local generation of hydrogen peroxide through the oxidation of blood glucose. Thus, the integrated graphene-haemin-glucose oxidase catalysts can readily enable the continuous generation of nitroxyl, an antithrombotic species, from physiologically abundant glucose and L-arginine. Finally, we demonstrate that the conjugates can be embedded within polyurethane to create a long-lasting antithrombotic coating for blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  16. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of three Mentha species essential oils.

    PubMed

    Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Bozin, Biljana; Soković, Marina; Mihajlović, Biserka; Matavulj, Milan

    2003-05-01

    The present study describes the antimicrobial activity and free radical scavenging capacity (RSC) of essential oils from Mentha aquatica L., Mentha longifolia L., and Mentha piperita L. The chemical profile of each essential oil was determined by GC-MS and TLC. All essential oils exhibited very strong antibacterial activity, in particularly against Esherichia coli strains. The most powerful was M. piperita essential oil, especially towards multiresistant strain of Shigella sonei and Micrococcus flavus ATTC 10,240. All tested oils showed significant fungistatic and fungicidal activity [expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) values, respectively], that were considerably higher than those of the commercial fungicide bifonazole. The essential oils of M. piperita and M. longifolia were found to be more active than the essential oil of M. aquatica. Especially low MIC (4 microL/mL) and MFC (4 microL/mL) were found with M. piperita oil against Trichophyton tonsurans and Candida albicans (both 8 microL/mL). The RSC was evaluated by measuring the scavenging activity of the essential oils on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and OH radicals. All examined essential oils were able to reduce DPPH radicals into the neutral DPPH-H form, and this activity was dose-dependent. However, only the M. piperita oil reduced DPPH to 50 % (IC50 = 2.53 microg/mL). The M. piperita essential oil also exhibited the highest OH radical scavenging activity, reducing OH radical generation in the Fenton reaction by 24 % (pure oil). According to GC-MS and TLC (dot-blot techniques), the most powerful scavenging compounds were monoterpene ketones (menthone and isomenthone) in the essential oils of M. longifolia and M. piperita and 1,8-cineole in the oil of M. aquatica. PMID:12802721

  17. Active Generations: An Intergenerational Approach to Preventing Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Holtgrave, Peter L.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the last 3 decades, US obesity rates have increased dramatically as more children and more adults become obese. This study explores an innovative program, Active Generations, an intergenerational nutrition education and activity program implemented in out-of-school environments (after school and summer camps). It utilizes older…

  18. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  19. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  20. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants. PMID:26717492

  1. Mechanisms of rapid reactive oxygen species generation in response to cytosolic Ca2+ or Zn2+ loads in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Aaron; McClanahan, Taylor; Ji, Sung G; Weiss, John H

    2013-01-01

    Excessive "excitotoxic" accumulation of Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) within neurons contributes to neurodegeneration in pathological conditions including ischemia. Putative early targets of these ions, both of which are linked to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, are mitochondria and the cytosolic enzyme, NADPH oxidase (NOX). The present study uses primary cortical neuronal cultures to examine respective contributions of mitochondria and NOX to ROS generation in response to Ca(2+) or Zn(2+) loading. Induction of rapid cytosolic accumulation of either Ca(2+) (via NMDA exposure) or Zn(2+) (via Zn(2+)/Pyrithione exposure in 0 Ca(2+)) caused sharp cytosolic rises in these ions, as well as a strong and rapid increase in ROS generation. Inhibition of NOX activation significantly reduced the Ca(2+)-induced ROS production with little effect on the Zn(2+)- triggered ROS generation. Conversely, dissipation of the mitochondrial electrochemical gradient increased the cytosolic Ca(2+) or Zn(2+) rises caused by these exposures, consistent with inhibition of mitochondrial uptake of these ions. However, such disruption of mitochondrial function markedly suppressed the Zn(2+)-triggered ROS, while partially attenuating the Ca(2+)-triggered ROS. Furthermore, block of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), through which Zn(2+) as well as Ca(2+) can enter the mitochondrial matrix, substantially diminished Zn(2+) triggered ROS production, suggesting that the ROS generation occurs specifically in response to Zn(2+) entry into mitochondria. Finally, in the presence of the sulfhydryl-oxidizing agent 2,2'-dithiodipyridine, which impairs Zn(2+) binding to cytosolic metalloproteins, far lower Zn(2+) exposures were able to induce mitochondrial Zn(2+) uptake and consequent ROS generation. Thus, whereas rapid acute accumulation of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) each can trigger injurious ROS generation, Zn(2+) entry into mitochondria via the MCU may do so with particular potency. This may be of

  2. Protective effects of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid against cardol-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species generation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Murata, Wakae; Tanaka, Toshio; Kubo, Isao; Fujita, Ken-ichi

    2013-06-01

    Cardol (C₁₅:₃), isolated from cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) nut shell liquid, has been shown to exhibit bactericidal activity against various strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains. The maximum level of reactive oxygen species generation was detected at around the minimum bactericidal concentration of cardol, while reactive oxygen species production drastically decreased at doses above the minimum bactericidal concentration. The primary response for bactericidal activity around the bactericidal concentration was noted to primarily originate from oxidative stress such as intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. High doses of cardol (C₁₅:₃) were shown to induce leakage of K⁺ from S. aureus cells, which may be related to the decrease in reactive oxygen species. Antioxidants such as α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid restricted reactive oxygen species generation and restored cellular damage induced by the lipid. Cardol (C₁₅:₃) overdose probably disrupts the native membrane-associated function as it acts as a surfactant. The maximum antibacterial activity of cardols against S. aureus depends on their log P values (partition coefficient in octanol/water) and is related to their similarity to those of anacardic acids isolated from the same source. PMID:23670625

  3. UVB dependence of quantum dot reactive oxygen species generation in common skin cell models

    PubMed Central

    MORTENSEN, LUKE J.; FAULKNOR, RENEA; RAVICHANDRAN, SUPRIYA; ZHENG, HONG; DELOUISE, LISA A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  4. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  5. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  6. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 10(10) peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  7. UVB Dependence of Quantum Dot Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Common Skin Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Faulknor, Renea; Ravichandran, Supriya; Zheng, Hong; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2015-09-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  8. Peroxiredoxin 1 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to reactive oxygen species-generating drugs - an alternative approach for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    He, Tiantian; Hatem, Elie; Vernis, Laurence; Huang, Meng-Er

    2014-10-01

    Peroxiredoxins have multiple cellular functions as major antioxidants, signaling regulators and tumor suppressors. Peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) is the most abundant among the six isoforms of human peroxiredoxins, catalyzing the reduction of peroxides utilizing thioredoxin 1as an electron donor. PRX1 is frequently over-expressed in various cancer cells, which is thought to be associated with carcinogenesis, metastasis and resistance to radiotherapy or chemotherapy. We investigated how modulations of intracellular redox system, especially PRX1, affect cancer cell sensitivity to reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating drugs. We observed that stable and transient Prx1 knockdown (Prx1-) significantly enhances HeLa cell sensitivity to β-lapachone (β-lap), a potential anticancer agent, and to other ROS-generating molecules. ROS accumulation played a crucial role in drug-enhanced Prx1- cell death. For β-lap, Prx1- cells sensitization is achieved through combined action of accumulation of ROS and enhancement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation. The effect of other ROS-inducing drugs on Prx1- cell survival will also be presented and discussed. Taken together, our data provide evidence that PRX1 could be an interesting anticancer target and modulation of intracellular redox states through PRX1 inhibition could be an alternative approach to enhance cancer cell sensitivity to ROS-generating drugs. PMID:26461286

  9. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via reactive oxygen species generation and caspases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yating; Wei, Sixi; Wang, Jishi; Fang, Qin; Chai, Qixiang

    2014-07-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a potential cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, including watercress, has been reported to inhibit cancer cell growth by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis in various human cancer cell models. However, the role of PEITC in the inhibition of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell growth and its underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, PEITC was found to induce cell death through the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress and oxidative damage. Heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1), which participates in the development of numerous tumors and the sensitivity of these tumors to chemotherapeutic drugs, plays a protective role by modulating oxidative injury. Therefore, the present study assessed the inhibitory effect of PEITC on K562 cells and whether HO‑1 facilitated cell apoptosis and ROS generation. PEITC was found to suppress cell growth and cause apoptosis by promoting Fas and Fas ligand expression, increasing ROS generation and by the successive release of cytochrome c as well as the activation of caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. PEITC was also combined with the HO‑1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX and the inducer hemin to assess whether HO‑1 determines cell survival and ROS generation. The results of the present study suggest that PEITC may be a potential anti‑tumor compound for CML therapy, and that HO‑1 has a critical function in PEITC‑induced apoptosis and ROS generation. PMID:24788892

  10. Redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L; Crum, Andrea D

    2016-04-01

    Three nationally prominent commercial powdered infant formulas generated hydrogen peroxide, ranging from 10.46 to 11.62 μM, when prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Treating infant formulas with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) significantly reduced H2O2 generation. In contrast, the addition of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) elevated the level of H2O2 generated in the same infant formulas by approximately 3- to 4-fold above the untreated infant formulas. The infant formulas contained ascorbate radicals ranging from about 138 nM to 40 nM. Treatment with catalase reduced the ascorbate radical contents by as much as 67%. Treatment with DTPA further reduced ascorbate radical signals to below quantifiable levels in most samples, further implicating the involvement of transition metal redox cycling in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Supportive evidence of the generation of ROS is provided using luminol-enhanced luminescence (LEL) in both model mixtures of ascorbic acid and in commercial infant formulas. PMID:26593482

  11. Discovering Engangered Species. A Learning and Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nancy; Machlis, Sally

    Up to 33 million species share the earth; no one knows the exact number for sure. All over the world, many species are becoming extinct. This workbook is designed to help children become more aware of the concept of extinction, and to develop personal strategies for helping with the problem of endangered species. Included are 31 activities…

  12. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  13. Optimization of next-generation sequencing transcriptome annotation for species lacking sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Nina F; O'Connell, Lauren A; Bush, Stephen J; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Barnes, Holly; Székely, Tamás; Hofmann, Hans A; Dorus, Steve; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing methods, such as RNA-seq, have permitted the exploration of gene expression in a range of organisms which have been studied in ecological contexts but lack a sequenced genome. However, the efficacy and accuracy of RNA-seq annotation methods using reference genomes from related species have yet to be robustly characterized. Here we conduct a comprehensive power analysis employing RNA-seq data from Drosophila melanogaster in conjunction with 11 additional genomes from related Drosophila species to compare annotation methods and quantify the impact of evolutionary divergence between transcriptome and the reference genome. Our analyses demonstrate that, regardless of the level of sequence divergence, direct genome mapping (DGM), where transcript short reads are aligned directly to the reference genome, significantly outperforms the widely used de novo and guided assembly-based methods in both the quantity and accuracy of gene detection. Our analysis also reveals that DGM recovers a more representative profile of Gene Ontology functional categories, which are often used to interpret emergent patterns in genomewide expression analyses. Lastly, analysis of available primate RNA-seq data demonstrates the applicability of our observations across diverse taxa. Our quantification of annotation accuracy and reduced gene detection associated with sequence divergence thus provides empirically derived guidelines for the design of future gene expression studies in species without sequenced genomes. PMID:26358618

  14. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization: Carbon nanohorn-induced reactive oxygen species generation and toxicity by this neglected mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mei; Zhang, Minfang; Tahara, Yoshio; Chechetka, Svetlana; Miyako, Eijiro; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxic effects of carbon nanomaterials is important for their future biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubular materials induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes cell death; however, the exact details of this process are still unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism of ROS generation that is involved in the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages caused by excess uptake of carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a typical type of carbon nanotubule. CNH accumulated in the lysosomes, where they induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and the subsequent release of lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsins, which in turn caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered the generation of ROS in the mitochondria. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase was not directly involved in CNH-related ROS production, and the ROS generation cannot be regulated by mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS fed back to amplify the mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and cell apoptosis. Carbon nanotubules commonly accumulate in the lysosomes after internalization in cells; however, lysosomal dysfunction has not attracted much attention in toxicity studies of these materials. These results suggest that LMP, a neglected mechanism, may be the primary reason for carbon nanotubule toxicity. - Highlights: • We clarify an apoptotic mechanism of RAW264.7 cells caused by carbon nanohorns. • In the meantime, the mechanism of CNH-induced ROS generation is identified. • LMP is the initial factor of CNH-induced ROS generation and cell death. • Cathepsins work as mediators that connect LMP and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Species Turnover and Diel Flight Activity of Species of Dung Beetles, Onthophagus, in the Tropical Lowland Forest of Peninsular Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonrotpong, Singtoe; Sotthibandhu, Sunthorn; Satasook, Chutamas

    2012-01-01

    Species turnover and temporal variation of forest insects were used to explain the ecological succession and ecological segregation between efficiently competing species. In this study, species richness, abundance, and beta-diversity of the genus Onthophagus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) assemblages between 2003 and 2007 were described and the diel—flight activity was examined in the disturbed forest and the interior forest of the lowland tropical rain forest at Ton Nga Chang Wildlife Sanctuary in peninsular Thailand. A total of 2,260 individuals of 22 species in 2003 and 2,382 individuals of 24 species in 2007 were collected. Although species richness and abundance did not differ significantly between the two years, all similarity indices were significantly different. The community structure of Onthophagus assemblage in 2003 demonstrated a heterogeneous pattern, whereas there was a tendency for the pattern to shift toward a more homogeneous structure in 2007. The temporal variation showed two distinct diel—flight activities; diurnal and crepuscular patterns. Six species were crepuscular (O. deflexicollis Lansberge, O. orientalis Harold, O. rudis Sharp, O. sp 1, O. sp 2, and O. sp 4), whereas most of Onthophagus species demonstrated diurnal pattern. Remarkably, five species (O. taurinus White, O. pilularius Lansberge, O. punneeae Masumoto, O. laevis Harold, and O. sp 3.) could not be classified as either diurnal or crepuscular species. It was suggested that the species turnover was probably influenced by the recovery of the forest structure and the decrease of anthropogenic disturbance. Resource partitioning was suggested to be a key factor for crepuscular adaptation in Onthophagus species. PMID:23418986

  16. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction. PMID:25748105

  17. "Invented Invaders": An Engaging Activity to Teach Characteristics Control of Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species, defined as exotic species that reach pest status, are major threats to global biodiversity. Although invasive species can belong to any taxonomic group, general characteristics such as rapid growth and reproduction are shared by many invasive species. "Invented Invaders" is a collaborative activity in which students…

  18. Pharmacologically active compounds in the Anoectochilus and Goodyera species.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Ming; Irino, Nobuto; Furusho, Norihiro; Hayashi, Jun; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2008-04-01

    The extract of Anoectochilus formosanus showed significant activity in decreasing the levels of the cytosolic enzymes LDH, GOT, and GPT, and the result demonstrated that A. formosanus possessed prominent hepatoprotective activity against CCl(4)-induced hepatotoxicity. Moreover, in the results of the test using aurothioglucose-induced obese mice, the extract showed a significant antihyperliposis effect. A. formosanus grown in the wild and propagated by tissue culture contain ten compounds, including a major known component, (3R)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)butanolide (kinsenoside; 1), and two new components, (3R)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-4-hydroxybutanoic acid (2) and 2-[(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)methyl]-5-hydroxymethylfuran (3), along with the known compounds, isopropyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), (R)-3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid gamma-lactone (5), 4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy) benzyl alcohol (6), (6R,9S)-9-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)megastigma-4,7-dien-3-one (7), and (3R)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-4-hydroxybutanolide (8). Since a higher concentration of kinsenoside (1) was detected in the crude drugs A. formosanus and A. koshunensis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, we proved a simple purification system for kinsenoside (1), giving 180 mg of kinsenoside (1) from 1 g of dried samples for further pharmacological experiments. In an anti-hyperliposis assay using high-fat-diet rats, 1 significantly reduced the weights of the body and the liver, and also decreased the triglyceride level in the liver compared to those of control rats. On the other hand, the epimer of 1, (3S)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)butanolide, goodyeroside A (9), which was isolated from the Goodyera species, had no effect for anti-hyperliposis. In aurothioglucose-induced obese mice, 1 suppressed the body and liver weight increase, significantly ameliorated the triglyceride level in the liver, and also reduced the deposition of uterine fat pads. The anti

  19. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol. PMID:26453927

  20. Urea degradation by electrochemically generated reactive chlorine species: products and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kangwoo; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the transformation of urea by electrochemically generated reactive chlorine species (RCS). Solutions of urea with chloride ions were electrolyzed using a bismuth doped TiO2 (BiOx/TiO2) anode coupled with a stainless steel cathode at applied anodic potentials (Ea) of either +2.2 V or +3.0 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. In NaCl solution, the current efficiency of RCS generation was near 30% at both potentials. In divided cell experiments, the pseudo-first-order rate of total nitrogen decay was an order of magnitude higher at Ea of +3.0 V than at +2.2 V, presumably because dichlorine radical (Cl2(-)·) ions facilitate the urea transformation primary driven by free chlorine. Quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of the reactor headspace revealed that N2 and CO2 are the primary gaseous products of the oxidation of urea, whose urea-N was completely transformed into N2 (91%) and NO3(-) (9%). The higher reaction selectivity with respect to N2 production can be ascribed to a low operational ratio of free available chlorine to N. The mass-balance analysis recovered urea-C as CO2 at 77%, while CO generation most likely accounts for the residual carbon. In light of these results, we propose a reaction mechanism involving chloramines and chloramides as reaction intermediates, where the initial chlorination is the rate-determining step in the overall sequence of reactions. PMID:25219459

  1. Interaction of organic surfaces with active species in the high-vacuum environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzorov, V.; Menard, E.; Pereversev, S.; Yakshinsky, B.; Madey, T.; Rogers, J. A.; Gershenson, M. E.

    2005-08-01

    Using single-crystal organic field-effect transistors with the conduction channel exposed to environmental agents, we have observed generation of electronic defects at the organic surface in the high-vacuum environment. Rapid decrease of the source-drain current of an operating device is observed upon exposure of the channel to the species generated by high-vacuum gauges. We attribute this effect to interaction of the organic surface with electrically neutral free radicals produced in the process of hydrocarbon cracking on hot filaments with a relatively low activation energy Ea˜2.5eV (240kJ/mol). The reported results might be important for optimizing the high-vacuum processes of fabrication and characterization of a wide range of organic and molecular electronic devices.

  2. Advanced glycation end products delay corneal epithelial wound healing through reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Long; Chen, Hongmei; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Xinyi

    2013-11-01

    Delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds is a serious complication in diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are intimately associated with the diabetic complications and are deleterious to the wound healing process. However, the effect of AGEs on corneal epithelial wound healing has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) on corneal epithelial wound healing and its underlying mechanisms. Our data showed that AGE-BSA significantly increased the generation of intracellular ROS in telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells. However, the generation of intracellular ROS was completely inhibited by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), anti-receptor of AGEs (RAGE) antibodies, or the inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, AGE-BSA increased NADPH oxidase activity and protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, p22phox and Nox4, but anti-RAGE antibodies eliminated these effects. Furthermore, prevention of intracellular ROS generation using NAC or anti-RAGE antibodies rescued AGE-BSA-delayed epithelial wound healing in porcine corneal organ culture. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AGE-BSA impaired corneal epithelial wound healing ex vivo. AGE-BSA increased intracellular ROS generation through NADPH oxidase activation, which accounted for the delayed corneal epithelial wound healing. These results may provide better insights for understanding the mechanism of delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds in diabetes. PMID:23955437

  3. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Qian-Jun; Kang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Qing-Di

    2013-12-01

    The chemical constituents isolated from Desmodium species (Leguminosae) included terpenoids, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids compounds. Modem pharmacological studies have showed that the Desmodium species have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, diuretic, antipyretic, analgesic and choleretic activity. This article mainly has reviewed the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species since 2003. PMID:24791478

  4. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  5. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  6. Income Generation Activities among Academic Staffs at Malaysian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Abd Rahman; Soon, Ng Kim; Ting, Ngeoh Pei

    2015-01-01

    Income generation activities have been acquainted among public higher education institutions (HEIs) in Malaysia. Various factors that brought to insufficient of funding caused Higher Education Institutions(HEIs) to seek for additional income as to support the operation expenses. Financial sustainability issues made up the significant impact…

  7. The Generation Effect: Activating Broad Neural Circuits During Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Zachary A.; Elman, Jeremy A.; Shimamura, Arthur P.

    2012-01-01

    The generation effect is a robust memory phenomenon in which actively producing material during encoding acts to improve later memory performance. In an fMRI analysis, we explored the neural basis of this effect. During encoding, participants generated synonyms from word-fragment cues (e.g. GARBAGE-W_ST_) or read other synonym pairs (e.g. GARBAGE-WASTE). Compared to simply reading target words, generating target words significantly improved later recognition memory performance. During encoding, this benefit was associated with a broad neural network that involved both prefrontal (inferior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus) and posterior cortex (inferior temporal gyrus, lateral occipital cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, ventral posterior parietal cortex). These findings define the prefrontal-posterior cortical dynamics associated with the mnemonic benefits underlying the generation effect. PMID:23079490

  8. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. PMID:27497983

  9. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  10. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  11. Growth inhibition dependent on reactive oxygen species generated by C9-UK-2A, a derivative of the antifungal antibiotic UK-2A, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Tani, Kazunori; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Tanaka, Toshio; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2004-08-01

    UK-2A is a potent antifungal antibiotic and its structure is highly similar to that of antimycin A3 (AA). UK-2A and AA inhibit mitochondrial electron transport at complex III. C9-UK-2A, which has been prepared to improve the duration of the antifungal activity of UK-2A, shows durable fungicidal activities against various species of fungi and induces both membrane injury and the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) against Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IFO 0001 cells. We found that C9-UK-2A inhibited the vegetative growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 0203 cells accompanying cellular ROS generation in Sabouraud dextrose (SD) medium, which contained a fermentable carbon source. The ROS generation was completely restricted by pretreatment with a lipophilic antioxidant alpha-tocopherol. In addition, the pretreatment with the antioxidant protected against the growth inhibition induced by C9-UK-2A. C9-UK-2A also induced ROS generation in isolated mitochondria of the S. cerevisiae cells. The addition of both a complex I inhibitor rotenone and a complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone reduced ROS generation induced by C9-UK-2A in the whole cells and the isolated mitochondria. The addition of the inhibitors of complex III, AA or myxothiazol, or of complex IV, KCN, did not reduce ROS generation. These results suggest that C9-UK-2A induces ROS generation due to the blockade of electron flow at complex III, thereby inhibiting the growth of S. cerevisiae in SD medium. PMID:15515888

  12. Bcl-2 overexpression inhibits generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and blocks adriamycin-induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chui-Ze; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to induction of apoptosis is a major obstacle for bladder cancer treatment. Bcl-2 is thought to be involved in anti-apoptotic signaling. In this study, we investigated the effect of Bcl-2 overexpression on apoptotic resistance and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in bladder cancer cells. A stable Bcl-2 overexpression cell line, BIU87-Bcl-2, was constructed from human bladder cancer cell line BIU87 by transfecting recombinant Bcl-2 [pcDNA3.1(+)-Bcl-2]. The sensitivity of transfected cells to adriamycin (ADR) was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry and acridine orange fluorescence staining. Intracellular ROS was determined using flow cytometry, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also investigated by the xanthinoxidase and visible radiation methods using SOD and CAT detection kits. The susceptibility of BIU87-Bcl-2 cells to ADR treatment was significantly decreased as compared with control BIU87 cells. Enhanced expression of Bcl-2 inhibited intracellular ROS generation following ADR treatment. Moreover, the suppression of SOD and CAT activity induced by ADR treatment was blocked in the BIU87-Bcl-2 case but not in their parental cells. The overexpression of Bcl-2 renders human bladder cancer cells resistant to ADR-induced apoptosis and ROS might act as an important secondary messenger in this process. PMID:23621258

  13. Tks5-dependent, Nox-mediated Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species is Necessary for Invadopodia Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Begoña; Shani, Gidon; Pass, Ian; Anderson, Diana; Quintavalle, Manuela; Courtneidge, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-rich membrane protrusions of cancer cells which facilitate pericellular proteolysis and invasive behavior. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the NADPH oxidase (Nox) system are necessary for invadopodia formation and function. The invadopodia protein Tks5 is structurally related to p47phox, a Nox component in phagocytic cells. Knockdown of Tks5 reduces total ROS levels in cancer cells. Furthermore, Tks5 and p22phox can associate with each other, suggesting that Tks5 is part of the Nox complex. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Tks5 and Tks4, but not other Src substrates, is reduced by Nox inhibition. We propose that Tks5 facilitates the production of ROS necessary for invadopodia formation, and that in turn ROS modulates Tks5 tyrosine phosphorylation in a positive feedback loop. PMID:19755709

  14. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  16. No more non-model species: The promise of Next Generation Sequencing for Comparative Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Coen, Adema; Raftos, David A; Benjamin, Gourbal; Christoph, Grunau; Louis, Du Pasquier

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for the rapid, comprehensive and cost effective analysis of entire genomes and transcriptomes. NGS provides approaches for immune response gene discovery, profiling gene expression over the course of parasitosis, studying mechanisms of diversification of immune receptors and investigating the role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating immune gene expression and/or diversification. NGS will allow meaningful comparisons to be made between organisms from different taxa in an effort to understand the selection of diverse strategies for host defence under different environmental pathogen pressures. At the same time, it will reveal the shared and unique components of the immunological toolkit and basic functional aspects that are essential for immune defence throughout the living world. In this review, we argue that NGS will revolutionize our understanding of immune responses throughout the animal kingdom because the depth of information it provides will circumvent the need to concentrate on a few “model” species. PMID:24508980

  17. Generation of singlet oxygen and other radical species by quantum dot and carbon dot nanosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, Roman; Christensen, Ingeborg L.; Chen, Wei; Sun, Ya-Ping; Kristensen, Solveig; Juzenas, Petras

    2009-06-01

    Medicinal applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots are of growing interest. In spite of the fact that their fabrication and imaging applications have been extensively investigated for the last decade, very little is documented on photodynamic action of quantum dots. In this study we demonstrate generation of singlet oxygen and other radical species upon exposure of quantum dots to blue light and therapeutic red light. Extent of radical production can be readily modified by antioxidants. Lay and scientific communities are two sites concerning potential hazards and enthusiastic applications of nanotechnology. Synthesis of quantum dots composed of less toxic materials is of great interest. A new candidate is a ubiquitous element carbon, which on nanoscale exhibits strong photoluminescence.

  18. SELECTION ON LEAF ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN A DESERT HYBRID HELIANTHUS SPECIES AND EARLY-GENERATION HYBRIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Fulco; Rosenthal, David M.; Johnston, Jill A.; Kane, Nolan; Gross, Briana L.; Lexer, Christian; Dudley, Susan A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Donovan, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Leaf ecophysiological traits related to carbon gain and resource use are expected to be under strong selection in desert annuals. We used comparative and phenotypic selection approaches to investigate the importance of leaf ecophysiological traits for Helianthus anomalus, a diploid annual sunflower species of hybrid origin that is endemic to active desert dunes. Comparisons were made within and among five genotypic classes: H. anomalus, its ancestral parent species (H. annuus and H. petiolaris), and two backcrossed populations of the parental species (designated BC2ann and BC2pet) representing putative ancestors of H. anomalus. Seedlings were transplanted into H. anomalus habitat at Little Sahara Dunes, Utah, and followed through a summer growing season for leaf ecophysiological traits, phenology, and fitness estimated as vegetative biomass. Helianthus anomalus had a unique combination of traits when compared to its ancestral parent species, suggesting that lower leaf nitrogen and greater leaf succulence might be adaptive. However, selection on leaf traits in H. anomalus favored larger leaf area and greater nitrogen, which was not consistent with the extreme traits of H. anomalus relative to its ancestral parents. Also contrary to expectation, current selection on the leaf traits in the backcross populations was not consistently similar to, or resulting in evolution toward, the current H. anomalus phenotype. Only the selection for greater leaf succulence in BC2ann and greater water-use efficiency in BC2pet would result in evolution toward the current H. anomalus phenotype. It was surprising that the action of phenotypic selection depended greatly on the genotypic class for these closely related sunflower hybrids grown in a common environment. We speculate that this may be due to either phenotypic correlations between measured and unmeasured but functionally related traits or due to the three genotypic classes experiencing the environment differently as a result of

  19. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  20. The occurrence of second generation anticoagulant rodenticides in non-target raptor species in Norway.

    PubMed

    Langford, Katherine H; Reid, Malcolm; Thomas, Kevin V

    2013-04-15

    Second generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) are commonly used for rodent pest control in Norway resulting in the potential exposure of non-target raptor species. In this study the occurrence of flocoumafen, difethialone, difenacoum, bromadiolone and brodifacoum was determined in the livers of five species of raptors found dead in Norway between 2009 and 2011. The SGARs brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum and flocoumafen were detected in golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) and eagle owl (Bubo bubo) livers at a total SGAR concentration of between 11 and 255 ng/g in approximately 70% of the golden eagles and 50% of the eagle owls examined in this study. In the absence of specific golden eagle and eagle owl toxicity thresholds for SGARs, a level of >100 ng/g was used as a potential lethal range, accepting that poisoning may occur below this level. Thirty percent (7/24) of the golden eagle and eagle owl livers contained total SGAR residue levels above this threshold. Further estimation of the potential mortality impact on the sampled raptor populations was not possible. PMID:23500818

  1. Generation of Reactive Oxygen and Anti-Oxidant Species by Hydrodynamically-Stressed Suspensions of Morinda citrofolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by plant cell suspension cultures, in response to the imposition of both biotic and abiotic stress, is well-documented. This study investigated the generation of hydrogen peroxide by hydrodynamically-stressed cultures of Morinda citrifolia, over a 5-ho...

  2. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  3. Various Molecular Species of Diacylglycerol Hydroperoxide Activate Human Neutrophils via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Takekoshi, Susumu; Tanino, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nakano, Minoru; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Takigawa, Tomoko; Ogino, Keiki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that diacylglycerol hydroperoxide-induced unregulated signal transduction causes oxidative stress-related diseases. In this study, we investigated which molecular species of diacylglycerol hydroperoxide activated human peripheral neutrophils. All diacylglycerol hydroperoxides, diacylglycerol hydroxides, and diacyglycerols tested in the present study induced superoxide production by neutrophils. The ability to activate neutrophils among molecular species containing the same fatty acid composition was as follows; diacylglycerol hydroperoxide>diacylglycerol hydroxide≥diacylglycerol. The diacylglycerol hydroperoxide composed of linoleate was a stronger activator for neutrophils than that composed of arachidonate. 1-Palmitoyl-2-linoleoylglycerol hydroperoxide (PLG-OOH) was the strongest stimulator for neutrophils. We reconfirmed that PLG-OOH activated protein kinase C (PKC) in neutrophils. PLG-OOH induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, a substrate of PKC and a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase, in neutrophils, as did N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate. Moreover, the time course of p47phox phosphorylation was comparable to that of superoxide production. These results suggest that PLG-OOH activated intracellular protein kinase C. PLG-OOH, produced via an uncontrolled process, can act as a biological second messenger to cause inflammatory disease from oxidative stress. PMID:18392102

  4. Cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation from aggregated carbon and carbonaceous nanoparticulate materials.

    PubMed

    Garza, Kristine M; Soto, Karla F; Murr, Lawrence E

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation for indoor and outdoor soots: candle, wood, diesel, tire, and natural gas burner soots--along with surrogate black carbon, various multiwall carbon nanotube aggregate materials, TiO2 (anatase) and chrysotile asbestos as reference materials. All soots were observed utilizing TEM and FESEM to be composed of aggregated, primary spherules (20-80 nm diameter) forming complex, branched fractal structures. These spherules were composed of intercalated, turbostratic arrangements of curved graphene fragments with varying concentrations ofpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) isomers. In vitro cultures with an immortalized human lung epithelial carcinoma cell line (A549) treated with these materials showed decreased cell viability and variations in ROS production, with no correlations to PAH content. The data demonstrate that soots are cytotoxic and that cytotoxicity is not related to PAH content but is related to ROS generation, suggesting that soot induces cellular oxidative stress and that cell viability assays can be indicators of ROS production. PMID:18488419

  5. Cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation from aggregated carbon and carbonaceous nanoparticulate materials

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Kristine M; Soto, Karla F; Murr, Lawrence E

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation for indoor and outdoor soots: candle, wood, diesel, tire, and natural gas burner soots – along with surrogate black carbon, various multiwall carbon nanotube aggregate materials, TiO2 (anatase) and chrysotile asbestos as reference materials. All soots were observed utilizing TEM and FESEM to be composed of aggregated, primary spherules (20–80 nm diameter) forming complex, branched fractal structures. These spherules were composed of intercalated, turbostratic arrangements of curved graphene fragments with varying concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) isomers. In vitro cultures with an immortalized human lung epithelial carcinoma cell line (A549) treated with these materials showed decreased cell viability and variations in ROS production, with no correlations to PAH content. The data demonstrate that soots are cytotoxic and that cytotoxicity is not related to PAH content but is related to ROS generation, suggesting that soot induces cellular oxidative stress and that cell viability assays can be indicators of ROS production. PMID:18488419

  6. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species via NOXa Is Important for Development and Pathogenicity of Mycosphaerella graminicola

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-E; Lee, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (synonym Zymoseptoria tritici) is an important pathogen of wheat causing economically significant losses. The primary nutritional mode of this fungus is thought to be hemibiotrophic. This pathogenic lifestyle is associated with an early biotrophic stage of nutrient uptake followed by a necrotrophic stage aided possibly by production of a toxin or reactive oxygen species (ROS). In many other fungi, the genes CREA and AREA are important during the biotrophic stage of infection, while the NOXa gene product is important during necrotrophic growth. To test the hypothesis that these genes are important for pathogenicity of M. graminicola, we employed an over-expression strategy for the selected target genes CREA, AREA, and NOXa, which might function as regulators of nutrient acquisition or ROS generation. Increased expressions of CREA, AREA, and NOXa in M. graminicola were confirmed via quantitative real-time PCR and strains were subsequently assayed for pathogenicity. Among them, the NOXa over-expression strain, NO2, resulted in significantly increased virulence. Moreover, instead of the usual filamentous growth, we observed a predominance of yeast-like growth of NO2 which was correlated with ROS production. Our data indicate that ROS generation via NOXa is important to pathogenicity as well as development in M. graminicola. PMID:27103853

  7. Detecting, Visualizing and Quantitating the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in an Amoeba Model System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) comprise a range of reactive and short-lived, oxygen-containing molecules, which are dynamically interconverted or eliminated either catalytically or spontaneously. Due to the short life spans of most ROS and the diversity of their sources and subcellular localizations, a complete picture can be obtained only by careful measurements using a combination of protocols. Here, we present a set of three different protocols using OxyBurst Green (OBG)-coated beads, or dihydroethidium (DHE) and Amplex UltraRed (AUR), to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively various ROS in professional phagocytes such as Dictyostelium. We optimised the beads coating procedures and used OBG-coated beads and live microscopy to dynamically visualize intraphagosomal ROS generation at the single cell level. We identified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli as a potent stimulator for ROS generation in Dictyostelium. In addition, we developed real time, medium-throughput assays using DHE and AUR to quantitatively measure intracellular superoxide and extracellular H2O2 production, respectively. PMID:24300479

  8. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species via NOXa Is Important for Development and Pathogenicity of Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-E; Lee, Changsu; Goodwin, Stephen B

    2016-03-01

    The ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (synonym Zymoseptoria tritici) is an important pathogen of wheat causing economically significant losses. The primary nutritional mode of this fungus is thought to be hemibiotrophic. This pathogenic lifestyle is associated with an early biotrophic stage of nutrient uptake followed by a necrotrophic stage aided possibly by production of a toxin or reactive oxygen species (ROS). In many other fungi, the genes CREA and AREA are important during the biotrophic stage of infection, while the NOXa gene product is important during necrotrophic growth. To test the hypothesis that these genes are important for pathogenicity of M. graminicola, we employed an over-expression strategy for the selected target genes CREA, AREA, and NOXa, which might function as regulators of nutrient acquisition or ROS generation. Increased expressions of CREA, AREA, and NOXa in M. graminicola were confirmed via quantitative real-time PCR and strains were subsequently assayed for pathogenicity. Among them, the NOXa over-expression strain, NO2, resulted in significantly increased virulence. Moreover, instead of the usual filamentous growth, we observed a predominance of yeast-like growth of NO2 which was correlated with ROS production. Our data indicate that ROS generation via NOXa is important to pathogenicity as well as development in M. graminicola. PMID:27103853

  9. Tick species (Acari: Ixodida) in Antalya City, Turkey: species diversity and seasonal activity.

    PubMed

    Koc, Samed; Aydın, Levent; Cetin, Huseyin

    2015-07-01

    Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) are an important group of ectoparasites of vertebrates. Most species are known vectors of diseases including Lyme disease, Q fever, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. A 3-year research was conducted in Antalya, Turkey, to determine tick species composition, seasonal abundance, and spatial distribution. The study was carried out in five districts (Aksu, Dosemealtı, Kepez, Konyaaltı, and Muratpasa) of Antalya Metropolitan Municipality area in Turkey, between May 2010 and May 2013, where 1393 tick specimens were collected from domestic and wild animals (cattle, goats, sheep, hedgehogs, tortoises, dogs, cats, chickens) and from the environment. The collected ticks were preserved in 70 % alcohol and then were identified. Five genus and eight hard and soft tick species were identified, including Argas persicus, Rhipicephalus annulatus, R. sanguineus, R. turanicus, Hyalomma aegyptium, H. marginatum, Haemaphysalis parva, and Dermacentor niveus. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, R. turanicus, and H. aegyptium were the most common tick species in Antalya city. Rhipicephalus turanicus and R. sanguineus were the most abundant tick species infesting dogs in the city. The hosts of H. aegyptium are primarily tortoises in Antalya. The results of this research will contribute to establishing appropriate measures to control tick infestations on animals and humans and their environment in the city of Antalya. PMID:25869959

  10. Ligation of Glycophorin A Generates Reactive Oxygen Species Leading to Decreased Red Blood Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Khoory, Joseph; Estanislau, Jessica; Elkhal, Abdallah; Lazaar, Asmae; Melhorn, Mark I.; Brodsky, Abigail; Illigens, Ben; Hamachi, Itaru; Kurishita, Yasutaka; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Ghiran, Ionita C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute, inflammatory conditions associated with dysregulated complement activation are characterized by significant increases in blood concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP. The mechanisms by which these molecules arise are not fully understood. In this study, using luminometric- and fluorescence-based methods, we show that ligation of glycophorin A (GPA) on human red blood cells (RBCs) results in a 2.1-fold, NADPH-oxidase-dependent increase in intracellular ROS that, in turn, trigger multiple downstream cascades leading to caspase-3 activation, ATP release, and increased band 3 phosphorylation. Functionally, using 2D microchannels to assess membrane deformability, GPS-ligated RBCs travel 33% slower than control RBCs, and lipid mobility was hindered by 10% using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). These outcomes were preventable by pretreating RBCs with cell-permeable ROS scavenger glutathione monoethyl ester (GSH-ME). Our results obtained in vitro using anti-GPA antibodies were validated using complement-altered RBCs isolated from control and septic patients. Our results suggest that during inflammatory conditions, circulating RBCs significantly contribute to capillary flow dysfunctions, and constitute an important but overlooked source of intravascular ROS and ATP, both critical mediators responsible for endothelial cell activation, microcirculation impairment, platelet activation, as well as long-term dysregulated adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:26784696

  11. Nitric oxide generated from isoniazid activation by KatG: source of nitric oxide and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Graham S; Master, Sharon; Rusnak, Frank; Deretic, Vojo

    2004-08-01

    Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) is a frontline antituberculosis agent. Once taken up by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, INH requires activation by the catalase-peroxidase KatG, converting INH from its prodrug form into a range of bactericidal reactive species. Here we used 15N-labeled INH together with electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping techniques to demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO*) is generated from oxidation at the hydrazide nitrogens during the activation of INH by M. tuberculosis KatG. We also observed that a specific scavenger of NO* provided protection against the antimycobacterial activity of INH in bacterial culture. No significant increases in mycobacterial protein nitration were detected, suggesting that NOdot; and not peroxynitrite, a nitrating metabolite of NO*, is involved in antimycobacterial action. In conclusion, INH-derived NO* has biological activity, which directly contributes to the antimycobacterial action of INH. PMID:15273113

  12. Antioxidant, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of Senecio species used in traditional medicine of northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Emilio; Castro, Felipe; Fernández, Francisco; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalán, César A N

    2012-05-01

    Senecio nutans Sch. Bip., S. viridis var. viridis Phill. and S. spegazzinii Cabrera are native species used in traditional medicine of northwestern Argentina. The total phenolics, flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids contents, as well as radical scavenging, antioxidant, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of aqueous extracts (infusion and decoction) of all three species were determined. S. nutans was the most active. The extracts did not show antibacterial activity. Alkaloids were not detected in any of the aqueous extracts of the three studied species. PMID:22799087

  13. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  14. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  15. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  16. Identification and characterization of gushing-active hydrophobins from Fusarium graminearum and related species.

    PubMed

    Sarlin, Tuija; Kivioja, Teemu; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Linder, Markus B; Nakari-Setälä, Tiina

    2012-04-01

    Fungal infection of barley and malt, particularly by the Fusarium species, is a direct cause of spontaneous overfoaming of beer, referred to as gushing. We have shown previously that small fungal proteins, hydrophobins, act as gushing-inducing factors in beer. The aim of our present study was to isolate and characterize hydrophobins from a gushing-active fungus, Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae) and related species. We generated profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) for the hydrophobin classes Ia, Ib and II from the multiple sequence alignments of their known members available in public domain databases. We searched the published Fusarium graminearum genome with the Markov models. The best matching sequences and the corresponding genes were isolated from F. graminearum and the related species F. culmorum and F. poae by PCR and characterized. One each of the putative F. graminearum and F. poae hydrophobin genes were expressed in the heterologous host Trichoderma reesei. The proteins corresponding to the genes were purified and identified as hydrophobins and named GzHYD5 and FpHYD5, respectively. Concentrations of 0.003 ppm of these hydrophobins were observed to induce vigorous beer gushing. PMID:21780148

  17. Phloretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Fan, Chenghe; Pu, Lv; Wei, Cui; Jin, Haiqiang; Teng, Yuming; Zhao, Mingming; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Jiang, Feng; Shu, Junlong; Li, Fan; Peng, Qing; Kong, Jian; Pan, Bing; Zheng, Lemin; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-01

    Phloretin, a flavonoid present in various plants, has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects. However, the mechanism of its chemo-preventive effect on human glioblastoma cells is not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of phloretin and its associated chemo-preventive effect in human glioblastoma cells. The results indicate that phloretin inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G0-G1 phase and induced apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells. Phloretin-induced cell cycle arrest was associated with increased expression of p27 and decreased expression of cdk2, cdk4, cdk6, cyclinD and cyclinE. Moreover, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades were suppressed by phloretin in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, phloretin triggered the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). This was accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax, Bak and c-PARP and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. The antioxidant agents N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione weakened the effect of phloretin on glioblastoma cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that phloretin exerts potent chemo-preventive activity in human glioblastoma cells through the generation of ROS. PMID:26983952

  18. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  19. Neural representations for the generation of inventive conceptions inspired by adaptive feature optimization of biological species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Inventive conceptions amount to creative ideas for designing devices that are both original and useful. The generation of inventive conceptions is a key element of the inventive process. However, neural mechanisms of the inventive process remain poorly understood. Here we employed functional feature association tasks and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate neural substrates for the generation of inventive conceptions. The functional MRI (fMRI) data revealed significant activations at Brodmann area (BA) 47 in the left inferior frontal gyrus and at BA 18 in the left lingual gyrus, when participants performed biological functional feature association tasks compared with non-biological functional feature association tasks. Our results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47) is associated with novelty-based representations formed by the generation and selection of semantic relatedness, and the left lingual gyrus (BA 18) is involved in relevant visual imagery in processing of semantic relatedness. The findings might shed light on neural mechanisms underlying the inventive process. PMID:23582377

  20. Reaction pathways for bio-active species in a He/H2O atmospheric pressure capacitive discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Helium/trace gas atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (rf) capacitive discharges have increasing biomedical applications. We have performed a principal pathway analysis for a chemically complex, bounded He/H2O atmospheric pressure, planar capacitive discharge, with a discharge gap of 0.5 mm and a power of 0.85 W cm-2 at 13.56 MHz (ne ≈ 1.6 × 1017 m-3). The discharge is embedded in a larger volume in which the H2O fraction is controlled to be 0.001. The generation and loss pathways for eleven species of interest for discharge maintenance and biomedical applications have been determined. The production and consumption pathways of He*, H2O, {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ and electrons are found to be tightly coupled. The metastable He* generated by electron impact excitation of He is mostly consumed by Penning reactions with H2O, followed by subsequent three-body association reactions with H2O, to form the dominant positive ion, {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ . The main loss pathways for {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ are ion cluster fragmentations at the wall, which are important generation pathways for H2O. The generation and loss pathways for electrons are almost the same as for {{\\text{H}}11}\\text{O}5+ . OH and H2O2 generation and loss are strongly coupled, and they are important intermediate species in the generation pathways for the purely O-containing bio-active species: O2(a), O, O3 and O*. The generation and loss pathways for the latter four species were found to be strongly coupled by volume and surface processes, with O2 as an important precursor. The generation of O2 from H2O involves H2O2 as a key long-lived intermediate.

  1. A Universal Method for Species Identification of Mammals Utilizing Next Generation Sequencing for the Analysis of DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Andreas O.; Dell'Amico, Barbara; Welander, Jenny; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Species identification can be interesting in a wide range of areas, for example, in forensic applications, food monitoring and in archeology. The vast majority of existing DNA typing methods developed for species determination, mainly focuses on a single species source. There are, however, many instances where all species from mixed sources need to be determined, even when the species in minority constitutes less than 1 % of the sample. The introduction of next generation sequencing opens new possibilities for such challenging samples. In this study we present a universal deep sequencing method using 454 GS Junior sequencing of a target on the mitochondrial gene 16S rRNA. The method was designed through phylogenetic analyses of DNA reference sequences from more than 300 mammal species. Experiments were performed on artificial species-species mixture samples in order to verify the method’s robustness and its ability to detect all species within a mixture. The method was also tested on samples from authentic forensic casework. The results showed to be promising, discriminating over 99.9 % of mammal species and the ability to detect multiple donors within a mixture and also to detect minor components as low as 1 % of a mixed sample. PMID:24358309

  2. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  3. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and HPLC Fingerprinting Profiles of Three Pyrola Species from Different Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; He, Fengyuan; Lv, Zhenjiang; Li, Dengwu

    2014-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the variation of phytochemical composition, antioxidant activity and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fingerprinting profiles of three Pyrola species. Thirteen samples (eight P. decorata, three P. calliantha and two P. renifolia) were collected from different regions in China. The tannin, hyperoside and quercetin contents of all samples were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and varied within the range 9.77–34.75, 0.34–2.16 and 0.062–0.147 mg/g dry weigh, respectively. Total flavonoid content was evaluated and varied within the range 16.22–37.82 mg/g dry weight. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH assay, with IC50 ranging from 7.96 to 50.33 µg/ml, ABTS•+ and FRAP assay, within the range 612.66–1021.05 and 219.64–398.12 µmol equiv. Trolox/g, respectively. These results revealed that there were significant variations in phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity among all samples. Due to the higher phytochemical content and significant antioxidant activity, P. calliantha was selected as the most valuable species, and the P. calliantha sample from Left banner of Alxa even possessed the strongest antioxidant activity among all the thirteen samples. Futhermore, Emei Mountain was proved to be the most suitable region for producing P. decorata. Moreover, in order to further evaluate the diversities and quality of Pyrola, HPLC fingerprint analysis coupled with hierarchical cluster and discrimination analyses were introduced to establish a simple, rapid and effective method for accurate identification, classification and quality assessment of Pyrola. Thirteen samples were divided into three groups consistent with their morphological classification. Two types of discriminant functions were generated and the ratio of discrimination was 100%. This method can identify different species of Pyrola and the same species from different regions of origin. Also, it can be used to compare and

  4. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  5. Evidence for the generation of reactive oxygen species from hydroquinone and benzoquinone: Roles in arsenite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenxiu; Wang, Yujun; Fang, Guodong; Wu, Tongliang; Liu, Cun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-05-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) significantly affects the fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In the present study, we investigated the oxidation of As(III) in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ), which were selected as model quinone moieties for NOM. It was found that As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in the presence of HQ or BQ at neutral conditions, and the oxidation efficiency of As(III) increased from 33% to 92% in HQ solutions and from 0 to 80% in BQ solutions with pH increasing from 6.5 to 8.5. The oxidation mechanism was further explored with electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The results showed that semiquinone radicals (SQ(-)) were generated from the comproportionation reaction between BQ and HQ, which mediated the formation of superoxide anion (O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH). Both the SQ(-), H2O2 and OH contributed to the oxidation of As(III). The increase of pH favored the formation of SQ(-), and thus promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as As(III) oxidation. Increasing concentrations of HQ and BQ from 0.1 to 1.0 mM enhanced As(III) oxidation from 65% to 94% and from 10% to 53%, respectively. The findings of this study facilitate our understanding of the fate and transformation of As(III) in organic-rich aquatic environments and highlight quinone moieties as the potential oxidants for As(III) in the remediation of arsenic contaminated sites. PMID:26891359

  6. ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of metals in roadway particulate matter deposited in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Shafer, Martin M; Heo, Jongbae; Pardo, Michal; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Assaf; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated the possible causal role for soluble metal species extracted from roadway traffic emissions in promoting particulate matter (PM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activation. To this end, these responses have been evaluated in alveolar macrophage and epithelial lung cells that have been exposed to 'Unfiltered', 'Filtered' and 'Filtered+Chelexed' water extracts of PM samples collected from the roadway urban environments of Thessaloniki, Milan and London. Except for Thessaloniki, our results demonstrate that filtration resulted in a minor decrease in ROS activity of the fine PM fraction, suggesting that ROS activity is attributed mainly to water-soluble PM species. In contrast to ROS, ARE activity was mediated predominantly by the water-soluble component of PM present in both the fine and coarse extracts. Further removal of metals by Chelex treatment from filtered water extracts showed that soluble metal species are the major factors mediating ROS and ARE activities of the soluble fraction, especially in the London PM extracts. Finally, utilizing step-wise multiple-regression analysis, we show that 87% and 78% of the total variance observed in ROS and ARE assays, respectively, is accounted for by changes in soluble metal concentration. Using a statistical analysis we find that As, Zn and Fe best predict the ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of the near roadway particulate matter in the pulmonary cells studied. Collectively, our findings imply that soluble metals present in roadside PM are potential drivers of both pro- and anti-oxidative effects of PM in respiratory tract. PMID:26775006

  7. Indole generates quiescent and metabolically active Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chin; Walia, Rupali; Mukherjee, Krishna J; Mahalik, Subhashree; Summers, David K

    2015-04-01

    An inherent problem with bacterial cell factories used to produce recombinant proteins or metabolites is that resources are channeled into unwanted biomass as well as product. Over several years, attempts have been made to increase efficiency by unlinking biomass and product generation. One example was the quiescent cell (Q-Cell) expression system that generated non-growing but metabolically active Escherichia coli by over-expressing a regulatory RNA (Rcd) in a defined genetic background. Although effective at increasing the efficiency with which resources are converted to product, the technical complexity of the Rcd-based Q-Cell system limited its use. We describe here an alternative method for generating Q-Cells by the direct addition of indole, or related indole derivatives, to the culture medium of an E. coli strain carrying defined mutations in the hns gene. This simple and effective approach is shown to be functional in both shake-flask and fermenter culture. The cells remain metabolically active and analysis of their performance in the fermenter suggests that they may be particularly suitable for the production of cellular metabolites. PMID:25594833

  8. Determination of photochemically-generated reactive oxygen species in natural water.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Manjun

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be produced by interactions between sunlight and light-absorbing substances in natural water environment. ROS may participate in the indirect photolysis of trace organic pollutants, therefore resulting in changes in their environmental fates and ecological risks in natural water systems. Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, exits widely in natural waters. The photodegradation of BPA promoted by ROS (*OH, 1O2, HO2*/O2(*-)), which were produced on the excitation of ubiquitous constituents (such as nitrate ion, humic substances and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes) in natural water under simulated solar radiation was investigated. Both molecular probe method and electron spin resonance (ESR) test were used for the characterization of the generated ROS. It was found that *OH was photochemically produced in the presence of nitrate ions, humic substances and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes and that 102 was produced with the presence of humic substances. The steady-state concentrations of *OH was 1.27x10(-14) mol/L in a nitrate solution, and the second-order rate constant of BPA with *OH was 1.01 x 10(10) L/(mol x s). PMID:19634440

  9. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Junghwa; Jung, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  10. Induction of reactive oxygen species generation inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes growth arrest in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Trinath P; Suman, Suman; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress is one causative factor of the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of most of the cancer types, including prostate cancer (CaP). A moderate increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces cell proliferation whereas excessive amounts of ROS promote apoptosis. In this study, we explored the pro-oxidant property of 3,9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (psoralidin [pso]), a dietary agent, on CaP (PC-3 and C4-2B) cells. Pso greatly induced ROS generation (more than 20-fold) that resulted in the growth inhibition of CaP cells. Overexpression of anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), SOD2, and catalase, or pretreatment with the pharmacological inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated both pso-mediated ROS generation and pso-mediated growth inhibition in CaP cells. Furthermore, pso administration significantly inhibited the migratory and invasive property of CaP cells by decreasing the transcription of β-catenin, and slug, which promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and by concurrently inducing E-cadherin expression in CaP cells. Pso-induced ROS generation in CaP cells resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome-c release, and activation of caspase-3 and -9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), which led to apoptosis. On the other hand, overexpression of anti-oxidants rescued pso-mediated effects on CaP cells. These findings suggest that increasing the threshold of intracellular ROS could prevent or treat CaP growth and metastasis. PMID:23475579

  11. Diminished Macrophage Apoptosis and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation after Phorbol Ester Stimulation in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christine D.; Rahman, Farooq Z.; Sewell, Gavin W.; Ahmed, Afshan; Ashcroft, Margaret; Bloom, Stuart L.; Segal, Anthony W.; Smith, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Crohn's Disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although its pathogenesis is complex, we have recently shown that CD patients have a systemic defect in macrophage function, which results in the defective clearance of bacteria from inflammatory sites. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have identified a number of additional macrophage defects in CD following diacylglycerol (DAG) homolog phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) activation. We provide evidence for decreased DNA fragmentation, reduced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, impaired reactive oxygen species production, diminished cytochrome c release and increased IL-6 production compared to healthy subjects after PMA exposure. The observed macrophage defects in CD were stimulus-specific, as normal responses were observed following p53 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusion These findings add to a growing body of evidence highlighting disordered macrophage function in CD and, given their pivotal role in orchestrating inflammatory responses, defective apoptosis could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:19907654

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Potato Tuber Mitochondria Is Modulated by Mitochondrially Bound Hexokinase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Meyer, Laudiene Evangelista; Machado, Lilia Bender; Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Galina, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria (PTM) have a mitochondrially bound hexokinase (HK) activity that exhibits a pronounced sensitivity to ADP inhibition. Here we investigated the role of mitochondrial HK activity in PTM reactive oxygen species generation. Mitochondrial HK has a 10-fold higher affinity for glucose (Glc) than for fructose (KMGlc = 140 μm versus KMFrc = 1,375 μm). Activation of PTM respiration by succinate led to an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release that was abrogated by mitochondrial HK activation. Mitochondrial HK activity caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in oxygen consumption by PTM. Inhibition of Glc phosphorylation by mannoheptulose or GlcNAc induced a rapid increase in H2O2 release. The blockage of H2O2 release sustained by Glc was reverted by oligomycin and atractyloside, indicating that ADP recycles through the adenine nucleotide translocator and F0F1ATP synthase is operative during the mitochondrial HK reaction. Inhibition of mitochondrial HK activity by 60% to 70% caused an increase of 50% in the maximal rate of H2O2 release. Inhibition in H2O2 release by mitochondrial HK activity was comparable to, or even more potent, than that observed for StUCP (S. tuberosum uncoupling protein) activity. The inhibition of H2O2 release in PTM was two orders of magnitude more selective for the ADP produced from the mitochondrial HK reaction than for that derived from soluble yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) HK. Modulation of H2O2 release and oxygen consumption by Glc and mitochondrial HK inhibitors in potato tuber slices shows that hexoses and mitochondrial HK may act as a potent preventive antioxidant mechanism in potato tubers. PMID:19109413

  13. TNFα-Induced Apoptosis Enabled by CCN1/CYR61: Pathways of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Cytochrome c Release

    PubMed Central

    Juric, Vladislava; Chen, Chih-Chiun; Lau, Lester F.

    2012-01-01

    Although TNFα is a strong inducer of apoptosis, its cytotoxicity in most normal cells in vitro requires blockade of NFκB signaling or inhibition of de novo protein synthesis, typically by the addition of cycloheximide. However, several members of CCN (CYR61/CTGF/NOV) family of extracellular matrix proteins enable TNFα-dependent apoptosis in vitro without inhibiting NFκB or de novo protein synthesis, and CCN1 (CYR61) is essential for optimal TNFα cytotoxicity in vivo. Previous studies showed that CCN1 unmasks the cytotoxicity of TNFα by binding integrins αvβ5, α6β1, and the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan 4 to induce the accumulation of a high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to a biphasic activation of JNK necessary for apoptosis. Here we show for the first time that CCN1 interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in a protein complex, and that binding to LRP1 is critical for CCN1-induced ROS generation and apoptotic synergism with TNFα. We also found that neutral sphingomyelinase 1 (nSMase1), which contributes to CCN1-induced ROS generation, is required for CCN1/TNFα-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, CCN1 promotes the activation of p53 and p38 MAPK, which mediate enhanced cytochrome c release to amplify the cytotoxicity of TNFα. By contrast, LRP1, nSMase1, p53, and p38 MAPK are not required when TNFα-dependent apoptosis is facilitated by the presence of cycloheximide, indicating that they function in the CCN1 signaling pathway that converges with TNFα-induced signaling events. Since CCN1/CYR61 is a physiological regulator of TNFα cytotoxicity at least in some contexts, these findings may reveal important mediators of TNFα-induced apoptosis in vivo and identify potential therapeutic targets for thwarting TNFα-dependent tissue damage. PMID:22363611

  14. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  15. ACROLEIN ACTIVATES MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES BY INCREASING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Timothy E.; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+]I with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+]I, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure. PMID:19371603

  16. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+](I) with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+](I), leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure. PMID:19371603

  17. Preparation of active HDS catalysts by controlling the dispersion of active species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Kazuhiro; Uchikawa, Kei; Matsuda, Satoshi; Akai, Yoshio

    1997-11-01

    It is demonstrated that the structural control of the metal ion precursors in the impregnating solution by adding the chelating agents is effective to prepare the higher active CoMo supported on alumina catalysts ( Co-Mo/Al 2O 3) for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Coordination structures of the Co and Mo complexes in the CoMo impregnating solution and distributions of the Co and Mo complexes were evaluated by spectroscopic characterization techniques and by using a computational calculation, respectively. An addition of a chelating agent, such as NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) and Glu (L-glutamic acid), in the CoMo solution results in the selective formation of the Co complexes, while the amount of the Mo complex is negligibly small at the practical pH of 9.2. The addition of the chelating agent increases the thiophene HDS activity of the sulfided catalysts typically by 50%, compared with that prepared without the chelating agent. Dispersion results of Co and Mo species on both oxidic and sulfided catalysts indicate that the higher HDS activity is explained by the higher degree of surface exposure of Co sites (namely the dispersion of Co) rather than that of Mo sites. The selective formation of the Co-chelate complexes keeps Co ions stable in solution up to high concentration. Furthermore, the Co complexes are estimated to be stable on the support even in the initial step of calcination, which would depress the formation of crystalline Co compounds, such as CoAl 2O 4 and CoMoO 4. These effects result in the higher dispersion of the active Co surface species.

  18. Evaluation of multi-activities of 14 edible species from Zingiberaceae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuan-Li; Zhao, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-02-01

    Fourteen Zingiberaceae species, widely used in China for both food and medicine, were selected to evaluate and compare their antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Results indicated that seven species displayed high antioxidant activity, while eight species exhibited different degrees of antimicrobial activities (minimum inhibitory concentrations were 2.00-40.00 μg/ml), and six species exhibited cytotoxicity on the SMMC-7721 cells. Alpinia officinarum and Alpinia oxyphylla showed a broader antimicrobial spectrum, while Curcuma phaeocaulis and Zingiber officinale displayed specific inhibition on Escherichia coli. Amomum villosum showed strong radical scavenging capacity. Amomum kravanh and Curcuma longa exhibited significant cytotoxicity. Overall, the antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of the 14 species showed obvious diversities. It is hoped that, from the results, the biological activity of ginger plants can be used more rationally and effectively in future. PMID:22716965

  19. Enhancement of ATP generation capacity, antioxidant activity and immunomodulatory activities by Chinese Yang and Yin tonifying herbs

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kam Ming; Leung, Hoi Yan

    2007-01-01

    Chinese tonifying herbs such as Herba Cistanche, Ganoderma and Cordyceps, which possess antioxidant and/or immunomodulatory activities, can be useful in the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. Pharmacological studies on Yang and Yin tonifying herbs suggest that Yang tonifying herbs stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, presumably through the intermediacy of reactive oxidant species, leading to the enhancement of cellular/mitochondrial antioxidant status. Yin tonifying herbs, however, apart from possessing antioxidant properties, exert mainly immunomodulatory functions that may boost a weak immune system and may also suppress overreactive immune responses. The abilities of Yang and Yin Chinese tonifying herbs to enhance ATP generation and to exhibit antioxidant and/or immunomodulatory actions are the pharmacological basis for their beneficial effects on the retardation of aging. PMID:17386115

  20. Phytochemical profiling of five medicinally active constituents across 14 Eutrema species.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guoqian; Wang, Qian; Liu, Bingbing; Liu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    Wasabi or Japanese horseradish (Eutrema japonicum) is both a traditional condiment and a medicinally important plant with diverse uses. Its medicinally active constituents appear to include five isothiocyanates, but their spatial variations in naturally occurring congeners are unknown. Thus, in this study we measured concentrations of these five active constituents in 20 populations of 14 species of Eutrema and one related species, Yinshania sinuata. Three to five of these constituents were detected in each of the examined species, at concentrations that varied greatly between sampled species and populations of the same species. However, two species, Eutrema tenue and Eutrema deltoideum, had higher total concentrations of the five isothiocyanates and substantially higher concentrations of one or two, than the widely cultivated E. japonicum. Thus, both of these species could be important wild resources for artificial cultivation, in addition to the currently widely cultivated E. japonicum. PMID:26946379

  1. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  2. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  3. Animal Related Activities as Determinants of Species Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has established a relationship between knowledge and environmental concern. Different factors may contribute to this knowledge and animal-related leisure activities may also contribute to this knowledge. 390 participants in Leipzig, Germany were interviewed to assess their animal-related leisure activities, their demographic status…

  4. Antifungal activity of local anesthetics against Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Vaz, C; Rodrigues, A G; Sansonetty, F; Martinez-De-Oliveira, J; Fonseca, A F; Mårdh, P A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the activity of benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, three drugs with local anesthetic activity, against Candida albicans and non-albicans strains and to clarify their mechanism of activity. METHODS: The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for 20 Candida strains (18 clinical isolates and two American Type Culture Collection strains). The fungistatic activity was studied with the fluorescent probe FUN-1 and observation under epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The fungicidal activity of the three drugs was assayed by viability counts. Membrane alterations induced in the yeast cells were evaluated by staining with propidium iodide, by quantitation of intracellular K+ leakage and by transmission electron microscopy of intact yeast cells and prepared spheroplasts. RESULTS: The MIC ranged from 12.5-50.0 microg/mL, 5.0-40.0 mg/mL, and 2.5-10.0 mg/mL for benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, respectively. The inhibitory activity of these concentrations could be detected with the fluorescent probe FUN-1 after incubation for 60 minutes. A very fast fungicidal activity was shown by 0.2, 50, and 30 mg/mL of benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: At lower concentrations, the tested drugs have a fungistatic activity, due to yeast metabolic impairment, while at higher concentrations they are fungicidal, due to direct damage to the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:10968594

  5. The formation and degradation of active species during methanol conversion over protonated zeotype catalysts.

    PubMed

    Olsbye, U; Svelle, S; Lillerud, K P; Wei, Z H; Chen, Y Y; Li, J F; Wang, J G; Fan, W B

    2015-10-21

    The methanol to hydrocarbon (MTH) process provides an efficient route for the conversion of carbon-based feedstocks into olefins, aromatics and gasoline. Still, there is room for improvements in product selectivity and catalytic stability. This task calls for a fundamental understanding of the formation, catalytic mechanism and degradation of active sites. The autocatalytic feature of the MTH process implies that hydrocarbons are active species on the one hand and deactivating species on the other hand. The steady-state performance of such species has been thoroughly studied and reviewed. However, the mechanism of formation of the initial hydrocarbon species (i.e.; the first C-C bond) and the evolution of active species into deactivating coke species have received less attention. Therefore, this review focuses on the significant progress recently achieved in these two stages by a combination of theoretical calculations, model studies, operando spectroscopy and catalytic tests. PMID:26185806

  6. Comparison of compounds of three Rubus species and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Caidan, Rezeng; Cairang, Limao; Pengcuo, Jiumei; Tong, Li

    2015-12-01

    Rubus amabilis, Rubus niveus Thunb., and Rubus sachalinensis are three Rubus species that are alternatively found in Manubzhithang, a Tibetan medicine, in different areas of China. The current study analyzed HPLC/UV chromatograms and it compared compounds of these three Rubus species in contrast to reference substances such as 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, procyanidin B4, and isovitexin-7-O-glucoside. The three Rubus species produced similar peaks in chromatograms. The antioxidant activity of the three Rubus species was determined using an assay for DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Results indicated that the three Rubus species extracts had almost the same level of free radical scavenging activity. Thus, findings indicated the rationality of substituting these species for one another as an ingredient in Manubzhithang. PMID:26781923

  7. Antimicrobial activities of three species of family mimosaceae.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Adeel; Mahmood, Aqeel; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of crude methanolic extract of leaves of Acacia nilotica L., Albizia lebbeck L. and Mimosa himalayana Gamble belonging to family mimosaceae were investigated in this research work. Antibacterial activity was studied by agar well diffusion method against one gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and three gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia. Crude extract of all plants showed best activity against gram-negative bacterial strains while minor inhibition zones were found against gram positive bacterial strains. Antifungal activity of crude plant extract was screened by agar tube dilution method against Aspergillus nigar and Aspergillus flavus. These results showed that these plants extracts have potential against bacterias, while against fungi their activity is not much effective. PMID:22186331

  8. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein. PMID:26620444

  9. Multilayer Heterojunction Anodes for Saline Wastewater Treatment: Design Strategies and Reactive Species Generation Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Shin, Jieun; Jasper, Justin T; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2016-08-16

    Multilayer heterojunction SbSn/CoTi/Ir anodes, which consist of Ir0.7Ta0.3O2 bottom layers coated onto a titanium base, Co-TiO2 interlayers, and overcoated discrete Sb-SnO2 islands, were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The Ir0.7Ta0.3O2 bottom layer serves as an Ohmic contact to facilitate electron transfer from semiconductor layers to the Ti base. The Co-TiO2 interlayer and overcoated Sb-SnO2 islands enhance the evolution of reactive chlorine. The surficial Sb-SnO2 islands also serve as the reactive sites for free radical generation. Experiments coupled with computational kinetic simulations show that while ·OH and Cl· are initially produced on the SbSn/CoTi/Ir anode surface, the dominant radical formed in solution is the dichlorine radical anion, Cl2·(-). The steady-state concentration of reactive radicals is 10 orders of magnitude lower than that of reactive chlorine. The SbSn/CoTi/Ir anode was applied to electrochemically treat human wastewater. These test results show that COD and NH4(+) can be removed after 2 h of electrolysis with minimal energy consumption (370 kWh/kg COD and 383 kWh/kg NH4(+)). Although free radical species contribute to COD removal, anodes designed to enhance reactive chlorine production are more effective than those designed to enhance free radical production. PMID:27402194

  10. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Meng, Xianghu; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Niu, Yonghua; Cui, Kai; Wang, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED) in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05). The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05). Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05). In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:27168996

  11. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  12. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  13. Species-specific alternative splicing generates a catalytically inactive form of human hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Laurell, H; Grober, J; Vindis, C; Lacombe, T; Dauzats, M; Holm, C; Langin, D

    1997-11-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step of adipose tissue lipolysis. The enzyme is also expressed in steroidogenic tissues, mammary gland, muscle tissues and macrophages. A novel HSL mRNA termed hHSL-S, 228 bp shorter than the full-length HSL mRNA, was detected in human adipocytes. hHSL-S mRNA results from the in-frame skipping of exon 6, which encodes the serine residue of the catalytic triad. The corresponding 80 kDa protein was identified in human adipocytes after immunoprecipitation. The truncated protein expressed in COS cells showed neither lipase nor esterase activity but was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. hHSL-S mRNA was found in all human tissues expressing HSL, except brown adipose tissue from newborns. It represented approx. 20% of total HSL transcripts in human subcutaneous adipocytes. No alternative splicing was detected in other mammals. Human and mouse three-exon HSL minigenes transfected into primate and rodent cell lines reproduced the splicing pattern of the endogenous HSL genes. Analysis of hybrid human/mouse minigenes transfected into human cell lines showed that cis-acting elements responsible for the skipping of human exon 6 were restricted to a 247 bp region including exon 6 and the first 19 nt of intron 6. Moreover, divergence in exonic splicing elements between mouse and human was shown to be critical for the species-specific alternative splicing. PMID:9359844

  14. Production of active oxygen species by blood phagocytes of pregnant women and their newborns with intrauterine infection.

    PubMed

    Safronova, V G; Matveeva, N K; Lomova, N A; Belyaeva, A S; Vanko, L V

    2013-09-01

    We studied the relationship between changes in the maternal and newborn granulocyte functions under conditions of infection risk and realization. Women with normal gestation and their healthy newborns, pregnant women with a high risk of infection and their newborns, healthy or with intrauterine infection, were examined. Changes in the active oxygen species-dependent phagocytosis system were found in the blood of risk group patients. An inverse relationship between the parameters venous and umbilical cord blood was detected indicating a relationship between changes in functional activities of maternal and newborn granulocytes. The percentage of CD11b(+)cells in venous and umbilical cord blood strictly correlated with the percent of cells that phagocytosed FITC-labeled E. coli. Deviations in the generation of active oxygen species in phagocytosis seemed to be related to the expression of surface receptors in the risk groups. PMID:24288724

  15. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  16. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Antolak, A. J.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.

    2009-03-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,γ)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,γ)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 μs long pulses, and a 1% duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  17. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Antolak, A.J.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,gamma)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,gamma)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 mu s long pulses, and a 1percent duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  18. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB{sub 6} tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 {mu}s long pulses, and a 1% duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  19. In vivo activity of aryl ozonides against Schistosoma species.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer; Ingram, Katrin; Vargas, Mireille; Chollet, Jacques; Wang, Xiaofang; Dong, Yuxiang; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the in vivo antischistosomal activities of 11 structurally diverse synthetic peroxides. Of all compounds tested, ozonide (1,2,4-trioxolane) OZ418 had the highest activity against adult Schistosoma mansoni, with total and female worm burden reductions of 80 and 90% (P < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, treatment of S. haematobium-infected mice with OZ418 reduced the total worm burden by 86%. In conclusion, OZ418 is a promising antischistosomal lead compound. PMID:22106214

  20. Generation mechanism of hydroxyl radical species and its lifetime prediction during the plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Dae Hoon; Park, Ji Hoon; Hong, Young J.; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-01-01

    Through this work, we have elucidated the mechanism of hydroxyl radicals (OH•) generation and its life time measurements in biosolution. We observed that plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis were responsible for the continues generation of OH• species, that resulted in OH• to be major reactive species (RS) in the solution. The density and lifetime of OH• species acted inversely proportional to each other with increasing depth inside the solution. The cause of increased lifetime of OH• inside the solution is predicted using theoretical and semiempirical calculations. Further, to predict the mechanism of conversion of hydroxide ion (OH−) to OH• or H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) and electron, we determined the current inside the solution of different pH. Additionally, we have investigated the critical criterion for OH• interaction on cancer cell inducing apoptosis under effective OH• exposure time. These studies are innovative in the field of plasma chemistry and medicine. PMID:25790968

  1. Generation mechanism of hydroxyl radical species and its lifetime prediction during the plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Dae Hoon; Park, Ji Hoon; Hong, Young J.; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    Through this work, we have elucidated the mechanism of hydroxyl radicals (OH•) generation and its life time measurements in biosolution. We observed that plasma-initiated ultraviolet (UV) photolysis were responsible for the continues generation of OH• species, that resulted in OH• to be major reactive species (RS) in the solution. The density and lifetime of OH• species acted inversely proportional to each other with increasing depth inside the solution. The cause of increased lifetime of OH• inside the solution is predicted using theoretical and semiempirical calculations. Further, to predict the mechanism of conversion of hydroxide ion (OH-) to OH• or H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) and electron, we determined the current inside the solution of different pH. Additionally, we have investigated the critical criterion for OH• interaction on cancer cell inducing apoptosis under effective OH• exposure time. These studies are innovative in the field of plasma chemistry and medicine.

  2. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Zhi

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors.

  3. Reactive oxygen species mediate TNFR1 increase after TRPV1 activation in mouse DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Liping; Westlund, Karin N

    2009-01-01

    Background Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is activated by low pH/protons and is well known to be involved in hyperalgesia during inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in nociceptive responses causing hyperalgesia through TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1) activation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is also prominently increased in inflamed tissue. The present study investigated TNFR1 receptors in primary cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after TRPV1 activation and the involvement of ROS. C57BL/6 mice, both TRPV1 knockout and wild type, were used for immunofluorescent and live cell imaging. The L4 and L5 DRGs were dissected bilaterally and cultured overnight. TRPV1 was stimulated with capsaicin or its potent analog, resiniferatoxin. ROS production was measured with live cell imaging and TNFR1 was detected with immunofluorescence in DRG primary cultures. The TRPV1 knockout mice, TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN), were employed to explore the functional relationship among TRPV1, ROS and TNFR1 in these studies. Results The results demonstrate that TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 receptors and ROS generation in primary cultures of mouse DRG neurons. Activated increases in TNFR1 receptors and ROS production are absent in TRPV1 deficient mice. The PBN blocks increases in TNFR1 and ROS production induced by capsaicin/resiniferatoxin. Conclusion TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 in cultured mouse DRG neurons through a ROS signaling pathway, a novel sensitization mechanism in DRG neurons. PMID:19531269

  4. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets: Effect of gas flow, active species, and snake-like bullet propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Tan, X.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-02-15

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets have recently attracted enormous interest owing to numerous applications in plasma biology, health care, medicine, and nanotechnology. A dedicated study of the interaction between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes revealed that the active species (electrons, ions, excited OH, metastable Ar, and nitrogen-related species) generated by the upstream plasma plume enhance the propagation of the downstream plasma plume. At gas flows exceeding 2 l/min, the downstream plasma plume is longer than the upstream plasma plume. Detailed plasma diagnostics and discharge species analysis suggest that this effect is due to the electrons and ions that are generated by the upstream plasma and flow into the downstream plume. This in turn leads to the relatively higher electron density in the downstream plasma. Moreover, high-speed photography reveals a highly unusual behavior of the plasma bullets, which propagate in snake-like motions, very differently from the previous reports. This behavior is related to the hydrodynamic instability of the gas flow, which results in non-uniform distributions of long-lifetime active species in the discharge tube and of surface charges on the inner surface of the tube.

  5. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption—as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration—than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered

  6. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Z G; Buhl, K; Bartell, S E; Schoenfuss, H L

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption-as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration-than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered Rio

  7. Ubiquitin Activates Patatin-Like Phospholipases from Multiple Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David M.; Sato, Hiromi; Dirck, Aaron T.; Feix, Jimmy B.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 enzymes are ubiquitously distributed throughout the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms and are utilized in a wide array of cellular processes and physiological and immunological responses. Several patatin-like phospholipase homologs of ExoU from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were selected on the premise that ubiquitin activation of this class of bacterial enzymes was a conserved process. We found that ubiquitin activated all phospholipases tested in both in vitro and in vivo assays via a conserved serine-aspartate catalytic dyad. Ubiquitin chains versus monomeric ubiquitin were superior in inducing catalysis, and ubiquitin-like proteins failed to activate phospholipase activity. Toxicity studies in a prokaryotic dual-expression system grouped the enzymes into high- and low-toxicity classes. Toxicity measured in eukaryotic cells also suggested a two-tiered classification but was not predictive of the severity of cellular damage, suggesting that each enzyme may correspond to unique properties perhaps based on its specific biological function. Additional studies on lipid binding preference suggest that some enzymes in this family may be differentially sensitive to phosphatidyl-4,5-bisphosphate in terms of catalytic activation enhancement and binding affinity. Further analysis of the function and amino acid sequences of this enzyme family may lead to a useful approach to formulating a unifying model of how these phospholipases behave after delivery into the cytoplasmic compartment. PMID:25404699

  8. Salinomycin simultaneously induces apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species in osteosarcoma U2OS cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hun; Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Yu, Sun-Nyoung; Seo, Young-Kyo; Chun, Sung-Sik; Noh, Kyung-Tae; Suh, Jeung-Tak; Ahn, Soon-Cheol

    2016-04-29

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, acts as a highly selective potassium ionophore. It was reported to anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines. In this study, salinomycin was examined on apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Apoptosis, autophagy, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ROS were analyzed using flow cytometry. Also, expressions of apoptosis- and autophagy-related proteins were determined by western blotting. As a result, salinomycin triggered apoptosis of U2OS cells, which was accompanied by change of MMP and cleavage of caspases-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. And salinomycin increased the expression of autophagy-related protein and accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO). Salinomycin-induced ROS production promotes both apoptosis and autophagy, as evidenced by the result that treatment of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, attenuated both apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3 MA) enhanced the salinoymcin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggested that salinomycin-induced autophagy, as a survival mechanism, might be a potential strategy through ROS regulation in cancer therapy. PMID:27033598

  9. Development of microsatellite primers in the protected species Viola elatior (Violaceae) using next-generation sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Mélina; Wegnez, Jérôme; Griveau, Chantal; Lambourdière, Josie; Utge, Jose; Noël, Florence; Abdelkrim, Jawad; Machon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Viola elatior (Violaceae) is a Eurasian perennial plant species in which French populations are threatened by anthropogenic pressures. Microsatellite primers were developed to investigate its genetic structure and diversity. Methods and Results: Eight microsatellite markers were isolated using next-generation sequencing. Loci were amplified and screened for 138 individuals in 17 populations from France. Two of the eight polymorphic loci presented no variability across populations. The total number of alleles per locus varied from two to four. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.051 to 1.000. All primers amplified successfully in the closely related species V. pumila. Conclusions: This set of microsatellites offers a valuable tool for assessing population genetic diversity of the species to improve its conservation and base management efforts. High observed heterozygosity values probably reflect the particular mating system of the species and suggest an important tendency to clonality. PMID:25995977

  10. Genotypic variation in foundation species generates network structure that may drive community dynamics and evolution.

    PubMed

    Lau, Matthew K; Keith, Arthur R; Borrett, Stuart R; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2016-03-01

    Although genetics in a single species is known to impact whole communities, little is known about how genetic variation influences species interaction networks in complex ecosystems. Here, we examine the interactions in a community of arthropod species on replicated genotypes (clones) of a foundation tree species, Populus angustifolia James (narrowleaf cottonwood), in a long-term, common garden experiment using a bipartite "genotype-species" network perspective. We combine this empirical work with a simulation experiment designed to further investigate how variation among individual tree genotypes can impact network structure. Three findings emerged: (1) the empirical "genotype-species network" exhibited significant network structure with modularity being greater than the highly conservative null model; (2) as would be expected given a modular network structure, the empirical network displayed significant positive arthropod co-occurrence patterns; and (3) furthermore, the simulations of "genotype-species" networks displayed variation in network structure, with modularity in particular clearly increasing, as genotypic variation increased. These results support the conclusion that genetic variation in a single species contributes to the structure of ecological interaction networks, which could influence eco-ogical dynamics (e.g., assembly and stability) and evolution in a community context. PMID:27197399

  11. Identification of conserved genomic regions and variation therein amongst Cetartiodactyla species using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has created an opportunity to genetically characterize an individual both inexpensively and comprehensively. In earlier work produced in our collaboration [1], it was demonstrated that, for animals without a reference genome, their Next Generation Sequence data ...

  12. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  13. Enzyme activities in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle of five avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Murray, H.C.; Bunck, C.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle from five species of captive birds. Few differences occurred in plasma activities between sexes but considerable differences occurred between species. All five enzymes were detected in each of the tissues sampled. Relative enzyme activities in liver, kidney, and muscle were similar for each species. CPK activity was much higher in muscle than in liver or kidney and, of the five enzymes studied, may be the best indicator of muscle damage. Most of the other enzymes were more evenly distributed among the three tissues, and no organ-specific enzyme could be identified for liver or kidney. Because of interspecific variations in plasma enzyme activities, it is important to establish baseline values for each species to ensure accurate interpretation of results.

  14. Characterization of serum phospholipase a(2) activity in three diverse species of west african crocodiles.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Mark; Juneau, Kate; Gemillion, Jared; Falconi, Rodolfo; Doucet, Aaron; Shirley, Matthew H

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A(2), an enzyme that exhibits substantial immunological activity, was measured in the serum of three species of diverse West African crocodiles. Incubation of different volumes of crocodile serum with bacteria labeled with a fluorescent fatty acid in the sn-2 position of membrane lipids resulted in a volume-dependent liberation of fluorescent probe. Serum from the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) exhibited slightly higher activity than that of the slender-snouted crocodile (Mecistops cataphractus) and the African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis). Product formation was inhibited by BPB, a specific PLA(2) inhibitor, confirming that the activity was a direct result of the presence of serum PLA(2). Kinetic analysis showed that C. niloticus serum produced product more rapidly than M. cataphractus or O. tetraspis. Serum from all three species exhibited temperature-dependent PLA(2) activities but with slightly different thermal profiles. All three crocodilian species showed high levels of activity against eight different species of bacteria. PMID:22110960

  15. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  16. Potential pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of an endophytic Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mahiti; Saxena, Sanjai; Goyal, Dinesh

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic lipase (PL) is considered as one of the safest target for diet-induced anti-obesity drug development. Orlistat is the only PL inhibitor approved for anti-obesity treatment till date. In the process of exploration of new PL inhibitors, we have screened culture filtrates of 70 endophytic fungi of medicinal plants using qualitative as well as quantitative in-vitro PL assays. The qualitative assays indicated potential PL inhibition in only three isolates, namely #57 TBBALM, #33 TBBALM and #1 CSSTOT. Only ethyl acetate extracts of the culture filtrates of these isolates exhibited the PL inhibition. #57 TBBLAM ethyl acetate extract of culture filtrate exhibited potential PL inhibition with an IC50 of 3.69 µg/ml which was comparable to the positive control, i.e. Orlistat exhibiting IC50 value of 2.73 µg/ml. Further molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify the isolate #57 TBBALM as Penicillium species. PMID:24417211

  17. Surface-Active Agents from Two Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, David G.; Goldenberg, Beena G.

    1987-01-01

    Two Bacillus species were studied which produced bioemulsifiers; however, they were distinctly different compounds. Bacillus sp. strain IAF 343 produced unusually high yields of extracellular biosurfactant when grown on a medium containing only water-soluble substrates. The yield of 1 g/liter was appreciably better than those of most of the biosurfactants reported previously. This neutral lipid product, unlike most lipid biosurfactants, had significant emulsifying properties. It did not appreciably lower the surface tension of water. On the same medium, Bacillus cereus IAF 346 produced a more conventional polysaccharide bioemulsifier, but it also produced a monoglyceride biosurfactant. The bioemulsifier contained substantial amounts of glucosamine and originated as part of the capsule layer. The monoglyceride lowered the surface tension of water to 28 mN/m. It formed a strong association with the polysaccharide, and it was necessary to use ultrafiltration to effect complete separation. The removal of the monoglyceride caused the polysaccharide to precipitate. It is suggested that earlier reports of biopolymers which both stabilized emulsions and lowered surface tension were actually similar aggregates of lipid and bioemulsifier. PMID:16347271

  18. Malassezia globosa tends to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia globosa is a major pathogen of Malassezia folliculitis (MF) and the predominant species on human skin. The aim of this study was to clarify the differences between M. globosa and other cutaneous Malassezia species, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis and M. furfur. The optimum growth temperature, effects of compounds of sweat and free fatty acids on growth, and lipase activities of five cutaneous Malassezia species were determined. The growth of M. globosa was promoted strongly by the compounds of sweat and high temperature unlike that of other cutaneous Malassezia species. This result clarified that M. globosa tended to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species. Furthermore, M. globosa showed high lipase activity. We consider these characteristics of M. globosa to relate to the pathogenesis of MF. PMID:22229642

  19. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  20. [Extraction of pharmacologically active alkaloids from Vinca species].

    PubMed

    Gagua, N D; Bakuridze, A D; Vachnadze, N S; Berashvili, D T; Vachnadze, V Iu

    2011-06-01

    From the Genius Vinca the drugs have been received, arbitrally named: Vingerbin- with anthyarithmic activity, Vincabral-for improvement of brain blood circulation and leicobetin-as stimulator of leicopoesis. The investigations has been performed for creation of rational, resource saving, rentable phyto technologies. As a result, the liquid extraction general schema is provided for receipt of indolic alkaloids from plants V. herbaceae and V.minor. Analyses have shown that extraction with diluent gaz gives the possibility to receive the sums rich with alkaloids:Vingerbin and Vincabral. The advantage of extraction with diluent gaz is exclusion of high volumes of organic and non organic chemicals on the stage of extraction from raw material and liquid extraction, and remain and lipofil fraction converse to new phytosubtances for receipt of biologically active flavonoids, amino acids etc. PMID:21778554

  1. Antiphytoviral activity of essential oil from endemic species Teucrium arduini.

    PubMed

    Dunkić, Valerija; Bezić, Nada; Vuko, Elma

    2011-09-01

    The essential oil of Teucrium arduini L. was characterized by a high concentration of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (43.8%) of which beta-caryophyllene (19.9%) being the major compound, followed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (19.6%) of which caryophyllene-oxide (14.6%) was dominant. When applied to plants of Chenopodium amaranticolor and Ch. quinoa for two successive days prior inoculation, the oil was effective in reducing lesion numbers on plants infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (25.7%) and Cucumber mosaic virus (21.9%). The main components of oil, beta-caryophyllene and caryophyllene oxide showed potent antiviral activity against CMV, but weak activity against TMV infection. PMID:21941920

  2. Investigation of cytotoxic activity in four stachys species from iran.

    PubMed

    Khanavi, Mahnaz; Manayi, Azadeh; Lotfi, Mahnaz; Abbasi, Rofeyde; Majdzadeh, Maryam; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    The aerial parts of Stachys laxa Boiss. and Buhse. from Siah-bishe in Mazandaran province, Stachys trinervis Aitch. and Hemsl. from Karaj in Alborz province, Stachys subaphylla Rech. F. and Stachys turcomanica Trautv. from Golestan province have been collected in May 2008. Total extracts were obtained through MeOH/H2O (80/20) and then partitioned between CHCl3, EtOAc and MeOH. These fractions and total extracts have been investigated for in-vitro cytotoxic activity against the colon carcinoma (HT-29), colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), breast ductal carcinoma (T47D) and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines using MTT assay (3-(4,5-di methyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-di phenyltetrazolium bromide). At each cell line, doses of 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 100, 200, 400 and 800 µg/mL in 1% (v/v) DMSO of all samples were tested. Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Stachys laxa against proliferation of T47D and HT-29 cell lines and chloroform fraction of Stachys subaphylla and Stachys subaphylla ethyl acetate fraction toward T47D cell line exhibited highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 < 50 µg/mL). Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Stachys turcomanica against HT-29 cell line, except methanol fraction of Stachys subaphylla, the other extrcts on T47D cell line, represented moderate cytotoxic activity (IC50 < 70 µg/mL). All fractions of S. trinervis demonstrated no effective cytotoxic activity. IC50 values confirmed that the growth and proliferation of HT-29 and T47D cells were most affected by chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions of Stachys laxa and Stachys turcomanica due to their nonpolar compounds. PMID:24250483

  3. Active colonization dynamics and diversity patterns are influenced by dendritic network connectivity and species interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Mathew; Altermatt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Habitat network connectivity influences colonization dynamics, species invasions, and biodiversity patterns. Recent theoretical work suggests dendritic networks, such as those found in rivers, alter expectations regarding colonization and dispersal dynamics compared with other network types. As many native and non-native species are spreading along river networks, this may have important ecological implications. However, experimental studies testing the effects of network structure on colonization and diversity patterns are scarce. Up to now, experimental studies have only considered networks where sites are connected with small corridors, or dispersal was experimentally controlled, which eliminates possible effects of species interactions on colonization dynamics. Here, we tested the effect of network connectivity and species interactions on colonization dynamics using continuous linear and dendritic (i.e., river-like) networks, which allow for active dispersal. We used a set of six protist species and one rotifer species in linear and dendritic microcosm networks. At the start of the experiment, we introduced species, either singularly or as a community within the networks. Species subsequently actively colonized the networks. We periodically measured densities of species throughout the networks over 2 weeks to track community dynamics, colonization, and diversity patterns. We found that colonization of dendritic networks was faster compared with colonization of linear networks, which resulted in higher local mean species richness in dendritic networks. Initially, community similarity was also greater in dendritic networks compared with linear networks, but this effect vanished over time. The presence of species interactions increased community evenness over time, compared with extrapolations from single-species setups. Our experimental findings confirm previous theoretical work and show that network connectivity, species-specific dispersal ability, and species

  4. Gardenin B-induced cell death in human leukemia cells involves multiple caspases but is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Saavedra, Ester; Del Rosario, Henoc; Perdomo, Juan; Loro, Juan F; Cifuente, Diego A; Tonn, Carlos E; García, Celina; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco

    2016-08-25

    Flavonoids have attracted great interest due to their possible anticancer activities. Here we investigated the antiproliferative activity of the flavonoids isolated from Baccharis scandens against human leukemia cell lines and found that the methoxyflavonoid gardenin B was the most cytotoxic compound against HL-60 and U-937 cells, showing IC50 values between 1.6 and 3.0 μM, but had no significant cytotoxic effects against quiescent or proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects on viability were accompanied by the concentration- and time-dependent appearance of apoptosis as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, formation of apoptotic bodies and a sub-G1 ratio increase. Comparative studies with the best-studied bioflavonoid quercetin indicate that gardenin B is a more cytotoxic and more apoptotic inducer than quercetin. Cell death induced by gardenin B was associated with: (i) a significant induction of caspase-2, -3, -8 and -9 activities; (ii) cleavage of the initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8 and -9), of the executioner caspase-3, and of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; and (iii) a concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by gardenin B is associated with activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways of cell death and occurs through a mechanism that is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:27423764

  5. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  6. Detection of oxygen species generated by WO{sub 3} modification fullerene/TiO{sub 2} in the degradation of 1,5-diphenyl carbazide

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhu, Lei; Ullah, Kefayat; Ye, Shu; Oh, Won-Chun

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Reactive oxygen species were detected through oxidation reaction from DPCI to DPCO. • Generated reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radicals can be analysed by DPCI degradation. • C{sub 60} have good effect in photo/ultrasonic degradation process. • Enhanced adsorption capacity can increase the degradation effect. • Photocatalytic activity attributed to photo-absorption effect by C{sub 60} and cooperative effect of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: In the present work, powders with different relative mole ratios of WO{sub 3}-fullerene/TiO{sub 2} were irradiated by visible light and ultrasonic. The composite obtained was characterized by BET surface area measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis analysis. A methylene blue (MB) solution under visible light and ultrasonic irradiation was used to determine the catalytic activity. The generation of reactive oxygen species were detected through the oxidation reaction from 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) to 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO). Finally, we performed experiments to find the optimum relative mole ratio of fullerene for the degradation of MB.

  7. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen (ROS and RNS) species generation and cell death in tomato suspension cultures--Botrytis cinerea interaction.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska, E; Różalska, S; Kaźmierczak, A; Nawrocka, J; Małolepsza, U

    2015-01-01

    This article reports events connected to cell survival and Botrytis cinerea infection development in cell suspension cultures of two tomato cultivars which show different levels of susceptibility to the pathogen: cv. Corindo (more susceptible) and cv. Perkoz (less susceptible). In parallel changes in reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species generation and in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity were studied. In vivo staining methods with acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) as well as fluorescent microscopy were used to assess tomato and B. cinerea cells death. The biochemical studies of ROS and RNS concentrations in plant cell extract were complemented by in vivo ROS and nitric oxide (NO) imaging using nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), diaminobenzidine (DAB) and diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-DA) staining methods, and confocal microscope technique. B. cinerea infection proceeded slower in Perkoz cell cultures. It was evidenced by measuring the pathogen conidia germination and germination tube development in which nuclei revealing cell death dominated. Two different types of tomato cell death were observed: cells with necrotic nuclei dominated in Corindo whereas in Perkoz cells with characteristic of vacuolar death type prevailed. In Perkoz cells, constitutive levels of NO and S-nitrosothiols (SNO) were significantly higher and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and superoxide anion (O₂(-)) concentrations were slightly higher as compared with Corindo cells. Moreover, increases in these molecule concentrations as a result of B. cinerea inoculation were observed in both, Perkoz and Corindo cell cultures. The enzymatic GSNOR activity seems to be an important player in controlling the SNO level in tomato cells. Involvements of the studied compounds in molecular mechanisms of tomato resistance to B. cinerea are discussed in the paper. PMID:25064634

  8. Efficient cross-species capture hybridization and next-generation sequencing of mitochondrial genomes from noninvasively sampled museum specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Victor C.; Li, Gang; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to uncover the phylogenetic history of recently extinct species and other species known only from archived museum material has rapidly improved due to the reduced cost and increased sequence capacity of next-generation sequencing technologies. One limitation of these approaches is the difficulty of isolating and sequencing large, orthologous DNA regions across multiple divergent species, which is exacerbated for museum specimens, where DNA quality varies greatly between samples and contamination levels are often high. Here we describe the use of cross-species DNA capture hybridization techniques and next-generation sequencing to selectively isolate and sequence partial to full-length mitochondrial DNA genomes from the degraded DNA of museum specimens, using probes generated from the DNA of a single extant species. We demonstrate our approach on specimens from an enigmatic gliding mammal, the Sunda colugo, which is widely distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We isolated DNA from 13 colugo specimens collected 47–170 years ago, and successfully captured and sequenced mitochondrial DNA from every specimen, frequently recovering fragments with 10%–13% sequence divergence from the capture probe sequence. Phylogenetic results reveal deep genetic divergence among colugos, both within and between the islands of Borneo and Java, as well as between the Malay Peninsula and different Sundaic islands. Our method is based on noninvasive sampling of minute amounts of soft tissue material from museum specimens, leaving the original specimen essentially undamaged. This approach represents a paradigm shift away from standard PCR-based approaches for accessing population genetic and phylogenomic information from poorly known and difficult-to-study species. PMID:21880778

  9. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  10. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials for generation of reactive species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  11. Two-Photon or Higher-Order Absorbing Optical Materials for Generation of Reactive Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumpston, Brian (Inventor); Lipson, Matthew (Inventor); Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Perry, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed are highly efficient multiphoton absorbing compounds and methods of their use. The compounds generally include a bridge of pi-conjugated bonds connecting electron donating groups or electron accepting groups. The bridge may be substituted with a variety of substituents as well. Solubility, lipophilicity, absorption maxima and other characteristics of the compounds may be tailored by changing the electron donating groups or electron accepting groups, the substituents attached to or the length of the pi-conjugated bridge. Numerous photophysical and photochemical methods are enabled by converting these compounds to electronically excited states upon simultaneous absorption of at least two photons of radiation. The compounds have large two-photon or higher-order absorptivities such that upon absorption, one or more Lewis acidic species, Lewis basic species, radical species or ionic species are formed.

  12. Kinetic modeling and determination role of sono/photo nanocatalyst-generated radical species on degradation of hydroquinone in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Sajad; Ayati, Bita; Rezaee, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Experimental findings of sonophotocatalytic process were used in degradation of hydroquinone to assess kinetic modeling and determine the effect of various active radical species. First, the effects of three photocatalytic, sonocatalytic, and sonophotocatalytic processes were studied for hydroquinone removal to determine kinetic constants and calculate the activation energy of reactions, and then the selected process was evaluated to determine active radical species. The reactor was composed of two parts, one included ultrasonic probe (sonocatalytic part) with powers 22, 80, and 176 W and the second part was the location of UV lamp (photocatalytic part) with tubular flow and power 15 W. After three systems were examined and the efficient system was selected, the role of different active species such as hydroxyl radical (OH(·)), superoxide radical (O2 (·-)), hole (h(+)), electrons (e (-)), and single oxygen molecule ((1)O2) and contribution of each of them were determined in hydroquinone degradation. According to tests, the results of this study showed that sonophotocatalytic integrated method as selected system among three systems studied followed the first-order equation for hydroquinone degradation and active hydroxyl species with 45 % and electron and hole with 15 and 10 %, respectively, had the highest and lowest contributions to conversion of hydroquinone. The findings showed that dissolved oxygen increases the capability of active radical formation so that 28.2 % of hydroquinone removal was increased under aeration compared to without aeration. Also, removal efficiency decreased 62 % with N2 injection due to the withdrawal of oxygen from the sample. By adding 25 Mm of sodium azide (NaN3) to stock solution, 46.5 % reduction was developed because single oxygen ((1)O2) played the role of an active species. The advantages of integrated sonocatalytic and photocatalytic method are the generation of active radical species with more variety and ultimately

  13. In Vitro Activities of Ketoconazole, Econazole, Miconazole, and Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil against Malassezia Species

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, K. A.; Carson, C. F.; Riley, T. V.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ketoconazole, econazole, miconazole, and tea tree oil against 54 Malassezia isolates were determined by agar and broth dilution methods. Ketoconazole was more active than both econazole and miconazole, which showed very similar activities. M. furfur was the least susceptible species. M. sympodialis, M. slooffiae, M. globosa, and M. obtusa showed similar susceptibilities to the four agents. PMID:10639388

  14. Comparative Microbial Modules Resource: Generation and Visualization of Multi-species Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Ashley; Eichenberger, Patrick; Bonneau, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The increasing abundance of large-scale, high-throughput datasets for many closely related organisms provides opportunities for comparative analysis via the simultaneous biclustering of datasets from multiple species. These analyses require a reformulation of how to organize multi-species datasets and visualize comparative genomics data analyses results. Recently, we developed a method, multi-species cMonkey, which integrates heterogeneous high-throughput datatypes from multiple species to identify conserved regulatory modules. Here we present an integrated data visualization system, built upon the Gaggle, enabling exploration of our method's results (available at http://meatwad.bio.nyu.edu/cmmr.html). The system can also be used to explore other comparative genomics datasets and outputs from other data analysis procedures – results from other multiple-species clustering programs or from independent clustering of different single-species datasets. We provide an example use of our system for two bacteria, Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. We illustrate the use of our system by exploring conserved biclusters involved in nitrogen metabolism, uncovering a putative function for yjjI, a currently uncharacterized gene that we predict to be involved in nitrogen assimilation. PMID:22144874

  15. The Trichoptera barcode initiative: a strategy for generating a species-level Tree of Life.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Frandsen, Paul B; Holzenthal, Ralph W; Beet, Clare R; Bennett, Kristi R; Blahnik, Roger J; Bonada, Núria; Cartwright, David; Chuluunbat, Suvdtsetseg; Cocks, Graeme V; Collins, Gemma E; deWaard, Jeremy; Dean, John; Flint, Oliver S; Hausmann, Axel; Hendrich, Lars; Hess, Monika; Hogg, Ian D; Kondratieff, Boris C; Malicky, Hans; Milton, Megan A; Morinière, Jérôme; Morse, John C; Mwangi, François Ngera; Pauls, Steffen U; Gonzalez, María Razo; Rinne, Aki; Robinson, Jason L; Salokannel, Juha; Shackleton, Michael; Smith, Brian; Stamatakis, Alexandros; StClair, Ros; Thomas, Jessica A; Zamora-Muñoz, Carmen; Ziesmann, Tanja; Kjer, Karl M

    2016-09-01

    DNA barcoding was intended as a means to provide species-level identifications through associating DNA sequences from unknown specimens to those from curated reference specimens. Although barcodes were not designed for phylogenetics, they can be beneficial to the completion of the Tree of Life. The barcode database for Trichoptera is relatively comprehensive, with data from every family, approximately two-thirds of the genera, and one-third of the described species. Most Trichoptera, as with most of life's species, have never been subjected to any formal phylogenetic analysis. Here, we present a phylogeny with over 16 000 unique haplotypes as a working hypothesis that can be updated as our estimates improve. We suggest a strategy of implementing constrained tree searches, which allow larger datasets to dictate the backbone phylogeny, while the barcode data fill out the tips of the tree. We also discuss how this phylogeny could be used to focus taxonomic attention on ambiguous species boundaries and hidden biodiversity. We suggest that systematists continue to differentiate between 'Barcode Index Numbers' (BINs) and 'species' that have been formally described. Each has utility, but they are not synonyms. We highlight examples of integrative taxonomy, using both barcodes and morphology for species description.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'. PMID:27481793

  16. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namita; Patil, C. R.; Chaudhari, K. B.; Wagh, J. P.; Surana, S. J.; Jadhav, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes) are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA) Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE) (Ders.) Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects. PMID:21808540

  17. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover's Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  18. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover`s Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  19. 77 FR 16222 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generator...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generator... this action are private as well as State, Local, or Tribal Governments. Title: Generator Standards... Agency (EPA) has finalized an alternative set of generator requirements applicable to laboratories...

  20. Metabolism of a highly selective gelatinase inhibitor generates active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mijoon; Villegas-Estrada, Adriel; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Toth, Marta; Kreitinger, Gloria; Forbes, Christopher; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2007-11-01

    (4-Phenoxyphenylsulfonyl)methylthiirane (inhibitor 1) is a highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9), which is showing considerable promise in animal models for cancer and stroke. Despite demonstrated potent, selective, and effective inhibition of gelatinases both in vitro and in vivo, the compound is rapidly metabolized, implying that the likely activity in vivo is due to a metabolite rather than the compound itself. To this end, metabolism of inhibitor 1 was investigated in in vitro systems. Four metabolites were identified by LC/MS-MS and the structures of three of them were further validated by comparison with authentic synthetic samples. One metabolite, 4-(4-thiiranylmethanesulfonylphenoxy)phenol (compound 21), was generated by hydroxylation of the terminal phenyl group of 1. This compound was investigated in kinetics of inhibition of several matrix metalloproteinases. This metabolite was a more potent slow-binding inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) than the parent compound 1, but it also served as a slow-binding inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-14, the upstream activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2. PMID:17927722

  1. Improved catalytic activity of laser generated bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R K

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of silver nanoparticles, bimetallic (Al2O3@Ag) nanoparticles and trimetallic (Al2O3@AgAu) nanoparticles by nanosecond pulse laser ablation (PLA) in deionized water. Two-step laser ablation methodologies were adopted for the synthesis of bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles. In this method a silver or gold target was ablated in colloidal solution of γ-alumina nanoparticles prepared by PLA. The TEM image analysis of bimetallic and trimetallic particles reveals deposition of fine silver particles and Ag-Au alloy particles, respectively, on large alumina particles. The laser generated nanoparticles were tested for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and showed excellent catalytic behaviour. The catalytic rate was greatly improved by incorporation of additional metal in silver nanoparticles. The catalytic efficiency of trimetallic Al2O3@AgAu for reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was remarkably enhanced and the catalytic reaction was completed in just 5 sec. Even at very low concentration, both Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles and Al2O3@AgAu nanoparticles showed improved rate of catalytic reduction than monometallic silver nanoparticles. Our results demonstrate that alumina particles in the solution not only provide the active sites for particle dispersion but also improve the catalytic activity. PMID:25924343

  2. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) critical technology pre-development activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminou, Donny M. A.; Bézy, Jean Loup; Meynart, Roland; Blythe, Paul; Kraft, S.; Zayer, I.; Linder, M.; Falkner, M.; Luhmann, H. J.

    2009-09-01

    ESA and EUMETSAT have initiated joint preparatory activities for the formulation and definition of the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) geostationary system to ensure the future continuity, and enhancement, of the current Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) system. The MTG programmatics are being established to ensure a seamless transition between the conclusion of the successful MSG operational system and the start of the new MTG operational system, with particular emphasis on continuity of the imagery missions. The MTG phase A studies were successfully concluded in December 2008 an re-consolidation phase B1 activities continued from January to July 2009. They were devoted to the MTG concept definition and requirements consolidation for meeting the User needs in the field of Nowcasting and Very Short Term Weather Forecasting (NWC), Medium/Short Range global and regional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), Climate, Air Quality and Composition Monitoring. The following missions have been analysed, measurement techniques studied and preliminary concepts established: - High Resolution Fast Imagery Mission (improved successor to MSG SEVIRI HRV mission) - Full Disk High Spectral Resolution Imagery Mission (improved successor to SEVIRI) - Lightning Imagery Mission - IR Sounding Mission - UV-VIS-NIR Sounding Mission Both space segment architecture and preliminary satellite and instrument concepts were investigated in the course of these studies, and a dual satellite configuration established comprising the Imaging satellite (MTG-I) and the sounding satellite (MTG-S). The study covered all elements to a level of detail allowing to establish a technical baseline, conclude on the feasibility of the system requirements and undertake preliminary programmatic evaluation. Riders to the Phase A studies (Phase B1 work) have been placed to further consolidate the satellite and payload definition and development, prior to the release of the Invitation To Tender (ITT) for the full space

  3. Antiparasitic activity of prenylated benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ninoska; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Giménez, Alberto; Ruiz, Grace; Gutiérrez, David; Bourdy, Genevieve; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2009-03-01

    Fractionation of dichloromethane extracts from the leaves of Piper heterophyllum and P. aduncum afforded three prenylated hydroxybenzoic acids, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl)-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-13-hydroxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl]-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-14-hydroxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,15-hexadecatetraenyl]-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, along with the known compounds, 4,5-dihydroxy-3-(E,E,E-11-formyl-3,7,15-trimethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid (arieianal), 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(E,E,E-3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-(E,E,E-3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid, 3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-4-methoxy-benzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)benzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butenyl)-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)benzoic acid. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, including homo- and heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) and comparison with data reported in the literature. Riguera ester reactions and optical rotation measurements established the compounds as racemates. The antiparasitic activity of the compounds were tested against three strains of Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium falciparum. The results showed that 3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-4-methoxy-benzoic acid exhibited potent and selective activity against L. braziliensis (IC(50) 6.5 microg/ml), higher that pentamidine used as control. Moreover, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-3,7,15-trimethyl- 2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl)-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butenyl)-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)benzoic acid showed moderate antiplasmodial (IC(50) 3.2 microg/ml) and trypanocidal (16.5 microg/ml) activities, respectively. PMID:19361822

  4. Identification and characterization of a highly variable region in mitochondrial genomes of fusarium species and analysis of power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, Haider Mousa

    In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) project, power generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was analyzed looking for a novel system for both energy generation and sustainability. The results suggest the possibility of generating electricity from different organic substances, which include agricultural and industrial by-products. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates usable electrons at 30°C using both submerged and solid state cultures. In the MFC biocathode experiment, most of the CO2 generated at the anodic chamber was converted into bicarbonate due the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) of the Gluconobacter sp.33 strain. These findings demonstrate the possibility of generation of electricity while at the same time allowing the biomimetic sequestration of CO2 using bacterial CA. In the mitochondrial genomes project, the filamentous fungal species Fusarium oxysporum was used as a model. This species causes wilt of several important agricultural crops. A previous study revealed that a highly variable region (HVR) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of three species of Fusarium contained a large, variable unidentified open reading frame (LV-uORF). Using specific primers for two regions of the LV-uORF, six strains were found to contain the ORF by PCR and database searches identified 18 other strains outside of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. The LV-uORF was also identified in three isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex. Interestingly, several F. oxysporum isolates lack the LV-uORF and instead contain 13 ORFs in the HVR, nine of which are unidentified. The high GC content and codon usage of the LV-uORF indicate that it did not co-evolve with other mt genes and was horizontally acquired and was introduced to the Fusarium lineage prior to speciation. The nonsynonymous/synonymous (dN/dS) ratio of the LV-uORFs (0.43) suggests it is under purifying selection and the putative polypeptide is predicted to be located in the mitochondrial membrane. Growth assays

  5. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  6. Oxidative DNA adducts after Cu(2+)-mediated activation of dihydroxy PCBs: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Wendy A; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2009-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic industrial chemicals, complete carcinogens, and efficacious tumor promoters. However, the mechanism(s) of PCB-mediated carcinogenicity remains largely undefined. One likely pathway by which these agents may play a role in carcinogenesis is the generation of oxidative DNA damage by redox cycling of dihydroxylated PCB metabolites. We have now employed a new (32)P-postlabeling system to examine novel oxidative DNA lesions induced by Cu(2+)-mediated activation of PCB metabolites. (32)P postlabeling of DNA incubated with various PCB metabolites resulted in over a dozen novel polar oxidative DNA adducts that were chromatographically similar for all active agents. The most potent metabolites tested were the hydroquinones (hydroxyl groups arranged para to each other), yielding polar oxidative adduct levels ranging from 55 to 142 adducts/10(6) nucleotides. PCB catechols, or ortho-dihydroxy metabolites, were up to 40% less active than their corresponding hydroquinone congeners, whereas monohydroxylated and quinone metabolites did not produce detectable oxidative damage over that of vehicle. With the exception of 2,4,5-Cl-2',5'-dihydroxybiphenyl, this oxidative DNA damage seemed to be inversely related to chlorine content: no chlorine approximately mono->di->trichlorinated metabolites. Importantly, copper, but not iron, was essential for activation of the PCB metabolites to these polar oxidative DNA adducts, because in its absence or in the presence of the Cu(+)-specific scavenger bathocuproine, no adducts were detected. Intervention studies with known reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifiers suggested that H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide may also be involved in this PCB-mediated oxidative DNA damage. These data indicate a mechanistic role for several ROS, in addition to copper, in PCB-induced DNA damage and provide further support for oxidative DNA damage in PCB-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19233261

  7. Airborne particulate matter PM2.5 from Mexico City affects the generation of reactive oxygen species by blood neutrophils from asthmatics: an in vitro approach

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Vargas, Martha Patricia; Guzman-Grenfell, Alberto Martin; Blanco-Jimenez, Salvador; Sepulveda-Sanchez, Jose David; Bernabe-Cabanillas, Rosa Maria; Cardenas-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Ceballos, Guillermo; Hicks, Juan Jose

    2009-01-01

    Background The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is densely populated, and toxic air pollutants are generated and concentrated at a higher rate because of its geographic characteristics. It is well known that exposure to particulate matter, especially to fine and ultra-fine particles, enhances the risk of cardio-respiratory diseases, especially in populations susceptible to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fine particles on the respiratory burst of circulating neutrophils from asthmatic patients living in Mexico City. Methods In total, 6 subjects diagnosed with mild asthma and 11 healthy volunteers were asked to participate. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral venous blood and incubated with fine particles, and the generation of reactive oxygen species was recorded by chemiluminescence. We also measured plasma lipoperoxidation susceptibility and plasma myeloperoxidase and paraoxonase activities by spectrophotometry. Results Asthmatic patients showed significantly lower plasma paraoxonase activity, higher susceptibility to plasma lipoperoxidation and an increase in myeloperoxidase activity that differed significantly from the control group. In the presence of fine particles, neutrophils from asthmatic patients showed an increased tendency to generate reactive oxygen species after stimulation with fine particles (PM2.5). Conclusion These findings suggest that asthmatic patients have higher oxidation of plasmatic lipids due to reduced antioxidant defense. Furthermore, fine particles tended to increase the respiratory burst of blood human neutrophils from the asthmatic group. On the whole, increased myeloperoxidase activity and susceptibility to lipoperoxidation with a concomitant decrease in paraoxonase activity in asthmatic patients could favor lung infection and hence disrupt the control of asthmatic crises. PMID:19563660

  8. The Trichoptera barcode initiative: a strategy for generating a species-level Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Paul B.; Holzenthal, Ralph W.; Beet, Clare R.; Bennett, Kristi R.; Blahnik, Roger J.; Bonada, Núria; Cartwright, David; Chuluunbat, Suvdtsetseg; Cocks, Graeme V.; Collins, Gemma E.; deWaard, Jeremy; Dean, John; Flint, Oliver S.; Hausmann, Axel; Hendrich, Lars; Hess, Monika; Hogg, Ian D.; Kondratieff, Boris C.; Malicky, Hans; Milton, Megan A.; Morinière, Jérôme; Morse, John C.; Mwangi, François Ngera; Pauls, Steffen U.; Gonzalez, María Razo; Rinne, Aki; Robinson, Jason L.; Salokannel, Juha; Shackleton, Michael; Smith, Brian; Stamatakis, Alexandros; StClair, Ros; Thomas, Jessica A.; Zamora-Muñoz, Carmen; Ziesmann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding was intended as a means to provide species-level identifications through associating DNA sequences from unknown specimens to those from curated reference specimens. Although barcodes were not designed for phylogenetics, they can be beneficial to the completion of the Tree of Life. The barcode database for Trichoptera is relatively comprehensive, with data from every family, approximately two-thirds of the genera, and one-third of the described species. Most Trichoptera, as with most of life's species, have never been subjected to any formal phylogenetic analysis. Here, we present a phylogeny with over 16 000 unique haplotypes as a working hypothesis that can be updated as our estimates improve. We suggest a strategy of implementing constrained tree searches, which allow larger datasets to dictate the backbone phylogeny, while the barcode data fill out the tips of the tree. We also discuss how this phylogeny could be used to focus taxonomic attention on ambiguous species boundaries and hidden biodiversity. We suggest that systematists continue to differentiate between ‘Barcode Index Numbers’ (BINs) and ‘species’ that have been formally described. Each has utility, but they are not synonyms. We highlight examples of integrative taxonomy, using both barcodes and morphology for species description. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481793

  9. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  10. Benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species and their antiparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ninoska; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Giménez, Alberto; Ruiz, Grace; Gutiérrez, David; Bourdy, Genevieve; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2008-09-01

    Piper glabratum and P. acutifolium were analyzed for their content of main secondary constituents, affording nine new benzoic acid derivatives (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 10-13), in addition to four known compounds (3, 6, 8, and 9). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Riguera ester reactions and optical rotation measurements established the new compounds as racemates. In the search for antiparasitic agents, the compounds were evaluated in vitro against the promastigote forms of Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi, and Plasmodium falciparum. Among the evaluated compounds, methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(3'-methyl-2'-butenyl)benzoate (7) exhibited leishmanicidal effect (IC50 13.8-18.5 microg/mL) against the three Leishmania strains used, and methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutenyl)benzoate (1), methyl 4-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-3-butenyl)benzoate (3), and methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl) benzoate (7) showed significant trypanocidal activity, with IC50 values of 16.4, 15.6, and 18.5 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:18712933

  11. Women's income generation activities in Merowe Province, Northern State, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Pitamber, S; Osama, S

    1994-06-01

    Merowe province in rural northern Sudan has been divided into three local government council areas: Merowe, Karima, and Ed Debba. A government program was instituted to increase the welfare of residents and food production. A baseline survey of 490 respondents was conducted in order to ascertain how illiterate women viewed development in the area and to provide useful information for program design and implementation. Women from 24 villages were administered questionnaires, observed in their daily activities, and engaged in discussion in a local meeting place. Discussions were also held with members of the local Popular Committee. Demographic information was very sketchy about age, and 48% had no formal education in writing and reading. General reading and writing skills of the remainder were very poor. There were 500 female children and 502 male children, and the sex ratio varied among the 3 council areas. 52% were married and 14% were divorced or widowed and living with relatives. The average monthly income was from Ls. 700 to Ls. 3000 based on reports from only 59.3% of respondents. Most of the women had skills in food processing and 25.7% were skilled in handicrafts. Water was obtained primarily from local wells and not decontaminated before use. Pit latrines were the standard. One bathing facility was available in the compound for the entire council area. Health units were either in each village or within 20-30 minutes walk. Child mortality was 4.3% in Merowe province. 77 children 0-5 years old died out of a total of 1002 live births. Life expectancy was 41-50 years for women and 61-70 years for men. Cleanliness and healthful eating were observed. 58% owned no land; plots were under 5 feddans and usually half a feddan. 92.1% had no bank account and 90% had no experience with loans. 70.2% were indifferent about involvement in an income generation program. 26% were interested in part-time participation. Only 3.9% desired full-time participation. 8.6% said they

  12. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna).

    PubMed

    Takao, L K; Imatomi, M; Gualtieri, S C J

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum). Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI) by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract) and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL-1), with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL-1). The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24-8.75 µg·mL-1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants. PMID:26675912

  13. Catalase activity of different Candida species after exposition to specific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Natália R.S.; Unterkircher, Carmelinda S.; Shimizu, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Antisera were developed in rabbits after challenge with intracellular antigens of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. Microorganism catalase has been correlated with virulence, resistance to drugs and immunogenicity. The intracellular catalase is consistently present in strains of Candida and in this paper, the enzyme activity was analysed by PAGE after exposition to antisera. The catalases of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were immunogenic and differed in their binding to specific antibodies raised in rabbits. Tests of cross-reactivity between different Candida species showed that when antiserum from C. albicans immunized rabbit was incubated with intracellular extracts of these three Candida species, the catalases activities were abolished. However, the antisera from C. parapsilosis or C. tropicalis immunized rabbits did not affect the catalase activity of C. albicans; the enzyme of C. albicans was inactivated only by the antiserum to the catalase of own C. albicans. The antiserum to the catalase of C. tropicalis was species-specific and did not cross-react with catalases of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The activities of Aspergillus niger and bovine catalases were not affected by the antiserum from any Candida immunized rabbits. This report is a preliminary study of specific antisera that react against intracellular catalase of Candida sp. and neutralize the enzymatic activity. Further study is necessary to develop species-specific antibody once differences in the susceptibility of the Candida species to commonly used antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important. PMID:24031174

  14. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite. PMID:26070143

  15. Chemotherapeutic agents subvert tumor immunity by generating agonists of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Ocana, Jesus A; Harrison, Kathleen A; Ferracini, Matheus; Touloukian, Christopher E; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Sun, Louis; Loesch, Mathew; Murphy, Robert C; Althouse, Sandra K; Perkins, Susan M; Speicher, Paul J; Tyler, Douglas S; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress suppresses host immunity by generating oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R). Because many classical chemotherapeutic drugs induce reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated whether these drugs might subvert host immunity by activating PAF-R. Here, we show that PAF-R agonists are produced in melanoma cells by chemotherapy that is administered in vitro, in vivo, or in human subjects. Structural characterization of the PAF-R agonists induced revealed multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are generated nonenzymatically. In a murine model of melanoma, chemotherapeutic administration could augment tumor growth by a PAF-R-dependent process that could be blocked by treatment with antioxidants or COX-2 inhibitors or by depletion of regulatory T cells. Our findings reveal how PAF-R agonists induced by chemotherapy treatment can promote treatment failure. Furthermore, they offer new insights into how to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by blocking its heretofore unknown impact on PAF-R activation. PMID:25304264

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingyong; Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  17. The role of water and structure on the generation of reactive oxygen species in peptide/hypericin complexes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Márcia I; Silva, Emerson R; Jaques, Ygor M; Ferreira, Fabio F; Fileti, Eudes E; Alves, Wendel A

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid associates formed between peptide assemblies and fluorophores are attractive mainly because of their unique properties for biomedical applications. Recently, we demonstrated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by hypericin and their stability in excited states are enhanced upon conjugation with l,l-diphenylalanine microtubes (FF-MNTs). Although the detailed mechanisms responsible for improving the photophysical properties of ROS remain unclear, tentative hypotheses have suggested that the driving force is the growth of overall dipolar moments ascribed either to coupling between aligned H2O dipoles within the ordered structures or to the organization of hypericin molecules on peptide interfaces. To provide new insights on ROS activity in hypericin/FF-MNTs hybrids and further explore the role of water in this respect, we present results obtained from investigations on the behavior of these complexes organized into different crystalline arrangements. Specifically, we monitored and compared the photophysical performance of hypericin bound to FF-MNTs with peptides organized in both hexagonal (water-rich) and orthorhombic (water-free) symmetries. From a theoretical perspective, we present the results of new molecular dynamics simulations that highlight the distinct hypericin/peptide interaction at the interface of FF-MNTs for the different symmetries. As a conclusion, we propose that although water enhances photophysical properties, the organization induced by peptide structures and the availability of a hydrophobic environment surrounding the hypericin/peptide interface are paramount to optimizing ROS generation. The findings presented here provide useful basic research insights for designing peptide/fluorophore complexes with outstanding technological potential. PMID:24845629

  18. HEMIPARASITES GENERATE ENVIRONMENTAL HETEROGENEITY AND ENHANCE SPECIES COEXISTENCE IN SALT MARSHES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tidal inundation and salinity are considered to be controlling factors in salt marsh species distributions. Parasitic plants may also influence community organization as parasite – host interactions may play a functional role in stress amelioration due to physiological mechanisms for salinity toler...

  19. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  20. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  1. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Matheus P; Correa Soares, Juliana B R; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  2. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Abrogation of Oxaliplatin Activity by Cetuximab in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Valeria; Jia, Ruochen; Thompson, Hannah; Nijhuis, Anke; Jeffery, Rosemary; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Silver, Andrew R.; Hartley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antibody cetuximab, targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Clinical trials suggest reduced benefit from the combination of cetuximab with oxaliplatin. The aim of this study was to investigate potential negative interactions between cetuximab and oxaliplatin. Methods: Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Calcusyn software were used to characterize drug interactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction oxidative stress arrays identified genes regulating ROS production. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) measured signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) binding to dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) promoter. SW48, DLD-1 KRAS wild-type cell lines and DLD-1 xenograft models exposed to cetuximab, oxaliplatin, or oxaliplatin + cetuximab (control [saline]; n = 3 mice per treatment group) were used. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Cetuximab and oxaliplatin exhibited antagonistic effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activity reduced by 1.4-fold, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78 to 2.11, P = .003) as opposed to synergistic effects observed with the irinotecan metabolite 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). Although both oxaliplatin and SN-38 produced ROS, only oxaliplatin-mediated apoptosis was ROS dependent. Production of ROS by oxaliplatin was secondary to STAT1-mediated transcriptional upregulation of DUOX2 (3.1-fold, 95% CI = 1.75 to 2.41, P < .001). Inhibition of DUOX2 induction and p38 activation by cetuximab reduced oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Inhibition of STAT1 and DUOX2-mediated ROS generation by cetuximab impairs p38-dependent apoptosis by oxaliplatin in preclinical models and may contribute to reduced efficacy in clinical settings. Understanding the rationale for unexpected trial results will inform improved rationales for combining EGFR

  3. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Hannah M; Ungerer, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  4. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Hannah M.; Ungerer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia. Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius. We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  5. Characteristics of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Source for the Production of Active Nitrogen Species in III-V Nitride Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A simple analysis is provided to determine the characteristics of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source for the generation of active nitrogen species in the molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nitrides. The effects of reactor geometry, pressure, power, and flow rate on the dissociation efficiency and ion flux are presented. Pulsing the input power is proposed to reduce the ion flux.

  6. Activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on oxide supported Au catalysts.

    PubMed

    Widmann, D; Behm, R J

    2014-03-18

    Although highly dispersed Au catalysts with Au nanoparticles (NPs) of a few nanometers in diameter are well-known for their high catalytic activity for several oxidation and reduction reactions already at rather low temperatures for almost 30 years, central aspects of the reaction mechanism are still unresolved. While most studies focused on the active site, the active Au species, and the effect of the support material, the most crucial step during oxidation reactions, the activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the resulting active oxygen species (Oact), received more attention just recently. This is topic of this Account, which focuses on the formation, location, and nature of the Oact species present on metal oxide supported Au catalysts under typical reaction conditions, at room temperature and above. It is mainly based on quantitative temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor measurements, which different from most spectroscopic techniques are able to detect and quantify these species even at the extremely low concentrations present under realistic reaction conditions. Different types of pulse experiments were performed, during which the highly dispersed, realistic powder catalysts are exposed to very low amounts of reactants, CO and/or O2, in order to form and reactively remove Oact species and gain information on their formation, nature, and the active site for Oact formation. Our investigations have shown that the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 for reaction at 80 °C and higher is a highly stable atomic species, which at 80 °C is formed only at the perimeter of the Au-oxide interface and whose reactive removal by CO is activated, but not its formation. From these findings, it is concluded that surface lattice oxygen represents the Oact species for the CO oxidation. Accordingly, the CO oxidation proceeds via a Au-assisted Mars-van Krevelen mechanism, during which surface lattice oxygen close to the Au NPs is removed by reaction

  7. A species of human alpha interferon that lacks the ability to boost human natural killer activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ortaldo, J R; Herberman, R B; Harvey, C; Osheroff, P; Pan, Y C; Kelder, B; Pestka, S

    1984-01-01

    Most species of recombinant leukocyte interferons (IFN-alpha A, -alpha B, -alpha C, -alpha D, -alpha F, -alpha I, and -alpha K) were capable of boosting human natural killer (NK) activity after a 2-hr treatment of cells at a concentration of 1-80 units/ml. In contrast, recombinant human IFN-alpha J was found to be incapable of augmenting NK activity after exposure of cells for 2 hr to concentrations as high as 10,000 units/ml. This inability of IFN-alpha J to boost NK activity was not complete because, after exposure of cells to a high concentration of IFN-alpha J (10,000 units/ml) for 18 hr, boosting of cytolysis was observed. IFN-alpha J appeared to interact with receptors for IFN on NK cells since it was found to interfere with the boosting of NK activity by other species of IFN-alpha. In contrast to its deficient ability to augment NK activity, IFN-alpha J has potent antiviral and antiproliferative activities. Such extensive dissociation of these biological activities has not been observed previously with any other natural or recombinant IFN species. Thus, this IFN species may be useful for evaluating the relative importance of various biological activities on the therapeutic effects of IFN, for understanding structure-function relationships, and for determining the biochemical pathways related to the various biological effects of IFN. PMID:6589637

  8. Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations

    PubMed Central

    San-Jose, Luis M.; Peñalver-Alcázar, Miguel; Milá, Borja; Gonzalez-Jimena, Virginia; Fitze, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Rock-paper-scissors (RPS) dynamics, which maintain genetic polymorphisms over time through negative frequency-dependent (FD) selection, can evolve in short-lived species with no generational overlap, where they produce rapid morph frequency cycles. However, most species have overlapping generations and thus, rapid RPS dynamics are thought to require stronger FD selection, the existence of which yet needs to be proved. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two cumulative selective episodes, FD sexual selection reinforced by FD selection on offspring survival, generate sufficiently strong selection to generate rapid morph frequency cycles in the European common lizard Zootoca vivipara, a multi-annual species with major generational overlap. These findings show that the conditions required for the evolution of RPS games are fulfilled by almost all species exhibiting genetic polymorphisms and suggest that RPS games may be responsible for the maintenance of genetic diversity in a wide range of species. PMID:24943372

  9. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen ( 1O 2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  10. Cellular reprogramming in farm animals: an overview of iPSC generation in the mammalian farm animal species.

    PubMed

    Ogorevc, J; Orehek, S; Dovč, P

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines has been successful in mouse and human, but not in farm animals. Development of direct reprogramming technology offers an alternative approach for generation of pluripotent stem cells, applicable also in farm animals. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent practically limitless, ethically acceptable, individuum-specific source of pluripotent cells that can be generated from different types of somatic cells. iPSCs can differentiate to all cell types of an organism's body and have a tremendous potential for numerous applications in medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. However, molecular mechanisms behind the reprogramming process remain largely unknown and hamper generation of bona fide iPSCs and their use in human clinical practice. Large animal models are essential to expand the knowledge obtained on rodents and facilitate development and validation of transplantation therapies in preclinical studies. Additionally, transgenic animals with special traits could be generated from genetically modified pluripotent cells, using advanced reproduction techniques. Despite their applicative potential, it seems that iPSCs in farm animals haven't received the deserved attention. The aim of this review was to provide a systematic overview on iPSC generation in the most important mammalian farm animal species (cattle, pig, horse, sheep, goat, and rabbit), compare protein sequence similarity of pluripotency-related transcription factors in different species, and discuss potential uses of farm animal iPSCs. Literature mining revealed 32 studies, describing iPSC generation in pig (13 studies), cattle (5), horse (5), sheep (4), goat (3), and rabbit (2) that are summarized in a concise, tabular format. PMID:26900466

  11. In-situ Raman spectroscopy of electrically generated species in fullerene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Siobhan B.; O'Connell, Barry S.; Farrell, Garrett F.; Chambers, Gordon; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2003-03-01

    Organic materials have, in recent decades, been shown to be insulators, semiconductors, or even metallic when doped and the prospect of cheap, easily fabricated devices has attracted much interest. Primitive devices have been demonstrated and yet potentially competitive performance has been limited to polymer light emitting diodes. The recent report that lattice expanded C60 single crystals can be made superconducting, with a transition temperature of 117K, by the injection of charge via a FET type geometry has once again highlighted the potential of C60 in the development of molecular electronic devices. In light of the aforementioned report it is essential that a true understanding of the inter- and intramolecular processes in terms of their contribution to the electronic transport be obtained. In this study the current voltage characteristics of C60 thin film sandwich structures fabricated by vacuum deposition on indium tin oxide (ITO) with an aluminium top electrode are presented and discussed. A strongly non-linear behavior and a sharp increase in the device conductivity was observed at relatively low voltages (~2V), at both room and low temperatures (20K). At room temperature the system is seen to collapse, and in situ Raman measurements indicate a solid state reduction of the fullerene thin film to form a polymeric state. The high conductivity state was seen to be stable at elevated voltages and low temperatures. This state is seen to be reversible with the application of high voltages. At these high voltages the C60 film was seen to sporadically emit white light at randomly localized points analogous to the much documented electroluminescence in single crystals. Moreover the evidence suggests that this highly conducting species maybe similar in nature to a high intensity optically excited species. It is further speculated that the species recently reported in the superconducting lattice expanded C60 single crystals may also be analogous to the highly

  12. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Beilei; Liu, Wei; Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-04-19

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  13. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  14. In vitro activity of Rutaceae species against the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Mafezoli, J; Vieira, P C; Fernandes, J B; da Silva, M F; de Albuquerque, S

    2000-11-01

    The activity of crude plant extracts of nine species of Rutaceae against the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated at 4 mg/ml. Thirty-two crude extracts were tested and eight of them showed significant activity (>80%). The most active extract was obtained from the stems of Pilocarpus spicatus (97.3%). Fractionation of the active crude extracts provided 25 fractions which were tested against the trypomastigote form of T. cruzi at 2 mg/ml. Of these six showed significant activity (>80%). The most active fractions (100%) were obtained from the leaves of Almeidea coerulea (butanol fraction) and Conchocarpus inopinatus (dichloromethane fraction). PMID:11025175

  15. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26185755

  16. Survival of selected bacterial species in sterilized activated carbon filters and biological activated carbon filters.

    PubMed Central

    Rollinger, Y; Dott, W

    1987-01-01

    The survival of selected hygienically relevant bacterial species in activated carbon (AC) filters on a bench scale was investigated. The results revealed that after inoculation of the test strains the previously sterilized AC absorbed all bacteria (10(6) to 10(7)). After a period of 6 to 13 days without countable bacteria in the effluent, the numbers of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas putida increased up to 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml of effluent and 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g of AC. When Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis were used, no growth in filters could be observed. The numbers of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida, however, decreased immediately and showed no regrowth in nonsterile AC from a filter which had been continuously connected to running tap water for 2 months. Under these conditions an autochthonous microflora developed on the carbon surface which could be demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and culturing methods (heterotrophic plate count). These bacteria reduced E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida densities in the effluent by a factor of more than 10(5) within 1 to 5 days. The hypothesis that antagonistic substances of the autochthonous microflora were responsible for the elimination of the artificial contamination could not be confirmed because less than 1% of the isolates of the autochthonous microflora were able to produce such substances as indicated by in vitro tests. Competition for limiting nutrients was thought to be the reason for the observed effects. PMID:3579281

  17. EFFECTS OF A 'CLEAN' COAL-FIRED POWER GENERATING STATION ON FOUR COMMON WISCONSIN LICHEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algal plasmolysis percentages and other morphological characteristics of Parmelia bolliana, P. caperata, P. rudecta, and Physicia millegrana were compared for specimens growing near to and far from a rural coal-fired generating station in south central Wisconsin. SO2 levels were ...

  18. Effect of plasma jet diameter on the efficiency of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kakuta, Maito; Furuta, Hiroshi; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-06-01

    The plasma jet generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in solution is important in biology, medicine, and disinfection. Studies using a wide variety of plasma jet devices have been carried out for this purpose, making it difficult to compare the performance between devices. In this study, we compared the efficiency of RONS generation in deionized (DI) water between 3.7-mm- and 800-µm-sized helium (He) plasma jets (hereafter mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively) at different treatment distances and times. The efficiency of RONS generation was determined by considering the total amount of RONS generated in DI water with respect to the input energy and gas consumption. We found that the mm-jet generated 20% more RONS in the DI water than the µm-jet at the optimized distance. However, when the input power and He gas consumption were taken into account, we discovered that the µm-jet was 5 times more efficient in generating RONS in the DI water. Under the parameters investigated in this study, the concentration of RONS continued to increase as a function of treatment time (up to 30 min). However treatment distance had a marked effect on the efficiency of RONS generation: treatment distances of 25 and 30 mm were optimal for the mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively. Our method of comparing the efficiency of RONS generation in solution between plasma jets could be used as a reference protocol for the development of efficient plasma jet sources for use in medicine, biology, and agriculture.

  19. Mental Arithmetic Activates Analogic Representations of Internally Generated Sums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallai, Arava Y.; Schunn, Christian D.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    The internal representation of numbers generated during calculation has received little attention. Much of the mathematics learning literature focuses on symbolic retrieval of math facts; in contrast, we critically test the hypothesis that internally generated numbers are represented analogically, using an approximate number system. In an fMRI…

  20. Activating Generative Learning in Organizations through Optimizing Relational Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mary Kay

    2010-01-01

    Using a grounded theory method, this dissertation seeks to discover how relationships impact organizational generative learning. An organization is a socially constructed reality and organizational learning is situated in the process of co-participation. To discover the link between relationships and generative learning this study considers the…

  1. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  2. Characterization of self-generated variants in Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica biofilm with increased antifouling activities.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Guo, Xing-Pan; Li, Baiyuan; Wang, Pengxia; Cai, Xingsheng; Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si; Yang, Jin-Long; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-12-01

    Pseudoalteromonas is widespread in various marine environments, and most strains can affect invertebrate larval settlement and metamorphosis by forming biofilms. However, the impact and the molecular basis of population diversification occurring in Pseudoalteromonas biofilms are poorly understood. Here, we show that morphological diversification is prevalent in Pseudoalteromonas species during biofilm formation. Two types of genetic variants, wrinkled (frequency of 12±5%) and translucent (frequency of 5±3%), were found in Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica biofilms. The inducing activities of biofilms formed by the two variants on larval settlement and metamorphosis of the mussel Mytilus coruscus were significantly decreased, suggesting strong antifouling activities. Using whole-genome re-sequencing combined with genetic manipulation, two genes were identified to be responsible for the morphology alternations. A nonsense mutation in AT00_08765 led to a wrinkled morphology due to the overproduction of cellulose, whereas a point mutation in AT00_17125 led to a translucent morphology via a reduction in capsular polysaccharide production. Taken together, the results suggest that the microbial behavior on larval settlement and metamorphosis in marine environment could be affected by the self-generated variants generated during the formation of marine biofilms, thereby rendering potential application in biocontrol of marine biofouling. PMID:26264135

  3. Functional implications of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generated by oncogenic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Between 15–20% of human cancers are associated with infection by oncogenic viruses. Oncogenic viruses, including HPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV-1, target mitochondria to influence cell proliferation and survival. Oncogenic viral gene products also trigger the production of reactive oxygen species which can elicit oxidative DNA damage and potentiate oncogenic host signaling pathways. Viral oncogenes may also subvert mitochondria quality control mechanisms such as mitophagy and metabolic adaptation pathways to promote virus replication. Here, we will review recent progress on viral regulation of mitophagy and metabolic adaptation and their roles in viral oncogenesis. PMID:25580106

  4. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  5. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  6. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron-Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Daifuku, Stephanie L; Kneebone, Jared L; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Neidig, Michael L

    2015-09-01

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η(6)-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)-SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings. PMID:26266698

  7. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron–Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron–SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron–SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η6-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)–SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki–Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings. PMID:26266698

  8. Emotion at Work: A Contribution to Third-Generation Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    Second-generation cultural-historical activity theory, which drew its inspiration from Leont'ev's work, constituted an advance over Vygotsky's first-generation theory by explicitly articulating the dialectical relation between individual and collective. As part of an effort to develop third-generation-historical activity theory, I propose in this…

  9. Julius Caesar Scaliger on plant generation and the question of species constancy.

    PubMed

    Blank, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The sixteenth-century physician and philosopher Julius Caesar Scaliger combines the view that living beings are individuated by a single substantial form with the view that the constituents of the organic body retain their identity due to the continued existence and operation of their own substantial forms. This essay investigates the implications of Scaliger's account of subordinate and dominant substantial forms for the question of the constancy of biological species. According to Scaliger, biological mutability involves not only change on the ontological level of accidents but, in some cases, also change on the level of substantial forms. While he shares the received view that substantial forms themselves cannot undergo change, he maintains that relations of domination and subordination between substantial forms can undergo change. He uses his theory of how such changes can occur to explain cases of revertible plant degeneration. Moreover, in his view plants that belong to previously unknown biological species can emerge from changes in the relations between the many forms contained in plant seeds. PMID:20695395

  10. The study of gas species on THz generation from laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, YiJian; Wu, Tong; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2015-08-01

    Intense Terahertz waves generated from air-induced plasma and serving as broadband THz source provide a promising broadband source for innovative technology. Terahertz generation in selected gases has attracted more and more researchers' interests in recent years. In this research, the THz emission from different atoms is described, such as nitrogen, argon and helium in Michelson. The THz radiation is detected by a Golay Cell equipped with a 6-mm-diameter diamond-inputting window. It can be seen in the first time that when the pump power lies at a stable level, the THz generation created by the femtosecond laser focusing on the nitrogen is higher than which focusing on the helium, and lower than that produced in the argon gas environment. We believe that the THz intensity is Ar > N > Ne because of its atomic mass, which is Ar > N > Ne as well. It is clear that the Gas molecular decides the release of free electrons ionized from ultra short femtosecond laser through the electronic dynamic analysis. The higher the gas mass is, the stronger the terahertz emission will be. We further explore the THz emission at the different laser power levels, and the experimental results can be commendably quadratic fitted. It can be inferred that THz emission under different gas medium environment still complies with the law of four-wave mixing (FWM) process and has nothing to do with the gas environment: the radiation energy is proportional to the quadratic of incident laser power.

  11. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  12. Salinity effects on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of three Perkinsus species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La, Peyre M.; Casas, S.; La, Peyre J.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the range of conditions in which many Perkinsus species may proliferate, making it difficult to predict conditions favorable for their expansion, to identify conditions inducing mortality, or to identify instances of potential cross-infectivity among sympatric host species. In this study, the effects of salinity on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki were determined. Specifically, this research examined the effects of 5 salinities (7, 11, 15, 25, 35???), (1) without acclimation, on the viability and metabolic activity of 2 isolates of each Perkinsus species, and (2) with acclimation, on the viability, metabolic activity, size and number of 1 isolate of each species. P. chesapeaki showed the widest range of salinity tolerance of the 3 species, with high viability and cell proliferation at all salinities tested. Although P. chesapeaki originated from low salinity areas (i.e. <15???), several measures (i.e. cell number and metabolic activity) indicated that higher salinities (15, 25???) were more favorable for its growth. P. olseni, originating from high salinity areas, had better viability and proliferation at the higher salinities (15, 25, 35???). Distinct differences in acute salinity response of the 2 P. olseni isolates at lower salinities (7, 11???), however, suggest the need for a more expansive comparison of isolates to better define the lower salinity tolerance. Lastly, P. marinus was more tolerant of the lower salinities (7 and 11???) than P. olseni, but exhibited reduced viability at 7???, even after acclimation. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  13. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen. PMID:23496653

  14. UV Light-Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Antimicrobial Properties of Cellulose Fabric Modified by 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone Tetracarboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Aiqin; Feng, Guanchen; Zhuo, Jingyuan; Sun, Gang

    2015-12-23

    3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA) could directly react with hydroxyl groups on cellulose to form ester bonds. The modified cotton fabrics not only provided good wrinkle-free and ultraviolet (UV) protective functions, but also exhibited important photochemical properties such as producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under UV light exposure. The amounts of the produced hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide were measured, and photochemical reactive mechanism of the BPTCA treated cellulose was discussed. The results reveal that the fabrics possess good washing durability in generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The cotton fabrics modified with different concentrations of BPTCA and cured at an elevated temperature demonstrated excellent antimicrobial activities, which provided 99.99% antibacterial activities against both E. coli and S. aureus. The advanced materials have potential applications in medical textiles and biological material fields. PMID:26636826

  15. Combining Next-Generation Sequencing Strategies for Rapid Molecular Resource Development from an Invasive Aphid Species, Aphis glycines

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wei; Orantes, Lucia; Jun, Tae-Hwan; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Mian, M. A. Rouf; Michel, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aphids are one of the most important insect taxa in terms of ecology, evolutionary biology, genetics and genomics, and interactions with endosymbionts. Additionally, many aphids are serious pest species of agricultural and horticultural plants. Recent genetic and genomic research has expanded molecular resources for many aphid species, including the whole genome sequencing of the pea aphid, Acrythosiphon pisum. However, the invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, lacks in any significant molecular resources. Methodology/Principal Findings Two next-generation sequencing technologies (Roche-454 and Illumina GA-II) were used in a combined approach to develop both transcriptomic and genomic resources, including expressed genes and molecular markers. Over 278 million bp were sequenced among the two methods, resulting in 19,293 transcripts and 56,688 genomic sequences. From this data set, 635 SNPs and 1,382 microsatellite markers were identified. For each sequencing method, different soybean aphid biotypes were used which revealed potential biotype specific markers. In addition, we uncovered 39,822 bp of sequence that were related to the obligatory endosymbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, as well as sequences that suggest the presence of Hamiltonella defensa, a facultative endosymbiont. Conclusions and Significance Molecular resources for an invasive, non-model aphid species were generated. Additionally, the power of next-generation sequencing to uncover endosymbionts was demonstrated. The resources presented here will complement ongoing molecular studies within the Aphididae, including the pea aphid whole genome, lead to better understanding of aphid adaptation and evolution, and help provide novel targets for soybean aphid control. PMID:20614011

  16. NADPH Oxidase-dependent Generation of Lysophosphatidylserine Enhances Clearance of Activated and Dying Neutrophils via G2A*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, S. Courtney; Berry, Karin Zemski; Fernandez-Boyanapalli, Ruby; Jin, Hyun-Sun; Leslie, Christina; Henson, Peter M.; Murphy, Robert C.; Bratton, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    Exofacial phosphatidylserine (PS) is an important ligand mediating apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes. Oxidation of PS fatty acyl groups (oxPS) during apoptosis reportedly mediates recognition through scavenger receptors. Given the oxidative capacity of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase, we sought to identify oxPS signaling species in stimulated neutrophils. Using mass spectrometry analysis, only trace amounts of previously characterized oxPS species were found. Conversely, 18:1 and 18:0 lysophosphatidylserine (lyso-PS), known bioactive signaling phospholipids, were identified as abundant modified PS species following activation of the neutrophil oxidase. NADPH oxidase inhibitors blocked the production of lyso-PS in vitro, and accordingly, its generation in vivo by activated, murine neutrophils during zymosan-induced peritonitis was absent in mice lacking a functional NADPH oxidase (gp91phox-/-). Treatment of macrophages with lyso-PS enhanced the uptake of apoptotic cells in vitro, an effect that was dependent on signaling via the macrophage G2A receptor. Similarly, endogenously produced lyso-PS also enhanced the G2A-mediated uptake of activated PS-exposing (but non-apoptotic) neutrophils, raising the possibility of non-apoptotic mechanisms for removal of inflammatory cells during resolution. Finally, antibody blockade of G2A signaling in vivo prolonged zymosan-induced neutrophilia in wild-type mice, whereas having no effect in gp91phox-/- mice where lyso-PS are not generated. Taken together, we show that lyso-PS are modified PS species generated following activation of the NADPH oxidase and lyso-PS signaling through the macrophage G2A functions to enhance existing receptor/ligand systems for optimal resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:18824544

  17. Determination of the antibiofilm, antiadhesive, and anti-MRSA activities of seven Salvia species

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bakri, Amal G.; Othman, Ghadeer; Afifi, Fatma U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several Salvia species are indigenous to Jordan and are widely used as beverages and spices and for their medicinal properties. The objective of the study was to establish the antimicrobial activities, including the antiadhesive and antibiofilm effects of seven different Salvia species. Materials and Methods: Methods used for planktonic culture included agar diffusion, broth microdilution, and minimal biocidal concentration determination while viable count was used for the determination of the antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities. Overnight cultures of reference strains of Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus and clinical strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were used as test microorganisms. Results: An antimicrobial activity toward planktonic cultures demonstrated a significant bacteriocidal activity (≥4 log cycle reduction) for the S. triloba extract against S. aureus including MRSA. Its volatile oil exhibited an antimicrobial activity covering all tested microorganisms with the exception of P. aeruginosa. S. triloba extract and volatile oil were successful in preventing and controlling the biofilm, demonstrating antiadhesion and antibiofilm activities, respectively. Conclusion: These reported activities for S. triloba extract and volatile oil allows their listing as potential antibiofilm and anti-MRSA natural agents. This might suggest their use as an antiseptic in the prophylaxis and treatment of S. aureus-associated skin infections. The antimicrobial activity of the other tested Salvia species was negligible. PMID:21120026

  18. Contributions of reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in arsenite-stimulated hemeoxygenase-1 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu

    2007-01-15

    Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. HO-1 has cytoprotective activities and arsenite is a potent inducer of HO-1 in many cell types and tissues, including epidermal keratinocytes. We investigated the potential contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation to arsenite-dependent regulation of HO-1 in HaCaT cells, an immortalized human keratinocyte line. Both epidermal growth factor (EGF) and arsenite stimulated ROS production was detected by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining and fluorescence microscopy. Arsenite induced HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, while HO-1 expression in response to EGF was modest and evident at extended time points (48-72 h). Inhibition of EGF receptor, MEK I/II or Src decreased arsenite-stimulated HO-1 expression by 20-30%. In contrast, addition of a superoxide scavenger or inhibition of p38 activity decreased the arsenite-dependent response by 80-90% suggesting that ROS and p38 are required for HO-1 induction. However, ROS generation alone was insufficient for the observed arsenite-dependent response as use of a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system to generate ROS did not produce an equivalent upregulation of HO-1. Cooperation between ERK signaling and ROS generation was demonstrated by synergistic induction of HO-1 in cells co-treated with EGF and xanthine/xanthine oxidase resulting in a response nearly equivalent to that observed with arsenite. These findings suggest that the ERK/MAPK activation is necessary but not sufficient for optimal arsenite-stimulated HO-1 induction. The robust and persistent upregulation of HO-1 may have a role in cellular adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  20. Meteorological influences on stemflow generation across diameter size classes of two morphologically distinct deciduous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stan, John T.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Levia, Delphis F.

    2014-12-01

    Many tree species have been shown to funnel substantial rainfall to their stem base as stemflow flux, given a favorable stand structure and storm conditions. As stemflow is a spatially concentrated flux, prior studies have shown its impact on ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes can be significant. Less work has been performed examining stemflow variability from meteorological conditions compared to canopy structural traits. As such, this study performs multiple regressions: (1) to examine stemflow variability due to event-based rainfall amount, intensity, mean wind speeds, and vapor pressure deficit; (2) across three diameter size classes (10-20, 21-40, and >41 cm DBH); and (3) for two common tree species in the northeastern USA of contrasting canopy morphology— Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) versus Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech). On the whole, multiple regression results yielded significant positive correlations with stemflow for rainfall amount, intensity, and mean wind speed and a significant negative correlation for vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Tree size altered stemflow-meteorological condition relationships, where larger trees strengthened indirect stemflow-VPD and direct stemflow-rainfall and stemflow-intensity associations. Canopies of rougher bark and lower branch angle (represented by L. tulipifera) enhanced correlations for nearly all meteorological conditions via greater stemflow residence time (and longer exposure to meteorological conditions). Multiple regressions performed on leafless canopy stemflow resulted in an inverse relationship with wind speeds, likely decoupling stemflow sheltered solely on bark surfaces from VPD influences. Leaf presence generally increased direct stemflow associations with rainfall intensity, yet diminished stemflow-rainfall relationships. F. grandifolia canopies (exemplifying structures of smoother bark and greater branch angle) strengthened differences in stemflow associations with

  1. Meteorological influences on stemflow generation across diameter size classes of two morphologically distinct deciduous species.

    PubMed

    Van Stan, John T; Van Stan, Jarrad H; Levia, Delphis F

    2014-12-01

    Many tree species have been shown to funnel substantial rainfall to their stem base as stemflow flux, given a favorable stand structure and storm conditions. As stemflow is a spatially concentrated flux, prior studies have shown its impact on ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes can be significant. Less work has been performed examining stemflow variability from meteorological conditions compared to canopy structural traits. As such, this study performs multiple regressions: (1) to examine stemflow variability due to event-based rainfall amount, intensity, mean wind speeds, and vapor pressure deficit; (2) across three diameter size classes (10-20, 21-40, and >41 cm DBH); and (3) for two common tree species in the northeastern USA of contrasting canopy morphology--Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) versus Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech). On the whole, multiple regression results yielded significant positive correlations with stemflow for rainfall amount, intensity, and mean wind speed and a significant negative correlation for vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Tree size altered stemflow-meteorological condition relationships, where larger trees strengthened indirect stemflow-VPD and direct stemflow-rainfall and stemflow-intensity associations. Canopies of rougher bark and lower branch angle (represented by L. tulipifera) enhanced correlations for nearly all meteorological conditions via greater stemflow residence time (and longer exposure to meteorological conditions). Multiple regressions performed on leafless canopy stemflow resulted in an inverse relationship with wind speeds, likely decoupling stemflow sheltered solely on bark surfaces from VPD influences. Leaf presence generally increased direct stemflow associations with rainfall intensity, yet diminished stemflow-rainfall relationships. F. grandifolia canopies (exemplifying structures of smoother bark and greater branch angle) strengthened differences in stemflow associations with

  2. Deconvoluting Mixtures ofEmissions Sources to Investigate PM2.5's Ability to Generate Reactive Oxygen Species and its Associations with Cardiorespiratory Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Bates, J.; Abrams, J.; Verma, V.; Fang, T.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) inhalation can catalytically generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of the body's antioxidant capacity, leading to oxidative stress and ultimately adverse health. PM2.5 emissions from different sources vary widely in chemical composition, with varied effects on the body. Here, the ability of mixtures of different sources of PM2.5 to generate ROS and associations of this capability with acute health effects were investigated. A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay that integrates over different sources was used to quantify ROS generation potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in Atlanta from June 2012 - June 2013. PM2.5 source impacts, estimated using the Chemical Mass Balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles, were related to DTT activity using a linear regression model, which provided information on intrinsic DTT activity (i.e., toxicity) of each source. The model was then used to develop a time series of daily DTT activity over a ten-year period (1998-2010) for use in an epidemiologic study. Light-duty gasoline vehicles exhibited the highest intrinsic DTT activity, followed by biomass burning and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Biomass burning contributed the largest fraction to total DTT activity, followed by gasoline and diesel vehicles (45%, 20% and 14%, respectively). These results suggest the importance of aged oxygenated organic aerosols and metals in ROS generation. Epidemiologic analyses found significant associations between estimated DTT activity and emergency department visits for congestive heart failure and asthma/wheezing attacks in the 5-county Atlanta area. Estimated DTT activity was the only pollutant measure out of PM2.5, O3, and PM2.5 constituents elemental carbon and organic carbon) that exhibited a significant link to congestive heart failure. In two-pollutant models, DTT activity was significantly associated with asthma/wheeze and congestive heart failure while PM2

  3. Generation of Benzyne Species from Diphenylphosphoryl Derivatives: Simultaneous Exchange of Three Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Gorobets, Evgueni; Parvez, Masood; Derksen, Darren J; Keay, Brian A

    2016-06-13

    Interaction of (2-diphenylphosphoryl-3-iodo-4-methoxy-phenyl) methanol with NaH in DMF at ambient temperature results in the generation of benzyne intermediates that can be trapped by furan or DMF. Trapping with DMF forms 3-(dimethylaminomethyl)-2-hydroxy-6-methoxybenzaldehyde demonstrating the simultaneous exchange of three functionalities in a single step. The presence of the alkoxy substituent adjacent to iodine is critical for high regioselectivity addition of DMF. The corresponding bromide or triflate can be used in place of the iodide with equal efficiency. This methodology was used to synthesize the reported structure of gigasol and leading to a structural reassignment of this biscoumarin natural product. PMID:27144945

  4. Effects of a clean coal-fired power generating station on four common Wisconsin lichen species

    SciTech Connect

    Will-Wolf, S.

    1980-01-01

    Algal plasmolysis percentages and other morphological characteristics of Parmelia bolliana Muell. Arg., P. caperata (L.) Ach., P. rudecta Ach., and Physcia millegrana Degel. were compared for specimens growing near to and far from a rural coal-fired generating station in south central Wisconsin. SO/sup 2/ levels were 389 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, maximum 1 hr level, and 5-9 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, annual averages. Parmelia bolliana and P. caperata showed evidence of morphological alterations near the station; P. rudecta and Physcia millegrana did not.

  5. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2−), hydroxyl radical (HO·), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO· (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma. PMID:25715710

  6. Fucoidan protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via normalization of reactive oxygen species generation through the Ca²⁺-dependent ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Qingfa; Liang, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) and it is the main cause of loss of vision. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of marine organisms has intensified. The effect of fucoidan from the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus on the molecular mechanisms of numerous diseases has been studied, while to date, its effect on DR was yet to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of fucoidan in DR. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE‑19 was exposed to high D‑glucose in the presence or absence of fucoidan. Cell viability was monitored using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Ca2+ influx was measured with a calcium imaging system and the activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) protein was evaluated using western blot analysis. The non‑toxic fucoidan protected ARPE‑19 cells from high glucose‑induced cell death and normalized high glucose‑induced generation of ROS. Fucoidan also inhibited high glucose‑induced cell apoptosis, as well as the Ca2+ influx and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in ARPE‑19 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that fucoidan protects ARPE‑19 cells against high glucose‑induced oxidative damage via normalization of ROS generation through the Ca2+‑dependent ERK signaling pathway. PMID:25606812

  7. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radical (HO.), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO. (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma.

  8. 20 CFR 667.262 - Are employment generating activities, or similar activities, allowable under WIA title I?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... generating activities, or similar activities, allowable under WIA title I? (a) Under WIA section 181(e), WIA... associations (such as chambers of commerce); joint labor management committees, labor associations, and.... 181(e).)...

  9. Exposure of Chlorpromazine to 266 nm Laser Beam Generates New Species with Antibacterial Properties: Contributions to Development of a New Process for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pascu, Mihail Lucian; Danko, Balazs; Martins, Ana; Jedlinszki, Nikoletta; Alexandru, Tatiana; Nastasa, Viorel; Boni, Mihai; Militaru, Andra; Andrei, Ionut Relu; Staicu, Angela; Hunyadi, Attila; Fanning, Seamus; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Phenothiazines when exposed to white light or to UV radiation undergo a variety of reactions that result in degradation of parental compound and formation of new species. This process is slow and may be sped up with exposure to high energy light such as that produced by a laser. Methods Varying concentrations of Chlorpromazine Hydrochloride (CPZ) (2–20 mg/mL in distilled water) were exposed to 266 nm laser beam (time intervals: 1–24 hrs). At distinct intervals the irradiation products were evaluated by spectrophotometry between 200–1500 nm, Thin Layer Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) - Diode Array Detection, HPLC tandem mass spectrometry, and for activity against the CPZ sensitive test organism Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Results CPZ exposure to 266 nm laser beam of given energy levels yielded species, whose number increased with duration of exposure. Although the major species produced were Promazine (PZ), hydroxypromazine or PZ sulfoxide, and CPZ sulfoxide, over 200 compounds were generated with exposure of 20 mg/mL of CPZ for 24 hrs. Evaluation of the irradiation products indicated that the bioactivity against the test organism increased despite the total disappearance of CPZ, that is due, most probably, to one or more new species that remain yet unidentified. Conclusions Exposure of CPZ to a high energy (6.5 mJ) 266 nm laser beam yields rapidly a large number of new and stable species. For biological grade phenothiazines (in other words knowing the impurities in the samples: solvent and solute) this process may be reproducible because one can control within reasonably low experimental errors: the concentration of the parent compound, the laser beam wavelength and average energy, as well as the duration of the exposure time. Because the process is “clean” and rapid, it may offer advantages over the pyrogenically based methods for the production of derivatives. PMID:23405212

  10. TGF-β1 stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and generation of reactive oxygen species in cultured mouse podocytes, mediated in part by the mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Sakairi, Toru; Beeson, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has been associated with podocyte injury; we have examined its effect on podocyte bioenergetics. We studied transformed mouse podocytes, exposed to TGF-β1, using a label-free assay system, Seahorse XF24, which measures oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR). Both basal OCR and ATP generation-coupled OCR were significantly higher in podocytes exposed to 0.3–10 ng/ml of TGF-β1 for 24, 48, and 72 h. TGF-β1 (3 ng/ml) increased oxidative capacity 75%, and 96% relative to control after 48 and 72 h, respectively. ATP content was increased 19% and 30% relative to control after a 48- and 72-h exposure, respectively. Under conditions of maximal mitochondrial function, TGF-β1 increased palmitate-driven OCR by 49%. Thus, TGF-β1 increases mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP generation in the presence of diverse energy substrates. TGF-β1 did not increase cell number or mitochondrial DNA copy number but did increase mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which could explain the OCR increase. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased by 32% after TGF-β1 exposure for 48 h. TGF-β activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and rapamycin reduced the TGF-β1-stimulated increases in OCR, ECAR, ATP generation, cellular metabolic activity, and protein generation. Our data suggest that TGF-β1, acting, in part, via mTOR, increases mitochondrial MMP and OCR, resulting in increased ROS generation and that this may contribute to podocyte injury. PMID:24049142

  11. Selenium status affects selenoprotein expression, reproduction, and F₁ generation locomotor activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Penglase, Sam; Hamre, Kristin; Rasinger, Josef D; Ellingsen, Staale

    2014-06-14

    Se is an essential trace element, and is incorporated into selenoproteins which play important roles in human health. Mammalian selenoprotein-coding genes are often present as paralogues in teleost fish, and it is unclear whether the expression patterns or functions of these fish paralogues reflect their mammalian orthologues. Using the model species zebrafish (Danio rerio; ZF), we aimed to assess how dietary Se affects key parameters in Se metabolism and utilisation including glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, the mRNA expression of key Se-dependent proteins (gpx1a, gpx1b, sepp1a and sepp1b), oxidative status, reproductive success and F1 generation locomotor activity. From 27 d until 254 d post-fertilisation, ZF were fed diets with graded levels of Se ranging from deficient ( < 0·10 mg/kg) to toxic (30 mg/kg). The mRNA expression of gpx1a and gpx1b and GPX activity responded in a similar manner to changes in Se status. GPX activity and mRNA levels were lowest when dietary Se levels (0·3 mg/kg) resulted in the maximum growth of ZF, and a proposed bimodal mechanism in response to Se status below and above this dietary Se level was identified. The expression of the sepp1 paralogues differed, with only sepp1a responding to Se status. High dietary Se supplementation (30 mg/kg) decreased reproductive success, while the offspring of ZF fed above 0·3 mg Se/kg diet had lower locomotor activity than the other groups. Overall, the novel finding of low selenoprotein expression and activity coinciding with maximum body growth suggests that even small Se-induced variations in redox status may influence cellular growth rates. PMID:24666596

  12. Synthetic Training Data Generation for Activity Monitoring and Behavior Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monekosso, Dorothy; Remagnino, Paolo

    This paper describes a data generator that produces synthetic data to simulate observations from an array of environment monitoring sensors. The overall goal of our work is to monitor the well-being of one occupant in a home. Sensors are embedded in a smart home to unobtrusively record environmental parameters. Based on the sensor observations, behavior analysis and modeling are performed. However behavior analysis and modeling require large data sets to be collected over long periods of time to achieve the level of accuracy expected. A data generator - was developed based on initial data i.e. data collected over periods lasting weeks to facilitate concurrent data collection and development of algorithms. The data generator is based on statistical inference techniques. Variation is introduced into the data using perturbation models.

  13. Nanoparticles up-regulate tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and CXCL8 via reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Mi; Shin, D.-M.; Song, Hwan-Moon; Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Zee-Won; Lee, Sang-Hee; Hwang, Song Mei; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Chang-Soo Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2009-07-15

    Evaluating the toxicity of nanoparticles is an integral aspect of basic and applied sciences, because imaging applications using traditional organic fluorophores are limited by properties such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. This study investigated the toxicity of nanoparticles and their biological mechanisms. We found that nanoparticles, quantum dots (QDs), considerably activated the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL) 8 through reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)-dependent mechanisms in human primary monocytes. Nanoparticles elicited a robust activation of intracellular ROS, phosphorylation of p47phox, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activities. Blockade of ROS generation with antioxidants significantly abrogated the QD-mediated TNF-{alpha} and CXCL8 expression in monocytes. The induced ROS generation subsequently led to the activation of MAPKs, which were crucial for mRNA and protein expression of TNF-{alpha} and CXCL8. Furthermore, confocal and electron microscopy analyses showed that internalized QDs were trapped in cytoplasmic vesicles and compartmentalized inside lysosomes. Finally, several repeated intravenous injections of QDs caused an increase in neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues in vivo. These results provide novel insights into the QD-mediated chemokine induction and inflammatory toxic responses in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Colloidal gold nanorings for improved photodynamic therapy through field-enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yue; Yang, Yamin; Wang, Hongjun; Du, Henry

    2013-02-01

    Au nanostructures that exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have excellent potential for photo-medicine, among a host of other applications. Here, we report the synthesis and use of colloidal gold nanorings (GNRs) with potential for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer. The GNRs were fabricated via galvanic replacement reaction of sacrificial Co nanoparticles in gold salt solution with low molecular weight (Mw = 2,500) poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a stabilizing agent. The size and the opening of the GNRs were controlled by the size of the starting Co particles and the concentration of the gold salt. UV-Vis absorption measurements indicated the tunability of the SPR of the GNRs from 560 nm to 780 nm. MTT assay showed that GNRs were non-toxic and biocompatible when incubated with breast cancer cells as well as the healthy counterpart cells. GNRs conjugated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) photosensitizer precursor led to elevated formation of reactive oxygen species and improved efficacy of photodynamic therapy of breast cancer cells under light irradiation compared to 5-ALA alone. These results can be attributed to significantly enhance localized electromagnetic field of the GNRs.

  15. Energy conversion, redox catalysis and generation of reactive oxygen species by respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Judy; Roessler, Maxie M

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is critical for respiration in mammalian mitochondria. It oxidizes NADH produced by the Krebs' tricarboxylic acid cycle and β-oxidation of fatty acids, reduces ubiquinone, and transports protons to contribute to the proton-motive force across the inner membrane. Complex I is also a significant contributor to cellular oxidative stress. In complex I, NADH oxidation by a flavin mononucleotide, followed by intramolecular electron transfer along a chain of iron-sulfur clusters, delivers electrons and energy to bound ubiquinone. Either at cluster N2 (the terminal cluster in the chain) or upon the binding/reduction/dissociation of ubiquinone/ubiquinol, energy from the redox process is captured to initiate long-range energy transfer through the complex and drive proton translocation. This review focuses on current knowledge of how the redox reaction and proton transfer are coupled, with particular emphasis on the formation and role of semiquinone intermediates in both energy transduction and reactive oxygen species production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26721206

  16. HBOC Vasoactivity: Interplay Between Nitric Oxide Scavenging and Capacity to Generate Bioactive Nitric Oxide Species

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite many advances in blood substitute research, the development of materials that are effective in maintaining blood volume and oxygen delivery remains a priority for emergency care and trauma. Clinical trials on hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have not provided information on the mechanism of toxicity, although all commercial formulations have safety concerns. Specifically, it is important to reconcile the different hypotheses of Hb toxicity, such as nitric oxide (NO) depletion and oxidative reactions, to provide a coherent molecular basis for designing a safe HBOC. Recent Advances: HBOCs with different sizes often exhibit differences in the degree of HBOC-induced vasoactivity. This has been attributed to differences in the degree of NO scavenging and in the extent of Hb extravasation. Additionally, it is appears that Hb can undergo reactions that compensate for NO scavenging by generating bioactive forms of NO. Critical Issues: Engineering modifications to enhance bioactive NO production can result in diminished oxygen delivery by virtue of increased oxygen affinity. This strategy can prevent the HBOC from fulfilling the intended goal on preserving oxygenation; however, the NO production effects will increase perfusion and oxygen transport. Future Directions: Hb modifications influence NO scavenging and the capacity of certain HBOCs to compensate for NO scavenging through nitrite-mediated reactions that generate bioactive NO. Based on the current understanding of these NO-related factors, possible synthetic strategies are presented that address how HBOC formulations can be prepared that: (i) effectively deliver oxygen, (ii) maintain tissue perfusion, and (iii) limit/reverse underlying inflammation within the vasculature. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2284–2297. PMID:23249305

  17. Activity Profile In Vitro of Micafungin against Spanish Clinical Isolates of Common and Emerging Species of Yeasts and Molds▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Mellado, Emilia; Monzon, Araceli; Buitrago, Maria J.; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of 2,278 isolates belonging to 86 different fungal species was tested with micafungin and eight other drugs using the EUCAST procedures. Micafungin was active against species of Candida and Aspergillus (even azole-resistant species) as well as Penicillium spp., Scedosporium apiospermum, and Acremonium spp. It was inactive for species of Basidiomycota and Mucorales and for multiresistant species such as those of Fusarium. PMID:19223630

  18. Cytotoxic activities of ethyl acetate extract and a metabolite from a Monocillium species.

    PubMed

    Khondkar, Proma; Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Islam, Anwarul

    2005-09-01

    The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of a cultural broth of a Monocillium species afforded the isolation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Both the extract and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural showed significant cytotoxic activities in a brine shrimp bioassay and the LC(50) values were found to be 14.96 microg/mL and 23.71 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:16220580

  19. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  20. Abiotic stresses activate a MAPkinase in the model grass species Lolium temulentum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are utilized in diverse environments which exposes them to a variety of abiotic stresses, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to these various stresses. In the model grass species Lolium temulentum (Lt), a 46 kDa mitogen-activated pro...

  1. Screening of halophilic bacteria and Alteromonas species for organophosphorus hydrolyzing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    DeFrank, J J; Beaudry, W T; Cheng, T C; Harvey, S P; Stroup, A N; Szafraniec, L L

    1993-06-01

    Previously, a G-type nerve agent degrading enzyme activity was found in a halophilic bacterial isolate designated JD6.5. This organism was tentatively identified as an unknown species of the genus Alteromonas. In order to determine whether this type of enzyme activity was common in other species of Alteromonas, a screening program was initiated. A number of Alteromonas species and five halophilic bacterial isolates were cultured and their crude cell extracts screened for hydrolytic activity against several organophosphorus chemical agents and other related compounds. The samples were also screened for cross-reactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against the purified enzyme from JD6.5 and for hybridization with a DNA probe based on its N-terminal amino acid sequence A wide spectrum of activities and reactivities were seen, suggesting a significant heterogeneity between the functionally similar enzymes that are present in these bacterial species. Enzymes of the type described here have considerable potential for the decontamination and demilitarization of chemical warfare agents. PMID:8393735

  2. Assessing Neutron Generator Output Using Delayed Activation of Silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generators are used for elemental composition analysis and medical applications. Often composition is determined by examining elemental ratios in which the knowledge of the neutron flux is unnecessary. However, the absolute value of the neutron flux is required when t...

  3. Fourth Generation Instructional Design Model: An Elaboration on Authoring Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Dean L.

    This paper presents the updated (fourth generation) version of the instructional design (ID) model, noting its emphasis on a scientific, iterative approach based upon research and theory in learning and instruction and upon applied development experience. Another important trend toward a scientific approach to instructional design is the increased…

  4. Levels of toxic arsenic species in native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities.

    PubMed

    García-Salgado, Sara; Quijano, M Ángeles

    2014-03-01

    Ten native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities (Mónica mine, NW Madrid, Spain), with high total arsenic concentration levels (up to 3500 μg g(-1)), have been studied to determine the fraction of arsenic present as toxic forms (inorganic and methylated species), which present a higher mobility and therefore the potential risk associated with their reintegration into the environment is high. Roots and aboveground parts were analyzed separately to assess possible transformations from translocation processes. Extractions were carried out with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction at a temperature of 90 °C and three extraction steps of 7.5 min each. Total extracted arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, showing extraction percentages from 9 to 39% (calculated as the ratio between total extracted arsenic (Asext) and total arsenic (AsT) concentrations in plants). Speciation studies, performed by high performance liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry, showed the main presence of arsenate (As(v)) (up to 350 μg g(-1)), followed by arsenite (As(iii)), in both plant parts. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also found only in some plants. On the other hand, the use of 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid as an extractant led to higher extraction percentages (33-87%), but lower column recoveries, probably due to the extraction of arsenic compounds different to the toxic free ions studied, which may come from biotransformation mechanisms carried out by plants to reduce arsenic toxicity. However, As(v) concentrations increased up to 800 μg g(-1) in acid medium, indicating the probable release of As(v) from organoarsenic compounds and therefore a higher potential risk for the environment. PMID:24513726

  5. GONe: software for estimating effective population size in species with generational overlap.

    PubMed

    Coombs, J A; Letcher, B H; Nislow, K H

    2012-01-01

    GONe is a user-friendly, Windows-based program for estimating effective size (N(e) ) in populations with overlapping generations. It uses the Jorde-Ryman modification to the temporal method to account for age structure in populations. This method requires estimates of age-specific survival and birth rate and allele frequencies measured in two or more consecutive cohorts. Allele frequencies are acquired by reading in genotypic data from files formatted for either GENEPOP or TEMPOFS. For each interval between consecutive cohorts, N(e) is estimated at each locus and over all loci. Furthermore, N(e) estimates are output for three different genetic drift estimators (F(s) , F(c) and F(k) ). Confidence intervals are derived from a chi-square distribution with degrees of freedom equal to the number of independent alleles. GONe has been validated over a wide range of N(e) values, and for scenarios where survival and birth rates differ between sexes, sex ratios are unequal and reproductive variances differ. GONe is freely available for download at https://bcrc.bio.umass.edu/pedigreesoftware/. PMID:21827640

  6. GONe: Software for estimating effective population size in species with generational overlap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, J.A.; Letcher, B.H.; Nislow, K.H.

    2012-01-01

    GONe is a user-friendly, Windows-based program for estimating effective size (N e) in populations with overlapping generations. It uses the Jorde-Ryman modification to the temporal method to account for age structure in populations. This method requires estimates of age-specific survival and birth rate and allele frequencies measured in two or more consecutive cohorts. Allele frequencies are acquired by reading in genotypic data from files formatted for either GENEPOP or TEMPOFS. For each interval between consecutive cohorts, N e is estimated at each locus and over all loci. Furthermore, N e estimates are output for three different genetic drift estimators (F s, F c and F k). Confidence intervals are derived from a chi-square distribution with degrees of freedom equal to the number of independent alleles. GONe has been validated over a wide range of N e values, and for scenarios where survival and birth rates differ between sexes, sex ratios are unequal and reproductive variances differ. GONe is freely available for download at. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Effect of Structural Transformation of Nanoparticulate Zero-Valent Iron on Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    He, Di; Ma, Jinxing; Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2016-04-01

    While it has been recognized for some time that addition of nanoparticlate zerovalent iron (nZVI) to oxygen-containing water results in both corrosion of Fe(0) and oxidation of contaminants, there is limited understanding of either the relationship between transformation of nZVI and oxidant formation or the factors controlling the lifetime and extent of oxidant production. Using Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we show that while nZVI particles are transformed to ferrihydrite then lepidocrocite in less than 2 h, oxidant generation continues for up to 10 h. The major products (Fe(II) and H2O2) of the reaction of nZVI with oxygenated water are associated, for the most part, with the surface of particles present with these surface-associated Fenton reagents inducing oxidation of a target compound (in this study, (14)C-labeled formate). Effective oxidation of formate only occurred after formation of iron oxides on the nZVI surface with the initial formation of high surface area ferrihydrite facilitating rapid and extensive adsorption of formate with colocation of this target compound and surface-associated Fe(II) and H2O2 apparently critical to formate oxidation. Ongoing formate oxidation long after nZVI is consumed combined with the relatively slow consumption of Fe(II) and H2O2 suggest that these reactants are regenerated during the nZVI-initiated heterogeneous Fenton process. PMID:26958862

  8. Formation of the active species of cytochrome p450 by using iodosylbenzene: a case for spin-selective reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Moreau, Yohann; Kumar, Devesh; Rock, Dan A; Jones, Jeffrey P; Shaik, Sason

    2007-01-01

    The generation of the active species for the enzyme cytochrome P450 by using the highly versatile oxygen surrogate iodosylbenzene (PhIO) often produces different results compared with the native route, in which the active species is generated through O(2) uptake and reduction by NADPH. One of these differences that is addressed here is the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) jump observed during N-dealkylation of N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) by P450, when the reaction conditions change from the native to the PhIO route. The paper presents a theoretical analysis targeted to elucidate the mechanism of the reaction of PhIO with heme, to form the high-valent iron-oxo species Compound I (Cpd I), and define the origins of the KIE jump in the reaction of Cpd I with DMA. It is concluded that the likely origin of the KIE jump is the spin-selective chemistry of the enzyme cytochrome P450 under different preparation procedures. In the native route, the reaction proceeds via the doublet spin state of Cpd I and leads to a low KIE value. PhIO, however, diverts the reaction to the quartet spin state of Cpd I, which leads to the observed high KIE values. The KIE jump is reproduced here experimentally for the dealkylation of N,N-dimethyl-4-(methylthio)aniline, by using intra-molecular KIE measurements that avoid kinetic complexities. The effect of PhIO is compared with N,N-dimethylaniline-N-oxide (DMAO), which acts both as the oxygen donor and the substrate and leads to the same KIE values as the native route. PMID:17367100

  9. Determination of inorganic arsenic species by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with variable sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Mirna E.; Beldoménico, Horacio R.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes a study on the determination of inorganic arsenic species in ground water and synthetic experimental matrices, using a flow injection system with on-line hydride generation device coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer with flame-heated quartz atomizer (FI HG AAS). Specific trivalent arsenic determination is based on the slow kinetics of As(V) on the hydride generation reaction using sufficiently low concentrations of sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH 4) as reductant in highly acidic conditions (pH<0). Under these conditions, the efficiency of hydride generation from As(V) is much lower than that from As(III). The pentavalent form is determined by the difference between total inorganic arsenic and As(III). As(V) interferences were studied using As(III) solutions ranging from 0% to 50% of total inorganic As. The optimized NaBH 4 concentration was 0.035% (w/v). The detection limit was 1.4 μg l -1 As(III). As(V) interferences were 6% in the case of water samples with 6 μg l -1 As(III) in the presence of 54 μg l -1 As(V) (i.e. 10% As(III)). Interferences of methylated arsenic species (MMA and DMA) were evaluated. Speciation method was satisfactorily applied to 20 field arsenical water samples from Santa Fe, Argentina, with values ranging from 30 to 308 μg l -1 total As. We found from 0% to 36% As(III) in the 20 field samples. The developed methodology constitutes an economic, simple and reliable way to evaluate inorganic arsenic distribution in underground waters or similar systems with negligible or no content of organoarsenicals.

  10. Dissolution and reactive oxygen species generation of inhaled cemented tungsten carbide particles in artificial human lung fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniak, A. B.; Leonard, S. S.; Hoover, M. D.; Virji, M. A.; Day, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of both cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC) particles is associated with development of hard metal lung disease (HMD) via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas Co alone is sufficient to cause asthma via solubilization and hapten formation. We characterized bulk and aerodynamically size-separated W, WC, Co, spray dryer (pre-sintered), and chamfer grinder (post-sintered) powders. ROS generation was measured in the murine RAW 264.7 cell line using electron spin resonance. When dose was normalized to surface area, hydroxyl radical generation was independent of particle size, which suggests that particle surface chemistry may be an important exposure factor. Chamfer grinder particles generated the highest levels of ROS, consistent with the hypothesis that intimate contact of metals is important for ROS generation. In artificial extracellular lung fluid, alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (ABDC), added to prevent mold growth during experiments, did not influence dissolution of Co (44.0±5.2 vs. 48.3±6.4%) however, dissolution was higher (p<0.05) in the absence of phosphate (62.0±5.4 vs. 48.3±6.4%). In artificial macrophage phagolysosomal fluid, dissolution of Co (36.2±10.4%) does not appear to be influenced (p=0.30) by the absence of glycine (29.8±2.1%), phosphate (39.6±8.6%), or ABDC (44.0±10.5%). These results aid in assessing and understanding Co and W inhalation dosimetry.

  11. Antibiofilm activity of carboxymethyl chitosan on the biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Leonhard, Matthias; Moser, Doris; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2016-09-20

    Although most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, non-C. albicans Candida species have been isolated in increasing numbers in patients. In this study, we determined the inhibition of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) on single and mixed species biofilm of non-albicans Candida species, including Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata. Biofilm by all tested species in microtiter plates were inhibited nearly 70%. CM-chitosan inhibited mixed species biofilm in microtiter plates and also on medical materials surfaces. To investigate the mechanism, the effect of CM-chitosan on cell viability and biofilm growth was employed. CM-chitosan inhibited Candida planktonic growth as well as adhesion. Further biofilm formation was inhibited with CM-chitosan added at 90min, 12h or 24h after biofilm initiation. CM-chitosan was not only able to inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida cells, but was also active upon the establishment and the development of biofilms. PMID:27261732

  12. Screening of radical scavenging activity and polyphenol content of Bulgarian plant species

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Discovery of new plant species with antioxidant properties is a priority of many research teams. Most of the species included in this study are unstudied for antioxidant properties, but they are taxonomically related to reference plants with well-documented antioxidant activity. Materials and Methods: Free radical scavenging activity of plant extracts was evaluated using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. An aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for flavonoid determination. The amount of phenolic compounds in the extracts was estimated by using the Folin–Ciocalteu reagent. Results: As a result of screening, it was found that the significant antioxidant properties possess several unstudied until now plant species (Veronica bellidioides L., V. kellereri Deg. et Urm, V. vindobonensis (M. Fisher) M. Fisher, V. beccabunga L., V. rhodopaea L., V. austriaca (Velen.) Degen., Clinopodium vulgare L., Stachysrecta L., Clematis vitalba L., and Xeranthemum annum L.). The antioxidant potential of the new species is comparable to that of reference medicinal plants. Conclusions: The existing data presented here provide new information for antioxidant potential of plant species that have not been traditionally used as medicinal plants. PMID:22224049

  13. In vitro antimalarial activity of six Aspidosperma species from the state of Minas Gerais (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Dolabela, Maria Fâni; Oliveira, Salma G; Peres, José M; Nascimento, José M S; Póvoa, Marinete M; Oliveira, Alaide B

    2012-12-01

    Ethnomedicinal informations point to some Aspidosperma species (Apocynaceae) as antimalarial plants in Brazil and have motivated the evaluation of six species which were collected in the state of Minas Gerais: A. cylindrocarpon Müll. Arg., A. parvifolium A. DC., A. olivaceum Müll. Arg., A. ramiflorum Müll. Arg., A. spruceanum Benth. ex Müll. Arg. and A. tomentosum Mart.. A total of 23 extracts of different plant parts in different solvents were assayed in vitro against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. All the extracts were shown to be active with IC50 values in the range of 5.0 ± 0 2.8 µg/mL to 65.0 ± 4.2 µg/mL. TLC profile of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids in the six species assayed. These results seem to confirm the popular use of Aspidosperma species to treat human malaria in Brazil and seem point to alkaloids as the putative active compounds of the assayed species. PMID:23207699

  14. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities and ethanol tolerance in Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae) fruit-fly species and their hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) system is one of the earliest known models of molecular evolution, and is still the most studied in Drosophila. Herein, we studied this model in the genus Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae). Due to the remarkable advantages it presents, it is possible to cross species with different Adh genotypes and with different phenotype traits related to ethanol tolerance. The two species studied here each have a different number of Adh gene copies, whereby crosses generate polymorphisms in gene number and in composition of the genetic background. We measured certain traits related to ethanol metabolism and tolerance. ADH specific enzyme activity presented gene by environment interactions, and the larval protein content showed an additive pattern of inheritance, whilst ADH enzyme activity per larva presented a complex behavior that may be explained by epistatic effects. Regression models suggest that there are heritable factors acting on ethanol tolerance, which may be related to enzymatic activity of the ADHs and to larval mass, although a pronounced environmental effect on ethanol tolerance was also observed. By using these data, we speculated on the mechanisms of ethanol tolerance and its inheritance as well as of associated traits. PMID:21637665

  15. Effective water splitting using CuOx/TiO2 composite films: Role of Cu species and content in hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qianqian; Huang, Jiquan; Li, Guojing; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Zhaojun; Deng, Zhonghua; Jiang, Yabin; Guo, Wang; Cao, Yongge

    2016-04-01

    We have fabricated a series of CuOx/TiO2 composite films composed of TiO2 nanorods and CuOx nanopariticles with copper content in the range of 0-4.75 at.% by a facile magnetron sputtering method for hydrogen generation from water splitting. By virtue of the one-dimensional TiO2 nanostructures, all the nanorods films show excellent photocatalytic activity. Especially, there appear to be an optimum Cu content of 2.72 at.% giving the H2 evolution rate of 53 mmol m-2 h-1, which is about 15 times higher than that of pristine anatase TiO2 nanorods film. To evaluate the effect of foreign copper on the photocatalytic properties, comprehensive structural, morphology and surface characterizations of catalysts have been carried out. It is found that CuO is an unstable species which is inevitably reduced to Cu2O during the initial stage of photocatalytic reaction, and the occurrence of highly disperse Cu2O species is responsible for the improved photocatalytic activity.

  16. Liposomal packaging generates Wnt protein with in vivo biological activity.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Leucht, Philipp; Zhao, Ludan; Kim, Jae-Beom; ten Berge, Derk; Ponnusamy, Karthik; Carre, A Lyonel; Dudek, Henryk; Zachlederova, Marie; McElhaney, Michael; Brunton, Shirley; Gunzner, Janet; Callow, Marinella; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike; Zhang, Xiaoyan M; Helms, Jill A; Nusse, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signals exercise strong cell-biological and regenerative effects of considerable therapeutic value. There are, however, no specific Wnt agonists and no method for in vivo delivery of purified Wnt proteins. Wnts contain lipid adducts that are required for activity and we exploited this lipophilicity by packaging purified Wnt3a protein into lipid vesicles. Rather than being encapsulated, Wnts are tethered to the liposomal surface, where they enhance and sustain Wnt signaling in vitro. Molecules that effectively antagonize soluble Wnt3a protein but are ineffective against the Wnt3a signal presented by a cell in a paracrine or autocrine manner are also unable to block liposomal Wnt3a activity, suggesting that liposomal packaging mimics the biological state of active Wnts. When delivered subcutaneously, Wnt3a liposomes induce hair follicle neogenesis, demonstrating their robust biological activity in a regenerative context. PMID:18698373

  17. Biological activity of photoproducts of merocyanine 540 generated by laser-light activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Chanh, Tran C.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Harriman, Anthony; Matthews, James Lester

    1992-08-01

    Controlled exposure of photoactive compounds to light prior to their use in biological targets results in the formation of heretofore unknown photoproducts. This process of photoproduct generation, termed "preactivation," renders the photactive compound capable of systemic use without further dependence on light. Preactivation of mercyanin 540 (MC540) and several other photoactive compounds is achievable by exposure to CW and pulse laser radiation. The singlet oxygen generated at excited states attacks the dye molucule itself, resulting in the formation of biologically active photoproducts. For preactivated MC540 (photoproducts of MC540) generated by exposure to argon laser light (514 nm) and light from free-electron laser, we have demonstrated its effectiveness in selective killing of certain types of cultured tumor cells as well as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with very low, if any, damage to normal cells and tisues. For example, approximately 90% of the Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells and HL-60 leukemic cells are killed by preactivated MC540 at a concentration of 120 μg/ml. A two-hour treatment of cultured cells with buthionine sulfoxamine followed by the treatement with preactivated MC540 reults in 99.99% inhibition of clonogenic tumor stem cell growth. We also have demonstrated that preactivated MC540 is very effective in killing cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1. It also is very effective in killing HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in virus-infected blood in vitro as determined by reverse transcriptase, P24, P17, core antigen expression and synctium formation. Treatment of HIV-1 with preactivated MC540 renders the treated HIV-1 incapable of binding to CD4 target molecules on T cells as determined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation assays. In vivo toxicology studies show that preactivated MC540 is very well tolerated and does not produce any signs of adverse reaction at the therapeutic doses, as determined by

  18. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jin Sil; Lee, Sora; Yoo, Young Do

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. • Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. • Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-κB activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB and transcriptional activity through constitutive IκBα phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-κB activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development.

  19. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  20. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of 24 Lamiaceae species growing in Iran.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Javidnia, Katayoun; Gholami, Maryam; Soltani, Mohammad; Miri, Ramin

    2010-02-01

    The antioxidant activities of the methanolic extracts of 9 Salvia species and 15 other Lamiaceae plants growing in Iran were evaluated using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assays. FRAP values ranged form 8.5 to 79.0 microM quercetin equivalents/g dry weight, and IC50 values in the DPPH assay from 115.7 to 1350.2 microg dry weight/mL. Salvia species showed the highest antioxidant activities. S. santolinifolia, S. eremophila and S. palestina, which have not been studied before, were the most active plants. These were more active than the previously studied species from this family, such as S. multicaulis and Marrubium vulgare. S. hydrangea and Gontscharovia popovii also showed high antioxidant activities. FRAP and DPPH assay results showed good correlations with the total phenolic contents of the plants, measured by the Folin-Ciocalteau assay (r2 = 0.925 and 0.799, respectively, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, our study shows that some Lamiaceae plants growing in Iran represent good potential sources of natural antioxidants useful for either prevention or treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:20334140

  1. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview.

    PubMed

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-07-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  2. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of benzophenones and xanthones from edible fruits of Garcinia species.

    PubMed

    Lyles, James T; Negrin, Adam; Khan, Shabana I; He, Kan; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-06-01

    Species of Garcinia have been used to combat malaria in traditional African and Asian medicines, including Ayurveda. In the current study, we have identified antiplasmodial benzophenone and xanthone compounds from edible Garcinia species by testing for in vitro inhibitory activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Whole fruits of Garcinia xanthochymus, G. mangostana, G. spicata, and G. livingstonei were extracted and tested for antiplasmodial activity. Garcinia xanthochymus was subjected to bioactivity-guided fractionation to identify active partitions. Purified benzophenones (1-9) and xanthones (10-18) were then screened in the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase assay and tested for cytotoxicity against mammalian (Vero) cells. The benzophenones guttiferone E (4), isoxanthochymol (5), and guttiferone H (6), isolated from G. xanthochymus, and the xanthones α-mangostin (15), β-mangostin (16), and 3-isomangostin (17), known from G. mangostana, showed antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values in the range of 4.71-11.40 µM. Artemisinin and chloroquine were used as positive controls and exhibited IC50 values in the range of 0.01-0.24 µM. The identification of antiplasmodial benzophenone and xanthone compounds from G. xanthochymus and G. mangostana provides evidence for the antiplasmodial activity of Garcinia species and warrants further investigation of these fruits as dietary sources of chemopreventive compounds. PMID:24963617

  3. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 μg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 μM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality.

  4. Chemical Constituents Analysis and Antidiabetic Activity Validation of Four Fern Species from Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Lin, Yenshou; Huang, Wei-Jan; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Hsu, Feng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pterosins are abundant in ferns, and pterosin A was considered a novel activator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which is crucial for regulating blood glucose homeostasis. However, the distribution of pterosins in different species of ferns from various places in Taiwan is currently unclear. To address this question, the distribution of pterosins, glucose-uptake efficiency, and protective effects of pterosin A on β-cells were examined. Our results showed that three novel compounds, 13-chloro-spelosin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), (3R)-Pterosin D 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (2), and (2R,3R)-Pterosin L 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (3), were isolated for the first time from four fern species (Ceratopteris thalictroides, Hypolepis punctata, Nephrolepis multiflora, and Pteridium revolutum) along with 27 known compounds. We also examined the distribution of these pterosin compounds in the mentioned fern species (except N. multiflora). Although all pterosin analogs exhibited the same effects in glucose uptake assays, pterosin A prevented cell death and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This paper is the first report to provide new insights into the distribution of pterosins in ferns from Taiwan. The potential anti-diabetic activity of these novel phytocompounds warrants further functional studies. PMID:25622260

  5. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 µg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 µM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality. PMID:22740147

  6. Endogenous superoxide-like species and antioxidant activity in ocular tissues detected by luminol luminescence.

    PubMed

    Trevithick, J R; Dzialoszynski, T

    1997-04-01

    A new luminescent method was used to detect the reactive oxygen species in aqueous and vitreous humors and in homogenates of the lens and retina of laboratory rats. Superoxide-like activity per microgram protein increased in all tissues with weight of the rat, a good indicator of animal age. Superoxide dismutase, centrophenoxine, soluble vitamin E (D-alpha-Locopherol (polyethlyene glycol 1000) succinate, and N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) reduced the luminescence. Catalase had no effect. These results are consistent with the detected species being superoxide-like. PMID:9111931

  7. Generation and secretion of eosinophilotactic activity from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils by various mechanisms of cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    König, W; Frickhofen, N; Tesch, H

    1979-01-01

    An eosinophil chemotactic factor(s) (ECF) can be generated from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils by the calcium ionophore, phagocytosis, arachidonic acid and hypotonic lysis. In kinetic studies it is observed that peak ECF activity is released prior to the maximum of lysosomal enzyme release with the calcium ionophore, phagocytosis and arachidonic acid, while under conditions of hypotonic exposure ECF activity appears after the maximum of enzyme release. The ECF obtained by hypotonic exposure shows a fluctuating pattern with sharp peaks and steep fall-offs in activity. The ECF-release for each stimulus is temperature dependent; extracellular calcium is required when the ionophore or phagocytosis are used as stimuli, while with arachidonic acid and hypotonic exposure no extracellular calcium is necessary for ECF-release. On Sephadex G-25 each preparation of ECF eluted in the low molecular weight range at approximately 500 daltons. Eosinophils can be deactivated and cross-deactivated with the various ECF-preparations indicating either a molecular identity or a common mode of action on eosinophils. PMID:437847

  8. Next-generation genome sequencing and assembly provides tools for phylogenetics and identification of closely related species of Spathius, parasitoids of Agrilus planipennis (emerald ash borer)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A crucial step in biological control programs is identification of candidates for introduction. This is often difficult when cryptic species are involved. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing allows whole genome sequencing in non-model species for the discovery and genotyping of ...

  9. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. PMID:20810175

  10. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  11. Diversity of secondary metabolites from marine Bacillus species: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-08-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  12. Removal of carbon contaminations by RF plasma generated reactive species and subsequent effects on optical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. K. Rai, S. K.; Modi, M. H.; Nayak, M.; Lodha, G. S.; Kumar, M.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2015-06-24

    Carbon contamination on optical elements is a serious issue in synchrotron beam lines for several decades. The basic mechanism of carbon deposition on optics and cleaning strategies are not fully understood. Carbon growth mechanism and optimized cleaning procedures are worldwide under development stage. Optimized RF plasma cleaning is considered an active remedy for the same. In present study carbon contaminated optical test surfaces (carbon capped tungsten thin film) are exposed for 30 minutes to four different gases, rf plasma at constant power and constant dynamic pressure. Structural characterization (thickness, roughness and density) of virgin samples and plasma exposed samples was done by soft x-ray (λ=80 Å) reflectivity measurements at Indus-1 reflectivity beam line. Different gas plasma removes carbon with different rate (0.4 to 0.65 nm /min). A thin layer 2 to 9 nm of different roughness and density is observed at the top surface of tungsten film. Ar gas plasma is found more suitable for cleaning of tungsten surface.

  13. Removal of carbon contaminations by RF plasma generated reactive species and subsequent effects on optical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, P. K.; Kumar, M.; Rai, S. K.; Modi, M. H.; Chakera, J. A.; Nayak, M.; Naik, P. A.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon contamination on optical elements is a serious issue in synchrotron beam lines for several decades. The basic mechanism of carbon deposition on optics and cleaning strategies are not fully understood. Carbon growth mechanism and optimized cleaning procedures are worldwide under development stage. Optimized RF plasma cleaning is considered an active remedy for the same. In present study carbon contaminated optical test surfaces (carbon capped tungsten thin film) are exposed for 30 minutes to four different gases, rf plasma at constant power and constant dynamic pressure. Structural characterization (thickness, roughness and density) of virgin samples and plasma exposed samples was done by soft x-ray (λ=80 Å) reflectivity measurements at Indus-1 reflectivity beam line. Different gas plasma removes carbon with different rate (0.4 to 0.65 nm /min). A thin layer 2 to 9 nm of different roughness and density is observed at the top surface of tungsten film. Ar gas plasma is found more suitable for cleaning of tungsten surface.

  14. In vitro incubation of human spermatozoa promotes reactive oxygen species generation and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Cicaré, J; Caille, A; Zumoffen, C; Ghersevich, S; Bahamondes, L; Munuce, M J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative process associated with sperm capacitation and its impact on DNA fragmentation and sperm function. Redox activity and lipid peroxidation were analysed in human spermatozoa after 3, 6 and 22 h of incubation in Ham's F10 medium plus bovine albumin at 37° and 5% CO2 for capacitation. DNA status, tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and induced acrosome reaction were evaluated after capacitating conditions. At 22 h of incubation, there was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in oxygen-free radicals and lipid peroxidation, with no effect on sperm viability. There also was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in fragmented DNA in capacitated spermatozoa compared to semen values with higher rates being found after the occurrence of the induced acrosome reaction. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern confirms that capacitation took place in parallel with the occurrence of DNA fragmentation. These results indicate that when spermatozoa are incubated for several hours (22 h), a common practice in assisted reproductive techniques, an increase in oxidative sperm metabolism and in the proportion of fragmented DNA should be expected. However, there was no effect on any of the other functional parameters associated with sperm fertilising capacity. PMID:25233794

  15. Transportation and Accumulation of Redox Active Species at the Buried Interfaces of Plasticized Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; De Marco, Roland; Jarolímová, Zdeňka; Pawlak, Marcin; Bakker, Eric; He, Ning; Latonen, Rose-Marie; Lindfors, Tom; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-09-29

    The transportation and accumulation of redox active species at the buried interface between glassy carbon electrodes and plasticized polymeric membranes have been studied using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Ferrocene tagged poly(vinyl chloride) [FcPVC], ferrocene (Fc), and its derivatives together with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) doped plasticized polymeric membrane electrodes have been investigated, so as to extend the study of the mechanism of this reaction chemistry to different time scales (both small and large molecules with variable diffusion coefficients) using a range of complementary electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. This study also provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the transportation and electrochemical reactivity of redox active species, regardless of the size of the electrochemically reactive molecule, at the buried interface of the substrate electrode. With all redox dopants, when CA electrolysis was performed, redox active species were undetectable (<1 wt % of signature elements or below the detection limit of SR-XPS and NEXAFS) in the outermost surface layers of the membrane, while a high concentration of redox species was located at the electrode substrate as a consequence of the deposition of the reaction product (Fc(+)-anion complex) at the buried interface between the electrode and the membrane. This reaction chemistry for redox active species within plasticized polymeric membranes may be useful in the fashioning of multilayered polymeric devices (e.g., chemical sensors, organic electronic devices, protective laminates, etc.) based on an electrochemical tunable deposition of redox molecules at the buried substrate electrode beneath

  16. Salinity effects on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of three Perkinsus species.

    PubMed

    La Peyre, Megan; Casas, Sandra; La Peyre, Jerome

    2006-07-11

    Little is known regarding the range of conditions in which many Perkinsus species may proliferate, making it difficult to predict conditions favorable for their expansion, to identify conditions inducing mortality, or to identify instances of potential cross-infectivity among sympatric host species. In this study, the effects of salinity on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki were determined. Specifically, this research examined the effects of 5 salinities (7, 11, 15, 25, 35 per thousand), (1) without acclimation, on the viability and metabolic activity of 2 isolates of each Perkinsus species, and (2) with acclimation, on the viability, metabolic activity, size and number of 1 isolate of each species. P. chesapeaki showed the widest range of salinity tolerance of the 3 species, with high viability and cell proliferation at all salinities tested. Although P. chesapeaki originated from low salinity areas (i.e. <15 per thousand), several measures (i.e. cell number and metabolic activity) indicated that higher salinities (15, 25 per thousand) were more favorable for its growth. P. olseni, originating from high salinity areas, had better viability and proliferation at the higher salinities (15, 25, 35 per thousand). Distinct differences in acute salinity response of the 2 P. olseni isolates at lower salinities (7, 11 per thousand), however, suggest the need for a more expansive comparison of isolates to better define the lower salinity tolerance. Lastly, P. marinus was more tolerant of the lower salinities (7 and 11 per thousand) than P. olseni, but exhibited reduced viability at 7 per thousand, even after acclimation. PMID:16922001

  17. Electro-active sensor, method for constructing the same; apparatus and circuitry for detection of electro-active species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electro-active sensor includes a nonconductive platform with a first electrode set attached with a first side of a nonconductive platform. The first electrode set serves as an electrochemical cell that may be utilized to detect electro-active species in solution. A plurality of electrode sets and a variety of additional electrochemical cells and sensors may be attached with the nonconductive platform. The present invention also includes a method for constructing the aforementioned electro-active sensor. Additionally, an apparatus for detection and observation is disclosed, where the apparatus includes a sealable chamber for insertion of a portion of an electro-active sensor. The apparatus allows for monitoring and detection activities. Allowing for control of attached cells and sensors, a dual-mode circuitry is also disclosed. The dual-mode circuitry includes a switch, allowing the circuitry to be switched from a potentiostat to a galvanostat mode.

  18. From Microbiology to Cancer Biology: The Rid Protein Family Prevents Cellular Damage Caused by Endogenously Generated Reactive Nitrogen Species

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Diana M.; Ernst, Dustin C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Rid family of proteins is highly conserved and broadly distributed throughout the domains of life. Genetic and biochemical studies, primarily in Salmonella enterica, have defined a role for RidA in responding to endogenously generated reactive metabolites. The data show that 2-aminoacrylate (2AA), a reactive enamine intermediate generated by some pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes, accumulates in the absence of RidA. The accumulation of 2AA leads to covalent modification and inactivation of several enzymes involved in essential metabolic processes. This review describes the 2AA hydrolyzing activity of RidA and the effect of this biochemical activity on the metabolic network, which impacts organism fitness. The reported activity of RidA and the consequences encountered in vivo when RidA is absent have challenged fundamental assumptions in enzymology, biochemistry and cell metabolism regarding the fate of transiently-generated reactive enamine intermediates. The current understanding of RidA in Salmonella and the broad distribution of Rid family proteins provide exciting opportunities for future studies to define metabolic roles of Rid family members from microbes to man. PMID:25620221

  19. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids attenuate reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase activation, and apoptosis in carcinoma cells treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liu; Chen, Chen; Gong, Wei; Li, Yuanjing; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wang, Dao Wen

    2011-11-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2J2 promote tumorogenesis in vivo and in vitro via direct stimulation of tumor cell growth and inhibition of tumor cell apoptosis. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism of inhibition of tumor cell apoptosis by EETs. In Tca-8113 cancer cells, the antileukemia drug arsenic trioxide (ATO) led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired mitochondrial function, and induced apoptosis. 11,12-EET pretreatment increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and inhibited ATO-induced apoptosis. 11,12-EET also prevented the ATO-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, caspase-3, and caspase-9. Therefore, 11,12-EET-pretreatment attenuated the ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial function, and caspase activation observed after ATO treatment. Moreover, the CYP2J2-specific inhibitor compound 26 enhanced arsenic cytotoxicity to a clinically relevant concentration of ATO (1-2 μM). Both the thiol-containing antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine, and 11,12-EET reversed the synergistic effect of the two agents. Taken together, these data indicate that 11,12-EET inhibits apoptosis induced by ATO through a mechanism that involves induction of antioxidant proteins and attenuation of ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21846841

  20. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  1. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  2. Antioxidant activities and phytochemical study of leaf extracts from 18 indigenous tree species in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shang-Tse; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Yong-Long; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Chung, Min-Jay; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess antioxidant activities of methanolic extracts from the leaves of 18 indigenous tree species in Taiwan. Results revealed that, among 18 species, Acer oliverianum exhibited the best free radical scavenging activities. The IC(50) values were 5.8 and 11.8 μg/mL on DPPH radical and superoxide radical scavenging activities, respectively. In addition, A. oliverianum also exhibited the strongest ferrous ion chelating activity. Based on a bioactivity-guided isolation principle, the resulting methanolic crude extracts of A. oliverianum leaves were fractionated to yield soluble fractions of hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water. Of these, the EtOAc fraction had the best antioxidant activity. Furthermore, 8 specific phytochemicals were isolated and identified from the EtOAc fraction. Among them, 1,2,3,4,6-O-penta-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose had the best free radical scavenging activity. These results demonstrate that methanolic extracts and their derived phytochemicals of A. oliverianum leaves have excellent antioxidant activities and thus they have great potential as sources for natural health products. PMID:22454657

  3. In vitro effects of cholesterol β-D-glucoside, cholesterol and cycad phytosterol glucosides on respiration and reactive oxygen species generation in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Panov, Alexander; Kubalik, Nataliya; Brooks, Benjamin R; Shaw, Christopher A

    2010-10-01

    The cluster of neurodegenerative disorders in the western Pacific termed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS-PDC) has been repeatedly linked to the use of seeds of various species of cycad. Identification and chemical synthesis of the most toxic compounds in the washed cycad seeds, a variant phytosteryl glucosides, and even more toxic cholesterol β-D-glucoside (CG), which is produced by the human parasite Helicobacter pylori, provide a possibility to study in vitro the mechanisms of toxicity of these compounds. We studied in detail the effects of CG on the respiratory activities and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by nonsynaptic brain and heart mitochondria oxidizing various substrates. The stimulatory effects of CG on respiration and ROS generation showed strong substrate dependence, suggesting involvement of succinate dehydrogenase (complex II). Maximal effects on ROS production were observed with 1 μmol CG/1 mg mitochondria. At this concentration the cycad toxins β-sitosterol-β-D-glucoside and stigmasterol-β-D-glucoside had effects on respiration and ROS production similar to CG. However, poor solubility precluded full concentration analysis of these toxins. Cholesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol had no effect on mitochondrial functions studied at concentrations up to 100 μmol/mg protein. Our results suggest that CG may influence mitochondrial functions through changes in the packing of the bulk membrane lipids, as was shown earlier by Deliconstantinos et al. (Biochem Cell Biol 67:16-24, 1989). The neurotoxic effects of phytosteryl glucosides and CG may be associated with increased oxidative damage of neurons. Unlike heart mitochondria, in activated neurons mitochondria specifically increase ROS production associated with succinate oxidation (Panov et al., J Biol Chem 284:14448-14456, 2009). PMID:20938651

  4. Sonochemical degradation of methyl orange in the presence of Bi2WO6: Effect of operating parameters and the generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Ling; Liu, Xian-Ping; Wang, Yong-Xia; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The Bi2WO6 was prepared by the hydrothermal method and its sonocatalytic activity was studied in the degradation of methyl orange (MO) solutions. The effects of catalytic activity of Bi2WO6 on dye were inspected by the change in absorbance of dye with UV-vis spectrometer. The influences of operational parameters such as the addition amount of Bi2WO6, pH, the initial concentration of dyes, ultrasonic power and irradiation time on the degradation ratio were investigated. In addition, the obtained results indicated that the kinetics of sonochemical reactions of MO were consistent with the pseudo first-order kinetics and Bi2WO6 had excellent reusability and stability during the sonochemical degradation processes. The generation and kinds of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their influence on the sonochemical degradation of MO were determined by the methods of oxidation-extraction spectrophotometry and ROS scavengers. The results indicate that the degradation of MO in the presence of Bi2WO6 under ultrasonic irradiation is related to the generation of ROS, in which both singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH) play important roles in the sonochemical degradation of MO. These experimental results provide a sound foundation for the further development of Bi2WO6 as a sonocatalyst in wastewater treatment. PMID:27245960

  5. Cytochromes P450 and species differences in xenobiotic metabolism and activation of carcinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D F; Ioannides, C; Parke, D V

    1998-01-01

    The importance of cytochrome P450 isoforms to species differences in the metabolism of foreign compounds and activation of procarcinogens has been identified. The possible range of P450 isozymes in significant variations in toxicity exhibited by experimental rodent species may have a relevance to chemical risk assessment, especially as human P450s are likely to show changes in the way they metabolize xenobiotics. Consequently, in the safety evaluation of chemicals, we should be cautious in extrapolating results from experimental animal models to humans. This paper focuses on examples in which species differences in P450s lead to significant alterations in carcinogenic response, and includes a discussion of the current procedures for toxicity screening, with an emphasis on short-term tests. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9755138

  6. Time and species dependent ambient air's effects on carbon clusters generated during femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenxia; Zhang, Nan; Feng, Peipei; Wu, Han; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2015-12-01

    Near infrared femtosecond laser is employed to ablate highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in ambient air and in vacuum respectively. The recorded transient emission spectra of the ablated plume with a time resolution of 2 ns indicate that the effects of air on the plume are dependent on both time and species. This finding provides important insights into the generation and decay mechanisms of different carbon radicals or clusters. At 1 or 2 ns after the laser pulse strikes the target, air weakens the Swan bands of C2 compared with the case in vacuum, an effect that may be caused by the quenching collisions between air molecules and C2 radicals. This result shows that C2 may be mainly generated by direct spallation from the target surface at the early stage of ablation. Emission spectra at large time delays present that the existence time of the Swan bands in air is longer than the lifetime of the upper electronic state of the Swan system, suggesting that the air-involved three-body recombination and collisional excitation that enhance the generation of emitting C2 overcome quenching collisions at large time delays. A spectral band at ~416 nm assigned to the transition from 1Σ u + to X 1Σ g + of C15 is more intense in air than in vacuum, indicating that C15 clusters are generated at least partially by the combination of smaller clusters in air. It is also found that air-assisted heat transfer makes the temperature of carbon clusters decrease more quickly in air than in vacuum, leading to a much shorter lifetime of the continuum in air.

  7. Using Guided, Corpus-Aided Discovery to Generate Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Shih

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, educators have proposed a variety of active learning pedagogical approaches that focus on encouraging students to discover for themselves the principles and solutions that will engage them in learning and enhance their educational outcomes. Among these approaches are problem-based, inquiry-based, experiential, and discovery…

  8. Educating for Political Activity: A Younger Generational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a response to Professor Chitty's "Educational Review" Guest Lecture article, "Educating for political activity". I address the three sections of his paper: a global and national-based politics of war, corporate manipulation and parliamentary scandals. This provides a basis to draw upon empirical material from a recent critical…

  9. Designed and User-Generated Activity in the Mobile Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes; Traxler, John; Pettit, John

    2007-01-01

    The paper addresses the question of how to design for learning taking place on mobile and wireless devices. The authors argue that learning activity designers need to consider the characteristics of mobile learning; at the same time, it is vital to realise that learners are already creating mobile learning experiences for themselves. Profound…

  10. ModuleBlast: identifying activated sub-networks within and across species

    PubMed Central

    Zinman, Guy E.; Naiman, Shoshana; O'Dee, Dawn M.; Kumar, Nishant; Nau, Gerard J.; Cohen, Haim Y.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    Identifying conserved and divergent response patterns in gene networks is becoming increasingly important. A common approach is integrating expression information with gene association networks in order to find groups of connected genes that are activated or repressed. In many cases, researchers are also interested in comparisons across species (or conditions). Finding an active sub-network is a hard problem and applying it across species requires further considerations (e.g. orthology information, expression data and networks from different sources). To address these challenges we devised ModuleBlast, which uses both expression and network topology to search for highly relevant sub-networks. We have applied ModuleBlast to expression and interaction data from mouse, macaque and human to study immune response and aging. The immune response analysis identified several relevant modules, consistent with recent findings on apoptosis and NFκB activation following infection. Temporal analysis of these data revealed cascades of modules that are dynamically activated within and across species. We have experimentally validated some of the novel hypotheses resulting from the analysis of the ModuleBlast results leading to new insights into the mechanisms used by a key mammalian aging protein. PMID:25428368

  11. ModuleBlast: identifying activated sub-networks within and across species.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Guy E; Naiman, Shoshana; O'Dee, Dawn M; Kumar, Nishant; Nau, Gerard J; Cohen, Haim Y; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-02-18

    Identifying conserved and divergent response patterns in gene networks is becoming increasingly important. A common approach is integrating expression information with gene association networks in order to find groups of connected genes that are activated or repressed. In many cases, researchers are also interested in comparisons across species (or conditions). Finding an active sub-network is a hard problem and applying it across species requires further considerations (e.g. orthology information, expression data and networks from different sources). To address these challenges we devised ModuleBlast, which uses both expression and network topology to search for highly relevant sub-networks. We have applied ModuleBlast to expression and interaction data from mouse, macaque and human to study immune response and aging. The immune response analysis identified several relevant modules, consistent with recent findings on apoptosis and NFκB activation following infection. Temporal analysis of these data revealed cascades of modules that are dynamically activated within and across species. We have experimentally validated some of the novel hypotheses resulting from the analysis of the ModuleBlast results leading to new insights into the mechanisms used by a key mammalian aging protein. PMID:25428368

  12. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  13. Early Activity of Cometary Species from ROSINA/DFMS at 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hässig, Myrtha; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bieler, André; Calmonte, Ursina; Dhooghe, Frederik; Fiethe, Björn; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Jäckel, Annette; Korth, Axel; Le Roy, Léna; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived after a journey of more than 10 years at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. ROSINA is an instrument package on board Rosetta. It consists of two mass spectrometers and a COmetary Pressure Sensor (COPS). The two mass spectrometers, the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) and the Reflectron Time of Flight (RTOF) complement each other with high mass resolution (e.g to resolve 13C from CH), high dynamic range (to detect low abundant isotopes and species), high mass range (to detect organics), and high time resolution. ROSINA is designed to measure the neutral gas and plasma composition in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in addition to the physical properties of the neutral component of the coma. For the first time, a comet can be observed in situ from its early activity towards and after perihelion. Little is known about what drives initial cometary activity very far from the Sun. Remote sensing observations to date are highly constrained to a limited number of a few bright comets (e.g. Hale-Bopp) and a limited number of species. Rosetta provides the first measurements of the early activity of a comet in situ and detected the first cometary molecules early August. We will focus on early activity of cometary species from the high resolution mass spectrometer ROSINA/DFMS.

  14. First record of second-generation facultative parthenogenesis in a vertebrate species, the whitespotted bambooshark Chiloscyllium plagiosum.

    PubMed

    Straube, N; Lampert, K P; Geiger, M F; Weiß, J D; Kirchhauser, J X

    2016-02-01

    In this study, two parthenogenetic events within a family of the whitespotted bambooshark Chiloscyllium plagiosum are reported. A captive female produced multiple parthenogens. Unexpectedly, a single specimen of a total of nine parthenogens displayed external claspers characterizing the male sex in chondrichthyans. Upon dissection, internal sexual organs of this specimen were malformed or absent; however, the presence of claspers in this study challenges the as yet assumed sex determination system in this shark species. Even more remarkable was that one of the female parthenogens reproduced asexually again producing viable offspring. As far as is known, this is the first genetically confirmed evidence for second-generation facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates. These results support the evolutionary significance of parthenogenesis as an alternative to sexual reproduction. PMID:26727105

  15. Subalpine Species Response to Past Climate Change and Fire Activity: Are We Underestimating the Biotic Resilience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, C. L.; Iglesias, V.; Krause, T.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-change impacts on species distributions will be especially complex in mountain systems with steep environmental gradients and heterogeneous landscapes. In the western US, projected climate conditions include rising temperatures, decreased snowpack, and increased moisture deficits, all of which will impact species distributions at high elevations. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis; WBP) is a keystone species in subalpine environments and one that is highly vulnerable to projected climate trends. In the past two decades, WBP populations dramatically declined as a result of bark beetle infestation, blister rust, high-severity fires, and drought. Species-niche modeling used to map future WPB distributions is based on the relation between present-day occurrence and bioclimatic parameters. While these models capture the realized niche, the full niche space inferred from paleo-observations appears to be much larger. To assess a broad range of bioclimatic conditions for WPB, we examined its response to past changes in climate, fire activity, and species competition. General additive modeling of pollen/charcoal data from the Greater Yellowstone area indicate that WBP reached maximum population size and distribution ~12,000 -7500 years ago and declined thereafter. Population dynamics tracked variations in summer insolation, such that WBP was most abundant when summer temperatures and fire frequency were higher than at present. Competition from lodgepole pine after ~10,000 years ago limited WBP at middle elevations. Paleoecological data indicate that the fundamental WBP niche is considerably larger than assumed, and simulations that project the demise of WBP in the next 50 years are probably too dramatic given WPB's ability to thrive under warm conditions and high fire activity in the past. Management strategies that reduce biotic competition and nonnative pathogens should help increase the future resilience of WBP and other subalpine species.

  16. Eriosema (Fabaceae) Species Represent a Rich Source of Flavonoids with Interesting Pharmacological Activities.

    PubMed

    Awouafack, Maurice Ducret; Tane, Pierre; Spiteller, Michael; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2015-07-01

    Many flavonoids have so far been isolated as main secondary metabolites in plant species of the genus Eriosema (Fabaceae), which contains approximately 160 species. A total of 52 flavonoids including isoflavones, dihydroflavonols, flavonols, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, isoflavanone and their pyrano or glucoside derivatives were isolated and characterized from the five species of this genus investigated to date. Total synthesis and semi-synthesis (acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation, and cyclization) of some isolated flavonoids were reported. Due to several significant pharmacological properties (antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, anti-mycobacterial, antioxidant, antiviral, erectile-dysfunction, vasodilatory and hypoglycemic) of the isolated flavonoids and derivatives, more scientists should be interested in investigating Eriosema species. The present review is the first to document all flavonoids that have been reported from the genus Eriosema to date together with their synthetic and semi-synthetic derivatives, and their pharmacological properties. Dihydrochalcones, which are precursors of other classes of flavonoids, are very rare in natural sources and their isolation from Eriosema species may explain the large number of flavonoids found in this genus. It appears that isoflavone could be a marker for species in this genus. The 83 flavonoids (1-83) documented include 52 isolates, 31 semi-synthetic and 3 totally synthetic derivatives. Data were obtained from Google scholar, Pubmed, Scifinder, Sciencedirect, and Scopus. With 52 different flavonoids isolated from only 5 of the approximately 160 species it shows the remarkable chemical diversity of this genus. This compilation of the biological activities and chemical composition may renew the interest of pharmacologists and phytochemists in this genus. PMID:26411043

  17. Scientific and Legal Perspectives on Science Generated for Regulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Carol J.; Conrad, James W.

    2008-01-01

    This article originated from a conference that asked “Should scientific work conducted for purposes of advocacy before regulatory agencies or courts be judged by the same standards as science conducted for other purposes?” In the article, which focuses on the regulatory advocacy context, we argue that it can be and should be. First, we describe a set of standards and practices currently being used to judge the quality of scientific research and testing and explain how these standards and practices assist in judging the quality of research and testing regardless of why the work was conducted. These standards and practices include the federal Information Quality Act, federal Good Laboratory Practice standards, peer review, disclosure of funding sources, and transparency in research policies. The more that scientific information meets these standards and practices, the more likely it is to be of high quality, reliable, reproducible, and credible. We then explore legal issues that may be implicated in any effort to create special rules for science conducted specifically for a regulatory proceeding. Federal administrative law does not provide a basis for treating information in a given proceeding differently depending on its source or the reason for which it was generated. To the contrary, this law positively assures that interested persons have the right to offer their technical expertise toward the solution of regulatory problems. Any proposal to subject scientific information generated for the purpose of a regulatory proceeding to more demanding standards than other scientific information considered in that proceeding would clash with this law and would face significant administrative complexities. In a closely related example, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considered but abandoned a program to implement standards aimed at “external” information. PMID:18197313

  18. Influence of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Enzyme Stability and Activity in the Presence of Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have examined the effect of ammonium and imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) on the stability and activity of proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin (CT) in the presence of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The present work aims to illustrate the state of art implementing the combined action of ILs and APPJ on the enzyme stability and activity. Our circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence and enzyme activity results of CT have revealed that buffer and all studied ILs {triethylammonium hydrogen sulphate (TEAS) from ammonium family and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]), 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim][Cl]) from imidazolium family} are notable to act as protective agents against the deleterious action of the APPJ, except triethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (TEAP) ammonium IL. However, TEAP attenuates strongly the deleterious action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) created by APPJ on native structure of CT. Further, TEAP is able to retain the enzymatic activity after APPJ exposure which is absent in all the other systems.This study provides the first combined effect of APPJ and ILs on biomolecules that may generate many theoretical and experimental opportunities. Through this methodology, we can utilise both enzyme and plasma simultaneously without affecting the enzyme structure and activity on the material surface; which can prove to be applicable in various fields. PMID:24066167

  19. Active hydrogen species on TiO2 for photocatalytic H2 production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zongfang; Zhang, Wenhua; Xiong, Feng; Yuan, Qing; Jin, Yuekang; Yang, Jinlong; Huang, Weixin

    2014-04-21

    Photocatalytic H2 production over TiO2 has attracted tremendous attention and achieved great progress, but the active hydrogen species is still unknown. Employing a rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model catalyst we report here for the first time the direct observation of photocatalytic H2 production under ultrahigh vacuum conditions during UV-light irradiation at 115 K and the identification of negatively-charged hydride-type H-Ti species as the corresponding photoactive surface species by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy, photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The formation and stability of H-Ti species are closely related to available surplus electrons on the rutile TiO2(110) surface that can be created by the formation of surface BBO vacancies or by the formation of surface hydroxyls via the adsorption of atomic H or molecular H2 on O sites. The photocatalytic H2 production from H-Ti species is hole-mediated and co-existing water exerts a negative effect on this process. PMID:24614827

  20. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  1. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  2. Evidence that reactive oxygen species do not mediate NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Makio; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Isao; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Karin, Michael; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2003-01-01

    It has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as second messengers leading to nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. This hypothesis is mainly based on the findings that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), compounds recognized as potential antioxidants, can inhibit NF-κB activation in a wide variety of cell types. Here we reveal that both NAC and PDTC inhibit NF-κB activation independently of antioxidative function. NAC selectively blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signaling by lowering the affinity of receptor to TNF. PDTC inhibits the IκB–ubiquitin ligase activity in the cell-free system where extracellular stimuli-regulated ROS production does not occur. Furthermore, we present evidence that endogenous ROS produced through Rac/NADPH oxidase do not mediate NF-κB signaling, but instead lower the magnitude of its activation. PMID:12839997

  3. The effect of five Taraxacum species on in vitro and in vivo antioxidant and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, D Muñoz; Plaza, A; Galán, A; Vicente, J A; Martínez, M P; Acero, N

    2015-08-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Taraxacum are considered a nutritious food, being consumed raw or cooked. Additionally, these plants have long been used in folk medicine due to their choleretic, diuretic, antitumor, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties. This genus, with its complex taxonomy, includes several species that are difficult to distinguish. Its traditional use must be related not only to T. officinale F.H. Wigg., the most studied species, but also to others. The aim of this work is to compare five different common South European species of Taraxacum (T. obovatum (Willd.) DC., T. marginellum H. Lindb., T. hispanicum H. Lindb., T. lambinonii Soest and T. lacistrum Sahlin), in order to find differences between antioxidant and cytotoxic activities among them. Dissimilarities between species in LC/MS patterns, in in vitro and intracellular antioxidant activity and also in the cytotoxicity assay were found. T. marginellum was the most efficient extract reducing intracellular ROS levels although in in vitro assays, T. obovatum was the best free radical scavenger. A relevant cytotoxic effect was found in T. lacistrum extract over HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. PMID:26158347

  4. Valuing the Endangered Species Antirrhinum lopesianum: Neuroprotective Activities and Strategies for in vitro Plant Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andreia; Fortalezas, Sofia; Pimpão, Rui; Figueira, Inês; Maroco, João; Aguiar, Carlos; Ferreira, Ricardo B.; Miguel, Célia; Santos, Cláudia N.

    2013-01-01

    Plant phytochemicals are described as possessing considerable neuroprotective properties, due to radical scavenging capacity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, important bioactivities in neurodegeneration. Antirrhinum lopesianum is a rare endemism from the Iberian Peninsula, occurring at the northeastern border between Portugal and Spain. It is classified as Endangered, due to its highly fragmented geographical occupation, facing a high risk of extinction in the Portuguese territory, within 20 years. Here, we describe for the first time the chemical characterization of extracts of the species concerning total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant properties. The profile of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) of the polyphenol-enriched fraction of plant extracts was also performed, showing the great potential of the species as a source of bioactive phytochemical compounds. A. lopesianum’s potential for neuroprotection was revealed by a significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and also by a neuroprotective effect on a human cell model of neurodegeneration. Moreover, this is the first report describing a successful procedure for the in vitro propagation of this endangered species. The comparison of phenolic content and the HPLC-DAD profile of wild and in vitro propagated plants revealed that in vitro plants maintain the ability to produce secondary metabolites, but the profiles are differentially affected by the growth regulators. The results presented here greatly contribute to the value for this species regarding its potential as a source of phytochemicals with prospective neuroprotective health benefits. PMID:26784465

  5. Valuing the Endangered Species Antirrhinum lopesianum: Neuroprotective Activities and Strategies for in vitro Plant Propagation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andreia; Fortalezas, Sofia; Pimpão, Rui; Figueira, Inês; Maroco, João; Aguiar, Carlos; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Miguel, Célia; Santos, Cláudia N

    2013-01-01

    Plant phytochemicals are described as possessing considerable neuroprotective properties, due to radical scavenging capacity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, important bioactivities in neurodegeneration. Antirrhinum lopesianum is a rare endemism from the Iberian Peninsula, occurring at the northeastern border between Portugal and Spain. It is classified as Endangered, due to its highly fragmented geographical occupation, facing a high risk of extinction in the Portuguese territory, within 20 years. Here, we describe for the first time the chemical characterization of extracts of the species concerning total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant properties. The profile of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) of the polyphenol-enriched fraction of plant extracts was also performed, showing the great potential of the species as a source of bioactive phytochemical compounds. A. lopesianum's potential for neuroprotection was revealed by a significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and also by a neuroprotective effect on a human cell model of neurodegeneration. Moreover, this is the first report describing a successful procedure for the in vitro propagation of this endangered species. The comparison of phenolic content and the HPLC-DAD profile of wild and in vitro propagated plants revealed that in vitro plants maintain the ability to produce secondary metabolites, but the profiles are differentially affected by the growth regulators. The results presented here greatly contribute to the value for this species regarding its potential as a source of phytochemicals with prospective neuroprotective health benefits. PMID:26784465

  6. Probabilistic analysis of activation volumes generated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2011-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient's primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs. PMID:20974269

  7. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Some Malvaceae Family Species

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Adriana Maria Fernandes; Pinheiro, Lilian Sousa; Pereira, Charlane Kelly Souto; Matias, Wemerson Neves; Gomes, Roosevelt Albuquerque; Chaves, Otemberg Souza; de Souza, Maria de Fátima Vanderlei; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nóbrega; de Assis, Temilce Simões

    2012-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of four species of the Malvaceae family (Sidastrum micranthum (A. St.-Hil.) Fryxell, Wissadula periplocifolia (L.) C. Presl, Sida rhombifolia (L.) E. H. L and Herissantia crispa L. (Brizicky)) were studied using the total phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging activity and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays. The antioxidant activity of the crude extract, phases and two isolated flavonoids, kaempferol 3,7-di-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (lespedin) and kaempferol 3-O-β-D-(6''-E-p-coumaroil) glucopyranoside (tiliroside) was determined. The results showed that there is a strong correlation between total polyphenol contents and antioxidant activity of the crude extract of Sidastrum micranthum and Wissadula periplocifolia; however, this was not observed between Sida rhombifolia and Herissantia crispa. The ethyl acetate (EaF) phase showed the best antioxidant effect in the total phenolics, DPPH and TEAC assays, followed by the chloroform (CfF) phase, in most species tested. Lespedin, isolated from the EaF phase of W. periplocifolia and H. crispa may not be responsible for the antioxidant activity due to its low antioxidant activity (IC50: DPPH: 1,019.92 ± 68.99 mg/mL; TEAC: 52.70 ± 0.47 mg/mL); whereas tiliroside, isolated from W. periplocifolia, H. crispa and S. micrantum presented a low IC50 value (1.63 ± 0.86 mg/mL) compared to ascorbic acid in the TEAC assay. PMID:26787614

  8. Effect of active species on animal cells in culture media induced by DBD Plasma irradiation using air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsubo, Tetsuya; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Little has been reported on action mechanism of active species produced by plasmas affecting living cells. In this study, active species in culture medium generated by torch type DBD and variations of animal cells are attempted to be clarified. Animal cells are irradiated by DBD plasma through various media such as DMEM, PBS and distilled water. Irradiation period is 1 to 15 min. The distance between the lower tip of plasma touch and the surface of the medium is 10 mm. Concentrations of NO2 -, O2 in liquid are measured. After the irradiation, the cells were cultivated in culture medium and their modifications are observed by microscope and some chemical reagents. Concentration of NO2 - and H2 O2 in all media increased with discharge period. Increase rate of NO2 -concentration is much higher than that of hydrogen peroxide. After plasma irradiation for 15 min, concentrations of NO2 were 80 mg/L in DMEM, 30 mg/L in PBS and 15 mg/L in distilled water. Also, the concentration of H2 O2 became 3mg/L in DMEM, 6.5 mg/L in PBS and 6.5mg/L in distilled water. The significant inactivation of cells was observed in the PBS. Above results indicate that, in this experiment, H2 O2 or OH radicals would affect animal cells in culture media.

  9. Antifungal Activity of Plant Extracts against Candida Species from Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, K.; Kumar, L. Sathish; Rajendran, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Bhaskar, K.; Sajit Khan, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    Seventy five patients with oral lesions attending the different departments of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University were screened for Candida. Forty six (61.3%) Candida strains were isolated from the oral lesions. Of the 46 Candida strains, Candida albicans accounted for 35 (76.08%), Candida glabrata for 5 (10.86%), Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei for 2 (4.34%) each and Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii for one (2.17%) each. Antifungal activity of ethanol extracts of five plant species that included Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea, Odina wodier, Momordica charantia and Melia azedarach and two algal species, Sargassum wightii and Caulerpa scalpelliformis were tested against 25 isolated strains by disc diffusion method. Antifungal activity was observed at 100 mg/ml for Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea and Caulerpa scalpelliformis and at 10 mg/ml for Sargassum wightii. PMID:21369447

  10. Assessment of antiproliferative and antiplasmodial activities of five selected Apocynaceae species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that the barks and roots of some Apocynaceae species have anticancer and antimalarial properties. In this study, leaf extracts of five selected species of Apocynaceae used in traditional medicine (Alstonia angustiloba, Calotropis gigantea, Dyera costulata, Kopsia fruticosa and Vallaris glabra) were assessed for antiproliferative (APF) and antiplasmodial (APM) activities, and analysed for total alkaloid content (TAC), total phenolic content (TPC) and radical-scavenging activity (RSA). As V. glabra leaf extracts showed wide spectrum APF and APM activities, they were further screened for saponins, tannins, cardenolides and terpenoids. Methods APF and APM activities were assessed using the sulphorhodamine B and lactate dehydrogenase assays, respectively. TAC, TPC and RSA were analysed using Dragendorff precipitation, Folin-Ciocalteu and DPPH assays, respectively. Screening for saponins, tannins, cardenolides and terpenoids were conducted using the frothing, ferric chloride, Kedde and vanillin-H2SO4 tests, respectively. Results Leaf extracts of A. angustiloba, C. gigantea and V. glabra displayed positive APF activity. Dichloromethane (DCM) extract of C. gigantea, and DCM and DCM:MeOH extracts of V. glabra showed strong APF activity against all six human cancer cell lines tested. DCM extract of A. angustiloba was effective against three cancer cell lines. Against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines, DCM extract of C. gigantea was stronger than standard drugs of xanthorrhizol, curcumin and tamoxifen. All five species were effective against K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum and three species (C. gigantea, D. costulata and K. fruticosa) were effective against 3D7 strain. Against K1 strain, all four extracts of V. glabra displayed effective APM activity. Extracts of D. costulata were effective against 3D7 strain. Selectivity index values of extracts of A. angustiloba, C. gigantea and V. glabra suggested that they are potentially safe for use to

  11. Differential Water Mite Parasitism, Phenoloxidase Activity, and Resistance to Mites Are Unrelated across Pairs of Related Damselfly Species

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarek, Julia J.; Iserbyt, Arne; Nagel, Laura; Forbes, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Related host species often demonstrate differences in prevalence and/or intensity of infection by particular parasite species, as well as different levels of resistance to those parasites. The mechanisms underlying this interspecific variation in parasitism and resistance expression are not well understood. Surprisingly, few researchers have assessed relations between actual levels of parasitism and resistance to parasites seen in nature across multiple host species. The main goal of this study was to determine whether interspecific variation in resistance against ectoparasitic larval water mites either was predictive of interspecific variation in parasitism for ten closely related species of damselflies (grouped into five “species pairs”), or was predicted by interspecific variation in a commonly used measure of innate immunity (total Phenoloxidase or potential PO activity). Two of five species pairs had interspecific differences in proportions of individuals resisting larval Arrenurus water mites, only one of five species pairs had species differences in prevalence of larval Arrenurus water mites, and another two of five species pairs showed species differences in mean PO activity. Within the two species pairs where species differed in proportion of individuals resisting mites the species with the higher proportion did not have correspondingly higher PO activity levels. Furthermore, the proportion of individuals resisting mites mirrored prevalence of parasitism in only one species pair. There was no interspecific variation in median intensity of mite infestation within any species pair. We conclude that a species’ relative ability to resist particular parasites does not explain interspecific variation in parasitism within species pairs and that neither resistance nor parasitism is reflected by interspecific variation in total PO or potential PO activity. PMID:25658982

  12. Portuguese Thymbra and Thymus species volatiles: chemical composition and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, A C; Barroso, J G; Pedro, L G; Salgueiro, L; Miguel, M G; Faleiro, M L

    2008-01-01

    Thymbra capitata and Thymus species are commonly known in Portugal as thyme and they are currently used as culinary herbs, as well as for ornamental, aromatizing and traditional medicinal purposes. The present work reports on the state of the art on the information available on the taxonomy, ethnobotany, cell and molecular biology of the Portuguese representatives of these genera and on the chemotaxonomy and antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of their essential oils and other volatile-containing extracts. PMID:19075695

  13. Seasonal brain acetylcholinesterase activity in three species of shorebirds overwintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, C.A.; White, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    There was no seasonal variation in average brain AChE activity for the 3 species of wild birds collected between October and February. Further work needs to be done, however, covering an even broader time frame which includes the reproductive cycle. It appears that some birds feeding at the mouth of an agricultural drain, at some distance from the nearest pesticide applications, were affected by AChE inhibitors.

  14. Highly Heterogeneous Probiotic Lactobacillus Species in Healthy Iranians with Low Functional Activities

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Mahdi; Noohi, Nasrin; Talebi, Malihe; Katouli, Mohammad; Pourshafie, Mohammad R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been considered as potentially probiotic organisms due to their potential human health properties. This study aimed to evaluate both in vitro and in vivo, the potential probiotic properties of Lactobacillus species isolated from fecal samples of healthy humans in Iran. Methods and Results A total of 470 LAB were initially isolated from 53 healthy individual and characterized to species level. Of these, 88 (86%) were Lactobacillus species. Biochemical and genetic fingerprinting with Phene-Plate system (PhP-LB) and RAPD-PCR showed that the isolates were highly diverse consisted of 67(76.1%) and 75 (85.2%) single types (STs) and a diversity indices of 0.994 and 0.997, respectively. These strains were tested for production of adhesion to Caco-2 cells, antibacterial activity, production of B12, anti-proliferative effect and interleukin-8 induction on gut epithelial cell lines and antibiotic resistance against 9 commonly used antibiotics. Strains showing the characteristics consistent with probiotic strains, were further tested for their anti-inflammatory effect in mouse colitis model. Only one L. brevis; one L. rhamnosus and two L. plantarum were shown to have significant probiotic properties. These strains showed shortening the length of colon compared to dextran sulfate sodium and disease activity index (DAI) was also significantly reduced in mouse. Conclusion Low number of LAB with potential probiotic activity as well as high diversity of lactobacilli species was evident in Iranian population. It also suggest that specific strains of L. plantarum, L. brevis and L. rhamnosus with anti-inflammatory effect in mouse model of colitis could be used as a potential probiotic candidate in inflammatory bowel disease to decrease the disease activity index. PMID:26645292

  15. In vitro antioxidant activity of species collected in Paraná.

    PubMed

    Menezes, P R; Schwarz, E A; Santos, C A M

    2004-06-01

    Hydroalcoholic extracts of 10 medicinally used species collected from the area covered by a reservoir due to a dam built for the Salto Caxias Hydro-electric power plant in the State of Paraná, Southern Brazil, and Casearia sylvestris, were investigated for their potential antioxidant activity against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) free radicals and by the phosphomolybdenum method. The extract of Bauhinia microstachya was found to be the most potent in both models. PMID:15159006

  16. Phenolic Profile and In vitro Antioxidant Activity of Endemic Bulgarian Carduus Species

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova-Dyulgerova, Ivanka; Zhelev, Iliya; Mihaylova, Dasha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Plant species from genus Carduus are widely distributed in the world and represented in Bulgaria by 14 species. Previous investigations on this genus demonstrated a strong antioxidant potential of extract from some Bulgarian Carduus species. Objective: The present study investigates the phenolic profile and the antioxidant potential of different extracts obtained from four endemic Compositae herbs, growing wild in Bulgaria: Carduus armatus Boiss and Heldr., Carduus candicans Waldst. et Kit ssp. globifer (Velen.) Kazmi., Carduus rhodopaeus Velen. and Carduus thracicus (Velen.) Hayek. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant capacity of the obtained extracts was estimated with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), and ferric reducing antioxidant power and copper reduction antioxidant assays. Phenolic profile was estimated by high performance liquid chromatography. Results: Eleven phenolic acids and eight flavonoids were quantified in the inflorescences. Sinapic (2760.72 ± 15.68 μg/g dry weight [dw]), chlorogenic (2564.50 ± 19.73 μg/g dw) and ferulic acids (1648.71 ± 19.57 μg/g dw), as well as luteolin (2345.45 ± 18.61 μg/g dw) and apigenin (1332.75 ± 12.05 μg/g dw) were found to be the predominant compounds. The above contents are the highest values found in C. candicans ssp. globifer. The highest established antioxidant activit