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Sample records for active spot scanning

  1. WE-EF-303-11: Activity Distributions of Positron-Emitting-Isotopes Activated by Modulated Spot-Scanning Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W; Deng, Y; Sun, L; Li, Y; Huang, Z; Sheng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhao, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the characteristics of positron-emitting-isotope (PEI) activity distributions on homogeneous and CIRS thorax phantoms irradiated by modulated spot-scanning carbon-ions and protons in Siemens IONTRIS system. Methods and Materials: Cylindrical homogeneous wax was irradiated by carbon-ions and protons of 10cm uniform square field with single-energy-layer ranges of 7cm, 16cm and 29cm. Images of PEI distributions were acquired over a period of 30 minutes at 10 minutes after each irradiation. Optimized uniform biological-equivalent doses of carbon-ions over a 5.0cm spherical target was delivered to CIRS phantom. Doses with range shifts in depths from 1mm to 6mm were also calculated and delivered to evaluate the accuracy of measuring activated PEI distributions. Results: Activated PEI distribution on homogeneous phantoms showed sharper peak near distal edge with flatter distribution toward proximal depth by carbon-ions than by protons. For depths near at Bragg-peak, penetration-depth spreading for energies from 10MeV/u to 60 MeV/u are from 0.4mm to 10.3mm, and 1.2mm to 30.4mm for projectile-fragments by carbon-ions and target-fragments by protons, respectively. For depths proximal to Bragg-peak, target-fragments for both carbon-ions and protons had minimal energy dependence in depth. For complex dose distributions delivered to CIRS thorax phantom, similar PEI peak-like distributions were still observed for carbon-ions. And, the changes at locations and edges of measured PEI peak were correlated within 0.5mm of shifted ranges. Mean activities over 5.0cm spherical target were similar for CISR phantom irradiated by doses with various range shifts. Conclusions: Peak-like PEI distributions by carbon-ions with good correlation to distal edges in both homogeneous and CIRS thorax phantoms present the potential for the in-vivo range verification while additional efforts is needed for protons. Due to flat distributions for depths at 6mm proximal to distal edges

  2. SU-E-T-510: Interplay Between Spots Sizes, Spot / Line Spacing and Motion in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, TK

    2015-06-15

    Purpose In proton beam configuration for spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT), one can define the spacing between spots and lines of scanning as a ratio of given spot size. If the spacing increases, the number of spots decreases which can potentially decrease scan time, and so can whole treatment time, and vice versa. However, if the spacing is too large, the uniformity of scanned field decreases. Also, the field uniformity can be affected by motion during SSPT beam delivery. In the present study, the interplay between spot/ line spacing and motion is investigated. Methods We used four Gaussian-shape spot sizes with 0.5cm, 1.0cm, 1.5cm, and 2.0cm FWHM, three spot/line spacing that creates uniform field profile which are 1/3*FWHM, σ/3*FWHM and 2/3*FWHM, and three random motion amplitudes within, +/−0.3mm, +/−0.5mm, and +/−1.0mm. We planned with 2Gy uniform single layer of 10×10cm2 and 20×20cm2 fields. Then, mean dose within 80% area of given field size, contrubuting MU per each spot assuming 1cGy/MU calibration for all spot sizes, number of spots and uniformity were calculated. Results The plans with spot/line spacing equal to or smaller than 2/3*FWHM without motion create ∼100% uniformity. However, it was found that the uniformity decreases with increased spacing, and it is more pronounced with smaller spot sizes, but is not affected by scanned field sizes. Conclusion It was found that the motion during proton beam delivery can alter the dose uniformity and the amount of alteration changes with spot size which changes with energy and spot/line spacing. Currently, robust evaluation in TPS (e.g. Eclipse system) performs range uncertainty evaluation using isocenter shift and CT calibration error. Based on presented study, it is recommended to add interplay effect evaluation to robust evaluation process. For future study, the additional interplay between the energy layers and motion is expected to present volumetric effect.

  3. Hot spot liver scan in focal nodular hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Piers, D.A.; Houthoff, H.J.; Krom, R.A.F.; Schuur, K.H.; Sikkens, H.; Weits, J.

    1980-12-01

    In scintigraphy of the liver with radiocolloid, space-occupying lesions generally are visualized as regions of decreased accumulation of radioactivity. Rarely focal areas of increased activity are depicted; most are related to altered vascular dynamics in the liver secondary to obstruction of the superior or inferior vena cava or the hepatic veins. There are reports of single cases of focally increased activity due to a hepatic hemangioma, hepatic venoocclusive disease, herniation of a part of the liver, and a liver hot spot found after radiocolloid injection via a malpositioned central venous catheter in one of the hepatic vein branches. In patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, liver scans with solitary defects as well as normal patterns are found. In some cases, increased uptake of colloid in the lesion has been documented. Pasquier and Dorta reported a patient with a palpable mass in the left liver lobe with increased accumulation of radioactivity on the radiocolloid liver scan. The histologic diagnosis was hamartoma, but reviewing the description and considering the confusion in the past concerning the nomenclature, this case is suggestive of focal nodular hyperplasia. We report a patient with focal nodular hyperplasia who had increased radiocolloid uptake in the lesion. The radionuclide studies are compared with angiography, sonography, and computed tomography. An explanation for the localized increased colloid accumulation based on histologic findings is suggested.

  4. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single-spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-21

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field size effects on dose output. In this study, we developed a pencil beam algorithm for scanning proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy.

  5. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field-size effects on dose output. In the present study, we developed a pencil-beam algorithm for scanning-proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil-beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field-size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy. PMID:22297324

  6. Spot-Scanning-Based Proton Therapy for Extracranial Chordoma

    SciTech Connect

    Staab, Adrian; Rutz, Hans Peter; Ares, Carmen; Timmermann, Beate; Schneider, Ralf; Bolsi, Alessandra; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness and safety of spot-scanning-based proton-radiotherapy (PT) for extracranial chordomas (ECC). Methods and Material: Between 1999-2006, 40 patients with chordoma of C-, T-, and L-spine and sacrum were treated at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with PT using spot-scanning. Median patient age was 58 years (range, 10-81 years); 63% were male, and 36% were female. Nineteen patients (47%) had gross residual disease (mean 69 cc; range, 13-495 cc) before PT, and 21 patients (53%) had undergone prior titanium-based surgical stabilization (SS) and reconstruction of the axial skeleton. Proton doses were expressed as Gy(RBE). A conversion factor of 1.1 was used to account for higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons compared with photons. Mean total dose was 72.5 Gy(RBE) [range, 59.4-75.2 Gy(RBE)] delivered at 1.8-2.0 Gy(RBE) dose per fraction. Median follow-up time was 43 months. Results: In 19 patients without surgical stabilization, actuarial local control (LC) rate at 5 years was 100%. LC for patients with gross residual disease but without surgical stabilization was also 100% at 5 years. In contrast, 12 failures occurred in 21 patients with SS, yielding a significantly decreased 5-year LC rate of 30% (p = 0.0003). For the entire cohort, 5-year LC rates were 62%, disease-free survival rates were 57%, and overall survival rates were 80%. Rates were 100% for patients without SS. No other factor, including dosimetric parameters (V95, V80) were predictive for tumor control on univariate analysis. Conclusion: Spot-scanning-based PT at PSI delivered subsequently to function-preserving surgery for tumor debulking, decompression of spinal cord, or biopsy only is safe and highly effective in patients with ECC without major surgical instrumentation even in view of large, unresectable disease.

  7. Impact of spot size on plan quality of spot scanning proton radiosurgery for peripheral brain lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dongxu Dirksen, Blake; Hyer, Daniel E.; Buatti, John M.; Sheybani, Arshin; Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; TenNapel, Mindi; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the plan quality of proton spot scanning (SS) radiosurgery as a function of spot size (in-air sigma) in comparison to x-ray radiosurgery for treating peripheral brain lesions. Methods: Single-field optimized (SFO) proton SS plans with sigma ranging from 1 to 8 mm, cone-based x-ray radiosurgery (Cone), and x-ray volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated for 11 patients. Plans were evaluated using secondary cancer risk and brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: For all patients, secondary cancer is a negligible risk compared to brain necrosis NTCP. Secondary cancer risk was lower in proton SS plans than in photon plans regardless of spot size (p = 0.001). Brain necrosis NTCP increased monotonically from an average of 2.34/100 (range 0.42/100–4.49/100) to 6.05/100 (range 1.38/100–11.6/100) as sigma increased from 1 to 8 mm, compared to the average of 6.01/100 (range 0.82/100–11.5/100) for Cone and 5.22/100 (range 1.37/100–8.00/100) for VMAT. An in-air sigma less than 4.3 mm was required for proton SS plans to reduce NTCP over photon techniques for the cohort of patients studied with statistical significance (p = 0.0186). Proton SS plans with in-air sigma larger than 7.1 mm had significantly greater brain necrosis NTCP than photon techniques (p = 0.0322). Conclusions: For treating peripheral brain lesions—where proton therapy would be expected to have the greatest depth-dose advantage over photon therapy—the lateral penumbra strongly impacts the SS plan quality relative to photon techniques: proton beamlet sigma at patient surface must be small (<7.1 mm for three-beam single-field optimized SS plans) in order to achieve comparable or smaller brain necrosis NTCP relative to photon radiosurgery techniques. Achieving such small in-air sigma values at low energy (<70 MeV) is a major technological challenge in commercially available proton therapy systems.

  8. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  9. SU-E-T-303: Spot Scanning Dose Delivery with Rapid Cycling Proton Beams From RCMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C; Liu, H; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A rapid cycling proton beam has several distinct characteristics superior to a slow extraction synchrotron: The beam energy and energy spread, beam intensity and spot size can be varied spot by spot. The feasibility of using a spot scanning beam from a rapidc-ycling-medical-synchrotron (RCMS) at 10 Hz repetition frequency is investigated in this study for its application in proton therapy. Methods: The versatility of the beam is illustrated by two examples in water phantoms: (1) a cylindrical PTV irradiated by a single field and (2) a spherical PTV irradiated by two parallel opposed fields. A uniform dose distribution is to be delivered to the volumes. Geant4 Monte Carlo code is used to validate the dose distributions in each example. Results: Transverse algorithms are developed to produce uniform distributions in each transverseplane in the two examples with a cylindrical and a spherical PTV respectively. Longitudinally, different proton energies are used in successive transverse planes toproduce the SOBP required to cover the PTVs. In general, uniformity of dosedistribution within 3% is obtained for the cylinder and 3.5% for the sphere. The transversealgorithms requires only few hundred beam spots for each plane The algorithms may beapplied to larger volumes by increasing the intensity spot by spot for the same deliverytime of the same dose. The treatment time can be shorter than 1 minute for any fieldconfiguration and tumor shape. Conclusion: The unique beam characteristics of a spot scanning beam from a RCMS at 10 Hz repetitionfrequency are used to design transverse and longitudinal algorithms to produce uniformdistribution for any arbitrary shape and size of targets. The proposed spot scanning beam ismore versatile than existing spot scanning beams in proton therapy with better beamcontrol and lower neutron dose. This work is supported in part by grants from the US Department of Energy under contract; DE-FG02-12ER41800 and the National Science

  10. Motion Interplay as a Function of Patient Parameters and Spot Size in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Lomax, Antony; Sharp, Greg; Shackleford, James; Choi, Noah; Willers, Henning; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of respiratory motion on the treatment of lung tumors with spot scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the interplay effect, which results from relative motion of the tumor and the proton beam, on the dose distribution in the patient. Ten patients with varying tumor sizes (2.6-82.3 cc) and motion amplitudes (3-30 mm) were included in the study. We investigated the impact of the spot size, which varies between proton facilities, and studied single fractions and conventionally fractionated treatments. The following metrics were used in the analysis: minimum/maximum/mean dose, target dose homogeneity, and 2-year local control rate (2y-LC). Results: Respiratory motion reduces the target dose homogeneity, with the largest effects observed for the highest motion amplitudes. Smaller spot sizes (σ ≈ 3 mm) are inherently more sensitive to motion, decreasing target dose homogeneity on average by a factor 2.8 compared with a larger spot size (σ ≈ 13 mm). Using a smaller spot size to treat a tumor with 30-mm motion amplitude reduces the minimum dose to 44.7% of the prescribed dose, decreasing modeled 2y-LC from 87.0% to 2.7%, assuming a single fraction. Conventional fractionation partly mitigates this reduction, yielding a 2y-LC of 71.6%. For the large spot size, conventional fractionation increases target dose homogeneity and prevents a deterioration of 2y-LC for all patients. No correlation with tumor volume is observed. The effect on the normal lung dose distribution is minimal: observed changes in mean lung dose and lung V{sub 20} are <0.6 Gy(RBE) and <1.7%, respectively. Conclusions: For the patients in this study, 2y-LC could be preserved in the presence of interplay using a large spot size and conventional fractionation. For treatments using smaller spot sizes and/or in the delivery of single fractions, interplay effects can lead to significant deterioration of

  11. A scanning spot-beam satellite communication system via transponder with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, K.; Teshirogi, T.

    1981-07-01

    A TDMA satellite communication system with a spot beam scanned rapidly over the entire service area is discussed, and a configuration of a satellite transponder is proposed, which has an up-link and a down-link beam simultaneously controlled in the same sequence. A comparison is made with Reudink's (1977) system, and it is shown that the switching rate of the down-link beam for the present system can handle high power and thus be reduced to a fraction of Reudink's system. The configuration of the present antenna system would also be simpler in the case of coexistence of a fixed multibeam and scanning spot-beam system.

  12. SU-E-T-133: Dosimetric Impact of Scan Orientation Relative to Target Motion During Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, J; Summers, P; Li, X; Gomez, D; Sahoo, N; Zhu, X; Gillin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intra-fraction motion during spot scanning proton beam therapy as a function of beam-scan orientation and target motion amplitude. Method: Multiple 4DCT scans were collected of a dynamic anthropomorphic phantom mimicking respiration amplitudes of 0 (static), 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm. A spot-scanning treatment plan was developed on the maximum intensity projection image set, using an inverse-planning approach. Dynamic phantom motion was continuous throughout treatment plan delivery.The target nodule was designed to accommodate film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Film and TLDs were uniquely labeled by location within the target. The phantom was localized on the treatment table using the clinically available orthogonal kV on-board imaging device. Film inserts provided data for dose uniformity; TLDs provided a 3% precision estimate of absolute dose. An inhouse script was developed to modify the delivery order of the beam spots, to orient the scanning direction parallel or perpendicular to target motion.TLD detector characterization and analysis was performed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core group (IROC)-Houston. Film inserts, exhibiting a spatial resolution of 1mm, were analyzed to determine dose homogeneity within the radiation target. Results: Parallel scanning and target motions exhibited reduced target dose heterogeneity, relative to perpendicular scanning orientation. The average percent deviation in absolute dose for the motion deliveries relative to the static delivery was 4.9±1.1% for parallel scanning, and 11.7±3.5% (p<<0.05) for perpendicularly oriented scanning. Individual delivery dose deviations were not necessarily correlated to amplitude of motion for either scan orientation. Conclusions: Results demonstrate a quantifiable difference in dose heterogeneity as a function of scan orientation, more so than target amplitude. Comparison to the analyzed planar dose of a single

  13. Scanning metallic nanosphere microscopy for vectorial profiling of optical focal spots.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hui; Long, Jing; Li, Hongquan; He, Xiaolong; Yang, Tian

    2015-04-06

    Recent years have witnessed fast progress in the development of spatially variant states of polarization under high numerical aperture focusing, and intensive exploration of their applications. We report a vectorial, broadband, high contrast and subwavelength resolution method for focal spot profiling. In this experiment, a 100 nm diameter gold nanosphere on a silica aerogel substrate is raster scanned across the focal spots, and the orthogonal polarization components can be obtained simultaneously by measuring the scattering far field in a confocal manner. The metallic-nanosphere-on-aerogel structure ensures negligible distortion to the focal spots, low crosstalk between orthogonal polarization components (1/39 in experiment), and a low level background noise (1/80 of peak intensity in experiment), while high contrast imaging is not limited by the resonance bandwidth.

  14. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of spot-scanning proton irradiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenichiro; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsuura, Taeko; Yamamori, Tohru; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nagane, Masaki; Nam, Jin-Min; Inanami, Osamu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) from a fixed value of 1.1 are critical in proton beam therapy. To date, studies estimating RBE at multiple positions relative to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) have been predominantly performed using passive scattering methods, and limited data are available for spot-scanning beams. Thus, to investigate the RBE of spot-scanning beams, Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were irradiated using the beam line at the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Cells were placed at six different depths, including the entrance of the proton beam and the proximal and distal part of the SOBP. Surviving cell fractions were analyzed using colony formation assay, and cell survival curves were obtained by the curve fitted using a linear-quadratic model. RBE10 and RBE37 were 1.15 and 1.21 at the center of the SOBP, respectively. In contrast, the distal region showed higher RBE values (1.50 for RBE10 and 1.85 for RBE37). These results are in line with those of previous studies conducted using passive scattering proton beams. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that variations in RBE should be considered during treatment planning for spot-scanning beams as well as for passive scattering proton beams.

  15. Effects of minimum monitor unit threshold on spot scanning proton plan quality

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Michelle Beltran, Chris; Mayo, Charles S.; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5–10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1–20 cm. Three-field, intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000–0.0060; and spot spacing range of 2–8 mm. Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. For the pediatric brain, two versions of the treatment planning system were also compared to judge the effects of the min-MU limit based on when it is accounted for in the optimization process (Eclipse v.10 and v.13, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Results: The increase of the min-MU limit with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 4 mm. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 8 mm, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusions: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤4 mm, plan quality decreases as min-MU increased beyond 0.0020. The effect of min-MU needs to be taken into consideration while planning proton therapy treatments.

  16. Use of treatment log files in spot scanning proton therapy as part of patient-specific quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Zhang Xiaodong; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to assess the monitor unit (MU) values and position accuracy of spot scanning proton beams as recorded by the daily treatment logs of the treatment control system, and furthermore establish the feasibility of using the delivered spot positions and MU values to calculate and evaluate delivered doses to patients. Methods: To validate the accuracy of the recorded spot positions, the authors generated and executed a test treatment plan containing nine spot positions, to which the authors delivered ten MU each. The spot positions were measured with radiographic films and Matrixx 2D ion-chambers array placed at the isocenter plane and compared for displacements from the planned and recorded positions. Treatment logs for 14 patients were then used to determine the spot MU values and position accuracy of the scanning proton beam delivery system. Univariate analysis was used to detect any systematic error or large variation between patients, treatment dates, proton energies, gantry angles, and planned spot positions. The recorded patient spot positions and MU values were then used to replace the spot positions and MU values in the plan, and the treatment planning system was used to calculate the delivered doses to patients. The results were compared with the treatment plan. Results: Within a treatment session, spot positions were reproducible within {+-}0.2 mm. The spot positions measured by film agreed with the planned positions within {+-}1 mm and with the recorded positions within {+-}0.5 mm. The maximum day-to-day variation for any given spot position was within {+-}1 mm. For all 14 patients, with {approx}1 500 000 spots recorded, the total MU accuracy was within 0.1% of the planned MU values, the mean (x, y) spot displacement from the planned value was (-0.03 mm, -0.01 mm), the maximum (x, y) displacement was (1.68 mm, 2.27 mm), and the (x, y) standard deviation was (0.26 mm, 0.42 mm). The maximum dose difference between calculated

  17. NOTE: Comparison of surface doses from spot scanning and passively scattered proton therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Cox, James; Lee, Andrew; Gillin, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Proton therapy for the treatment of cancer is delivered using either passively scattered or scanning beams. Each technique delivers a different amount of dose to the skin, because of the specific feature of their delivery system. The amount of dose delivered to the skin can play an important role in choosing the delivery technique for a specific site. To assess the differences in skin doses, we measured the surface doses associated with these two techniques. For the purpose of this investigation, the surface doses in a phantom were measured for ten prostate treatment fields planned with passively scattered proton beams and ten patients planned with spot scanning proton beams. The measured doses were compared to evaluate the differences in the amount of skin dose delivered by using these techniques. The results indicate that, on average, the patients treated with spot scanning proton beams received lower skin doses by an amount of 11.8% ± 0.3% than did the patients treated with passively scattered proton beams. That difference could amount to 4 CGE per field for a prescribed dose of 76 CGE in 38 fractions treated with two equally weighted parallel opposed fields.

  18. Fast range measurement of spot scanning proton beams using a volumetric liquid scintillator detector

    PubMed Central

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Alsanea, Fahed; Beddar, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Accurate confirmation and verification of the range of spot scanning proton beams is crucial for correct dose delivery. Current methods to measure proton beam range using ionization chambers are either time-consuming or result in measurements with poor spatial resolution. The large-volume liquid scintillator detector allows real-time measurements of the entire dose profile of a spot scanning proton beam. Thus, liquid scintillator detectors are an ideal tool for measuring the proton beam range for commissioning and quality assurance. However, optical artefacts may decrease the accuracy of measuring the proton beam range within the scintillator tank. The purpose of the current study was to 1) develop a geometric calibration system to accurately calculate physical distances within the liquid scintillator detector, taking into account optical artefacts; and 2) assess the accuracy, consistency, and robustness of proton beam range measurement using the liquid scintillator detector with our geometric calibration system. The range of the proton beam was measured with the calibrated liquid scintillator system and was compared to the nominal range. Measurements were made on three different days to evaluate the setup robustness from day to day, and three sets of measurements were made for each day to evaluate the consistency from delivery to delivery. All proton beam ranges measured using the liquid scintillator system were within half a millimeter of the nominal range. The delivery-to-delivery standard deviation of the range measurement was 0.04 mm, and the day-to-day standard deviation was 0.10 mm. In addition to the accuracy and robustness demonstrated by these results when our geometric calibration system was used, the liquid scintillator system allowed the range of all 94 proton beams to be measured in just two deliveries, making the liquid scintillator detector a perfect tool for range measurement of spot scanning proton beams. PMID:27274863

  19. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  20. SU-E-T-73: Commissioning of a Treatment Planning System for Proton Spot Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, J; Kang, Y; Schultz, L; Nicewonger, D; Herrera, M; Wong, T; Bowen, S; Bloch, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned for clinical use with a fixed beam line proton delivery system. An outline of the data collection, modeling, and verification is provided. Methods: Beam data modeling for proton spot scanning in CMS Xio TPS requires the following measurements: (i) integral depth dose curves (IDDCs); (ii) absolute dose calibration; and (iii) beam spot characteristics. The IDDCs for 18 proton energies were measured using an integrating detector in a single spot field in a water phantom. Absolute scaling of the IDDCs were performed based on ion chamber measurements in mono-energetic 10×10 cm{sup 2} fields in water. Beam spot shapes were measured in air using a flat panel scintillator detector at multiple planes. For beam model verification, more than 45 uniform dose phantom and patient plans were generated. These plans were used to measure range, point dose, and longitudinal and lateral profiles. Tolerances employed for verification are: point dose and longitudinal profiles, ±2%; range, ±1 mm; FWHM for lateral profiles, ±2 mm; and patient plan dose distribution, gamma index of >90% at 3%/3 mm criteria. Results: More than 97% of the point dose measurements out of 115 were within +/-2% with maximum deviation of 3%. 98% of the ranges measured were within 1 mm with maximum deviation of 1.4mm. The normalized depth doses were within 2% at all depths. The maximum error in FWHM of lateral profiles was found to be less than 2mm. For 5 patient plans representing different anatomic sites, a total of 38 planes for 12 beams were analyzed for gamma index with average value of 99% and minimum of 94%. Conclusions: The planning system is successfully commissioned and can be safely deployed for clinical use. Measurements of IDDCs on user beam are highly recommended instead of using standard beam IDDCs.

  1. Stellar activity with LAMOST - I. Spot configuration in Pleiades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiang-Song; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Chen, Yu-Qin; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2016-12-01

    We use the spectra of Pleiades and field stars from the LAMOST DR2 archive to study how spottedness and activity vary as a function of mass at young ages. We obtained the standard TiO band strength by measuring TiO bands near 7050 Å from LAMOST spectra (R ≈ 1800) for a large sample of field GKM dwarfs with solar metallicity. Analysis shows that active dwarfs, including those of late G and early K types, have extra TiO absorption compared to their inactive counterparts, indicating the presence of cool spots on their surface. Active late K and M dwarfs show deeper TiO2 and shallower TiO4 compared to inactive stars at a given TiO5, which could be partly explained through cool spots. We estimated the cool-spot fractional coverage for 304 Pleiades candidates by modelling their TiO2 (and TiO5) band strength with respect to the standard value. The results show that the surfaces of a large fraction of K- and M-type members have very large spot coverage (˜50 per cent). We analysed the correlation between spot coverage, rotation and the amplitude of light variation, and found spot coverage on slow rotators (Ro > 0.1) increases with decreasing Rossby number Ro. Interestingly, we detected a saturation-like feature for spot coverage in fast rotators with a saturation level of 40-50 per cent. In addition, the spot distribution in hotter fast rotators is more symmetrical compared to slow rotators. More interestingly, we detected a large spot coverage in many M-type members with no or little light variation. In the bigger picture, these results provide important constraints for the stellar dynamos of these cool active stars.

  2. SU-E-T-439: Fundamental Verification of Respiratory-Gated Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hamano, H; Yamakawa, T; Hayashi, N; Kato, H; Yasui, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The spot-scanning proton beam irradiation with respiratory gating technique provides quite well dose distribution and requires both dosimetric and geometric verification prior to clinical implementation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of gating irradiation as a fundamental verification. Methods: We evaluated field width, flatness, symmetry, and penumbra in the gated and non-gated proton beams. The respiration motion was distinguished into 3 patterns: 10, 20, and 30 mm. We compared these contents between the gated and non-gated beams. A 200 MeV proton beam from PROBEAT-III unit (Hitachi Co.Ltd) was used in this study. Respiratory gating irradiation was performed by Quasar phantom (MODUS medical devices) with a combination of dedicated respiratory gating system (ANZAI Medical Corporation). For radiochromic film dosimetry, the calibration curve was created with Gafchromic EBT3 film (Ashland) on FilmQA Pro 2014 (Ashland) as film analysis software. Results: The film was calibrated at the middle of spread out Bragg peak in passive proton beam. The field width, flatness and penumbra in non-gated proton irradiation with respiratory motion were larger than those of reference beam without respiratory motion: the maximum errors of the field width, flatness and penumbra in respiratory motion of 30 mm were 1.75% and 40.3% and 39.7%, respectively. The errors of flatness and penumbra in gating beam (motion: 30 mm, gating rate: 25%) were 0.0% and 2.91%, respectively. The results of symmetry in all proton beams with gating technique were within 0.6%. Conclusion: The field width, flatness, symmetry and penumbra were improved with the gating technique in proton beam. The spot scanning proton beam with gating technique is feasible for the motioned target.

  3. An MCNPX Monte Carlo model of a discrete spot scanning proton beam therapy nozzle

    PubMed Central

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Perles, Luis A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ron; Ciangaru, George; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Gillin, Michael T.; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to validate a discrete spot scanning proton beam nozzle using the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNPX and use the MC validated model to investigate the effects of a low-dose envelope, which surrounds the beam’s central axis, on measurements of integral depth dose (IDD) profiles. Methods: An accurate model of the discrete spot scanning beam nozzle from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, Texas) was developed on the basis of blueprints provided by the manufacturer of the nozzle. The authors performed simulations of single proton pencil beams of various energies using the standard multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) algorithm within the MCNPX source code and a new MCS algorithm, which was implemented in the MCNPX source code. The MC models were validated by comparing calculated in-air and in-water lateral profiles and percentage depth dose profiles for single pencil beams with their corresponding measured values. The models were then further tested by comparing the calculated and measured three-dimensional (3-D) dose distributions. Finally, an IDD profile was calculated with different scoring radii to determine the limitations on the use of commercially available plane-parallel ionization chambers to measure IDD. Results: The distance to agreement, defined as the distance between the nearest positions of two equivalent distributions with the same value of dose, between measured and simulated ranges was within 0.13 cm for both MCS algorithms. For low and intermediate pencil beam energies, the MC simulations using the standard MCS algorithm were in better agreement with measurements. Conversely, the new MCS algorithm produced better results for high-energy single pencil beams. The IDD profile calculated with cylindrical tallies with an area equivalent to the area of the largest commercially available ionization chamber showed up to 7.8% underestimation of the integral dose in certain depths of the IDD profile

  4. Rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation in scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR): simulation with spot images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C

    2007-07-01

    The anti-scatter grid has been widely used to reject scatter and increase the perceptibility of a low-contrast object in chest radiography; however, it also attenuated the primary x-rays, resulting in a substantial loss of information and an increased relative noise level in heavily attenuated regions. A more dose efficient approach to scatter rejection is the slot-scan imaging technique. Another problem in chest radiography is the low transmitted x-ray intensity in heavily attenuating regions. It results in a higher relative noise level, thus limiting the contrast sensitivity. A solution to this problem is through the exposure equalization technique, with which the incident x-ray intensity is regionally modulated to compensate for the differences of x-ray attenuation due to the anatomic variation. We are in the process of implementing the scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) technique, which combines the advantages of slot-scan imaging and exposure equalization. However, associated with the use of exposure equalization is a redistribution of scattered radiation at the detector, which may impact on the benefit of using exposure equalization in conjunction with the slot-scan imaging geometry. In order to understand the scatter properties and their impact in SEDR, we have used spot collimated digital radiographic images to synthesize simulated SEDR images with which scatter components, primary signals, and scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) were measured. It was shown that the anti-scatter grid rejected approximately 70% and 80% of scattered radiation in lightly and heavily attenuated regions, respectively, while the slot-scan method can reject as high as 95% (with 1 cm slot width) of scattered radiation without attenuation of the primary x-rays. Using a simple model for scatter effects, we have also estimated and compared the contrast-to-noise ratio degradation factors (CNRDFs, i.e., the fraction by which CNR is reduced). It was found that for quantum limited

  5. A dynamic collimation system for penumbra reduction in spot-scanning proton therapy: Proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E. Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system the lateral penumbra of spot scanning (SS) dose distributions delivered by low energy proton beams is highly dependent on the spot size. For current commercial equipment, spot size increases with decreasing proton energy thereby reducing the benefit of the SS technique. This paper presents a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for sharpening the lateral penumbra of proton therapy dose distributions delivered by SS. Methods: The collimation system presented here exploits the property that a proton pencil beam used for SS requires collimation only when it is near the target edge, enabling the use of trimmers that are in motion at times when the pencil beam is away from the target edge. The device consists of two pairs of parallel nickel trimmer blades of 2 cm thickness and dimensions of 2 cm × 18 cm in the beam's eye view. The two pairs of trimmer blades are rotated 90° relative to each other to form a rectangular shape. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. The blades travel on curved tracks to match the divergence of the proton source. An algorithm for selecting blade positions is developed to minimize the dose delivered outside of the target, and treatment plans are created both with and without the DCS. Results: The snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using currently available components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. For irregularly shaped fields, the use of the DCS reduces the mean dose outside of a 2D target of 46.6 cm{sup 2} by approximately 40% as compared to an identical plan without collimation. The use of the DCS increased treatment time by 1–3 s per energy layer. Conclusions: The spread of the

  6. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the "Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)". In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  7. SV Cam spot activity in February 2001 - March 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zboril, M.; Djurašević, G.

    2003-07-01

    We present the analysis of new BVR light curves for the active star SV Cam. The Roche model with spotted areas on the hotter primary component fits satisfactorily all filter observations yielding two spots in intermediate latitudes and covering about 1.5% each of the stellar surface. Both are ~ 1000 K cooler than surrounding photosphere. The comparison with an earlier season (January/February 2000) suggests that the spots probably evolved in area longitude and latitude but basic and preferred orientation from previous season is confirmed. Data are available only in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/406/193

  8. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors.

  9. TH-C-BRD-09: Successes and Limitations of Online Range Adaptive Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, JP; Dong, L; Park, P; Zhu, XR; Kudchadker, RJ; Frank, SJ; Court, LE

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the ability to adapt discrete spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) plans based on geometric changes of anatomy to minimize normal tissue dose and maintain target coverage. Methods: We developed and tested a range-correction algorithm to compensate for anatomy changes in SSPT with correction factors for target lateral size changes and energy scaling. This algorithm adjusts the energy of each spot from the original optimized treatment plan to match the new daily anatomy based on water equivalent path-length. To correct for the lateral target size changes, the peripheral spots were scaled based on phantom studies with variable target size. For energy change corrections, alternative cumulative scaling factor lookup tables were generated based on calculated central-axis and integral depth dose calculations for different energies. These various adaptive algorithms were performed on 7 lung cancer patients that were previously treated with proton therapy and who required at least one adaptive intervention. Single-field optimized SSPT plans were generated for these patients with clinical beam angles. Dose-volume histogram metrics were obtained for these patients for both the non-adaptive and the different adaptive plans applied to the last available weekly CT scan. Results: The doses to normal tissue were largely reduced for the spinal cord (Dmax), total lung (V20Gy), and contralateral lung (V20Gy) for all different methods of adaptive planning. With both corrections applied, the average changes for these metrics were −6.2Gy, −2.7%, and −4.9%, respectively. The same method generated unacceptably high target hot spots with average target V110% increase of 12.3%. Conclusion: Adaptive methods based on direct adjustments to proton range can reduce normal tissue doses under large anatomical changes but are insufficient in achieving clinically acceptable target doses and generate unacceptably sizeable hot spots. Adaptive planning methods for proton

  10. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was carried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three different depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon intensity

  11. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was car-ried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three dif-ferent depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon

  12. Adjustment of the lateral and longitudinal size of scanned proton beam spots using a pre-absorber to optimize penumbrae and delivery efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Perles, Luis A; Newhauser, Wayne D; Taddei, Phillip J; Mohan, Radhe

    2010-01-01

    In scanned-beam proton therapy, the beam spot properties, such as the lateral and longitudinal size and the minimum achievable range, are influenced by beam optics, scattering media and drift spaces in the treatment unit. Currently available spot scanning systems offer few options for adjusting these properties. We investigated a method for adjusting the lateral and longitudinal spot size that utilizes downstream plastic pre-absorbers located near a water phantom. The spot size adjustment was characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of a modified commercial scanned-beam treatment head. Our results revealed that the pre-absorbers can be used to reduce the lateral full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose spots in water by up to 14 mm, and to increase the longitudinal extent from about 1 mm to 5 mm at residual ranges of 4 cm and less. A large factor in manipulating the lateral spot sizes is the drift space between the pre-absorber and the water phantom. Increasing the drift space from 0 cm to 15 cm leads to an increase in the lateral FWHM from 2.15 cm to 2.87 cm, at a water-equivalent depth of 1 cm. These findings suggest that this spot adjustment method may improve the quality of spot-scanned proton treatments. PMID:21076194

  13. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Malignancies of the Base of Skull: Treatment Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Grosshans, David R.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Melancon, Adam; Allen, Pamela K.; Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew; McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L.; Gillin, Michael; DeMonte, Franco; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Results: Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. Conclusions: In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and

  14. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm2/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients from

  15. Brain activation during the spot the differences game.

    PubMed

    Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime; Wada, Akihiko; Uchida, Kouji; Hara, Shinji; Hayashi, Takafumi; Oda, Kazushige; Uchida, Nobue

    2009-01-01

    Spot the Differences is a simple and popular game in which an observer compares a pair of similar pictures to detect the differences between them. Functional activation of the brain while playing this game has not been investigated. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the main cortical regions involved in playing this game and compared the sites of cortical activation between a session of playing the game and a session of viewing 2 identical pictures. The right posterior parietal cortex showed more activation during game playing, and cortical activation volume correlated with game-playing accuracy. This cortical region may play an important role in awareness of differences between 2 similar pictures.

  16. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-04: Utilization of Optical Dosimeter for Modulated Spot-Scanning Particle Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W; Li, Y; Huang, Z; Sheng, Y; Deng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhao, F; Sun, L; Moyers, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the utilization of an optical dosimeter for modulated spot-scanning carbon-ion and proton beams during the acceptance test of Siemens IONTRIS system. Method and Materials: An optical dosimeter using phosphor scintillation was developed to map and interactively analyze the shapes and sizes of spots over 190 energies for ProTom modulated-scanning system. The dose response to proton had been characterized with proper pixel calibration at ProTom system. The dose response was further studied at 0.7 cm depths by uniform 8cm in-diameter fields of 424.89 MeV/u (E290) carbon-ions and 215.18MeV (E282) protons at IONTRIS system. The virtual source axial distances (vSAD) of carbonions and protons of IONTRIS system was investigated by measuring either variations of spot position or field size at five different locations to Isocenter. By measuring lateral profiles of uniform doses with varied thin-thicknesses of chest-board pattern and placing the scintillation plate at near to the distal edge, range variations at different off-axis-distances (rOAD) were examined. Relative accuracy and reproducibility of beam range were measured for three beam ranges with a ramping block at front of scintillation plate. Results: Similar dose response was observed for high energies of carbon ions and protons. Mean vSAD at X and Y axes were 744.1 cm and 807.4cm with deviation of 7.4cm and 7.7cm, respectively. Variation of rOAD was within 0.35 mm over 10cm for both protons and carbon ions. Accuracy of measuring relative distal range using the ramping block was 0.2mm. Measured range over repeated three times for each range were within 0.25mm at same room, and within 1.0mm between four rooms. Conclusions: The optical dosimeter could efficiently measure the virtual source distance. And, to measure small range variation at different off-axial locations, and for the relative beam range between rooms during acceptance test of a modulated spot-scanning particle system.

  17. WE-D-17A-01: A Dynamic Collimation System for Spot Scanned Proton Therapy: Conceptual Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D; Hill, P; Wang, D; Smith, B; Flynn, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system, the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy delivered at low energies is highly dependent on the spot size. This dependence, coupled with the fact that spot sizes increase with decreasing energy, reduces the benefit of the PBS technique for treating shallow tumors such as those found in the head and neck region. In order to overcome this limitation, a dynamic collimation system (DCS) was developed for sharpening the lateral penumbra of low energy proton therapy dose distributions delivered by PBS. Methods: The proposed DCS consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades which intercept the edges of the proton beam near the target edge in the beam's eye view. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. Two-dimensional treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σ-air) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm, representing a wide array of clinically available equipment. Results: In its current configuration, the snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using off the shelf components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. The treatment plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2–40.6% for spot sizes of 3–9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The DCS can be integrated with current or future proton therapy equipment and we believe it will serve as a useful tool to further improve the next generation of proton therapy delivery.

  18. SU-E-T-127: Application of TG-119 for Evaluation of Proton Spot Scanning Based Planning and Treatment Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, J; Cao, N; Wong, T; Bowen, S; Bloch, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The clinical test cases presented in AAPM TG-119 are used to evaluate the accuracy of treatment planning and delivery through spot scanning proton beams. Methods: An IBA spot scanning delivery system has been commissioned to be used with the RayStation treatment planning system. Various test cases provided in TG-119 were used for planning and delivery verification. The CT dataset and structures as provided by TG-119 were imported into a mock patient. The plans were optimized using the multi field optimization (MFO) to achieve the desired goals. The planner was given the flexibility to achieve the given dose-volume goals by creating appropriate objectives and constraints. Beams were delivered to a phantom and measurements were performed at multiple depths using the MatrixxPT detector array. The analyses were performed on beam by beam basis and quantified using the gamma index. A tolerance of 3%/3 mm in 2D was used for gamma index analysis along with dose threshold of 10%. Results: The clinical goals for targets and critical structures were met or improved for all cases except the C-Shape target with difficult constraints. The minimum gamma index using the 3%/3mm as a criterion is 93.3% for one of the planes measured for C-Shape target. Using 2%/2mm as a criterion, the minimum gamma index drops to 70%. Only Prostate target has all the planes above >90% pass using the 2%/2mm criterion. Conclusion: The overall accuracy of the treatment planning and delivery is deemed clinically acceptable. The test cases with highly modulated beams can have steep gradients in the dose profiles that can reduce the gamma index pass rate. Gamma analysis based on 3D data may be needed for routine use of 2%/2mm criterion. In addition, improvements in modelling of spot profiles in dose engine may be required for further improving the gamma index pass rate.

  19. Laser treatment of cutaneous lesions with image-guided fine spot-scanning irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Isami; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kanno, Akihiro; Kan, Yasushi; Yoshimasa, Takezawa; Maruyama, Tomohiro; Maeda, Yoshitaka

    2007-11-01

    We propose a new laser irradiation method for the treatment of cutaneous lesions in plastic surgery. In general, lasers with a spot size of 1 to 10 mm are used in irradiation on diseased skin. Although the target absorbs more light energy according to the theory of selective photothermolysis, the surrounding tissue, however, is still somewhat damaged. In proposed method, an f-theta lens, which is assembled by a shrink fitter, focuses the irradiation laser beam to a very fine spot with the size of 125 μm. Guided by the captured object-image, such laser beam is conducted by a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to irradiate only the desired tissue target without thermal damage to surrounding tissue. Moreover, an optical coherence tomography, whose probe is capable of wide field of view, can be used to provide the guidance information for the best treatment. The usefulness of the developed laser therapy apparatus was demonstrated by performing an experiment on the removal of tattoo pigment.

  20. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  1. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  2. Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermann, Beate . E-mail: beate.timmermann@psi.ch; Schuck, Andreas; Niggli, Felix; Weiss, Markus; Lomax, Antony Jonathan; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin; Rutz, Hans Peter; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment strategy of childhood sarcomas. Consequences of treatment are likely to affect the survivor's quality of life significantly. We investigated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy (PT) for soft tissue tumors in childhood. Methods and Materials: Sixteen children with soft tissue sarcomas were included. Median age at PT was 3.3 years. In 10 children the tumor histology was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. All tumors were located in the head or neck, parameningeal, or paraspinal, or pelvic region. In the majority of children, the tumor was initially unresectable (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study [IRS] Group III in 75%). In 50% of children the tumors exceeded 5 cm. Fourteen children had chemotherapy before and during PT. Median total dose of radiotherapy was 50 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE). All 16 children were treated with spot-scanning proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and in 3 children the PT was intensity-modulated (IMPT). Results: After median follow-up of 1.5 years, local control was achieved in 12 children. Four children failed locally, 1 at the border of the radiation field and 3 within the field. All 4 children died of tumor recurrence. All 4 showed unfavorable characteristic either of site or histopathology of the tumor. Acute toxicity was low, with Grade 3 or 4 side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria occurring in the bone marrow only. Conclusions: Proton therapy was feasible and well tolerated. Early local control rates are comparable to those being achieved after conventional radiotherapy. For investigations on late effect, longer follow-up is needed.

  3. Extracranial chordoma: Outcome in patients treated with function-preserving surgery followed by spot-scanning proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter . E-mail: hanspeter.rutz@psi.ch; Weber, Damien C.; Sugahara, Shinji; Timmermann, Beate; Lomax, Antony J.; Bolsi, Alessandra; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin M.S.; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of postoperative proton therapy (PT) in extracranial chordoma. Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients were treated. Gross total resection was achieved in 18 patients. Nine patients had cervical, 2 had thoracic, 8 had lumbar, and 7 had sacro-coccygeal chordomas. Thirteen patients had implants. PT was administered after function-preserving surgery, using a gantry and spot scanning, without or with intensity modulation (IMPT; 6 patients), and/or photon-based radiotherapy (RT, 6 patients). Median total dose was 72 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; range, 59.4-74.4), with means of 70.5 and 73.2 CGE for patients with and without implants. Median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 13-73 months). Adverse events were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grading system (version 3.0). Results: At 3 years, actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 84% and 77%, respectively. One patient each died of local failure (LF), distant failure (DF), suicide, and secondary tumor. We observed 5 LFs and 3 DFs; 3-year LF-free and DF-free survival rates were 86%. We observed four radiation-induced late adverse events (Grade 2 sensory neuropathy; Grade 3 subcutaneous necrosis, and osteonecrosis; and Grade 5 secondary cancer). In univariate analysis, implants were associated with LF (p = 0.034). Gross residual tumor above 30 mL was negatively associated with OS (p = 0.013) and PFS (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Postoperative PT for extracranial chordomas delivered with spot scanning offers high local control rates. Toxicity was acceptable. Implants were significantly associated with LF. Residual tumor above 30 mL impacted negatively on OS and PFS.

  4. A conserved TLR5 binding and activation hot spot on flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wan Seok; Jeon, Ye Ji; Namgung, Byeol; Hong, Minsun; Yoon, Sung-il

    2017-01-01

    Flagellin is a bacterial protein that polymerizes into the flagellar filament and is essential for bacterial motility. When flagellated bacteria invade the host, flagellin is recognized by Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) as a pathogen invasion signal and eventually evokes the innate immune response. Here, we provide a conserved structural mechanism by which flagellins from Gram-negative γ-proteobacteria and Gram-positive Firmicutes bacteria bind and activate TLR5. The comparative structural analysis using our crystal structure of a complex between Bacillus subtilis flagellin (bsflagellin) and TLR5 at 2.1 Å resolution, combined with the alanine scanning analysis of the binding interface, reveals a common hot spot in flagellin for TLR5 activation. An arginine residue (bsflagellin R89) of the flagellin D1 domain and its adjacent residues (bsflagellin E114 and L93) constitute a hot spot that provides shape and chemical complementarity to a cavity generated by the loop of leucine-rich repeat 9 in TLR5. In addition to the flagellin D1 domain, the D0 domain also contributes to TLR5 activity through structurally dispersed regions, but not a single focal area. These results establish the groundwork for the future design of flagellin-based therapeutics. PMID:28106112

  5. Spots and activity of the M dwarf KIC 1572802

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Gladilina, N. G.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    The photometric variability of the M dwarf KIC 1572802 has been studied using the most complete observational data, obtained by the Kepler Space Telescope. Power spectra constructed from 59 488 single brightness measurements over 1460 days ( 4 yr) show complex brightness variations. It is suggested that two peaks corresponding to the periods P = 0.37088 d and P = 0.37100 d are related to the presence of active regions at different latitudes on the differentially rotating star. Maps of the surface temperature inhomogeneities are used to derive the positions of these active regions. Analysis of these maps suggests that a switch in the active latitudes occurred 590 days after the beginning of the observations. The variations of the positions of the active regions are also analyzed. These high-temporal-resolution observations revealed a short time-scale change in the active latitudes lasting about 7 d , followed by a "flip-flop," for the first time. The fraction of the surface of KIC 1572802 covered by spots is S 7%. Comparison with literature data indicate that this S value for KIC 1572802 is substantially higher than the average spottedness of stars with temperatures of 3500-4500 K. This may indicate enhanced activity of KIC 1572802. The parameters of the differential rotation of the star are estimated; the inferred rotational velocity, Ω = 0.0056 ± 0.0010, is substantially lower than the solar value, but comparable to Ω for the cool dwarfs HK Aqr and EY Dra. The value of the Rossby number Ro = 0.011 suggests that KIC 1572802 is in the saturation region of the diagram of Ro vs. X-ray luminosity. If the Ro value for KIC 1572802 is this low, this implies that its magnetic field is of the order of tens or even hundreds of Gauss.

  6. A TR-induced algorithm for hot spots elimination through CT-scan HIFU simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Nicolas; Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    Although nowadays widely spread for imaging and treatments uses, HIFU techniques are still limited by the distortion of the wavefront due to refraction and reflection on the inhomogeneous media inside the human body. CT-scan Time Reversal (TR) procedure has risen as a promising candidate for focus control. A finite difference time domain parallelized code is used to provide simulations of TR-enhanced propagation through elements of the human body and implement a simple algorithm to address the issue of grating lobes, i.e secondary peaks of pressure due to natural diffraction by phased arrays and enhanced by medium heterogeneity. Using an iterative, progressive process combining secondary sound sources and independent signal summation, the primary peak is strengthened while secondary peaks are increasingly obliterated. This method supports the feasibility of precise modification and enhancement of the pressure profile in the targeted area through Time Reversal based solutions.

  7. Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Spot Scanning Proton Therapy Using Single-Field Uniform Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Song, Xiaofei; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ciangaru, George; Taylor, M. Brad; Lii, Ming Fwu; Martin, Craig; Arjomandy, Bijan; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh nhu; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To describe our experiences with patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for patients with prostate cancer receiving spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using single-field uniform dose (SFUD). Methods and Materials: The first group of 249 patients with prostate cancer treated with SSPT using SFUD was included in this work. The scanning-beam planning target volume and number of monitor units were recorded and checked for consistency. Patient-specific dosimetric measurements were performed, including the point dose for each plan, depth doses, and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution in the planes perpendicular to the incident beam direction for each field at multiple depths. The {gamma}-index with 3% dose or 3-mm distance agreement criteria was used to evaluate the 2D dose distributions. Results: We observed a linear relationship between the number of monitor units and scanning-beam planning target volume. The difference between the measured and calculated point doses (mean {+-} SD) was 0.0% {+-} 0.7% (range, -2.9% to 1.8%). In general, the depth doses exhibited good agreement except at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak. The pass rate of {gamma}-index (mean {+-} SD) for 2D dose comparison was 96.2% {+-} 2.6% (range, 90-100%). Discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions primarily resulted from the limitation of the model used by the treatment planning system. Conclusions: We have established a patient-specific QA program for prostate cancer patients receiving SSPT using SFUD.

  8. SU-E-T-552: Minimum Monitor Unit Effects On Plan Quality for Multi-Field Optimized Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M; Beltran, C; Herman, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5-10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1-20 cm. Three field intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000-0.0060; and spot spacing range of 0.5-2.0σ of the nominal spot size at isocenter in water (σ=4mm in this work). Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. Results: The increase of the min-MU with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 1σ. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 2σ, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusion: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤ 1σ of the spot size in water, plan quality decreases as min- MU increases greater than 0.0020. The effect of min-MU should be taken into consideration while planning spot scanning proton therapy treatments to realize its full potential.

  9. Ultrastructure of sperm of the Spotted scat (Scatophagus argus, Linnaeus, 1766) observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Madhavi, M; Kailasam, M; Mohanlal, D L

    2015-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to understand the sperm cell morphology and ultrastructure of Spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) through scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The present study reveals that the sperm of S. argus can be differentiated into three major parts - an acrosome-less spherical head, a short mid-piece, and a cylindrical flagellum. The scat sperm cell had a mean total length of 21.32 ± 1.80 μm with the presence of ovoid electron-dense nucleus. The mean length and width of ovoid nucleus measured 1.44 ± 0.34 and 1.54 ± 0.33 μm, respectively. The structural characteristics of the nucleus were found to be a shallow axial nuclear fossa and centriolar complex. The two centrioles were positioned nearly perpendicular to each other with a conventional "9 + 0" pattern in the proximal centriole. The short mid-piece was located laterally to the nucleus and contains 5 or 6 spherical and unequal-sized mitochondria. The mitochondria were separated from the axoneme by a cytoplasmic canal. The flagellum was inserted at the base of the nucleus with the presence of an axoneme structure of 9 + 2 paired micro tubules. The sperm flagellum had short irregular lateral fins. The present study reveals that Spotted scat sperm can be categorized as being of a "primitive or ect-aquasperm type" and belongs to the teleostean "type I" sperm. This is the first report on the morphology and ultrastructure of sperm in Scatophagidae family.

  10. Altered behavior in spotted hyenas associated with increased human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boydston, Erin E.; Kapheim, Karen M.; Watts, Heather E.; Szykman, Micaela; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate how anthropogenic activity might affect large carnivores, we studied the behaviour of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) during two time periods. From 1996 to 1998, we documented the ecological correlates of space utilization patterns exhibited by adult female hyenas defending a territory at the edge of a wildlife reserve in Kenya. Hyenas preferred areas near dense vegetation but appeared to avoid areas containing the greatest abundance of prey, perhaps because these were also the areas of most intensive livestock grazing. We then compared hyena behaviour observed in 1996–98 with that observed several years earlier and found many differences. Female hyenas in 1996–98 were found farther from dens, but closer to dense vegetation and to the edges of their territory, than in 1988–90. Recent females also had larger home ranges, travelled farther between consecutive sightings, and were more nocturnal than in 1988–90. Finally, hyenas occurred in smaller groups in 1996–98 than in 1988–90. We also found several changes in hyena demography between periods. We next attempted to explain differences observed between time periods by testing predictions of hypotheses invoking prey abundance, climate, interactions with lions, tourism and livestock grazing. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that increased reliance on the reserve for livestock grazing was responsible for observed changes. That behavioural changes were not associated with decreased hyena population density suggests the behavioural plasticity typical of this species may protect it from extinction.

  11. Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Treatment Planning Technique and Analysis of Consequences of Rotational and Translational Alignment Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jeff; Bluett, Jaques; Amos, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Conventional proton therapy with passively scattered beams is used to treat a number of tumor sites, including prostate cancer. Spot scanning proton therapy is a treatment delivery means that improves conformal coverage of the clinical target volume (CTV). Placement of individual spots within a target is dependent on traversed tissue density. Errors in patient alignment perturb dose distributions. Moreover, there is a need for a rational planning approach that can mitigate the dosimetric effect of random alignment errors. We propose a treatment planning approach and then analyze the consequences of various simulated alignment errors on prostate treatments. Methods and Materials: Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for spot scanning proton therapy. After delineation of the clinical target volume, a scanning target volume (STV) was created to guide dose coverage. Errors in patient alignment in two axes (rotational and yaw) as well as translational errors in the anteroposterior direction were then simulated, and dose to the CTV and normal tissues were reanalyzed. Results: Coverage of the CTV remained high even in the setting of extreme rotational and yaw misalignments. Changes in the rectum and bladder V45 and V70 were similarly minimal, except in the case of translational errors, where, as a result of opposed lateral beam arrangements, much larger dosimetric perturbations were observed. Conclusions: The concept of the STV as applied to spot scanning radiation therapy and as presented in this report leads to robust coverage of the CTV even in the setting of extreme patient misalignments.

  12. Analysis of measurement deviations for the patient-specific quality assurance using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; Hsi, Wen C.

    2017-04-01

    To analyze measurement deviations of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams, a commercial radiation dosimeter using 24 pinpoint ionization chambers was utilized. Before the clinical trial, validations of the radiation dosimeter and treatment planning system were conducted. During the clinical trial 165 measurements were performed on 36 enrolled patients. Two or three fields of particle beam were used for each patient. Measurements were typically performed with the dosimeter placed at special regions of dose distribution along depth and lateral profiles. In order to investigate the dosimeter accuracy, repeated measurements with uniform dose irradiations were also carried out. A two-step approach was proposed to analyze 24 sampling points over a 3D treatment volume. The mean value and the standard deviation of each measurement did not exceed 5% for all measurements performed on patients with various diseases. According to the defined intervention thresholds of mean deviation and the distance-to-agreement concept with a Gamma index analysis using criteria of 3.0% and 2 mm, a decision could be made regarding whether the dose distribution was acceptable for the patient. Based measurement results, deviation analysis was carried out. In this study, the dosimeter was used for dose verification and provided a safety guard to assure precise dose delivery of highly modulated particle therapy. Patient-specific QA will be investigated in future clinical operations.

  13. Saturation scanning of ubiquitin variants reveals a common hot spot for binding to USP2 and USP21

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Isabel; Dekel, Ayelet; Shifman, Julia M.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby ubiquitin (Ub) recognizes enzymes in the Ub proteasome system is crucial for understanding the biological function of Ub. Many structures of Ub complexes have been solved and, in most cases, reveal a large structural epitope on a common face of the Ub molecule. However, owing to the generally weak nature of these interactions, it has been difficult to map in detail the functional contributions of individual Ub side chains to affinity and specificity. Here we took advantage of Ub variants (Ubvs) that bind tightly to particular Ub-specific proteases (USPs) and used phage display and saturation scanning mutagenesis to comprehensively map functional epitopes within the structural epitopes. We found that Ubvs that bind to USP2 or USP21 contain a remarkably similar core functional epitope, or “hot spot,” consisting mainly of positions that are conserved as the wild type sequence, but also some positions that prefer mutant sequences. The Ubv core functional epitope contacts residues that are conserved in the human USP family, and thus it is likely important for the interactions of Ub across many family members. PMID:27436899

  14. Implication of spot position error on plan quality and patient safety in pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Juan; Beltran, Chris J. Herman, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively and systematically assess dosimetric effects induced by spot positioning error as a function of spot spacing (SS) on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan quality and to facilitate evaluation of safety tolerance limits on spot position. Methods: Spot position errors (PE) ranging from 1 to 2 mm were simulated. Simple plans were created on a water phantom, and IMPT plans were calculated on two pediatric patients with a brain tumor of 28 and 3 cc, respectively, using a commercial planning system. For the phantom, a uniform dose was delivered to targets located at different depths from 10 to 20 cm with various field sizes from 2{sup 2} to 15{sup 2} cm{sup 2}. Two nominal spot sizes, 4.0 and 6.6 mm of 1 σ in water at isocenter, were used for treatment planning. The SS ranged from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ, which is 2–6 mm for the small spot size and 3.3–9.9 mm for the large spot size. Various perturbation scenarios of a single spot error and systematic and random multiple spot errors were studied. To quantify the dosimetric effects, percent dose error (PDE) depth profiles and the value of percent dose error at the maximum dose difference (PDE [ΔDmax]) were used for evaluation. Results: A pair of hot and cold spots was created per spot shift. PDE[ΔDmax] is found to be a complex function of PE, SS, spot size, depth, and global spot distribution that can be well defined in simple models. For volumetric targets, the PDE [ΔDmax] is not noticeably affected by the change of field size or target volume within the studied ranges. In general, reducing SS decreased the dose error. For the facility studied, given a single spot error with a PE of 1.2 mm and for both spot sizes, a SS of 1σ resulted in a 2% maximum dose error; a SS larger than 1.25 σ substantially increased the dose error and its sensitivity to PE. A similar trend was observed in multiple spot errors (both systematic and random errors). Systematic PE can lead to noticeable hot

  15. PRDM9 variation strongly influences recombination hot-spot activity and meiotic instability in humans.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Lam, Kwan-Wood G; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; May, Celia A; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2010-10-01

    PRDM9 has recently been identified as a likely trans regulator of meiotic recombination hot spots in humans and mice. PRDM9 contains a zinc finger array that, in humans, can recognize a short sequence motif associated with hot spots, with binding to this motif possibly triggering hot-spot activity via chromatin remodeling. We now report that human genetic variation at the PRDM9 locus has a strong effect on sperm hot-spot activity, even at hot spots lacking the sequence motif. Subtle changes within the zinc finger array can create hot-spot nonactivating or enhancing variants and can even trigger the appearance of a new hot spot, suggesting that PRDM9 is a major global regulator of hot spots in humans. Variation at the PRDM9 locus also influences aspects of genome instability-specifically, a megabase-scale rearrangement underlying two genomic disorders as well as minisatellite instability-implicating PRDM9 as a risk factor for some pathological genome rearrangements.

  16. SU-E-T-47: A Monte Carlo Model of a Spot Scanning Proton Beam Based On a Synchrotron Proton Therapy Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, C; Lin, H; Jing, J; Chen, C; Cao, R; Pei, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build the model of a spot scanning proton beam for the dose calculation of a synchrotron proton therapy accelerator, which is capable of accelerating protons from 50 up to 221 MeV. Methods: The spot scanning beam nozzle is modeled using TOPAS code, a simulation tool based on Geant4.9.6. The model contained a beam pipe vacuum window, a beam profile monitor, a drift chamber, two plane-parallel ionization chambers, and a spot-position monitor consisted of a multiwire ionization chamber. A water phantom is located with its upstream surface at the isocenter plane. The initial proton beam energy and anglar deflection are modeled using a Gaussian distribution with FWHM (Full Widths at Half Maximum) deponding on its beam energy. The phase space file (PSF) on a virtual surface located at the center between the two magnets is recorded. PSF is used to analyze the pencil beam features and offset the pencil beam position. The source model parameters are verificated by fitting the simulated Result to the measurement. Results: The simulated percentage depth dose (PDD) and lateral profiles of scanning pencil beams of various incident proton energies are verificated to the measurement. Generally the distance to agreement (DTA) of Bragg peaks is less than 0.2cm. The FWHM of Gaussian anglar distribution was adjusted to fit the lateral profile difference between the simulation and the measurement to less than 2∼3cm. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo model of a spot scanning proton beam was bullt based on a synchrotron proton therapy accelerator. This scanning pencil beam model will be as a block to build the broad proton beam as a proton TPS dose verification tool.

  17. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  18. Whole-pelvic radiotherapy with spot-scanning proton beams for uterine cervical cancer: a planning study

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shingo; Shibamoto, Yuta; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Hiroki; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Sugie, Chikao; Mizoe, Jun-etsu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric parameters of whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) for cervical cancer among plans involving 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). The dose distributions of 3D-CRT-, IMRT-, and SSPT-based WPRT plans were compared in 10 patients with cervical cancer. All of the patients were treated with a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions, and all of the plans involved the same planning target volume (PTV) constrictions. A 3D-CRT plan involving a four-field box, an IMRT plan involving seven coplanar fields, and an SSPT plan involving four fields were created. The median PTV D95% did not differ between the 3D-CRT, IMRT and SSPT plans. The median conformity index 95% and homogeneity index of the IMRT and SSPT were better than those of the 3D-CRT. The homogeneity index of the SSPT was better than that of the IMRT. SSPT resulted in lower median V20 values for the bladder wall, small intestine, colon, bilateral femoral heads, skin, and pelvic bone than IMRT. Comparing the Dmean values, SSPT spared the small intestine, colon, bilateral femoral heads, skin and pelvic bone to a greater extent than the other modalities. SSPT can reduce the irradiated volume of the organs at risk compared with 3D-CRT and IMRT, while maintaining excellent PTV coverage. Further investigations of SSPT are warranted to assess its role in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27380800

  19. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  20. Spot Scanning-Based Proton Therapy for Intracranial Meningioma: Long-Term Results From the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Damien C.; Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Koch, Tamara; Ares, Carmen; Geismar, Jan H.; Schertler, Andreas; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hug, Eugen B.

    2012-07-01

    Background: To assess the long-term clinical results of spot scanning proton therapy (PT) in the treatment of intracranial meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with meningioma (histologically proven 34/39) were treated with PT between July 1997 and January 2010. Thirty-two (82.1%) patients were treated as primary treatment (exclusive PT, n = 8; postoperative PT, n = 24). Mean age was 48.3 {+-} 17.9 years and 32 (82.1%) patients had skull base lesions. For patients undergoing surgery, 24 patients had a diagnosis of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I and 10 of a WHO Grade II/III meningioma, respectively. The female-to-male ratio was 3.3. The median administered dose was 56.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) (range, 52.2-66.6) at 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.76 to 546.5 cm{sup 3} (median, 21.5). Late toxicity was assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Mean follow-up time was 62.0 months and all patients were followed for >6 months. Results: Six patients presented with tumor recurrence and 6 patients died during follow-up, of which 4 of tumor progression. Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 84.8% and 81.8%, respectively, for the entire cohort and 100% for benign histology. Cumulative 5-year Grade {>=}3 late toxicity-free survival was 84.5%. On univariate analysis, LC was negatively influenced by WHO grade (p = 0.001), GTV (p = 0.013), and male gender (p = 0.058). Conclusions: PT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with untreated, recurrent, or incompletely resected intracranial meningiomas. WHO grade and tumor volume was an adverse prognostic factor for local control.

  1. Comparing proton treatment plans of pediatric brain tumors in two pencil beam scanning nozzles with different spot sizes.

    PubMed

    Kralik, John C; Xi, Liwen; Solberg, Timothy D; Simone, Charles B; Lin, Liyong

    2015-11-01

    Target coverage and organ-at-risk sparing were compared for 22 pediatric patients with primary brain tumors treated using two distinct nozzles in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Consecutive patients treated at our institution using a PBS-dedicated nozzle (DN) were replanned using a universal nozzle (UN) beam model and the original DN plan objectives. Various cranial sites were treated among the patients to prescription doses ranging from 45 to 54 Gy. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were patient-dependent; 15 unique OARs were analyzed, all of which were assessed in at least 10 patients. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and organ sparing were compared for the two nozzles using dose-volume histogram data. Statistical analysis using a confidence-interval approach demonstrates that CTV coverage is equivalent for UN and DN plans within ±5% equivalence bounds. In contrast, average mean and maximum doses are significantly higher for nearly all 15 OARs in the UN plans. The average median increase over all OARs and patients is approximately 1.7 Gy, with an increase in the 25%-75% of 1.0-2.3 Gy; the median increase to the pituitary gland, temporal lobes, eyes and cochleas are 1.8, 1.7, 0.7, and 2.7 Gy, respectively. The CTV dose distributions fall off slower for UN than for the DN plans; hence, normal tissue structures in close proximity to CTVs receive higher doses in UN plans than in DN plans. The higher OAR doses in the UN plans are likely due to the larger spot profile in plans created with UN beams. In light of the high rates of toxicities in pediatric patients receiving cranial irradiation and in light of selected brain tumor types having high cure rates, this study suggests the smaller DN beam profile is preferable for the advantage of reducing dose to OARs. PACS number: 87.55.D.

  2. Comparing proton treatment plans of pediatric brain tumors in two pencil beam scanning nozzles with different spot sizes.

    PubMed

    Kralik, John C; Xi, Liwen; Solberg, Timothy D; Simone Ii, Charles B; Lin, Liyong

    2015-11-08

    Target coverage and organ-at-risk sparing were compared for 22 pediatric patients with primary brain tumors treated using two distinct nozzles in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Consecutive patients treated at our institution using a PBS-dedicated nozzle (DN) were replanned using a universal nozzle (UN) beam model and the original DN plan objectives. Various cranial sites were treated among the patients to prescription doses ranging from 45 to 54 Gy. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were patient-dependent; 15 unique OARs were analyzed, all of which were assessed in at least 10 patients. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and organ sparing were compared for the two nozzles using dose-volume histogram data. Statistical analysis using a confidence-interval approach demonstrates that CTV coverage is equivalent for UN and DN plans within ± 5% equivalence bounds. In contrast, average mean and maximum doses are significantly higher for nearly all 15 OARs in the UN plans. The average median increase over all OARs and patients is approximately 1.7 Gy, with an increase in the 25%-75% of 1.0-2.3 Gy; the median increase to the pituitary gland, temporal lobes, eyes and cochleas are 1.8, 1.7, 0.7, and 2.7 Gy, respectively. The CTV dose distributions fall off slower for UN than for the DN plans; hence, normal tissue structures in close proximity to CTVs receive higher doses in UN plans than in DN plans. The higher OAR doses in the UN plans are likely due to the larger spot profile in plans created with UN beams. In light of the high rates of toxicities in pediatric patients receiving cranial irradiation and in light of selected brain tumor types having high cure rates, this study suggests the smaller DN beam profile is preferable for the advantage of reducing dose to OARs.

  3. Spot scanning proton therapy plan assessment: design and development of a dose verification application for use in routine clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Walsh, Timothy J.; Beltran, Chris J.; Stoker, Joshua B.; Mundy, Daniel W.; Parry, Mark D.; Bues, Martin; Fatyga, Mirek

    2016-04-01

    The use of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been carried out clinically since the late 1800's. Early on however, it was discovered that a radiation dose sufficient to destroy cancer cells can also cause severe injury to surrounding healthy tissue. Radiation oncologists continually strive to find the perfect balance between a dose high enough to destroy the cancer and one that avoids damage to healthy organs. Spot scanning or "pencil beam" proton radiotherapy offers another option to improve on this. Unlike traditional photon therapy, proton beams stop in the target tissue, thus better sparing all organs beyond the targeted tumor. In addition, the beams are far narrower and thus can be more precisely "painted" onto the tumor, avoiding exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. To safely treat patients with proton beam radiotherapy, dose verification should be carried out for each plan prior to treatment. Proton dose verification systems are not currently commercially available so the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Mayo Clinic developed its own, called DOSeCHECK, which offers two distinct dose simulation methods: GPU-based Monte Carlo and CPU-based analytical. The three major components of the system include the web-based user interface, the Linux-based dose verification simulation engines, and the supporting services and components. The architecture integrates multiple applications, libraries, platforms, programming languages, and communication protocols and was successfully deployed in time for Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient. Having a simple, efficient application for dose verification greatly reduces staff workload and provides additional quality assurance, ultimately improving patient safety.

  4. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  5. TH-C-BRD-07: Minimizing Dose Uncertainty for Spot Scanning Beam Proton Therapy of Moving Tumor with Optimization of Delivery Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Li, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has been shown to be able to reduce dose to normal tissue compared to intensity modulated photon radio-therapy (IMRT), and has been implemented for selected lung cancer patients. However, respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty remain one of the major concerns for the radiotherapy of lung cancer, and the utility of IMPT for lung patients was limited because of the proton dose uncertainty induced by motion. Strategies such as repainting and tumor tracking have been proposed and studied but repainting could result in unacceptable long delivery time and tracking is not yet clinically available. We propose a novel delivery strategy for spot scanning proton beam therapy. Method: The effective number of delivery (END) for each spot position in a treatment plan was calculated based on the parameters of the delivery system, including time required for each spot, spot size and energy. The dose uncertainty was then calculated with an analytical formula. The spot delivery sequence was optimized to maximize END and minimize the dose uncertainty. 2D Measurements with a detector array on a 1D moving platform were performed to validate the calculated results. Results: 143 2D measurements on a moving platform were performed for different delivery sequences of a single layer uniform pattern. The measured dose uncertainty is a strong function of the delivery sequence, the worst delivery sequence results in dose error up to 70% while the optimized delivery sequence results in dose error of <5%. END vs. measured dose uncertainty follows the analytical formula. Conclusion: With optimized delivery sequence, it is feasible to minimize the dose uncertainty due to motion in spot scanning proton therapy.

  6. SU-D-BRE-06: Modeling the Dosimetric Effects of Volumetric and Layer-Based Repainting Strategies in Spot Scanning Proton Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J E; Beltran, C; Herman, M G; Kruse, J J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare multiple repainting techniques as strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in free-breathing, spot scanning proton plans. Methods: An analytic routine modeled three-dimensional dose distributions of pencil-beam proton plans delivered to a moving target. The interplay effect was studied in subsequent calculations by modeling proton delivery from a clinical synchrotron based spot scanning system and respiratory target motion, patterned from surrogate breathing traces from clinical 4DCT scans and normalized to nominal 0.5 and 1 cm amplitudes. Two distinct repainting strategies were modeled. In idealized volumetric repainting, the plan is divided up and delivered multiple times successively, with each instance only delivering a fraction of the total MU. Maximum-MU repainting involves delivering a fixed number of MU per spot and repeating a given energy layer until the prescribed MU are reached. For each of 13 patient breathing traces, the dose was computed for up to four volumetric repaints and an array of maximum-MU values. Delivery strategies were inter-compared based on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and delivery time. Results: Increasing levels of repainting generally improved plan quality and reduced dosimetric variability at the expense of longer delivery time. Motion orthogonal to the scan direction yielded substantially greater dose deviations than motion parallel to the scan direction. For a fixed delivery time, maximum-MU repainting was most effective relative to idealized volumetric repainting at small maximum-MU values. For 1 cm amplitude motion orthogonal to the scan direction, the average homogeneity metric (D5 – D95)[%] of 23.4% was reduced to 7.6% with a 168 s delivery using volumetric repainting compared with 8.7% in 157.2 s for maximum-MU repainting. The associated static target homogeneity metric was 2.5%. Conclusion: Maximum-MU repainting can provide a reasonably effective alternative to volumetric repainting for

  7. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: An initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki; Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated.Methods: A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3}, in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data.Results: With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was {+-}2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the criteria for the

  8. SU-E-T-286: Dose Verification of Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Using GafChromic EBT3 Film

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C; Tang, S; Mah, D; Chan, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose verification of spot-scanning proton pencil beam is performed via planar dose measurements at several depths using an ionization-chamber array, requiring repeat irradiations of each field for each depth. Here we investigate film dosimetry which has two advantages: higher resolution and efficiency from one-shot irradiation for multiple depths. Methods: Film calibration was performed using an EBT3 film at 20-cm depth of Plastic Water (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) exposed by a 10-level step wedge on a Proteus Plus proton system (IBA, Belgium). The calibration doses ranged from 25–250 cGy(RBE) for proton energies of 170–200 MeV. A uniform 1000 cm{sup 3} dose cube and a clinical prostate combined with seminal-vesicle and pelvic-nodes plan were used for this study. All treatment plans were generated in the RayStation (RaySearch Lab, Sweden). The planar doses at different depths for both cases were measured with film using triple-channel dosimetry and the MatriXX PT (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The Gamma passing rates, dose-difference maps, and profiles of 2D planar doses measured with EBT3 film and MatriXX, versus treatment planning system (TPS) calculations were analyzed and compared using the FilmQA Pro (Ashland Inc., Bridgewater, NJ). Results: The EBT3 film measurement results matched well with the TPS calculation data with an average passing rate >95% for 2%/2mm and are comparable with the MatriXX measurements (0.7%, 1.8%, 3.8% mean differences corresponding to 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm, 2%/2mm, respectively). Overall passing rates for EBT3 films appear higher than those with MatriXX detectors. Conclusion: The energy dependence of the film response could be minimized by calibration using proton beam with mixed energies. The greater efficiency of the dose verification using GafChromic EBT3 results in a potential cost trade-off between room capacity and film cost. EBT3 film may offer distinct advantages in highly intensity-modulated fields due to its higher resolution

  9. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J.; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV)50Gy or PTV62.5Gy (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D98 was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D98 was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D98 was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D98 was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup errors and might be unacceptable for

  10. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Keita; Das, Indra J.; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2016-01-01

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm3, which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation technique. We

  11. Comparison of changes in the global magnetic field and spot activity in cycles 21 to 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    We compare changes in the solar global magnetic field (GMF) given by the distribution of magnetic fields on the source surface and spot activity characterized by Wolf numbers, the number of spots, and their area reflecting the dynamics of local magnetic fields of active regions during cycles 21 to 24 (1976-2015). The results indicate that the changes in the GMF and spot activity have certain differences, both in different cycles generally and in the phases of growth, maximum, and decline in each individual cycle. The maximum and minimum correlations between the GMF and spot activity are observed in cycles 22 and 24, respectively. The maximum correlation is reached in growth phases (cycles 21, 22, and 24) and in the phase of decline (cycle 23), which can be associated with the fact that the phase of decline in cycle 23 is anomalously extended. Almost no correlation between the GMF and spot activity can be found at the phases of the maximum and early beginning of decline in all cycles. This can be associated with structural reorganization and sign change in the GMF.

  12. Postoperative Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Initial Experience at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter Weber, Damien C.; Goitein, Gudrun; Ares, Carmen; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Hug, Eugen B.; Timmermann, Beate

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate postoperative spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) and intensity-modulated PT (IMPT) for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 10 patients (six male patients, four female patients; six chordomas, four chondrosarcomas), aged 10-20 years (median, 16 years), were treated at our institute. Tumor sites were in the brain (one case), skull base (five cases), cervical (three cases), and lumbar spine (one case). Three children had complete resections. In seven children, resection was incomplete, leaving residual tumor behind (range, 2.3-46.3 mL). PT was delivered using spot scanning, with (three patients) or without (seven patients) IMPT. Total dose was 74.0 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) for chordoma, and 63.2-68.0 CGE for chondrosarcoma (median, 66.0), depending on histopathological grading and whether the patient had concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 8-77 months). Radiation treatment was well tolerated. All patients remained failure-free at their last follow-up. Late adverse events were reported in three patients and were mild (neurosensory in one patient; alopecia and hypoaccusis in one patient) to moderate (one patient, Grade 2 pituitary insufficiency). Conclusions: Postoperative spot-scanning PT, delivered in combination with and without IMPT, for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in children and adolescents was tolerated without unacceptable adverse event and initial outcome is perfectly satisfactory in this small cohort. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to more fully assess tumor control, adverse events, as well as functional and cosmetic outcome.

  13. Effectiveness and Safety of Spot Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: First Long-Term Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony J.; Bolsi, Alessandra; Timmermann, Beate; Rutz, Hans Peter; Schuller, Jan C.; Pedroni, Eros; Goitein, Gudrun

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness and safety of spot-scanning-based proton radiotherapy (PT) in skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Between October 1998 and November 2005, 64 patients with skull-base chordomas (n = 42) and chondrosarcomas (n = 22) were treated at Paul Scherrer Institute with PT using spot-scanning technique. Median total dose for chordomas was 73.5 Gy(RBE) and 68.4 Gy(RBE) for chondrosarcomas at 1.8-2.0 Gy(RBE) dose per fraction. Local control (LC), disease specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated. Toxicity was assessed according to CTCAE, v. 3.0. Results: Mean follow-up period was 38 months (range, 14-92 months). Five patients with chordoma and one patient with chondrosarcoma experienced local recurrence. Actuarial 5-year LC rates were 81% for chordomas and 94% for chondrosarcomas. Brainstem compression at the time of PT (p = 0.007) and gross tumor volume >25 mL (p = 0.03) were associated with lower LC rates. Five years rates of DSS and OS were 81% and 62% for chordomas and 100% and 91% for chondrosarcomas, respectively. High-grade late toxicity consisted of one patient with Grade 3 and one patient with Grade 4 unilateral optic neuropathy, and two patients with Grade 3 central nervous system necrosis. No patient experienced brainstem toxicity. Actuarial 5-year freedom from high-grade toxicity was 94%. Conclusions: Our data indicate safety and efficacy of spot-scanning based PT for skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. With target definition, dose prescription and normal organ tolerance levels similar to passive-scattering based PT series, complication-free, tumor control and survival rates are at present comparable.

  14. SU-D-304-05: Validation of Low-Dose-Tail Modeling for Proton Pencil Beam Spot Scanning Using a Quality Assurance Test Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Ainsley, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models of the low-dose tails of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape and location, and for determining monitor units. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distribution based on the weighted superposition of spot profiles previously measured using a pair-magnification method. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The cutoff of the halo component is smaller at higher energies, and is not observable for the 225 MeV proton beam for UN #2. Conclusion: In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive test pattern can facilitate the validation of the halo component of proton PBS spots at off axis locations. The cutoff of the halo component should be taken into consideration for large fields or PBS systems that intend to trim spot profiles using apertures. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  15. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  16. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Stefan; Shen, Jiajian; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  17. SU-E-T-266: Development of Evaluation System of Optimal Synchrotron Controlling Parameter for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Multiple Gate Irradiations in One Operation Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T; Fujii, Y; Miyamoto, N; Matsuura, T; Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y; Koyano, H; Shirato, H; Nihongi, H; Umezawa, M; Matsuda, K; Umegaki, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We have developed a gated spot scanning proton beam therapy system with real-time tumor-tracking. This system has the ability of multiple-gated irradiation in a single synchrotron operation cycle controlling the wait-time for consecutive gate signals during a flat-top phase so that the decrease in irradiation efficiency induced by irregular variation of gate signal is reduced. Our previous studies have shown that a 200 ms wait-time is appropriate to increase the average irradiation efficiency, but the optimal wait-time can vary patient by patient and day by day. In this research, we have developed an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on the log data of the real-time-image gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system. Methods: The developed system consists of logger for operation of RGPT system and software for evaluation of optimal wait-time. The logger records timing of gate on/off, timing and the dose of delivered beam spots, beam energy and timing of X-ray irradiation. The evaluation software calculates irradiation time in the case of different wait-time by simulating the multiple-gated irradiation operation using several timing information. Actual data preserved in the log data are used for gate on and off time, spot irradiation time, and time moving to the next spot. Design values are used for the acceleration and deceleration times. We applied this system to a patient treated with the RGPT system. Results: The evaluation system found the optimal wait-time of 390 ms that reduced the irradiation time by about 10 %. The irradiation time with actual wait-time used in treatment was reproduced with accuracy of 0.2 ms. Conclusion: For spot scanning proton therapy system with multiple-gated irradiation in one synchrotron operation cycle, an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on log data has been developed. Funding Support: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the FIRST

  18. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rombi, Barbara; Ares, Carmen; Hug, Eugen B.; Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Timmermann, Beate

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  19. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, R.; Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J.; Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Short, S. C.; Loughrey, C.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  20. Hot-spot detection and calibration of a scanning thermal probe with a noise thermometry gold wire sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Wolgast, Steven; Covington, Elizabeth; Kurdak, Cagliyan

    2013-02-01

    Measuring the temperature profile of a nanoscale sample using scanning thermal microscopy is challenging due to a scanning probe's non-uniform heating. In order to address this challenge, we have developed a calibration sample consisting of a 1-μm wide gold wire, which can be heated electrically by a small bias current. The Joule heating in the calibration sample wire is characterized using noise thermometry. A thermal probe was scanned in contact over the gold wire and measured temperature changes as small as 0.4 K, corresponding to 17 ppm changes in probe resistance. The non-uniformity of the probe's temperature profile during a typical scan necessitated the introduction of a temperature conversion factor, η, which is defined as the ratio of the average temperature change of the probe with respect to the temperature change of the substrate. The conversion factor was calculated to be 0.035 ± 0.007. Finite element analysis simulations indicate a strong correlation between thermal probe sensitivity and probe tip curvature, suggesting that the sensitivity of the thermal probe can be improved by increasing the probe tip curvature, though at the expense of the spatial resolution provided by sharper tips. Simulations also indicate that a bow-tie metallization design could yield an additional 5- to 7-fold increase in sensitivity.

  1. SU-E-T-187: Collimation Methods in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy: A Treatment Plan Comparison Between a Fixed Aperture and a Dynamic Collimation System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B; Gelover, E; Wang, D; Moignier, A; Flynn, R; Hyer, D; Lin, L; Kirk, M; Solberg, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Low-energy treatments during spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT) suffer from poor conformity due to increased spot size. Collimation devices can reduce the lateral penumbra of a proton therapy dose distribution and improve the overall plan quality. The purpose of this work was to study the advantages of individual energy-layer collimation, which is unique to a recently proposed Dynamic Collimation System (DCS), in comparison to a standard, fixed aperture that allows only a single shape for all energy layers. Methods: Three brain patients previously planned and treated with SSPT were re-planned using an in-house treatment planning system capable of modeling collimated and un-collimated proton beamlets. The un-collimated plans, which served as a baseline for comparison, reproduced the target coverage of the clinically delivered plans. The collimator opening for the aperture based plans included a 0.6 cm expansion of the largest cross section of the target in the Beam’s Eye View, while the DCS based plans were created by optimizing the collimator position for beam spots near the periphery of the target in each energy layer. Results: The reduction of mean dose to normal tissue adjacent to the target, as defined by a 10 mm ring, averaged 9.13% and 3.48% for the DCS and aperture plans, respectively. The conformity index, as defined by the ratio of the volume of the 50% isodose line to the target volume, yielded an average improvement of 16.42% and 8.16% for the DCS and aperture plans, respectively. Conclusion: Collimation reduces the dose to normal tissue adjacent to the target and increases dose conformity to the target region for low-energy SSPT. The ability of the DCS to provide collimation to each energy layer yields better conformity in comparison to fixed aperture plans. This work was partially funded by IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.)

  2. SU-E-T-189: Commission Range Shifter On a Spot Scanning Proton System Using Raystation Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X; Wu, H; Rosen, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To treat superficial target e.g. chest wall, head&neck or cranial cases, we commissioned two range shifter(RS) in Raystation4.0 with 7.37cm(RS1) and 4.1cm(RS2) Water Equivalent Thickness(WET) respectively. However, current beam model has limitations due to the secondary scattered proton. This study provides a detailed and critical commission data and provides suggestions for using RS in clinic. Methods: RS’ WET was verified by Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber from 120MeV to 226.7MeV before TPS modeling. Spot characteristics were measured using 2D scintillate detector at ISO with different air gap. A 8×8×10cm3 cube is created in 8cm depth of water to verify the absolute dose accuracy. Plans were created with different air gap using both RS. Absolute dose verification was measured along the central axis from distal end to surface using PPC05. 10 clinical RS2 plans were measured using MatriXXPT in 3 planes (proximal, distal and midSOBP). Results: RS material’s proton stopping power is energy dependent(from 70MeV to 226.7MeV) ranging from 7.42 to 7.31cm and from 4.10 to 4.03cm respectively. We chose 7.37cm (RS1) and 4.10cm (RS2) to favor the low and median proton energy. With different air gap(3cm to 32cm), spot size expands from 3.2mm to 5.5mm(RS1) and from 3.1mm to 4.1mm(RS2) respectively(226.7MeV in air, 1-sigma). For the absolute dose verification, the larger air gap and shallower depth causes larger discrepancy between TPS and measurements. All 10 clinical plans with 5–10cm air gap passed gamma index 95% with 3%/3mm criteria and outputs differences were within 3%. Conclusion: We strongly recommend each institution to verify the WET independently and choose the value to fit the clinical needs. To minimize the output difference in Raystation4.0 while avoid potential collision to the patient, we recommend to use 5–10cm air gap to minimize the output difference within 2% and preferably use RS with smaller WET if possible.

  3. First spinal axis segment irradiation with spot-scanning proton beam delivered in the treatment of a lumbar primitive neuroectodermal tumour. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weber, D C; Rutz, H P; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U; Lombriser, N; Zenhausern, R; Goitein, G

    2004-08-01

    Primary intraspinal primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a rare tumour entity. The optimal therapeutic management is unclear but, in general, this tumour is treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Proton beam radiation therapy (PT) offers superior dose distributional qualities compared with X- or gamma rays, as the dose deposition occurs in a modulated narrow zone called the Bragg peak. As a result, organs at risk are optimally speared. Here, we present a patient treated with the first spinal axis segment irradiation using spot-scanning PT with a single field, combined with conventional cranio-spinal axis radiotherapy after surgery and chemotherapy, and an extensive review of the literature outlining the clinical features and treatment modality of spinal PNET.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the adult Spotted seal, Phoca largha.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs) of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae) of adult Spotted seals (Phoca largha) using SEM and light microscopy. The tongue was V-shaped and its apex was rather rounded. On the dorsal surface from apex to the one-third posterior of the tongue, the lingual mucosa was densely covered by filiform papillae, with a scatted distribution of dome-like fungiform papillae, which have orthokeratinized epithelium. At the posterior part of the tongue, filiform papillae were totally diminished and their epithelium was parakeratinized. Approximately 6-7 vallate papillae were arranged in a V-shape on the posterior of the tongue. After removal of the epithelium, the CTCs of the filiform papillae that were distributed at apex consisted of a primary core and approximately 5-6 rod-shaped small accessory cores. The CTCs of filiform papillae that were distributed at anterior part of the tongue lacked primary protrusions and possessed approximately 10-15 rod shaped small accessory cores that were arranged in a horseshoe manner. The CTCs offungiform papillae had cylindrical primary cores and were fringed with accessory protrusion. In the Vallate papillae, taste buds were only seen at the dorsal epithelium.

  5. Comparison of organ-at-risk sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton therapy and volumetric modulated arc photon therapy in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barten, Danique L. J. Tol, Jim P.; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) aims to improve organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing over photon radiotherapy. However, it may be less robust for setup and range uncertainties. The authors investigated OAR sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton planning techniques and compared these with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans. Methods: Ten HNC patients were replanned using two arc VMAT (RapidArc) and spot-scanning proton techniques. OARs to be spared included the contra- and ipsilateral parotid and submandibular glands and individual swallowing muscles. Proton plans were made using Multifield Optimization (MFO, using three, five, and seven fields) and Single-field Optimization (SFO, using three fields). OAR sparing was evaluated using mean dose to composite salivary glands (Comp{sub Sal}) and composite swallowing muscles (Comp{sub Swal}). Plan robustness was determined for setup and range uncertainties (±3 mm for setup, ±3% HU) evaluating V95% and V107% for clinical target volumes. Results: Averaged over all patients Comp{sub Sal}/Comp{sub Swal} mean doses were lower for the three-field MFO plans (14.6/16.4 Gy) compared to the three-field SFO plans (20.0/23.7 Gy) and VMAT plans (23.0/25.3 Gy). Using more than three fields resulted in differences in OAR sparing of less than 1.5 Gy between plans. SFO plans were significantly more robust than MFO plans. VMAT plans were the most robust. Conclusions: MFO plans had improved OAR sparing but were less robust than SFO and VMAT plans, while SFO plans were more robust than MFO plans but resulted in less OAR sparing. Robustness of the MFO plans did not increase with more fields.

  6. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of losartan and its active metabolite on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Raju, S Satyanarayana; Vali, R Mastan; Sankar, G Girija

    2012-08-01

    A simple and rapid quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of losartan and its active metabolite, losartan carboxylic acid on rat dried blood spots was developed and validated as per regulatory guidelines. Losartan and its metabolite were extracted from dried blood spots using 50% aqueous methanol and separated on Waters XTerra(®) RP18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column using mobile phase composed of 40% acetonitrile and 60% aqueous ammonium acetate (10mM). The eluents were monitored using ESI tandem mass spectrometric detection with negative polarity in MRM mode using ion transitions m/z 421.2→179.0, m/z 435.3→157.0 and m/z 427.3→193.0 for losartan, losartan carboxylic acid and Irbesartan (internal standard), respectively. The method was validated over the linear range of 1-200 ng/mL and 5-1000 ng/mL with lower limits of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL and 5.0 ng/mL for losartan and losartan carboxylic acid, respectively. Inter and intra-day precision and accuracy (Bias) were below 5.96% and between -2.8 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean recoveries of the analytes from dried blood spots were between 89% and 97%. No significant carry over and matrix effects were observed. The stability of stock solution, whole blood, dried blood spot and processed samples were tested under different conditions and the results were found to be well within the acceptable limits. Additional validation parameters such as influence of hematocrit and spot volume were also evaluated and found to be well within the acceptable limits.

  7. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) for the Analysis of Activated Carbon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    impregnation procedures . It is believed that Sutcliffe-Speakman is currently using coconut - shell as the carbon precursor (instead of the New Zealand coal...microstructure facilitate the adsorption process whereby all the undesirable materials are retained. For military deployment, the activated carbon is...AD-A245 899 H.P ’ l N dI dUenm / DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY (DSC) FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by S.H.C. a and L.E. Cameron DTIC x

  8. Measuring Faecal Epi-Androsterone as an Indicator of Gonadal Activity in Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta)

    PubMed Central

    Pribbenow, Susanne; East, Marion L.; Ganswindt, Andre; Tordiffe, Adrian S. W.; Hofer, Heribert; Dehnhard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) that measure faecal testosterone metabolites (fTM) are useful tools to monitor gonadal activity. The aim of this study was to validate an “in-house” epiandrosterone EIA to monitor fTM in spotted hyenas. FTM were characterised in a male and a female hyena that each received an injection of 3H-testosterone. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses revealed a cluster of highly polar enzyme-hydrolysable hormone metabolite conjugates. We performed hydrolysis using β-glucuronidase to deconjugate metabolites and improve sensitivity of the assay. Because β-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia has been reported to bias testosterone measurements in some species, we compared the enzymatic activity of the commonly used β-glucuronidase extracted from H. pomatia with the same enzyme from Escherichia coli. Our results showed that β-glucuronidases from both sources produced similar results from spotted hyena faeces. We therefore hydrolysed samples with H. pomatia enzymes. HPLC analyses also demonstrated that following hydrolysis the epiandrosterone EIA measured significant amounts of immunoreactive metabolites corresponding to radiolabelled metabolites in both sexes. Additionally, HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirmed the presence of epiandrosterone in faeces of spotted hyenas. The biological relevance of the epiandrosterone EIA was validated by demonstrating (1) a significant increase in fTM levels in response to a testosterone injection within 16 h, (2) no biological responsiveness to an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection and (3) significant differences in fTM levels between juvenile males and adult immigrant males in a free-ranging wild population. Our results clearly demonstrate that the epiandrosterone EIA is a reliable non-invasive method to monitor gonadal activity in spotted hyenas. PMID:26107516

  9. Measuring Faecal Epi-Androsterone as an Indicator of Gonadal Activity in Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Pribbenow, Susanne; East, Marion L; Ganswindt, Andre; Tordiffe, Adrian S W; Hofer, Heribert; Dehnhard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) that measure faecal testosterone metabolites (fTM) are useful tools to monitor gonadal activity. The aim of this study was to validate an "in-house" epiandrosterone EIA to monitor fTM in spotted hyenas. FTM were characterised in a male and a female hyena that each received an injection of 3H-testosterone. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses revealed a cluster of highly polar enzyme-hydrolysable hormone metabolite conjugates. We performed hydrolysis using β-glucuronidase to deconjugate metabolites and improve sensitivity of the assay. Because β-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia has been reported to bias testosterone measurements in some species, we compared the enzymatic activity of the commonly used β-glucuronidase extracted from H. pomatia with the same enzyme from Escherichia coli. Our results showed that β-glucuronidases from both sources produced similar results from spotted hyena faeces. We therefore hydrolysed samples with H. pomatia enzymes. HPLC analyses also demonstrated that following hydrolysis the epiandrosterone EIA measured significant amounts of immunoreactive metabolites corresponding to radiolabelled metabolites in both sexes. Additionally, HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirmed the presence of epiandrosterone in faeces of spotted hyenas. The biological relevance of the epiandrosterone EIA was validated by demonstrating (1) a significant increase in fTM levels in response to a testosterone injection within 16 h, (2) no biological responsiveness to an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection and (3) significant differences in fTM levels between juvenile males and adult immigrant males in a free-ranging wild population. Our results clearly demonstrate that the epiandrosterone EIA is a reliable non-invasive method to monitor gonadal activity in spotted hyenas.

  10. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  11. Neutrophils scan for activated platelets to initiate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Adrover, José M.; Ballesteros, Ivan; Cuartero, Maria Isabel; Rossaint, Jan; Bilbao, Izaskun; Nácher, Maria; Pitaval, Christophe; Radovanovic, Irena; Fukui, Yoshinori; McEver, Rodger P.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Zarbock, Alexander; Moro, María A.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses require leukocytes to migrate within and through the vasculature, a process that is facilitated by their capacity to switch to a polarized morphology with asymmetric distribution of receptors. We report that neutrophil polarization within activated venules served to organize a protruding domain that engaged activated platelets present in the bloodstream. The selectin ligand PSGL-1 transduced signals emanating from these interactions, resulting in redistribution of receptors that drive neutrophil migration. Consequently, neutrophils unable to polarize or to transduce signals through PSGL-1 displayed aberrant crawling, and blockade of this domain protected mice against thrombo-inflammatory injury. These results reveal that recruited neutrophils scan for activated platelets, and suggest that their bipolarity allows integration of signals present at both the endothelium and the circulation before inflammation proceeds. PMID:25477463

  12. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Ram; Smith, Susan; Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  13. SU-E-T-281: Dose Measurements of Modulated Spot-Scanning Particle Beams with Beam-Gating of Respiratory-Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W; Huang, Z; Wang, W; Sheng, Y; Deng, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present dosimetric variations due to target movements with beam-gating windows of various respiratory-phase in homogeneous phantom irradiated by modulated spot-scanning carbon-ions and protons in Siemens IONTRIS system. Methods: For the safety and efficacy of proton therapy to treat three patients with lung cancer during our clinical trial, residual motion was required within 5mm. To study dosimetric variations due to respiratory movement, a target of 4.0cmx4.0cm with 2cm thick was moved with distances of 3.5mm, 4.4mm, 6.0mm, 8.3mm, and 11.0mm with beam-gating windows between various phases of inhalation or exhalation at a sin-wave breathing pattern. The target was irritated at 110mm depth by modulated carbon-ions with focus sizes of 4.1mm to 4.6mm, and a grid size of 1mm between spots. And, by modulated protons with focus sizes of 11.4mm to 13.6mm, and a grid size of 1.9mm between spots. A 4.0cmx4.0cm field size was used for both beams. EBT3 films was placed at the center of target for measurements. Delivery dose was 5.0 Gy with >1.0% uniformity over target. The uniformity and field size of each measured 2D lateral profiles were extracted. Results: By irradiating films to a doses at linear region of dose response, the uniformity and field size were extracted by measured optical density. The measured deviations from calculated field width and dose increase with increased motion amplitude. Larger non-uniformity was observed for carbonion with smaller focus size in comparing with protons. For movements of 4.4mm and 6.0mm, Optical Density uniformity of 3.80% and 5.66%were observed for carbon beam. But, is 3.46% for protons with 11.4mm movement. Conclusion: Our investigations showed that 5% optical density uniformity for carbon-ions and protons might be acceptable for treatments with 8.3mm movements in homogeneous phantoms. Dose variation introduced in complex anatomy of real patients need further investigation.

  14. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  15. Comparison of tuberculin skin testing and T-SPOT.TB for diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Hulya; Alpar, Sibel; Ucar, Nazire; Aksu, Funda; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gözalan, Aysegul; Cesur, Salih; Ertek, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The T-SPOT.TB test does not cross-react with Bacille Calmette-Guérin or most non-tuberculosis mycobacterium species, and is based on IFN-gamma responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. The objective of this study was to compare tuberculin skin test (TST) with T-SPOT.TB results used in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) as well as latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). A total of 136 subjects participated in three different groups (47 patients with active pulmonary TB, 47 healthy persons without M. tuberculosis exposure, and 42 hospital members with a history of close contact with active TB patients). The T-SPOT.TB sensitivity (83.0%) and the negative predictive value (NPV) (82.6%) in the diagnosis of active TB were significantly higher than those of TST. The sensitivity and NPV of the TST were 38.3 and 60.8%, respectively. The T-SPOT.TB specificity (80.9%) and positive predictive value (81.3%) were lower than those of TST (95.7 and 90.0%, respectively). The performance of T-SPOT.TB and TST for diagnosing LTBI was the same (54.8%). T-SPOT.TB was superior in terms of sensitivity (83.0%); TST detected only 18, whereas T-SPOT.TB test detected 39 out of 47 patients with active TB. T-SPOT.TB is thought to have better performance than TST due to false-negative results in diagnosing active TB. However, it is considered that large prospective longitudinal studies are needed for diagnosing LTBI.

  16. Short-term evolution and coexistence of spots, plages and flare activity on LQ Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the short-term evolution of the chromospheric and photospheric activity of the young, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya. Methods: Four months of quasi-simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations were used to study the variations of the photometric light curve, the evolution of the chromospheric activity from the Hα and Hβ lines, and the distribution of cool spots from Doppler maps. Results: During our observations one side of the star was more active than the other. The equivalent width of the Hα line from the least active hemisphere increased from ≈0.7 Å at the beginning of the observation to 1.0 Å at the end. The basal emission of the most active hemisphere remained roughly constant at EWHαt1.0 Å. Intense flare activity was observed during the first twenty days, where at least four different events were detected. The line asymmetries of the Hα line suggest that one of the flares could have produced a mass ejection with a maximum projected speed of 70kms-1. The rotational modulation of the V-band photometry showed clear anti-correlation with the chromospheric activity. The difference in brightness between the opposite hemispheres decreased from 0.m16 to 0.m09 in two months. Three spots gradually moving apart from each other are dominating the photospheric Doppler maps. The comparison between the maps and the Hα line as the star rotates reveals the spatial coexistence of chromospheric Hα emission and photospheric spots. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the active regions of LQ Hya can live for at least four months. The detected changes in the photometric light curve and the spectroscopic Doppler images seem to be more a consequence of the spatial redistribution of the active regions rather than due to changes in their strength. Only one of the active regions shows significant changes in its chromospheric emission. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP

  17. Valuation of active blind spot detection systems by younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Souders, Dustin J; Best, Ryan; Charness, Neil

    2016-08-24

    Due to their disproportional representation in fatal crashes, younger and older drivers both stand to benefit from in-vehicle safety technologies, yet little is known about how they value such technologies, or their willingness to adopt them. The current study investigated older (aged 65 and greater; N=49) and younger (ages 18-23; N=40) adults' valuation of a blind spot monitor and asked if self-reported visual difficulties while driving predicted the amount participants were willing to pay for a particular system (BMW's Active Blind Spot Detection System) that was demonstrated using a short video. Large and small anchor values ($250 and $500, respectively) were used as between subjects manipulations to examine the effects of initial valuation, and participants proceeded through a short staircase procedure that offered them either the free installation of the system on their current vehicle or a monetary prize ($25-$950) that changed in value according to which option they had selected in the previous step of the staircase procedure. Willingness to use other advanced driver assistance systems (lane-departure warning, automatic lane centering, emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, and self-parking systems) was also analyzed, additionally controlling for prior familiarity of those systems. Results showed that increased age was associated with a higher valuation for the Active Blind Spot Detection System in both the large and small anchor value conditions controlling for income, gender, and technology self-efficacy. Older adults valued blind spot detection about twice as much ($762) as younger adults ($383) in the large anchor condition, though both groups' values were in the range for the current cost of an aftermarket system. Similarly, age was the most robust positive predictor of willingness to adopt other driving technologies, along with system familiarity. Difficulties with driving-related visual factors also positively predicting acceptance levels for

  18. Wood ant nests as hot spots of microbial activity in forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilkova, Veronika; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Wood ants build large and long-lasting nests from organic materials and mineral soil which have a very special structure. Nests are well-aerated due to numerous chambers and galleries and stable temperature and moisture are maintained there thanks to ant activities. These conditions together with the constant input of easily available nutrients from food of ants support microbial activity. Due to respiration of ants and microbes, wood ant nests are known as hot spots of CO2 production in forest ecosystems. Although the main source of CO2 is represented by ant respiration, a significant amount of CO2 originates also from microbial decomposition of organic materials. Several conditions affect microbial respiration, such as moisture of nest material, changes in temperatures or food input. As mineral nutrients are released from organic materials, wood ant nests represent hot spots of mineral nutrients in forest ecosystems which can be exploited by other organisms, such as roots of trees, and can also cause heterogeneity in species abundance and composition.

  19. Finding the perfect spot for fluorine: improving potency up to 40-fold during a rational fluorine scan of a Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) inhibitor scaffold.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yan; Sweeney, Zachary K; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Davis, Dana; Goldstein, David M; Han, Xiaochun; Hong, Junbae; Kocer, Buelent; Kondru, Rama K; Litman, Renee; McIntosh, Joel; Sarma, Keshab; Suh, Judy; Taygerly, Joshua; Owens, Timothy D

    2015-01-15

    A rational fluorine scan based on co-crystal structures was explored to increase the potency of a series of selective BTK inhibitors. While fluorine substitution on a saturated bicyclic ring system yields no apparent benefit, the same operation on an unsaturated bicyclic ring can increase HWB activity by up to 40-fold. Comparison of co-crystal structures of parent molecules and fluorinated counterparts revealed the importance of placing fluorine at the optimal position to achieve favorable interactions with protein side chains.

  20. Camouflage through an active choice of a resting spot and body orientation in moths.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-K; Moon, J-Y; Lee, S-I; Jablonski, P G

    2012-09-01

    Cryptic colour patterns in prey are classical examples of adaptations to avoid predation, but we still know little about behaviours that reinforce the match between animal body and the background. For example, moths avoid predators by matching their colour patterns with the background. Active choice of a species-specific body orientation has been suggested as an important function of body positioning behaviour performed by moths after landing on the bark. However, the contribution of this behaviour to moths' crypticity has not been directly measured. From observations of geometrid moths, Hypomecis roboraria and Jankowskia fuscaria, we determined that the positioning behaviour, which consists of walking and turning the body while repeatedly lifting and lowering the wings, resulted in new resting spots and body orientations in J. fuscaria and in new resting spots in H. roboraria. The body positioning behaviour of the two species significantly decreased the probability of visual detection by humans, who viewed photographs of the moths taken before and after the positioning behaviour. This implies that body positioning significantly increases the camouflage effect provided by moth's cryptic colour pattern regardless of whether the behaviour involves a new body orientation or not. Our study demonstrates that the evolution of morphological adaptations, such as colour pattern of moths, cannot be fully understood without taking into account a behavioural phenotype that coevolved with the morphology for increasing the adaptive value of the morphological trait.

  1. Lightning activity in Saturn's Great White Spot of 2010/2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Georg; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Pagaran, Joseph A.

    2014-05-01

    In this presentation we will summarize the main findings about Saturn's Great White Spot of 2010/2011 gained by analyzing data from the Cassini RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument in combination with images from the Cassini cameras. Great White Spots (GWS) are planetary-scale disturbances in Saturn's atmosphere that usually happen once per Saturn year (29.5 Earth years). The last GWS of 2010/2011 occurred earlier than expected, and the Cassini RPWS instrument measured radio emissions caused by lightning discharges thereby identifying the GWS as a giant thunderstorm. Lightning radio emissions were measured for almost 9 months, from 5 December 2010 until 28 August 2011, with typical flash rates of more than 10 per second. Many images of the GWS were taken with the Cassini ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and by Earth-based telescopes which captured the storm's birth, evolution and demise. The GWS developed an elongated eastward tail due to Saturn's zonal winds, and this tail wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. RPWS data indicated that the storm's head was the main center of lightning activity, but the region of active thunderstorm cells also extented eastward into the tail. This was confirmed by the first optical observation of lightning flashes on Saturn's dayside located eastward of the head. The head region periodically spawned anticyclonic vortices, and the optical flashes appeared in the cyclonic gaps between them where the atmosphere looked clear down to the level of deep clouds. The largest anticyclonic vortex in the tail drifted with a rate that was 2 deg/day slower than the head. Hence, after about half a year one caught up with the other, and it came to a head-vortex collision in mid-June 2011. This led to a significant decrease of lightning and convective activity, which became intermittent and finally ended in late August 2011.

  2. WE-EF-303-05: Development and Commissioning of Real-Time Imaging Function for Respiratory-Gated Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N; Takao, S; Matsuura, T; Matsuzaki, Y; Matsuo, Y; Yamada, T; Fujii, Y; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H; Kidani, T; Egashira, Y; Umekawa, T; Umegaki, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To realize real-time-image gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) for treating mobile tumors. Methods: The rotating gantry of spot scanning proton beam therapy has been designed to equip two x-ray fluoroscopy devices that enable real-time imaging of the internal fiducial markers during respiration. Three-dimensional position of the fiducial marker located near the tumor can be calculated from the fluoroscopic images obtained from orthogonal directions and therapeutic beam is gated only when the fiducial marker is within the predefined gating window. Image acquisition rate can be selected from discrete value ranging from 0.1 Hz to 30 Hz. In order to confirm the effectiveness of RGPT and apply it clinically, clinical commissioning was conducted. Commissioning tests were categorized to main three parts including geometric accuracy, temporal accuracy and dosimetric evaluation. Results: Developed real-time imaging function has been installed and its basic performances have been confirmed. In the evaluation of geometric accuracy, coincidence of three-dimensional treatment room coordinate system and imaging coordinate system was confirmed to be less than 1 mm. Fiducial markers (gold sphere and coil) were able to be tracked in simulated clinical condition using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. In the evaluation of temporal accuracy, latency from image acquisition to gate on/off signal was about 60 msec in typical case. In dosimetric evaluation, treatment beam characteristics including beam irradiation position and dose output were stable in gated irradiation. Homogeneity indices to the mobile target were 0.99 (static), 0.89 (w/o gating, motion is parallel to direction of scan), 0.75 (w/o gating, perpendicular), 0.98 (w/ gating, parallel) and 0.93 (w/ gating, perpendicular). Dose homogeneity to the mobile target can be maintained in RGPT. Conclusion: Real-time imaging function utilizing x-ray fluoroscopy has been developed and commissioned successfully in order to

  3. Development of digestive enzyme activity in larvae of spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus II: Electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-González, C A; Moyano-López, F J; Civera-Cerecedo, R; Carrasco-Chávez, V; Ortíz-Galindo, J L; Nolasco-Soria, H; Tovar-Ramírez, D; Dumas, S

    2010-03-01

    The activities of several digestive enzymes during larval development of the spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) were evaluated using electrophoretic techniques. The results show the presence of three isoforms of alkaline protease from day 2 after hatching (ah) and the early appearance of one pepsin-like band from day 12 ah onwards. In addition, two lipase bands first appeared on day 2 ah, and there was a change in the molecular weight of one band from day 15 ah onwards. Several alpha-amylase isoforms were observed from hatching up to day 5 ah. These results indicate that the important digestive enzymes develop rapidly in these larvae, supporting the possibility of early weaning at day 12 ah using artificial diets.

  4. Microfluidic setup for on-line SERS monitoring using laser induced nanoparticle spots as SERS active substrate

    PubMed Central

    Buja, Oana-M; Gordan, Ovidiu D; Morschhauser, Andreas; Nestler, Jörg; Zahn, Dietrich R T

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic setup which enables on-line monitoring of residues of malachite green (MG) using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is reported. The SERS active substrate was prepared via laser induced synthesis of silver or gold nanoparticles spot on the bottom of a 200 μm inner dimension glass capillary, by focusing the laser beam during a continuous flow of a mixture of silver nitrate or gold chloride and sodium citrate. The described microfluidic setup enables within a few minutes the monitoring of several processes: the synthesis of the SERS active spot, MG adsorption to the metal surface, detection of the analyte when saturation of the SERS signal is reached, and finally, the desorption of MG from the spot. Moreover, after MG complete desorption, the regeneration of the SERS active spot was achieved. The detection of MG was possible down to 10−7 M concentration with a good reproducibility when using silver or gold spots as SERS substrate. PMID:28243562

  5. Chromospheric activity and lithium line variations in the spectra of the spotted star LQ Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Although the relationship between lithium abundance in stars and their magnetic activity is commonly accepted, it is still unclear how the different phenomena related to it can increase the amount of Li, reduce its depletion, or be a source of bias for the measurements. Aims: We study the rotational modulation of chromospheric and photospheric parameters of the young, active, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya and their connection with the variability of the Li i 6708 Å line. Methods: A total of 199 high-resolution STELLA spectra and quasi-simultaneous photometry were used to compute effective temperature, gravity, and chromospheric activity indicators such as Hα and Hβ emission, Balmer decrement, and chromospheric electron density, as a function of the rotational phase. The variation of the Li i 6708 Å line was characterized in terms of equivalent width, abundance, and of 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio in the form of line shifts. Results: Photospheric and chromospheric parameters show clear rotational modulation. Effective temperatures and continuum variations reveal a higher concentration of cool spots on the side of the star on which we also detect stronger chromospheric activity. Increased electron densities and the modulation of the He i D3 line suggest that the source of this activity can be a combination of plages and repeated low-intensity flares. The Li line and other temperature-sensitive lines are clearly enhanced by the spots located on the most active side of the star. Li abundances calculated taking into account the temperature variations simultaneously show, although with high dispersion, a small overabundance of this element that correlates well with the surface magnetic activity. In addition, the Li line center is more intensely redshifted than in the other hemisphere, which might be interpreted as a weak enrichment of 6Li. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC, and the Vienna

  6. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  7. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  8. Development of digestive enzyme activity in larvae of spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus. 1. Biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-González, C A; Moyano-López, F J; Civera-Cerecedo, R; Carrasco-Chávez, V; Ortiz-Galindo, J L; Dumas, S

    2008-12-01

    Spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus is a potential aquaculture species in Northwest Mexico. In the last few years it has been possible to close its life cycle and to develop larviculture technology at on pilot scale using live food, however survival values are low (11%) and improvements in growth and survival requires the study of the morpho-physiological development during the initial ontogeny. In this research digestive activity of several enzymes were evaluated in larvae, from hatching to 30 days after hatching (dah), and in live prey (rotifers and Artemia), by use of biochemical and electrophoretic techniques. This paper, is the first of two parts, and covers only the biochemical analysis. All digestive enzyme activities were detected from mouth opening; however the, maximum activities varied among different digestive enzymes. For alkaline protease and trypsin the maximum activities were detected from 12 to 18 dah. Acid protease activity was observed from day 12 onwards. The other digestive enzymes appear between days 4 and 18 after hatching, with marked fluctuations. These activities indicate the beginning of the juvenile stage and the maturation of the digestive system, in agreement with changes that occur during morpho-physiological development and food changes from rotifers to Artemia. All enzymatic activities were detected in rotifers and Artemia, and their contribution to enhancement the digestion capacity of the larvae appears to be low, but cannot be minimised. We concluded that the enzymatic equipment of P. maculatofasciatus larvae is similar to that of other marine fish species, that it becomes complete between days 12 and 18 after hatching, and that it is totally efficient up to 25 dah.

  9. Scanning L Band Active Passive Validation Experiment 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Patel, H.; Cosh, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    SLAP (Scanning L-band Active Passive) comprises of a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer and fully polarimetric L-band radar with a shared antenna. SLAP is designed to be compatible with several aircrafts; specifically, C-23, Twin Otter, P-3, and C-130. SLAP is designed for simplicity, accuracy, & reliability. It leverages, as much as possible, existing instruments, hardware, and software in order to minimize cost, time, and risk.The SLAP airborne/ground campaign is designed to conduct flight testing and ground truth for the airborne instrument. The campaign took place the third week of December 2013 in Eastern Shore, MD. SLAP contributes to the NASA's core mission because of its ability to serve as an airborne simulator for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission, one of NASA's flagship missions scheduled to launch in January 2015. A 3-day aircraft validation campaign was conducted where the new SLAP instrument flew three separate days over the proposed sampling region. The study area is a mixed agriculture and forest site located about 1 hour east of Washington, DC on the Eastern Shore (of the Chesapeake Bay). This region is located on the Delmarva Peninsula. The advantages of the selected site are: (1) Site was used before in previous field campaign (SMAPVEX08) (2) ARS HRSL has some established sampling sites within region (3) Dynamic variation in land cover (4) Variety of plant structures and densities. The goal of this campaign was to fly the instrument over the proposed site before a rain event, then have 2 other flights after the rain event to capture a dry down. In conjunction with the aircraft, there was in-situ ground sampling. Ground observations were collected concurrent with aircraft flights. These included soil moisture, soil temperature, surface temperature, surface roughness and vegetation parameters. Forest sites were monitored with small temporary networks of in situ sensors installed prior to the first flight. Soil moisture was

  10. Improving spot-scanning proton therapy patient specific quality assurance with HPlusQA, a second-check dose calculation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Dennis; Li, Yupeng; Taylor, Michael B.; Kerr, Matthew; Holmes, Charles; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Li, Heng; Lii, Jim; Amos, Richard; Wu, Richard; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the use of HPlusQA, spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) dose calculation software developed at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, as second-check dose calculation software for patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA). The authors also showed how HPlusQA can be used within the current PSQA framework.Methods: The authors compared the dose calculations of HPlusQA and the Eclipse treatment planning system with 106 planar dose measurements made as part of PSQA. To determine the relative performance and the degree of correlation between HPlusQA and Eclipse, the authors compared calculated with measured point doses. Then, to determine how well HPlusQA can predict when the comparisons between Eclipse calculations and the measured dose will exceed tolerance levels, the authors compared gamma index scores for HPlusQA versus Eclipse with those of measured doses versus Eclipse. The authors introduce the αβγ transformation as a way to more easily compare gamma scores.Results: The authors compared measured and calculated dose planes using the relative depth, z/R × 100%, where z is the depth of the measurement and R is the proton beam range. For relative depths than less than 80%, both Eclipse and HPlusQA calculations were within 2 cGy of dose measurements on average. When the relative depth was greater than 80%, the agreement between the calculations and measurements fell to 4 cGy. For relative depths less than 10%, the Eclipse and HPlusQA dose discrepancies showed a negative correlation, −0.21. Otherwise, the correlation between the dose discrepancies was positive and as large as 0.6. For the dose planes in this study, HPlusQA correctly predicted when Eclipse had and had not calculated the dose to within tolerance 92% and 79% of the time, respectively. In 4 of 106 cases, HPlusQA failed to predict when the comparison between measurement and Eclipse's calculation had exceeded the tolerance levels of 3% for

  11. Biological effect of dose distortion by fiducial markers in spot-scanning proton therapy with a limited number of fields: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Sutherland, Kenneth; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Shimizu, Shinichi; Takao, Seishin; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: In accurate proton spot-scanning therapy, continuous target tracking by fluoroscopic x ray during irradiation is beneficial not only for respiratory moving tumors of lung and liver but also for relatively stationary tumors of prostate. Implanted gold markers have been used with great effect for positioning the target volume by a fluoroscopy, especially for the cases of liver and prostate with the targets surrounded by water-equivalent tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that gold markers can cause a significant underdose in proton therapy. This paper focuses on prostate cancer and explores the possibility that multiple-field irradiation improves the underdose effect by markers on tumor-control probability (TCP). Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the dose distortion effect. A spherical gold marker was placed at several characteristic points in a water phantom. The markers were with two different diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm, both visible on fluoroscopy. Three beam arrangements of single-field uniform dose (SFUD) were examined: one lateral field, two opposite lateral fields, and three fields (two opposite lateral fields + anterior field). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was set to 1.1 and a dose of 74 Gy (RBE) was delivered to the target of a typical prostate size in 37 fractions. The ratios of TCP to that without the marker (TCP{sub r}) were compared with the parameters of the marker sizes, number of fields, and marker positions. To take into account the dependence of biological parameters in TCP model, {alpha}/{beta} values of 1.5, 3, and 10 Gy (RBE) were considered. Results: It was found that the marker of 1.5 mm diameter does not affect the TCPs with all {alpha}/{beta} values when two or more fields are used. On the other hand, if the marker diameter is 2 mm, more than two irradiation fields are required to suppress the decrease in TCP from TCP{sub r} by less than 3%. This is especially true when multiple

  12. MO-F-16A-05: Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Patient-Specific Quality Assurance: Our Methodology and Results From 295 Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, D; Zhang, X; Li, H; Wu, R; Poenisch, F; Kerr, M; Holmes, C; Zhu, X; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Li, Y; Suzuki, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA) results for 295 spot-scanning proton therapy treatment plans from the MD Anderson PTC-Houston. We show how the results differed by treatment site and how they were affected by the treatment plan optimization method and by a range shifter in the treatment field. We also discuss some causes of PSQA problems. Methods: The PSQA procedure, which is designed to verify both the accuracy of the treatment planning system's (Eclipse™ v8.9) dose calculations and the dose delivery of the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron, consists of (1) an end-to-end test in which the beam is delivered and measured at the prescribed gantry angle, and (2) additional dose plane measurements made from gantry angle 270°. HPlusQA™ software automatically performs the gamma analysis with criteria 3% (dose tolerance), 3 mm (distance-to-agreement, DTA) and 2%, 2 mm. Passing is defined as at least 90% of the pixels having a gamma score less than 1. Results: The PSQA gamma passing rate was 96.2% for 3%, 3 mm, and 85.3% for 2%, 2 mm. The rate depended on the treatment site. For example, the 3%, 3 mm passing rate was 95% for head and neck plans, vs 100% for prostate plans. The passing rates of multi- vs. single-field optimization plans did not significantly differ. However, the rate for fields with range shifters was 94.8±0.6%, vs 99.0±0.6% for those without (p = 0.002). Longitudinal dose gradients caused most of the low scores. Overestimation of the calculated dose proximal to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) caused many of the others. Conclusion: The planned and delivered doses consistently agreed within tolerance levels. Minor dose modeling deficiencies remain proximal to the SOBP. The 3% dose tolerance, 3 mm DTA, with 90% pixel passing rate is a reasonable action level for 2D gamma comparisons.

  13. TU-EF-304-11: Therapeutic Benefits of Collimation in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy in the Treatment of Brain Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moignier, A; Gelover, E; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D; Kirk, M; Lin, L; Solberg, T; Lin, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A dynamic collimation system (DCS) based on two orthogonal pairs of mobile trimmer blades has recently been proposed to reduce the lateral penumbra in spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT). The purpose of this work is to quantify the therapeutic benefit of using the DCS for SSPT of brain cancer by comparing un-collimated and collimated treatment plans. Methods: Un-collimated and collimated brain treatment plans were created for five patients, previously treated with SSPT, using an in-house treatment planning system capable of modeling collimated and un-collimated beamlets. Un-collimated plans reproduced the clinically delivered plans in terms of target coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, whereas collimated plans were re-optimized to improve the organ-at-risk sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and risk of secondary brain cancer were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 7.1% (95% CI: 4.2%–9.9%; p<0.01) and 14.3% (95% CI: 7.8%–20.8%; p<0.01), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 12.0% (95% CI: 8.2%–15.7%; p<0.01) for the brain necrosis NTCP using the Flickinger model, and 14.2% (95% CI: 7.7%–20.8%; p<0.01) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. The average maximum dose reductions for the brainstem, chiasm, optic nerves, cochleae and pituitary gland when comparing un-collimated and collimated plans were 14.3%, 10.4%, 11.2%, 13.0%, 12.9% and 3.4%, respectively. Evaluating individual plans using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman NTCP model also yielded improvements. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction performed by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of

  14. Spots and the activity of M dwarfs from observations with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. S.; Savanov, I. S.

    2017-02-01

    A method for estimating the spottedness parameter S (the spotted area as a fraction of the surface of an active star) proposed earlier is applied to an analysis of activity in 1570 M dwarf stars. The analysis is based on observational material obtained with the Kepler Space Telescope, as well as data on the fluxes of the studied objects in the near and far ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) based on data from the GALEX space telescope. The variations of S with the ages of the stars are studied (four groups with different ages are distinguished), as well as variations of S with their rotational periods. A diagram characterizing the relationship between S and the Rossby number Ro resembles the classical dependence of the X-ray luminosities of active stars on Ro, and a saturation regime is attained at the same value, Ro = 0.13. Moreover, objects with ages of more than 100 million years do not form a single sequence (and stars older than 900 million years possess surface spottednesses of order 1%). The S-Ro dependence obtained could expand possibilities for analyzing the dependence of the X-ray luminosities of active stars on their Rossby numbers, and could also be applied to refine parameters characterizing the action of dynamo mechanisms, such as the dynamo number N D . A comparison of the GALEX NUV and FUV brightness estimates with the activity parameters of the stars suggests that younger, more rapidly rotating active stars are brighter in the NUV, and that the FUV flux grows and the difference of the FUV and NUV brightnesses decreases with increasing spottedness S.

  15. SU-D-304-01: Development of An Applicator for Treating Shallow and Moving Tumors with Respiratory-Gated Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Using Real-Time Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, T; Fujii, Y; Takao, S; Yamada, T; Matsuzaki, Y; Miyamoto, N; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H; Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umegaki, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for treating shallow and moving tumors (e.g., lung tumors) with respiratory-gated spot-scanning proton therapy using real-time image guidance (RTPT). Methods: An applicator was developed which can be installed by hand on the treatment nozzle. The mechanical design was considered such that the Bragg peaks are placed at the patient surface while a sufficient field of view (FOV) of fluoroscopic X-rays was maintained during the proton beam delivery. To reduce the treatment time maintaining the robustness of the dose distribution with respect to motion, a mini-ridge filter (MRF) was sandwiched between two energy absorbers. The measurements were performed to obtain a data for beam modeling and to verify the spot position-invariance of a pencil beam dose distribution. For three lung cancer patients, treatment plans were made with and without the MRF and the effects of the MRF were evaluated. Next, the effect of respiratory motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Results: To scan the proton beam over a 14 x 14 cm area while maintaining the φ16 cm of fluoroscopic FOV, the lower face of the applicator was set 22 cm upstream of the isocenter. With an additional range variance of 2.2 mm and peak-to-peak distance of 4 mm of the MRF, the pencil beam dose distribution was unchanged with the displacement of the spot position. The quality of the treatment plans was not worsened by the MRF. With the MRF, the number of energy layers was reduced to less than half and the treatment time by 26–37%. The simulation study showed that the interplay effect was successfully suppressed by respiratory-gating both with and without MRF. Conclusions: The spot-scanning proton beam was successfully delivered to shallow and moving tumors within a sufficiently short time by installing the developed applicator at the RTPT nozzle.

  16. Activity and cold spots on the surface of G-type superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2015-07-01

    Based on the high precision photometric observations of the Kepler space telescope, we have investigated the properties of the active regions (cold spots) on the surface of 279 stars of the spectral class G, for which 1547 superflares with energies in the range of 1033-1036 erg have been revealed. The main conclusion of our study is the quantitative estimation of the increased surface spottedness of superflare stars, which indicates enhancedmagnetic activity of these objects. The increased spottedness on the surfaces of the studied stars was confirmed based on two independent estimations of stellar brightness variations. In addition, it was concluded that superflare stars do not stand out in the common dataset of differential rotation parameters. Based on the data considered, no correlation was found of the spottedness parameters or the differential rotation parameters with the characteristics of these objects—their Rossby numbers and superflare energy. Additionally, the correlation between the superflare energy and the inverse Rossby number was considered. None of these comparisons gave an indication for the presence of any obvious correlation. The results of the analysis of five stars with a few dozen flares registered indicate that for the same star whereas spottedness S variations are small, significant changes in the superflare energy can be achieved. On the example of KIC 10422252, we show that at sixfold S variations, the flare energy varies by orders of magnitude at any given S value.

  17. Light-curve solutions of 20 eclipsing Kepler binaries, most of them with pronounced spot and flare activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Atanasova, T.; Dimitrov, D.

    2016-07-01

    We carried out light curve solutions of the Kepler light curves of twenty detached eclipsing binaries with circular orbits and determined the orbital inclinations, temperatures. relative radii and luminosities of their components. We studied the quality of the solutions with respect to the adopted limb-darkening law and its coefficients. The detailed tracing of the numerous and uninterrupted data of our targets gave us an unique possibility to detect and learn their spot and flare activity. We established that the out-of-eclipse variability of the most targets gradually changes from small-amplitude two-waved type to big-amplitude one-waved type and vice versa, i.e. their spot activity cycles pass through phase of two almost diametrically opposite spots and phase of big polar cool spot. We found that the low-temperature targets show flare activity of UV Cet-type with amplitudes of 0.002-0.22 mag and duration of up to several hours. Data from Kepler

  18. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Li, Yupeng; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties.Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared.Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to the

  19. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Li, Yupeng; Frank, Steven J.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties. Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared. Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to the

  20. The transcriptional co-activator LEDGF/p75 displays a dynamic scan-and-lock mechanism for chromatin tethering

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Gijsbers, Rik; De Rijck, Jan; Voet, Arnout; Hotta, Jun-ichi; McNeely, Melissa; Hofkens, Johan; Debyser, Zeger; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all cellular and disease related functions of the transcriptional co-activator lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) involve tethering of interaction partners to chromatin via its conserved integrase binding domain (IBD), but little is known about the mechanism of in vivo chromatin binding and tethering. In this work we studied LEDGF/p75 in real-time in living HeLa cells combining different quantitative fluorescence techniques: spot fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (sFRAP) and half-nucleus fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (hnFRAP), continuous photobleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and an improved FCS method to study diffusion dependence of chromatin binding, tunable focus FCS. LEDGF/p75 moves about in nuclei of living cells in a chromatin hopping/scanning mode typical for transcription factors. The PWWP domain of LEDGF/p75 is necessary, but not sufficient for in vivo chromatin binding. After interaction with HIV-1 integrase via its IBD, a general protein–protein interaction motif, kinetics of LEDGF/p75 shift to 75-fold larger affinity for chromatin. The PWWP is crucial for locking the complex on chromatin. We propose a scan-and-lock model for LEDGF/p75, unifying paradoxical notions of transcriptional co-activation and lentiviral integration targeting. PMID:20974633

  1. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  2. Active nanocharacterization of nanofunctional materials by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daisuke; Sagisaka, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to nanofabrication and nanocharacterization are reviewed. The main focus of this paper is to outline techniques for depositing and manipulating nanometer-scale structures using STM tips. Firstly, the transfer of STM tip material through the application of voltage pulses is introduced. The highly reproducible fabrication of metallic silver nanodots and nanowires is discussed. The mechanism is thought to be spontaneous point-contact formation caused by field-enhanced diffusion to the apex of the tip. Transfer through the application of z-direction pulses is also introduced. Sub-nanometer displacement pulses along the z-direction form point contacts that can be used for reproducible nanodot deposition. Next, the discovery of the STM structural manipulation of surface phases is discussed. It has been demonstrated that superstructures on Si(001) surfaces can be reverse-manipulated by controlling the injected carriers. Finally, the fabrication of an atomic-scale one-dimensional quantum confinement system by single-atom deposition using a controlled point contact is presented. Because of its combined nanofabrication and nanocharacterization capabilities, STM is a powerful tool for exploring the nanotechnology and nanoscience fields.

  3. Active nanocharacterization of nanofunctional materials by scanning tunneling microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Daisuke; Sagisaka, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to nanofabrication and nanocharacterization are reviewed. The main focus of this paper is to outline techniques for depositing and manipulating nanometer-scale structures using STM tips. Firstly, the transfer of STM tip material through the application of voltage pulses is introduced. The highly reproducible fabrication of metallic silver nanodots and nanowires is discussed. The mechanism is thought to be spontaneous point-contact formation caused by field-enhanced diffusion to the apex of the tip. Transfer through the application of z-direction pulses is also introduced. Sub-nanometer displacement pulses along the z-direction form point contacts that can be used for reproducible nanodot deposition. Next, the discovery of the STM structural manipulation of surface phases is discussed. It has been demonstrated that superstructures on Si(001) surfaces can be reverse-manipulated by controlling the injected carriers. Finally, the fabrication of an atomic-scale one-dimensional quantum confinement system by single-atom deposition using a controlled point contact is presented. Because of its combined nanofabrication and nanocharacterization capabilities, STM is a powerful tool for exploring the nanotechnology and nanoscience fields. PMID:27877921

  4. Dynamic Characterization of the CT Angiographic ‘Spot Sign’

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Santanu; Alhazzaa, Mohammed; Wasserman, Jason K.; Sun, Yang Yang; Stotts, Grant; Hogan, Mathew J.; Demchuk, Andrew; Aviv, Richard I.; Dowlatshahi, Dar

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Standard (static) CT angiography is used to identify the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) spot sign. We used dynamic CT-angiography to describe spot sign characteristics and measurement parameters over 60-seconds of image acquisition. Methods We prospectively identified consecutive patients presenting with acute ICH within 4.5 hours of symptom onset, and collected whole brain dynamic CT-angiography (dCTA). Spot parameters (earliest appearance, duration, maximum Hounsfield unit (HU), time to maximum HU, time to spot diagnostic definition, spot volume and hematoma volumes) were measured using volumetric analysis software. Result We enrolled 34 patients: three were excluded due to secondary causes of ICH. Of the remaining 31 patients there were 18 females (58%) with median age 70 (range 47–86) and baseline hematoma volume 33 ml (range 0.7–103 ml). Positive dCTA spot sign was present in 13 patients (42%) visualized as an expanding 3-dimensional structure temporally evolving its morphology over the scan period. Median time to spot appearance was 21 s (range 15–35 seconds). This method allowed tracking of spots evolution until the end of venous phase (active extravasation) with median duration of 39 s (range 25–45 seconds). The average density and time to maximum density was 204HU and 30.8 s (range 23–31 s) respectively. Median time to spot diagnosis was 20.8 s using either 100 or 120HU definitions. Conclusion Dynamic CTA allows a 3-dimensional assessment of spot sign formation during acute ICH, and captured higher spot sign prevalence than previously reported. This is the first study to describe and quantify spot sign characteristics using dCTA; these can be used in ongoing and upcoming ICH studies. PMID:24594897

  5. Active Listening--Listen, Repeat, Do. Scans Plans Portfolio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sample, Barbara

    In this unit, students will use active listening, repeating, or paraphrasing what has been said to confirm understanding and introductory phrases and rising intonation to ask for clarification. They will also follow one, two, or multi-step instructions or give instructions to another person. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education)…

  6. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  7. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  8. Hot spot activity and tectonic settings near Amsterdam-St. Paul plateau (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janin, M.; HéMond, C.; Guillou, H.; Maia, M.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Bollinger, C.; Liorzou, C.; Mudholkar, A.

    2011-05-01

    The Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) plateau is located in the central part of the Indian Ocean and results from the interaction between the ASP hot spot and the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). It is located near the diffuse boundary between the Capricorn and Australian plates. The seamount chain of the Dead Poets (CDP) is northeast of the ASP plateau and may represent older volcanism related to the ASP hot spot; this chain consists of two groups of seamounts: (1) large flat-topped seamounts formed 8-10 Ma and (2) smaller conical seamounts formed during the last 2 Myr. The ASP hot spot has produced two pulses of magmatism that have been ponded under the ASP plateau and erupted along the divergent boundary between the Capricorn and Australian plates. The N65° orientation of the CDP as well as the seamount's elongated shapes support an opening motion between the Capricorn and Australian plates along a suture oriented in the N155° direction. This motion compared to the Antarctic plate amounts to an apparent velocity of 7.7 cm/yr northeastward for the Capricorn-Australian block. This motion does not fit with a fixed plume model. We suggest, therefore, that the ASP plume experienced a motion of about 1-2 cm/yr to the SW, which is opposite to the asthenospheric flow in this region and suggests a deep-seated plume.

  9. Real-time prompt γ monitoring in spot-scanning proton therapy using imaging through a knife-edge-shaped slit.

    PubMed

    Bom, Victor; Joulaeizadeh, Leila; Beekman, Freek

    2012-01-21

    In this paper we report on Monte Carlo simulations to investigate real-time monitoring of the track depth profile in particle therapy by measuring prompt gamma ray emissions: a high sensitivity imaging system employing a knife-edge-shaped slit combined with a position-sensitive gamma detector was evaluated. Calculations to test this new concept were performed for a head-sized software phantom. Clear spatial correlation is shown between the distribution of gamma rays detected with energies above 1.5 MeV and the distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted from the phantom. The number of neutrons originating from nuclear reactions in the phantom that are detected at these high energies is small. Most importantly it is shown that under common therapy conditions enough data may be collected during one spot-step (of the order of 10 ms) to locate the distal dose edge with a 1σ accuracy of better than 1 mm. This indicates that simple slit cameras have high potential for accurate real-time particle therapy adjustment and may become a practical way to improve particle therapy accuracy.

  10. Magnetic activity in the photosphere of CoRoT-Exo-2a. Active longitudes and short-term spot cycle in a young Sun-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Pagano, I.; Leto, G.; Messina, S.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Boumier, P.; Collier Cameron, A.; Comparato, M.; Cutispoto, G.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Foing, B.; Kaiser, A.; Moutou, C.; Parihar, P. S.; Silva-Valio, A.; Weiss, W. W.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The space experiment CoRoT has recently detected transits by a hot Jupiter across the disc of an active G7V star (CoRoT-Exo-2a) that can be considered as a good proxy for the Sun at an age of approximately 0.5 Gyr. Aims: We present a spot modelling of the optical variability of the star during 142 days of uninterrupted observations performed by CoRoT with unprecedented photometric precision. Methods: We apply spot modelling approaches previously tested in the case of the Sun by modelling total solar irradiance variations, a good proxy for the optical flux variations of the Sun as a star. The best results in terms of mapping of the surface brightness inhomogeneities are obtained by means of maximum entropy regularized models. To model the light curve of CoRoT-Exo-2a, we take into account the photometric effects of both cool spots and solar-like faculae, adopting solar analogy. Results: Two active longitudes initially on opposite hemispheres are found on the photosphere of CoRoT-Exo-2a with a rotation period of 4.522 ± 0.024 days. Their separation changes by ≈80° during the time span of the observations. From this variation, a relative amplitude of the surface differential rotation lower than ~1 percent is estimated. Individual spots form within the active longitudes and show an angular velocity ~1 percent lower than that of the longitude pattern. The total spotted area shows a cyclic oscillation with a period of 28.9 ± 4.3 days, which is close to 10 times the synodic period of the planet as seen by the rotating active longitudes. We discuss the effects of solar-like faculae on our models, finding indications of a facular contribution to the optical flux variations of CoRoT-Exo-2a being significantly smaller than in the present Sun. Conclusions: The implications of such results for the internal rotation of CoRoT-Exo-2a are discussed, based on solar analogy. A possible magnetic star-planet interaction is suggested by the cyclic variation of the spotted

  11. Composition and acaricidal activity of Lippia sidoides essential oil against two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch).

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, S C H; Niculau, E dos S; Blank, A F; Câmara, C A G; Araújo, I N; Alves, P B

    2010-01-01

    The essential oils from accessions of Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) were characterized by GC and GC/MS and investigated for their acaricidal activity against the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch). Twenty-nine compounds were identified with potential acaricidal activity. Glass receptacles were used as test chambers. For each dose and exposure time combination, three replicates were used. Each replicate consisted of 30 adult females of T. urticae, 10 mites in each leaf disk of Canavalia ensiformis placed in a Petri dish. Increasing amounts of oil or terpene were applied on a blotting paper strip, fixed on the inner surface of the glass recipient cover, corresponding to 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 microL/L of air, respectively. Exposure periods were 24, 48, and 72 h. Data obtained in these experiments were submitted to probit analysis. The essential oil of L. sidoides, thymol and carvacrol exhibited potent acaricidal activity against T. urticae.

  12. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-06-17

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process.

  13. Anomalous accretion activity and the spotted nature of the DQ Tau binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Bary, Jeffrey S.; Petersen, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    We report the detection of an anomalous accretion flare in the tight eccentric pre-main-sequence binary system DQ Tau. In a multi-epoch survey consisting of randomly acquired low- to moderate-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained over a period of almost 10 yr, we detect a significant and simultaneous brightening of four standard accretion indicators (Ca II infrared triplet, the Paschen and Brackett series H I lines, and He I 1.083 μm), on back-to-back nights (φ = 0.372 and 0.433) with the flare increasing in strength as the system approached apastron (φ = 0.5). The mass accretion rate measured for the anomalous flare is nearly an order of magnitude stronger than the average quiescent rate. While previous observations established that frequent, periodic accretion flares phased with periastron passages occur in this system, these data provide evidence that orbitally modulated accretion flares occur near apastron, when the stars make their closest approach to the circumbinary disk. The timing of the flare suggests that this outburst is due to interactions of the stellar cores (or the highly truncated circumstellar disks) with material in non-axisymmetric structures located at the inner edge of the circumbinary disk. We also explore the optical/infrared spectral type mismatch previously observed for T Tauri stars (TTSs) and successfully model the shape of the spectra from 0.8 to 1.0 μm and the strengths of the TiO and FeH bands as manifestations of large cool spots on the surfaces of the stellar companions in DQ Tau. These findings illustrate that a complete model of near-infrared spectra of many TTSs must include parameters for spot filling factors and temperatures.

  14. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  15. SPOT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jason T.; Welsh, Sam J.; Farinetti, Antonio L.; Wegner, Tim; Blakeslee, James; Deboeck, Toni F.; Dyer, Daniel; Corley, Bryan M.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine; Kramer, Leonard; Zimmerman, Patrick L.; Khatri, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    A Spacecraft Position Optimal Tracking (SPOT) program was developed to process Global Positioning System (GPS) data, sent via telemetry from a spacecraft, to generate accurate navigation estimates of the vehicle position and velocity (state vector) using a Kalman filter. This program uses the GPS onboard receiver measurements to sequentially calculate the vehicle state vectors and provide this information to ground flight controllers. It is the first real-time ground-based shuttle navigation application using onboard sensors. The program is compact, portable, self-contained, and can run on a variety of UNIX or Linux computers. The program has a modular objec-toriented design that supports application-specific plugins such as data corruption remediation pre-processing and remote graphics display. The Kalman filter is extensible to additional sensor types or force models. The Kalman filter design is also strong against data dropouts because it uses physical models from state and covariance propagation in the absence of data. The design of this program separates the functionalities of SPOT into six different executable processes. This allows for the individual processes to be connected in an a la carte manner, making the feature set and executable complexity of SPOT adaptable to the needs of the user. Also, these processes need not be executed on the same workstation. This allows for communications between SPOT processes executing on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Thus, SPOT can be executed in a distributed sense with the capability for a team of flight controllers to efficiently share the same trajectory information currently being computed by the program. SPOT is used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) for Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and International Space Station Program (ISSP) operations, and can also be used as a post -flight analysis tool. It is primarily used for situational awareness, and for contingency situations.

  16. Active Well Coincidence Counter measurements of enriched uranium fuel assemblies in scanning and stationary modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Cowder, L. ); Maltsev, V.; Chernikov, A.; Mokeenko, P.; D'yadkov, K.; Ivanov, V. Nuclear Power Plant, Zarechnyy ); Lagattu, A.; Lopatin, Y.; Czock, K.; Rundquist, D.; Pedraza, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Enriched uranium fuel assemblies were measured with an Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) at the Beloyarskaya Nuclear Power Plant. Special AWCC inserts, electronics, and software were used. Stationary and scanning measurements were performed to establish calibrations and performance specifications for the assay of {sup 235}U and {sub 235}U/cm for BN600 fuel. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Dark Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Dark spots (left) and 'fans' appear to scribble dusty hieroglyphics on top of the Martian south polar cap in two high-resolution Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera images taken in southern spring. Each image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  18. Unusual seismic activity in 2011 and 2013 at the submarine volcano Rocard, Society hot spot (French Polynesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talandier, Jacques; Hyvernaud, Olivier; Maury, René C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two seismic events that occurred on 27 May 2011 and 29 April 2013 at the Rocard submarine volcano which overlies the Society hot spot. The Polynesian Seismic Network recorded for the first time unusual associated short- and long-period signals, with perfectly monochromatic (0.0589 Hz) Rayleigh wave trains of long period and duration. None of the numerous observations of long-period (10-30 s) signals previously associated with volcanic activity in Japan, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Antarctica, and the Hawaiian Islands have the characteristics we observed at Rocard. We propose a tentative model for these unusual and rather enigmatic signals, in which the movement of lava excited the resonance of a shallow open conduit under a high hydrostatic pressure of ~400 bars.

  19. Acaricidal and quantitative structure activity relationship of monoterpenes against the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed E I; El-Arami, Sailan A A; Abdelgaleil, Samir A M

    2010-11-01

    The acaricidal activity of 12 monoterpenes against the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, was examined using fumigation and direct contact application methods. Cuminaldehyde and (-)-linalool showed the highest fumigant toxicity with LC(50) = 0.31 and 0.56 mg/l, respectively. The other monoterpenes exhibited a strong fumigant toxicity, the LC(50) values ranging from 1.28 to 8.09 mg/l, except camphene, which was the least effective (LC(50) = 61.45 mg/l). Based on contact activity, the results were rather different: menthol displayed the highest acaricidal activity (LC(50) = 128.53 mg/l) followed by thymol (172.0 mg/l), geraniol (219.69 mg/l) and (-)-limonene (255.44 mg/l); 1-8-cineole, cuminaldehyde and (-)-linalool showed moderate toxicity. At 125 mg/l, (-)-Limonene and (-)-carvone caused the highest egg mortality among the tested compounds (70.6 and 66.9% mortality, respectively). In addition, the effect of molecular descriptors was also analyzed using the quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) procedure. The QSAR model showed excellent agreement between the estimated and experimentally measured toxicity parameter (LC(50)) for the tested monoterpenes and the fumigant activity increased significantly with the vapor pressure. Comparing the results of the fumigant and contact toxicity assays of monoterpenes against T. urticae with the results of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory effect revealed that some of the tested compounds showed a strong acaricidal activity and a potent AChE inhibitory activity, such as cuminaldehyde, (-)-linalool, (-)-limonene and menthol. However, other compounds such as (-)-carvone revealed a strong fumigant activity but a weak AChE inhibitory activity.

  20. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Christy K; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone.

  1. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  2. Anti-white spot syndrome virus activity of Ceriops tagal aqueous extract in giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, N S; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2012-09-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the most contagious pathogen of cultured shrimp, causes mass mortality, leading to huge economic loss to the shrimp industry. The lack of effective therapeutic or prophylactic measures has aggravated the situation, necessitating the development of antiviral agents. With this objective, the antiviral activity in the aqueous extract of a mangrove plant Ceriops tagal in Penaeus monodon was evaluated. The Ceriops tagal aqueous extract (CTAE) was non-toxic to shrimps at 50 mg/ml when injected intramuscularly at a dosage of 10 μL/animal (0.5 mg/animal) and showed a protective effect against WSSV at 30 mg/ml when mixed with WSSV suspension at a 1:1 ratio. When the extract was administered along with the diet and the animals were challenged orally, there was a dose-dependent increase in survival, culminating in 100 % survival at a concentration of 500 mg/kg body weight/day. Neither hypertrophied nuclei nor the viral envelope protein VP28 could be demonstrated in surviving shrimps using histology and indirect immunofluorescence histochemistry (IIFH), respectively. To elucidate the mode of action, the temporal expression of WSSV genes and shrimp immune genes, including antimicrobial peptides, was attempted. None of the viral genes were found to be expressed in shrimps that were fed with the extract and challenged or in those that were administered CTAE-exposed WSSV. The overall results suggest that the aqueous extract from C. tagal can protect P. monodon from white spot syndrome virus infection.

  3. Solar Spots - Activities to Introduce Solar Energy into the K-8 Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longe, Karen M.; McClelland, Michael J.

    Following an introduction to solar technology which reviews solar heating and cooling, passive solar systems (direct gain systems, thermal storage walls, sun spaces, roof ponds, and convection loops), active solar systems, solar electricity (photovoltaic and solar thermal conversion systems), wind energy, and biomass, activities to introduce solar…

  4. Defrosting Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    3 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, defrosting spots formed on a polygon-cracked plain in the south polar region of Mars. The surface was covered with carbon dioxide frost during the previous winter. In spring, the material begins to sublime away, creating a pattern of dark spots that sometimes have wind streaks emanating from them, as wind carries away or erodes the frost.

    Location near: 87.2oS, 28.4oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  5. Active thermography inspection of protective glass contamination on laser scanning heads.

    PubMed

    Skala, J; Svantner, M; Tesar, J; Franc, A

    2016-12-01

    Industrial lasers are an expanding technology of welding and other materials processing. Lasers with optical scanning heads are often used, as these provide more versatility, accuracy, and speed. The output part of the scanning head is covered by a protective glass, which might get contaminated by various particles from the laser processing. This decreases the transmissivity of the glass, and it can affect the production quality. The contamination needs to be checked regularly, but a visual inspection might not always be effective. This paper proposes two alternative methods of inspecting the protective glass: flash-pulse active thermography, and laser active thermography. They are based on the thermal excitation of the glass and measuring the response with an infrared camera. The experimental setup and practical results are described and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The presented methods are proven to be effective in detecting the contamination of the glass.

  6. [Estimation of activities caused by black spots in digital radiography systems: analysis of black spots by the low concentrate radioisotopes adhered directly to the surface of the phosphor plate].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Takashi, Satoru; Hanamitsu, Hiroki; Mori, Michiko; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Onuma, Yoji

    2012-01-01

    Because of an accident of the nuclear power plants in the Fukushima, many radioisotopes (RI) have been diffused to the environment. As a result, black spots were appearing on the medical images which were taken by the phosphor plate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activity (Bq) of radioactive contaminated IP based on the experiment using RI. The radioactive material ((134)Cs and/or (137)Cs) in the form of liquid was dropped on filter paper (25 mm(2)), and radioactive sources having 40-240 Bq activities were made. These sources were closely attached to the IP with irradiation times of 2-22 h. Then, we obtained the relationship between pixel values and products of activities and irradiation times. Using these relationships, we evaluated the activity in the contaminated IP. The evaluated value of approximately 7 Bq was in good agreement with a value which was inhered in a chemical wiper used for the decontamination of the IP. Based on the results, we summarized that almost all black spots were created by the RI adhered directly to the IP.

  7. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan

    2017-01-01

    The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.

  9. Emilia sonchifolia extract activity against white spot syndrome virus and yellow head virus in shrimp cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Maikaeo, Lamai; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Mahabusarakam, Wilawan

    2015-07-23

    Emilia sonchifolia (L.) DC is a plant used in traditional medicine to treat several viral and bacterial diseases. The antiviral activities of selected Sephadex LH-20 column fractions and HPLC subfractions of an acetone extract of E. sonchifolia leaves were determined in shrimp Penaeus merguiensis primary lymphoid cells infected with either white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) or yellow head virus (YHV). WSSV and YHV replication was quantified using quantitative real-time PCR tests targeted to the VP19 and ORF1b gene transcripts, respectively. In lymphoid organ cells exposed to 100 µg ml⁻¹ of either the Sephadex fraction F14 or the HPLC F14 subfraction SF4, both fractions caused reduced replication, but YHV replication was reduced only by SF4. In the asthiazolyl blue mitochondrial enzyme activity assays to assess extract cytotoxicity, >60% of primary lymphoid organ cells remained viable following exposure to 100 µg ml⁻¹ of either F14 or SF4. GC-MS analysis of the HPLC F14 subfraction SF4 showed that it contained 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. This study is the first to show that E. sonchifolia leaf extracts might be useful as bioactive agents to protect shrimp against viruses such as WSSV and YHV.

  10. Sensorimotor semantics on the spot: brain activity dissociates between conceptual categories within 150 ms

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury

    2013-01-01

    Although semantic processing has traditionally been associated with brain responses maximal at 350–400 ms, recent studies reported that words of different semantic types elicit topographically distinct brain responses substantially earlier, at 100–200 ms. These earlier responses have, however, been achieved using insufficiently precise source localisation techniques, therefore casting doubt on reported differences in brain generators. Here, we used high-density MEG-EEG recordings in combination with individual MRI images and state-of-the-art source reconstruction techniques to compare localised early activations elicited by words from different semantic categories in different cortical areas. Reliable neurophysiological word-category dissociations emerged bilaterally at ~ 150 ms, at which point action-related words most strongly activated frontocentral motor areas and visual object-words occipitotemporal cortex. These data now show that different cortical areas are activated rapidly by words with different meanings and that aspects of their category-specific semantics is reflected by dissociating neurophysiological sources in motor and visual brain systems. PMID:23732850

  11. Scanning electron microscopy in the investigation of the in vitro hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Iveli; Tasca, Tiana; Tessele, Paola M; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2002-04-01

    The in vitro hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis has been previously demonstrated, but the mechanisms involved remain to be elucidated. In this work we used scanning electron microscopy to investigate the contact dependency of the hemolytic phenomenon caused by the parasites. The erythrocytes adhered to the parasites' surface and were phagocytosed. These observations suggest that the contact between T. vaginalis and erythrocytes may be an important mechanism in the injury caused to the erythrocytes. The hemolytic activity of T. vaginalis may be an efficient means of obtaining nutrients for the parasite and allow the investigation of the mechanism used by T. vaginalis to damage cellular membranes.

  12. Results of the survey activities and mobile gamma scanning in Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.

    1985-11-01

    The town of Monticello, Utah, was once the site of an active mill which processed vanadium ore (1942 to 1948), and uranium ore (1948 to 1960). Properties in the vicinity of that mill have become contaminated with radioactive material from ore processing. The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested by the Division of Remedial Action Projects (DRAP) in the Department of Energy (DOE) to: (1) identify potentially contaminated properties; (2) assess natural background radiation levels; and (3) rapidly assess the magnitude, extent, and type (i.e. ore, tailings, etc.) of contamination present on these properties (if any). This survey was conducted by RASA during April 1983. In addition to the 114 properties previously identified from historical information, the ORNL mobile gamma scanning van located 36 new properties exhibiting anomalous gamma radiation levels. Onsite surveys were conducted on 145 of the 150 total properties identified either historically or with the gamma scanning van. Of these 145 properties, 122 of them appeared to have some type of contaminated material present on them; however, only 48 appeared to be contaminated to the extent where they were in excess of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria (40 CFR 192). Twenty-one other properties were recommended for additional investigation (indoor gamma scanning and radon daughter measurements); of these, only ten required further analysis. This report provides the detailed data and analyses related to the radiological survey efforts performed by ORNL in Monticello, Utah.

  13. Mongolian spots.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Mongolian spots (MS) are birthmarks that are present at birth and their most common location is sacrococcygeal or lumbar area. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually involve < 5% total body surface area. They are macular and round, oval or irregular in shape. The color varies from blue to greenish, gray, black or a combination of any of the above. The size varies from few to more than 20 centimetres. Pigmentation is most intense at the age of one year and gradually fades thereafter. It is rarely seen after the age of 6 years. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although regarded as benign, recent data suggest that MS may be associated with inborn errors of metabolism and neurocristopathies. Mongolian spots usually resolve by early childhood and hence no treatment is generally needed if they are located in the sacral area. However, sometimes it may be required for extrasacral lesions for cosmesis.

  14. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission Radar: A Novel Conically Scanning SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Chan, Samuel; Veilleux, Louise; Wheeler, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is a NASA mission identified by the NRC "decadal survey" to measure both soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive chan-nels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. The active radar will further utilize SAR processing in order to obtain the sub-footprint resolution necessary for the geophysical retrievals. The SMAP radar has a unique geometry where the antenna footprint is continuously rotated about nadir in a conical fashion, as opposed to the more common side-looking SAR design. In additional to the unconventional scan geometry, the SMAP radar must address the effects of Faraday rotation and radio frequency interference (RFI), both consequences of the L-Band frequency of operation.

  15. Molecular characterization, immune response against white spot syndrome virus infection of peroxiredoxin 4 in Fenneropenaeus chinensis and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingli; Huang, Jie; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Qinghui; Wei, Jiankai; Liang, Gaofeng; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-03-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are a family of antioxidant proteins and perform important functions in intracellular signal transduction. Here, we report a Prx gene from Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The full-length cDNA of FcPrx gene contained an open reading frame of 735 bp encoding a polypeptide of 275 amino acids. The molecular mass of the deduced amino acid of FcPrx is 27445.43 Da with an estimated pI of 5.71. Sequence comparison showed that the FcPrx shares high identities with Prx IVs and it was named FcPrx4. A real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was developed to assess the mRNA expression of FcPrx4 in different tissues and temporal expression in hemocytes and hepatopancreas of F. chinensis challenged by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Transcripts of FcPrx4 can be detected in all tissues examined. The expression of FcPrx4 showed significant up-regulation in shrimp hemocytes and hepatopancreas after artificial infection with WSSV. A fusion protein containing FcPrx4 was produced in vitro and was confirmed by Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) assay. And activity analysis indicated that the recombinant FcPrx4 proteins can reduce H2O2 in the presence of dithiothreitol.

  16. Isolation and characterization of an antifungal peptide with antiproliferative activity from seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Spotted Bean'.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2007-02-01

    A 7.3-kDa antifungal peptide with an N-terminal sequence exhibiting remarkable homology to defensins from other leguminous plants was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Spotted Bean'. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on O-diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and SP-Sepharose. It exerted an antifungal action on Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It inhibited mycelial growth in F. oxysporum with an IC(50) value of 1.8 microM. It suppressed [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine incorporation by leukemia L1210 cells and MBL2 cells with an IC(50) value of 4.0 and 9.0 microM, respectively. There was no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity when the peptide was tested up to 0.1 mM.

  17. Ontario primary care reform and quality improvement activities: an environmental scan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality improvement is attracting the attention of the primary health care system as a means by which to achieve higher quality patient care. Ontario, Canada has demonstrated leadership in terms of its improvement in healthcare, but the province lacks a structured framework by which it can consistently evaluate its quality improvement initiatives specific to the primary healthcare system. The intent of this research was to complete an environmental scan and capacity map of quality improvement activities being built in and by the primary healthcare sector (QI-PHC) in Ontario as a first step to developing a coordinated and sustainable framework of primary healthcare for the province. Methods Data were collected between January and July 2011 in collaboration with an advisory group of stakeholder representatives and quality improvement leaders in primary health care. Twenty participants were interviewed by telephone, followed by review of relevant websites and documents identified in the interviews. Data were systematically examined using Framework Analysis augmented by Prior’s approach to document analysis in an iterative process. Results The environmental scan identified many activities (n = 43) designed to strategically build QI-PHC capacity, identify promising QI-PHC practices and outcomes, scale up quality improvement-informed primary healthcare practice changes, and make quality improvement a core organizational strategy in health care delivery, which were grouped into clusters. Cluster 1 was composed of initiatives in the form of on-going programs that deliberately incorporated long-term quality improvement capacity building through province-wide reach. Cluster 2 represented activities that were time-limited (research, pilot, or demonstration projects) with the primary aim of research production. The activities of most primary health care practitioners, managers, stakeholder organizations and researchers involved in this scan demonstrated a

  18. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  19. Long-term home cage activity scans reveal lowered exploratory behaviour in symptomatic female Rett mice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lianne; Plano, Andrea; Cobb, Stuart; Riedel, Gernot

    2013-08-01

    Numerous experimental models have been developed to reiterate endophenotypes of Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder with a multitude of motor, cognitive and vegetative symptoms. Here, female Mecp2(Stop) mice [1] were characterised at mild symptomatic conditions in tests for anxiety (open field, elevated plus maze) and home cage observation systems for food intake, locomotor activity and circadian rhythms. Aged 8-9 months, Mecp2(Stop) mice presented with heightened body weight, lower overall activity in the open field, but no anxiety phenotype. Although home cage activity scans conducted in two different observation systems, PhenoMaster and PhenoTyper, confirmed normal circadian activity, they revealed severely compromised habituation to a novel environment in all parameters registered including those derived from a non-linear decay model such as initial exploration maximum, decay half-life of activity and span, as well as plateau. Furthermore, overall activity was significantly reduced in nocturnal periods due to reductions in both fast ambulatory movements, but also a slow lingering. In contrast, light-period activity profiles during which the amount of sleep was highest remained normal in Mecp2(Stop) mice. These data confirm the slow and progressive development of Rett-like symptoms in female Mecp2(Stop) mice resulting in a prominent reduction of overall locomotor activity, while circadian rhythms are maintained. Alterations in the time-course of habituation may indicate deficiencies in cognitive processing.

  20. Clinical neurological examination, neuropsychology, electroencephalography and computed tomographic head scanning in active amateur boxers.

    PubMed

    McLatchie, G; Brooks, N; Galbraith, S; Hutchison, J S; Wilson, L; Melville, I; Teasdale, E

    1987-01-01

    Twenty active amateur boxers were studied seeking evidence of neurological dysfunction and, if present, the best method for detecting it. Seven of these boxers had an abnormal clinical neurological examination, eight an abnormal EEG and nine of 15 examined had abnormal neuropsychometry. The CT scan was abnormal in only one. An abnormal clinical examination correlated significantly (p less than 0.05) with an increasing number of fights, and an abnormal EEG with decreasing age (p less than 0.05). In several of the neuropsychometric tests, the boxers were significantly worse than controls (p less than 0.05). Neuropsychometry was the best method for detecting neurological dysfunction.

  1. Lead acetate does not inhibit dimethylnitrosamine activation and interacts with phenobarbital which is genotoxic in the ST cross of the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Partida, Laura; Heres-Pulido, Ma Eugenia; Guzmán-Rincón, Judith; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Delfín-Alcalá, Irma

    2011-09-01

    Lead acetate (PbAc) is known to inhibit the synthesis of the heme group, needed for hemeproteins like Cytochromes P450 (CYP450s). Dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) requires metabolic activation by CYP450s. The Drosophila wing spot test was performed to establish whether PbAc inhibits DMN activation in the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with different levels of CYP450s. Phenobarbital (PH) was used as an antagonist for its ability to induce CYP450s synthesis. PbAc (0.01, 0.1, 1.0mM) produced significant small spots frequencies in the ST cross, indicating a possible genotoxic activity, however, the total spots frequency was negative at all concentrations. DMN (0.076 mM) was genotoxic in both crosses; surprisingly, PH (12 mM) was genotoxic and the PH-DMN treatment resulted synergic in the ST cross. Interestingly, the PbAc-PH pre-co-treatments showed a possible interaction in the ST cross. The GC-MS analysis showed a drop in the PH content as the PbAc concentration increased. PbAc also seemed to inhibit the genotoxic activity of PH, except at 0.01 mM. It is concluded that PbAc does not inhibit DMN activation by CYP450s in both crosses since it exerted a clear genotoxicity and that PH is genotoxic and interacts with PbAc in the ST but not the HB cross.

  2. Elevated soft tissue activity in early but not delayed phase of bone scan in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2013-03-01

    Triple-phase bone scan is commonly used in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Elevated bone tracer activity in early but not delayed phase of the study favors cellulitis over osteomyelitis. We reported that Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by malformations of the capillary, venous, and lymphatic systems, can have images similar to cellulitis on triple-phase bone scan.

  3. High-resolution surveys along the hot spot-affected Gálapagos Spreading Center: 3. Black smoker discoveries and the implications for geological controls on hydrothermal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, Rachel M.; White, Scott M.; Baker, Edward T.; Anderson, Peter G.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Resing, Joseph A.

    2008-12-01

    To explore effects of hot spots on mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems, we conducted nested sonar, hydrothermal plume, and near-bottom photographic surveys along the portion of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) influenced by the Galápagos hot spot, from longitude 95°-89.5°W. We report the first active high-temperature black smokers to be found on the GSC, at longitudes 94°4.5'W and 91°56.2'-54.3'W; describe two areas of recently inactive smokers, at longitudes 91°23.4'-23.7'W and 91°13.8'W; and document an older inactive site, at longitude 90°33.4'W. All imaged vents issue either from dike-induced fissures along linear axial volcanic ridges and collapses or from a caldera. Magmatic control of hydrothermal systems also is revealed by spatial clustering of plumes within the topographically elevated middles of volcanic ridge segments with inferred centralized melt supply. In searched areas, smokers are more typical than diffuse flow vents, but total GSC plume incidence is half of that expected from the spreading rate. Why? Dike-fed fissures provide permeable pathways for efficient hydrothermal extraction of magmatic heat, but cones without calderas do not. Among many point-source cones surveyed, only the two with calderas had detectable plumes. Possibly, dominance of point-source over linear-source melt delivery on the GSC decreases plume incidence. Also, similar maturities of observed vents and their host lava flows indicate that hydrothermally active volcanic segments along the western GSC are contemporaneously in a waning phase of volcanic-hydrothermal activity. Perhaps ridge/hot spot interaction produces melt pulses that drive near-synchronous volcanic-hydrothermal activity on the volcanic segments spanning the hot spot. During active periods, hydrothermally active dike-fed fissures and calderas may be more abundant than we currently observe.

  4. Transcript Analysis of White spot syndrome virus Latency and Phagocytosis Activating Protein Genes in Infected Shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Shekhar, M S; Dillikumar, M; Vinaya Kumar, K; Gopikrishna, G; Rajesh, S; Kiruthika, J; Ponniah, A G

    2012-12-01

    Viral latency has been recently observed to be associated with White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in shrimp. In the present study, shrimp samples (Penaeus monodon) surviving WSSV infection were examined for presence of WSSV in latent phase. Virus latency was observed in shrimp which were either experimentally challenged with WSSV and survived the infection or those which survived the natural infection. Three viral transcripts (ORFs 427, 151, 366) associated with latency were analyzed by real-time PCR. The shrimp surviving the natural WSSV infection on estimation with RT-PCR were found to have low grade of WSSV infection (less than 56 copies of WSSV). All the shrimp samples were RT-PCR negative for structural protein genes of WSSV, VP24 and VP28, indicating that these samples were harboring latent phase virus. RT-PCR of all the shrimp samples which survived WSSV infection revealed amplification of phagocytosis activating protein (PAP) gene (435 bp) with higher gene expression levels in experimentally challenged shrimp when compared to naturally infected shrimp. The expression of PAP in WSSV infected shrimp samples indicates its possible role in host response for resistance against WSSV infection. PAP was cloned and expressed as recombinant protein for protection studies. Shrimp were injected with three doses (5, 15 and 20 μg g(-1) body weight) of recombinant PAP. Relative percent survival of 10 % was observed in shrimp immunized with the dose of 15 μg g(-1) body weight of recombinant PAP. The expression of both WSSV latency associated and PAP genes obtained from shrimp surviving the WSSV infection, indicates the possible role of these genes in host-pathogen interaction.

  5. Acaricidal activity and sublethal effects of an oxymatrine-based biopesticide on two-spotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Marčić, Dejan; Međo, Irena

    2014-11-01

    Lethal and sublethal effects of the biopesticide Kingbo (oxymatrine 0.2 % + psoralen 0.4 %) on the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) were investigated in laboratory bioassays. The biopesticide was applied to bean leaf discs or primary leaves by using a Potter spray tower. Acute toxicity tests showed no significant ovicidal action: toxic effect (LC50 = 55.49 μl/l) was the result of a residual activity against larvae that hatched from the treated eggs. Preovipositional females and female teleiochrysales showed similar susceptibility (LC50 = 52.68 and 59.03 μl/l, respectively), whereas larvae, protonymphs and female deutonymphs were the most susceptible stages (LC50 = 6.88, 13.03, and 8.80 μl/l, respectively). In a choice test, females preferred the untreated halves of leaves over the halves treated with 2,000, 1,000, and 500 μl/l in the first 24 h, and their oviposition in those treatments was significantly greater on the untreated halves after 24 and 48 h, as well as the summed oviposition over 72 h. Viability and reproduction of survivors, as well as population growth, were strongly affected after the treatments of preovipositional females and female teleiochrysales with 100, 50 and 25 μl/l. On the other hand, sublethal effects on the females that survived treatment at the egg stage or reached adulthood from the eggs laid on the treated surface (treatments with 50 and 25 μl/l) were significantly weaker. Acaricidal and sublethal effects of the biopesticide Kingbo were discussed as a starting point for further research aimed to improve management of T. urticae populations. Regulatory issues and safety concerns regarding further commercialization of this biopesticide are addressed as well.

  6. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Assays of Palmitoyl Protein Thioesterase 1 and Tripeptidyl Peptidase Activity in Dried Blood Spots for the Detection of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report new substrates for quantitative enzyme activity measurements of human palmitoyl protein thioesterase (PPT1) and tripeptidyl peptidase (TPP1) in dried blood spots from newborns using tandem mass spectrometry. Deficiencies in these enzyme activities due to inborn errors of metabolism cause neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The assays use synthetic compounds that were designed to mimic the natural substrates. Incubation produces nanomole quantities of enzymatic products per a blood spot that are quantified by tandem mass spectrometry using synthetic internal standards and selected reaction monitoring. The assays utilize a minimum steps for sample workup and can be run in a duplex format for the detection of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses or potentially multiplexed with other mass spectrometry-based assays for newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:25019629

  7. The Rhizosphere Zone: A Hot Spot of Microbial Activity and Methylmercury Production in Saltmarsh Sediments of San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Voytek, M.; Kirshtein, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Agee, J. L.; Cox, M.; Kakouros, E.; Collins, J. N.; Yee, D.

    2008-12-01

    -reducing bacterial DNA in vegetated sites. In contrast to microbial indicators of mercury methylation, no effects of devegetation or seasonal sampling were observed on sediment pools of reactive Hg (Hg(II)R), although the relative abundance of mercuric reductase functional genes (MerA) was reduced by devegetation and was correlated with live root density. These experiments, among others, demonstrate that the presence and activity of emergent wetland plants directly influence Hg cycling in densely rooted surface soils. Development of this shallow and dense rhizosphere is likely to be a primary reason as to why periodically flooded, high elevation marsh sites are a "hot spot" for mercury methylation.

  8. Southern Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03092 Southern Spots

    This VIS image of the south polar region was collected during the summer season. The markings of the pole are very diverse and easy to see after the winter frost has been removed.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79.7S, Longitude 56.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Are 'hot spots' hot spots?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, Gillian R.

    2012-07-01

    The term 'hot spot' emerged in the 1960s from speculations that Hawaii might have its origins in an unusually hot source region in the mantle. It subsequently became widely used to refer to volcanic regions considered to be anomalous in the then-new plate tectonic paradigm. It carried with it the implication that volcanism (a) is emplaced by a single, spatially restricted, mongenetic melt-delivery system, assumed to be a mantle plume, and (b) that the source is unusually hot. This model has tended to be assumed a priori to be correct. Nevertheless, there are many geological ways of testing it, and a great deal of work has recently been done to do so. Two fundamental problems challenge this work. First is the difficulty of deciding a 'normal' mantle temperature against which to compare estimates. This is usually taken to be the source temperature of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). However, Earth's surface conduction layer is ˜200 km thick, and such a norm is not appropriate if the lavas under investigation formed deeper than the 40-50 km source depth of MORB. Second, methods for estimating temperature suffer from ambiguity of interpretation with composition and partial melt, controversy regarding how they should be applied, lack of repeatability between studies using the same data, and insufficient precision to detect the 200-300 °C temperature variations postulated. Available methods include multiple seismological and petrological approaches, modelling bathymetry and topography, and measuring heat flow. Investigations have been carried out in many areas postulated to represent either (hot) plume heads or (hotter) tails. These include sections of the mid-ocean spreading ridge postulated to include ridge-centred plumes, the North Atlantic Igneous Province, Iceland, Hawaii, oceanic plateaus, and high-standing continental areas such as the Hoggar swell. Most volcanic regions that may reasonably be considered anomalous in the simple plate-tectonic paradigm have been

  10. Development and evaluation of a short-range applicator for treating superficial moving tumors with respiratory-gated spot-scanning proton therapy using real-time image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Fujii, Yusuke; Takao, Seishin; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of superficial tumors that move with respiration (e.g. lung tumors) using spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) is a high-priority research area. The recently developed real-time image-gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system has proven to be useful for treating moving tumors deep inside the liver. However, when treating superficial tumors, the proton’s range is small and so is the sizes of range straggling, making the Bragg-peaks extremely sharp compared to those located in deep-seated tumors. The extreme sharpness of Bragg-peaks is not always beneficial because it necessitates a large number of energy layers to make a spread-out Bragg-peak, resulting in long treatment times, and is vulnerable to motion-induced dose deterioration. We have investigated a method to treat superficial moving tumors in the lung by the development of an applicator compatible with the RGPT system. A mini-ridge filter (MRF) was developed to broaden the pristine Bragg-peak and, accordingly, decrease the number of required energy layers to obtain homogeneous irradiation. The applicator position was designed so that the fiducial marker’s trajectory can be monitored by fluoroscopy during proton beam-delivery. The treatment plans for three lung cancer patients were made using the applicator, and four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for the RGPT were performed using patient respiratory motion data. The effect of the MRF on the dose distributions and treatment time was evaluated. With the MRF, the number of energy layers was decreased to less than half of that needed without it, whereas the target volume coverage values (D99%, D95%, D50%, D2%) changed by less than 1% of the prescribed dose. Almost no dose distortion was observed after the 4D dose calculation, whereas the treatment time decreased by 26%-37%. Therefore, we conclude that the developed applicator compatible with RGPT is useful to solve the issue in the treatment of superficial moving tumors with SSPT.

  11. Permanent 3D laser scanning system for an active landslide in Gresten (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canli, Ekrem; Höfle, Bernhard; Hämmerle, Martin; Benni, Thiebes; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have widely been used for high spatial resolution data acquisition of topographic features and geomorphic analyses. Existing applications encompass different landslides including rockfall, translational or rotational landslides, debris flow, but also coastal cliff erosion, braided river evolution or river bank erosion. The main advantages of TLS are (a) the high spatial sampling density of XYZ-measurements (e.g. 1 point every 2-3 mm at 10 m distance), particularly in comparison with the low data density monitoring techniques such as GNSS or total stations, (b) the millimeter accuracy and precision of the range measurement to centimeter accuracy of the final DEM, and (c) the highly dense area-wide scanning that enables to look through vegetation and to measure bare ground. One of its main constraints is the temporal resolution of acquired data due to labor costs and time requirements for field campaigns. Thus, repetition measurements are generally performed only episodically. However, for an increased scientific understanding of the processes as well as for early warning purposes, we present a novel permanent 3D monitoring setup to increase the temporal resolution of TLS measurements. This accounts for different potential monitoring deliverables such as volumetric calculations, spatio-temporal movement patterns, predictions and even alerting. This system was installed at the active Salcher landslide in Gresten (Austria) that is situated in the transition zone of the Gresten Klippenbelt (Helvetic) and the Flyschzone (Penninic). The characteristic lithofacies are the Gresten Beds of Early Jurassic age that are covered by a sequence of marly and silty beds with intercalated sandy limestones. Permanent data acquisition can be implemented into our workflow with any long-range TLS system offering fully automated capturing. We utilize an Optech ILRIS-3D scanner. The time interval between two scans is currently set to 24 hours, but can be

  12. Segmentation of lung lesions on CT scans using watershed, active contours, and Markov random field

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Lung lesions vary considerably in size, density, and shape, and can attach to surrounding anatomic structures such as chest wall or mediastinum. Automatic segmentation of the lesions poses a challenge. This work communicates a new three-dimensional algorithm for the segmentation of a wide variety of lesions, ranging from tumors found in patients with advanced lung cancer to small nodules detected in lung cancer screening programs. Methods: The authors’ algorithm uniquely combines the image processing techniques of marker-controlled watershed, geometric active contours as well as Markov random field (MRF). The user of the algorithm manually selects a region of interest encompassing the lesion on a single slice and then the watershed method generates an initial surface of the lesion in three dimensions, which is refined by the active geometric contours. MRF improves the segmentation of ground glass opacity portions of part-solid lesions. The algorithm was tested on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom dataset and two publicly accessible clinical lung datasets. These clinical studies included a same-day repeat CT (prewalk and postwalk scans were performed within 15 min) dataset containing 32 lung lesions with one radiologist's delineated contours, and the first release of the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset containing 23 lung nodules with 6 radiologists’ delineated contours. The phantom dataset contained 22 phantom nodules of known volumes that were inserted in a phantom thorax. Results: For the prewalk scans of the same-day repeat CT dataset and the LIDC dataset, the mean overlap ratios of lesion volumes generated by the computer algorithm and the radiologist(s) were 69% and 65%, respectively. For the two repeat CT scans, the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.998, indicating high reliability of the algorithm. The mean relative difference was −3% for the phantom dataset. Conclusions: The performance of this new segmentation

  13. Tritrichomonas foetus: a scanning electron microscopy study of erythrocyte adhesion associated with hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Tasca, Tiana; Pires Borges, Fernanda

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro hemolytic activity of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The parasite was tested against human erythrocytes of groups A, B, AB, and O, and against erythrocytes of nine adult animals of different species (the rabbit, rat, chicken, cat, dog, swine, horse, bovine, and sheep). The results showed that T. foetus strains (ATCC KV1, K, PAL, 5022, RJ, 90) did not present any hemolytic activity against any human erythrocyte group nor against rabbit, rat, chicken, cat, dog and swine erythrocytes. T. foetus strains, however, lysed horse, bovine, and sheep erythrocytes. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be identified. Hemolysis did not occur with trichomonad culture supernatants, with sonicated extracts of T. foetus, nor with killed organisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that human erythrocytes did not adhere to the trophozoites, in contrast horse erythrocytes adhered to the surface of the parasites and were phagocytosed for up to 90 min. The parasites are able to exert their cytopathic effects through: (a) physical contact established between the two cell surfaces, (b) toxins released from parasites into the interaction media, or (c) the association of both mechanisms. Further studies are necessary to clarify the importance of the hemolytic activity in the biology of T. foetus.

  14. Optimization of a general-purpose, actively scanned proton beamline for ocular treatments: Geant4 simulations.

    PubMed

    Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Rimoldi, Adele; Riccardi, Cristina; Pirola, Michele; Molinelli, Silvia; Ciocca, Mario

    2015-03-08

    The Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), a synchrotron-based hospital facility, started the treatment of patients within selected clinical trials in late 2011 and 2012 with actively scanned proton and carbon ion beams, respectively. The activation of a new clinical protocol for the irradiation of uveal melanoma using the existing general-purpose proton beamline is foreseen for late 2014. Beam characteristics and patient treatment setup need to be tuned to meet the specific requirements for such a type of treatment technique. The aim of this study is to optimize the CNAO transport beamline by adding passive components and minimizing air gap to achieve the optimal conditions for ocular tumor irradiation. The CNAO setup with the active and passive components along the transport beamline, as well as a human eye-modeled detector also including a realistic target volume, were simulated using the Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit. The strong reduction of the air gap between the nozzle and patient skin, as well as the insertion of a range shifter plus a patient-specific brass collimator at a short distance from the eye, were found to be effective tools to be implemented. In perspective, this simulation toolkit could also be used as a benchmark for future developments and testing purposes on commercial treatment planning systems.

  15. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chroust, Karel; Pavlová, Martina; Prokop, Zbynek; Mendel, Jan; Bozková, Katerina; Kubát, Zdenek; Zajícková, Veronika; Damborský, Jiri

    2007-02-01

    Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic description of cellular activity and mineral changes in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, O; Boudigues, S; Pilet, P; Aguado, E; Heymann, D; Daculsi, G

    2001-12-01

    The cellular activity and changes in mineral composition of dental tissues involved in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions were investigated. Teeth with at least 1 lesion (n = 10) were extracted from 10 different cats that were presented primarily for chronic gingivostomatitis and/or severe periodontal disease. Scanning electron microscopic methods were used to determine the presence of resorptive cells in 8 teeth while 2 teeth were evaluated for pathologic changes in dental mineral composition. Observations were complicated by the presence of organic wear on the dental surfaces, however resorptive cells could be clearly identified in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions. Resorptive cells had morphologic features indicative of "osteoclast-like" cells or odontoclasts. Resorptive cell activity created a resorption area of darker dentin continuous with physiologic dentin. The darker dentin area seemed poorly mineralized and showed a significantly lower calcium/phosphorous ratio compared with adjacent physiologic denting in 1 tooth. A significantly higher level of magnesium combined with available carbonate ions may have increased the solubility in areas of darker dentin.

  17. Physical properties, star-spot activity, orbital obliquity and transmission spectrum of the Qatar-2 planetary system from multicolour photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Crossfield, I.; Nikolov, N.; Bruni, I.; Zambelli, R.; Henning, Th.

    2014-09-01

    We present 17 high-precision light curves of five transits of the planet Qatar-2 b, obtained from four defocused 2 m-class telescopes. Three of the transits were observed simultaneously in the Sloan g'r'i'z' passbands using the seven-beam Gamma Ray Burst Optical and Near-Infrared Detector imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope. A fourth was observed simultaneously in Gunn grz using the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán 2.2-m telescope with Bonn University Simultaneous Camera, and in r using the Cassini 1.52-m telescope. Every light curve shows small anomalies due to the passage of the planetary shadow over a cool spot on the surface of the host star. We fit the light curves with the PRISM+GEMC model to obtain the photometric parameters of the system and the position, size and contrast of each spot. We use these photometric parameters and published spectroscopic measurements to obtain the physical properties of the system to high precision, finding a larger radius and lower density for both star and planet than previously thought. By tracking the change in position of one star-spot between two transit observations, we measure the orbital obliquity of Qatar-2 b to be λ = 4.3° ± 4.5°, strongly indicating an alignment of the stellar spin with the orbit of the planet. We calculate the rotation period and velocity of the cool host star to be 11.5 ± 0.2 d and 3.28 ± 0.04 km s-1 at a colatitude of 74°. We assemble the planet's transmission spectrum over the 386-976 nm wavelength range and search for variations of the measured radius of Qatar-2 b as a function of wavelength. Our analysis highlights a possible H2/He Rayleigh scattering in the blue.

  18. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J. Trompier, F.; Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M.; Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C.; Trinkl, S.; Dufek, V.; Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P.; Kubancak, J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  19. Effect of material flow on joint strength in activation spot joining of Al alloy and steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Goro; Yogo, Yasuhiro; Takao, Hisaaki

    2014-08-01

    A new joining method for dissimilar metal sheets was developed where a rotated consumable rod of Al alloy is pressed onto an Al alloy sheet at the part overlapped with a mild steel sheet. The metal flow in the joining region is increased by the through-hole in the Al sheet and consumable Al rod. The rod creates the joint interface and pads out of the thinly joined parts through pressing. This produces a higher joint strength than that of conventional friction stir spot welding. Measurements of the joint interface showed the presence of a 5-10 nm thick amorphous layer consisting of Al and Mg oxides.

  20. Silent and continuous fMRI scanning differentially modulate activation in an auditory language comprehension task.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Conny F; Zaehle, Tino; Meyer, Martin; Geiser, Eveline; Boesiger, Peter; Jancke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Sparse temporal acquisition schemes have been adopted to investigate the neural correlates of human audition using blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) devoid of ambient confounding acoustic scanner noise. These schemes have previously been extended to clustered-sparse temporal acquisition designs which record several subsequent BOLD contrast images in rapid succession in order to enhance temporal sampling efficiency. In the present study we demonstrate that an event-related task design can effectively be combined with a clustered temporal acquisition technique in an auditory language comprehension task. The same fifteen volunteers performed two separate auditory runs which either applied customary fMRI acquisition (CA) composed of continuous scanner noise or "silent" fMRI built on a clustered temporal acquisition (CTA) protocol. In accord with our hypothesis, the CTA scheme relative to the CA protocol is accompanied by significantly stronger functional responses along the entire superior temporal plane. By contrast, the bilateral insulae engage more strongly during continuous scanning. A post-hoc region-of-interest analysis reveals cortical activation in subportions of the supratemporal plane which varies as a function of acquisition protocol. The middle part of the supratemporal plane shows a rightward asymmetry only for the CTA scheme while the posterior supratemporal plane exposes a significantly stronger leftward asymmetry during the CTA. Our findings implicate that silent fMRI is advantageous when it comes to the exploration of auditory and speech functions residing in the supratemporal plane.

  1. Effect of maltodextrin on characteristics and antioxidative activity of spray-dried powder of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from scales of spotted golden goatfish.

    PubMed

    Chuaychan, Sira; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2016-09-01

    Characteristics and antioxidative activity of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate powders from scale of spotted golden goatfish using maltodextrin as a carrier agent at different ratios [1:0, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2 (w/w)] were investigated. Gelatin hydrolysates with 40 % degree of hydrolysis exhibited the highest antioxidative activity. With increasing maltodextrin proportions, the resulting powders showed an increase in yields, total sugar content and whiteness with coincidental decrease in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]-values and browning intensity. Solubility of gelatin powder increased with increase in maltodextrin proportion. Gelatin powder was spherical with smooth surface of hydrolysate varied, regardless of maltodextrin levels. Gelatin hydrolysate powder form, uniform agglomerates when maltodextrin was incorporated. DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities and ferric-reducing antioxidant power of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate decreased when maltodextrin was used as a carrier agent. Thus, maltodextrin levels directly affected characteristics and antioxidative activity of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate powders.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy of electrochemically activated platinum surfaces. A direct ex-situ determination of the electrode nanotopography

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, L.; Gomez, J.; Baro, A.M.; Garcia, N.; Marcos, M.L.; Velasco, J.G.; Vara, J.M.; Arvia, A.J.; Presa, J.; Garcia, A.; Aguilar, M.

    1987-03-18

    A direct scanning tunneling microscopy ex-situ determination on the nanometer scale of the topography of electrochemically highly activated platinum electrodes is presented. A correlation between catalytic activity and surface microtopography becomes evident. This result gives support to a structural model for the activated electrode surface. In the model, a volume with a pebble-like structure allows electrocatalytic processes to occur practically free of diffusion relaxation contributions under usual voltammetric conditions.

  3. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency.

  4. Scanning technique for tracking small eye-movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. H.; Crane, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Scanning technique images spot of blue light on fundus, measures variations in reflectance of spot and compares reflectance pattern with a stored reference pattern. Method then converts the difference from stored pattern into infrared eye motion.

  5. Process window aware layout optimization using hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Sachiko; Kyoh, Suigen; Kotani, Toshiya; Inoue, Soichi

    2007-03-01

    spot, complying with the design rule. The design modification process is verified with design-rule checker (DRC) and process simulation to confirm hot spot elimination without side effect. In this work, HSF is implemented in the design flow for various logic devices of 65 nm node. We extend modification target layers to multiple critical layers, including active area, poly, local metal wire and intermediate metal wire. The feasibility of the provided HSF system has been studied by applying it to around one hundred data of various sizes with respect to pattern fixing rate and turn around time (TAT). Moreover, process margin expansion including depth of focus (DOF) and exposure latitude (EL), in small layout was verified using process simulation and also by experimental results, namely, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of focus exposure matrix. The detailed results are shown in the paper.

  6. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  7. Activity and cool spots on the surfaces of G-type stars with superflares from observations with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The properties of active regions (cool spots) on the surfaces of 279 G-type stars in which more than 1500 superflares with energies of 1033-1036 erg were detected are analyzed. Diagrams plotting the superflare energy against activity parameters of the stars (the area of their magnetic spots) are considered, and a more extensive study of the activity of two stars with the highest numbers of flares is presented. The range of variation of the superflare energies (up to two orders of magnitude) is realized over the entire interval of rotation periods. It is proposed that the plot of superflare energy vs. rotational period is bimodal. There are probably no appreciable differences in the maximum flare energies for the two groups of objects, which have rotational periods of more than and less than 10 days. Three groups of stars with different surface spottednesses can be distinguished in a plot of superflare energy vs. cool-spot area. The range of variation of the flare energy within a group is roughly the same for these three groups. Most of the points on this diagram lie to the right of the dependence corresponding to B = 3000Gand an inclination i = 90° (the first two groups of objects). It is confirmed that the flare activity is not related directly to circumpolar active regions, since the majority of the points on the diagram lie to the right of the dependence for B = 1000 G and i = 3°. Analysis of stars from the sample, including objects with more than 20 superflares, shows that large variations of the energy (by up to two orders of magnitude) can be reached with small variations of the spottedness parameter S for a single star. Appreciable variability of the spottedness (by factors of five to six) was detected for only two objects from the sample (KIC 10422252 and KIC 11764567). These stars displayed an increase in the flare energy by orders of magnitude for any spottedness level. The activity of KIC 11551430 and KIC 11764567 is analyzed in detail using all

  8. Mongolian blue spots (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly ... back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with ...

  9. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of ...

  10. A broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) approach for rapid measurement of aerosol particle hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Cheng, Y.; Ma, N.; Wang, Z.; Wang, X.; Pöhlker, M.; Nillius, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Pöschl, U.

    2015-09-01

    The activation and hygroscopicity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are key to understand aerosol-cloud interactions and their climate impact. It can be measured by scanning the particle size and supersaturation in CCN measurements. The scanning of supersaturation is often time-consuming and limits the temporal resolution and performance of CCN measurements. Here we present a new approach, termed broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) method, in which a range of supersaturation is simultaneously scanned reducing the time interval between different supersaturation scans. The practical applicability of the BS2 approach is demonstrated with nano-CCN measurements of laboratory-generated aerosol particles. Model simulations show that the BS2 approach is also applicable for measuring CCN activation of ambient mixed particles. Due to its fast response and technical simplicity, the BS2 approach may be well suited for long-term measurements. Since hygroscopicity is closely related to the fraction of organics/inorganics in aerosol particles, a BS2-CCN counter can also serve as a complementary sensor for fast detection/estimation of aerosol chemical compositions.

  11. A broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) approach for rapid measurement of aerosol particle hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang; Ma, Nan; Wang, Zhibin; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Nillius, Björn; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    The activation and hygroscopicity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are key to the understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions and their impact on climate. They can be measured by scanning the particle size and supersaturation in CCN measurements. The scanning of supersaturation is often time-consuming and limits the temporal resolution and performance of CCN measurements. Here we present a new approach, termed the broad supersaturation scanning (BS2) method, in which a range of supersaturation is simultaneously scanned, reducing the time interval between different supersaturation scans. The practical applicability of the BS2 approach is demonstrated with nano-CCN measurements of laboratory-generated aerosol particles. Model simulations show that the BS2 approach may also be applicable for measuring CCN activation of ambient mixed particles. Due to its fast response and technical simplicity, the BS2 approach may be well suited for aircraft and long-term measurements. Since hygroscopicity is closely related to the fraction of organics/inorganics in aerosol particles, a BS2-CCN counter can also serve as a complementary sensor for fast detection/estimation of aerosol chemical compositions.

  12. Modulation of the DNA scanning activity of the Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.W.; Lloyd, R.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease incises DNA at the sites of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced pyrimidine dimers. The mechanism of incision has been previously shown to be a glycosylic bond cleavage at the 5'-pyrimidine of the dimer followed by an apyrimidine endonuclease activity which cleaves the phosphodiester backbone between the pyrimidines. The process by which M. luteus UV endonuclease locates pyrimidine dimers within a population of UV-irradiated plasmids was shown to occur, in vitro, by a processive or sliding mechanism on non-target DNA as opposed to a distributive or random hit mechanism. Form I plasmid DNA containing 25 dimers per molecule was incubated with M. luteus UV endonuclease in time course reactions. The three topological forms of plasmid DNA generated were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. When the enzyme encounters a pyrimidine dimer, it is significantly more likely to make only the glycosylase cleavage as opposed to making both the glycosylic and phosphodiester bond cleavages. Thus, plasmids are accumulated with many alkaline-labile sites relative to single-stranded breaks. In addition, reactions were performed at both pH 8.0 and pH 6.0, in the absence of NaCl, as well as 25,100, and 250 mM NaCl. The efficiency of the DNA scanning reaction was shown to be dependent on both the ionic strength and pH of the reaction. At low ionic strengths, the reaction was shown to proceed by a processive mechanism and shifted to a distributive mechanism as the ionic strength of the reaction increased. Processivity at pH 8.0 is shown to be more sensitive to increases in ionic strength than reactions performed at pH 6.0.

  13. Confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy investigation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm degradation using passive and active sodium hypochlorite irrigation within a simulated root canal model.

    PubMed

    Mohmmed, Saifalarab A; Vianna, Morgana E; Penny, Matthew R; Hilton, Stephen T; Mordan, Nicola; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2017-02-28

    Root canal irrigation is an important adjunct to control microbial infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2.5% (wt/vol) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) agitation on the removal, killing, and degradation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. A total of 45 root canal models were manufactured using 3D printing with each model comprising an 18 mm length simulated root canal of apical size 30 and taper 0.06. E. faecalis biofilms were grown on the apical 3 mm of the models for 10 days. A total of 60 s of 9 ml of 2.5% NaOCl irrigation using syringe and needle was performed, the irrigant was either left stagnant in the canal or agitated using manual (Gutta-percha), sonic, and ultrasonic methods for 30 s. Following irrigation, the residual biofilms were observed using confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Dunnett post hoc tests at a level of significance p ≤ .05. Consequence of root canal irrigation indicate that the reduction in the amount of biofilm achieved with the active irrigation groups (manual, sonic, and ultrasonic) was significantly greater when compared with the passive and untreated groups (p < .05). Collectively, finding indicate that passive irrigation exhibited more residual biofilm on the model surface than irrigant agitated by manual or automated (sonic, ultrasonic) methods. Total biofilm degradation and nonviable cells were associated with the ultrasonic group.

  14. Microfocusing of the FERMI@Elettra FEL beam with a K-B active optics system: Spot size predictions by application of the WISE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, L.; Svetina, C.; Mahne, N.; Cocco, D.; Abrami, A.; De Marco, M.; Fava, C.; Gerusina, S.; Gobessi, R.; Capotondi, F.; Pedersoli, E.; Kiskinova, M.; De Ninno, G.; Zeitoun, P.; Dovillaire, G.; Lambert, G.; Boutu, W.; Merdji, H.; Gonzalez, A. I.; Gauthier, D.; Zangrando, M.

    2013-05-01

    FERMI@Elettra, the first seeded EUV-SXR free electron laser (FEL) facility located at Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste has been conceived to provide very short (10-100 fs) pulses with ultrahigh peak brightness and wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm. A section fully dedicated to the photon transport and analysis diagnostics, named PADReS, has already been installed and commissioned. Three of the beamlines, EIS-TIMEX, DiProI and LDM, installed after the PADReS section, are in advanced commissioning state and will accept the first users in December 2012. These beam lines employ active X-ray optics in order to focus the FEL beam as well as to perform a controlled beam-shaping at focus. Starting from mirror surface metrology characterization, it is difficult to predict the focal spot shape applying only methods based on geometrical optics such as the ray tracing. Within the geometrical optics approach one cannot take into account the diffraction effect from the optics edges, i.e. the aperture diffraction, and the impact of different surface spatial wavelengths to the spot size degradation. Both these effects are strongly dependent on the photon beam energy and mirror incident angles. We employed a method based on physical optics, which applies the Huygens-Fresnel principle to reflection (on which the WISE code is based). In this work we report the results of the first measurements of the focal spot in the DiProI beamline end-station and compare them to the predictions computed with Shadow code and WISE code, starting from the mirror surface profile characterization.

  15. Biological effects of passive versus active scanning proton beams on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao W; Wroe, Andrew J; Luo-Owen, Xian

    2015-02-01

    The goal was to characterize differences in cell response after exposure to active beam scanning (ABS) protons compared to a passive delivery system. Human lung epithelial (HLE) cells were evaluated at various locations along the proton depth dose profile. The dose delivered at the Bragg peak position was essentially identical (∼4 Gy) with the two techniques, but depth dose data showed that ABS resulted in lower doses at entry and more rapid drop-off after the peak. Average dose rates for the passive and ABS beams were 1.1 Gy/min and 5.1 Gy/min, respectively; instantaneous dose rates were 19.2 Gy/min and 2,300 Gy/min (to a 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2) voxel). Analysis of DNA synthesis was based on (3)H-TdR incorporation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done to determine expression of genes related to p53 signaling and DNA damage; a total of 152 genes were assessed. Spectral karyotyping and analyses of the Golgi apparatus and cytokines produced by the HLE cells were also performed. At or near the Bragg peak position, ABS protons resulted in a greater decrease in DNA synthesis compared to passively delivered protons. Genes with >2-fold change (P < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy) after passive proton irradiation at one or more locations within the Bragg curve were BTG2, CDKN1A, IFNB1 and SIAH1. In contrast, many more genes had >2-fold difference with ABS protons: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDC25A, CDC25C, CCNB2, CDK1, DMC1, DNMT1, E2F1, EXO1, FEN1, GADD45A, GTSE1, IL-6, JUN, KRAS, MDM4, PRC1, PTTG1, RAD51, RPA1, TNF, WT1, XRCC2, XRCC3 and XRCC6BP1. Spectral karyotyping revealed numerous differences in chromosomal abnormalities between the two delivery systems, especially at or near the Bragg peak. Percentage of cells staining for the Golgi apparatus was low after exposure to passive and active proton beams. Studies such as this are needed to ensure patient safety and make modifications in ABS delivery, if necessary.

  16. Production of Gentisyl Alcohol from Phoma herbarum Endophytic in Curcuma longa L. and Its Antagonistic Activity Towards Leaf Spot Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suruchi; Kaul, Sanjana; Singh, Baljinder; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Dhar, Manoj K

    2016-11-01

    Endophytes from medicinal plants represent a potential source of bioactive compounds. During the present investigation, fungal endophytes were isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa), an important medicinal plant. A total of 207 endophytic fungal isolates were obtained from the rhizome of C. longa L. They were grouped into seven genera based on morphological and molecular data. The fungal endophytes of C. longa were evaluated for antifungal activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, the causal organism of leaf spot of turmeric. The disease is a major cause for economic loss in turmeric cultivation. Endophytic Phoma herbarum showed significant activity against C. gloeosporioides and was therefore selected for further studies. A compound gentisyl alcohol was isolated from P. herbarum which showed effective antagonism against C. gloeosporioides. The organism could therefore be used as a biocontrol agent against C. gloeosporioides.

  17. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge, a linear trace of the Kerguelen hot spot in the Indian Ocean, was emplaced on a rapidly drifting Indian plate. Magma production rates along the ridge track are computed using gravity-derived excess crustal thickness data. The production rates change between 2 and 15 m3/s over timescales of 3-16 Myr. Major variations in magma production rates are primarily associated with significant changes in the Indian plate velocity with low-production phases linked to high plate velocity periods. The lowest magma production rate (2 m3/s) at 62 Ma is associated with the rapid northward drift of Indian plate under the influence of the Reunion mantle plume. The contemporaneous slowing of the African plate coincides with increase in magma production rate along the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean. The present study suggests that variations in the Indian plate motion and frequent ridge jumps have a major role in controlling the magma production, particularly on long-period cycles (~16 Myr). Short-period variations (~5 Myr) in magma productions may be associated with intrinsic changes in the plume, possibly due to the presence of solitary waves in the plume conduit.

  18. The Necessity of Environmental Scanning Prior to Long-Range Planning Activities at Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Ty J.

    Formal environmental scanning procedures can provide key administrators of higher education institutions with valuable external information regarding both the probability and impact of external trends and forces. Such information may then be used in various strategic planning stages including scenario development, institutional mission and goals…

  19. Scanning Terahertz Heterodyne Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter; Dengler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging systems are now at an early stage of development. In a basic scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging system, (see Figure 1) two far-infrared lasers generate beams denoted the local-oscillator (LO) and signal that differ in frequency by an amount, denoted the intermediate frequency (IF), chosen to suit the application. The LO beam is sent directly to a mixer as one of two inputs. The signal beam is focused to a spot on or in the specimen. After transmission through or reflection from the specimen, the beams are focused to a spot on a terahertz mixer, which extracts the IF outputs. The specimen is mounted on a translation stage, by means of which the focal spot is scanned across the specimen to build up an image.

  20. Object-oriented classification of a high-spatial resolution SPOT5 image for mapping geology and landforms of active volcanoes: Semeru case study, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassouk, Zeineb; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Solikhin, Akhmad; Liew, Soo Chin

    2014-09-01

    The present work explores the object-oriented classification (OOC) of high-spatial resolution (HSR) satellite panchromatic imagery for mapping the geology of the persistently active Semeru volcano and its ring plain, east Java, Indonesia. A panchromatic SPOT5 image and a digital elevation model (DEM) have been used to identify geologic units, structures, landforms and deposits. The panchromatic image was georeferenced and enhanced using histogram equalization. The enhanced image was segmented into polygons using the EnviFx (©Exelis) Software. The polygons were delineated and classified on the basis of spectral (panchromatic hues and textures), topographic (slope, elevation) information and geologic/geomorphic processes. The validity of classification was evaluated by interpreting Google Earth images, aerial photographs and limited field observations. The classification consists of three hierarchical levels across the volcanic area of about 745 km2. The first operational spatial level includes seven large volcano domains based on the spectral content of the volcanic, tectonic and lithological structures, and principal catchments. The second operational level, based on contextual relationships (topography, drainage network, vegetation cover type, stratigraphy and slope dynamics), encompasses 20 geological units that range between 30 and 80 km2 in area. Among the units, the third operational level distinguishes as many as 47 geomorphological sub-units (0.25-25 km2) according to slope gradient, deposit type, mass-wasting process and weathering. The resulting map provides a detailed pattern of geologic and geomorphic features unlike previous geologic maps that identified only 11 stratigraphic units. We show that the high-spatial resolution panchromatic SPOT5 scene can help to safely map the geology and landforms of persistently active volcanoes such as Semeru. We have applied the OOC technique on one HSR GeoEye panchromatic image to map another active volcano, Merapi

  1. Anti-melanization mechanism of the white spot syndrome viral protein, WSSV453, via interaction with shrimp proPO-activating enzyme, PmproPPAE2.

    PubMed

    Sutthangkul, Jantiwan-; Amparyup, Piti-; Eum, Jai Hoon; Strand, Michael R; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-01-28

    Inhibition of the host melanization reaction, activated by the prophenoloxidase activating (proPO) system, is one of the crucial evasion strategies of pathogens. Recently, the shrimp pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), was found to inhibit melanization in the shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The viral protein WSSV453 was previously shown to interact with PO-activating enzyme 2 (PmPPAE2) and reported to be involved in suppressing the shrimp melanization response after WSSV infection. Here, we characterized how WSSV453 inhibits melanization. WSSV453 is a non-structural viral protein, which was first detected in shrimp hemocytes at 6 hours post infection (hpi) by WSSV and in shrimp plasma at 24 hpi. We produced recombinant proteins for three components of the P. monodon, proPO system: PmproPPAE2, PmproPO1 and PmproPO2. Functional assays showed that active PmPPAE2 processed PmproPO1 and 2 to produce functional PO. Incubation of WSSV453 with PmproPPAE2 dose-dependently reduced PmPPAE2 activity toward PmPO1 or PmPO2. In contrast, WSSV453 had no effect on activated PmPPAE2. The addition of active PmPPAE2 to WSSV-infected shrimp plasma at day 2 post-infection also rescued PO activity. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-melanization activity of WSSV is due to WSSV453, which interacts with PmproPPAE2 and interferes its activation to active PmPPAE2.

  2. Purification, characterization, and biological activity of insulins from the spotted dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula, and the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W Gary; Ali, Mohamed F; Einarsdóttir, Ingibjörg E; Schäffer, Lauge; Hazon, Neil; Conlon, J Michael

    2002-03-01

    Insulin was purified from pancreatic extracts of two elasmobranch species belonging to different families in the order Carcharhiniformes, the European spotted dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula (Scyliorhinidae), and the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini (Carcharhinidae). The amino acid sequence of dogfish insulin was established as A-chain GIVDHCCRNT(10)CSLYDLEGYC(20)NQ and B-chain LPSQHLCGSH(10)LVETLYFVCG(20)QKGFYYVPKV(30). The primary structure of hammerhead shark insulin was similar to that of dogfish insulin with only 2 amino acid substitutions at A8 (R --> H) and B30 (V --> I). The elasmobranch insulins were markedly different from human insulin (17 amino acid substitutions) but all the residues in human insulin that are believed to be important in determining the receptor binding conformation (B6, B8, B11, B13, B23, B24, B25, A2, A3, and A19) have been conserved in the elasmobranch insulins with the exception of the conservative substitution Phe --> Tyr at B25. Consistent with this, dogfish and human insulin showed almost identical binding affinity to the recombinant solubilized human insulin receptor (K(D) values of 14.0 and 18.6 pM, respectively; relative potency 133%). Previous studies have shown that bovine insulin produces severe and sustained hypoglycemia in elasmobranchs but the effect is of slow onset. Bolus arterial injections of dogfish insulin (10 nmol x kg(-1)) into unanesthetized, fasting dogfish (n = 9) produced no changes in blood glucose, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate concentrations over a 4-h period. In a second series of experiments (n = 7), dogfish insulin (10 nmol x kg(-1)) produced a significant (P < 0.05) fall in blood glucose after 12 h that persisted for at least 48 h, but no change in ketone body concentrations. The data indicate that the metabolic actions of an endogenous elasmobranch insulin in an elasmobranch are similar to those previously described for mammalian insulin.

  3. Correlation of seasonal acclimatization in metabolic enzyme activity with preferred body temperature in the Eastern red spotted newt (Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens).

    PubMed

    Berner, Nancy J; Bessay, Emmanuel P

    2006-08-01

    Eastern red spotted newts, as aquatic adults, are active year round. They are small and easy to handle, and thus lent themselves to a laboratory study of seasonal changes in preferred body temperature and biochemical acclimatization. We collected newts in summer (n=20), late fall (n=10) and winter (n=5). Ten each of the summer and late fall newts were subjected to an aquatic thermal gradient. Summer newts maintained higher cloacal temperatures than late fall newts (26.8+/-0.5 degrees C and 17.2+/-0.4 degrees C, respectively). In addition, the activity of three muscle metabolic enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), citrate synthase (CS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) was studied in all newts collected. Newts compensated for lower late fall and winter temperatures by increasing the activity of CCO during those seasons over that in summer newts at all assay temperatures (8, 16 and 26 degrees C). The activity of CS was greater in winter over summer newts at 8 and 16 degrees C. No seasonal differences in LDH activity were demonstrated. These data in newts indicate that this amphibian modifies some muscle metabolic enzymes in relation to seasonal changes and can modify its behavioral in a way that correlates with those biochemical changes.

  4. Determination of Biological Variance and Validation of a Fluorometric Assay for Measurement of α-l-Iduronidase Activity in Dried Blood Spots Samples: The First Experience in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Mohammad; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Said; Alaei, Mohammad Reza; Azadi, Namam-Ali; Vakili, Rahim; Zamanfar, Daniel; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Khatami, Shohreh

    2015-07-01

    Methods for assaying lysosomal diseases in dried blood samples are very useful today due to its several advantages related to the stability of samples, its transportation, handled and analysis, and its potential use for newborn screening compared to traditional methods in leucocytes samples. For this reason, it is important to validate these assays before being used in routine laboratory. Because of different in biological markers based on ethnicity, we aimed this study to validation a DBS-based fluorometric assay for measurement of α-l-Iduronidase activity for diagnosis of MPS I patients in Iran. DBS samples were collected from 15 MPS I patients and 60 healthy age matched subjects. Diagnostic value, biological variance and α-l-Iduronidase activity were determined. DBS α-l-Iduronidase activity was significantly higher in male subjects than in female group. Using a cut-off level of 1.08 µmol/spot 20 h, sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 98 %. The linearity of test was proved and we showed that within-run and between run precision were 5.6 and 14.66 %. Measurement of α-l-Iduronidase activity in DBS samples is an accurate test for diagnosis of MPS I and because of its rapid shipping and simplicity to keeping, DBS-based enzyme activity could be considered as a useful diagnostic tool in this disease.

  5. Application of space-time scan statistics to describe geographic and temporal clustering of visible drug activity.

    PubMed

    Linton, Sabriya L; Jennings, Jacky M; Latkin, Carl A; Gomez, Marisela B; Mehta, Shruti H

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the geographic and temporal clustering of drug activity can inform where health and social services are needed and can provide insight on the potential impact of local policies on drug activity. This ecologic study assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of drug activity in Baltimore, Maryland, prior to and following the implementation of a large urban redevelopment project in East Baltimore, which began in 2003. Drug activity was measured by narcotic calls for service at the neighborhood level. A space-time scan statistic approach was used to identify statistically significant clusters of narcotic calls for service across space and time, using a discrete Poisson model. After adjusting for economic deprivation and housing vacancy, clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in Southeast, Northeast, Northwest, and West Baltimore from 2001 to 2010. Clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in East Baltimore from 2001 to 2003, indicating a decrease in narcotic calls thereafter. A large proportion of clusters occurred among neighborhoods located in North and Northeast Baltimore after 2003, which indicated a potential spike during this time frame. These findings suggest potential displacement of drug activity coinciding with the initiation of urban redevelopment in East Baltimore. Space-time scan statistics should be used in future research to describe the potential implications of local policies on drug activity.

  6. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  7. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  8. Liver scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nuclear scan - technetium; Nuclear scan - liver or spleen Images Liver scan References Lidofsky S. Jaundice. In: Feldman M, ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  9. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have an allergic reaction to the tracer material. Some people have pain, redness, or swelling at ... with diabetes. Most PET scans are now performed along with a CT scan. This combination scan ...

  10. A hot-spot-active magnetic graphene oxide substrate for microRNA detection based on cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Sai; Chen, Min; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Dong, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Herein, a cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (C-CRET) process was demonstrated from horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme-catalyzed luminol-H2O2 to fluorescein and further to graphene oxide (GO) when HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein was in close proximity to the GO surface. The proposed C-CRET system was successfully implemented to construct three modes of C-CRET hot-spot-active substrates (modes I, II and III) by covalently immobilizing HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein-labeled hairpin DNAs (hot-spot-generation probes) on magnetic GO (MGO), resulting in a signal ``off'' state due to the quenching of the luminol/H2O2/HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein CRET system by GO. Upon the introduction of microRNA-122 (miRNA-122), the targets (mode I) or the new triggers that were generated through a strand displacement reaction (SDR) initiated by miRNA-122 (modes II and III) hybridized with the loop domains of hairpin probes on MGO to form double-stranded (modes I and II) or triplex-stem structures (mode III), causing an ``open'' configuration of the hairpin probe and a CRET signal ``on'' state, thus achieving sensitive and selective detection of miRNA-122. More importantly, the substrate exhibited excellent controllability, reversibility and reproducibility through SDR and magnetic separation (modes II and III), especially sequence-independence for hairpin probes in mode III, holding great potential for the development of a versatile platform for optical biosensing.Herein, a cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (C-CRET) process was demonstrated from horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme-catalyzed luminol-H2O2 to fluorescein and further to graphene oxide (GO) when HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein was in close proximity to the GO surface. The proposed C-CRET system was successfully implemented to construct three modes of C-CRET hot-spot-active substrates (modes I, II and III) by covalently immobilizing HRP-mimicking DNAzyme

  11. Molecular cloning, expression of orange-spotted grouper goose-type lysozyme cDNA, and lytic activity of its recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhi-Xin; He, Jian-Guo; Deng, Wei-Xin; Chan, Siu-Ming

    2003-07-08

    Lysozyme acts as a non-specific innate-immunity molecule against the invasion of bacteria pathogens. A leukocyte cDNA library of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides was constructed and the goose-type (g-type) lysozyme cDNA was isolated. The complete cDNA consists of an open reading frame of 585 bp encoding a protein of 194 amino acids. This protein shows a 72.2% amino acid sequence identity with the flounder g-type lysozyme. Similar to most other species, the glu catalytic residue in g-type lysozymes of the grouper is conserved. Furthermore, like the flounder and carp, the 4 conserved cysteine residues identified in avian and mammalian g-type lysozymes were also absent from the grouper. Northern blot analysis indicated that the g-type lysozyme was expressed in intestine, liver, spleen, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, heart, gill, muscle and leukocytes. In addition, RT-PCR analysis detected the g-type lysozyme transcripts in the stomach, brain and ovary. When an orange-spotted grouper was injected with Vibrio alginolyticus, the number of lysozyme mRNA transcripts detected in the stomach, spleen, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, heart, brain and leucocytes increased 72 h after injection. Recombinant grouper g-type lysozyme produced in the Escherichia coli expression system showed lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus, V. alginolyticus from Epinephelus fario, V. vulnificus from culture water, Aeromonas hydrophila from soft-shell turtle, A. hydrophila from goldfish and V. parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas fluorescens and V. fluvialis from culture water.

  12. Neptune's small dark spot (D2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This bulls-eye view of Neptune's small dark spot (D2) was obtained by Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera. Banding surrounding the feature indicates unseen strong winds, while structures within the bright spot suggest both active upwelling of clouds and rotation about the center. A rotation rate has not yet been measured, but the V-shaped structure near the right edge of the bright area indicates that the spot rotates clockwise. Unlike the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, which rotates counterclockwise, if the D2 spot on Neptune rotates clockwise, the material will be descending in the dark oval region. The fact that infrared data will yield temperature information about the region above the clouds makes this observation especially valuable. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  13. PmTBC1D20, a Rab GTPase-activating protein from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, is involved in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yingvilasprasert, Wanchart; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2014-02-01

    TBC (TRE2/BUB2/CDC16) domain proteins contain an ≈ 200-amino-acid motif and function as Rab GTPase-activating proteins that are required for regulating the activity of Rab proteins, and so, in turn, endocytic membrane trafficking in cells. TBC domain family member 20 (TBC1D20) has recently been reported to mediate Hepatitis C virus replication. Herein, PmTBC1D20 identified from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, was characterized and evaluated for its role in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. The full-length cDNA sequence of PmTBC1D20 contains 2003 bp with a predicted 1443 bp open reading frame encoding a deduced 480 amino acid protein. Its transcript levels were significantly up-regulated at 24 and 48 h by ≈ 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively, after systemic infection with WSSV. In addition, depletion of PmTBC1D20 transcript in shrimps by double stranded RNA interference led to a decrease in the level of transcripts of three WSSV genes (VP28, ie1 and wsv477). This suggests the importance of PmTBC1D20 in WSSV infection. This is the first report of TBC1D20 in a crustacean and reveals the possible mechanism used by WSSV to modulate the activity of the host protein, PmTBC1D20, for its benefit in viral trafficking and replication.

  14. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  15. Mass spectrometric studies on the in vivo metabolism and excretion of SIRT1 activating drugs in rat urine, dried blood spots, and plasma samples for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Sebastian; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The NAD(+) depending enzyme SIRT1 regulates the mitochondrial biogenesis, fat and glucose metabolism through catalyzing the deacetylation of several metabolism-related protein-substrates. Recently, synthetic activators of SIRT1 referred to as STACs (Sirtuin activating compounds, e.g. SRT2104) were identified and tested in clinical studies for the treatment of aging-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and obesity. Although the mechanism of SIRT1 activation by small molecules has caused considerable controversy, STACs demonstrated a significant performance enhancement in mice experiments including an improvement of endurance, muscle strength, and locomotor behavior. Due to their potential to increase exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, SIRT1 activators are currently being monitored by anti-doping authorities. In the present study, the in vivo metabolic clearance of three SIRT1 activators was investigated in rats by the collection of urine, DBS (dried blood spots) and plasma samples following a single oral administration. The resulting metabolic products were studied by positive electrospray ionization - (tandem) mass spectrometry and confirmed by the comparison with in vitro generated metabolites using human and rat liver microsomal preparations. Subsequently, a screening procedure for five SIRT1 activators and the metabolite M1-SRT1720 in DBS specimens was developed. Liquid-liquid-extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed based on diagnostic ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode and two deuterated internal standards namely d8-SRT1720 and d8-M1-SRT1720 were utilized. The doping control assay was characterized with regard to specificity, limit of detection (10-50ng/ml), recovery (65-83%) and imprecision (7-20%) and ion suppression/enhancement effects (<10%), demonstrating its fitness-for-purpose for sports drug testing applications.

  16. Imaging of Active Microwave Devices at Cryogenic Temperatures using Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawalla, Ashfaq S.; Dutta, S. K.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, D. E.; Feenstra, B. J.; Anlage, Steven M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    1998-03-01

    The ability to image electric fields in operating microwave devices is interesting both from the fundamental point of view and for diagnostic purposes. To that end we have constructed a scanning near-field microwave microscope which uses an open-ended coaxial probe and operates at cryogenic temperatures.(For related publications see: C. P. Vlahacos, R. C. Black, S. M. Anlage, A. Amar and F. C. Wellstood, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69), 3274 (1996) and S. M. Anlage, C. P. Vlahacos, Sudeep Dutta and F. C. Wellstood, IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 7, 3686 (1997). Using this system we have imaged electric fields generated by both normal metal and superconducting microstrip resonators at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 300 K. We will present images and discuss our results including observations of clear standing wave patterns at the fundamental resonant frequency and an increased quality factor of the resonators at low temperatures.

  17. An investigation of carbonic anhydrase activity in the gills and blood plasma of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus), longnose skate (Raja rhina), and spotted raffish (Hydrolagus colliei).

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Kathleen M; Shah, Bina; Szebedinszky, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Separated plasma and whole blood non-bicarbonate buffering capacities, together with plasma and gill carbonic anhydrase activities and endogenous plasma carbonic anhydrase inhibitor activity were investigated in three species of fish: the brown bullhead (Ameirus nebulosus), a teleost; the longnose skate (Raja rhina), an elasmobranch; and the spotted ratfish (Hydrolagus colliei), a chimaeran. The objective was to test the hypothesis that species possessing gill membrane-bound carbonic anhydrase and/or plasma carbonic anhydrase activity would also exhibit high plasma nonbicarbonate buffering capacity relative to whole blood non-bicarbonate buffering capacity and would lack an endogenous plasma carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Separated plasma non-bicarbonate buffering capacity constituted > or = 40% of whole-blood buffering in all three species. In addition, all species lacked an endogenous plasma carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Separated plasma from skate and ratfish contained carbonic anhydrase activity, whereas bullhead plasma did not. Examination of the subcellular distribution and characteristics of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity revealed that the majority of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity originated from the cytoplasmic fraction in all species, with only 3-5% being associated with a microsomal fraction. The microsomal carbonic anhydrase activity of bullhead and ratfish was significantly reduced by washing, indicating the presence of carbonic anhydrase activity that was not integrally associated with the membrane pellet, microsomal carbonic anhydrase activity in skate was unaffected by washing. In addition, microsomal carbonic anhydrase activity from skate and ratfish but not bullhead gills was released to a significant extent from its membrane association by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. The results obtained for skate are consistent with published data for dogfish, suggesting that the possession of branchial membrane

  18. Interferometric diagnostics for magnetic spots detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.

    2014-09-01

    The signature of activity in general, and of stellar magnetic spots in particular, is present in every measurements, including interferometric ones. Indeed, stellar spots can be found on many stellar surfaces, their size and number varying according to their host's magnetic field and rotational velocity. To correctly determine stellar parameters, it is thus necessary to determine and extract stellar activity's signals. Interferometric observables are disturbed by activity, and this observing technique thus constitutes a good way of probing stellar surface. However, magnetic spots sometimes mimic other phenomenon, like a transiting exoplanet. In that case, the combination of several observing techniques, like photometry and interferometry, is mandatory to extract the planetary signal from the spot's one, and then characterize the exoplanet.

  19. The expression and purification of WSSV134 from white spot syndrome virus and its inhibitory effect on caspase activity from Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Bowornsakulwong, Thanunthon; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Khunrae, Pongsak

    2017-02-01

    WSSV134 or VP36A protein of white spot syndrome virus was previously reported to be able to reduce apoptosis in Sf-9 cells transfected with caspase of Penaeus monodon (PmCasp). The protein was therefore believed to have a role in supporting the survival of WSSV inside the host cells during infection. However, the anti-apoptosis activity of WSSV134 involved in the inhibition of PmCasp is still unclear. In this study, we produced a recombinant WSSV134 (rWSSV134) and tested for its ability to inhibit PmCasp in vitro. The results from a caspase inhibition assay revealed that rWSSV134 could inhibit PmCasp in a dose-dependent manner. Since WSSV134 was predicted to contain three potential caspase binding sites, corresponding to the D54, D104 and D259, we then employed site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the involvement of these sites in PmCasp inhibition. D54A and D259A mutants could still inhibit PmCasp while D104A mutant lacks this activity. Our results confirmed that the WSSV134 is an inhibitor for PmCasp and that residue D104 is important for PmCasp inhibition.

  20. The promoter of the white spot syndrome virus immediate-early gene WSSV108 is activated by the cellular KLF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Jing; Lo, Chu-Fang; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lai, Ying-Jang; Chang, Li-Kwan; Chang, Yun-Shiang

    2015-03-01

    A series of deletion and mutation assays of the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) immediate-early gene WSSV108 promoter showed that a Krüppel-like factor (KLF) binding site located from -504 to -495 (relative to the transcription start site) is important for the overall level of WSSV108 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further showed that overexpressed recombinant Penaeus monodon KLF (rPmKLF) formed a specific protein-DNA complex with the (32)P-labeled KLF binding site of the WSSV108 promoter, and that higher levels of Litopenaeus vannamei KLF (LvKLF) were expressed in WSSV-infected shrimp. A transactivation assay indicated that the WSSV108 promoter was strongly activated by rPmKLF in a dose-dependent manner. Lastly, we found that specific silencing of LvKLF expression in vivo by dsRNA injection dramatically reduced both WSSV108 expression and WSSV replication. We conclude that shrimp KLF is important for WSSV genome replication and gene expression, and that it binds to the WSSV108 promoter to enhance the expression of this immediate-early gene.

  1. Immunostimulatory activity of sulfated galactans isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri and development of resistance against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wongprasert, Kanokpan; Rudtanatip, Tawut; Praiboon, Jantana

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated galactans (SG) were isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri). Chemical analysis revealed SG contains sulfate (12.7%) and total carbohydrate (42.2%) with an estimated molecular mass of 100 kDa. Structure analysis by NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that SG is a complex structure with a linear backbone of alternating 3-linked β-D-galactopyranose and 4-linked 3,6-anhydrogalactose units with partial 6-O-methylate-β-D-galactopyranose and with sulfation occurring on C4 of D-galactopyranose and C6 of L-galactopyranose units. SG treatment enhanced immune parameters including total haemocytes, phenoloxidase activity, superoxide anions and superoxide dismutase in shrimp Penaeus monodon. Shrimp fed with Artemia salina enriched with SG (100 and 200 μg ml(-1)) and inoculated with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) showed a significantly lower mortality rate and lower viral VP 28 amplification and expression than control. The results suggest that SG from G. fisheri exhibits immune stimulatory and antiviral activities that could protect P. monodon from WSSV infection.

  2. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  3. Imaging the elastic modulus of human platelets during thrombin-induced activation using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Vogel, Sebastian; Seifert, Jan; Schächtele, Marc; Borst, Oliver; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-02-01

    Platelet activation plays a critical role in haemostasis and thrombosis. It is well-known that platelets generate contractile forces during activation. However, their mechanical material properties have rarely been investigated. Here, we use scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to visualise morphological and mechanical properties of live human platelets at high spatial resolution. We found that their mean elastic modulus decreases during thrombin-induced activation by about a factor of two. We observed a similar softening of platelets during cytochalasin D-induced cytoskeleton depolymerisation. However, thrombin-induced temporal and spatial modulations of the elastic modulus were substantially different from cytochalasin D-mediated changes. We thereby provide new insights into the mechanics of haemostasis and establish SICM as a novel imaging platform for the ex vivo investigation of the mechanical properties of live platelets.

  4. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution.

  5. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  6. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  7. A Hot-spot of In-frame Duplications Activates the Oncoprotein AKT1 in Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bessière, Laurianne; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Auguste, Aurélie; Sarnacki, Sabine; Flatters, Delphine; Legois, Bérangère; Sultan, Charles; Kalfa, Nicolas; Galmiche, Louise; Veitia, Reiner A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian granulosa cell tumors are the most common sex-cord stromal tumors and have juvenile (JGCTs) and adult forms. In a previous study we reported the occurrence of activating somatic mutations of Gαs, which transduces mitogenic signals, in 30% of the analyzed JGCTs. Methods We have searched for alterations in other proteins involved in ovarian mitogenic signaling. We focused on the PI3K–AKT axis. As we found mutations in AKT1, we analyzed the subcellular localization of the mutated proteins and performed functional explorations using Western-blot and luciferase assays. Findings We detected in-frame duplications affecting the pleckstrin-homology domain of AKT1 in more than 60% of the tumors occurring in girls under 15 years of age. The somatic status of the mutations was confirmed when peritumoral DNA was available. The JGCTs without duplications carried point mutations affecting highly conserved residues. Several of these substitutions were somatic lesions. The mutated proteins carrying the duplications had a non-wild-type subcellular distribution, with a marked enrichment at the plasma membrane. This led to a striking degree of AKT1 activation demonstrated by a strong phosphorylation level and by reporter assays. Interpretation Our study incriminates somatic mutations of AKT1 as a major event in the pathogenesis of JGCTs. The existence of AKT inhibitors currently tested in clinical trials opens new perspectives for targeted therapies for these tumors, which are currently treated with standard non-specific chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26137586

  8. Recent rock fall activity in the Wetterstein Mountains revealed by a time series of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpa, Anne; Baewert, Henning; Cook, Kristen; Morche, David

    2015-04-01

    The north face of the Hochwanner in the Reintal valley, Wetterstein Mountains, southern Germany, has been a site of frequent rock fall activity for the past several hundred years. The so-called 'Steingerümpel' rock fall included an estimated volume of 2.3-2.7 x 106 m3 and led to damming of the Partnach river. This event was dated to 1400-1600 AD. The rock fall left a prominent scar in the rock face where subsequent rock fall activity was concentrated, postulated to be a 'delayed consequence' of the Steingerümpel event. Previous workers used airborne and terrestrial laser scan data to evaluate the volume of the detached material and the deposits on the talus cone at the foot of the slope from the 'delayed consequence' activity between 2006 and 2008 (Heckmann et al., 2012). The largest event during this period was a 5 x 104 m3 rock fall in August 2007. We compared the data of six terrestrial laser scans, which were acquired in June and September 2008, September 2010, June 2011, August 2013, October and November 2014, in order to assess the volumes of detached material after the large rock fall event of 2007. The aim is to investigate the post-event activity at a site of a large rock fall in order to give estimates about the timing when the activity is back to normal conditions in relation to the magnitude of the large event. Although no large rock fall occurred in the observation period, the comparison of the laser scan data indicate that the average rock wall retreat at this site is still higher compared to the mean annual rock wall retreat rate of 0.54 mm/yr for the last millennium in the Reintal valley (Krautblatter et al., 2012). This shows that sites of large rock falls remain active even years after the event. Heckmann, T.; Bimböse, M.; Krautblatter, M.; Haas, F.; Becht, M.; Morche, D. (2012): From geotechnical analysis to quantification and modelling using LiDAR data: a study on rockfall in the Reintal catchment, Bavarian Alps, Germany; Earth Surface

  9. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePlus

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  10. Lincoln's Spot Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1988-01-01

    Examines the events leading to and immediately following the declaration of war on Mexico in 1846. Includes the second and third pages of Abraham Lincoln's "Spot Resolutions" and presents teaching suggestions for interpreting the document and assessing public opinion. (GEA)

  11. Scientists Spot 'Teetotaler' Gene

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162265.html Scientists Spot 'Teetotaler' Gene Discovery might one day lead to drugs to ... HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they've identified a gene variant that dampens the desire to drink alcohol. ...

  12. Activating Transcription Factor 4 and X Box Binding Protein 1 of Litopenaeus vannamei Transcriptional Regulated White Spot Syndrome Virus Genes Wsv023 and Wsv083

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Yun; Pang, Li-Ran; Chen, Yong-Gui; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Chen, Yi-Hong; He, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    In response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the signaling pathway termed unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated. To investigate the role of UPR in Litopenaeus vannamei immunity, the activating transcription factor 4 (designated as LvATF4) which belonged to a branch of the UPR, the [protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase, (PERK)]-[eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit alpha (eIF2α)] pathway, was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvATF4 was 1972 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1299 bp long that encoded a 432 amino acid protein. LvATF4 was highly expressed in gills, intestines and stomach. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, LvATF4 was upregulated in the gills after 3 hpi and increased by 1.9-fold (96 hpi) compared to the mock-treated group. The LvATF4 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in a lower cumulative mortality of L. vannamei under WSSV infection. Reporter gene assays show that LvATF4 could upregulate the expression of the WSSV gene wsv023 based on the activating transcription factor/cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate response element (ATF/CRE). Another transcription factor of L. vannamei, X box binding protein 1 (designated as LvXBP1), has a significant function in [inositol-requiring enzyme-1(IRE1) – (XBP1)] pathway. This transcription factor upregulated the expression of the WSSV gene wsv083 based on the UPR element (UPRE). These results suggest that in L. vannamei UPR signaling pathway transcription factors are important for WSSV and might facilitate WSSV infection. PMID:23638122

  13. Investigating catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition by bacteria biofilms in real time using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, Erwin; Ke, Neng; Cornut, Renaud; Patelunas, Anthony; Miller, Douglas; Nishiguchi, Michele K; Zoski, Cynthia G

    2014-01-07

    Catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a 1 mM bulk solution above Vibrio fischeri (γ-Protebacteria-Vibrionaceae) bacterial biofilms of either symbiotic or free-living strains was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The catalase activity, in units of micromoles hydrogen peroxide decomposed per minute over a period of 348 s, was found to vary with incubation time of each biofilm in correlation with the corresponding growth curve of bacteria in liquid culture. Average catalase activity for the same incubation times ranging from 1 to 12 h was found to be 0.28 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the symbiotic biofilms and 0.31 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the free-living biofilms, suggesting similar catalase activity. Calculations based on Comsol Multiphysics simulations in fitting experimental biofilm data indicated that approximately (3 ± 1) × 10(6) molecules of hydrogen peroxide were decomposed by a single bacterium per second, signifying the presence of a highly active catalase. A 2-fold enhancement in catalase activity was found for both free-living and symbiotic biofilms in response to external hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 1 nM in the growth media, implying a similar mechanism in responding to oxidative stress.

  14. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  15. Bone Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several ... you're nursing. A bone scan is a nuclear imaging procedure. In nuclear imaging, tiny amounts of ...

  16. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  17. Determination of spatial distributions of zinc and active biomass in microbial biofilms by two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Houston, Paul L; Hay, Anthony G; Shuler, Michael L; Abruña, Héctor D; Ghiorse, William C; Lion, Leonard W

    2005-07-01

    The spatial distributions of zinc, a representative transition metal, and active biomass in bacterial biofilms were determined using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM). Application of 2P-LSM permits analysis of thicker biofilms than are amenable to observation with confocal laser scanning microscopy and also provides selective excitation of a smaller focal volume with greater depth localization. Thin Escherichia coli PHL628 biofilms were grown in a minimal mineral salts medium using pyruvate as the carbon and energy source under batch conditions, and thick biofilms were grown in Luria-Bertani medium using a continuous-flow drip system. The biofilms were visualized by 2P-LSM and shown to have heterogeneous structures with dispersed dense cell clusters, rough surfaces, and void spaces. Contrary to homogeneous biofilm model predictions that active biomass would be located predominantly in the outer regions of the biofilm and inactive or dead biomass (biomass debris) in the inner regions, significant active biomass fractions were observed at all depths in biofilms (up to 350 microm) using live/dead fluorescent stains. The active fractions were dependent on biofilm thickness and are attributed to the heterogeneous characteristics of biofilm structures. A zinc-binding fluorochrome (8-hydroxy-5-dimethylsulfoamidoquinoline) was synthesized and used to visualize the spatial location of added Zn within biofilms. Zn was distributed evenly in a thin (12 microm) biofilm but was located only at the surface of thick biofilms, penetrating less than 20 microm after 1 h of exposure. The relatively slow movement of Zn into deeper biofilm layers provides direct evidence in support of the concept that thick biofilms may confer resistance to toxic metal species by binding metals at the biofilm-bulk liquid interface, thereby retarding metal diffusion into the biofilm (G. M. Teitzel and M. R. Park, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:2313-2320, 2003).

  18. Nitrogen positional scanning in tetramines active against HIV-1 as potential CXCR4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Gibert, Albert; Planesas, Jesús M; Ros-Blanco, Laia; Batllori, Xavier; Badía, Roger; Clotet, Bonaventura; Esté, José; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I

    2016-01-28

    The paradigm, derived from bicyclams and other cyclams, by which it is necessary to use the p-phenylene moiety as the central core in order to achieve high HIV-1 antiviral activities has been reexamined for the more flexible and less bulky structures 4, previously described by our group as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. The symmetrical compounds 7{x,x} and the non-symmetrical compounds 8{x,y} were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated in order to explore the impact on the biological activity of the distance between the phenyl ring and the first nitrogen atom of the side chains. EC50 exactly followed the order 7{x,x} < 8{x,x} < 4{x,x} indicating that, for such flexible tetramines, the presence of two methylene units on each side of the central phenyl ring increases the biological activity contrary to AMD3100. A computational study of the interactions of 4{3,3}, 7{3,3} and 8{3,3} with CXCR4 revealed interactions in the same pocket region with similar binding modes for 4{3,3} and 7{3,3} but a different one for 8{3,3}.

  19. Influence of Agathi grandiflora active principles inhibit viral multiplication and stimulate immune system in Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus against white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bindhu, Francis; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Five herbs including Adathoda vasica, Agathi grandiflora, Leucas aspera, Psoralea corylifolia, and Quercus infectoria were selected to screen the antiviral and immunostimulant activity against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio harveyi respectively using different organic polar and non-polar solvents. Based on the initial screening results, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of A. grandiflora had strong antiviral and immunostimulant activities. Those extracts incubated with WSSV injected Fenneropenaeus indicus got only 20% mortality and no PCR positive signals were seen in two step PCR amplification. The methanolic extracts of A. grandiflora were further purified through silica column chromatography and the fractions screened again for antiviral and immunostimulant activity. The secondary screening results revealed that, the fractions of F5 to F7 had effectively controlled the WSSV multiplication and V. harveyi growth. The pooled fractions (F5 to F7) was structurally characterized by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and few compounds were identified including 3,7.11,15-Tetramethyl-2-Hexane-1-ol, pytol and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisooctyl ester. The pooled fractions were mixed with the basal feed ingredients at the concentration of 100 (D-1), 200 (D-2), 300 (D-3) and 400 (D-4) mg kg(-1) and the diets fed to the F. indicus (9.0 ± 0.5 g) for 30 days. After the completion of feeding trail, they were challenged with virulent WSSV and studied the cumulative mortality, molecular diagnosis by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), biochemical, haematological and immunological parameters. The control diet fed F. indicus succumbed to death 100% within 3 days whereas the D-3 and D-4 helped to reduced the cumulative mortality of 60-80% respectively. The qRT-PCR revealed that, the WSSV copy number was gradually decreased when increasing concentration of A. grandiflora extract active fraction in the diets. The diets D-3 and D-4 helped to

  20. Ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Zhang, Siyuan; Fu, Quanyou; Xu, Zhian; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping applicable in a liquid or liquid filled tissue cavities exposed by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Scattered signals from cavitation bubbles were obtained in a scan line immediately after one HIFU exposure, and then there was a waiting time of 2 s long enough to make the liquid back to the original state. As this pattern extended, an image was built up by sequentially measuring a series of such lines. The acquisition of the beamformed radiofrequency (RF) signals for a scan line was synchronized with HIFU exposure. The duration of HIFU exposure, as well as the delay of the interrogating pulse relative to the moment while HIFU was turned off, could vary from microseconds to seconds. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in tap-water and a tap-water filled cavity in the tissue-mimicking gelatin-agar phantom as capable of observing temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud with temporal resolution of several microseconds, lateral and axial resolution of 0.50 mm and 0.29 mm respectively. The dissolution process of cavitation bubble cloud and spatial distribution affected by cavitation previously generated were also investigated. Although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid (e.g. tap water, etc.) that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, the technique may be a useful tool in spatial-temporal cavitation mapping for HIFU with high precision and resolution, providing a reference for clinical therapy.

  1. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  2. Application of a Scanning Thermal Nano-Probe for Thermal Imaging of High Frequency Active devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joodaki, Mojtaba; Janus, Pawel; Gotszalk, Teodor; Kompa, Günter; Edinger, Klaus; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2005-09-01

    The first application of a new thermal nano-probe based on the changes of electrical resistivity of a nanometer-sized filament with temperature has been presented for the thermal imaging of microwave power active devices. The integration of the filament the fabrication process of the novel thermal probe with a spatial resolution better than 80 nm and a thermal resolution of the order of 10-3 K have already been presented in reference [J. Microelectron. Eng. \\textbf{57--58} (2001) 737]. To demonstrate the capability of the novel thermal nano-probe the measurements have been successfully performed on a 30 fingers GaAs metal--semiconductor field-effect transistor (GaAs-MESFET) with a maximum power dissipation of 2.5 W. The bias circuit has been designed to suppress the undesired microwave oscillations in the transistor. In this case the power dissipation is equal to the dc power input. The near-field measurements using the nano-probe are compared with infrared measurement and three-dimensional finite element static thermal simulations. The good agreement between simulations and measurements confirms the high capability of the nono-probe for these applications.

  3. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  4. TALE-induced bHLH transcription factors that activate a pectate lyase contribute to water soaking in bacterial spot of tomato

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    AvrHah1 [avirulence (avr) gene homologous to avrBs3 and hax2, no. 1] is a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector (TALE) in Xanthomonas gardneri that induces water-soaked disease lesions on fruits and leaves during bacterial spot of tomato. We observe that water from outside the leaf is drawn into the apoplast in X. gardneri-infected, but not X. gardneriΔavrHah1 (XgΔavrHah1)-infected, plants, conferring a dark, water-soaked appearance. The pull of water can facilitate entry of additional bacterial cells into the apoplast. Comparing the transcriptomes of tomato infected with X. gardneri vs. XgΔavrHah1 revealed the differential up-regulation of two basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors with predicted effector binding elements (EBEs) for AvrHah1. We mined our RNA-sequencing data for differentially up-regulated genes that could be direct targets of the bHLH transcription factors and therefore indirect targets of AvrHah1. We show that two pectin modification genes, a pectate lyase and pectinesterase, are targets of both bHLH transcription factors. Designer TALEs (dTALEs) for the bHLH transcription factors and the pectate lyase, but not for the pectinesterase, complement water soaking when delivered by XgΔavrHah1. By perturbing transcriptional networks and/or modifying the plant cell wall, AvrHah1 may promote water uptake to enhance tissue damage and eventual bacterial egression from the apoplast to the leaf surface. Understanding how disease symptoms develop may be a useful tool for improving the tolerance of crops from damaging disease lesions. PMID:28100489

  5. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Assay for Biofilm-Active Antibiotics Commonly Used for Treatment of Prosthetic Implant Infections

    PubMed Central

    Knippenberg, Ben; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Clark, Ben; Dyer, John; Batty, Kevin T.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. We sought to develop, validate, and apply a DBS assay for rifampin (RIF), fusidic acid (FUS), and ciprofloxacin (CIP). These antibiotics are considered active against organisms in biofilms and are therefore commonly used for the treatment of infections associated with prosthetic implants. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy DBS assay was developed and validated, including red cell partitioning and thermal stability for each drug and the rifampin metabolite desacetyl rifampin (Des-RIF). Plasma and DBS concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and the concentration-time profiles were incorporated into population PK models. The limits of quantification for RIF, Des-RIF, CIP, and FUS in DBS were 15 μg/liter, 14 μg/liter, 25 μg/liter, and 153 μg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations for each antibiotic (r > 0.95; P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable. These drugs were stable in DBSs for at least 10 days at room temperature and 1 month at 4°C. The present DBS antibiotic assays are robust and can be used as surrogates for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including therapeutic drug monitoring or studies of implant infections. PMID:27270283

  6. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  7. The biochemical adaptations of spotted wing drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to fresh fruits reduced fructose concentrations and glutathione-S transferase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America, because the females have a serrated ovipositor enabling them to infest ripening almost all small fruits before harvest. Also flies are strongly attracted to fresh fruits rath...

  8. Renal scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urinate often to help remove the radioactive material from the body. How to Prepare for the Test Tell your health care provider if you take ... drink additional fluids before the scan. How the Test will ... into the vein. However, you will not feel the radioactive material. The scanning table may be hard and cold. ...

  9. Rolling Spot Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Garret E.; Fonteyne, Steve L.

    1990-01-01

    Wheeled tool speeds tack-welding operations. Spotwelds foil to parts in preparation for brazing. Includes electrode wheel rolling across foil. Welding current in electrode pulsed as electrode moves along, making series of uniformly-spaced low-current spot welds.

  10. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  11. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  12. TV spots' impact.

    PubMed

    El-bakly, S

    1994-09-01

    The Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Center of the State Information Service was established in 1979 for the purpose of providing information to the people on the population issue. The Ministry of Information has accorded the State Information Service free TV and radio air time for family planning dramas and spots. In the early years information campaigns were organized to make people aware of the population problem by slogans, songs, and cartoons. Around 1984 misconceptions about family planning and contraceptives were attacked through a number of TV and radio spots. A few years later 21 spots on specific contraceptive methods were broadcast which were aired for three years over 3000 times. They were extremely successful. The impact of these TV spots was one of the major reasons why the contraceptive prevalence rate increased from 30% in 1984 to 38% in 1988 and 47% in 1992. Spots were also broadcast about the social implications of large families. The TV soap opera "And The Nile Flows On", with the family planning message interwoven into it, was very well received by the target audience. A program entitled "Wedding of the Month" features couples who know family planning well. The most successful radio program is a 15-20 minute long quiz show for residents of the villages where the Select Villages Project is being implemented. The State Information Service has 60 local information centers in the 26 governorates of Egypt that make plans for the family planning campaign. In 1992 the Minya Initiative, a family planning project was implemented in the Minya Governorate. As a result, the contraceptive prevalence rate rose from 22% to 30% over 18 months. A new project, the Select Village Project, was developed in 1993 that replicates the Minya Initiative on the village level in other governorates. This new project that was implemented in sixteen governorates.

  13. Serial T-SPOT.TB and quantiFERON-TB-Gold In-Tube assays to monitor response to antitubercular treatment in Italian children with active or latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Elena; Bonsignori, Francesca; Mangone, Giusi; Galli, Luisa; Mazzantini, Rachele; Sollai, Sara; Azzari, Chiara; de Martino, Maurizio

    2012-09-01

    We performed a prospective study to investigate T-SPOT.TB and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G-IT) dynamics during antitubercular treatment in active tuberculosis (TB) or latent TB. Eighteen children with latent TB and 26 with TB were enrolled. At 6 months of follow-up reversion rate was 5.88% (95% CI:0-13.79) for QFT-G-IT; 9.09% (95% CI:0.59-17.58) for T-SPOT.TB (P=0.921) in TB cases. Significant decline in quantitative response was observed exclusively in TB cases. Our results suggest that serial IGRA have limited use in children receiving antitubercular treatment.

  14. The ScanDeNi process could turn an existing under-performing activated sludge plant into an asset.

    PubMed

    Rosén, S; Huijbregsen, C

    2003-01-01

    With tightening up of effluent discharge standards from wastewater treatment facilities, many plants are facing costly augmentations and in many cases completely new plants will have to be constructed. The ScanDeNi process was developed in Sweden for increased nitrogen removal at the Västerås Sewage Treatment Plant (STP), 125,000 p.e. near Stockholm, and can be described as a modified contact stabilisation process with pre-denitrification and a selector stage for nitrification. The STP was upgraded at a cost of some 25 Mill. SEK (2.5 Mill. USD). It has been successfully in operation since 1998, exceeding all expectations. The process is showing the following major advantages. 25-35% less volume for the same Sludge Retention Time (SRT) and secondary sedimentation sludge load, compared to conventional pre-denitrification; or a 25-35% higher load can be applied within the same volume with the same removal efficiencies. The selector mechanism appears to be not limited to the nitrifying bacteria alone. Other microorganisms appear to be responsible for the reduction of surface active matter from the return activated sludge (RAS), as well as in the reject stream from sludge dewatering, resulting in an increase in alpha-values of approximately 50%. Due to the high alpha-values less aeration is required, resulting in significant operating cost savings. 'Automatic' creation of anaerobic conditions, enabling biological phosphorus removal. Whilst rarely a concern in warmer climates, BNR plants in cold climates in winter often lose their capacity to nitrify. The Västerås STP has consistently maintained excellent effluent quality even with effluent temperatures as low as 7 degrees C, and at an SRT of some 7-9 days, proving the effectiveness of the nitrifier selector. The ScanDeNi process could offer excellent effluent discharge standards (T-N < 10 mg/L, T-P < 0.5 mg/L) in smaller tank volumes and at a significantly lower operating cost, compared to conventional pre

  15. Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Activities at UNAVCO: From GeoEarthScope to INTERFACE and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.

    2009-05-01

    UNAVCO leads and supports airborne and terrestrial laser scanning (ALS and TLS) activities in support of a wide range of earth science applications. UNAVCO acquired nearly 6,000 km2 of high resolution ALS data as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the National Science Foundation. GeoEarthScope ALS targets in most cases were 1- to 2-km wide corridors centered along active faults including the San Andreas, Hayward, Calaveras, Maacama, Green Valley, Little Salmon, Elsinore, San Cayetano, Garlock, Calico, Lenwood, Blackwater, Helendale, Panamint Valley, Ash Hill, Owens Valley, Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley, Wasatch, Teton, Denali and Totschunda faults. Acquisitions were planned and conducted based on community recommendations with respect to target identification and data collection practices. Particular care was taken to ensure the highest data quality possible within scope and budget, with special considerations given to effective ground point density and geodetic control. Data products are freely available from http://opentopography.org. TLS projects include numerous investigations in polar regions, such as the first TLS survey of the lava lake at Mount Erebus, Antarctica, in January 2009, and activities related to INTERFACE (INTERdisciplinary alliance for digital Field data ACquisition and Exploration), a Collaborative project currently funded by NSF and managed at UNAVCO which includes specialized TLS data processing and visualization software tools developed specifically for geoscience applications. We will present an overview of ALS and TLS project highlights; resources for data collection, accessibility and analysis; and potential use of these data for scientific research and as a framework for future endeavors.

  16. Real time anti-Toxoplasma gondii activity of an active fraction of Eurycoma longifolia root studied by in situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Nowroji; Noordin, Rahmah; Kit-Lam, Chan; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2012-08-02

    The inhibitory effect of active fractions of Eurycoma longifolia (E. longifolia) root, namely TAF355 and TAF401, were evaluated against Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). In our previous study, we demonstrated that T. gondii was susceptible to TAF355 and TAF401 with IC₅₀ values of 1.125 µg/mL and 1.375 µg/mL, respectively. Transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations were used to study the in situ antiparasitic activity at the IC₅₀ value. Clindamycin was used as positive control. SEM examination revealed cell wall alterations with formation of invaginations followed by completely collapsed cells compared to the normal T. gondii cells in response to the fractions. The main abnormality noted via TEM study was decreased cytoplasmic volume, leaving a state of structural disorganization within the cell cytoplasm and destruction of its organelles as early as 12 h of treatment, which indicated of rapid antiparasitic activity of the E. longifolia fractions. The significant antiparasitic activity shown by the TAF355 and TAF401 active fractions of E. longifolia suggests their potential as new anti-T. gondii agent candidates.

  17. Poisson Spot with Magnetic Levitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Matthew; Everhart, Michael; D'Arruda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a unique method for obtaining the famous Poisson spot without adding obstacles to the light path, which could interfere with the effect. A Poisson spot is the interference effect from parallel rays of light diffracting around a solid spherical object, creating a bright spot in the center of the shadow.

  18. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... material called gallium and is a type of nuclear medicine exam. A related test is gallium scan ... Brown ML, Forstrom LA, et al. Society of nuclear medicine procedure guideline for gallium scintigraphy in inflammation. ...

  19. CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposing your baby to radiation. Reactions to contrast material In certain cases, your doctor may recommend you ... for a few hours before your scan Contrast material A special dye called a contrast material is ...

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of ripple filters designed for proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy with active scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhaleb, F.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, P.; Marchetto, F.; Donetti, M.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; La Rosa, A.; Pardo, J.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.

    2008-02-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams have a very sharp Bragg peak. For proton beams of energies smaller than 100 MeV, fitting with a gaussian the region of the maximum of the Bragg peak, the sigma along the beam direction is smaller than 1 mm, while for carbon ion beams, the sigma derived with the same technique is smaller than 1 mm for energies up to 360 MeV. In order to use low energy proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy and to achieve an acceptable homogeneity of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) either the peak positions along the beam have to be quite close to each other or the longitudinal peak shape needs to be broaden at least few millimeters by means of a properly designed ripple filter. With a synchrotron accelerator in conjunction with active scanning techniques the use of a ripple filter is necessary to reduce the numbers of energy switches necessary to obtain a smooth SOBP, leading also to shorter overall irradiation times. We studied the impact of the design of the ripple filter on the dose uniformity in the SOBP region by means of Monte Carlo simulations, implemented using the package Geant4. We simulated the beam delivery line supporting both proton and carbon ion beams using different energies of the beams. We compared the effect of different kind of ripple filters and their advantages.

  1. A Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of intracanal smear layer removal by two different final irrigation activation systems

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Deepti; Dua, Ankur; Uppin, Veerendra M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare smear layer removal at apical 1 mm level after final irrigation activation with an EndoVac system and Max-I probe. Materials and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups after completing cleaning and shaping with ProTaper rotary files. In one group, final irrigation was performed with an EndoVac system while in the other group final irrigation was performed with a 30 gauge Max-I probe. 3% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid were used as final irrigants in all teeth. After instrumentation and irrigation, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into buccal and palatal halves and viewed under a scanning electron microscope for evaluation of the smear layer. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The EndoVac group showed significantly better smear layer removal compared with the Max-I probe at the apical 1 mm level. Conclusion: An apical negative pressure system (EndoVac) results in better debridement at apical 1 mm when compared with side-vented closed ended needle irrigation (Max-I probe). PMID:24808693

  2. Robust Initialization of Active Shape Models for Lung Segmentation in CT Scans: A Feature-Based Atlas Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2014-01-01

    Model-based segmentation methods have the advantage of incorporating a priori shape information into the segmentation process but suffer from the drawback that the model must be initialized sufficiently close to the target. We propose a novel approach for initializing an active shape model (ASM) and apply it to 3D lung segmentation in CT scans. Our method constructs an atlas consisting of a set of representative lung features and an average lung shape. The ASM pose parameters are found by transforming the average lung shape based on an affine transform computed from matching features between the new image and representative lung features. Our evaluation on a diverse set of 190 images showed an average dice coefficient of 0.746 ± 0.068 for initialization and 0.974 ± 0.017 for subsequent segmentation, based on an independent reference standard. The mean absolute surface distance error was 0.948 ± 1.537 mm. The initialization as well as segmentation results showed a statistically significant improvement compared to four other approaches. The proposed initialization method can be generalized to other applications employing ASM-based segmentation. PMID:25400660

  3. Strategy to eliminate catalyst hot-spots in the partial oxidation of methane: enhancing its activity for direct hydrogen production by reducing the reactivity of lattice oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wen, Cun; Liu, Yi; Guo, Yun; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2010-02-14

    Hydrogen can be produced over Er(2)O(3) in methane oxidation (oxygen/methane = 26). The reactivity of lattice oxygen in the catalyst plays a main role in the conversion of surface hydroxyl species to hydrogen or water. Adding a rare earth element into a catalyst can reduce the reactivity of lattice oxygen, resulting in increased hydrogen production, to eliminate catalyst hot-spots.

  4. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lacz, N L; Schwartz, R A; Kapila, R

    2006-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an unusual but important dermatological condition to identify without hesitation. The classic triad of headache, fever, and a rash that begins on the extremities and travels proximally to involve the trunk is found in a majority of patients. The cutaneous centripetal pattern is a result of cell to cell migration by the causative organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Such individuals should receive prompt antimicrobial therapy and supportive care to avoid serious and potentially fatal complications.

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kamper, C A; Chessman, K H; Phelps, S J

    1988-02-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reviewed. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted to man by various species of ticks. High-incidence areas exist in the southeast and south central United States. Only 60-70% of patients with the disease report a history of tick bite or exposure to tick-infested areas. The disease is initially characterized by fever, headache, gastrointestinal complaints, myalgia, and a generalized rash. In several days generalized vasculitis may lead to periorbital edema and nonpitting edema of the face and extremities. Central nervous system involvement is common. Because signs and symptoms associated with the disease are nonspecific, the diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Traditionally diagnostic confirmation relied on serologic testing, but an indirect fluorescent antibody assay will soon be commercially available. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is usually treated with the rickettsiostatic agents chloramphenicol or tetracycline, but few comparative data on these agents in patients with the disease are available. For patients who cannot tolerate oral medications, intravenous chloramphenicol sodium succinate is the preferred treatment; chloramphenicol is also the drug of choice for children less than eight years of age. Otherwise, oral tetracycline hydrochloride is the drug of choice. Antibiotic therapy should be continued for 7-10 days or until the patient is afebrile for two to five days. All cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever must be reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The best ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease are to increase awareness of its signs and symptoms and to prevent exposure to ticks.

  6. Optical analysis of scanning microstereolithography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Suhas P.; Dubey, Shashikant; Gandhi, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    Microstereolithography (MSL) is rapidly developing technique for micro-fabrication. Vector-by-vector scanning MSL has a potential to create true 3D micro-devices as compared to mostly planar (2D-2 1/2 D) devices fabricated by conventional MEMS techniques. Previous literature shows two different scanning methods:(1) Galvanomirror scanning, (2) Photoreactor tank scanning. Galvanomirror scanning technique has higher fabrication speed but poor resolution because of defocusing of laser spot on the resin surface. Photo-reactor tank scanning has higher resolution but produces a wavy structures and limited speed of fabrication. This paper proposes and develops an offaxis lens scanning technique for MSL and carries out optical analysis to compare its performance with the existing techniques mentioned above. The comparison clearly demonstrates improved performance with the proposed offaxis lens scanning technique.

  7. Indium 111-granulocyte scanning in the assessment of disease extent and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. A comparison with colonoscopy, histology, and fecal indium 111-granulocyte excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Camilleri, M.; Rees, H.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1986-05-01

    Indium 111-leukocyte scanning has recently been introduced as a new method for imaging inflammatory bowel disease. The technique has recently been made more specific for acute inflammation by labeling a pure granulocyte fraction rather than the conventional mixed leukocyte preparation. We now report a prospective study comparing 111In-granulocyte scanning with endoscopy, histology, and fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion for the assessment of disease extent and severity in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. In 52 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, disease extent and severity were assessed macroscopically, histologically, or by scanning using a numerical grading system. Excellent correlations were found between both endoscopy and histology and 111In scans (r = 0.90 (endoscopy) and r = 0.90 (histology) for extent; r = 0.86 and r = 0.91 for disease activity). Severity graded by scanning also showed a close correlation with fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion (r = 0.90). Indium 111-granulocyte scans are a rapid, accurate, noninvasive means of assessing both disease extent and severity of colonic involvement in inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Chromosomal context dependence of a eukaryotic recombinational hot spot.

    PubMed Central

    Ponticelli, A S; Smith, G R

    1992-01-01

    The single base-pair mutation M26 in the ade6 gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe creates a hot spot for meiotic homologous recombination. When DNA fragments containing M26 and up to 3.0 kilobases of surrounding DNA were moved to the ura4 gene or to a multicopy plasmid, M26 had no detectable hot spot activity. Our results indicate that nucleotide sequences at least 1 kilobase away from M26 are required for M26 hot spot activity and suggest that, as for transcriptional promoters, a second site or proper chromatin structure is required for activation of this eukaryotic recombinational hot spot. We discuss the implications of these results for studies of other meiotic recombinational hot spots and for gene targeting. PMID:1729693

  9. Spots on AG Virginis - Paradigm or panacea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. A.; Rainger, P. P.; Hilditch, R. W.

    1990-12-01

    New photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eclipsing binary AG Vir are presented. Medium-resolution spectroscopy has allowed the measurement of velocities for the secondary component for the first time. The V light curve shows many of the features seen in previous studies of this system. A full analysis of the spectroscopic and photometric data has been made which suggests that the system is either in a marginal state of conatact or a deep-contact configuration depending on the type of spot model invoked. AG Vir constitutes an excellent example of the expected manifestations of spot activity on a light curve. It also demonstrates the ease with which the spot phenomenon can be invoked to explain the appearance of a light curve and to provide conflicting results. This study shows the necessity of a more thorough investigation of this system using Doppler-imaging techniques and simultaneous infrared and optical photometry.

  10. Micrometer accuracy method for small-scale laser focal spot centroid measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Zhiwei; Wang, Xin; Ba, Dexin; Zhu, Chengyu

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of the centroid of small-scale laser focal spot is one of the most promising technologies for small-scale laser focal spot precise positioning. A method of two-dimensional scanning with CCD has been conducted to precisely measure the centroid of the small-scale laser focal spot (diameter in microns) by obtaining the change curve for gray value. The theoretical analysis is consistent with the experimental results.

  11. A simple dried blood spot method for therapeutic drug monitoring of the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, and their active metabolites using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Berm, E J J; Paardekooper, J; Brummel-Mulder, E; Hak, E; Wilffert, B; Maring, J G

    2015-03-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) is considered useful in patients with major depressive disorder, since these drugs display large individual differences in clearance, and the therapeutic windows of these drugs are relatively small. We developed an assay for determination of amitriptyline (ATP), nortriptyline (NTP), imipramine (IMP), desipramine (DSP) clomipramine (CMP) and desmethyl-clomipramine (DCMP) in dried blood spots (DBS). A fast and robust LC-MS/MS method was developed and analytically validated for simultaneous determination of ATP, NTP, IMP, DSP, CMP, and DCMP in DBS. Six mm circles were punched out from DBS collected on Whatman DMPK-C paper and mixed with acetonitrile: methanol 1:3 containing the internal standard. The extract was analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Total LC-MS/MS runtime was 4.8 min. The assay was linear in the range 20-500 µg/L for all compounds. Overall-assay accuracy and precision were<20% for the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), except for CMP (CV=22.3%), and <15% at other concentrations. The initial LLOQ was 20 µg/L however for CMP and DMCP it was increased to 40 µg/L. The blood volume per spot did not influence the results, but a low hematocrit (≤ 30%) was associated with a >15% negative bias for all compounds. Punching at the perimeter of the blood spot instead of the center was associated with a positive bias. A good correlation was found between patients plasma and DBS samples of ATP, NTP and DMCP, but not for CMP. In addition, proportional differences were found. This LC-MS/MS method was analytically validated for determination of TCAs in DBS. Future validation will focus on the clinical application of the method.

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: segmentation and classification using 3D active contours.

    PubMed

    Way, Ted W; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N; Kazerooni, Ella A; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2006-07-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A(z)) of 0.83 +/- 0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D

  13. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    PubMed Central

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  14. Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie shows counterclockwise atmospheric motion around Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The clip was made from blue-filter images taken with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft during seven separate rotations of Jupiter between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000.

    The clip also shows the eastward and westward motion of the zonal jets, seen as the horizontal stripes flowing in opposite directions. The zonal jets circle the planet. As far as can be determined from both Earth-based and spacecraft measurements, the positions and speeds of the jets have not changed for 100 years. Since Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid boundary, the jet speeds are measured relative to Jupiter's magnetic field, which rotates, wobbling like a top because of its tilt, every 9 hours 55.5 minutes. The movie shows motions in the magnetic reference frame, so winds to the west correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than the magnetic field, and eastward winds correspond to features rotating a little faster.

    Because the Red Spot is in the southern hemisphere, the direction of motion indicates it is a high-pressure center. Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Scientists suspect these small white features are lightning storms. The storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for the large-scale features.

    The smallest features in the movie are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across. The spacing of the movie frames in time is not uniform; some consecutive images are separated by two Jupiter rotations, and some by one. The images have been re-projected using a simple cylindrical map projection. They show an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east-west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet

  15. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Reinauer, K M; Jaschonek, K; Kusch, G; Heizmann, W R; Döller, P C; Jenss, H

    1990-01-12

    After returning from a holiday in the USA a 24-year-old man fell ill with diarrhoea, high fever and marked rash including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When a history of a tick bite in the USA was elicited, a rickettsial infection was suspected. Treatment with doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily, was instituted finally and the fever slowly resolved. The patient became completely well again within four weeks. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  16. Dark Spots and Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As winter turns to spring at the south polar ice cap of Mars, the rising sun reveals dark spots and fans emerging from the cold polar night. Using visual images (left) and temperature data (right) from the Thermal Emission Imaging system on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, scientists have built a new model for the origin of the dark markings. Scientists propose the markings come from dark sand and dust strewn by high-speed jets of carbon-dioxide gas. These erupt from under a layer of carbon-dioxide ice that forms each Martian winter.

  17. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  18. Scan-independent slot arrays with parasitic wire arrays in stratified medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Kwong T.; Munk, Benedikt A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a parasitic wire array on the scan admittance of a slot array has been investigated. Structures considered can consist of an infinite slot array and an arbitrary number of parasitic infinte arrays of piecewise linear wires, all arrays being embedded in a stratified medium. These include, as particular cases, phased arrays of Clavin elements. Expressing the fields from the arrays as plane waves, a procedure similar to the periodic moment method for infinite periodic structures is set up to obtain the the scan admittance of the slot array. Scan admittances are presented for a slot array with monopole arrays in free space, and a slot array with a tilted dipole array in a stratified medium. Blind spots at which the incident energy is mainly reflected rather than transmitted were found. Results obtained indicate the possibility of using parasitic wire arrays for scan compensation of active slot arrays.

  19. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated and developed the use of holographic optical elements (HOE) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. By rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis, a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope is possible. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOES for use with the first three harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, and designed, built, and tested two lidar systems based on this technology.

  20. Configurable hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Masanari; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Aburada, Ryota; Furuta, Nozomu; Kotani, Toshiya

    2014-03-01

    Hot spot fixing (HSF) method has been used to fix many hot spots automatically. However, conventional HSF based on a biasing based modification is difficult to fix many hot spots under a low-k1 lithography condition. In this paper we proposed a new HSF, called configurable hotspot fixing system. The HSF has two major concepts. One is a new function to utilize vacant space around a hot spot by adding new patterns or extending line end edges around the hot spot. The other is to evaluate many candidates at a time generated by the new functions. We confirmed the proposed HSF improves 73% on the number of fixing hot spots and reduces total fixing time by 50% on a device layout equivalent to 28nm-node. The result shows the proposed HSF is effective for layouts under the low-k1 lithography condition.

  1. Turbulent spots in hypervelocity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Joseph S.; Leyva, Ivett A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2017-04-01

    The turbulent spot propagation process in boundary layer flows of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and air/carbon dioxide mixtures in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is investigated. Experiments are performed in a hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel with a 5-degree half-angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with flush-mounted fast-response coaxial thermocouples. Time-resolved and spatially demarcated heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent bursts within the mean flow, and convection rates at approximately 91, 74, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, peak, and trailing edge of the spots. A simple model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from observed transition onset to completion distance. Spot generation rates in air and nitrogen are estimated to be approximately twice the spot generation rates in air/carbon dioxide mixtures.

  2. Jovian Dark Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A recently discovered black spot in Jupiter's clouds is darker than any feature ever before observed on the giant planet. The spot may be the result of a downward spiraling wind that blows away high clouds and reveals deeper, very dark cloud layers. These three panels depict the same area of Jupiter's atmosphere. A map of Jovian temperatures near 250 millibar pressure (top) panel is derived from the photopolarimeter-radiometer instrument on NASA's Galileo Jupiter orbiter. This map is compared with maps derived from images of the same area in visible light (middle panel)and thermal radiation sensitive to cloud-top temperatures (bottom panel).

    The single downward-pointing arrow in the top panel indicates the location of a warm area that corresponds to the position of a so-called 'black spot'(shown in the middle panel), a feature that is about a year old. Features this dark are rare on Jupiter. The bottom panel, sensitive to temperatures at Jupiter's cloud tops, shows this feature as a bright object, meaning that upper-level cold clouds are missing - allowing us to see deeper into Jupiter's warmer interior. The dark visible appearance of the feature than most likely represents the color of very deep clouds. The warm temperatures and cloud-free conditions imply that this feature is a region where dry upper-atmospheric gas is being forced to converge, is warmed up and then forced to descend, clearing out clouds. It is the opposite of wet, upwelling gas in areas such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot or white ovals. On the other hand, it is unlike the dry and relatively cloudless feature into which the Galileo probe descended in 1995, because that region had the same temperatures as its surroundings and did not appear nearly as dark as this new spot.

    The temperatures sampled by the photopolarimeter radiometer are near the top of Jupiter's troposphere, where wind motions control the atmosphere. The top row of arrows shows the location of temperature waves in a warm region

  3. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method).

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  4. Special report: workshop on 4D-treatment planning in actively scanned particle therapy--recommendations, technical challenges, and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Antje; Bert, Christoph; Heath, Emily; Nill, Simeon; Kraus, Kim; Richter, Daniel; Hug, Eugen; Pedroni, Eros; Safai, Sairos; Albertini, Francesca; Zenklusen, Silvan; Boye, Dirk; Söhn, Matthias; Soukup, Martin; Sobotta, Benjamin; Lomax, Antony

    2010-09-01

    This article reports on a 4D-treatment planning workshop (4DTPW), held on 7-8 December 2009 at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The participants were all members of institutions actively involved in particle therapy delivery and research. The purpose of the 4DTPW was to discuss current approaches, challenges, and future research directions in 4D-treatment planning in the context of actively scanned particle radiotherapy. Key aspects were addressed in plenary sessions, in which leaders of the field summarized the state-of-the-art. Each plenary session was followed by an extensive discussion. As a result, this article presents a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets (intrafractional changes) with actively scanned particles and a list of requirements to elaborate and apply these guidelines clinically.

  5. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J; Trompier, F; Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P; Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M; Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M; Dufek, V; Frojdh, E; George, S; Harrison, R; Kubancak, J; Ploc, O; Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S; and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  6. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  7. High-speed massively parallel scanning

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    2010-07-06

    A new technique for recording a series of images of a high-speed event (such as, but not limited to: ballistics, explosives, laser induced changes in materials, etc.) is presented. Such technique(s) makes use of a lenslet array to take image picture elements (pixels) and concentrate light from each pixel into a spot that is much smaller than the pixel. This array of spots illuminates a detector region (e.g., film, as one embodiment) which is scanned transverse to the light, creating tracks of exposed regions. Each track is a time history of the light intensity for a single pixel. By appropriately configuring the array of concentrated spots with respect to the scanning direction of the detection material, different tracks fit between pixels and sufficient lengths are possible which can be of interest in several high-speed imaging applications.

  8. Hot-spot tectonics on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis is that extensional tectonics and low-angle detachment faults probably occur on Io in association with the hot spots. These processes may occur on a much shorter timescale on Ion than on Earth, so that Io could be a natural laboratory for the study of thermotectonics. Furthermore, studies of heat and detachment in crustal extension on Earth and the other terresrial planets (especially Venus and Mars) may provide analogs to processes on Io. The geology of Io is dominated by volcanism and hot spots, most likely the result of tidal heating. Hot spots cover 1 to 2% of Io's surface, radiating at temperatures typically from 200 to 400 K, and occasionally up to 700K. Heat loss from the largest hot spots on Io, such as Loki Patera, is about 300 times the heat loss from Yellowstone, so a tremendous quantity of energy is available for volcanic and tectonic work. Active volcanism on Io results in a resurfacing rate as high as 10 cm per year, yet many structural features are apparent on the surface. Therefore, the tectonics must be highly active.

  9. Projections of scan patterns on human retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. H.; Crane, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Fundus camera tracks eye movements by using camera optics with the aid of an inverted system. Camera provides a flying-spot circular scanning light source in the normal film plane and a broadband photodetector in position normally occupied by light source.

  10. Occurrence of pathogenic fungi to Amblyomma cajennense in a rural area of Central Brazil and their activities against vectors of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Walmirton B; Humber, Richard A; Luz, Christian

    2012-08-13

    Two isolates of Beauveria bassiana and one of Purpureocillium lilacinum (=Paecilomyces lilacinus) were found infecting Amblyomma cajennense engorged females collected on horses (0.15% infection rate from a total of 1982 specimens) and another two isolates of P. lilacinum and one Metarhizium anisopliae detected in soils (2.1% from 144 samples) collected in typical pasture habitats of this tick in Central Brazil from October 2009 to March 2011. Fungi were isolated from soils with Rhipicephalus sanguineus as surrogate baits. No fungi were found in ticks or soils during the driest months (May to August). Testing pathogenicity of fungi all R. sanguineus females were killed regardless of the isolate and fungi sporulated abundantly on the cadavers. A. cajennense was less susceptible to infection with P. lilacinum within 20 days than R. sanguineus. All three fungal species probably act as natural antagonists of A. cajennense particularly in the rainy season and have interest for integrate control of vectors of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  11. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Dynes, Joseph L; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and 'skimming plane' imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes.

  12. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kyle L.; Dynes, Joseph L.; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and ‘skimming plane’ imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes. PMID:26308212

  13. Resolving stellar surface spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T.; Rice, J. B.; Savanov, I. S.

    Doppler imaging of stellar surfaces is a novel technique with similarities to medical brain tomography (instead of a fixed brain and a rotating scanner, astronomers have a fixed spectrograph and a rotating brain, star of course). The number of free (internal) parameters is of the order of the number of surface grid points and only constrained by the number of input data points. This obviously ill-posed situation requires modern inversion algorithms with penalty functions of the form of maximum entropy or Tikhonov etc.. We present a brief status review of our Doppler imaging codes at AIP that span from temperature and spot-filling-factor mapping to full Stokes-based magnetic field mapping.

  14. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2007-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a life-threatening disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, an obligately intracellular bacterium that is spread to human beings by ticks. More than a century after its first clinical description, this disease is still among the most virulent human infections identified, being potentially fatal even in previously healthy young people. The diagnosis of RMSF is based on the patient's history and a physical examination, and often presents a dilemma for clinicians because of the non-specific presentation of the disease in its early course. Early empirical treatment is essential to prevent severe complications or a fatal outcome, and treatment should be initiated even in unconfirmed cases. Because there is no vaccine available against RMSF, avoidance of tick-infested areas is still the best way to prevent the infection.

  15. Demography of Northern Spotted Owls in southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zabel, Cynthia J.; Salmons, Susan E.; Forsman, Eric D.; Destefano, Stephen; Raphael, Martin G.; Gutierrez, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) are associated with lower elevation, commercially valuable, late-successional coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest. Meta-analyses of demographic parameters indicate that Northern Spotted Owl populations are declining throughout their range (Anderson and Burnham 1992, Burnham et al. this volume). Recent research has attempted to determine whether management activities have affected the viability of Spotted Owl populations, and results have led to development of conservation plans for the species (Dawson et al. 1987, Thomas et al. 1990, Murphy and Noon 1992, USDI 1992, Thomas et al. 1993b).In the Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (USDI 1992b) threats to the species were identified as small population sizes, declining populations, limited amounts of habitat, continued loss and fragmentation of habitat, geographically isolated populations, and predation and competition from other avian species. Weather and fire are natural processes that also may affect reproductive success of Spotted Owls. Weather may be a factor in the high annual variability in fecundity of Spotted Owls, as has been suggested for other predatory bird species (Newton, 1979, 1986). However, these factors have not been addressed in previous studies of Spotted Owls.Our objectives were to estimate survival, fecundity, and annual rates of population change (l) for resident, territorial female Spotted Owls at two study areas in the coastal mountains of southwestern Oregon. We tested if the amount of rainfall was correlated with reproduction of Spotted Owls. While surveying for Spotted Owls, we documented the increased presence of Barred Owls (Strix varia), a potential competitor of Spotted Owls.

  16. 77 FR 50526 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for the Northern Spotted Owl, Skamania, Klickitat, and Yakima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for the Northern Spotted Owl, Skamania... take of the threatened northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) at a level that enables the... would also authorize incidental take of the spotted owl as a result of management activities during...

  17. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  18. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  19. Two New Hot Spots on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on Galileo obtained this image of half of Io's disk in darkness on September 19, 1997. This image, at 5 microns, shows several hot spots on Io, which are volcanic regions of enhanced thermal emission. The area shown is part of the leading hemisphere of Io.

    Two new hot spots are shown and indicated in the image (New, and Shamshu). Neither of these hot spots were seen by NIMS or the Solid State Imaging Experiment, (SSI) prior to this observation, becoming only recently active. Several other previously known hot spots are labelled in the image. Galileo was at a distance of 342,000 km from Io when this observation was made.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  20. Hot spot-ridge crest convergence in the northeast Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Karsten, J.L.; Delaney, J.R. )

    1989-01-10

    Evolution of the Juan de Fuca Ridge during the past 7 m.y. has been reconstructed taking into account both the propagating rift history and migration of the spreading center in the 'absolute' (fixed hot spot) reference frame. Northwestward migration of the spreading center (at a rate of 30 km/m.y.) has resulted in progressive encroachment of the ridge axis on the Cobb Hot Spot and westward jumping of the central third of the ridge axis more recently than 0.5 Ma. Seamounts in the Cobb-Eickelberg chain are predicted to display systematic variations in morphology and petrology, and a reduction in the age contrast between the edifice and underlying crust, as a result of the ridge axis approach. Relative seamount volumes also indicate that magmatic output of the hot spot varied during this interval, with a reduction in activity between 2.5 and 4.5 Ma, compared with relatively more robust activity before and after this period. Spatial relationships determined in this reconstruction allow hypotheses relating hot spot activity and rift propagation to be evaluated. In most cases, rift propagation has been directed away from the hot spot during the time period considered. Individual propagators show some reduction in propagation rate as separation between the propagating rift tip and hot spot increases, but cross comparison of multiple propagators does not uniformly display the same relationship. No obvious correlation exists between propagation rate and increasing proximity of the hot spot to the ridge axis or increasing hot spot output. Taken together, these observations do not offer compelling support for the concept of hot spot driven rift propagation. However, short-term reversals in propagation direction at the Cobb Offset coincide with activity of the Heckle melting anomaly, suggesting that local propagation effects may be related to excess magma supply at the ridge axis.

  1. Scanning-Pencil-Beam Radar Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, David G.; Freilich, Michael H.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Noon, Don E.

    1992-01-01

    SCANSCAT conceptual scanning radar scatterometer placed in nearly polar orbit around Earth at altitude of 705 km aboard Spacecraft B of NASA's Earth Observing System. Measures radar backscattering from surface of ocean. Data processed on ground into normalized radar-backscattering cross sections, then processed into velocities of winds near surface of ocean by use of empirical mathematical model of relationship between normalized backscattering cross section, wind vector at scanned spot, and angle of incidence and azimuth angle of radar beam. Accuracy and coverage exceeds those of fan-beam scatterometer. Modified versions of scanning plan useful in laser inspection of surface finishes on machined parts.

  2. Holographic optical elements as scanning lidar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2006-09-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. Rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  3. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  4. ‘Neanderthal bone flutes’: simply products of Ice Age spotted hyena scavenging activities on cave bear cubs in European cave bear dens

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2015-01-01

    Punctured extinct cave bear femora were misidentified in southeastern Europe (Hungary/Slovenia) as ‘Palaeolithic bone flutes’ and the ‘oldest Neanderthal instruments’. These are not instruments, nor human made, but products of the most important cave bear scavengers of Europe, hyenas. Late Middle to Late Pleistocene (Mousterian to Gravettian) Ice Age spotted hyenas of Europe occupied mainly cave entrances as dens (communal/cub raising den types), but went deeper for scavenging into cave bear dens, or used in a few cases branches/diagonal shafts (i.e. prey storage den type). In most of those dens, about 20% of adult to 80% of bear cub remains have large carnivore damage. Hyenas left bones in repeating similar tooth mark and crush damage stages, demonstrating a butchering/bone cracking strategy. The femora of subadult cave bears are intermediate in damage patterns, compared to the adult ones, which were fully crushed to pieces. Hyenas produced round–oval puncture marks in cub femora only by the bone-crushing premolar teeth of both upper and lower jaw. The punctures/tooth impact marks are often present on both sides of the shaft of cave bear cub femora and are simply a result of non-breakage of the slightly calcified shaft compacta. All stages of femur puncturing to crushing are demonstrated herein, especially on a large cave bear population from a German cave bear den. PMID:26064624

  5. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  6. Saturn's Hot Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the sharpest image of Saturn's temperature emissions taken from the ground; it is a mosaic of 35 individual exposures made at the W.M. Keck I Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii on Feb. 4, 2004.

    The images to create this mosaic were taken with infrared radiation. The mosaic was taken at a wavelength near 17.65 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's upper troposphere. The prominent hot spot at the bottom of the image is right at Saturn's south pole. The warming of the southern hemisphere was expected, as Saturn was just past southern summer solstice, but the abrupt changes in temperature with latitude were not expected. The tropospheric temperature increases toward the pole abruptly near 70 degrees latitude from 88 to 89 Kelvin (-301 to -299 degrees Fahrenheit) and then to 91 Kelvin (-296 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole.

    Ring particles are not at a uniform temperature everywhere in their orbit around Saturn. The ring particles are orbiting clockwise in this image. Particles are coldest just after having cooled down in Saturn's shadow (lower left). As they orbit Saturn, the particles increase in temperature up to a maximum (lower right) just before passing behind Saturn again in shadow.

    A small section of the ring image is missing because of incomplete mosaic coverage during the observing sequence.

  7. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    PubMed Central

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance. PMID:27375314

  8. Single spots, unipolar magnetic regions, and pairs of spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    2014-06-01

    McIntosh (1981) noted that sunspot pairs appear preferentially near the boundary of unipolar magnetic (UM) regions of opposite polarity. A large number of solar magnetograms from the Mount Wilson Observatory and the Kitt Peak Observatory during fairly quiet periods are examined to confirm his finding. In this study, it is also found collaterally that positive single spots appear in a positive UM region and vice versa. It is suggested thus that a pair of spots of opposite polarity is formed because two single spots develop in the vicinity of the boundary (the neutral line) of two UM regions of opposite polarity for polarity arrangement appropriate to the Hale law, namely, the Hale boundary. For these reasons, it is suggested that single spots and UM regions have significant meaning in solar magnetism.

  9. Weird Warm Spot on Exoplanet

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates an unexpected warm spot on the surface of a gaseous exoplanet. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that the hottest part of the planet, shown here as bright, orange...

  10. Center Spot: Shoe Box Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jan

    1976-01-01

    This is the second "Center Spot" devoted to Jan Hoffman's "Shoe Box Science," a program that organizes manipulative materials so that children can identify, describe, order, construct, name and distinguish on their own.

  11. Scanning the periphery.

    PubMed

    Day, George S; Schoemaker, Paul J H

    2005-11-01

    Companies often face new rivals, technologies, regulations, and other environmental changes that seem to come out of left field. How can they see these changes sooner and capitalize on them? Such changes often begin as weak signals on what the authors call the periphery, or the blurry zone at the edge of an organization's vision. As with human peripheral vision, these signals are difficult to see and interpret but can be vital to success or survival. Unfortunately, most companies lack a systematic method for determining where on the periphery they should be looking, how to interpret the weak signals they see, and how to allocate limited scanning resources. This article provides such a method-a question-based framework for helping companies scan the periphery more efficiently and effectively. The framework divides questions into three categories: learning from the past (What have been our past blind spots? What instructive analogies do other industries offer? Who in the industry is skilled at picking up weak signals and acting on them?); evaluating the present (What important signals are we rationalizing away? What are our mavericks, outliers, complainers, and defectors telling us? What are our peripheral customers and competitors really thinking?); and envisioning the future (What future surprises could really hurt or help us? What emerging technologies could change the game? Is there an unthinkable scenario that might disrupt our business?). Answering these questions is a good first step toward anticipating problems or opportunities that may appear on the business horizon. The article concludes with a self-test that companies can use to assess their need and capability for peripheral vision.

  12. Portable pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer with a spot size of 40 μm.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2017-02-01

    We report a method of reducing the spot size of an electron beam in a portable pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) and its application to on-site microanalysis. An electron beam with a spot size of 40 μm full width at half maximum was achieved by preventing the production of an electric field on the side of a needle tip set on the pyroelectric crystal in the EPMA by coating the side of the tip with an insulating material. This spot size was approximately 10 times smaller than that previously reported. We were able to acquire a line scan profile of a thin copper line sputtered on a silicon substrate using the portable pyroelectric EPMA. The width of the sputtered copper evaluated from the line scan profile (120 μm) corresponded to that from a line scan profile obtained by conventional stationary scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy equipment.

  13. Portable pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer with a spot size of 40 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2017-02-01

    We report a method of reducing the spot size of an electron beam in a portable pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) and its application to on-site microanalysis. An electron beam with a spot size of 40 μm full width at half maximum was achieved by preventing the production of an electric field on the side of a needle tip set on the pyroelectric crystal in the EPMA by coating the side of the tip with an insulating material. This spot size was approximately 10 times smaller than that previously reported. We were able to acquire a line scan profile of a thin copper line sputtered on a silicon substrate using the portable pyroelectric EPMA. The width of the sputtered copper evaluated from the line scan profile (120 μm) corresponded to that from a line scan profile obtained by conventional stationary scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy equipment.

  14. SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors fabricated using scanning atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang-Han; Chiu, Yi-Fan; Yeh, Po-Wei; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    SnO2/CNT electrodes for supercapacitors are fabricated by first screen-printing pastes containing SnO2 nanoparticles and CNTs on carbon cloth, following which nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sintering is performed at various APPJ scan rates. The APPJ scan rates change the time intervals for which the reactive plasma species and the heat of the nitrogen APPJs influence the designated sintering spot on the carbon cloth, resulting in APPJ-sintered SnO2/CNT nanocomposites with different properties. The water contact angle decreases with the APPJ scan rate. The improved wettability can facilitate the penetration of the electrolyte into the nanopores of the SnO2/CNT nanocomposites, thereby improving the charge storage and specific capacitance of the supercapacitors. Among the three tested APPJ scan rates, 1.5, 3, and 6 mm s-1, the SnO2/CNT supercapacitor sintered by APPJ under the lowest APPJ scan rate of 1.5 mm s-1 shows the best specific capacitance of ˜90 F g-1 as evaluated by cyclic voltammetry under a potential scan rate of 2 mV s-1. A high APPJ scan rate may result in low degree of materials activation and sintering, leading to poorer performance of SnO2/CNT supercapacitors. The results suggest the feasibility of an APPJ roll-to-roll process for the fabrication of SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors.

  15. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  16. Prognostic differences of World Health Organization-assessed mitotic activity index and mitotic impression by quick scanning in invasive ductal breast cancer patients younger than 55 years.

    PubMed

    Skaland, Ivar; van Diest, Paul J; Janssen, Emiel A M; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Baak, Jan P A

    2008-04-01

    The proliferation marker mitotic activity index is the strongest prognostic indicator in lymph node-negative breast cancer. The World Health Organization (WHO) 2003-defined procedure for determining WHO-mitotic activity index is often replaced by a quick scan mitotic impression. We evaluated the prognostic consequences of this practice in 433 T(1-3)N(0)M(0) lymph node-negative invasive ductal type breast cancers with long-term follow-up (median, 112 months; range, 12-187 months). Twenty-seven percent of the studied cases developed distant metastases, and 25% died of disease. Agreement between WHO-mitotic activity index (0-5 = 1, 6-10 = 2, >10 = 3) and mitotic impression (1, 2, 3) categories was 66% (kappa = 0.41), including 85% for category 1, 26% for category 2, and 52% for category 3. The WHO-mitotic activity index was a much stronger prognosticator than the mitotic impression, and the 10-year survival rates of the same categories (eg, mitotic activity index and mitotic impression category both 2) differed greatly. When grade was assessed by combining WHO-mitotic activity index or mitotic impression with the same values for tubular formation and nuclear atypia, grades disagreed in 18% of the cases. Deviation from the formal WHO-mitotic activity index assessment guidelines in breast cancer often results in erroneous prognosis estimations with therapeutic consequences and may explain why the prognostic value of proliferative activity in breast cancer is not always confirmed.

  17. Turbulent Region Near Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    True and false color mosaics of the turbulent region west of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot is on the planetary limb on the right hand side of each mosaic. The region west (left) of the Great Red Spot is characterized by large, turbulent structures that rapidly change in appearance. The turbulence results from the collision of a westward jet that is deflected northward by the Great Red Spot into a higher latitude eastward jet. The large eddies nearest to the Great Red Spot are bright, suggesting that convection and cloud formation are active there.

    The top mosaic combines the violet (410 nanometers) and near infrared continuum (756 nanometers) filter images to create a mosaic similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundance of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The lower mosaic uses the Galileo imaging camera's three near-infrared (invisible) wavelengths (756 nanometers, 727 nanometers, and 889 nanometers displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Light blue clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are deep, and white clouds are high and thick. Purple most likely represents a high haze overlying a clear deep atmosphere. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.

    The mosaic is centered at 16.5 degrees south planetocentric latitude and 85 degrees west longitude. The north-south dimension of the Great Red Spot is approximately 11,000 kilometers. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. North is at the top of the picture. The images used were taken on June 26, 1997 at a range of 1.2 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology

  18. Scanning electrochemical microscopy based evaluation of influence of pH on bioelectrochemical activity of yeast cells - Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ramanavicius, A; Morkvenaite-Vilkonciene, I; Kisieliute, A; Petroniene, J; Ramanaviciene, A

    2017-01-01

    In this research scanning electrochemical microscopy was applied for the investigation of immobilized yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Two redox mediators based system was applied in order to increase the efficiency of charge transfer from yeast cells. 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was applied as a lipophilic redox mediator, which has the ability to cross the cell's membrane; another redox mediator was ferricyanide, which acted as a hydrophylic electron acceptor able to transfer electrons from the PQ to the working electrode of SECM. Hill's function was applied to determine the optimal pH for this described SECM-based system. The influence of pH on cell viability could be well described by Hill's function. It was determined that at pH 6.5 the PQ has a minimal toxic influence on yeast cells, and the kinetics of metabolic processes in cells as well as electron transfer rate achieved in consecutive action of both redox mediators were appropriate to achieve optimal current signals.

  19. Influence of focal spot on characteristics of very small diameter radiosurgical beams.

    PubMed

    Sham, Edwin; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2008-07-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and beam profiles of very small diameter (1.5-5 mm) megavoltage radiosurgical beams calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) technique critically depend on the diameter of the circular focal spot used in the simulation: The smaller is the field diameter, the larger is the effect. Thus, in simulations of radiosurgical fields that have diameters of the order of the focal spot size, an accurate focal spot geometry should be used. We used a simplified moving slit technique in conjunction with a diode detector for evaluation of the focal spot size and shape of a megavoltage 6 MV linac as well as for determination of the equivalent focal spot diameter of the linac for use in MC simulations. The measured total diode signal contains three components: A direct focal spot signal, a background signal, and an extra-focal radiation signal. A single profile scan of the focal spot signal is Gaussian like in shape, and its full width at half maximum is used to define the focal spot dimension for this scan. The focal spot of our 6 MV linac is approximated with a Gaussian circle, and when the geometry of the effective focal spot circle is used in MC simulations, the agreement between MC-calculated and measured PDD distributions as well as beam profiles is good even for radiosurgical fields as small as 1.5 mm in diameter. Our results also confirm that matching the penumbral areas of accurately measured large-field beam profiles to the same areas of the MC-calculated beam profiles reliably leads to a realistic effective focal spot size for use in MC simulations of very small diameter beams.

  20. Thermal imaging of hot spots in nanostructured microstripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saïdi, E.; Lesueur, J.; Aigouy, L.; Labéguerie-Egéa, J.; Mortier, M.

    2010-03-01

    By scanning thermal microscopy, we study the behavior of nanostructured metallic microstripes heated by Joule effect. Regularly spaced indentations have been made along the thin film stripe in order to create hot spots. For the designed stripe geometry, we observe that heat remains confined in the wire and in particular at shrinkage points within ~1μm2. Thermal maps have been obtained with a good lateral resolution (< 300nm) and a good temperature sensitivity (~1K).

  1. Line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Ustun, Teoman E.; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Webb, Robert H.

    2006-07-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a powerful imaging tool with specialized applications limited to research and ophthalmology clinics due in part to instrument size, cost, and complexity. Conversely, low-cost retinal imaging devices have limited capabilities in screening, detection, and diagnosis of diseases. To fill the niche between these two, a hand-held, nonmydriatic line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO) is designed, constructed, and tested on normal human subjects. The LSLO has only one moving part and uses a novel optical approach to produce wide-field confocal fundus images. Imaging modes include multiwavelength illumination and live stereoscopic imaging with a split aperture. Image processing and display functions are controlled with two stacked prototype compact printed circuit boards. With near shot-noise limited performance, the digital LSLO camera requires low illumination power (<500 µW) at near-infrared wavelengths. The line-scanning principle of operation is examined in comparison to SLO and other imaging modes. The line-scanning approach produces high-contrast confocal images with nearly the same performance as a flying-spot SLO. The LSLO may significantly enhance SLO utility for routine use by ophthalmologists, optometrists, general practitioners, and also emergency medical personnel and technicians in the field for retinal disease detection and other diverse applications.

  2. Substitution scanning identifies a novel, catalytically active ibrutinib-resistant BTK cysteine 481 to threonine (C481T) variant.

    PubMed

    Hamasy, A; Wang, Q; Blomberg, K E M; Mohammad, D K; Yu, L; Vihinen, M; Berglöf, A; Smith, C I E

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors, ibrutinib and acalabrutinib have demonstrated remarkable clinical responses in multiple B-cell malignancies. Acquired resistance has been identified in a sub-population of patients in which mutations affecting BTK predominantly substitute cysteine 481 in the kinase domain for catalytically active serine, thereby ablating covalent binding of inhibitors. Activating substitutions in the BTK substrate phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) instead confers resistance independent of BTK. Herein, we generated all six possible amino acid substitutions due to single nucleotide alterations for the cysteine 481 codon, in addition to threonine, requiring two nucleotide substitutions, and performed functional analysis. Replacement by arginine, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine completely inactivated the catalytic activity, whereas substitution with glycine caused severe impairment. BTK with threonine replacement was catalytically active, similar to substitution with serine. We identify three potential ibrutinib resistance scenarios for cysteine 481 replacement: (1) Serine, being catalytically active and therefore predominating among patients. (2) Threonine, also being catalytically active, but predicted to be scarce, because two nucleotide changes are needed. (3) As BTK variants replaced with other residues are catalytically inactive, they presumably need compensatory mutations, therefore being very scarce. Glycine and tryptophan variants were not yet reported but likely also provide resistance.

  3. Substitution scanning identifies a novel, catalytically active ibrutinib-resistant BTK cysteine 481 to threonine (C481T) variant

    PubMed Central

    Hamasy, A; Wang, Q; Blomberg, K E M; Mohammad, D K; Yu, L; Vihinen, M; Berglöf, A; Smith, C I E

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors, ibrutinib and acalabrutinib have demonstrated remarkable clinical responses in multiple B-cell malignancies. Acquired resistance has been identified in a sub-population of patients in which mutations affecting BTK predominantly substitute cysteine 481 in the kinase domain for catalytically active serine, thereby ablating covalent binding of inhibitors. Activating substitutions in the BTK substrate phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) instead confers resistance independent of BTK. Herein, we generated all six possible amino acid substitutions due to single nucleotide alterations for the cysteine 481 codon, in addition to threonine, requiring two nucleotide substitutions, and performed functional analysis. Replacement by arginine, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine completely inactivated the catalytic activity, whereas substitution with glycine caused severe impairment. BTK with threonine replacement was catalytically active, similar to substitution with serine. We identify three potential ibrutinib resistance scenarios for cysteine 481 replacement: (1) Serine, being catalytically active and therefore predominating among patients. (2) Threonine, also being catalytically active, but predicted to be scarce, because two nucleotide changes are needed. (3) As BTK variants replaced with other residues are catalytically inactive, they presumably need compensatory mutations, therefore being very scarce. Glycine and tryptophan variants were not yet reported but likely also provide resistance. PMID:27282255

  4. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the body area, called ...

  5. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called ...

  6. Hot spots of soil respiration in an Asian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Mizue; Kume, Tomonori; Yamane, Seiki; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2007-04-01

    Little is known about the variability in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soil (soil respiration) in tropical rainforests. We studied temporal and spatial fluctuations of soil respiration in an intact Asian tropical rainforest. The values of soil respiration were distributed lognormally with mean and median values of 5.32 and 4.65 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. Soil respiration varied little over time though highly in space. CO2 hot spots (>10 μmol m-2 s-1) were found with extremely high values (15-25 μmol m-2 s-1). Each CO2 hot spot occurred sporadically at different times and locations. It is hypothesized that animal activities are responsible for the hot spots. The impact of CO2 hot spots on total soil respiration was 10%, which is comparable to the estimation of net C balance in tropical rainforests.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of various extracts of Ocimum basilicum L. and observation of the inhibition effect on bacterial cells by use of scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ilhan; Yigit, Nazife; Benli, Mehlika

    2008-06-18

    The antimicrobial activities of chloroform, acetone and two different concentrations of methanol extracts of Ocimum basilicum L. were studied. These extracts were tested in vitro against 10 bacteria and 4 yeasts strains by the disc diffusion method. The results indicated that the methanol extracts of O. basilucum exhibited the antimicrobial activity against tested microorganisms. While the chloroform and acetone extracts had no effect, the methanol extracts showed inhibition zones against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and two different strains of Escherichia coli. The cells of microorganisms, which were treated and untreated with plant extracts, were observed by using the scanning electron microscope. It was observed that the treated cells were damaged.

  8. Inhibition of the recBCD-dependent activation of Chi recombinational hot spots in SOS-induced cells of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rinken, R; Wackernagel, W

    1992-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences called Chi (5'-GCTGGTGG-3') enhance homologous recombination near their location by the RecBCD enzyme in Escherichia coli (Chi activation). A partial inhibition of Chi activation measured in lambda red gam mutant crosses was observed after treatment of wild-type cells with DNA-damaging agents including UV, mitomycin, and nalidixic acid. Inhibition of Chi activation was not accompanied by an overall decrease of recombination. A lexA3 mutation which blocks induction of the SOS system prevented the inhibition of Chi activation, indicating that an SOS function could be responsible for the inhibition. Overproduction of the RecD subunit of the RecBCD enzyme from a multicopy plasmid carrying the recD gene prevented the induced inhibition of Chi activation, whereas overproduction of RecB or RecC subunits did not. It is proposed that in SOS-induced cells the RecBCD enzyme is modified into a Chi-independent recombination enzyme, with the RecD subunit being the regulatory switch key. PMID:1310498

  9. Characterizing hot spots throughout the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, N.; Lockington, D.; Jakeman, T.; Hunt, R.

    2012-04-01

    Few catchments in the world are left truly undisturbed. Rather, they are under anthropogenic stress for a variety of reasons ranging from climate forcing to meeting the basic water allocation needs of the population. Reduction in the number of inundation areas has significantly decreased the nutrient and organic matter retention capacity along the river corridor, with major consequences for the both the riverine and coastal ecosystems. Cumulative stress may build up to a "tipping point" which can cause a change or set of changes which could occur non-linearly. In order to mitigate the environmental stress on these ecosystems, management plans are created to balance the needs of the dependent populations and those of ecology. While these catchment-wide plans aim to improve the ecological function of aquatic areas over the large scale, this sledge-hammer approach ignores the inherent heterogeneity in the catchment. Societal (and policy) decisions involve more than abiotic quantification of water storage and flow. A more encompassing ecohydrological view facilitates a more rounded policy framework that has flexibility to accommodate multiple social drivers, and one that can accommodate an "ecosystem improvement" rather than single species improvement. Not every spot in the landscape is equally valuable for specific societal values. Areas of high activity may provide the resilience capacity necessary to prevent catastrophic changes. In times of ecological instability, ecosystem resilience is of paramount importance in maintaining essential ecosystem services. Hot spots of biogeochemical cycling will occur where unique situations arise, such as areas of surface and groundwater interaction, creating spots of localized, high activity. In order to understand the systems' potential to support various habitat niches in the large scale, the identification of specific hot spots or hot moments is necessary. A basal understanding of the concurrent biogeochemical cycles enables

  10. Intermittency Models and Spot Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental work at the University of Oxford Osney Lab has demonstrated characteristics of the late-stage transition process by the use of thin-film heat transfer gauges. The development of turbulent spots has been observed in a range of environments, including flat plates, turbine blade cascade tests and wake-passing experiments. These results were taken at Mach/Reynolds numbers and gas-to-wall temperature ratios representative of gas turbines. Analyses of the spot characteristics are consistent with measurements taken in low speed experiments, and support the Schubauer and Klebanoff type of turbulent spots. The addition of simulated wakes from upstream stages has been observed to be primarily superpositional for these tests.

  11. Poisson's spot and Gouy phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Paz, I. G.; Soldati, Rodolfo; Cabral, L. A.; de Oliveira, J. G. G.; Sampaio, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    Recently there have been experimental results on Poisson spot matter-wave interferometry followed by theoretical models describing the relative importance of the wave and particle behaviors for the phenomenon. We propose an analytical theoretical model for Poisson's spot with matter waves based on the Babinet principle, in which we use the results for free propagation and single-slit diffraction. We take into account effects of loss of coherence and finite detection area using the propagator for a quantum particle interacting with an environment. We observe that the matter-wave Gouy phase plays a role in the existence of the central peak and thus corroborates the predominantly wavelike character of the Poisson's spot. Our model shows remarkable agreement with the experimental data for deuterium (D2) molecules.

  12. From a Well-Prepared Teacher to an On-the-Spot Facilitator: A Reflection on Delivering an Active Learning Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyowon

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I describe my experience of preparing and delivering a brand new computing undergraduate course in a new university and in doing so, share how the special institutional push of the active learning pedagogy of the university changed the way I prepared and delivered the course, and ended up transforming my own view of teaching. I…

  13. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  14. Arbitrary-scan imaging for two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botcherby, Edward; Smith, Christopher; Booth, Martin; Juskaitis, Rimas; Wilson, Tony

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we present details of a scanning two-photon fluorescence microscope we have built with a nearisotropic scan rate. This means that the focal spot can be scanned at high speed along any direction in the specimen, without introducing systematic aberrations. We present experimental point spread function measurements for this system using an Olympus 0.8 NA 40X water dipping objective lens that demonstrates an axial range of operation greater than 200 μm. We give details of a novel actuator device used to displace the focusing element and demonstrate axial scan responses up to 3.5 kHz. Finally, we present a bioscience application of this system to image dendritic processes that follow non-linear paths in three-dimensional space. The focal spot was scanned along one such process at 400 Hz with an axial range of more than 90 μm.

  15. Design Rules For Holographic Optical Scanning Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig, H. P.; Dandliker, R.

    1987-10-01

    An analytical method for the design of holographic optical elements (HOE) for focussing laser scanners with minimum aberrations and optimum scan line definition is reported. It can be shown analytically, using second order (paraxial) approximation, that a circular motion of the HOE cannot generate a straight line in space without astigmatism of the focal spot. Accepting a slightly curved scan line, the astigmatism can be compensated. Experimental results for HOE with a wavelength shift between recording and reconstruction are demonstrated. The required aspherical wavefronts for the recording are realized with the help of computer generated holograms (CGH).

  16. High resolution obtained by photoelectric scanning techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Several applications of linear scanning of different types of objects are described; examples include double stars, satellites, the Red Spot of Jupiter and a landing site on the moon. This technique allows one to achieve a gain of about an order of magnitude in resolution over conventional photoelectric techniques; it is also effective in providing sufficient data for removing background effects and for the application of deconvolution procedures. Brief consideration is given to two-dimensional scanning, either at the telescope or of electronographic images in the laboratory. It is suggested that some of the techniques described should be given serious consideration for space applications.

  17. Ultrasonic versus sonic activation of the final irrigant in root canals instrumented with rotary/reciprocating files: An in-vitro scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khalap, Neha Deepak; Kokate, Sharad; Hegde, Vibha

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the smear layer and debris removal in root canals instrumented with two different kinematic motions after ultrasonic and sonic irrigation activation. Materials and Methods: Eighty freshly extracted teeth were selected for the study and randomly divided the samples into two groups (n = 40) for instrumentation with either rotary ProTaper NEXT (PTN) or reciprocating WaveOne (WO) file systems. These (n = 40) were further divided into two groups (n = 20) where the final irrigant was activated using either Ultrasonics (Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation; PUI) or Sonics (EndoActivator; EA). Group 1: PTN + EA; Group 2: PTN + PUI; Group 3: WO + EA; and Group 4: WO + PUI. During instrumentation, a total of 4 ml of 5.25% NaOCl was used for irrigation. The final irrigation protocol included NaOCl and Smear Clear Solution. The samples were processed by scanning electron microscopic examination for debris and smear layer scoring, and statistical analysis was done. Results: The mean debris and smear layer score was less in the group instrumented by PTN with sonic activation of the irrigant. Conclusion: A combination of PTN instrumentation with sonic irrigation activation by EA is more effective in debris and smear layer removal in the groups tested. PMID:27563189

  18. Distribution, foraging behavior, and capture results of the spotted bat (Euderma maculatum) in central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodhouse, T.J.; McCaffrey, M.F.; Wright, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    The spotted bat (Euderma maculatum) has been virtually unknown in Oregon despite the existence of potential habitat in many areas of the state. In 2002 and 2003 we searched for spotted bats along the John Day, Deschutes, and Crooked Rivers and at a remote dry canyon southeast of the city of Bend in central Oregon. The species was documented through the use of mist-nets, a bat detector, and recognition of audible spotted bat calls. Spotted bats were found at 11 locations in 6 Oregon counties. Nightly activity patterns of spotted bats were unpredictable. Spotted bats were found in 78% of search areas but on only 48% of survey nights. We observed spotted bats foraging above fields and low upland slopes adjacent to rivers and creeks and along the rims of cliffs. Estimated flying heights of spotted bats ranged from 3 m to 50 m aboveground. The species was difficult to capture and was captured only after considerable experimentation with methods and materials. Three spotted bats were captured toward the end of the project in 2003 and accounted for only 0.5% of all bats captured during the study. Although we attached radio transmitters to 2 spotted bats, we found no roost locations. We believe additional spotted bat surveys in Oregon are warranted, especially in higher-elevation habitats, but recommend that to increase their effectiveness, surveys accommodate the unique foraging behavior of the species.

  19. Nanoscale thermometry by scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Fabian; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Measuring temperature is a central challenge in nanoscience and technology. Addressing this challenge, we report the development of a high-vacuum scanning thermal microscope and a method for non-equilibrium scanning probe thermometry. The microscope is built inside an electromagnetically shielded, temperature-stabilized laboratory and features nanoscopic spatial resolution at sub-nanoWatt heat flux sensitivity. The method is a dual signal-sensing technique inferring temperature by probing a total steady-state heat flux simultaneously to a temporally modulated heat flux signal between a self-heated scanning probe sensor and a sample. Contact-related artifacts, which so far limit the reliability of nanoscopic temperature measurements by scanning thermal microscopy, are minimized. We characterize the microscope's performance and demonstrate the benefits of the new thermometry approach by studying hot spots near lithographically defined constrictions in a self-heated metal interconnect.

  20. A measurement concept for hot-spot BRDFs from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1996-01-01

    Several concepts for canopy hot-spot measurements from space have been investigated. The most promising involves active illumination and bistatic detection that would allow hot-spot angular distribution (BRDF) measurements from space in a search-light mode. The concept includes a pointable illumination source, such as a laser operating at an atmospheric window wavelength, coupled with a number of high spatial-resolution detectors that are clustered around the illumination source in space, receiving photons nearly coaxial with the reto-reflection direction. Microwave control and command among the satellite cluster would allow orienting the direction of the laser beam as well as the focusing detectors simultaneously so that the coupled system can function like a search light with almost unlimited pointing capabilities. The concept is called the Hot-Spot Search-Light (HSSL) satellite. A nominal satellite altitude of 600 km will allow hot-spot BRDF measurements out to about 18 degrees phase angle. The distributed are taking radiometric measurements of the intensity wings of the hot-spot angular distribution without the need for complex imaging detectors. The system can be operated at night for increased signal-to-noise ratio. This way the hot-spot angular signatures can be quantified and parameterized in sufficient detail to extract the biophysical information content of plant architectures.

  1. A measurement concept for hot-spot BRDFs from space

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1996-09-01

    Several concepts for canopy hot-spot measurements from space have been investigated. The most promising involves active illumination and bistatic detection that would allow hot-spot angular distribution (BRDF) measurements from space in a search-light mode. The concept includes a pointable illumination source, such as a laser operating at an atmospheric window wavelength, coupled with a number of high spatial-resolution detectors that are clustered around the illumination source in space, receiving photons nearly coaxial with the reto-reflection direction. Microwave control and command among the satellite cluster would allow orienting the direction of the laser beam as well as the focusing detectors simultaneously so that the coupled system can function like a search light with almost unlimited pointing capabilities. The concept is called the Hot-Spot Search-Light (HSSL) satellite. A nominal satellite altitude of 600 km will allow hot-spot BRDF measurements out to about 18 degrees phase angle. The distributed are taking radiometric measurements of the intensity wings of the hot-spot angular distribution without the need for complex imaging detectors. The system can be operated at night for increased signal-to-noise ratio. This way the hot-spot angular signatures can be quantified and parameterized in sufficient detail to extract the biophysical information content of plant architectures.

  2. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (-54.52 %), hemoglobin (-36.98 %), packed cell volume (-36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (-1.41 %) and oxygen (O2) carrying capacity (-37.04 %) declined significantly over reference fish, however total leukocyte count (+25.43 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+33.52 %) and mean corpuscular volume (+35.49 %) showed elevation. High frequency of micronuclei (1133.3 %) and lobed nuclei (150 %) were observed in exposed fish which may indicate mutagenesis. Activities of pathological marker enzymes ALP, AST, ALT and CK increased significantly in serum of exposed fish. The ratio of ALT: AST in exposed fish was beyond 1 which indicates manifestation of pathological processes. These biomarkers show that fish have macrocytic hypochromic anemia. Leukocytosis showed general defence response against heavy metal toxicity and marker enzymes showed tissue degeneration. In conclusion, thermal power plant effluent has strong potential to induce micronuclei, tissue pathology, making the fish anemic, weak, stressed and vulnerable to diseases.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  4. A sequence variation scan of the coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) structural gene and associations with plasma FVIII activity levels.

    PubMed

    Viel, Kevin R; Machiah, Deepa K; Warren, Diane M; Khachidze, Manana; Buil, Alfonso; Fernstrom, Karl; Souto, Juan C; Peralta, Juan M; Smith, Todd; Blangero, John; Porter, Sandra; Warren, Stephen T; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Soria, Jose M; Flanders, W Dana; Almasy, Laura; Howard, Tom E

    2007-05-01

    Plasma factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C) level is a highly heritable quantitative trait that is strongly correlated with thrombosis risk. Polymorphisms within only 1 gene, the ABO blood-group locus, have been unequivocally demonstrated to contribute to the broad population variability observed for this trait. Because less than 2.5% of the structural FVIII gene (F8) has been examined previously, we resequenced all known functional regions in 222 potentially distinct alleles from 137 unrelated nonhemophilic individuals representing 7 racial groups. Eighteen of the 47 variants identified, including 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were previously unknown. As the degree of linkage disequilibrium across F8 was weak overall, we used measured-genotype association analysis to evaluate the influence of each polymorphism on the FVIII:C levels in 398 subjects from 21 pedigrees known as the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia project (GAIT). Our results suggested that 92714C>G, a nonsynonymous SNP encoding the B-domain substitution D1241E, was significantly associated with FVIII:C level. After accounting for important covariates, including age and ABO genotype, the association persisted with each C-allele additively increasing the FVIII:C level by 14.3 IU dL(-1) (P = .016). Nevertheless, because the alleles of 56010G>A, a SNP within the 3' splice junction of intron 7, are strongly associated with 92714C>G in GAIT, additional studies are required to determine whether D1241E is itself a functional variant.

  5. A sequence variation scan of the coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) structural gene and associations with plasma FVIII activity levels

    PubMed Central

    Viel, Kevin R.; Machiah, Deepa K.; Warren, Diane M.; Khachidze, Manana; Buil, Alfonso; Fernstrom, Karl; Souto, Juan C.; Peralta, Juan M.; Smith, Todd; Blangero, John; Porter, Sandra; Warren, Stephen T.; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Soria, Jose M.; Dana Flanders, W.; Almasy, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Plasma factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C) level is a highly heritable quantitative trait that is strongly correlated with thrombosis risk. Polymorphisms within only 1 gene, the ABO blood-group locus, have been unequivocally demonstrated to contribute to the broad population variability observed for this trait. Because less than 2.5% of the structural FVIII gene (F8) has been examined previously, we resequenced all known functional regions in 222 potentially distinct alleles from 137 unrelated nonhemophilic individuals representing 7 racial groups. Eighteen of the 47 variants identified, including 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were previously unknown. As the degree of linkage disequilibrium across F8 was weak overall, we used measured-genotype association analysis to evaluate the influence of each polymorphism on the FVIII:C levels in 398 subjects from 21 pedigrees known as the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia project (GAIT). Our results suggested that 92714C>G, a nonsynonymous SNP encoding the B-domain substitution D1241E, was significantly associated with FVIII:C level. After accounting for important covariates, including age and ABO genotype, the association persisted with each C-allele additively increasing the FVIII:C level by 14.3 IU dL−1 (P = .016). Nevertheless, because the alleles of 56010G>A, a SNP within the 3′ splice junction of intron 7, are strongly associated with 92714C>G in GAIT, additional studies are required to determine whether D1241E is itself a functional variant. PMID:17209060

  6. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  7. The Guiding Light: Vri/uvby & Tio Photometry Of The Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System Im Peg - The Guide-star For The Gravity Probe-b Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, E.; Messina, S.; Wasatonic, R.; McCook, G.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the starspot and chromospheric properties of IM Pegasi - the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of General Relativity - frame-dragging and geodetic effects, via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. IM Peg was selected as the mission's guide star as it is not only bright enough to be seen with GP-B's onboard optical telescope but it is also a bright radio source. Thus, ground-based radio telescope observations can easily and accurately correct for IM Peg's motions in space. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light-center of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter dK component. Since 2000 we have carried out multi-band high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby filters, VRCIC filters and TiO (719/755 nm ) narrow-band filter sets. Measurements were made relative to neaby comparsion & check stars using a robotic 0.8-m telescope (located in AZ) and 0.25-m telescope (located in PA). The TiO- and multi-band continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures and distributions. The photometry is being modeled to determine the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. The results of our analysis and possible impacts on the GP-B Mission will be discussed. This research is supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST- 0507536 and AST- 0507542 which we gratefully acknowledge.

  8. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    SciTech Connect

    S. Brunner; E. Valeo

    2001-08-30

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background.

  9. ``Hot spots'' growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    ``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials.``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a

  10. System for demonstrating arbitrary multi-spot beam steering from spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Xun, Xiaodong; Chang, Xiaoguang; Cohn, Robert

    2004-01-26

    A graphical user interface is used to program sequences of analog phase patterns onto a 512 x 512 pixel, electrically-addressed spatial light modulator (SLM). Hand sketches made with a digital pen are used to prescribe the footprints, velocities and trajectories of multiple, independently-controlled diffracted spots. The interface is intended to demonstrate to potential end-users, who are not knowledgeable about diffractive optical design, to what degree SLM's may be considered to produce arbitrary multi-spot beam steering. Using the interface, scanning sequences are created, programmed, run through, and diffracted from a SLM that simultaneously scans multiple patterns on distinct trajectories.

  11. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer makes several images of the body area. These ...

  12. HIDA Scan (Cholescintigraphy)

    MedlinePlus

    HIDA scan Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A hepatobiliary (HIDA) scan is an imaging procedure used to diagnose ... the liver, gallbladder and bile ducts. For a HIDA scan, also known as cholescintigraphy and hepatobiliary scintigraphy, ...

  13. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  14. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Electrocardiogram Heart Attack Send a link to NHLBI ... calcium, or calcifications, are a sign of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or coronary microvascular disease. A coronary calcium scan ...

  15. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in a spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Goodnight, Andrea L; Traslavina, Ryan P; Emanuelson, Karen; Affolter, Verena K; Gaffney, Patricia M; Vernau, William; Williams, Colette; Wu, Connie I-kuan; Sturges, Beverly K; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2013-12-01

    A 25-yr-old spayed female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) developed intermittent right pelvic limb lameness that persisted following conservative medical therapy. No obvious musculoskeletal lesions were noted on initial physical exam; however, spinal radiography was suspicious for possible intervertebral degenerative joint disease or discospondylitis. Despite prolonged medical therapy, the lameness progressed to minimal weight bearing and marked muscle atrophy of the right pelvic limb. Electromyography showed spontaneous activity in the muscles of right sciatic nerve distribution. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities in the right tibial and peroneal nerves were undetectable and markedly reduced, respectively. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a large, space-occupying mass on the right side of the sacrum and pelvis. Antemortem fine-needle aspiration of the mass and postmortem histopathology resulted in diagnosis of a high-grade squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac is very rare in domestic dogs and previously unreported in spotted hyenas.

  17. Starspot signature on the light curve. Learning about the latitudinal distribution of spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. R. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Quasi-periodic modulations of the stellar light curve may result from dark spots crossing the visible stellar disc. Owing to differential rotation, spots at different latitudes generally have different rotation periods. Hence, by studying spot-induced modulations, it is possible to learn about stellar surface (differential) rotation and magnetic activity. Recently, a method based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram of light curves has been proposed to identify the sign of the differential rotation at the stellar surface. Aims: Our goal is to understand how the modulation of the stellar light curve due to the presence of spots and the corresponding periodogram are affected by both the stellar and spot properties. Methods: We generate synthetic light curves of stars with different properties (inclination angle, limb darkening, and rotation rate) and spot configurations (number of spots, latitude, intensity contrast, and size). By analysing their Lomb-Scargle periodograms, we compute the ratio between the heights of the second and first harmonics of the rotation period (peak-height ratio). Results: We find that the peak-height ratios are essentially a function of a single parameter, the fraction of time the spot is visible, which is related to the sinusoidality of the spot modulation. We identify the conditions under which the periodogram analysis can actually provide an estimate of the spot latitudes and/or the stellar inclination angle. We also identify possible sources of error in the identification of the sign of the differential rotation.

  18. 9 CFR 149.4 - Spot audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spot audit. 149.4 Section 149.4... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.4 Spot audit. (a) In addition to regularly scheduled site audits, certified production sites will be subject to spot audits. (1) Random...

  19. 9 CFR 149.4 - Spot audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spot audit. 149.4 Section 149.4... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.4 Spot audit. (a) In addition to regularly scheduled site audits, certified production sites will be subject to spot audits. (1) Random...

  20. Hot spots on Io: Initial results from Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; Davies, A.G.; Carlson, R.; Smythe, W.; Kamp, L.; Soderblom, L.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on Galileo has monitored the volcanic activity on Io since June 28, 1996. This paper presents preliminary analysis of NIMS thermal data for the first four orbits of the Galileo mission. NIMS has detected 18 new hot spots and 12 others which were previously known to be active. The distribution of the hot spots on Io's surface may not be random, as hot spots surround the two bright, SO2-rich regions of Bosphorus Regio and Colchis Regio. Most hot spots seem to be persistently active from orbit to orbit and 10 of those detected were active in 1979 during the Voyager encounters. We report the distribution of hot spot temperatures and find that they are consistent with silicate volcanism. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Compact scanning lidar systems using holographic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David

    1998-08-01

    Two scanning lidar systems have been built using holographic optical elements (HOE) that function as a scanning telescope primary optic. One is a ground based lidar using a reflection HOE, and uses a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser transmitter. The other system is an airborne/ground based system that uses a transmission HOE and operates at the 1064 nm fundamental of the Nd:YAG laser. Each HOE has a focal spot on the center- line, normal to the flat disk holding the hologram, and a field of view (FOV) that points approximately 45 degrees from the normal. Rotating the disk effects a conical scan of the FOV. In both systems, the same HOE is also used to collimate and steer the transmitted laser beam. The utility of using the HOEs to save weight and size in scanning lidars is evidenced by the atmospheric backscatter data collected with these systems. They also will lower the cost of commercial systems due to the low cost of replicating HOEs and the simplified mechanical scanning systems. Development of airborne scanning lidar altimeters and other lidars and passive instruments using holographic optics are underway, including the development of a one meter diameter, space qualified holographic scanning telescope for use in the ultraviolet.

  2. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  3. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  4. Association of poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine sequences with meiotic recombination hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Andrew TM; Pitt, Joel PW; Gemmell, Neil J

    2006-01-01

    Background Meiotic recombination events have been found to concentrate in 1–2.5 kilo base regions, but these recombination hot spots do not share a consensus sequence and why they occur at specific sites is not fully understood. Some previous evidence suggests that poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine (poly-pu/py) tracts (PPTs), a class of sequence with distinctive biochemical properties, could be involved in recombination, but no general association of PPTs with meiotic recombination hot spots has previously been reported. Results We used computational methods to investigate in detail the relationship between PPTs and hot spots. We show statistical associations of PPT frequency with hot spots of meiotic recombination initiating lesions, double-strand breaks, in the genome of the yeast S. cerevisiae and with experimentally well characterized human meiotic recombination hot spots. Supporting a possible role of poly-pu/py-rich sequences in hot spot recombination, we also found that all three single nucleotide polymorphisms previously shown to be associated with human hot spot activity changes occur within sequence contexts of 14 bp or longer that are 85% or more poly-pu/py and at least 70% G/C. These polymorphisms are all close to the hot spot mid points. Comparing the sequences of experimentally characterized human hot spots with the orthologous regions of the chimpanzee genome previously shown not to contain hot spots, we found that in all five cases in which comparisons for the hot spot central regions are possible with publicly available sequence data, there are differences near the human hot spot mid points within sequences 14 bp or longer consisting of more than 80% poly-pu/py and at least 50% G/C. Conclusion Our results, along with previous evidence for the unique biochemical properties and recombination-stimulating potential of poly-pu/py-rich sequences, suggest that the possible functional involvement of this type of sequence in meiotic recombination hot spots

  5. A microscopy method for scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of the antibacterial activity of polymeric nanoparticles on a biofilm with an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chisato; Muto, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu

    2016-04-18

    In this study, we developed a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) method for imaging the antibacterial activity of organic polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) toward biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis bacterial cells, for optimizing NPs to treat biofilm infections. The combination of sample preparation method using a hydrophilic ionic liquid (IL) and STEM observation using the cooling holder eliminates the need for specialized equipment and techniques for biological sample preparation. The annular dark-field STEM results indicated that the two types of biodegradable poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs: PLGA modified with chitosan (CS), and clarithromycin (CAM)-loaded + CS-modified PLGA, prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion exhibited different antibacterial activities in nanoscale. To confirm damage to the sample during STEM observation, we observed the PLGA NPs and the biofilm treated with PLGA NPs by both the conventional method and the newly developed method. The optimized method allows microstructure of the biofilm treated with PLGA NPs to be maintained for 25 min at a current flow of 40 pA. The developed simple sample preparation method would be helpful to understand the interaction of drugs with target materials. In addition, this technique could contribute to the visualization of other deformable composite materials at the nanoscale level. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  6. Justifications shape ethical blind spots.

    PubMed

    Pittarello, Andrea; Leib, Margarita; Gordon-Hecker, Tom; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-06-01

    To some extent, unethical behavior results from people's limited attention to ethical considerations, which results in an ethical blind spot. Here, we focus on the role of ambiguity in shaping people's ethical blind spots, which in turn lead to their ethical failures. We suggest that in ambiguous settings, individuals' attention shifts toward tempting information, which determines the magnitude of their lies. Employing a novel ambiguous-dice paradigm, we asked participants to report the outcome of the die roll appearing closest to the location of a previously presented fixation cross on a computer screen; this outcome would determine their pay. We varied the value of the die second closest to the fixation cross to be either higher (i.e., tempting) or lower (i.e., not tempting) than the die closest to the fixation cross. Results of two experiments revealed that in ambiguous settings, people's incorrect responses were self-serving. Tracking participants' eye movements demonstrated that people's ethical blind spots are shaped by increased attention toward tempting information.

  7. Systematic Propulsion Optimization Tools (SPOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark; Celestian, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computer program written by senior-level Mechanical Engineering students at the University of Alabama in Huntsville which is capable of optimizing user-defined delivery systems for carrying payloads into orbit. The custom propulsion system is designed by the user through the input of configuration, payload, and orbital parameters. The primary advantages of the software, called Systematic Propulsion Optimization Tools (SPOT), are a user-friendly interface and a modular FORTRAN 77 code designed for ease of modification. The optimization of variables in an orbital delivery system is of critical concern in the propulsion environment. The mass of the overall system must be minimized within the maximum stress, force, and pressure constraints. SPOT utilizes the Design Optimization Tools (DOT) program for the optimization techniques. The SPOT program is divided into a main program and five modules: aerodynamic losses, orbital parameters, liquid engines, solid engines, and nozzles. The program is designed to be upgraded easily and expanded to meet specific user needs. A user's manual and a programmer's manual are currently being developed to facilitate implementation and modification.

  8. Jumping-droplet electronics hot-spot cooling

    DOE PAGES

    Oh, Junho; Birbarah, Patrick; Foulkes, Thomas; ...

    2017-03-20

    Demand for enhanced cooling technologies within various commercial and consumer applications has increased in recent decades due to electronic devices becoming more energy dense. This study demonstrates jumping-droplet based electric-field-enhanced (EFE) condensation as a potential method to achieve active hot spot cooling in electronic devices. To test the viability of EFE condensation, we developed an experimental setup to remove heat via droplet evaporation from single and multiple high power gallium nitride (GaN) transistors acting as local hot spots (4.6 mm x 2.6 mm). An externally powered circuit was developed to direct jumping droplets from a copper oxide (CuO) nanostructured superhydrophobicmore » surface to the transistor hot spots by applying electric fields between the condensing surface and the transistor. Heat transfer measurements were performed in ambient air (22-25°C air temperature, 20-45% relative humidity) to determine the effect of gap spacing (2-4 mm), electric field (50-250 V/cm), and heat flux (demonstrated to 13 W/cm2). EFE condensation was shown to enhance the heat transfer from the local hot spot by ≈ 200% compared to cooling without jumping and by 20% compared to non-EFE jumping. Dynamic switching of the electric field for a two-GaN system reveals the potential for active cooling of mobile hot spots. The opportunity for further cooling enhancement by the removal of non-condensable gases promises hot spot heat dissipation rates approaching 120 W/cm2. Finally, this work provides a framework for the development of active jumping droplet based vapor chambers and heat pipes capable of spatial and temporal thermal dissipation control.« less

  9. Nodal line-scanning method for maskless optical lithography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth C

    2014-12-01

    Maskless optical lithography can improve the economics and performance of multi-patterning by eliminating photomasks and by simplifying the lithography exposure technology. It could also potentially eliminate the need for multi-patterning by enabling dual-wavelength, nonlinear optical recording methods. High-resolution, maskless patterning can be achieved with a scanned-spot-array system in which modulated, diffraction-limited focus spots write the exposure pattern. Each spot has a central zero-intensity interference null along a line parallel to the scan direction for printing sub-resolution line patterns. High throughput can be achieved at the comparatively low repetition rate of excimer lasers (e.g., 6 kHz). The low repetition rate simplifies the optical modulation technology, enabling the use of supplemental modulation controls including dynamic gray-level and beam-centration controls for resolution enhancement.

  10. Downstream Development of a Laminar Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Naoki; Matsumoto, Akira

    It was well-known that a disturbance, introduced artificially into a supercritical laminar boundary layer along a flat plate, is still laminar in the initial stage of its downstream development. Thus, we named it a "laminar spot" because it resembles a turbulent spot though its velocity perturbation remains laminar. From velocity measurements using a rake-type 16-channel hot-wire probe, we found that in the first stage of the downstream development of a laminar spot, its maximum width was at 0.2δ (what is called the critical layer) and one-half of its lateral growth angle was about 5°, which is almost one-half that of a turbulent spot. We call this region a "laminar spot region". In the present study, we measured in detail the velocity field of a laminar spot using a new hot-wire probe in the laminar spot region. The results showed that a laminar spot consists of some hairpin vortices and some induced U-shaped vortices under the hairpin vortices. Because of the interaction of the velocities induced by the respective vortex legs, the legs of the U-shaped vortices were located at the outermost part of the spot. Moreover, the new vortex legs extended spanwise at about 4° as the spot traveled downstream. Consequently, we concluded that the laminar spot grew spanwise in accordance with the span of these vortex legs.

  11. ESA uncovers Geminga's `hot spot'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    16 July 2004 Astronomers using ESA’s X-ray observatory XMM-Newton have detected a small, bright ‘hot spot’ on the surface of the neutron star called Geminga, 500 light-years away. The hot spot is the size of a football field and is caused by the same mechanism producing Geminga’s X-ray tails. This discovery identifies the missing link between the X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Geminga. hi-res Size hi-res: 1284 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot This figure shows the effects of charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere of Geminga. Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of particles kicked out by Geminga’s strong magnetic field, trail the neutron star as it moves about in space. Panel (b) shows how electrically charged particles interact with Geminga’s magnetic field. For example, if electrons (blue) are kicked out by the star, positrons (in red) hit the star’s magnetic poles like in an ‘own goal’. Panel (c) illustrates the size of Geminga’s magnetic field (blue) compared to that of the star itself at the centre (purple). The magnetic field is tilted with respect to Geminga’s rotation axis (red). Panel (d) shows the magnetic poles of Geminga, where charged particles hit the surface of the star, creating a two-million degrees hot spot, a region much hotter than the surroundings. As the star spins on its rotation axis, the hot spot comes into view and then disappears, causing the periodic colour change seen by XMM-Newton. An animated version of the entire sequence can be found at: Click here for animated GIF [low resolution, animated GIF, 5536 KB] Click here for AVI [high resolution, AVI with DIVX compression, 19128 KB] hi-res Size hi-res: 371 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot, panel (a) Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of

  12. Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) Validation Data Management at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, M. C.; Paserba, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is supporting the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) validation activity. NSIDC has designed and developed a web portal to data and information collected during NASA's AMSR-E Validation Program: (http://nsidc.org/data/amsr_validation/.) The AMSR-E validation experiments address three disciplines: soil moisture, rainfall and cryospheric validation campaigns. This poster describes all these experiments (past, present and future). NSIDC provides documentation, e.g., user guides, as well as metadata documents (DIFS) submitted to the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), for all the AMSR-E validation experiments. NSIDC further supports the validation activities by collaborating with the AMSR-E Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) to provide scientists in the field (e.g., Arctic and Antarctic ship and flight campaigns) with quick, easy access to AMSR-E data for their validation experiments. NSIDC provides subsets of reformatted data in a manner most convenient to the validation scientists while they conduct their experiments. The AMSR-E is a mission instrument launched aboard NASA's Aqua Satellite on 4 May 2002. The Aqua mission provides a multi-disciplinary study of the Earth's atmospheric, oceanic, cryospheric, and land processes and their relationship to global change. With six instruments aboard, the Aqua Satellite will travel in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit. NSIDC will archive and distribute all AMSR-E products, including Levels 1A, 2, and 3 data. Users can order Level-1A AMSR-E data beginning 19 June 2003 and Level-2A data beginning 01 September 2003. Other products will be available in March 2004.

  13. Effectiveness of Four Different Final Irrigation Activation Techniques on Smear Layer Removal in Curved Root Canals : A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Puneet; Nandini, Suresh; Ballal, Suma; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of apical negative pressure (ANP), manual dynamic agitation (MDA), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) and needle irrigation (NI) as final irrigation activation techniques for smear layer removal in curved root canals. Materials and Methods: Mesiobuccal root canals of 80 freshly extracted maxillary first molars with curvatures ranging between 25° and 35° were used. A glide path with #08–15 K files was established before cleaning and shaping with Mtwo rotary instruments (VDW, Munich, Germany) up to size 35/0.04 taper. During instrumentation, 1 ml of 2.5% NaOCl was used at each change of file. Samples were divided into 4 equal groups (n=20) according to the final irrigation activation technique: group 1, apical negative pressure (ANP) (EndoVac); group 2, manual dynamic agitation (MDA); group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI); and group 4, needle irrigation (NI). Root canals were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer at coronal, middle and apical levels was evaluated by superimposing 300-μm square grid over the obtained photomicrographs using a four-score scale with X1,000 magnification. Results: Amongst all the groups tested, ANP showed the overall best smear layer removal efficacy (p < 0.05). Removal of smear layer was least effective with the NI technique. Conclusion: ANP (EndoVac system) can be used as the final irrigation activation technique for effective smear layer removal in curved root canals. PMID:24910670

  14. Two New Spotted Variables-HD 191262 and HD 191011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Douglas S.; Henry, Gregory W.

    1992-11-01

    New 1988-1990 photometry in V and B with a 16 inch automatic telescope shows that both HD 191262, a previously known chromospherically active binary, and its comparison star HD 191011 are variable, with starspots judged to be the mechanism in both. In HD 191262 and 191011, respectively, spot rotation periods of 5d.4 < P < 5d.7 and 1 7d.4 < P < 23d.0 were found and differential rotation coefficients of k=0.054 and 0.28 were estimated. HD 191011, shown to be a KS giant about 475 parsecs away, had eight different spots present during the 2.5 years of observation.

  15. Io hot spots - Infrared photometry of satellite occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, J. D.; Matson, D. L.; Sinton, W. M.; Howell, R. R.; Dyck, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Io's active hot spots, which are presently mapped on the basis of IR photometry of this moon's occultation by other Gallilean satellites, are obtained with greatest spatial resolution near the sub-earth point. A model is developed for the occultation lightcurves, and its fitting to the data defines the apparent path of the occulting satellite relative to Io; the mean error in apparent relative position of occulting satellites is of the order of 178 km. A heretofore unknown, 20-km diameter hot spot is noted on Io's leading hemisphere.

  16. Laser guide star spot shrinkage for affordable wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Wilfried; Hugot, Emmanuel; Fusco, Thierry; Neichel, Benoit; Ferrari, Marc; Correia, Carlos; Pueyo, Laurent; Dohlen, Kjetil; Pascal, Sandrine; Vola, Pascal; Sauvage, Jean-François; El Hadi, Kacem; Gach, Jean Luc

    2016-07-01

    Innovative optical designs allow tackling the spot elongation issues in Shack-Hartman based laser guide star wavefront sensors. We propose two solutions using either a combination of two arrays of freeform microlenses, or a combination of freeform optics, to perform a shrinkage of the laser spots as well as a magnification of the SH focal plane. These approaches will drastically reduce the number of needed pixels, thus making possible the use of existing detectors. We present the recent advances on this activity as well as the estimation of performance, linearity and sensitivity of the compressed system in presence of aberrations.

  17. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75° latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180°. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker’s Ω-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10°. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  18. Water absorption of freeze-dried meat at different water activities: a multianalytical approach using sorption isotherm, differential scanning calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Cavani, Claudio; Placucci, Giuseppe; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Cremonini, Mauro A

    2007-12-26

    Hydration of freeze-dried chicken breast meat was followed in the water activity range of aw=0.12-0.99 by a multianalytical approach comprising of sorption isotherm, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The amount of frozen water and the shape of the T2-relaxogram were evaluated at each water content by DSC and NMR, respectively. Data revealed an agreement between sorption isotherm and DSC experiments about the onset of bulk water (aw=0.83-0.86), and NMR detected mobile water starting at aw=0.75. The origin of the short-transverse relaxation time part of the meat NMR signal was also reinvestigated through deuteration experiments and proposed to arise from protons belonging to plasticized matrix structures. It is proved both by D2O experiments and by gravimetry that the extra protons not contributing to the water content in the NMR experiments are about 6.4% of the total proton NMR CPMG signal of meat.

  19. Geodetic Laser Scanning: Refractive Optics Offer Wide Variety of Scan Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, C. K.; Shrestha, K. Y.; Cossio, T.

    2005-12-01

    Most commercial geodetic laser mapping instruments use reflective element scanners, often a single nutating or oscillating mirror, and sometimes dual axis units, to create a specific pattern of laser spots on the surface being mapped. The user may be able to set the scanning speed (scan lines per second) and field of coverage (range of scan angles), but the basic pattern of points sampled is fixed. Engineers developing scanners for a surprisingly diverse set of applications, ranging from bar code scanning, to compensating for image motion in astronomical telescopes, to scanning spectrometers, have increasingly turned to refractive scanners-most particularly to scanners that utilize "Risley prisms." Samuel Doty Risley (1845-1920), an ophthalmologist, invented an optometer that contained a pair of thin prisms that rotated in opposite directions about their optical axes to change the convergence of light rays from a single source. He used his optometer measure the visual acuity of patients eyes, as a function of distance. In this original application, both prisms were driven by a common gear assembly, which resulted in a nearly linear scan line. But if the prisms are driven independently in both direction and angular speed, a wide variety of scan patterns can be generated. The University of Florida is developing, a photon counting geodetic laser scanning instrument that will use a Risley prism scanner. The scanner, being built by Sigma Space Inc., will be capable of producing nearly linear scan lines (saw tooth pattern from moving platform), circular scans lines (helical pattern from a moving platform) and any number of rosette scan patterns that are particularly interesting for fixed ground based work. The flexibility provided by the scanner offers the possibility of using the same sensor for airborne and ground based geodetic laser scanning. Examples of the scanner patterns and the initial results from laboratory and early field tests will be presented.

  20. Watermarking spot colors in packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Alastair; Filler, TomáÅ.¡; Falkenstern, Kristyn; Bai, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In January 2014, Digimarc announced Digimarc® Barcode for the packaging industry to improve the check-out efficiency and customer experience for retailers. Digimarc Barcode is a machine readable code that carries the same information as a traditional Universal Product Code (UPC) and is introduced by adding a robust digital watermark to the package design. It is imperceptible to the human eye but can be read by a modern barcode scanner at the Point of Sale (POS) station. Compared to a traditional linear barcode, Digimarc Barcode covers the whole package with minimal impact on the graphic design. This significantly improves the Items per Minute (IPM) metric, which retailers use to track the checkout efficiency since it closely relates to their profitability. Increasing IPM by a few percent could lead to potential savings of millions of dollars for retailers, giving them a strong incentive to add the Digimarc Barcode to their packages. Testing performed by Digimarc showed increases in IPM of at least 33% using the Digimarc Barcode, compared to using a traditional barcode. A method of watermarking print ready image data used in the commercial packaging industry is described. A significant proportion of packages are printed using spot colors, therefore spot colors needs to be supported by an embedder for Digimarc Barcode. Digimarc Barcode supports the PANTONE spot color system, which is commonly used in the packaging industry. The Digimarc Barcode embedder allows a user to insert the UPC code in an image while minimizing perceptibility to the Human Visual System (HVS). The Digimarc Barcode is inserted in the printing ink domain, using an Adobe Photoshop plug-in as the last step before printing. Since Photoshop is an industry standard widely used by pre-press shops in the packaging industry, a Digimarc Barcode can be easily inserted and proofed.

  1. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; ...

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings.more » The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.« less

  2. Comparison of antibody array substrates and the use of glycerol to normalize spot morphology.

    PubMed

    Olle, Eric W; Messamore, James; Deogracias, Michael P; McClintock, Shannon D; Anderson, Timothy D; Johnson, Kent J

    2005-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are a high-throughput proteomic technology used to examine the expression of multiple proteins in complex solutions. Antibody microarrays can be manufactured on a variety of commercially available activated glass or coated slides. The goal of this study was to compare Hydrogeltrade mark, nitrocellulose, aldehyde-silane and epoxy-silane slides to determine the amount of antibody bound. The optimal substrate was defined as one that bound the greatest amount of antibody with minimal background. Our studies found that epoxy-silane enhanced surface (ES) slides gave the greatest degree of binding along with a minimal background. However, larger antibody microarrays showed variability in spot size, high intra-spot coefficient of variation and drying artifacts. Increasing the amount of glycerol in the spotting buffer caused a dose-dependent improvement in overall spot morphology. Glycerol was tested on 128 different antibodies and showed decreased: mean spot diameter, intra-spot coefficient of variation and drying artifacts. These studies revealed that the optimal slide substrate was epoxy-silane ES microarray slides. Furthermore, glycerol could normalize spot size, decrease intra-spot coefficient of variability, decrease drying artifacts and increase antibody-spotting density.

  3. Calibration for single multi-mode fiber digital scanning microscopy imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhe; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Gan, Yu; Zhuang, Zhitao; Chen, Fengdong

    2015-11-01

    Single multimode fiber (MMF) digital scanning imaging system is a development tendency of modern endoscope. We concentrate on the calibration method of the imaging system. Calibration method comprises two processes, forming scanning focused spots and calibrating the couple factors varied with positions. Adaptive parallel coordinate algorithm (APC) is adopted to form the focused spots at the multimode fiber (MMF) output. Compare with other algorithm, APC contains many merits, i.e. rapid speed, small amount calculations and no iterations. The ratio of the optics power captured by MMF to the intensity of the focused spots is called couple factor. We setup the calibration experimental system to form the scanning focused spots and calculate the couple factors for different object positions. The experimental result the couple factor is higher in the center than the edge.

  4. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. For example, rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  5. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Pardo, J; Donetti, M; Bourhaleb, F; Ansarinejad, A; Attili, A; Cirio, R; Garella, M A; Giordanengo, S; Givehchi, N; La Rosa, A; Marchetto, F; Monaco, V; Pecka, A; Peroni, C; Russo, G; Sacchi, R

    2009-06-01

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  8. Still from Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is one of seven from the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft assembled as a brief movie of cloud movements on Jupiter. It was taken with a blue filter. The smallest features visible are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across.

    Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Based on data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft, scientists suspect that these small white features are lightning storms, where falling raindrops create an electrical charge. The lightning storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for these large-scale features. Imaging observations of the darkside of the planet in the weeks following Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter on Dec. 30, 2000 will search for lightning storms like these.

    This image was re-projected by cylindrical-map projection of an image taken in the first week of October 2000. It shows an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  9. Spot and Runway Departure Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon Chul

    2013-01-01

    The Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a research prototype of a decision support tool for ATC tower controllers to assist in manging and controlling traffic on the surface of an airport. SARDA employs a scheduler to generate an optimal runway schedule and gate push-back - spot release sequence and schedule that improves efficiency of surface operations. The advisories for ATC tower controllers are displayed on an Electronic Flight Strip (EFS) system. The human-in-the-loop simulation of the SARDA tool was conducted for east operations of Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) to evaluate performance of the SARDA tool and human factors, such as situational awareness and workload. The results indicates noticeable taxi delay reduction and fuel savings by using the SARDA tool. Reduction in controller workload were also observed throughout the scenario runs. The future plan includes modeling and simulation of the ramp operations of the Charlotte International Airport, and develop a decision support tool for the ramp controllers.

  10. Instructor Debrief Training in SPOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lynne; Orasanu, Judith; Villeda, Eric; Conners, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One way to enhance the effectiveness of Special Purpose Operational Training' (SPOT) debriefing sessions may be for instructors to make explicit connections between the Crew Resource Management (CRM) concepts a carrier advocates and the behaviors displayed by the crew in question. A tool listing key behaviors from the scenario was devised, accompanied by an instructors' training session in which links were made between the behaviors and the underlying CRM processes they reflect. The aim of the tool is to assist instructors to focus the debriefing on the key SPOT/ CRM issues, in this case on planning. A second tool suggested ways to facilitate the discussion. Fourteen instructors at a major U.S. carrier took part in the training session and used the toolkit in their subsequent debriefs. Pre- and post-training debriefing samples from each instructor were compared to assess whether there were any changes in instructors' approaches to discussions in terms of the topics they covered and how they raised the points.

  11. Spotted bass Micropterus punctulatus (Rafinesque 1819)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, Timothy N.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2015-01-01

    Three subspecies of Spotted Bass Micropterus punctulatus were historically recognized: the smaller Northern Spotted Bass M. p. punctulatus, the larger, longer-lived Alabama Spotted Bass M. p. henshalli, and the now invalidated Wichita Spotted Bass M. p. wichitae (Bailey and Hubbs 1940; Cofer 1995; Warren 2009; Rider and Maceina 2015, this volume). The subspecific status has been examined over the past decade as advanced genetic analyses have been developed (e.g., Kassler et al. 2002; Baker et al. 2008; Tringali et al. 2015, this volume). The American Fisheries Society has recently changed the designation of the Alabama Spotted Bass to a separate species, Alabama Bass M. henshalli (Page et al. 2013). The remainder of this paper will discuss the biology and conservation of only Spotted Bass. Both species have been observed to hybridize with other Micropterus spp. (Koppelman 1994; Pierce and Van Den Avyle 1997; Barwick et al. 2006).

  12. Integrating sustainable hunting in biodiversity protection in Central Africa: hot spots, weak spots, and strong spots.

    PubMed

    Fa, John E; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Ángel; Márquez, Ana Luz; Vargas, Juan Mario; Real, Raimundo; Nasi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat) for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165) in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots) and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS) of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability), weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting.

  13. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  14. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  16. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  17. Cardiac CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Scan Related Topics Aneurysm Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Pulmonary Embolism Send a link to ... imaging test can help doctors detect or evaluate coronary heart disease, calcium buildup in the coronary arteries, problems with ...

  18. Defect Detection Using a Scanning Laser Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, S. E.; Dixon, S.

    2011-06-01

    Surface breaking defects are identified using a scanning laser source. A Q-switched Nd-YAG laser is used as a non-contact source of ultrasound and an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) employed as detector. For a thin plate, an increase in frequency content of the received wave is observed when the laser spot is situated directly over the defect. Time-frequency analysis using a Wigner transform has enabled individual Lamb wave modes to be identified, while propagation of Lamb waves through aluminium sheet is studied by finite element analysis.

  19. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  20. Comparison of thermal effects of stilbenoid analogs in lipid bilayers using differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics: correlation of thermal effects and topographical position with antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Koukoulitsa, Catherine; Durdagi, Serdar; Siapi, Eleni; Villalonga-Barber, Carolina; Alexi, Xanthippi; Steele, Barry R; Micha-Screttas, Maria; Alexis, Michael N; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    In previous studies it was shown that cannabinoids (CBs) bearing a phenolic hydroxyl group modify the thermal properties of lipid bilayers more significantly than methylated congeners. These distinct differential properties were attributed to the fact that phenolic hydroxyl groups constitute an anchoring group in the vicinity of the head-group, while the methylated analogs are embedded deeper towards the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayers. In this work the thermal effects of synthetic polyphenolic stilbenoid analogs and their methylated congeners have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to explain the DSC results. Thus, two of their phenolic hydroxyl groups orient in the lipid bilayers in such a way that they anchor in the region of the head-group. In contrast, their methoxy congeners cannot anchor effectively and are embedded deeper in the hydrophobic segment of the lipid bilayers. The MD results explain the fact that hydroxystilbenoid analogs exert more significant effects on the pretransition than their methoxy congeners, especially at low concentrations. To maximize the polar interactions, the two phenolic hydroxyl groups are localized in the vicinity of the head-group region, directing the remaining hydroxy group in the hydrophobic region. This topographical position of stilbenoid analogs forms a mismatch that explains the significant broadening of the width of the phase transition and lowering of the main phase-transition temperature in the lipid bilayers. At high concentrations, hydroxy and nonhydroxy analogs appear to form different domains. The correlation of thermal effects with antioxidant activity is discussed.

  1. Astroparticle transport and yield in extragalactic jets and hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, A.; Casse, F.

    2005-02-01

    The present work discusses yield and transport of high-energy particle within extragalactic jet terminal shocks, also known as hotspots. These astrophysical sources are responsible for strong non-thermal synchrotron emission produced by relativistic electrons accelerated via a Fermi-type mechanism. We investigate in some details the cosmic ray, neutrinos and high-energy photons yield in hotspots of powerful FRII radio-galaxies by scanning all known spatial transport regimes, adiabatic and radiative losses as well as Fermi acceleration processes. Since both electrons and cosmic rays are prone to the same type of acceleration, we derive analytical estimates of the maximal cosmic ray energy attainable in both toroidal and poloidal magnetic field dominated shock structures by using observational data on synchrotron emission coming from various hot-spots. One of our main conclusions is that the best hot-spot candidates for high energy astroparticle production is the extended (LHS >= 1kpc), strongly magnetized (B > 0.1mG) terminal shock displaying synchrotron emission cut-off lying at least in the optical band. We found only one object (3C273A) over the six objects in our sample being capable to produce cosmic rays up to 1020 eV. We also show that the Bohm regime is unlikely to occur in the whole hot-spot since it would require unrealistically low jet velocities. We finally investigate the astroparticle yields of a characteric cosmic-ray loud hot-spot and compared them to the sensibilities of the future neutrinos and gamma-ray missions.

  2. Suspension system for gimbal supported scanning payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Gimballed scanning devices or instruments are the subject of this invention. Scanning is an important aspect of space science. To achieve a scan pattern some means must be provided which impart to the payload an oscillatory motion. Various forms of machines have been employed for controllably conferring on scanning instruments predetermined scan patterns. They include control moment gyroscopes, reaction wheels, torque motors, reaction control systems, and the like. But rotating unbalanced mass (RUM) devices are a new and efficient way to generate scans in gimballed payloads. RUM devices are superior to previous scanning apparatus, but they require power consuming and frequently complex auxiliary control systems to position and reposition the particular scan pattern relative to a target or a number of targets. Herein the control system is simplified. The most frequently employed method for achieving the various scan patterns is to gimbal the scanning device. Gimbals are suspended in such a way that they can be activated to generate the scan pattern. The suspension means described is for payloads supported in gimbals wherein the payload rotation is restricted by a flex pivot so that the payload oscillates, thereby moving in a scan pattern.

  3. High-resolution seismic and side scan sonar imaging of active structures and Quaternary channels on the shallow shelf of Otago, southeastern New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, A. R.; Bruce, C.; Preskett, S. A.; Norris, R.; Choveaux, R.; Flemish, H.; Green, C.

    2011-12-01

    The shallow and narrow continental shelf off the coast of Otago has unique geological characteristics due to the juxtaposition of active coast-parallel contractional faults related to the nearby Pacific-Australian plate boundary and late-Miocene shield volcanism that affects the structural and sedimentological regimes of the region. For example, the offshore extent of the active Akatore Fault, a NE-SW trending reverse fault that runs along the coast SW of Dunedin, is poorly constrained to the northeast where is intersects the Dunedin Volcanic Complex. This fault is possibly associated with several other offshore coast-parallel faults based on shallow controlled-source seismic data. Historical earthquakes, including those of 1974 and 1989, are attributed these faults. The Dunedin Volcanic Complex also has impacted Quaternary erosional and sedimentation patterns on the shelf as a result of topographical features that affect drainage and sediment transport patterns. Single-channel electro-acoustic boomer seismic reflection data and side scan sonar profiles have been collected along a ~35-km-long section of the shallow shelf SW of Dunedin over the last three years. The majority of lines were collected along NW-SE azimuths (perpendicular to the coast), running from just outside the surf zone (<10 m water depth) to a maximum of 28 km offshore (~75 m water depth). Survey lines were ~250 m apart near shore and up to 5 km apart offshore. Boomer subsurface penetration is limited, primarily by the presence of multiple reflections. However, primary reflections were recorded from sub-seafloor depths of up to 100 m. Several significant structures have been imaged within the survey area, principally the Akatore and Green Island Faults. The Akatore Fault is imaged very near shore in the southern portion of the survey, and a minimum post-Miocene displacement of 55 m was calculated. Offset on the Green Island Fault, a high-angle reverse fault, was relatively well constrained to ~200

  4. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation.

  5. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  6. Voyager 1 Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows the portion of Jupiter around the Great Red Spot as it swirls through more than 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storm shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  7. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; Retailliau, H; O'Brien, R J; Slutzker, M; Fontaine, R E; Hanson, B

    1978-09-29

    Forty-four fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurring in 1974 were compared with 50 nonfatal cases of similar age, sex, date of onset, and place of occurrence. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment in fatal cases were substantially delayed compared with nonfatal cases. Several reasons for this delay were identified: (1) the rash appeared later in the course of illness in the fatal cases, often not until the patient was terminal, (2) a history of tick bite was less often obtained during life or obtained late in the clinical course in fatal cases, and (3) initial nonspecific symptoms or unexpected symptoms led to an initial diagnosis of more common diseases. Only two fatal cases were treated with either tetracycline or chloramphenicol before the sixth day of illness. Presumptive diagnosis of RMSF and initiation of tetracycline therapy before onset of rash may be necessary to reduce mortality.

  8. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  9. White spots on Smoke rings by Bruce Nauman: a case study on contemporary art conservation using microanalytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Mafalda, Ana Cardeira; da Câmara, Rodrigo Bettencourt; Strzelec, Patrick; Schiavon, Nick; Mirão, José; Candeias, António; Carvalho, Maria Luísa; Manso, Marta

    2015-02-01

    The artwork "Smoke Rings: Two Concentric Tunnels, Non-Communicating" by Bruce Nauman represents a case study of corrosion of a black patina-coated Al-alloy contemporary artwork. The main concern over this artwork was the widespread presence of white spots on its surface. Alloy substrate, patina, and white spots were characterized by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Alloy substrate was identified as an aluminum alloy 6,000 series Al-Si-Mg. Patina's identified composition confirmed the documentation provided by the atelier. Concerning the white spots, zircon particles were found on patina surface as external elements.

  10. Ambystoma maculatum (spotted salamander). Reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glorioso, Brad M.; Waddle, Hardin; Hefner, Jeromi

    2012-01-01

    The Spotted Salamander is a wide-ranging salamander of the eastern United States that typically breeds in winter or early spring in ephemeral pools in lowland forests. Ambystoma maculatum is known to deposit 2-4 egg masses per year, each containing 1-250 eggs. As part of ongoing research into the ecology and reproductive biology of Spotted Salamanders in the Kisatchie District of Kisatchie National Forest in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, USA, we have been counting the number of embryos per egg mass. We captured seven female A. maculatum in a small pool, six of which were still gravid. We took standard measurements, including SVL, and then implanted a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) into each adult female as was the protocol. About an hour after processing these animals we marked new A. maculatum egg masses found in the same small pool using PVC pin flags pushed carefully through the outer jelly. We did not have enough time to process them that evening, and it was not until a few days later that we photographed those masses. We discovered that one of the masses contained a PIT tag in the outer jelly that corresponded to one of the six gravid females that were marked that same evening. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PIT tags being the means, albeit coincidentally, by which a particular egg mass of Ambystoma maculatum has been assigned to a particular female. For our purposes, losing the PIT tag from the adult female is counter to the goals of our study of this population, and we will no longer be implanting PIT tags into gravid females.

  11. Predation by Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) on Western toads (Bufo boreas) in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Hayes, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toads of the genus Bufo co-occur with true frogs (family Ranidae) throughout their North American ranges. Yet, Bufo are rarely reported as prey for ranid frogs, perhaps due to dermal toxins that afford them protection from some predators. We report field observations from four different localities demonstrating that Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) readily consume juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) at breeding sites in Oregon. Unpalatability thought to deter predators of selected taxa and feeding mode may not protect juvenile stages of western toads from adult Oregon spotted frogs. Activity of juvenile western toads can elicit ambush behavior by Oregon spotted frog adults. Our review of published literature suggests that regular consumption of toadlets sets Oregon spotted frogs apart from most North American ranid frogs. Importance of the trophic context of juvenile western toads as a seasonally important resource to Oregon spotted frogs needs critical investigation.

  12. Strategic Improvements to TSA Spot Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Administration’s Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques (SPOT) program analyzes the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and Office of Inspector...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iv ABSTRACT This study of Transportation Security Administration’s Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques ...area SME subject matter expert SPOT screening passengers by observation techniques TAC threat assessment capabilities TAD threat assessment

  13. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  14. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  15. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old.

  16. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  17. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Statistics and Epidemiology ...

  18. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Spotted seatrout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostecki, Paul T.

    1984-01-01

    The estuarine spotted seatrout, a primarily estuarine species, is one of the most important sport and commercial fishes in coastal Gulf of Mexico waters (Arnold et a1. 1976). Spotted seatrout rank second by weight in catches by U.S. saltwater sport fishermen (National Marine Fisheries Services 1981) .

  19. A novel multi-scale Hessian based spot enhancement filter for two dimensional gel electrophoresis images.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi, Sina; Miran Baygi, Mohammad Hossein; Azarian, Bahareh; Gooya, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) is a useful method for studying proteins in a wide variety of applications including identifying post-translation modification (PTM), biomarker discovery, and protein purification. Computerized segmentation and detection of the proteins are the two main processes that are carried out on the scanned image of the gel. Due to the complexities of 2DGE images and the presence of artifacts, the segmentation and detection of protein spots in these images are non-trivial, and involve supervised and time consuming processes. This paper introduces a new spot filter for enhancing, and separating the closely overlapping spots of protein in 2DGE images based on the multi-scale eigenvalue analysis of the image Hessian. Using a Gaussian spot model, we have derived closed form equations to compute the eigen components of the image Hessian of two overlapping spots in a multi-scale fashion. Based on this analysis, we have proposed a novel filter that suppresses the overlapping area and results in a better spot separation. The performance of the proposed filter has been evaluated on the synthetic and real 2DGE images. The comparison with three conventional techniques and a commercial software package reveals the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed filter.

  20. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  1. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  2. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  3. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  4. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  5. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  6. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  7. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  8. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  9. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  10. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  11. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  12. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  13. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  14. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  15. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  16. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  17. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  18. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  19. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Light Spotted Cotton § 28.413 Middling Light Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between...

  20. Masculinized otoacoustic emissions in female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    McFadden, Dennis; Pasanen, Edward G; Weldele, Mary L; Glickman, Stephen E; Place, Ned J

    2006-08-01

    In humans and rhesus monkeys, click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are stronger in females than in males, and there is considerable circumstantial evidence that this sex difference is attributable to the greater exposure to androgens prenatally in males. Because female spotted hyenas are highly androgenized beginning early in prenatal development, we expected an absence of sexual dimorphism in the CEOAEs of this species. The CEOAEs obtained from 9 male and 7 female spotted hyenas confirmed that expectation. The implication is that the marked androgenization to which female spotted hyenas are exposed masculinizes the cochlear mechanism responsible for CEOAEs. The CEOAEs measured in 3 male and 3 female hyenas that had been treated with anti-androgenic agents during prenatal development were stronger than the CEOAEs of the untreated animals, in accord with the implied inverse relationship between prenatal androgen exposure and the strength of the cochlear mechanisms producing CEOAEs. The CEOAEs of three ovariectomized females and two castrated males were essentially the same as those for the untreated females and males, suggesting that there is little or no activational effect of hormones on CEOAE strength in spotted hyenas. Distortion product OAEs (DPOAEs) also were measured. Those sex differences also were generally small (as they are in humans), and the effects of the anti-androgen agents were inconsistent. Thus, prenatal androgen exposure apparently does affect OAEs, but the effects appear to be greater for the reflection-based cochlear mechanism that underlies CEOAEs than for the nonlinear cochlear mechanism underlying DPOAEs.

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  2. Fatal Israeli spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Yagupsky, P; Wolach, B

    1993-11-01

    We describe three Israeli children with fatal spotted fever. Clinical disease was characterized by irreversible shock, encephalopathy, renal failure, bleeding tendency, and death within 24 hours of admission. None of the patients had a history of tick bite, and no tache noire was noted. One child presented without rash, and the other two did not have antibodies to spotted-fever-group rickettsiae. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Rickettsia conorii from the patients' blood and tissues in cell cultures or from susceptible laboratory animals inoculated with human specimens. The present cases demonstrate the existence of a severe form of Israeli spotted fever in this population that resembles Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Because Israeli spotted fever may follow a quick, unpredictable, rapidly fatal clinical course, specific antimicrobial therapy should be promptly administered whenever the diagnosis is suspected.

  3. TEVA-SPOT Toolkit 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jonathan; Riesen, Lee Ann; Hart, William

    2007-07-26

    The TEVA-SPOT Toolkit (SPOT) supports the design of contaminant warning systems (CWSs) that use real-time sensors to detect contaminants in municipal water distribution networks. Specifically, SPOT provides the capability to select the locations for installing sensors in order to maximize the utility and effectiveness of the CWS. SPOT models the sensor placement process as an optimization problem, and the user can specify a wide range of performance objectives for contaminant warning system design, including population health effects, time to detection, extent of contamination, volume consumed and number of failed detections. For example, a SPOT user can integrate expert knowledge during the design process by specigying required sensor placements or designating network locations as forbidden. Further, cost considerations can be integrated by limiting the design with user-specified installation costs at each location.

  4. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations. PMID:26938537

  5. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J M; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-03-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  6. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, W.; Kanat, I.O.

    1986-07-01

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy.

  7. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  8. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status.

  9. Geo Spots and Vortex Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straser, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    ), when limited to particular regions, may have created in the past and perhaps still do to this day torsions in localized spots of the Earth's crust (Geo Spots), which over time have conditioned the distribution of tectonic stresses on the surface of the Earth at a regional scale.

  10. System Design Considerations In Bar-Code Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkan, Eric; Swartz, Jerome

    1984-08-01

    The unified transfer function approach to the design of laser barcode scanner signal acquisition hardware is considered. The treatment of seemingly disparate system areas such as the optical train, the scanning spot, the electrical filter circuits, the effects of noise, and printing errors is presented using linear systems theory. Such important issues as determination of depth of modulation, filter specification, tolerancing of optical components, and optimi-zation of system performance in the presence of noise are discussed. The concept of effective spot size to allow for impact of optical system and analog processing circuitry upon depth of modulation is introduced. Considerations are limited primarily to Gaussian spot profiles, but also apply to more general cases. Attention is paid to realistic bar-code symbol models and to implications with respect to printing tolerances.

  11. Dark Dune Spots: possible biomarkers on Mars?

    PubMed

    Gánti, Tibor; Horváth, András; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Gesztesi, Albert; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2003-10-01

    Dark Dune Spots (DDSs) are transitional geomorphologic formations in the frost-covered polar regions of Mars. Our analysis of the transformations and arrangements of subsequent stages of DDSs into time sequence revealed their: (i) hole-like characteristics, (ii) development and formation from the bottom of the frosted layer till the disapperance of the latter, (iii) repeated (seasonal and annual) appearance in a pattern of multiple DDSs on the surface, and (iv) probable origin. We focused our studies on a model in which DDSs were interpreted as objects triggered by biological activity involved in the frosting and melting processes. We discuss two competing interpretations of DDSs: development by defrosting alone, and by defrosting and melting enhanced by the activity of Martian Surface Organisms (MSOs). MSOs are hypothetical Martian photosynthetic surface organisms thought to absorb sunlight. As a result they warm up by late winter and melt the ice around them, whereby their growth and reproduction become possible. The ice cover above the liquid water lens harbouring the MSOs provides excellent heat and UV insulation, prevents fast evaporation, and sustains basic living conditions until the ice cover exists. When the frost cover disappears MSOs go to a dormant, desiccated state. We propose further studies to be carried out by orbiters and landers travelling to Mars and by analysis of partial analogues on earth.

  12. Bone scanning in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Noyek, A M

    1979-09-01

    Modern radionuclide bone scanning has introduced a new concept in physiologic and anatomic diagnostic imaging to general medicine. As otolaryngologists must diagnose and treat disease in relation to the bony and/or cartilaginous supporting structures of the neurocranium and upper airway, this modality should be included in the otolaryngologist's diagnostic armamentarium. It is the purpose of this manuscript to study the specific applications of bone scanning to our specialty at this time, based on clinical experience over the past three years. This thesis describes the development of bone scanning in general (history of nuclear medicine and nuclear physics; history of bone scanning in particular). General concepts in nuclear medicine are then presented; these include a discussion of nuclear semantics, principles of radioactive emmissions, the properties 99mTc as a radionuclide, and the tracer principle. On the basis of these general concepts, specific concepts in bone scanning are then brought forth. The physiology of bone and the action of the bone scan agents is presented. Further discussion considers the availability and production of the bone scan agent, patient factors, the gamma camera, the triphasic bone scan and the ultimate diagnostic principle of the bone scan. Clinical applications of bone scanning in otolaryngology are then presented in three sections. Proven areas of application include the evaluation of malignant tumors of the head and neck, the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders, the diagnosis of facial fractures, the evaluation of osteomyelitis, nuclear medicine imaging of the larynx, and the assessment of systemic disease. Areas of adjunctive or supplementary value are also noted, such as diagnostic imaging of meningioma. Finally, areas of marginal value in the application of bone scanning are described.

  13. Extracting Hot spots of Topics from Time Stamped Documents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chundi, Parvathi

    2011-07-01

    Identifying time periods with a burst of activities related to a topic has been an important problem in analyzing time-stamped documents. In this paper, we propose an approach to extract a hot spot of a given topic in a time-stamped document set. Topics can be basic, containing a simple list of keywords, or complex. Logical relationships such as and, or, and not are used to build complex topics from basic topics. A concept of presence measure of a topic based on fuzzy set theory is introduced to compute the amount of information related to the topic in the document set. Each interval in the time period of the document set is associated with a numeric value which we call the discrepancy score. A high discrepancy score indicates that the documents in the time interval are more focused on the topic than those outside of the time interval. A hot spot of a given topic is defined as a time interval with the highest discrepancy score. We first describe a naive implementation for extracting hot spots. We then construct an algorithm called EHE (Efficient Hot Spot Extraction) using several efficient strategies to improve performance. We also introduce the notion of a topic DAG to facilitate an efficient computation of presence measures of complex topics. The proposed approach is illustrated by several experiments on a subset of the TDT-Pilot Corpus and DBLP conference data set. The experiments show that the proposed EHE algorithm significantly outperforms the naive one, and the extracted hot spots of given topics are meaningful.

  14. Climatic factors in resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, E.E.; Creus, B.F.; Cueto, F.B.; Porta, F.S.

    1986-06-07

    There has been a recent resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever in areas bordering the Mediterranean Sea. This disease is caused by Rickettsia conorii, the dog tick being the vector and main reservoir. Ticks prefer warm weather and their activity increases with rising temperature. In the Valles Occidental, Spain, the incidence of the disease is correlated with hotter and drier summers in the past ten years.

  15. Rocky Mountain spotted fever acquired in Florida, 1973-83.

    PubMed

    Sacks, J J; Janowski, H T

    1985-12-01

    From 1973 to 1983, 49 Florida residents were reported with confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), 25 of whom were considered to have had Florida-acquired disease. Although there was no history of tick exposure for six of these 25 persons, all had contact with dogs or outdoor activities during the incubation period. The tick vectors of RMSF are widely distributed throughout Florida. We conclude that RMSF, although rare in Florida, can be acquired in the state.

  16. HUBBLE FINDS NEW DARK SPOT ON NEPTUNE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a new great dark spot, located in the northern hemisphere of the planet Neptune. Because the planet's northern hemisphere is now tilted away from Earth, the new feature appears near the limb of the planet. The spot is a near mirror-image to a similar southern hemisphere dark spot that was discovered in 1989 by the Voyager 2 probe. In 1994, Hubble showed that the southern dark spot had disappeared. Like its predecessor, the new spot has high altitude clouds along its edge, caused by gasses that have been pushed to higher altitudes where they cool to form methane ice crystal clouds. The dark spot may be a zone of clear gas that is a window to a cloud deck lower in the atmosphere. Planetary scientists don t know how long lived this new feature might be. Hubble's high resolution will allow astronomers to follow the spot's evolution and other unexpected changes in Neptune's dynamic atmosphere. The image was taken on November 2, 1994 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, when Neptune was 2.8 billion miles (4.5 billion kilometers) from Earth. Hubble can resolve features as small as 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) across in Neptune's cloud tops. Credit: H. Hammel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and NASA

  17. Pencil beam scanning dosimetry for large animal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy D; Carabe, Alexandro; Mcdonough, James E; Diffenderfer, Eric; Sanzari, Jenine K; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith

    2014-09-01

    The space radiation environment imposes increased dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during a solar particle event. These events consist primarily of low-energy protons that produce a highly inhomogeneous depth-dose distribution. Here we describe a novel technique that uses pencil beam scanning at extended source-to-surface distances and range shifter (RS) to provide robust but easily modifiable delivery of simulated solar particle event radiation to large animals. Thorough characterization of spot profiles as a function of energy, distance and RS position is critical to accurate treatment planning. At 105 MeV, the spot sigma is 234 mm at 4800 mm from the isocentre when the RS is installed at the nozzle. With the energy increased to 220 MeV, the spot sigma is 66 mm. At a distance of 1200 mm from the isocentre, the Gaussian sigma is 68 mm and 23 mm at 105 MeV and 220 MeV, respectively, when the RS is located on the nozzle. At lower energies, the spot sigma exhibits large differences as a function of distance and RS position. Scan areas of 1400 mm (superior-inferior) by 940 mm (anterior-posterior) and 580 mm by 320 mm are achieved at the extended distances of 4800 mm and 1200 mm, respectively, with dose inhomogeneity <2%. To treat large animals with a more sophisticated dose distribution, spot size can be reduced by placing the RS closer than 70 mm to the surface of the animals, producing spot sigmas below 6 mm.

  18. Pencil beam scanning dosimetry for large animal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy D.; Carabe, Alexandro; Mcdonough, James E.; Diffenderfer, Eric; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The space radiation environment imposes increased dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during a solar particle event. These events consist primarily of low-energy protons that produce a highly inhomogeneous depth–dose distribution. Here we describe a novel technique that uses pencil beam scanning at extended source-to-surface distances and range shifter (RS) to provide robust but easily modifiable delivery of simulated solar particle event radiation to large animals. Thorough characterization of spot profiles as a function of energy, distance and RS position is critical to accurate treatment planning. At 105 MeV, the spot sigma is 234 mm at 4800 mm from the isocentre when the RS is installed at the nozzle. With the energy increased to 220 MeV, the spot sigma is 66 mm. At a distance of 1200 mm from the isocentre, the Gaussian sigma is 68 mm and 23 mm at 105 MeV and 220 MeV, respectively, when the RS is located on the nozzle. At lower energies, the spot sigma exhibits large differences as a function of distance and RS position. Scan areas of 1400 mm (superior–inferior) by 940 mm (anterior–posterior) and 580 mm by 320 mm are achieved at the extended distances of 4800 mm and 1200 mm, respectively, with dose inhomogeneity <2%. To treat large animals with a more sophisticated dose distribution, spot size can be reduced by placing the RS closer than 70 mm to the surface of the animals, producing spot sigmas below 6 mm. PMID:24855043

  19. Research on high precision equal-angle scanning method in rotary kiln temperature measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaosheng; Guo, Zhongyuan; You, Changhui; Liu, Jinsong; Cheng, Yang; Tang, Huaming

    2016-05-01

    Aiming at traditional horizontal equal-angle scanning method's disadvantage of measurement error, a high precision equal-angle scanning method is proposed, the proposed method establishes a tilt scanning model by the following steps: introducing height variable, precisely calculating the viewing angle, building scanning model. The model is used to calculate scanning position on rotary kiln's surface, which helps to locate and track temperature variation. The experiment shows that the proposed method can effectively improve the precision of temperature spots' location on the rotary kiln surface.

  20. Fluorescence liftime imaging (FLIM) using ps-pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Angelika C.; Dolp, Frank; Happ, Claudia; Steiner, Rudolf; Beil, Michael

    2003-06-01

    A setup consisting on a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units was developed for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for on-line detection of structural changes of various biomolecules. Short-pulsed excitation was performed with a diode laser which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps duration. The laser was coupled to the laser scanning microscope. For time resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of an Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images (τ-mapping). The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of 5-ALA (5-aminolevulinic-acid), as well as 5-ALAhe (5-aminolevulinic-acid-hexylester)- induced protoporphyrine IX (PPIX) were investigated before and during PDT with subcellular resolution. For cells which were incubated with 5-ALA, a component with a fluorescence lifetime of about 7 ns was correlated with a structured fluorescence, which probably coincides with mitochondria, whereas a shorter lifetime was found in the cytoplasm. In the case of 5-ALAhe the lifetime of PPIX was longer, which could be due to different localization. During PDT the component with the longer lifetime completely vanished, whereas the shorter liftime was retained. It seems that FLIM is a valuable method to selectively identify and localize the photodynamically active photosensitizer.

  1. Micro-determination of iron in pharmaceutical preparations by image scanning and computational quantification.

    PubMed

    Anwar, J; Salman, M; Shafique, U; Waheed-uz-Zaman; Dar, A; Anzano, J M

    2010-01-01

    Iron has been quantified in pharmaceutical preparations by developing red spots pursuant to interaction of Fe(II) ions in the sample with 1, 10-phenanthroline on TLC plate. Soon after, TLC was scanned on a flatbed scanner and the image was transferred to the computer. Color intensity of the spot was computationally quantified with the help of native software developed for this purpose. The conditions were optimized and the results were compared with a reference method.

  2. Allele-dependent recombination frequency: homology requirement in meiotic recombination at the hot spot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Sagai, T; Lindahl, K F; Toyoda, Y; Moriwaki, K; Shiroishi, T

    1995-05-20

    Meiotic recombination break joints in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are clustered within short segments known as hot spots. We systematically investigated the requirement for sequence homology between two chromosomes for recombination activity at the hot spot next to the Lmp2 gene. The results indicated that a high rate of recombination required a high degree of similarity of overall genome structure at the hot spot. In particular, the same copy number of repetitive sequences within the hot spot was essential for a high frequency of recombination, suggesting that recombination in mouse meiosis is more sensitive to heterozygous deletion or insertion of DNA than to mismatches of single-base substitutions.

  3. A Dark Spot on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft of Jupiter's icy moon Europa focuses on a dark, smooth region whose center is the lowest area in this image. To the west (left), it is bounded by a cliff and terraces, which might have been formed by normal faulting. The slopes toward the east (right) leading into the dark spot are gentle.

    Near the center of the dark area, it appears the dark materials have covered some of the bright terrain and ridges. This suggests that when the dark material was deposited, it may have been a fluid or an icy slush.

    Only a few impact craters are visible, with some of them covered or flooded by dark material. Some appear in groups, which may indicate that they are secondary craters formed by debris excavated during a larger impact event. A potential source for these is the nearby crater Mannann`an.

    North is to the top of the picture which is centered at 1 degree south latitude and 225 degrees west longitude. The images in this mosaic have been re-projected to 50 meters (55 yards) per picture element. They were obtained by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on March 29, 1998, during Galileo's fourteenth orbit of Jupiter, at ranges as close as 1940 kilometers (1,200 miles) from Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Finding your innovation sweet spot.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Jacob; Horowitz, Roni; Levav, Amnon; Mazursky, David

    2003-03-01

    Most new product ideas are either uninspired or impractical. So how can developers hit the innovation sweet spot--far enough from existing products to attract real interest but close enough that they are feasible to make and market? They can apply five innovation patterns that manipulate existing components of a product and its immediate environment to come up with something both ingenious and viable, say the authors. The subtraction pattern works by removing product components, particularly those that seem desirable or indispensable. Think of the legless high chair that attaches to the kitchen table. The multiplication pattern makes one or more copies of an existing component, then alters those copies in some important way. For example, the Gillette double-bladed razor features a second blade that cuts whiskers at a slightly different angle. By dividing an existing product into its component parts--the division pattern--you can see something that was an integrated whole in an entirely different light. Think of the modern home stereo--it has modular speakers, tuners, and CD and tape players, which allow users to customize their sound systems. The task unification pattern involves assigning a new task to an existing product element or environmental attribute, thereby unifying two tasks in a single component. An example is the defrosting filament in an automobile windshield that also serves as a radio antenna. Finally, the attribute dependency pattern alters or creates the dependent relationships between a product and its environment. For example, by creating a dependent relationship between lens color and external lighting conditions, eyeglass developers came up with a lens that changes color when exposed to sunlight.

  5. A Clinical Trial of Optimal Time Interval Between Ablation and Diagnostic Activity When a Pretherapy RAI Scanning Is Performed on Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yafu; Mao, Qiufen; Chen, Song; Li, Na; Li, Xuena; Li, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article investigates the association of the time interval between the diagnostic dose and ablation with the stunning effect, when a 74 MBq 131I pretherapy scanning was performed on patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC); the patients who were diagnosed as DTC and would be performed radioiodine (RAI) ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases were recruited during January 2011 and May 2012 in our hospital. Thirty-seven patients with DTC who had the RAI ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases for the first time were recruited. All the patients received a dose of 1850 to 7400 MBq of 131I for ablation and a diagnostic scan was performed 24 hours after the administration of 74 MBq 131I before ablation. A posttherapy scan was performed 2 to 7 days after the ablation. The patients were broken down into 3 groups (G1, G2, and G3) according to the interval time between the diagnostic dose and therapy (1–3, 4–7, and >7 days). The fractional concentrations of 131I in remnants or functional metastases were quantified and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic (Rx/Dx). The level of significance was set at 0.05. Sixty-seven foci were found both on pretherapy and posttherapy scans, the mean ratio of Rx/Dx was 0.43 ± 0.29, and the ratio of 49 foci (73.13%) was <0.6. The ratios in G1, G2, and G3 were 0.46 ± 0.29, 0.29 ± 0.18, and 0.55 ± 0.33, respectively. The differences between G1 and G2, and G2 and G3 were statistically significant (t = 2.40, P = 0.021 and t = 3.28, P = 0.002), whereas the difference between G1 and G3 was not significant (t = 1.01, P = 0.319). By a diagnostic scan of 74 MBq 131I, stunning prominently occurs with a time of 4 to 7 days between the diagnostic dose and ablation. We recommend that for less stunning effect, RAI ablation should be performed within 3 days or postponed until 1 week after the diagnostic dose administrated. PMID:26252311

  6. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2014-11-21

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or 'halo', in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution.

  7. Flood basalts and hot-spot tracks: plume heads and tails.

    PubMed

    Richards, M A; Duncan, R A; Courtillot, V E

    1989-10-06

    Continental flood basalt eruptions have resulted in sudden and massive accumulations of basaltic lavas in excess of any contemporary volcanic processes. The largest flood basalt events mark the earliest volcanic activity of many major hot spots, which are thought to result from deep mantle plumes. The relative volumes of melt and eruption rates of flood basalts and hot spots as well as their temporal and spatial relations can be explained by a model of mantle plume initiation: Flood basalts represent plume "heads" and hot spots represent continuing magmatism associated with the remaining plume conduit or "tail." Continental rifting is not required, although it commonly follows flood basalt volcanism, and flood basalt provinces may occur as a natural consequence of the initiation of hot-spot activity in ocean basins as well as on continents.

  8. Resonant scanning mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Newman, Mike; Gutierrez, Homero; Hoffman, Charlie; Quakenbush, Tim; Waldeck, Dan; Leone, Christopher; Ostaszewski, Miro

    2014-10-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. developed a Resonant Scanning Mechanism (RSM) capable of combining a 250- Hz resonant scan about one axis with a two-hertz triangular scan about the orthogonal axis. The RSM enables a rapid, high-density scan over a significant field of regard (FOR) while minimizing size, weight, and power requirements. The azimuth scan axis is bearing mounted allowing for 30° of mechanical travel, while the resonant elevation axis is flexure and spring mounted with five degrees of mechanical travel. Pointing-knowledge error during quiescent static pointing at room temperature across the full range is better than 100 μrad RMS per axis. The compact design of the RSM, roughly the size of a soda can, makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low-altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) resonant springs which allow for a high-frequency scan axis with low power consumption; and ii) an independent lower-frequency scan axis allowing for a wide FOR. The pointing control system operates each axis independently and employs i) a position loop for the azimuth axis; and ii) a unique combination of parallel frequency and amplitude control loops for the elevation axis. All control and pointing algorithms are hosted on a 200-MHz microcontroller with 516 KB of RAM on a compact 3"×4" digital controller, also of Ball design.

  9. Self-Checks Help Spot Melanoma's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163682.html Self-Checks Help Spot Melanoma's Return Patient-detected symptoms were most common way ... Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Self-checks by melanoma skin cancer patients play an important role in ...

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety for the Whole Family Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Hey! A Tick Bit Me! Bug Bites and Stings Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Lyme Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  11. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  12. How Many Spots Does a Cheetah Have?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Kristine M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes first grade students' mathematical investigation of the number of spots on a cheetah. The exploration of counting and estimation strategies that grew from the investigation gives evidence that mathematicians come in all ages. (ASK)

  13. Tube focal spot size and power capability impact image quality in the evaluation of intracoronary stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesmeli, Erdogan; Berry, Joel L.; Carr, J. J.

    2005-04-01

    Proliferation of coronary stent deployment for treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) creates a need for imaging-based follow-up examinations to assess patency. Technological improvements in multi-detector computer tomography (MDCT) make it a potential non-invasive alternative to coronary catheterization for evaluation of stent patency; however, image quality with MDCT varies based on the size and composition of the stent. We studied the role of tube focal spot size and power in the optimization of image quality in a stationary phantom. A standard uniform physical phantom with a tubular insert was used where coronary stents (4 mm in diameter) were deployed in a tube filled with contrast to simulate a typical imaging condition observed in clinical practice. We utilized different commercially available stents and scanned them with different tube voltage and current settings (LightSpeed Pro16, GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI, USA). The scanner used different focal spot size depending on the power load and thus allowed us to assess the combined effect of the focal spot size and the power. A radiologist evaluated the resulting images in terms of image quality and artifacts. For all stents, we found that the small focal spot size yielded better image quality and reduced artifacts. In general, higher power capability for the given focal spot size improved the signal-to-noise ratio in the images allowing improved assessment. Our preliminary study in a non-moving phantom suggests that a CT scanner that can deliver the same power on a small focal spot size is better suited to have an optimized scan protocol for reliable stent assessment.

  14. Dosimetric consequences of pencil beam width variations in scanned beam particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, M. A.; Ammazzalorso, F.; Wittig, A.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Jelen, U.

    2013-06-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery enables the highest degree of target dose conformation attainable in external beam radiotherapy. Nominal pencil beam widths (spot sizes) are recorded during treatment planning system commissioning. Due to changes in the beam-line optics, the actual spot sizes may differ from these commissioning values, leading to differences between planned and delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to analyse the dosimetric consequences of spot size variations in particle therapy treatment plans. For 12 patients with skull base tumours and 12 patients with prostate carcinoma, scanned-beam carbon ion and proton treatment plans were prepared and recomputed simulating spot size changes of (1) ±10% to simulate the typical magnitude of fluctuations, (2) ±25% representing the worst-case scenario and (3) ±50% as a part of a risk analysis in case of fault conditions. The primary effect of the spot size variation was a dose deterioration affecting the target edge: loss of target coverage and broadening of the lateral penumbra (increased spot size) or overdosage and contraction of the lateral penumbra (reduced spot size). For changes ⩽25%, the resulting planning target volume mean 95%-isodose line coverage (CI-95%) deterioration was ranging from negligible to moderate. In some cases changes in the dose to adjoining critical structures were observed.

  15. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magro, G.; Molinelli, S.; Mairani, A.; Mirandola, A.; Panizza, D.; Russo, S.; Ferrari, A.; Valvo, F.; Fossati, P.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5-30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size ratio. The accuracy of the TPS was proved to be clinically acceptable in all cases but very small and shallow volumes. In this contest, the use of MC to validate TPS results proved to be a reliable procedure for pre-treatment plan verification.

  16. Butterfly Wings Are Three-Dimensional: Pupal Cuticle Focal Spots and Their Associated Structures in Junonia Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Taira, Wataru; Otaki, Joji M

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns often contain eyespots, which are developmentally determined at the late larval and early pupal stages by organizing activities of focal cells that can later form eyespot foci. In the pupal stage, the focal position of a future eyespot is often marked by a focal spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots, on the pupal surface. Here, we examined the possible relationships of the pupal focal spots with the underneath pupal wing tissues and with the adult wing eyespots using Junonia butterflies. Large pupal focal spots were found in two species with large adult eyespots, J. orithya and J. almana, whereas only small pupal focal spots were found in a species with small adult eyespots, J. hedonia. The size of five pupal focal spots on a single wing was correlated with the size of the corresponding adult eyespots in J. orithya. A pupal focal spot was a three-dimensional bulge of cuticle surface, and the underside of the major pupal focal spot exhibited a hollowed cuticle in a pupal case. Cross sections of a pupal wing revealed that the cuticle layer shows a curvature at a focal spot, and a positional correlation was observed between the cuticle layer thickness and its corresponding cell layer thickness. Adult major eyespots of J. orithya and J. almana exhibited surface elevations and depressions that approximately correspond to the coloration within an eyespot. Our results suggest that a pupal focal spot is produced by the organizing activity of focal cells underneath the focal spot. Probably because the focal cell layer immediately underneath a focal spot is thicker than that of its surrounding areas, eyespots of adult butterfly wings are three-dimensionally constructed. The color-height relationship in adult eyespots might have an implication in the developmental signaling for determining the eyespot color patterns.

  17. Butterfly Wings Are Three-Dimensional: Pupal Cuticle Focal Spots and Their Associated Structures in Junonia Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Wataru; Otaki, Joji M.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns often contain eyespots, which are developmentally determined at the late larval and early pupal stages by organizing activities of focal cells that can later form eyespot foci. In the pupal stage, the focal position of a future eyespot is often marked by a focal spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots, on the pupal surface. Here, we examined the possible relationships of the pupal focal spots with the underneath pupal wing tissues and with the adult wing eyespots using Junonia butterflies. Large pupal focal spots were found in two species with large adult eyespots, J. orithya and J. almana, whereas only small pupal focal spots were found in a species with small adult eyespots, J. hedonia. The size of five pupal focal spots on a single wing was correlated with the size of the corresponding adult eyespots in J. orithya. A pupal focal spot was a three-dimensional bulge of cuticle surface, and the underside of the major pupal focal spot exhibited a hollowed cuticle in a pupal case. Cross sections of a pupal wing revealed that the cuticle layer shows a curvature at a focal spot, and a positional correlation was observed between the cuticle layer thickness and its corresponding cell layer thickness. Adult major eyespots of J. orithya and J. almana exhibited surface elevations and depressions that approximately correspond to the coloration within an eyespot. Our results suggest that a pupal focal spot is produced by the organizing activity of focal cells underneath the focal spot. Probably because the focal cell layer immediately underneath a focal spot is thicker than that of its surrounding areas, eyespots of adult butterfly wings are three-dimensionally constructed. The color-height relationship in adult eyespots might have an implication in the developmental signaling for determining the eyespot color patterns. PMID:26731532

  18. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  19. White-spot disease of salmon fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazuranich, J.J.; Nielson, W.E.

    1959-01-01

     White-spot disease, sometimes referred to as coagulated-yolk disease, has been associated with excessive mortalities occurring among the fry and early fingerling stages of the fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytacha) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Stations at Carson, Cook, Underwood, and Willard, Washington. This disease of eggs and fry should not be confused with the "white-spot" infection that is caused in fingerlings by members of the protozoan genus Ichthyophthirius.

  20. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S. G.

    2013-04-18

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating insidents involving redioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  1. Features of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This montage features activity in the turbulent region of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS). Four sets of images of the GRS were taken through various filters of the Galileo imaging system over an 11.5 hour period on 26 June, 1996 Universal Time. The sequence was designed to reveal cloud motions. The top and bottom frames on the left are of the same area, northeast of the GRS, viewed through the methane (732 nm) filter but about 70 minutes apart. The top left and top middle frames are of the same area and at the same time, but the top middle frame is taken at a wavelength (886 nm) where methane absorbs more strongly. (Only high clouds can reflect sunlight in this wavelength.) Brightness differences are caused by the different depths of features in the two images. The bottom middle frame shows reflected light at a wavelength (757 nm) where there are essentially no absorbers in the Jovian atmosphere. The white spot is to the northwest of the GRS; its appearance at different wavelengths suggests that the brightest elements are 30 km higher than the surrounding clouds. The top and bottom frames on the right, taken nine hours apart and in the violet (415 nm) filter, show the time evolution of an atmospheric wave northeast of the GRS. Visible crests in the top right frame are much less apparent 9 hours later in the bottom right frame. The misalignment of the north-south wave crests with the observed northwestward local wind may indicate a shift in wind direction (wind shear) with height. The areas within the dark lines are 'truth windows' or sections of the images which were transmitted to Earth using less data compression. Each of the six squares covers 4.8 degrees of latitude and longitude (about 6000 square kilometers). North is at the top of each frame.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment

  2. Spatial and temporal distributions of Martian north polar cold spots before, during, and after the global dust storm of 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornwall, C.; Titus, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, Mariner and Viking observed features in the Mars northern polar region that were a few hundred kilometers in diameter with 20 fj,m brightness temperatures as low as 130 K (considerably below C02 ice sublimation temperatures). Over the past decade, studies have shown that these areas (commonly called "cold spots") are usually due to emissivity effects of frost deposits and occasionally to active C02 snowstorms. Three Mars years of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer data were used to observe autumn and wintertime cold spot activity within the polar regions. Many cold spots formed on or near scarps of the perennial cap, probably induced by adiabatic cooling due to orographic lifting. These topographically associated cold spots were often smaller than those that were not associated with topography. We determined that initial grain sizes within the cold spots were on the order of a few millimeters, assuming the snow was uncontaminated by dust or water ice. On average, the half-life of the cold spots was 5 Julian days. The Mars global dust storm in 2001 significantly affected cold spot activity in the north polar region. Though overall perennial cap cold spot activity seemed unaffected, the distribution of cold spots did change by a decrease in the number of topographically associated cold spots and an increase in those not associated with topography. We propose that the global dust storm affected the processes that form cold spots and discuss how the global dust storm may have affected these processes. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a seasonal alert.

    PubMed

    Walker, D H

    1995-05-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever occurs during seasonal tick activity. A history of exposure to tick-containing habitats within the 3- to 12-day incubation period is a key epidemiological factor. The signs of fever, headache, myalgia, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia at onset of infection are difficult to distinguish from those of self-limited viral infections. Rash usually appears later and, if present, progresses through a sequence of stages and distribution that are never pathognomonic. The effects of disseminated Rickettsia rickettsii infection of endothelial cells include increased vascular permeability, edema, hypovolemia, hypotension, prerenal azotemia, and, in life-threatening cases, pulmonary edema, shock, acute tubular necrosis, and meningoencephalitis. In severe cases, fluid management is a challenge. The clinical diagnosis, which is difficult, is rarely assisted by laboratory findings because antibodies are usually detected only in convalescence, and immunohistologic methods for detection of rickettsiae are unavailable in most clinics. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice except for pregnant or allergic patients, who are treated with chloramphenicol.

  4. Angle extended linear MEMS scanning system for 3D laser vision sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yajun; Zhang, Yinxin; Yang, Huaidong; Zhu, Pan; Gai, Ye; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Zhanhua

    2016-09-01

    Scanning system is often considered as the most important part for 3D laser vision sensor. In this paper, we propose a method for the optical system design of angle extended linear MEMS scanning system, which has features of huge scanning degree, small beam divergence angle and small spot size for 3D laser vision sensor. The principle of design and theoretical formulas are derived strictly. With the help of software ZEMAX, a linear scanning optical system based on MEMS has been designed. Results show that the designed system can extend scanning angle from ±8° to ±26.5° with a divergence angle small than 3.5 mr, and the spot size is reduced for 4.545 times.

  5. Unblinding the dark matter blind spots

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tao; Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang; ...

    2017-02-10

    The dark matter (DM) blind spots in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) refer to the parameter regions where the couplings of the DM particles to the $Z$-boson or the Higgs boson are almost zero, leading to vanishingly small signals for the DM direct detections. In this paper, we carry out comprehensive analyses for the DM searches under the blind-spot scenarios in MSSM. Guided by the requirement of acceptable DM relic abundance, we explore the complementary coverage for the theory parameters at the LHC, the projection for the future underground DM direct searches, and the indirect searches from the relicmore » DM annihilation into photons and neutrinos. We find that (i) the spin-independent (SI) blind spots may be rescued by the spin-dependent (SD) direct detection in the future underground experiments, and possibly by the indirect DM detections from IceCube and SuperK neutrino experiments; (ii) the detection of gamma rays from Fermi-LAT may not reach the desirable sensitivity for searching for the DM blind-spot regions; (iii) the SUSY searches at the LHC will substantially extend the discovery region for the blind-spot parameters. As a result, the dark matter blind spots thus may be unblinded with the collective efforts in future DM searches.« less

  6. Nonbright-spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    The use of amplitude variation with offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace (A) and the gradient trace (B) have been used extensively in bright spot AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with low acoustic impedance bright spot responses, they are not reliable indicators of nonbright-spot seismic anomalies. Analyzing nonbright-spot seismic data with common AVO attribute sections will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. The authors divide nonbright-spot AVO offset responses into two subcategories: those with phase reversals and those without. An AVO analysis procedure for these anomalies is presented through two examples. The procedure exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and this technique is adaptive to both subcategories of nonbright-spot AVO responses. This technique identifies the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir when compared to a conventionally processed, relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance contrast sands.

  7. Unblinding the dark matter blind spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang; Wu, Yongcheng

    2017-02-01

    The dark matter (DM) blind spots in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) refer to the parameter regions where the couplings of the DM particles to the Z-boson or the Higgs boson are almost zero, leading to vanishingly small signals for the DM direct detections. In this paper, we carry out comprehensive analyses for the DM searches under the blind-spot scenarios in MSSM. Guided by the requirement of acceptable DM relic abundance, we explore the complementary coverage for the theory parameters at the LHC, the projection for the future underground DM direct searches, and the indirect searches from the relic DM annihilation into photons and neutrinos. We find that (i) the spin-independent (SI) blind spots may be rescued by the spin-dependent (SD) direct detection in the future underground experiments, and possibly by the indirect DM detections from IceCube and SuperK neutrino experiments; (ii) the detection of gamma rays from Fermi-LAT may not reach the desirable sensitivity for searching for the DM blind-spot regions; (iii) the SUSY searches at the LHC will substantially extend the discovery region for the blind-spot parameters. The dark matter blind spots thus may be unblinded with the collective efforts in future DM searches.

  8. Canopy hot-spot as crop identifier

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Simmer, C.; Powers, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    Illuminating any reflective rough or structured surface by a directional light source results in an angular reflectance distribution that shows a narrow peak in the direction of retro-reflection. This is called the Heiligenschein or hot-spot of vegetation canopies and is caused by mutual shading of leaves. The angular intensity distribution of the hot-spot, its brightness and slope, are therefore indicators of the plant's geometry. We propose the use of hot-spot characteristics as crop identifiers in satellite remote sensing because the canopy hot-spot carries information about plant stand architecture that is more distinctive for different plant species than, for instance, their spectral reflectance characteristics. A simple three-dimensional Monte Carlo/ray tracing model and an analytic two-dimensional model are developed to estimate the angular distribution of the hot-spot as a function of the size of the plant leaves. The results show that the brightness-distribution and slope of the hot-spot change distinctively for different leaf sizes indicating a much more peaked maximum for the smaller leaves.

  9. Modeling deflagration waves out of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that shock initiation and detonation of heterogeneous explosives comes about by a two-step process known as ignition and growth. In the first step a shock sweeping through an explosive cell (control volume) creates hot spots that become ignition sites. In the second step, deflagration waves (or burn waves) propagate out of those hot spots and transform the reactant in the cell into reaction products. The macroscopic (or average) reaction rate of the reactant in the cell depends on the speed of those deflagration waves and on the average distance between neighboring hot spots. Here we simulate the propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots on the mesoscale in axial symmetry using a 2D hydrocode, to which we add heat conduction and bulk reaction. The propagation speed of the deflagration waves may depend on both pressure and temperature. It depends on pressure for quasistatic loading near ambient temperature, and on temperature at high temperatures resulting from shock loading. From the simulation we obtain deflagration fronts emanating out of the hot spots. For 8 to 13 GPa shocks, the emanating fronts propagate as deflagration waves to consume the explosive between hot spots. For higher shock levels deflagration waves may interact with the sweeping shock to become detonation waves on the mesoscale. From the simulation results we extract average deflagration wave speeds.

  10. How petals change their spots: cis-regulatory re-wiring in Clarkia (Onagraceae).

    PubMed

    Martins, Talline R; Jiang, Peng; Rausher, Mark D

    2016-09-06

    A long-standing question in evolutionary developmental biology is how new traits evolve. Although most floral pigmentation studies have focused on how pigment intensity and composition diversify, few, if any, have explored how a pattern element can shift position. In the present study, we examine the genetic changes underlying shifts in the position of petal spots in Clarkia. Comparative transcriptome analyses were used to identify potential candidate genes responsible for spot formation. Co-segregation analyses in F2 individuals segregating for different spot positions, quantitative PCR, and pyrosequencing, were used to confirm the role of the candidate gene in determining spot position. Transient expression assays were used to identify the expression domain of different alleles. An R2R3Myb transcription factor (CgMyb1) activated spot formation, and different alleles of CgMyb1 were expressed in different domains, leading to spot formation in different petal locations. Reporter assays revealed that promoters from different alleles determine different locations of expression. The evolutionary shift in spot position is due to one or more cis-regulatory changes in the promoter of CgMyb1, indicating that shifts in pattern element position can be caused by changes in a single gene, and that cis-regulatory rewiring can be used to alter the relative position of an existing character.

  11. The evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots contributes to speciation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smagulova, Fatima; Brick, Kevin; Pu, Yongmei; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Petukhova, Galina V.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is required for the segregation of homologous chromosomes and is essential for fertility. In most mammals, the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are directed to a subset of genomic loci (hot spots) by sequence-specific binding of the PRDM9 protein. Rapid evolution of the DNA-binding specificity of PRDM9 and gradual erosion of PRDM9-binding sites by gene conversion will alter the recombination landscape over time. To better understand the evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots and its consequences, we mapped DSB hot spots in four major subspecies of Mus musculus with different Prdm9 alleles and in their F1 hybrids. We found that hot spot erosion governs the preferential usage of some Prdm9 alleles over others in hybrid mice and increases sequence diversity specifically at hot spots that become active in the hybrids. As crossovers are disfavored at such hot spots, we propose that sequence divergence generated by hot spot turnover may create an impediment for recombination in hybrids, potentially leading to reduced fertility and, eventually, speciation. PMID:26833728

  12. The evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots contributes to speciation in mice.

    PubMed

    Smagulova, Fatima; Brick, Kevin; Pu, Yongmei; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel; Petukhova, Galina V

    2016-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is required for the segregation of homologous chromosomes and is essential for fertility. In most mammals, the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are directed to a subset of genomic loci (hot spots) by sequence-specific binding of the PRDM9 protein. Rapid evolution of the DNA-binding specificity of PRDM9 and gradual erosion of PRDM9-binding sites by gene conversion will alter the recombination landscape over time. To better understand the evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots and its consequences, we mapped DSB hot spots in four major subspecies of Mus musculus with different Prdm9 alleles and in their F1 hybrids. We found that hot spot erosion governs the preferential usage of some Prdm9 alleles over others in hybrid mice and increases sequence diversity specifically at hot spots that become active in the hybrids. As crossovers are disfavored at such hot spots, we propose that sequence divergence generated by hot spot turnover may create an impediment for recombination in hybrids, potentially leading to reduced fertility and, eventually, speciation.

  13. Methodology and software to detect viral integration site hot-spots

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern gene therapy methods have limited control over where a therapeutic viral vector inserts into the host genome. Vector integration can activate local gene expression, which can cause cancer if the vector inserts near an oncogene. Viral integration hot-spots or 'common insertion sites' (CIS) are scrutinized to evaluate and predict patient safety. CIS are typically defined by a minimum density of insertions (such as 2-4 within a 30-100 kb region), which unfortunately depends on the total number of observed VIS. This is problematic for comparing hot-spot distributions across data sets and patients, where the VIS numbers may vary. Results We develop two new methods for defining hot-spots that are relatively independent of data set size. Both methods operate on distributions of VIS across consecutive 1 Mb 'bins' of the genome. The first method 'z-threshold' tallies the number of VIS per bin, converts these counts to z-scores, and applies a threshold to define high density bins. The second method 'BCP' applies a Bayesian change-point model to the z-scores to define hot-spots. The novel hot-spot methods are compared with a conventional CIS method using simulated data sets and data sets from five published human studies, including the X-linked ALD (adrenoleukodystrophy), CGD (chronic granulomatous disease) and SCID-X1 (X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency) trials. The BCP analysis of the human X-linked ALD data for two patients separately (774 and 1627 VIS) and combined (2401 VIS) resulted in 5-6 hot-spots covering 0.17-0.251% of the genome and containing 5.56-7.74% of the total VIS. In comparison, the CIS analysis resulted in 12-110 hot-spots covering 0.018-0.246% of the genome and containing 5.81-22.7% of the VIS, corresponding to a greater number of hot-spots as the data set size increased. Our hot-spot methods enable one to evaluate the extent of VIS clustering, and formally compare data sets in terms of hot-spot overlap. Finally, we show that the

  14. Nonlinear mathematical model for a biaxial MOEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yunfei; Davis, Wyatt O.; Ellis, Matt; Brown, Dean

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear mathematic model for Microvision's MOEMS scanning mirror is presented. The pixel placement accuracy requirement for scanned laser spot displays translates into a roughly 80dB signal to noise ratio, noise being a departure from the ideal trajectory. To provide a tool for understanding subtle nonidealities, a detailed nonlinear mathematical model is derived, using coefficients derived from physics, finite element analysis, and experiments. Twelve degrees of freedom parameterize the motion of a gimbal plate and a suspended micromirror; a thirteenth is the device temperature. Illustrations of the application of the model to capture subtleties about the device dynamics and transfer functions are presented.

  15. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiquan; Yao, Shun; Lu, Fenggui; Tang, Xinhua; Zhang, Wei

    2005-11-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built. This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams, escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  16. Nuclear Heart Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your blood and travels to your heart. Nuclear heart scans use single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) to detect the energy from the tracer to make pictures of your ...

  17. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  18. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive ch