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Sample records for active spot scanning

  1. Scans Spot Brain Region That Misfires in Depressed People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scans Spot Brain Region That Misfires in Depressed People Contrary to previous thinking, the habenula is less ... bad experiences acts in an unexpected way in people with depression, a small study finds. One theory ...

  2. Experimental verification of motion mitigation of discrete proton spot scanning by re-scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätti, A.; Zakova, M.; Meer, D.; Lomax, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to be able to treat mobile tumours with active, scanned proton therapy, adequate motion mitigation techniques have to be applied. Re-scanning is such an approach, where the interplay effect between tumour motion and treatment delivery is statistically smeared out. Different re-scanning methods have been used for the irradiation of a spherical target volume and motion amplitudes of up to 10 mm. The resulting dose distributions have been captured in two dimensions by imaging a scintillating screen at the iso-centre for different motion starting phases. Dose inhomogeneity increased approximately linearly with motion amplitude, while the influence of motion period and direction was small. Re-scanning the whole target volume reduced the interplay effect more than re-scanning only the iso-energy layers. Even for 10 mm motion amplitude, no hot or cold spots were seen for 10 re-scans of the whole volume. A fast energy change and fast beam scanning is vital for this kind of re-scanning, as available on Gantry 2 at the Paul Scherrer Institute. For larger motion amplitudes, re-scanning should be combined with gating, breath-hold or tracking to reduce the internal target volume.

  3. Experimental verification of motion mitigation of discrete proton spot scanning by re-scanning.

    PubMed

    Schätti, A; Zakova, M; Meer, D; Lomax, A J

    2013-12-01

    In order to be able to treat mobile tumours with active, scanned proton therapy, adequate motion mitigation techniques have to be applied. Re-scanning is such an approach, where the interplay effect between tumour motion and treatment delivery is statistically smeared out. Different re-scanning methods have been used for the irradiation of a spherical target volume and motion amplitudes of up to 10 mm. The resulting dose distributions have been captured in two dimensions by imaging a scintillating screen at the iso-centre for different motion starting phases. Dose inhomogeneity increased approximately linearly with motion amplitude, while the influence of motion period and direction was small. Re-scanning the whole target volume reduced the interplay effect more than re-scanning only the iso-energy layers. Even for 10 mm motion amplitude, no hot or cold spots were seen for 10 re-scans of the whole volume. A fast energy change and fast beam scanning is vital for this kind of re-scanning, as available on Gantry 2 at the Paul Scherrer Institute. For larger motion amplitudes, re-scanning should be combined with gating, breath-hold or tracking to reduce the internal target volume. PMID:24254249

  4. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single-spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field size effects on dose output. In this study, we developed a pencil beam algorithm for scanning proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy

  5. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field-size effects on dose output. In the present study, we developed a pencil-beam algorithm for scanning-proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil-beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field-size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy. PMID:22297324

  6. Spot-Scanning-Based Proton Therapy for Extracranial Chordoma

    SciTech Connect

    Staab, Adrian; Rutz, Hans Peter; Ares, Carmen; Timmermann, Beate; Schneider, Ralf; Bolsi, Alessandra; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness and safety of spot-scanning-based proton-radiotherapy (PT) for extracranial chordomas (ECC). Methods and Material: Between 1999-2006, 40 patients with chordoma of C-, T-, and L-spine and sacrum were treated at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with PT using spot-scanning. Median patient age was 58 years (range, 10-81 years); 63% were male, and 36% were female. Nineteen patients (47%) had gross residual disease (mean 69 cc; range, 13-495 cc) before PT, and 21 patients (53%) had undergone prior titanium-based surgical stabilization (SS) and reconstruction of the axial skeleton. Proton doses were expressed as Gy(RBE). A conversion factor of 1.1 was used to account for higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons compared with photons. Mean total dose was 72.5 Gy(RBE) [range, 59.4-75.2 Gy(RBE)] delivered at 1.8-2.0 Gy(RBE) dose per fraction. Median follow-up time was 43 months. Results: In 19 patients without surgical stabilization, actuarial local control (LC) rate at 5 years was 100%. LC for patients with gross residual disease but without surgical stabilization was also 100% at 5 years. In contrast, 12 failures occurred in 21 patients with SS, yielding a significantly decreased 5-year LC rate of 30% (p = 0.0003). For the entire cohort, 5-year LC rates were 62%, disease-free survival rates were 57%, and overall survival rates were 80%. Rates were 100% for patients without SS. No other factor, including dosimetric parameters (V95, V80) were predictive for tumor control on univariate analysis. Conclusion: Spot-scanning-based PT at PSI delivered subsequently to function-preserving surgery for tumor debulking, decompression of spinal cord, or biopsy only is safe and highly effective in patients with ECC without major surgical instrumentation even in view of large, unresectable disease.

  7. Scanning light spot analysis of faulty solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehovec, K.; Fedotowsky, A.

    1980-06-01

    Current output patterns of a solar cell panel exposed to a scanning light spot are computed for fault-free and for faulty cell containing either cracks with leakage conductances across the exposed junction at the crack, or point shorts in series with various spreading resistances. Low light level, uniform attenuation length, and an external panel termination of low impedance are assumed. It is shown that various boundary conditions can be satisfied by appropriate imaging techniques. A general equivalency theorem for the cell output of an illuminated point with that of an illuminated line through that point parallel to the finger electrode is derived and utilized. The preferred attenuation length of about half the finger electrode spacing can be achieved by modulating the light beam at an appropriate frequency which is typically in the low MHz range. Output patterns generated by a modulated light beam are compared with those obtained by unmodulated light.

  8. Impact of spot size on plan quality of spot scanning proton radiosurgery for peripheral brain lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dongxu Dirksen, Blake; Hyer, Daniel E.; Buatti, John M.; Sheybani, Arshin; Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; TenNapel, Mindi; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the plan quality of proton spot scanning (SS) radiosurgery as a function of spot size (in-air sigma) in comparison to x-ray radiosurgery for treating peripheral brain lesions. Methods: Single-field optimized (SFO) proton SS plans with sigma ranging from 1 to 8 mm, cone-based x-ray radiosurgery (Cone), and x-ray volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated for 11 patients. Plans were evaluated using secondary cancer risk and brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: For all patients, secondary cancer is a negligible risk compared to brain necrosis NTCP. Secondary cancer risk was lower in proton SS plans than in photon plans regardless of spot size (p = 0.001). Brain necrosis NTCP increased monotonically from an average of 2.34/100 (range 0.42/100–4.49/100) to 6.05/100 (range 1.38/100–11.6/100) as sigma increased from 1 to 8 mm, compared to the average of 6.01/100 (range 0.82/100–11.5/100) for Cone and 5.22/100 (range 1.37/100–8.00/100) for VMAT. An in-air sigma less than 4.3 mm was required for proton SS plans to reduce NTCP over photon techniques for the cohort of patients studied with statistical significance (p = 0.0186). Proton SS plans with in-air sigma larger than 7.1 mm had significantly greater brain necrosis NTCP than photon techniques (p = 0.0322). Conclusions: For treating peripheral brain lesions—where proton therapy would be expected to have the greatest depth-dose advantage over photon therapy—the lateral penumbra strongly impacts the SS plan quality relative to photon techniques: proton beamlet sigma at patient surface must be small (<7.1 mm for three-beam single-field optimized SS plans) in order to achieve comparable or smaller brain necrosis NTCP relative to photon radiosurgery techniques. Achieving such small in-air sigma values at low energy (<70 MeV) is a major technological challenge in commercially available proton therapy systems.

  9. Effects of spot size and spot spacing on lateral penumbra reduction when using a dynamic collimation system for spot scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the reduction in lateral dose penumbra that can be achieved when using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for spot scanning proton therapy as a function of two beam parameters: spot size and spot spacing. This is an important investigation as both values impact the achievable dose distribution and a wide range of values currently exist depending on delivery hardware. Treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σair) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm as well as spot spacing intervals of 2, 4, 6 and 8 mm. Compared to un-collimated treatment plans, the plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2-40.6% for spot sizes of 3-9 mm, respectively. Increasing the spot spacing resulted in a decrease in the time penalty associated with using the DCS that was approximately proportional to the reduction in the number of rows in the raster delivery pattern. We conclude that dose distributions achievable when using the DCS are comparable to those only attainable with much smaller initial spot sizes, suggesting that the goal of improving high dose conformity may be achieved by either utilizing a DCS or by improving beam line optics.

  10. Effects of spot size and spot spacing on lateral penumbra reduction when using a dynamic collimation system for spot scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Daniel E; Hill, Patrick M; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R; Flynn, Ryan T

    2014-11-21

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the reduction in lateral dose penumbra that can be achieved when using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for spot scanning proton therapy as a function of two beam parameters: spot size and spot spacing. This is an important investigation as both values impact the achievable dose distribution and a wide range of values currently exist depending on delivery hardware. Treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σair) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm as well as spot spacing intervals of 2, 4, 6 and 8 mm. Compared to un-collimated treatment plans, the plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2-40.6% for spot sizes of 3-9 mm, respectively. Increasing the spot spacing resulted in a decrease in the time penalty associated with using the DCS that was approximately proportional to the reduction in the number of rows in the raster delivery pattern. We conclude that dose distributions achievable when using the DCS are comparable to those only attainable with much smaller initial spot sizes, suggesting that the goal of improving high dose conformity may be achieved by either utilizing a DCS or by improving beam line optics. PMID:25330783

  11. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  12. SU-E-T-303: Spot Scanning Dose Delivery with Rapid Cycling Proton Beams From RCMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C; Liu, H; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A rapid cycling proton beam has several distinct characteristics superior to a slow extraction synchrotron: The beam energy and energy spread, beam intensity and spot size can be varied spot by spot. The feasibility of using a spot scanning beam from a rapidc-ycling-medical-synchrotron (RCMS) at 10 Hz repetition frequency is investigated in this study for its application in proton therapy. Methods: The versatility of the beam is illustrated by two examples in water phantoms: (1) a cylindrical PTV irradiated by a single field and (2) a spherical PTV irradiated by two parallel opposed fields. A uniform dose distribution is to be delivered to the volumes. Geant4 Monte Carlo code is used to validate the dose distributions in each example. Results: Transverse algorithms are developed to produce uniform distributions in each transverseplane in the two examples with a cylindrical and a spherical PTV respectively. Longitudinally, different proton energies are used in successive transverse planes toproduce the SOBP required to cover the PTVs. In general, uniformity of dosedistribution within 3% is obtained for the cylinder and 3.5% for the sphere. The transversealgorithms requires only few hundred beam spots for each plane The algorithms may beapplied to larger volumes by increasing the intensity spot by spot for the same deliverytime of the same dose. The treatment time can be shorter than 1 minute for any fieldconfiguration and tumor shape. Conclusion: The unique beam characteristics of a spot scanning beam from a RCMS at 10 Hz repetitionfrequency are used to design transverse and longitudinal algorithms to produce uniformdistribution for any arbitrary shape and size of targets. The proposed spot scanning beam ismore versatile than existing spot scanning beams in proton therapy with better beamcontrol and lower neutron dose. This work is supported in part by grants from the US Department of Energy under contract; DE-FG02-12ER41800 and the National Science

  13. Motion Interplay as a Function of Patient Parameters and Spot Size in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Lomax, Antony; Sharp, Greg; Shackleford, James; Choi, Noah; Willers, Henning; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of respiratory motion on the treatment of lung tumors with spot scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the interplay effect, which results from relative motion of the tumor and the proton beam, on the dose distribution in the patient. Ten patients with varying tumor sizes (2.6-82.3 cc) and motion amplitudes (3-30 mm) were included in the study. We investigated the impact of the spot size, which varies between proton facilities, and studied single fractions and conventionally fractionated treatments. The following metrics were used in the analysis: minimum/maximum/mean dose, target dose homogeneity, and 2-year local control rate (2y-LC). Results: Respiratory motion reduces the target dose homogeneity, with the largest effects observed for the highest motion amplitudes. Smaller spot sizes (σ ≈ 3 mm) are inherently more sensitive to motion, decreasing target dose homogeneity on average by a factor 2.8 compared with a larger spot size (σ ≈ 13 mm). Using a smaller spot size to treat a tumor with 30-mm motion amplitude reduces the minimum dose to 44.7% of the prescribed dose, decreasing modeled 2y-LC from 87.0% to 2.7%, assuming a single fraction. Conventional fractionation partly mitigates this reduction, yielding a 2y-LC of 71.6%. For the large spot size, conventional fractionation increases target dose homogeneity and prevents a deterioration of 2y-LC for all patients. No correlation with tumor volume is observed. The effect on the normal lung dose distribution is minimal: observed changes in mean lung dose and lung V{sub 20} are <0.6 Gy(RBE) and <1.7%, respectively. Conclusions: For the patients in this study, 2y-LC could be preserved in the presence of interplay using a large spot size and conventional fractionation. For treatments using smaller spot sizes and/or in the delivery of single fractions, interplay effects can lead to significant deterioration of

  14. SU-E-T-133: Dosimetric Impact of Scan Orientation Relative to Target Motion During Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, J; Summers, P; Li, X; Gomez, D; Sahoo, N; Zhu, X; Gillin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intra-fraction motion during spot scanning proton beam therapy as a function of beam-scan orientation and target motion amplitude. Method: Multiple 4DCT scans were collected of a dynamic anthropomorphic phantom mimicking respiration amplitudes of 0 (static), 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm. A spot-scanning treatment plan was developed on the maximum intensity projection image set, using an inverse-planning approach. Dynamic phantom motion was continuous throughout treatment plan delivery.The target nodule was designed to accommodate film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Film and TLDs were uniquely labeled by location within the target. The phantom was localized on the treatment table using the clinically available orthogonal kV on-board imaging device. Film inserts provided data for dose uniformity; TLDs provided a 3% precision estimate of absolute dose. An inhouse script was developed to modify the delivery order of the beam spots, to orient the scanning direction parallel or perpendicular to target motion.TLD detector characterization and analysis was performed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core group (IROC)-Houston. Film inserts, exhibiting a spatial resolution of 1mm, were analyzed to determine dose homogeneity within the radiation target. Results: Parallel scanning and target motions exhibited reduced target dose heterogeneity, relative to perpendicular scanning orientation. The average percent deviation in absolute dose for the motion deliveries relative to the static delivery was 4.9±1.1% for parallel scanning, and 11.7±3.5% (p<<0.05) for perpendicularly oriented scanning. Individual delivery dose deviations were not necessarily correlated to amplitude of motion for either scan orientation. Conclusions: Results demonstrate a quantifiable difference in dose heterogeneity as a function of scan orientation, more so than target amplitude. Comparison to the analyzed planar dose of a single

  15. A method to select aperture margin in collimated spot scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R; Gelover, Edgar; Flynn, Ryan T; Hyer, Daniel E

    2015-04-01

    The use of collimator or aperture may sharpen the lateral dose gradient for spot scanning proton therapy. However, to date, there has not been a standard method to determine the aperture margin for a single field in collimated spot scanning proton therapy. This study describes a theoretical framework to select the optimal aperture margin for a single field, and also presents the spot spacing limit required such that the optimal aperture margin exists. Since, for a proton pencil beam partially intercepted by collimator, the maximum point dose (spot center) shifts away from the original pencil beam central axis, we propose that the optimal margin should be equal to the maximum pencil beam center shift under the condition that spot spacing is small with respect to the maximum pencil beam center shift, which can be numerically determined based on beam modeling data. A test case is presented which demonstrates agreement with the prediction made based on the proposed methods. When apertures are applied in a commercial treatment planning system this method may be implemented. PMID:25776926

  16. A method to select aperture margin in collimated spot scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Gelover, Edgar; Flynn, Ryan T.; Hyer, Daniel E.

    2015-04-01

    The use of collimator or aperture may sharpen the lateral dose gradient for spot scanning proton therapy. However, to date, there has not been a standard method to determine the aperture margin for a single field in collimated spot scanning proton therapy. This study describes a theoretical framework to select the optimal aperture margin for a single field, and also presents the spot spacing limit required such that the optimal aperture margin exists. Since, for a proton pencil beam partially intercepted by collimator, the maximum point dose (spot center) shifts away from the original pencil beam central axis, we propose that the optimal margin should be equal to the maximum pencil beam center shift under the condition that spot spacing is small with respect to the maximum pencil beam center shift, which can be numerically determined based on beam modeling data. A test case is presented which demonstrates agreement with the prediction made based on the proposed methods. When apertures are applied in a commercial treatment planning system this method may be implemented.

  17. Scanning metallic nanosphere microscopy for vectorial profiling of optical focal spots.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hui; Long, Jing; Li, Hongquan; He, Xiaolong; Yang, Tian

    2015-04-01

    Recent years have witnessed fast progress in the development of spatially variant states of polarization under high numerical aperture focusing, and intensive exploration of their applications. We report a vectorial, broadband, high contrast and subwavelength resolution method for focal spot profiling. In this experiment, a 100 nm diameter gold nanosphere on a silica aerogel substrate is raster scanned across the focal spots, and the orthogonal polarization components can be obtained simultaneously by measuring the scattering far field in a confocal manner. The metallic-nanosphere-on-aerogel structure ensures negligible distortion to the focal spots, low crosstalk between orthogonal polarization components (1/39 in experiment), and a low level background noise (1/80 of peak intensity in experiment), while high contrast imaging is not limited by the resonance bandwidth. PMID:25968672

  18. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of spot-scanning proton irradiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenichiro; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsuura, Taeko; Yamamori, Tohru; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nagane, Masaki; Nam, Jin-Min; Inanami, Osamu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) from a fixed value of 1.1 are critical in proton beam therapy. To date, studies estimating RBE at multiple positions relative to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) have been predominantly performed using passive scattering methods, and limited data are available for spot-scanning beams. Thus, to investigate the RBE of spot-scanning beams, Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were irradiated using the beam line at the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Cells were placed at six different depths, including the entrance of the proton beam and the proximal and distal part of the SOBP. Surviving cell fractions were analyzed using colony formation assay, and cell survival curves were obtained by the curve fitted using a linear-quadratic model. RBE10 and RBE37 were 1.15 and 1.21 at the center of the SOBP, respectively. In contrast, the distal region showed higher RBE values (1.50 for RBE10 and 1.85 for RBE37). These results are in line with those of previous studies conducted using passive scattering proton beams. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that variations in RBE should be considered during treatment planning for spot-scanning beams as well as for passive scattering proton beams. PMID:26838131

  19. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of spot-scanning proton irradiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kenichiro; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsuura, Taeko; Yamamori, Tohru; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nagane, Masaki; Nam, Jin-Min; Inanami, Osamu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) from a fixed value of 1.1 are critical in proton beam therapy. To date, studies estimating RBE at multiple positions relative to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) have been predominantly performed using passive scattering methods, and limited data are available for spot-scanning beams. Thus, to investigate the RBE of spot-scanning beams, Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were irradiated using the beam line at the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Cells were placed at six different depths, including the entrance of the proton beam and the proximal and distal part of the SOBP. Surviving cell fractions were analyzed using colony formation assay, and cell survival curves were obtained by the curve fitted using a linear–quadratic model. RBE10 and RBE37 were 1.15 and 1.21 at the center of the SOBP, respectively. In contrast, the distal region showed higher RBE values (1.50 for RBE10 and 1.85 for RBE37). These results are in line with those of previous studies conducted using passive scattering proton beams. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that variations in RBE should be considered during treatment planning for spot-scanning beams as well as for passive scattering proton beams. PMID:26838131

  20. Effects of minimum monitor unit threshold on spot scanning proton plan quality

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Michelle Beltran, Chris; Mayo, Charles S.; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5–10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1–20 cm. Three-field, intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000–0.0060; and spot spacing range of 2–8 mm. Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. For the pediatric brain, two versions of the treatment planning system were also compared to judge the effects of the min-MU limit based on when it is accounted for in the optimization process (Eclipse v.10 and v.13, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Results: The increase of the min-MU limit with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 4 mm. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 8 mm, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusions: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤4 mm, plan quality decreases as min-MU increased beyond 0.0020. The effect of min-MU needs to be taken into consideration while planning proton therapy treatments.

  1. Treatment planning and verification of proton therapy using spot scanning: Initial experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, Antony J.; Boehringer, Terence; Bolsi, Alessandra; Coray, Doelf; Emert, Frank; Goitein, Gudrun; Jermann, Martin; Lin, Shixiong; Pedroni, Eros; Rutz, Hanspeter; Stadelmann, Otto; Timmermann, Beate; Verwey, Jorn; Weber, Damien C.

    2004-11-01

    Since the end of 1996, we have treated more than 160 patients at PSI using spot-scanned protons. The range of indications treated has been quite wide and includes, in the head region, base-of-skull sarcomas, low-grade gliomas, meningiomas, and para-nasal sinus tumors. In addition, we have treated bone sarcomas in the neck and trunk - mainly in the sacral area - as well as prostate cases and some soft tissue sarcomas. PTV volumes for our treated cases are in the range 20-4500 ml, indicating the flexibility of the spot scanning system for treating lesions of all types and sizes. The number of fields per applied plan ranges from between 1 and 4, with a mean of just under 3 beams per plan, and the number of fluence modulated Bragg peaks delivered per field has ranged from 200 to 45 000. With the current delivery rate of roughly 3000 Bragg peaks per minute, this translates into delivery times per field of between a few seconds to 20-25 min. Bragg peak weight analysis of these spots has shown that over all fields, only about 10% of delivered spots have a weight of more than 10% of the maximum in any given field, indicating that there is some scope for optimizing the number of spots delivered per field. Field specific dosimetry shows that these treatments can be delivered accurately and precisely to within {+-}1 mm (1 SD) orthogonal to the field direction and to within 1.5 mm in range. With our current delivery system the mean widths of delivered pencil beams at the Bragg peak is about 8 mm ({sigma}) for all energies, indicating that this is an area where some improvements can be made. In addition, an analysis of the spot weights and energies of individual Bragg peaks shows a relatively broad spread of low and high weighted Bragg peaks over all energy steps, indicating that there is at best only a limited relationship between pencil beam weighting and depth of penetration. This latter observation may have some consequences when considering strategies for fast re-scanning

  2. Use of treatment log files in spot scanning proton therapy as part of patient-specific quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Zhang Xiaodong; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to assess the monitor unit (MU) values and position accuracy of spot scanning proton beams as recorded by the daily treatment logs of the treatment control system, and furthermore establish the feasibility of using the delivered spot positions and MU values to calculate and evaluate delivered doses to patients. Methods: To validate the accuracy of the recorded spot positions, the authors generated and executed a test treatment plan containing nine spot positions, to which the authors delivered ten MU each. The spot positions were measured with radiographic films and Matrixx 2D ion-chambers array placed at the isocenter plane and compared for displacements from the planned and recorded positions. Treatment logs for 14 patients were then used to determine the spot MU values and position accuracy of the scanning proton beam delivery system. Univariate analysis was used to detect any systematic error or large variation between patients, treatment dates, proton energies, gantry angles, and planned spot positions. The recorded patient spot positions and MU values were then used to replace the spot positions and MU values in the plan, and the treatment planning system was used to calculate the delivered doses to patients. The results were compared with the treatment plan. Results: Within a treatment session, spot positions were reproducible within {+-}0.2 mm. The spot positions measured by film agreed with the planned positions within {+-}1 mm and with the recorded positions within {+-}0.5 mm. The maximum day-to-day variation for any given spot position was within {+-}1 mm. For all 14 patients, with {approx}1 500 000 spots recorded, the total MU accuracy was within 0.1% of the planned MU values, the mean (x, y) spot displacement from the planned value was (-0.03 mm, -0.01 mm), the maximum (x, y) displacement was (1.68 mm, 2.27 mm), and the (x, y) standard deviation was (0.26 mm, 0.42 mm). The maximum dose difference between calculated

  3. NOTE: Comparison of surface doses from spot scanning and passively scattered proton therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Cox, James; Lee, Andrew; Gillin, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Proton therapy for the treatment of cancer is delivered using either passively scattered or scanning beams. Each technique delivers a different amount of dose to the skin, because of the specific feature of their delivery system. The amount of dose delivered to the skin can play an important role in choosing the delivery technique for a specific site. To assess the differences in skin doses, we measured the surface doses associated with these two techniques. For the purpose of this investigation, the surface doses in a phantom were measured for ten prostate treatment fields planned with passively scattered proton beams and ten patients planned with spot scanning proton beams. The measured doses were compared to evaluate the differences in the amount of skin dose delivered by using these techniques. The results indicate that, on average, the patients treated with spot scanning proton beams received lower skin doses by an amount of 11.8% ± 0.3% than did the patients treated with passively scattered proton beams. That difference could amount to 4 CGE per field for a prescribed dose of 76 CGE in 38 fractions treated with two equally weighted parallel opposed fields.

  4. Experimental characterization of two-dimensional spot profiles for two proton pencil beam scanning nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong; Ainsley, Christopher G.; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Dose calculation for pencil beam scanning proton therapy requires accurate measurement of the broad tails of the proton spot profiles for every nozzle in clinical use. By applying a pair/magnification method and merging film data, 200 mm × 240 mm dose kernels extending to 10-4 of the central spot dose are generated for six selected energies of the IBA dedicated and universal nozzles (DN and UN). One-dimensional, circular profiles up to 100 mm in radius are generated from the asymmetric profiles to facilitate spot profile comparison. For the highest energy, 225 MeV, the output of both the DN and the UN for field sizes from 40 to 200 mm increases in parallel, slowest at the surface (˜1%) and fastest at a depth of 150 mm (˜9%). In contrast, at the lowest energy, 100 MeV, the output of the DN across the same range of field sizes increases 3-4% versus 6-7% for the UN throughout all the depths. The charge deficits in the measured depth-dose of Bragg peaks are similar between the UN and the DN. At 100 MeV, the field size factor difference at the surface between two orientations of a rectangular 40 mm × 200 mm field is 1.4% at isocentre for the DN versus 2% for the UN. Though the one-dimensional distributions are similar for the primary and tail components at different positions, the primary components of the DN spots are more elliptical 270 mm upstream than at isocentre.

  5. Experimental characterization of two-dimensional spot profiles for two proton pencil beam scanning nozzles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Ainsley, Christopher G; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E

    2014-01-20

    Dose calculation for pencil beam scanning proton therapy requires accurate measurement of the broad tails of the proton spot profiles for every nozzle in clinical use. By applying a pair/magnification method and merging film data, 200 mm × 240 mm dose kernels extending to 10(-4) of the central spot dose are generated for six selected energies of the IBA dedicated and universal nozzles (DN and UN). One-dimensional, circular profiles up to 100 mm in radius are generated from the asymmetric profiles to facilitate spot profile comparison. For the highest energy, 225 MeV, the output of both the DN and the UN for field sizes from 40 to 200 mm increases in parallel, slowest at the surface (∼1%) and fastest at a depth of 150 mm (∼9%). In contrast, at the lowest energy, 100 MeV, the output of the DN across the same range of field sizes increases 3-4% versus 6-7% for the UN throughout all the depths. The charge deficits in the measured depth-dose of Bragg peaks are similar between the UN and the DN. At 100 MeV, the field size factor difference at the surface between two orientations of a rectangular 40 mm × 200 mm field is 1.4% at isocentre for the DN versus 2% for the UN. Though the one-dimensional distributions are similar for the primary and tail components at different positions, the primary components of the DN spots are more elliptical 270 mm upstream than at isocentre. PMID:24374943

  6. SU-E-T-73: Commissioning of a Treatment Planning System for Proton Spot Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, J; Kang, Y; Schultz, L; Nicewonger, D; Herrera, M; Wong, T; Bowen, S; Bloch, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned for clinical use with a fixed beam line proton delivery system. An outline of the data collection, modeling, and verification is provided. Methods: Beam data modeling for proton spot scanning in CMS Xio TPS requires the following measurements: (i) integral depth dose curves (IDDCs); (ii) absolute dose calibration; and (iii) beam spot characteristics. The IDDCs for 18 proton energies were measured using an integrating detector in a single spot field in a water phantom. Absolute scaling of the IDDCs were performed based on ion chamber measurements in mono-energetic 10×10 cm{sup 2} fields in water. Beam spot shapes were measured in air using a flat panel scintillator detector at multiple planes. For beam model verification, more than 45 uniform dose phantom and patient plans were generated. These plans were used to measure range, point dose, and longitudinal and lateral profiles. Tolerances employed for verification are: point dose and longitudinal profiles, ±2%; range, ±1 mm; FWHM for lateral profiles, ±2 mm; and patient plan dose distribution, gamma index of >90% at 3%/3 mm criteria. Results: More than 97% of the point dose measurements out of 115 were within +/-2% with maximum deviation of 3%. 98% of the ranges measured were within 1 mm with maximum deviation of 1.4mm. The normalized depth doses were within 2% at all depths. The maximum error in FWHM of lateral profiles was found to be less than 2mm. For 5 patient plans representing different anatomic sites, a total of 38 planes for 12 beams were analyzed for gamma index with average value of 99% and minimum of 94%. Conclusions: The planning system is successfully commissioned and can be safely deployed for clinical use. Measurements of IDDCs on user beam are highly recommended instead of using standard beam IDDCs.

  7. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  8. Experimental characterization of two-dimensional pencil beam scanning proton spot profiles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2013-09-01

    Dose calculations of pencil beam scanning treatment plans rely on the accuracy of proton spot profiles; not only the primary component but also the broad tail components. Four films are placed at several locations in air and multiple depths in Solidwater® for six selected energies. The films used for the primary components are exposed to 50-200 MU to avoid saturation; the films used for the tail components are exposed to 800, 8000 and 80,000 MU. By applying a pair/magnification method and merging these data, dose kernels down to 10(-4) of the central spot dose can be generated. From these kernels one can calculate the dose-per-MU for different field sizes and shapes. Measurements agree within 1% of dose-kernel-based calculations for output versus field size comparisons. Asymmetric, comet-shaped profile tails have a bigger impact at superficial depths and low energies: the output difference between two orientations at the surface of a rectangular field of 40 mm×200 mm is about 2% at the isocentre at 100 MeV. Integration of these dose kernels from 0 to 40 mm radius shows that the charge deficit in the Bragg peak chamber varies <2% from entrance to the end of range for energies <180 MeV, but exceeds 5% at 225 MeV. PMID:23948730

  9. Experimental characterization of two-dimensional pencil beam scanning proton spot profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong; Ainsley, Christopher G.; McDonough, James E.

    2013-09-01

    Dose calculations of pencil beam scanning treatment plans rely on the accuracy of proton spot profiles; not only the primary component but also the broad tail components. Four films are placed at several locations in air and multiple depths in Solidwater® for six selected energies. The films used for the primary components are exposed to 50-200 MU to avoid saturation; the films used for the tail components are exposed to 800, 8000 and 80 000 MU. By applying a pair/magnification method and merging these data, dose kernels down to 10-4 of the central spot dose can be generated. From these kernels one can calculate the dose-per-MU for different field sizes and shapes. Measurements agree within 1% of dose-kernel-based calculations for output versus field size comparisons. Asymmetric, comet-shaped profile tails have a bigger impact at superficial depths and low energies: the output difference between two orientations at the surface of a rectangular field of 40 mm×200 mm is about 2% at the isocentre at 100 MeV. Integration of these dose kernels from 0 to 40 mm radius shows that the charge deficit in the Bragg peak chamber varies <2% from entrance to the end of range for energies <180 MeV, but exceeds 5% at 225 MeV.

  10. An MCNPX Monte Carlo model of a discrete spot scanning proton beam therapy nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Perles, Luis A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ron; Ciangaru, George; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Gillin, Michael T.; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to validate a discrete spot scanning proton beam nozzle using the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNPX and use the MC validated model to investigate the effects of a low-dose envelope, which surrounds the beam's central axis, on measurements of integral depth dose (IDD) profiles. Methods: An accurate model of the discrete spot scanning beam nozzle from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, Texas) was developed on the basis of blueprints provided by the manufacturer of the nozzle. The authors performed simulations of single proton pencil beams of various energies using the standard multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) algorithm within the MCNPX source code and a new MCS algorithm, which was implemented in the MCNPX source code. The MC models were validated by comparing calculated in-air and in-water lateral profiles and percentage depth dose profiles for single pencil beams with their corresponding measured values. The models were then further tested by comparing the calculated and measured three-dimensional (3-D) dose distributions. Finally, an IDD profile was calculated with different scoring radii to determine the limitations on the use of commercially available plane-parallel ionization chambers to measure IDD. Results: The distance to agreement, defined as the distance between the nearest positions of two equivalent distributions with the same value of dose, between measured and simulated ranges was within 0.13 cm for both MCS algorithms. For low and intermediate pencil beam energies, the MC simulations using the standard MCS algorithm were in better agreement with measurements. Conversely, the new MCS algorithm produced better results for high-energy single pencil beams. The IDD profile calculated with cylindrical tallies with an area equivalent to the area of the largest commercially available ionization chamber showed up to 7.8% underestimation of the integral dose in certain depths of the IDD profile

  11. Spot market activity remains weak as prices continue to fall

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    A summary of financial data for the uranium spot market in November 1996 is provided. Price ranges for the restricted and unrestricted markets, conversion, and separative work are listed, and total market volume and new contracts are noted. Transactions made are briefly described. Deals made and pending in the spot concentrates, medium and long-term, conversion, and markets are listed for U.S. and non-U.S. buyers. Spot market activity increased in November with just over 1.0 million lbs of U3O8 equivalent being transacted compared to October`s total of 530,000 lbs of U3O8 equivalent. The restricted uranium spot market price range slipped from $15.50-$15.70/lb U3O8 last month to $14.85/lb - $15.25/lb U3O8 this month. The unrestricted uranium spot market price range also slipped to $14.85/lb - $15.00/lb this month from $15.00/lb - $15.45/lb in October. Spot prices for conversion and separative work units remained at their October levels.

  12. A dynamic collimation system for penumbra reduction in spot-scanning proton therapy: Proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E. Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system the lateral penumbra of spot scanning (SS) dose distributions delivered by low energy proton beams is highly dependent on the spot size. For current commercial equipment, spot size increases with decreasing proton energy thereby reducing the benefit of the SS technique. This paper presents a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for sharpening the lateral penumbra of proton therapy dose distributions delivered by SS. Methods: The collimation system presented here exploits the property that a proton pencil beam used for SS requires collimation only when it is near the target edge, enabling the use of trimmers that are in motion at times when the pencil beam is away from the target edge. The device consists of two pairs of parallel nickel trimmer blades of 2 cm thickness and dimensions of 2 cm × 18 cm in the beam's eye view. The two pairs of trimmer blades are rotated 90° relative to each other to form a rectangular shape. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. The blades travel on curved tracks to match the divergence of the proton source. An algorithm for selecting blade positions is developed to minimize the dose delivered outside of the target, and treatment plans are created both with and without the DCS. Results: The snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using currently available components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. For irregularly shaped fields, the use of the DCS reduces the mean dose outside of a 2D target of 46.6 cm{sup 2} by approximately 40% as compared to an identical plan without collimation. The use of the DCS increased treatment time by 1–3 s per energy layer. Conclusions: The spread of the

  13. More than 10 years experience of beam monitoring with the Gantry 1 spot scanning proton therapy facility at PSI

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shixiong; Boehringer, Terence; Coray, Adolf; Grossmann, Martin; Pedroni, Eros

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The beam monitoring equipments developed for the first PSI spot scanning proton therapy facility, Gantry 1, have been successfully used for more than 10 years. The purpose of this article is to summarize the author's experience in the beam monitoring technique for dynamic proton scanning. Methods: The spot dose delivery and verification use two independent beam monitoring and computer systems. In this article, the detector construction, electronic system, dosimetry, and quality assurance results are described in detail. The beam flux monitor is calibrated with a Faraday cup. The beam position monitoring is realized by measuring the magnetic fields of deflection magnets with Hall probes before applying the spot and by checking the beam position and width with an ionization strip chamber after the spot delivery. Results: The results of thimble ionization chamber dosimetry measurements are reproducible (with a mean deviation of less than 1% and a standard deviation of 1%). The resolution in the beam position measurement is of the order of a tenth of a millimeter. The tolerance of the beam position delivery and monitoring during scanning is less than 1.5 mm. Conclusions: The experiences gained with the successful operation of Gantry 1 represent a unique and solid background for the development of a new system, Gantry 2, in order to perform new advanced scanning techniques.

  14. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  15. Laser Pyrometer For Spot Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Allen, J. L.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser pyrometer makes temperature map by scanning measuring spot across target. Scanning laser pyrometer passively measures radiation emitted by scanned spot on target and calibrated by similar passive measurement on blackbody of known temperature. Laser beam turned on for active measurements of reflectances of target spot and reflectance standard. From measurements, temperature of target spot inferred. Pyrometer useful for non-contact measurement of temperature distributions in processing of materials.

  16. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the "Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)". In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  17. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    SciTech Connect

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-19

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the {sup F}unding Program for World-Leading Innovative R and D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program){sup .} In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  18. A novel technique for measuring the low-dose envelope of pencil-beam scanning spot profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong; Ainsley, Christopher G.; Mertens, Thierry; De Wilde, Olivier; Talla, Patrick T.; McDonough, James E.

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the profile measurement capabilities of an IBA-Dosimetry scintillation detector and to assess its feasibility for determining the low-intensity tails of pencil-beam scanning spots, the responses of the scintillation detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film to a 115 MeV proton spot were measured in-air at the isocenter. Pairs of irradiations were made: one lower-level irradiation insufficient to cause saturation, and one higher-level irradiation which deliberately saturated the central region of the spot, but provided magnification of the tails. By employing the pair/magnification technique, agreement between the film and scintillation detector measurements of the spot profile can be extended from 4% of the central spot dose down to 0.01%. Gamma analysis between these measurements shows 95% and 99% agreement within a ±9 cm bound using criteria of 3 mm/3% and 5 mm/5%, respectively. Above 4%, our 115 MeV proton spot can be well-described by Gaussian function; below 4%, non-Gaussian, diamond-shaped tails predominate.

  19. Hot spots and active longitudes: Organization of solar activity as a probe of the interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Scherrer, Phil H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate how solar activity is organized in longitude, major solar flares, large sunspot groups, and large scale photospheric magnetic field strengths were analyzed. The results of these analyses are reported. The following results are discussed: hot spots, initially recognized as areas of high concentration of major flares, are the preferred locations for the emergence of big sunspot groups; double hot spots appear in pairs that rotate at the same rate separated by about 180 deg in longitude, whereas, single hot spots have no such companions; the northern and southern hemispheres behave differently in organizing solar activity in longitude; the lifetime of hot spots range from one to several solar cycles; a hot spot is not always active throughout its lifetime, but goes through dormant periods; and hot spots with different rotational periods coexist in the same hemisphere during the same solar cycle.

  20. Evidence of Hot Spot Activity on BH Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fuyuan; Tao, Xia; Tian, Yongpo

    2007-10-01

    Photoelectric light curves of BH Vir in the UBVRI bands observed by Arévalo et al. in 1986 were analyzed by using the latest version of the Wilson-Devinney program and to investigate the photometric parameters and spot activity. Satisfactory fits were obtained by assuming a hot spot only on the secondary star. The results show that the temperature of the spotted region relative to the photosphere, Ts / Tph, is 1.13 ± 0.027. The active region tends to occur at low latitude (near 81°). The results also show that the mass ratio obtained from the photoelectric light curves is q = m2 / m1 = 0.971. It is close to the spectroscopic value of 0.968 obtained by Zhai et al. (1990). The photosphere temperature of the primary is T1 = 5969 ± 11 K. After checking of the activity pattern from 1953 to 1991, the activity cycle is estimated to be about 10 yr.

  1. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors.

  2. TH-C-BRD-09: Successes and Limitations of Online Range Adaptive Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, JP; Dong, L; Park, P; Zhu, XR; Kudchadker, RJ; Frank, SJ; Court, LE

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the ability to adapt discrete spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) plans based on geometric changes of anatomy to minimize normal tissue dose and maintain target coverage. Methods: We developed and tested a range-correction algorithm to compensate for anatomy changes in SSPT with correction factors for target lateral size changes and energy scaling. This algorithm adjusts the energy of each spot from the original optimized treatment plan to match the new daily anatomy based on water equivalent path-length. To correct for the lateral target size changes, the peripheral spots were scaled based on phantom studies with variable target size. For energy change corrections, alternative cumulative scaling factor lookup tables were generated based on calculated central-axis and integral depth dose calculations for different energies. These various adaptive algorithms were performed on 7 lung cancer patients that were previously treated with proton therapy and who required at least one adaptive intervention. Single-field optimized SSPT plans were generated for these patients with clinical beam angles. Dose-volume histogram metrics were obtained for these patients for both the non-adaptive and the different adaptive plans applied to the last available weekly CT scan. Results: The doses to normal tissue were largely reduced for the spinal cord (Dmax), total lung (V20Gy), and contralateral lung (V20Gy) for all different methods of adaptive planning. With both corrections applied, the average changes for these metrics were −6.2Gy, −2.7%, and −4.9%, respectively. The same method generated unacceptably high target hot spots with average target V110% increase of 12.3%. Conclusion: Adaptive methods based on direct adjustments to proton range can reduce normal tissue doses under large anatomical changes but are insufficient in achieving clinically acceptable target doses and generate unacceptably sizeable hot spots. Adaptive planning methods for proton

  3. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was car-ried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three dif-ferent depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon

  4. Comparison of two methods for minimizing the effect of delayed charge on the dose delivered with a synchrotron based discrete spot scanning proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Thomas J. Beltran, Chris; Tryggestad, Erik; Kruse, Jon J.; Remmes, Nicholas B.; Tasson, Alexandria; Herman, Michael G.; Bues, Martin

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Delayed charge is a small amount of charge that is delivered to the patient after the planned irradiation is halted, which may degrade the quality of the treatment by delivering unwarranted dose to the patient. This study compares two methods for minimizing the effect of delayed charge on the dose delivered with a synchrotron based discrete spot scanning proton beam. Methods: The delivery of several treatment plans was simulated by applying a normally distributed value of delayed charge, with a mean of 0.001(SD 0.00025) MU, to each spot. Two correction methods were used to account for the delayed charge. Method one (CM1), which is in active clinical use, accounts for the delayed charge by adjusting the MU of the current spot based on the cumulative MU. Method two (CM2) in addition reduces the planned MU by a predicted value. Every fraction of a treatment was simulated using each method and then recomputed in the treatment planning system. The dose difference between the original plan and the sum of the simulated fractions was evaluated. Both methods were tested in a water phantom with a single beam and simple target geometry. Two separate phantom tests were performed. In one test the dose per fraction was varied from 0.5 to 2 Gy using 25 fractions per plan. In the other test the number fractions were varied from 1 to 25, using 2 Gy per fraction. Three patient plans were used to determine the effect of delayed charge on the delivered dose under realistic clinical conditions. The order of spot delivery using CM1 was investigated by randomly selecting the starting spot for each layer, and by alternating per layer the starting spot from first to last. Only discrete spot scanning was considered in this study. Results: Using the phantom setup and varying the dose per fraction, the maximum dose difference for each plan of 25 fractions was 0.37–0.39 Gy and 0.03–0.05 Gy for CM1 and CM2, respectively. While varying the total number of fractions, the maximum dose

  5. Adjustment of the lateral and longitudinal size of scanned proton beam spots using a pre-absorber to optimize penumbrae and delivery efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Perles, Luis A; Newhauser, Wayne D; Taddei, Phillip J; Mohan, Radhe

    2010-01-01

    In scanned-beam proton therapy, the beam spot properties, such as the lateral and longitudinal size and the minimum achievable range, are influenced by beam optics, scattering media and drift spaces in the treatment unit. Currently available spot scanning systems offer few options for adjusting these properties. We investigated a method for adjusting the lateral and longitudinal spot size that utilizes downstream plastic pre-absorbers located near a water phantom. The spot size adjustment was characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of a modified commercial scanned-beam treatment head. Our results revealed that the pre-absorbers can be used to reduce the lateral full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose spots in water by up to 14 mm, and to increase the longitudinal extent from about 1 mm to 5 mm at residual ranges of 4 cm and less. A large factor in manipulating the lateral spot sizes is the drift space between the pre-absorber and the water phantom. Increasing the drift space from 0 cm to 15 cm leads to an increase in the lateral FWHM from 2.15 cm to 2.87 cm, at a water-equivalent depth of 1 cm. These findings suggest that this spot adjustment method may improve the quality of spot-scanned proton treatments. PMID:21076194

  6. Adjustment of the lateral and longitudinal size of scanned proton beam spots using a pre-absorber to optimize penumbrae and delivery efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Perles, Luis A.; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mohan, Radhe

    2010-12-01

    In scanned-beam proton therapy, the beam spot properties, such as the lateral and longitudinal size and the minimum achievable range, are influenced by beam optics, scattering media and drift spaces in the treatment unit. Currently available spot scanning systems offer few options for adjusting these properties. We investigated a method for adjusting the lateral and longitudinal spot size that utilizes downstream plastic pre-absorbers located near a water phantom. The spot size adjustment was characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of a modified commercial scanned-beam treatment head. Our results revealed that the pre-absorbers can be used to reduce the lateral full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose spots in water by up to 14 mm, and to increase the longitudinal extent from about 1 mm to 5 mm at residual ranges of 4 cm and less. A large factor in manipulating the lateral spot sizes is the drift space between the pre-absorber and the water phantom. Increasing the drift space from 0 cm to 15 cm leads to an increase in the lateral FWHM from 2.15 cm to 2.87 cm, at a water-equivalent depth of 1 cm. These findings suggest that this spot adjustment method may improve the quality of spot-scanned proton treatments.

  7. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Malignancies of the Base of Skull: Treatment Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Grosshans, David R.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Melancon, Adam; Allen, Pamela K.; Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew; McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L.; Gillin, Michael; DeMonte, Franco; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Results: Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. Conclusions: In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and

  8. Active Listening - Information Gap. SCANS Plans Portfolio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sample, Barbara

    A classroom activity for teaching vocational English as a Second Language to adults and focusing on development of listening comprehension is described. The exercise is based on the principles for development of workplace skills offered by the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), and addresses specific competencies…

  9. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm2/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients from

  10. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm{sup 2}/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients

  11. Spots and active longitudes on the star V815 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2009-10-01

    An analysis of photometric observations for the starHD166181 (V815Her) is presented. B and V light curves were used to reconstruct temperature inhomogeneities on the stellar surface. The spots on the surface of V815 Her are concentrated at two preferred longitudes separated by 0.5 in phase (180° in longitude). The positions of more and less active regions quasi-periodically “flip-flop,” on time scales of about 600, 950, and 1250 days. The times of active-longitude switches coincide with the maxima and minima of the light curve and the amplitude of the brightness variations, as well as with the minima and maxima of the star’s spottedness.

  12. WE-D-17A-01: A Dynamic Collimation System for Spot Scanned Proton Therapy: Conceptual Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D; Hill, P; Wang, D; Smith, B; Flynn, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system, the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy delivered at low energies is highly dependent on the spot size. This dependence, coupled with the fact that spot sizes increase with decreasing energy, reduces the benefit of the PBS technique for treating shallow tumors such as those found in the head and neck region. In order to overcome this limitation, a dynamic collimation system (DCS) was developed for sharpening the lateral penumbra of low energy proton therapy dose distributions delivered by PBS. Methods: The proposed DCS consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades which intercept the edges of the proton beam near the target edge in the beam's eye view. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. Two-dimensional treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σ-air) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm, representing a wide array of clinically available equipment. Results: In its current configuration, the snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using off the shelf components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. The treatment plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2–40.6% for spot sizes of 3–9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The DCS can be integrated with current or future proton therapy equipment and we believe it will serve as a useful tool to further improve the next generation of proton therapy delivery.

  13. Laser treatment of cutaneous lesions with image-guided fine spot-scanning irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Isami; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kanno, Akihiro; Kan, Yasushi; Yoshimasa, Takezawa; Maruyama, Tomohiro; Maeda, Yoshitaka

    2007-11-01

    We propose a new laser irradiation method for the treatment of cutaneous lesions in plastic surgery. In general, lasers with a spot size of 1 to 10 mm are used in irradiation on diseased skin. Although the target absorbs more light energy according to the theory of selective photothermolysis, the surrounding tissue, however, is still somewhat damaged. In proposed method, an f-theta lens, which is assembled by a shrink fitter, focuses the irradiation laser beam to a very fine spot with the size of 125 μm. Guided by the captured object-image, such laser beam is conducted by a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to irradiate only the desired tissue target without thermal damage to surrounding tissue. Moreover, an optical coherence tomography, whose probe is capable of wide field of view, can be used to provide the guidance information for the best treatment. The usefulness of the developed laser therapy apparatus was demonstrated by performing an experiment on the removal of tattoo pigment.

  14. Towards effective and efficient patient-specific quality assurance for spot scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Ronald; Li, Yupeng; Mackin, Dennis; Li, Heng; Poenisch, Falk; Lee, Andrew K; Mahajan, Anita; Frank, Steven J; Gillin, Michael T; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA) program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D) measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR) system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS) in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS). The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer) is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic. PMID:25867000

  15. Towards Effective and Efficient Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. Ronald.; Li, Yupeng; Mackin, Dennis; Li, Heng; Poenisch, Falk; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahajan, Anita; Frank, Steven J.; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA) program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D) measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR) system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS) in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS). The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer) is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic. PMID:25867000

  16. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  17. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    PubMed

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  18. Infrared radiation emitted due to scanning of a hot spot as a probe of hidden defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźny, Mariusz; Maś, Kinga; Prokhorenko, Serhiy; Ploch, Dariusz; Sheregii, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    Specially created subsurface defects in a sample are detected using a high resolution infrared camera FLIR SC7000. A scanning hot air (about 110 °C) nozzle is applied to introduce additional energy in a researched sample. The hidden defect has an increased temperature in comparison with the surrounding area that is a result of changed emissivity and thermal diffusivity. The suggested method is compared with pulse thermography which uses a xenon lamp for excitation.

  19. Extracranial chordoma: Outcome in patients treated with function-preserving surgery followed by spot-scanning proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter . E-mail: hanspeter.rutz@psi.ch; Weber, Damien C.; Sugahara, Shinji; Timmermann, Beate; Lomax, Antony J.; Bolsi, Alessandra; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin M.S.; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of postoperative proton therapy (PT) in extracranial chordoma. Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients were treated. Gross total resection was achieved in 18 patients. Nine patients had cervical, 2 had thoracic, 8 had lumbar, and 7 had sacro-coccygeal chordomas. Thirteen patients had implants. PT was administered after function-preserving surgery, using a gantry and spot scanning, without or with intensity modulation (IMPT; 6 patients), and/or photon-based radiotherapy (RT, 6 patients). Median total dose was 72 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; range, 59.4-74.4), with means of 70.5 and 73.2 CGE for patients with and without implants. Median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 13-73 months). Adverse events were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grading system (version 3.0). Results: At 3 years, actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 84% and 77%, respectively. One patient each died of local failure (LF), distant failure (DF), suicide, and secondary tumor. We observed 5 LFs and 3 DFs; 3-year LF-free and DF-free survival rates were 86%. We observed four radiation-induced late adverse events (Grade 2 sensory neuropathy; Grade 3 subcutaneous necrosis, and osteonecrosis; and Grade 5 secondary cancer). In univariate analysis, implants were associated with LF (p = 0.034). Gross residual tumor above 30 mL was negatively associated with OS (p = 0.013) and PFS (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Postoperative PT for extracranial chordomas delivered with spot scanning offers high local control rates. Toxicity was acceptable. Implants were significantly associated with LF. Residual tumor above 30 mL impacted negatively on OS and PFS.

  20. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  1. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy in the Curative Treatment of Adult Patients With Sarcoma: The Paul Scherrer Institute Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Damien C. Rutz, Hans Peter; Bolsi, Alessandra; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin; Lomax, Antony J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of spot scanning proton beam therapy (PT) in the curative treatment of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) in adults patients. Patients and Methods: We identified 13 STS patients treated with PT between July 1998 and May 2005 in our institutional database. Tumor histology varied with the most common histologic subtypes including liposarcoma and peripheral nerve sheet tumor. All tumors were located in vicinity of critical structures, such as the spinal cord, optic apparatus, bowel, kidney, or bowel. Of the patients, 6 and 5 patients received PT either as adjuvant therapy for non-R0 resection or for recurrence, respectively. Two patients received radical PT for unresectable disease. The median prescribed dose was 69.4 CGE (CGE = proton Gy x 1.1)-Gy (range, 50.4-76.0) at 1.8 to 2 CGE-Gy (median, 1.9) per fraction. Pre-PT anthracycline-based chemotherapy was delivered to 3 patients only. No patient has been lost to follow-up (median 48.1 months, range, 19.1-100.7 months). Results: Of the 13 patients, all but 2 patients were alive. Local recurrence developed in 3 (23%) patients. The administered dose to these patients was {<=}60 Gy-CGE. Distant control was achieved in all but 2 patients (lung metastasis), 1 of whom presented with a concomitant local recurrence. The 4-year local control and metastasis-free survival rates were 74.1% and 84.6%, respectively. Late grade {>=}2 toxicity was observed in only 2 patients. Conclusions: Spot scanning PT is an effective and safe treatment for patient with STS in critical locations. The observed toxicity rate was acceptable.

  2. Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermann, Beate . E-mail: beate.timmermann@psi.ch; Schuck, Andreas; Niggli, Felix; Weiss, Markus; Lomax, Antony Jonathan; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin; Rutz, Hans Peter; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment strategy of childhood sarcomas. Consequences of treatment are likely to affect the survivor's quality of life significantly. We investigated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy (PT) for soft tissue tumors in childhood. Methods and Materials: Sixteen children with soft tissue sarcomas were included. Median age at PT was 3.3 years. In 10 children the tumor histology was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. All tumors were located in the head or neck, parameningeal, or paraspinal, or pelvic region. In the majority of children, the tumor was initially unresectable (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study [IRS] Group III in 75%). In 50% of children the tumors exceeded 5 cm. Fourteen children had chemotherapy before and during PT. Median total dose of radiotherapy was 50 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE). All 16 children were treated with spot-scanning proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and in 3 children the PT was intensity-modulated (IMPT). Results: After median follow-up of 1.5 years, local control was achieved in 12 children. Four children failed locally, 1 at the border of the radiation field and 3 within the field. All 4 children died of tumor recurrence. All 4 showed unfavorable characteristic either of site or histopathology of the tumor. Acute toxicity was low, with Grade 3 or 4 side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria occurring in the bone marrow only. Conclusions: Proton therapy was feasible and well tolerated. Early local control rates are comparable to those being achieved after conventional radiotherapy. For investigations on late effect, longer follow-up is needed.

  3. Altered behaviour in spotted hyenas associated with increased human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boydston, E.E.; Kapheim, K.M.; Watts, H.E.; Szykman, M.; Holekamp, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate how anthropogenic activity might affect large carnivores, we studied the behaviour of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) during two time periods. From 1996 to 1998, we documented the ecological correlates of space utilization patterns exhibited by adult female hyenas defending a territory at the edge of a wildlife reserve in Kenya. Hyenas preferred areas near dense vegetation but appeared to avoid areas containing the greatest abundance of prey, perhaps because these were also the areas of most intensive livestock grazing. We then compared hyena behaviour observed in 1996-98 with that observed several years earlier and found many differences. Female hyenas in 1996-98 were found farther from dens, but closer to dense vegetation and to the edges of their territory, than in 1988-90. Recent females also had larger home ranges, travelled farther between consecutive sightings, and were more nocturnal than in 1988-90. Finally, hyenas occurred in smaller groups in 1996-98 than in 1988-90. We also found several changes in hyena demography between periods. We next attempted to explain differences observed between time periods by testing predictions of hypotheses invoking prey abundance, climate, interactions with lions, tourism and livestock grazing. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that increased reliance on the reserve for livestock grazing was responsible for observed changes. That behavioural changes were not associated with decreased hyena population density suggests the behavioural plasticity typical of this species may protect it from extinction. ?? 2003 The Zoological Society of London.

  4. Experimental characterization of the low-dose envelope of spot scanning proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Ciangaru, George; Titt, Uwe; Anand, Aman; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan

    2010-06-01

    In scanned proton beam radiotherapy, multiple pencil beams are used to deliver the total dose to the target volume. Because the number of such beams can be very large, an accurate dosimetric characterization of every single pencil beam is important to provide adequate input data for the configuration of the treatment planning system. In this work, we present a method to measure the low-dose envelope of single pencil beams, known to play a meaningful role in the dose computation for scanned proton beams. We measured the low-dose proton beam envelope, which extends several centimeters outwards from the center of each single pencil beam, by acquiring lateral dose profile data, down to relative dose levels that were a factor of 104 lower than the central axis dose. The overall effect of the low-dose envelope on the total dose delivered by multiple pencil beams was determined by measuring the dose output as a function of field size. We determined that the low-dose envelope can be influential even for fields as large as 20 cm × 20 cm.

  5. A TR-induced algorithm for hot spots elimination through CT-scan HIFU simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Nicolas; Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    Although nowadays widely spread for imaging and treatments uses, HIFU techniques are still limited by the distortion of the wavefront due to refraction and reflection on the inhomogeneous media inside the human body. CT-scan Time Reversal (TR) procedure has risen as a promising candidate for focus control. A finite difference time domain parallelized code is used to provide simulations of TR-enhanced propagation through elements of the human body and implement a simple algorithm to address the issue of grating lobes, i.e secondary peaks of pressure due to natural diffraction by phased arrays and enhanced by medium heterogeneity. Using an iterative, progressive process combining secondary sound sources and independent signal summation, the primary peak is strengthened while secondary peaks are increasingly obliterated. This method supports the feasibility of precise modification and enhancement of the pressure profile in the targeted area through Time Reversal based solutions.

  6. Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Spot Scanning Proton Therapy Using Single-Field Uniform Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Song, Xiaofei; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ciangaru, George; Taylor, M. Brad; Lii, Ming Fwu; Martin, Craig; Arjomandy, Bijan; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh nhu; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To describe our experiences with patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for patients with prostate cancer receiving spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using single-field uniform dose (SFUD). Methods and Materials: The first group of 249 patients with prostate cancer treated with SSPT using SFUD was included in this work. The scanning-beam planning target volume and number of monitor units were recorded and checked for consistency. Patient-specific dosimetric measurements were performed, including the point dose for each plan, depth doses, and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution in the planes perpendicular to the incident beam direction for each field at multiple depths. The {gamma}-index with 3% dose or 3-mm distance agreement criteria was used to evaluate the 2D dose distributions. Results: We observed a linear relationship between the number of monitor units and scanning-beam planning target volume. The difference between the measured and calculated point doses (mean {+-} SD) was 0.0% {+-} 0.7% (range, -2.9% to 1.8%). In general, the depth doses exhibited good agreement except at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak. The pass rate of {gamma}-index (mean {+-} SD) for 2D dose comparison was 96.2% {+-} 2.6% (range, 90-100%). Discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions primarily resulted from the limitation of the model used by the treatment planning system. Conclusions: We have established a patient-specific QA program for prostate cancer patients receiving SSPT using SFUD.

  7. Is II-Pegasi HD224085 a New Spot-Cycle Activity Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohusz, E.; Udalski, A.

    New observations of II Pegasi (HD 224085) are presented. They are used together with the earlier ones to study the photometric period variations. Basing on the spot model the photometric period changes can be explained by solar-like spot activity with the period 8-10 years.

  8. SU-E-T-552: Minimum Monitor Unit Effects On Plan Quality for Multi-Field Optimized Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M; Beltran, C; Herman, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5-10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1-20 cm. Three field intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000-0.0060; and spot spacing range of 0.5-2.0σ of the nominal spot size at isocenter in water (σ=4mm in this work). Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. Results: The increase of the min-MU with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 1σ. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 2σ, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusion: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤ 1σ of the spot size in water, plan quality decreases as min- MU increases greater than 0.0020. The effect of min-MU should be taken into consideration while planning spot scanning proton therapy treatments to realize its full potential.

  9. Commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam delivery system at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Houston

    SciTech Connect

    Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Bues, Martin; Ciangaru, George; Sawakuchi, Gabriel; Poenisch, Falk; Arjomandy, Bijan; Martin, Craig; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Smith, Alfred R.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To describe a summary of the clinical commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam at the Proton Therapy Center, Houston (PTC-H). Methods: Discrete spot scanning system is composed of a delivery system (Hitachi ProBeat), an electronic medical record (Mosaiq V 1.5), and a treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse V 8.1). Discrete proton pencil beams (spots) are used to deposit dose spot by spot and layer by layer for the proton distal ranges spanning from 4.0 to 30.6 g/cm{sup 2} and over a maximum scan area at the isocenter of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. An arbitrarily chosen reference calibration condition has been selected to define the monitor units (MUs). Using radiochromic film and ion chambers, the authors have measured spot positions, the spot sizes in air, depth dose curves, and profiles for proton beams with various energies in water, and studied the linearity of the dose monitors. In addition to dosimetric measurements and TPS modeling, significant efforts were spent in testing information flow and recovery of the delivery system from treatment interruptions. Results: The main dose monitors have been adjusted such that a specific amount of charge is collected in the monitor chamber corresponding to a single MU, following the IAEA TRS 398 protocol under a specific reference condition. The dose monitor calibration method is based on the absolute dose per MU, which is equivalent to the absolute dose per particle, the approach used by other scanning beam institutions. The full width at half maximum for the spot size in air varies from approximately 1.2 cm for 221.8 MeV to 3.4 cm for 72.5 MeV. The measured versus requested 90% depth dose in water agrees to within 1 mm over ranges of 4.0-30.6 cm. The beam delivery interlocks perform as expected, guarantying the safe and accurate delivery of the planned dose. Conclusions: The dosimetric parameters of the discrete spot scanning proton beam have been measured as part of the clinical commissioning program

  10. Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Treatment Planning Technique and Analysis of Consequences of Rotational and Translational Alignment Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jeff; Bluett, Jaques; Amos, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Conventional proton therapy with passively scattered beams is used to treat a number of tumor sites, including prostate cancer. Spot scanning proton therapy is a treatment delivery means that improves conformal coverage of the clinical target volume (CTV). Placement of individual spots within a target is dependent on traversed tissue density. Errors in patient alignment perturb dose distributions. Moreover, there is a need for a rational planning approach that can mitigate the dosimetric effect of random alignment errors. We propose a treatment planning approach and then analyze the consequences of various simulated alignment errors on prostate treatments. Methods and Materials: Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for spot scanning proton therapy. After delineation of the clinical target volume, a scanning target volume (STV) was created to guide dose coverage. Errors in patient alignment in two axes (rotational and yaw) as well as translational errors in the anteroposterior direction were then simulated, and dose to the CTV and normal tissues were reanalyzed. Results: Coverage of the CTV remained high even in the setting of extreme rotational and yaw misalignments. Changes in the rectum and bladder V45 and V70 were similarly minimal, except in the case of translational errors, where, as a result of opposed lateral beam arrangements, much larger dosimetric perturbations were observed. Conclusions: The concept of the STV as applied to spot scanning radiation therapy and as presented in this report leads to robust coverage of the CTV even in the setting of extreme patient misalignments.

  11. Optimizing mini-ridge filter thickness to reduce proton treatment times in a spot-scanning synchrotron system

    SciTech Connect

    Courneyea, Lorraine; Beltran, Chris Tseung, Hok Seum Wan Chan; Yu, Juan; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Study the contributors to treatment time as a function of Mini-Ridge Filter (MRF) thickness to determine the optimal choice for breath-hold treatment of lung tumors in a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton machine. Methods: Five different spot-scanning nozzles were simulated in TOPAS: four with MRFs of varying maximal thicknesses (6.15–24.6 mm) and one with no MRF. The MRFs were designed with ridges aligned along orthogonal directions transverse to the beam, with the number of ridges (4–16) increasing with MRF thickness. The material thickness given by these ridges approximately followed a Gaussian distribution. Using these simulations, Monte Carlo data were generated for treatment planning commissioning. For each nozzle, standard and stereotactic (SR) lung phantom treatment plans were created and assessed for delivery time and plan quality. Results: Use of a MRF resulted in a reduction of the number of energy layers needed in treatment plans, decreasing the number of synchrotron spills needed and hence the treatment time. For standard plans, the treatment time per field without a MRF was 67.0 ± 0.1 s, whereas three of the four MRF plans had treatment times of less than 20 s per field; considered sufficiently low for a single breath-hold. For SR plans, the shortest treatment time achieved was 57.7 ± 1.9 s per field, compared to 95.5 ± 0.5 s without a MRF. There were diminishing gains in time reduction as the MRF thickness increased. Dose uniformity of the PTV was comparable across all plans; however, when the plans were normalized to have the same coverage, dose conformality decreased with MRF thickness, as measured by the lung V20%. Conclusions: Single breath-hold treatment times for plans with standard fractionation can be achieved through the use of a MRF, making this a viable option for motion mitigation in lung tumors. For stereotactic plans, while a MRF can reduce treatment times, multiple breath-holds would still be necessary due to the

  12. The active RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi. IV. The SPOT activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.

    1999-10-01

    A total of 6 new surface images of II Peg obtained for the years 1997 and 1998 confirms the recently revealed permanent active longitude structure. The lower limit of the active longitudes' lifetime is now extended up to 25 years. A new ``flip-flop'' phenomenon, redefined as a switch of the activity between the active longitudes, has started in summer of 1998. It coincides reasonably well with the moment predicted from the activity cycle of the star. This confirms definitely the cyclic behaviour of the activity of II Peg we recently discovered. Therefore, we assign numbers to the cycles of 4.65 yr since the earliest photoelectric observations of II Peg and define the active longitudes as ``odd'' and ``even'' corresponding to odd and even numbers of cycles. With such a definition, in late 1998 the 7th cycle began and the ``odd'' active longitude became more active. From the analysis of the spot area evolution within the active longitudes we conclude that the activity cycle is developed as a rearrangement of the nearly constant amount of the spot area between the active longitudes. We discuss the ``flip-flop'' phenomenon as a tracer of stellar activity and the role of the unseen secondary in establishing the cycle. Based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), La Palma, Spain; the 1.25m telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Ukraine; the Phoenix 10 robotic telescope, APT Observatory, Arizona, USA.}

  13. High-resolution spot-scan electron microscopy of microcrystals of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein.

    PubMed

    Bullough, P A; Tulloch, P A

    1990-09-01

    We describe the electron microscopy of a crystalline assembly of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein extracted from the ootheca of the praying mantis. Electron diffraction patterns of unstained crystals show crystal lattice sampling of the coiled-coil molecular transform to a resolution beyond 1.5 A. Using a "spot-scan" method of electron imaging, micrographs of unstained crystals have been obtained that visibly diffract laser light from crystal spacings as small as 4.3 A. A projection map was calculated to 4 A using electron diffraction amplitudes and phases from computer-processed images. The projection map clearly shows modulations in density arising from the 5.1 A alpha-helical repeat, the first time this type of modulation has been revealed by electron microscopy. The crystals have p2 plane group symmetry with a = 92.4 A, b = 150.7 A, y = 92.4 degrees. Examination of tilted specimens shows that c is approximately 18 A, indicating that the unit cell is only one molecule thick. A preliminary interpretation shows tightly packed molecules some 400 A long lying with their long axes in the plane of the projection. The molecules have a coiled-coil configuration for most of their length. The possible modes of packing of the molecules in three dimensions are discussed. PMID:2398496

  14. Saturation scanning of ubiquitin variants reveals a common hot spot for binding to USP2 and USP21.

    PubMed

    Leung, Isabel; Dekel, Ayelet; Shifman, Julia M; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby ubiquitin (Ub) recognizes enzymes in the Ub proteasome system is crucial for understanding the biological function of Ub. Many structures of Ub complexes have been solved and, in most cases, reveal a large structural epitope on a common face of the Ub molecule. However, owing to the generally weak nature of these interactions, it has been difficult to map in detail the functional contributions of individual Ub side chains to affinity and specificity. Here we took advantage of Ub variants (Ubvs) that bind tightly to particular Ub-specific proteases (USPs) and used phage display and saturation scanning mutagenesis to comprehensively map functional epitopes within the structural epitopes. We found that Ubvs that bind to USP2 or USP21 contain a remarkably similar core functional epitope, or "hot spot," consisting mainly of positions that are conserved as the wild type sequence, but also some positions that prefer mutant sequences. The Ubv core functional epitope contacts residues that are conserved in the human USP family, and thus it is likely important for the interactions of Ub across many family members. PMID:27436899

  15. Implication of spot position error on plan quality and patient safety in pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Juan; Beltran, Chris J. Herman, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively and systematically assess dosimetric effects induced by spot positioning error as a function of spot spacing (SS) on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan quality and to facilitate evaluation of safety tolerance limits on spot position. Methods: Spot position errors (PE) ranging from 1 to 2 mm were simulated. Simple plans were created on a water phantom, and IMPT plans were calculated on two pediatric patients with a brain tumor of 28 and 3 cc, respectively, using a commercial planning system. For the phantom, a uniform dose was delivered to targets located at different depths from 10 to 20 cm with various field sizes from 2{sup 2} to 15{sup 2} cm{sup 2}. Two nominal spot sizes, 4.0 and 6.6 mm of 1 σ in water at isocenter, were used for treatment planning. The SS ranged from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ, which is 2–6 mm for the small spot size and 3.3–9.9 mm for the large spot size. Various perturbation scenarios of a single spot error and systematic and random multiple spot errors were studied. To quantify the dosimetric effects, percent dose error (PDE) depth profiles and the value of percent dose error at the maximum dose difference (PDE [ΔDmax]) were used for evaluation. Results: A pair of hot and cold spots was created per spot shift. PDE[ΔDmax] is found to be a complex function of PE, SS, spot size, depth, and global spot distribution that can be well defined in simple models. For volumetric targets, the PDE [ΔDmax] is not noticeably affected by the change of field size or target volume within the studied ranges. In general, reducing SS decreased the dose error. For the facility studied, given a single spot error with a PE of 1.2 mm and for both spot sizes, a SS of 1σ resulted in a 2% maximum dose error; a SS larger than 1.25 σ substantially increased the dose error and its sensitivity to PE. A similar trend was observed in multiple spot errors (both systematic and random errors). Systematic PE can lead to noticeable hot

  16. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  17. A patient-specific aperture system with an energy absorber for spot scanning proton beams: Verification for clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Keisuke; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Omachi, Chihiro; Kibe, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Kensuke; Shibata, Hiroki; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Nikawa, Eiki; Asai, Kumiko; Shimomura, Akira; Kinou, Hideto; Isoyama, Shigeru; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Fujii, Yusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Hirayama, Shusuke; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Komori, Masataka

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In the authors’ proton therapy system, the patient-specific aperture can be attached to the nozzle of spot scanning beams to shape an irradiation field and reduce lateral fall-off. The authors herein verified this system for clinical application. Methods: The authors prepared four types of patient-specific aperture systems equipped with an energy absorber to irradiate shallow regions less than 4 g/cm{sup 2}. The aperture was made of 3-cm-thick brass and the maximum water equivalent penetration to be used with this system was estimated to be 15 g/cm{sup 2}. The authors measured in-air lateral profiles at the isocenter plane and integral depth doses with the energy absorber. All input data were obtained by the Monte Carlo calculation, and its parameters were tuned to reproduce measurements. The fluence of single spots in water was modeled as a triple Gaussian function and the dose distribution was calculated using a fluence dose model. The authors compared in-air and in-water lateral profiles and depth doses between calculations and measurements for various apertures of square, half, and U-shaped fields. The absolute doses and dose distributions with the aperture were then validated by patient-specific quality assurance. Measured data were obtained by various chambers and a 2D ion chamber detector array. Results: The patient-specific aperture reduced the penumbra from 30% to 70%, for example, from 34.0 to 23.6 mm and 18.8 to 5.6 mm. The calculated field width for square-shaped apertures agreed with measurements within 1 mm. Regarding patient-specific aperture plans, calculated and measured doses agreed within −0.06% ± 0.63% (mean ± SD) and 97.1% points passed the 2%-dose/2 mm-distance criteria of the γ-index on average. Conclusions: The patient-specific aperture system improved dose distributions, particularly in shallow-region plans.

  18. SU-D-BRE-02: Development and Commissioning of A Gated Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy System with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Umegaki, K; Matsuura, T.; Takao, S.; Nihongi, H.; Yamada, T.; Miyamoto, N.; Shimizu, S.; Shirato, H.; Matsuda, K.; Nakamura, F.; Umezawa, M.; Hiramoto, K.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel Proton Beam Therapy system has been developed by integrating Real-Time Tumor-Tracking (RTRT) and discrete spot scanning techniques. The system dedicated for spot scanning delivers significant advantages for both clinical and economical points of view. The system has the ability to control dose distribution with spot scanning beams and to gate the beams from the synchrotron to irradiate moving tumors only when the actual positions of them are within the planned position. Methods: The newly designed system consists of a synchrotron, beam transport systems, a compact and rotating gantry system with robotic couch and two orthogonal sets of X-ray fluoroscopes. The fully compact design of the system has been realized by reducing the maximum energy of the beam to 220MeV, corresponding to 30g/cm2 range and the number of circulating protons per synchrotron operation cycle, due to higher beam utilization efficiency in spot scanning. To improve the irradiation efficiency in the integration of RTRT and spot scanning, a new control system has been developed to enable multiple gated irradiation per operation cycle according to the gating signals. After the completion of the equipment installation, beam tests and commissioning has been successfully performed. Results: The basic performances and beam characteristics through the synchrotron accelerator to iso-center have been confirmed and the performance test of the irradiation nozzle and whole system has been appropriately completed. CBCT image has been checked and sufficient quality was obtained. RTRT system has been demonstrated and realized accurate dose distributions for moving targets. Conclusion: The gated spot scanning Proton Beam Therapy system with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking has been developed, successfully installed and tested. The new system enables us to deliver higher dose to the moving target tumors while sparing surrounding normal tissues and to realize the compact design of the system and facility

  19. Production of a high-resolution spot for ellipsometric scanning immunology using an off-the-shelf light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Stephen M.; Yang, Shao

    2000-10-01

    A modified ellipsometric optical system has been designed for an in-vitro medical diagnostic instrument using an off- the-shelf 525-nm LED source. System requirements included a 20 degree (+/- 1 deg) incident angle, 1 uW (min) assay surface incident power, 300 um (max) incident spot diameter (full spatial extent) and 500:1 (min) detector S/N in normal room light. The fixed polarization ellipsometric optical analysis method is discussed, and the lens prescription used in a prototype instrument is given. Zemas spot size analyses are given, as well as a theoretical model for S/N assessment. Incident spot size and optical power data are provided which agree with the theory presented. Finally, the application of results and typical scanned signal output are discussed.

  20. Spot Scanning-Based Proton Therapy for Intracranial Meningioma: Long-Term Results From the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Damien C.; Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Koch, Tamara; Ares, Carmen; Geismar, Jan H.; Schertler, Andreas; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hug, Eugen B.

    2012-07-01

    Background: To assess the long-term clinical results of spot scanning proton therapy (PT) in the treatment of intracranial meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with meningioma (histologically proven 34/39) were treated with PT between July 1997 and January 2010. Thirty-two (82.1%) patients were treated as primary treatment (exclusive PT, n = 8; postoperative PT, n = 24). Mean age was 48.3 {+-} 17.9 years and 32 (82.1%) patients had skull base lesions. For patients undergoing surgery, 24 patients had a diagnosis of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I and 10 of a WHO Grade II/III meningioma, respectively. The female-to-male ratio was 3.3. The median administered dose was 56.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) (range, 52.2-66.6) at 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.76 to 546.5 cm{sup 3} (median, 21.5). Late toxicity was assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Mean follow-up time was 62.0 months and all patients were followed for >6 months. Results: Six patients presented with tumor recurrence and 6 patients died during follow-up, of which 4 of tumor progression. Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 84.8% and 81.8%, respectively, for the entire cohort and 100% for benign histology. Cumulative 5-year Grade {>=}3 late toxicity-free survival was 84.5%. On univariate analysis, LC was negatively influenced by WHO grade (p = 0.001), GTV (p = 0.013), and male gender (p = 0.058). Conclusions: PT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with untreated, recurrent, or incompletely resected intracranial meningiomas. WHO grade and tumor volume was an adverse prognostic factor for local control.

  1. Quality of Life and Toxicity from Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs. SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after PBT. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified RTOG grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity and argon plasma coagulation (APC) were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results 226 men received PSPT and 65 SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel EPIC summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was one Grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade 3 or greater GI or GU toxicity. APC application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs. SSPT 1.5%; p = 0.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥ 2 GI or GU toxicity with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted. PMID:24139077

  2. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  3. Comparing proton treatment plans of pediatric brain tumors in two pencil beam scanning nozzles with different spot sizes.

    PubMed

    Kralik, John C; Xi, Liwen; Solberg, Timothy D; Simone Ii, Charles B; Lin, Liyong

    2015-01-01

    Target coverage and organ-at-risk sparing were compared for 22 pediatric patients with primary brain tumors treated using two distinct nozzles in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Consecutive patients treated at our institution using a PBS-dedicated nozzle (DN) were replanned using a universal nozzle (UN) beam model and the original DN plan objectives. Various cranial sites were treated among the patients to prescription doses ranging from 45 to 54 Gy. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were patient-dependent; 15 unique OARs were analyzed, all of which were assessed in at least 10 patients. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and organ sparing were compared for the two nozzles using dose-volume histogram data. Statistical analysis using a confidence-interval approach demonstrates that CTV coverage is equivalent for UN and DN plans within ± 5% equivalence bounds. In contrast, average mean and maximum doses are significantly higher for nearly all 15 OARs in the UN plans. The average median increase over all OARs and patients is approximately 1.7 Gy, with an increase in the 25%-75% of 1.0-2.3 Gy; the median increase to the pituitary gland, temporal lobes, eyes and cochleas are 1.8, 1.7, 0.7, and 2.7 Gy, respectively. The CTV dose distributions fall off slower for UN than for the DN plans; hence, normal tissue structures in close proximity to CTVs receive higher doses in UN plans than in DN plans. The higher OAR doses in the UN plans are likely due to the larger spot profile in plans created with UN beams. In light of the high rates of toxicities in pediatric patients receiving cranial irradiation and in light of selected brain tumor types having high cure rates, this study suggests the smaller DN beam profile is preferable for the advantage of reducing dose to OARs. PMID:26699553

  4. Spot scanning proton therapy plan assessment: design and development of a dose verification application for use in routine clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Walsh, Timothy J.; Beltran, Chris J.; Stoker, Joshua B.; Mundy, Daniel W.; Parry, Mark D.; Bues, Martin; Fatyga, Mirek

    2016-04-01

    The use of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been carried out clinically since the late 1800's. Early on however, it was discovered that a radiation dose sufficient to destroy cancer cells can also cause severe injury to surrounding healthy tissue. Radiation oncologists continually strive to find the perfect balance between a dose high enough to destroy the cancer and one that avoids damage to healthy organs. Spot scanning or "pencil beam" proton radiotherapy offers another option to improve on this. Unlike traditional photon therapy, proton beams stop in the target tissue, thus better sparing all organs beyond the targeted tumor. In addition, the beams are far narrower and thus can be more precisely "painted" onto the tumor, avoiding exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. To safely treat patients with proton beam radiotherapy, dose verification should be carried out for each plan prior to treatment. Proton dose verification systems are not currently commercially available so the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Mayo Clinic developed its own, called DOSeCHECK, which offers two distinct dose simulation methods: GPU-based Monte Carlo and CPU-based analytical. The three major components of the system include the web-based user interface, the Linux-based dose verification simulation engines, and the supporting services and components. The architecture integrates multiple applications, libraries, platforms, programming languages, and communication protocols and was successfully deployed in time for Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient. Having a simple, efficient application for dose verification greatly reduces staff workload and provides additional quality assurance, ultimately improving patient safety.

  5. TH-C-BRD-07: Minimizing Dose Uncertainty for Spot Scanning Beam Proton Therapy of Moving Tumor with Optimization of Delivery Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Li, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has been shown to be able to reduce dose to normal tissue compared to intensity modulated photon radio-therapy (IMRT), and has been implemented for selected lung cancer patients. However, respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty remain one of the major concerns for the radiotherapy of lung cancer, and the utility of IMPT for lung patients was limited because of the proton dose uncertainty induced by motion. Strategies such as repainting and tumor tracking have been proposed and studied but repainting could result in unacceptable long delivery time and tracking is not yet clinically available. We propose a novel delivery strategy for spot scanning proton beam therapy. Method: The effective number of delivery (END) for each spot position in a treatment plan was calculated based on the parameters of the delivery system, including time required for each spot, spot size and energy. The dose uncertainty was then calculated with an analytical formula. The spot delivery sequence was optimized to maximize END and minimize the dose uncertainty. 2D Measurements with a detector array on a 1D moving platform were performed to validate the calculated results. Results: 143 2D measurements on a moving platform were performed for different delivery sequences of a single layer uniform pattern. The measured dose uncertainty is a strong function of the delivery sequence, the worst delivery sequence results in dose error up to 70% while the optimized delivery sequence results in dose error of <5%. END vs. measured dose uncertainty follows the analytical formula. Conclusion: With optimized delivery sequence, it is feasible to minimize the dose uncertainty due to motion in spot scanning proton therapy.

  6. SU-D-BRE-06: Modeling the Dosimetric Effects of Volumetric and Layer-Based Repainting Strategies in Spot Scanning Proton Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J E; Beltran, C; Herman, M G; Kruse, J J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare multiple repainting techniques as strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in free-breathing, spot scanning proton plans. Methods: An analytic routine modeled three-dimensional dose distributions of pencil-beam proton plans delivered to a moving target. The interplay effect was studied in subsequent calculations by modeling proton delivery from a clinical synchrotron based spot scanning system and respiratory target motion, patterned from surrogate breathing traces from clinical 4DCT scans and normalized to nominal 0.5 and 1 cm amplitudes. Two distinct repainting strategies were modeled. In idealized volumetric repainting, the plan is divided up and delivered multiple times successively, with each instance only delivering a fraction of the total MU. Maximum-MU repainting involves delivering a fixed number of MU per spot and repeating a given energy layer until the prescribed MU are reached. For each of 13 patient breathing traces, the dose was computed for up to four volumetric repaints and an array of maximum-MU values. Delivery strategies were inter-compared based on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and delivery time. Results: Increasing levels of repainting generally improved plan quality and reduced dosimetric variability at the expense of longer delivery time. Motion orthogonal to the scan direction yielded substantially greater dose deviations than motion parallel to the scan direction. For a fixed delivery time, maximum-MU repainting was most effective relative to idealized volumetric repainting at small maximum-MU values. For 1 cm amplitude motion orthogonal to the scan direction, the average homogeneity metric (D5 – D95)[%] of 23.4% was reduced to 7.6% with a 168 s delivery using volumetric repainting compared with 8.7% in 157.2 s for maximum-MU repainting. The associated static target homogeneity metric was 2.5%. Conclusion: Maximum-MU repainting can provide a reasonably effective alternative to volumetric repainting for

  7. Computer-controlled spot-scan imaging of crotoxin complex crystals with 400 keV electrons at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Brink, J; Chiu, W; Dougherty, M

    1992-10-01

    400 keV electrons yield a better relative image contrast than 100 keV electrons for a beam-sensitive organic crystal when spot-scan imaging is used [J. Brink and W. Chiu, J. Microscopy 161 (1991) 279]. A FORTRAN 77 program has been written to operate the spot-scan imaging system on a computer workstation under the VMS operating system which is interfaced serially to the JEOL4000 electron microscope. We demonstrate the application of this implementation by imaging crotoxin complex crystals embedded in either vitreous ice or glucose to 2.5 A resolution. The intensity strength of the structure factors of this protein crystal are different at low (> 10 A) resolution but similar at high resolution (< 10 A) for the two embedding media as expected from their scattering contrast difference. Based on our experience as judged from the electron diffraction patterns of highly tilted crystals, flat crystals embedded in glucose can be readily obtained. Furthermore, our spot-scan imaging system also has the option of correcting the focus gradient that is present in images of tilted specimens. PMID:1481273

  8. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: An initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki; Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated.Methods: A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3}, in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data.Results: With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was {+-}2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the criteria for the

  9. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J.; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV)50Gy or PTV62.5Gy (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D98 was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D98 was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D98 was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D98 was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup errors and might be unacceptable for

  10. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  11. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Keita; Das, Indra J.; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2016-01-01

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm3, which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation technique. We

  12. The effectiveness of combined gating and re-scanning for treating mobile targets with proton spot scanning. An experimental and simulation-based investigation.

    PubMed

    Schätti, A; Zakova, M; Meer, D; Lomax, A J

    2014-07-21

    Organ motion is one of the major obstacles in radiotherapy and charged particle therapy. Even more so, the theoretical advantages of dose distributions in scanned ion beam therapy may be lost due to the interplay between organ motion and beam scanning. Several techniques for dealing with this problem have been devised. In re-scanning, the target volume is scanned several times to average out the motion effects. In gating and breath-hold, dose is only delivered if the tumour is in a narrow window of position. Experiments have been performed to verify if gating and re-scanning are effective means of motion mitigation. Dose distributions were acquired in a lateral plane of a homogeneous phantom. For a spherical target volume and regular motion gating was sufficient. However, for realistic, irregular motion or a patient target volume, gating did not reduce the interplay effect to an acceptable level. Combining gating with re-scanning recovered the dose distributions. The simplest re-scanning approach, where a treatment plan is duplicated several times and applied in sequence, was not efficient. Simulations of different combinations of gating window sizes and re-scanning schemes revealed that reducing the gating window is the most efficient approach. However, very small gating windows are not robust for irregular motion. PMID:24955723

  13. The effectiveness of combined gating and re-scanning for treating mobile targets with proton spot scanning. An experimental and simulation-based investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätti, A.; Zakova, M.; Meer, D.; Lomax, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Organ motion is one of the major obstacles in radiotherapy and charged particle therapy. Even more so, the theoretical advantages of dose distributions in scanned ion beam therapy may be lost due to the interplay between organ motion and beam scanning. Several techniques for dealing with this problem have been devised. In re-scanning, the target volume is scanned several times to average out the motion effects. In gating and breath-hold, dose is only delivered if the tumour is in a narrow window of position. Experiments have been performed to verify if gating and re-scanning are effective means of motion mitigation. Dose distributions were acquired in a lateral plane of a homogeneous phantom. For a spherical target volume and regular motion gating was sufficient. However, for realistic, irregular motion or a patient target volume, gating did not reduce the interplay effect to an acceptable level. Combining gating with re-scanning recovered the dose distributions. The simplest re-scanning approach, where a treatment plan is duplicated several times and applied in sequence, was not efficient. Simulations of different combinations of gating window sizes and re-scanning schemes revealed that reducing the gating window is the most efficient approach. However, very small gating windows are not robust for irregular motion.

  14. SCAN+

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  15. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  16. T-SPOT.TB in Detection of Active Tuberculosis During Pregnancy: A Retrospective Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiaopei; Guo, Xuxiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays have not been validated in active TB among pregnant women. Therefore, the objective of this retrospective study was to estimate the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB in active TB among pregnant women. Material/Methods Between May 2012 and May 2015, 26 consecutive pregnant women with suspected TB were enrolled in our study. The clinicopathological characteristics and T-SPOT.TB results were reviewed and analyzed. Results Pregnant patients were divided into a TB group (n=21) and a Non-TB group (n=5). In the TB group, 5 patients had pulmonary TB, 5 had pulmonary TB+ extrapulmonary TB, and 11 had exclusively extrapulmonary TB. The most common site of extrapulmonary TB was pleural (n=11). Statistical analysis showed that the lymphocyte count in the TB group was lower than in the Non-TB group (P<0.05). For detection of active TB during pregnancy, T-SPOT.TB had a high sensitivity of 100.0% (84.5%–100.0%) and a specificity of 80.0% (37.6–96.4%). Conclusions T-SPOT.TB shows good performance in detection of active tuberculosis during pregnancy. Interferon gamma release assay for TB screening of pregnant women is recommended in clinical practice because it may be a more appropriate diagnostic tool than the tuberculin skin test. PMID:26732770

  17. CO2 ice state during active Dark Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, F.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.

    2013-09-01

    MOC and HiRISE high-resolution images permitted the identification of various active seasonal processes such as cold CO2 jets or dark flows [7] on Mars seasonal caps, triggered by the caps' seasonal variations [5]. The purpose of this work is to retrieve quantitative information about the CO2 ice physical state, and its evolution, to constrain the active processes. To this end, we perform a radiative transfer inversion of CRISM near-infrared spectra before, during and after the event. After atmospheric gas and aerosols contributions correction [3], we use a radiative transfer model [2] that simulates reflectance spectra of granular icy material to create a look up table, and then a spectral inversion based on the likelihood that allows taking into account possible bias in atmospheric correction [1]. Using that inversion method, we are able to retrieve the spatial and temporal evolutions of various parameters of the icy surface.

  18. Postoperative Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Initial Experience at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter Weber, Damien C.; Goitein, Gudrun; Ares, Carmen; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Hug, Eugen B.; Timmermann, Beate

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate postoperative spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) and intensity-modulated PT (IMPT) for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 10 patients (six male patients, four female patients; six chordomas, four chondrosarcomas), aged 10-20 years (median, 16 years), were treated at our institute. Tumor sites were in the brain (one case), skull base (five cases), cervical (three cases), and lumbar spine (one case). Three children had complete resections. In seven children, resection was incomplete, leaving residual tumor behind (range, 2.3-46.3 mL). PT was delivered using spot scanning, with (three patients) or without (seven patients) IMPT. Total dose was 74.0 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) for chordoma, and 63.2-68.0 CGE for chondrosarcoma (median, 66.0), depending on histopathological grading and whether the patient had concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 8-77 months). Radiation treatment was well tolerated. All patients remained failure-free at their last follow-up. Late adverse events were reported in three patients and were mild (neurosensory in one patient; alopecia and hypoaccusis in one patient) to moderate (one patient, Grade 2 pituitary insufficiency). Conclusions: Postoperative spot-scanning PT, delivered in combination with and without IMPT, for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in children and adolescents was tolerated without unacceptable adverse event and initial outcome is perfectly satisfactory in this small cohort. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to more fully assess tumor control, adverse events, as well as functional and cosmetic outcome.

  19. Effectiveness and Safety of Spot Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: First Long-Term Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony J.; Bolsi, Alessandra; Timmermann, Beate; Rutz, Hans Peter; Schuller, Jan C.; Pedroni, Eros; Goitein, Gudrun

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness and safety of spot-scanning-based proton radiotherapy (PT) in skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Between October 1998 and November 2005, 64 patients with skull-base chordomas (n = 42) and chondrosarcomas (n = 22) were treated at Paul Scherrer Institute with PT using spot-scanning technique. Median total dose for chordomas was 73.5 Gy(RBE) and 68.4 Gy(RBE) for chondrosarcomas at 1.8-2.0 Gy(RBE) dose per fraction. Local control (LC), disease specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated. Toxicity was assessed according to CTCAE, v. 3.0. Results: Mean follow-up period was 38 months (range, 14-92 months). Five patients with chordoma and one patient with chondrosarcoma experienced local recurrence. Actuarial 5-year LC rates were 81% for chordomas and 94% for chondrosarcomas. Brainstem compression at the time of PT (p = 0.007) and gross tumor volume >25 mL (p = 0.03) were associated with lower LC rates. Five years rates of DSS and OS were 81% and 62% for chordomas and 100% and 91% for chondrosarcomas, respectively. High-grade late toxicity consisted of one patient with Grade 3 and one patient with Grade 4 unilateral optic neuropathy, and two patients with Grade 3 central nervous system necrosis. No patient experienced brainstem toxicity. Actuarial 5-year freedom from high-grade toxicity was 94%. Conclusions: Our data indicate safety and efficacy of spot-scanning based PT for skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. With target definition, dose prescription and normal organ tolerance levels similar to passive-scattering based PT series, complication-free, tumor control and survival rates are at present comparable.

  20. SU-D-304-05: Validation of Low-Dose-Tail Modeling for Proton Pencil Beam Spot Scanning Using a Quality Assurance Test Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Ainsley, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models of the low-dose tails of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape and location, and for determining monitor units. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distribution based on the weighted superposition of spot profiles previously measured using a pair-magnification method. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The cutoff of the halo component is smaller at higher energies, and is not observable for the 225 MeV proton beam for UN #2. Conclusion: In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive test pattern can facilitate the validation of the halo component of proton PBS spots at off axis locations. The cutoff of the halo component should be taken into consideration for large fields or PBS systems that intend to trim spot profiles using apertures. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  1. UAVSAR Active Electronically-Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Chamberlain, Neil; Figueroa, Harry; Fisher, Charlie; Grando, Maurio; Hamilton, Gary; Vorperian, Vatche; Zawadzki, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) repeat pass, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Using complex radar images collected during separate passes on time scales of hours to years, changes in surface topography can be measured. The repeat-pass InSAR technique requires that the radar look angle be approximately the same on successive passes. Due to variations in aircraft attitude between passes, antenna beam steering is required to replicate the radar look angle. This paper describes an active, electronically steered array (AESA) that provides beam steering capability in the antenna azimuth plane. The array contains 24 transmit/receive modules generating 2800 W of radiated power and is capable of pulse-to-pulse beam steering and polarization agility. Designed for high reliability as well as serviceability, all array electronics are contained in single 178cm x 62cm x 12 cm air-cooled panel suitable for operation up 60,000 ft altitude.

  2. A Proton Beam Therapy System Dedicated to Spot-Scanning Increases Accuracy with Moving Tumors by Real-Time Imaging and Gating and Reduces Equipment Size

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Shinichi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Matsuura, Taeko; Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi; Umegaki, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A proton beam therapy (PBT) system has been designed which dedicates to spot-scanning and has a gating function employing the fluoroscopy-based real-time-imaging of internal fiducial markers near tumors. The dose distribution and treatment time of the newly designed real-time-image gated, spot-scanning proton beam therapy (RGPT) were compared with free-breathing spot-scanning proton beam therapy (FBPT) in a simulation. Materials and Methods In-house simulation tools and treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi, Ltd., Japan) were used for estimating the dose distribution and treatment time. Simulations were performed for 48 motion parameters (including 8 respiratory patterns and 6 initial breathing timings) on CT data from two patients, A and B, with hepatocellular carcinoma and with clinical target volumes 14.6 cc and 63.1 cc. The respiratory patterns were derived from the actual trajectory of internal fiducial markers taken in X-ray real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RTRT). Results With FBPT, 9/48 motion parameters achieved the criteria of successful delivery for patient A and 0/48 for B. With RGPT 48/48 and 42/48 achieved the criteria. Compared with FBPT, the mean liver dose was smaller with RGPT with statistical significance (p<0.001); it decreased from 27% to 13% and 28% to 23% of the prescribed doses for patients A and B, respectively. The relative lengthening of treatment time to administer 3 Gy (RBE) was estimated to be 1.22 (RGPT/FBPT: 138 s/113 s) and 1.72 (207 s/120 s) for patients A and B, respectively. Conclusions This simulation study demonstrated that the RGPT was able to improve the dose distribution markedly for moving tumors without very large treatment time extension. The proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot-scanning with a gating function for real-time imaging increases accuracy with moving tumors and reduces the physical size, and subsequently the cost of the equipment as well as of the building housing the equipment. PMID

  3. Spots and Flares: Stellar Activity in the Time Domain Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    Time domain photometric surveys for large numbers of stars have ushered in a new era of statistical studies of astrophysics. This new parameter space allows us to observe how stars behave and change on a human timescale, and facilitates ensemble studies to understand how stars change over cosmic timescales. With current and planned time domain stellar surveys, we will be able to put the Sun in a Galactic context, and discover how typical or unique our parent star truly is. The goal of this thesis is to develop techniques for detecting and analyzing the most prominent forms of magnetic activity from low-mass stars in modern time domain surveys: starspots and flares. Magnetic field strength is a fundamental property that decays over a star's life. As a result, flux modulations from both flares and starspots become smaller amplitude and more infrequent in light curves. Methods for detecting these forms of magnetic activity will be extensible to future time domain surveys, and helpful in characterizing the properties of stars as they age. Flares can be detected in sparsely sampled wide field surveys by searching for bright single-point outliers in light curves. Using both red optical and near infrared data from ground-based surveys over many years, I have constrained the rate of flares in multiple wavelengths for an ensemble of M dwarfs. Studying flares in these existing ground-based datasets will enable predictions for future survey yields. Space-based photometry enables continuous and precise monitoring of stars for many years, which is crucial for obtaining a complete census of flares from a single star. Using 11 months of 1-minute photometry for the M dwarf GJ 1243, I have amassed over 6100 flare events, the largest sample of white light flares for any low-mass star. I have also created the first high fidelity empirical white light flare template, which shows three distinct phases in typical flare light curves. With this template, I demonstrate that complex multi

  4. Spots and Flares: Stellar Activity in the Time Domain Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James

    2015-08-01

    Time domain photometric surveys for large numbers of stars have ushered in a new era of statistical studies of astrophysics. This new parameter space allows us to observe how stars behave and change on a human timescale, and facilitates ensemble studies to understand how stars change over cosmic timescales. With current and planned time domain stellar surveys, we will be able to put the Sun in a Galactic context, and discover how typical or unique our parent star truly is. The goal of this thesis is to develop techniques for detecting and analyzing the most prominent forms of magnetic activity from low-mass stars in modern time domain surveys: starspots and flares. Magnetic field strength is a fundamental property that decays over a star's life. As a result, flux modulations from both flares and starspots become smaller amplitude and more infrequent in light curves. Methods for detecting these forms of magnetic activity will be extensible to future time domain surveys, and helpful in characterizing the properties of stars as they age. Flares can be detected in sparsely sampled wide field surveys by searching for bright single-point outliers in light curves. Using both red optical and near infrared data from ground-based surveys over many years, I have constrained the rate of flares in multiple wavelengths for an ensemble of M dwarfs. Studying flares in these existing ground-based datasets will enable predictions for future survey yields. Space-based photometry enables continuous and precise monitoring of stars for many years, which is crucial for obtaining a complete census of flares from a single star. Using 11 months of 1-minute photometry for the M dwarf GJ 1243, I have amassed over 6100 flare events, the largest sample of white light flares for any low-mass star. I have also created the first high fidelity empirical white light flare template, which shows three distinct phases in typical flare light curves. With this template, I demonstrate that complex multi

  5. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Stefan; Shen, Jiajian; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  6. SU-E-T-346: Validation of Beam Accuracy of a Gated Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy System with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking at Hokkaido University

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T; Matsuura, T; Toramatsu, C; Takao, S; Nihongi, H; Miyamoto, N; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H; Takayanagi, T; Umezawa, M; Matsuda, K; Umegaki, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: At Hokkaido University, we have developed a gated spot scanning proton beam therapy system with real-time tumor-tracking under collaborative work with Hitachi Ltd. This system has the ability to gate proton beams from the synchrotron, turning the beam on only when the actual positions of inserted fiducial markers monitored by two fluoroscopic X-ray systems are within the planned positions [Shirato, 2012]. In this research, we validated the accuracy of the proton beams while utilizing external gating signals. Methods: The accuracy of spot positions, spot dose, absolute dose at the center of the SOBP, and range were measured while utilizing external gating signals. The following external gating signals were generated by an arbitrary waveform generator: (1) ON at all times (without gating), (2) an OFF period of 4 s followed by an ON period of 1 s, (3) two ON periods of 0.5 s with a 0.15 s OFF interval, (4) signals recorded during the treatment of real-time tumor-tracking X-ray therapy in Hokkaido University. The spot positions and spot dose were measured by beam monitors in the nozzle. The ranges were measured with a multi-layer ion chamber made by Hitachi Ltd. The absolute dose was measured with a Farmer ionization chamber and a RFA300 water phantom system. Results: The maximum error of the beam position in the isocenter plane was 0.8 mm without the gating signal and 1.0 mm with the gating signal. The maximum error of the spot dose was 0.0029 MU, below the criterion of 0.0032 MU. The maximum error of the absolute dose was 0.4% and the maximum variation of the range was 0.1 mm. Conclusion: It was confirmed with measurements of the beam that the accuracy of the proton beam met the criteria with external gating signals. This research was supported by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R and D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program

  7. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rombi, Barbara; Ares, Carmen; Hug, Eugen B.; Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Timmermann, Beate

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  8. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, R.; Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J.; Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Short, S. C.; Loughrey, C.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  9. Defective active silicon uptake affects some components of rice resistance to brown spot.

    PubMed

    Dallagnol, Leandro J; Rodrigues, Fabrício A; Mielli, Mateus V B; Ma, Jian F; Datnoff, Lawrence E

    2009-01-01

    Rice is known to accumulate high amounts of silicon (Si) in plant tissue, which helps to decrease the intensity of many economically important rice diseases. Among these diseases, brown spot, caused by the fungus Bipolaris oryzae, is one of the most devastating because it negatively affects yield and grain quality. This study aimed to evaluate the importance of active root Si uptake in rice for controlling brown spot development. Some components of host resistance were evaluated in a rice mutant, low silicon 1 (lsi1), defective in active Si uptake, and its wild-type counterpart (cv. Oochikara). Plants were inoculated with B. oryzae after growing for 35 days in a hydroponic culture amended with 0 or 2 mMol Si. The components of host resistance evaluated were incubation period (IP), relative infection efficiency (RIE), area under brown spot progress curve (AUBSPC), final lesion size (FLS), rate of lesion expansion (r), and area under lesion expansion progress curve (AULEPC). Si content from both Oochikara and lsi1 in the +Si treatment increased in leaf tissue by 219 and 178%, respectively, over the nonamended controls. Plants from Oochikara had 112% more Si in leaf tissue than plants from lsi1. The IP of brown spot from Oochikara increased approximately 6 h in the presence of Si and the RIE, AUBSPC, FLS, r, and AULEPC were significantly reduced by 65, 75, 33, 36, and 35%, respectively. In the presence of Si, the IP increased 3 h for lsi1 but the RIE, AUBSPC, FLS, r, and AULEPC were reduced by only 40, 50, 12, 21, and 12%, respectively. The correlation between Si leaf content and IP was significantly positive but Si content was negatively correlated with RIE, AUBSPC, FLS, r, and AULEPC. Single degree-of-freedom contrasts showed that Oochikara and lsi1 supplied with Si were significantly different from those not supplied with Si for all components of resistance evaluated. This result showed that a reduced Si content in tissues of plants from lsi1 dramatically affected

  10. Measuring Faecal Epi-Androsterone as an Indicator of Gonadal Activity in Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta)

    PubMed Central

    Pribbenow, Susanne; East, Marion L.; Ganswindt, Andre; Tordiffe, Adrian S. W.; Hofer, Heribert; Dehnhard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) that measure faecal testosterone metabolites (fTM) are useful tools to monitor gonadal activity. The aim of this study was to validate an “in-house” epiandrosterone EIA to monitor fTM in spotted hyenas. FTM were characterised in a male and a female hyena that each received an injection of 3H-testosterone. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses revealed a cluster of highly polar enzyme-hydrolysable hormone metabolite conjugates. We performed hydrolysis using β-glucuronidase to deconjugate metabolites and improve sensitivity of the assay. Because β-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia has been reported to bias testosterone measurements in some species, we compared the enzymatic activity of the commonly used β-glucuronidase extracted from H. pomatia with the same enzyme from Escherichia coli. Our results showed that β-glucuronidases from both sources produced similar results from spotted hyena faeces. We therefore hydrolysed samples with H. pomatia enzymes. HPLC analyses also demonstrated that following hydrolysis the epiandrosterone EIA measured significant amounts of immunoreactive metabolites corresponding to radiolabelled metabolites in both sexes. Additionally, HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirmed the presence of epiandrosterone in faeces of spotted hyenas. The biological relevance of the epiandrosterone EIA was validated by demonstrating (1) a significant increase in fTM levels in response to a testosterone injection within 16 h, (2) no biological responsiveness to an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection and (3) significant differences in fTM levels between juvenile males and adult immigrant males in a free-ranging wild population. Our results clearly demonstrate that the epiandrosterone EIA is a reliable non-invasive method to monitor gonadal activity in spotted hyenas. PMID:26107516

  11. Measuring Faecal Epi-Androsterone as an Indicator of Gonadal Activity in Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Pribbenow, Susanne; East, Marion L; Ganswindt, Andre; Tordiffe, Adrian S W; Hofer, Heribert; Dehnhard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) that measure faecal testosterone metabolites (fTM) are useful tools to monitor gonadal activity. The aim of this study was to validate an "in-house" epiandrosterone EIA to monitor fTM in spotted hyenas. FTM were characterised in a male and a female hyena that each received an injection of 3H-testosterone. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses revealed a cluster of highly polar enzyme-hydrolysable hormone metabolite conjugates. We performed hydrolysis using β-glucuronidase to deconjugate metabolites and improve sensitivity of the assay. Because β-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia has been reported to bias testosterone measurements in some species, we compared the enzymatic activity of the commonly used β-glucuronidase extracted from H. pomatia with the same enzyme from Escherichia coli. Our results showed that β-glucuronidases from both sources produced similar results from spotted hyena faeces. We therefore hydrolysed samples with H. pomatia enzymes. HPLC analyses also demonstrated that following hydrolysis the epiandrosterone EIA measured significant amounts of immunoreactive metabolites corresponding to radiolabelled metabolites in both sexes. Additionally, HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirmed the presence of epiandrosterone in faeces of spotted hyenas. The biological relevance of the epiandrosterone EIA was validated by demonstrating (1) a significant increase in fTM levels in response to a testosterone injection within 16 h, (2) no biological responsiveness to an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection and (3) significant differences in fTM levels between juvenile males and adult immigrant males in a free-ranging wild population. Our results clearly demonstrate that the epiandrosterone EIA is a reliable non-invasive method to monitor gonadal activity in spotted hyenas. PMID:26107516

  12. Assessing VLT-UT science image quality from active optics Shack-Hartmann spot patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, Julio; Kolb, Johan; Lombardi, Gianluca; Noethe, Lothar; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-07-01

    A one year database has been gathered from the VLT active optics Shack-Hartmann (S-H) wavefront sensor images taken at each operating focus about every 30 seconds. The VLT telescope control software includes a dedicated code to extract the median full width at half maximum of the unvignetted S-H spots which is used for this study. This code applies a 1-D fit, assuming circular Hartmann spots, which allows to work only on foci equipped with atmospheric dispersion correction, or when the telescopes are observing close to zenith. The S-H image size measured inside the 30m enclosures is compared the outside seeing measured at 6m above ground by the VLT Astronomical Site Monitor (DIMM). A method for correcting DIMM measurements from surface layer turbulence contamination is proposed.

  13. Spot activity on HD 89546 (FG UMa) from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdarcan, O.; Evren, S.; Henry, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We present the analysis of 20 years of time-series BV photometry of the SB1 RS CVn binary HD 89546. The system's yearly mean V brightness, the B-V color index, the photometric period, and the light curve amplitude all show clear cyclic variability with an ≈9-year time scale. We also find some evidence for brightness variability on a time scale longer than the 20-year time span of our observations, perhaps indicating a longer cycle analogous to the solar Gleissberg cycle. We estimate the unspotted V magnitude of HD 89546 to be 7.154m, which is ≈0.2m brighter than the observed maximum brightness. Spot modelling of the system shows that spot temperature variations affect the observed B-V color as well as the V brightness. Two active longitudes are observed, centered around 180° and 360° longitude on the G9 III primary, each covering a longitude range of 120°. Furthermore, two inactive longitude zones are seen spanning only 60° between the two active longitudes. The longitudinal distribution of the spots exhibits no strong cyclic variability but does show rapid jumps of 120° that look like the flip-flop phenomenon. We estimate the differential rotation coefficient of the star as k=0.086 by considering the range of observed photometric period variations and assumed latitudinal spot variations over 45°. Based on data obtained with the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m APT at Fairborn Observatory, operated by Tennessee State University, and T30 0.3 m telescope of the Ege University Observatory in Izmir.

  14. Structural health monitoring of multi-spot welded joints using a lead zirconate titanate based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ping; Kong, Qingzhao; Xu, Kai; Jiang, Tianyong; Huo, Lin-sheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    Failures of spot welded joints directly reduce the load capacity of adjacent structures. Due to their complexity and invisibility, real-time health monitoring of spot welded joints is still a challenge. In this paper, a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) based active sensing approach was proposed to monitor the structural health of multi-spot welded joints in real time. In the active sensing approach, one PZT transducer was used as an actuator to generate a guided stress wave, while another one, as a sensor, detected the wave response. Failure of a spot welded joint reduces the stress wave paths and attenuates the wave propagation energy from the actuator to the sensor. A total of four specimens made of dual phase steel with spot welds, including two specimens with 20 mm intervals of spot welded joints and two with 25 mm intervals, were designed and fabricated for this research. Under tensile tests, the spot welded joints successively failed, resulting in the PZT sensor reporting decreased received energy. The energy attenuations due to the failures of joints were clearly observed by the PZT sensor signal in both the time domain and frequency domain. In addition, a wavelet packet-based spot-weld failure indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the failure condition corresponding to the number of failed joints.

  15. Comparison of organ-at-risk sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton therapy and volumetric modulated arc photon therapy in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barten, Danique L. J. Tol, Jim P.; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) aims to improve organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing over photon radiotherapy. However, it may be less robust for setup and range uncertainties. The authors investigated OAR sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton planning techniques and compared these with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans. Methods: Ten HNC patients were replanned using two arc VMAT (RapidArc) and spot-scanning proton techniques. OARs to be spared included the contra- and ipsilateral parotid and submandibular glands and individual swallowing muscles. Proton plans were made using Multifield Optimization (MFO, using three, five, and seven fields) and Single-field Optimization (SFO, using three fields). OAR sparing was evaluated using mean dose to composite salivary glands (Comp{sub Sal}) and composite swallowing muscles (Comp{sub Swal}). Plan robustness was determined for setup and range uncertainties (±3 mm for setup, ±3% HU) evaluating V95% and V107% for clinical target volumes. Results: Averaged over all patients Comp{sub Sal}/Comp{sub Swal} mean doses were lower for the three-field MFO plans (14.6/16.4 Gy) compared to the three-field SFO plans (20.0/23.7 Gy) and VMAT plans (23.0/25.3 Gy). Using more than three fields resulted in differences in OAR sparing of less than 1.5 Gy between plans. SFO plans were significantly more robust than MFO plans. VMAT plans were the most robust. Conclusions: MFO plans had improved OAR sparing but were less robust than SFO and VMAT plans, while SFO plans were more robust than MFO plans but resulted in less OAR sparing. Robustness of the MFO plans did not increase with more fields.

  16. TH-C-BRD-04: Beam Modeling and Validation with Triple and Double Gaussian Dose Kernel for Spot Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, S; Takayanagi, T; Fujii, Y; Fujimoto, R; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Nagamine, Y; Hosaka, M; Yasui, K; Toshito, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present the validity of our beam modeling with double and triple Gaussian dose kernels for spot scanning proton beams in Nagoya Proton Therapy Center. This study investigates the conformance between the measurements and calculation results in absolute dose with two types of beam kernel. Methods: A dose kernel is one of the important input data required for the treatment planning software. The dose kernel is the 3D dose distribution of an infinitesimal pencil beam of protons in water and consists of integral depth doses and lateral distributions. We have adopted double and triple Gaussian model as lateral distribution in order to take account of the large angle scattering due to nuclear reaction by fitting simulated inwater lateral dose profile for needle proton beam at various depths. The fitted parameters were interpolated as a function of depth in water and were stored as a separate look-up table for the each beam energy. The process of beam modeling is based on the method of MDACC [X.R.Zhu 2013]. Results: From the comparison results between the absolute doses calculated by double Gaussian model and those measured at the center of SOBP, the difference is increased up to 3.5% in the high-energy region because the large angle scattering due to nuclear reaction is not sufficiently considered at intermediate depths in the double Gaussian model. In case of employing triple Gaussian dose kernels, the measured absolute dose at the center of SOBP agrees with calculation within ±1% regardless of the SOBP width and maximum range. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the beam modeling results of dose distribution employing double and triple Gaussian dose kernel. Treatment planning system with the triple Gaussian dose kernel has been successfully verified and applied to the patient treatment with a spot scanning technique in Nagoya Proton Therapy Center.

  17. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, P; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions.

  18. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun ...

  19. Distribution of flares on the sun during 1955-1985 - 'Hot spots' (active zones) lasting for 30 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1988-01-01

    The coordinates of 'major solar flares' observed during the period from January 1955 through August 1985 are analyzed. About 100 'superactive' regions (large, complex, active regions containing large sunspots) produced 46 percent of the major flares during the period. Superactive regions appeared more frequently in certain areas of the sun called 'hot spots' or 'active zones'. The synodic rotation periods of the northern and southern hemisphere hot spots were 26.72 d and 26.61 d, respectively. One of the two hot spots persisted through three solar cycles, and the other was active during cycles 19 and 21 but was dormant during cycle 20. These findings suggest that the mechanism producing hot spots must be stable for two or three solar cycles or longer.

  20. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  1. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Ram; Smith, Susan; Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  2. Identifying Clusters of Active Transportation Using Spatial Scan Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan; Stinchcomb, David G.; Pickle, Linda W.; Dill, Jennifer; Berrigan, David

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an intense interest in the possibility that neighborhood characteristics influence active transportation such as walking or biking. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a spatial cluster identification method can evaluate the geographic variation of active transportation and identify neighborhoods with unusually high/low levels of active transportation. Methods Self-reported walking/biking prevalence, demographic characteristics, street connectivity variables, and neighborhood socioeconomic data were collected from respondents to the 2001 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS; N=10,688) in Los Angeles County (LAC) and San Diego County (SDC). Spatial scan statistics were used to identify clusters of high or low prevalence (with and without age-adjustment) and the quantity of time spent walking and biking. The data, a subset from the 2001 CHIS, were analyzed in 2007–2008. Results Geographic clusters of significantly high or low prevalence of walking and biking were detected in LAC and SDC. Structural variables such as street connectivity and shorter block lengths are consistently associated with higher levels of active transportation, but associations between active transportation and socioeconomic variables at the individual and neighborhood levels are mixed. Only one cluster with less time spent walking and biking among walkers/bikers was detected in LAC, and this was of borderline significance. Age-adjustment affects the clustering pattern of walking/biking prevalence in LAC, but not in SDC. Conclusions The use of spatial scan statistics to identify significant clustering of health behaviors such as active transportation adds to the more traditional regression analysis that examines associations between behavior and environmental factors by identifying specific geographic areas with unusual levels of the behavior independent of predefined administrative units. PMID:19589451

  3. Camouflage through an active choice of a resting spot and body orientation in moths.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-K; Moon, J-Y; Lee, S-I; Jablonski, P G

    2012-09-01

    Cryptic colour patterns in prey are classical examples of adaptations to avoid predation, but we still know little about behaviours that reinforce the match between animal body and the background. For example, moths avoid predators by matching their colour patterns with the background. Active choice of a species-specific body orientation has been suggested as an important function of body positioning behaviour performed by moths after landing on the bark. However, the contribution of this behaviour to moths' crypticity has not been directly measured. From observations of geometrid moths, Hypomecis roboraria and Jankowskia fuscaria, we determined that the positioning behaviour, which consists of walking and turning the body while repeatedly lifting and lowering the wings, resulted in new resting spots and body orientations in J. fuscaria and in new resting spots in H. roboraria. The body positioning behaviour of the two species significantly decreased the probability of visual detection by humans, who viewed photographs of the moths taken before and after the positioning behaviour. This implies that body positioning significantly increases the camouflage effect provided by moth's cryptic colour pattern regardless of whether the behaviour involves a new body orientation or not. Our study demonstrates that the evolution of morphological adaptations, such as colour pattern of moths, cannot be fully understood without taking into account a behavioural phenotype that coevolved with the morphology for increasing the adaptive value of the morphological trait. PMID:22775528

  4. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  5. Spot activity of LQ Hydra from photometry between 1988 and 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, J.; Jetsu, L.; Hackman, T.; Kajatkari, P.; Henry, G. W.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the spot activity of the young magnetically active main sequence star LQ Hya. Our aims are to identify possible active longitudes, estimate the differential rotation, and study long and short term changes in the activity. Methods: Our analysis is based on 24 years of Johnson V-band photometry of LQ Hya obtained with the T3 0.4 m Automated Telescope at the Fairborn Observatory. We use the previously published continuous period search (CPS) method to model the evolution of the light curve of LQ Hya. The CPS fits a Fourier series model to short overlapping subsets of data. This enables us to monitor the evolution of the light curve and thus the spot configuration of the star with a higher time resolution. Results: We find seasonal variability in the mean level and amplitude of the light curve of LQ Hya. The variability of the light curve amplitude seems not to be cyclic, but the long-term variations in the mean magnitude may be indicative of an approximately 13 year cycle. However, because of the limited length of the observed time series, it is not yet possible to determine whether this structure really represents an activity cycle. Based on fluctuations of the light curve period, we estimate the differential rotation of the star to be small, and the star is potentially very close to a rigid rotator. We search for active longitudes from the inferred epochs of the light curve minima. We find that on time scales up to six months there are typically one or two relatively stable active areas on the star with limited phase migration. On the other hand, on time scales longer than one year, no stable active longitudes have been present except for the period between 2003 and 2009 and possibly also some time before 1995. Neither do we find any signs of flip-flops with a regular period. The mean time scale of change of the light curve during the observation period is determined to be of the same order of magnitude as the estimated convective turnover time

  6. Chromospheric activity and lithium line variations in the spectra of the spotted star LQ Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Although the relationship between lithium abundance in stars and their magnetic activity is commonly accepted, it is still unclear how the different phenomena related to it can increase the amount of Li, reduce its depletion, or be a source of bias for the measurements. Aims: We study the rotational modulation of chromospheric and photospheric parameters of the young, active, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya and their connection with the variability of the Li i 6708 Å line. Methods: A total of 199 high-resolution STELLA spectra and quasi-simultaneous photometry were used to compute effective temperature, gravity, and chromospheric activity indicators such as Hα and Hβ emission, Balmer decrement, and chromospheric electron density, as a function of the rotational phase. The variation of the Li i 6708 Å line was characterized in terms of equivalent width, abundance, and of 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio in the form of line shifts. Results: Photospheric and chromospheric parameters show clear rotational modulation. Effective temperatures and continuum variations reveal a higher concentration of cool spots on the side of the star on which we also detect stronger chromospheric activity. Increased electron densities and the modulation of the He i D3 line suggest that the source of this activity can be a combination of plages and repeated low-intensity flares. The Li line and other temperature-sensitive lines are clearly enhanced by the spots located on the most active side of the star. Li abundances calculated taking into account the temperature variations simultaneously show, although with high dispersion, a small overabundance of this element that correlates well with the surface magnetic activity. In addition, the Li line center is more intensely redshifted than in the other hemisphere, which might be interpreted as a weak enrichment of 6Li. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC, and the Vienna

  7. SU-D-BRE-03: Dosimetric Impact of In-Air Spot Size Variations for Commissioning a Room-Matched Beam Model for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Giebeler, A; Mascia, A; Piskulich, F; Perles, L; Lepage, R; Dong, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric consequence of spot size variations and validate beam-matching criteria for commissioning a pencil beam model for multiple treatment rooms. Methods: A planning study was first conducted by simulating spot size variations to systematically evaluate dosimetric impact of spot size variations in selected cases, which was used to establish the in-air spot size tolerance for beam matching specifications. A beam model in treatment planning system was created using in-air spot profiles acquired in one treatment room. These spot profiles were also acquired from another treatment room for assessing the actual spot size variations between the two treatment rooms. We created twenty five test plans with targets of different sizes at different depths, and performed dose measurement along the entrance, proximal and distal target regions. The absolute doses at those locations were measured using ionization chambers at both treatment rooms, and were compared against the calculated doses by the beam model. Fifteen additional patient plans were also measured and included in our validation. Results: The beam model is relatively insensitive to spot size variations. With an average of less than 15% measured in-air spot size variations between two treatment rooms, the average dose difference was −0.15% with a standard deviation of 0.40% for 55 measurement points within target region; but the differences increased to 1.4%±1.1% in the entrance regions, which are more affected by in-air spot size variations. Overall, our single-room based beam model in the treatment planning system agreed with measurements in both rooms < 0.5% within the target region. For fifteen patient cases, the agreement was within 1%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that dosimetrically equivalent machines can be established when in-air spot size variations are within 15% between the two treatment rooms.

  8. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  9. Activity and cold spots on the surface of G-type superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2015-07-01

    Based on the high precision photometric observations of the Kepler space telescope, we have investigated the properties of the active regions (cold spots) on the surface of 279 stars of the spectral class G, for which 1547 superflares with energies in the range of 1033-1036 erg have been revealed. The main conclusion of our study is the quantitative estimation of the increased surface spottedness of superflare stars, which indicates enhancedmagnetic activity of these objects. The increased spottedness on the surfaces of the studied stars was confirmed based on two independent estimations of stellar brightness variations. In addition, it was concluded that superflare stars do not stand out in the common dataset of differential rotation parameters. Based on the data considered, no correlation was found of the spottedness parameters or the differential rotation parameters with the characteristics of these objects—their Rossby numbers and superflare energy. Additionally, the correlation between the superflare energy and the inverse Rossby number was considered. None of these comparisons gave an indication for the presence of any obvious correlation. The results of the analysis of five stars with a few dozen flares registered indicate that for the same star whereas spottedness S variations are small, significant changes in the superflare energy can be achieved. On the example of KIC 10422252, we show that at sixfold S variations, the flare energy varies by orders of magnitude at any given S value.

  10. Geneva cocktail for cytochrome p450 and P-glycoprotein activity assessment using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Bosilkovska, M; Samer, C F; Déglon, J; Rebsamen, M; Staub, C; Dayer, P; Walder, B; Desmeules, J A; Daali, Y

    2014-09-01

    The suitability of the capillary dried blood spot (DBS) sampling method was assessed for simultaneous phenotyping of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) using a cocktail approach. Ten volunteers received an oral cocktail capsule containing low doses of the probes bupropion (CYP2B6), flurbiprofen (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), dextromethorphan (CYP2D6), midazolam (CYP3A), and fexofenadine (P-gp) with coffee/Coke (CYP1A2) on four occasions. They received the cocktail alone (session 1), and with the CYP inhibitors fluvoxamine and voriconazole (session 2) and quinidine (session 3). In session 4, subjects received the cocktail after a 7-day pretreatment with the inducer rifampicin. The concentrations of probes/metabolites were determined in DBS and plasma using a single liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the drugs were comparable in DBS and plasma. Important modulation of CYP and P-gp activities was observed in the presence of inhibitors and the inducer. Minimally invasive one- and three-point (at 2, 3, and 6 h) DBS-sampling methods were found to reliably reflect CYP and P-gp activities at each session. PMID:24722393

  11. Ex vivo bubble production from ovine large blood vessels: size on detachment and evidence of "active spots".

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Marmur, A

    2014-08-15

    Nanobubbles formed on the hydrophobic silicon wafer were shown to be the source of gas micronuclei from which bubbles evolved during decompression. Bubbles were also formed after decompression on the luminal surface of ovine blood vessels. Four ovine blood vessels: aorta, pulmonary vein, pulmonary artery, and superior vena cava, were compressed to 1013 kPa for 21 h. They were then decompressed, photographed at 1-s intervals, and bubble size was measured on detachment. There were certain spots at which bubbles appeared, either singly or in a cluster. Mean detachment diameter was between 0.7 and 1.0 mm. The finding of active spots at which bubbles nucleate is a new, hitherto unreported observation. It is possible that these are the hydrophobic spots at which bubbles nucleate, stabilise, and later transform into the gas micronuclei that grow into bubbles. The possible neurological effects of these large arterial bubbles should be further explored. PMID:24933644

  12. Spots and activity cycles of the star FKCom—2013-2015 data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzin, V. B.; Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.; Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Yakunin, I. A.; Burdanov, A. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of new photometric and spectropolarimetric observations of a chromospherically active star FKCom. Based on this observational data and the data from the literature sources, applying a common technique, we performed an analysis of a complete set of the available photometric data, which were divided into 218 individual light curves. For each of them a reverse problem of restoring largescale temperature irregularities on the surface of the star from its light curve was solved. We analyzed the time series for the brightness of the star in the U-, B-, and V-bands, the brightness variability amplitudes, the total area of the spots on the surface of the star, and the average brightness of each set considered. The analysis of determination results of the positions of active longitudes leads to the conclusion about the existence of two systems of active regions on the FKCom surface. It was determined that the positions of each of these systems undergo cyclic changes. This confirms the conclusion on the likely absence of a strongly pronounced regularity of the flip-flops in FKCom, earlier suggested by other researchers. The results of the new polarimetric observations FKCom in 2014-2015 are presented. These measurements evidence the legitimacy of the proposed interpretation the behavior of the longitudinal magnetic field strength < B z >, indicating the settling-in of a more symmetric distribution of magnetic region on the FKCom surface. An increasing activity of the star over the recent years, registered from the photometric observations is also consistent with the probable onset of growth in the < B z > parameter starting from 2014.

  13. Light-curve solutions of 20 eclipsing Kepler binaries, most of them with pronounced spot and flare activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Atanasova, T.; Dimitrov, D.

    2016-07-01

    We carried out light curve solutions of the Kepler light curves of twenty detached eclipsing binaries with circular orbits and determined the orbital inclinations, temperatures. relative radii and luminosities of their components. We studied the quality of the solutions with respect to the adopted limb-darkening law and its coefficients. The detailed tracing of the numerous and uninterrupted data of our targets gave us an unique possibility to detect and learn their spot and flare activity. We established that the out-of-eclipse variability of the most targets gradually changes from small-amplitude two-waved type to big-amplitude one-waved type and vice versa, i.e. their spot activity cycles pass through phase of two almost diametrically opposite spots and phase of big polar cool spot. We found that the low-temperature targets show flare activity of UV Cet-type with amplitudes of 0.002-0.22 mag and duration of up to several hours. Data from Kepler

  14. MO-F-16A-05: Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Patient-Specific Quality Assurance: Our Methodology and Results From 295 Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, D; Zhang, X; Li, H; Wu, R; Poenisch, F; Kerr, M; Holmes, C; Zhu, X; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Li, Y; Suzuki, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA) results for 295 spot-scanning proton therapy treatment plans from the MD Anderson PTC-Houston. We show how the results differed by treatment site and how they were affected by the treatment plan optimization method and by a range shifter in the treatment field. We also discuss some causes of PSQA problems. Methods: The PSQA procedure, which is designed to verify both the accuracy of the treatment planning system's (Eclipse™ v8.9) dose calculations and the dose delivery of the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron, consists of (1) an end-to-end test in which the beam is delivered and measured at the prescribed gantry angle, and (2) additional dose plane measurements made from gantry angle 270°. HPlusQA™ software automatically performs the gamma analysis with criteria 3% (dose tolerance), 3 mm (distance-to-agreement, DTA) and 2%, 2 mm. Passing is defined as at least 90% of the pixels having a gamma score less than 1. Results: The PSQA gamma passing rate was 96.2% for 3%, 3 mm, and 85.3% for 2%, 2 mm. The rate depended on the treatment site. For example, the 3%, 3 mm passing rate was 95% for head and neck plans, vs 100% for prostate plans. The passing rates of multi- vs. single-field optimization plans did not significantly differ. However, the rate for fields with range shifters was 94.8±0.6%, vs 99.0±0.6% for those without (p = 0.002). Longitudinal dose gradients caused most of the low scores. Overestimation of the calculated dose proximal to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) caused many of the others. Conclusion: The planned and delivered doses consistently agreed within tolerance levels. Minor dose modeling deficiencies remain proximal to the SOBP. The 3% dose tolerance, 3 mm DTA, with 90% pixel passing rate is a reasonable action level for 2D gamma comparisons.

  15. Improving spot-scanning proton therapy patient specific quality assurance with HPlusQA, a second-check dose calculation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Dennis; Li, Yupeng; Taylor, Michael B.; Kerr, Matthew; Holmes, Charles; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Li, Heng; Lii, Jim; Amos, Richard; Wu, Richard; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the use of HPlusQA, spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) dose calculation software developed at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, as second-check dose calculation software for patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA). The authors also showed how HPlusQA can be used within the current PSQA framework.Methods: The authors compared the dose calculations of HPlusQA and the Eclipse treatment planning system with 106 planar dose measurements made as part of PSQA. To determine the relative performance and the degree of correlation between HPlusQA and Eclipse, the authors compared calculated with measured point doses. Then, to determine how well HPlusQA can predict when the comparisons between Eclipse calculations and the measured dose will exceed tolerance levels, the authors compared gamma index scores for HPlusQA versus Eclipse with those of measured doses versus Eclipse. The authors introduce the αβγ transformation as a way to more easily compare gamma scores.Results: The authors compared measured and calculated dose planes using the relative depth, z/R × 100%, where z is the depth of the measurement and R is the proton beam range. For relative depths than less than 80%, both Eclipse and HPlusQA calculations were within 2 cGy of dose measurements on average. When the relative depth was greater than 80%, the agreement between the calculations and measurements fell to 4 cGy. For relative depths less than 10%, the Eclipse and HPlusQA dose discrepancies showed a negative correlation, −0.21. Otherwise, the correlation between the dose discrepancies was positive and as large as 0.6. For the dose planes in this study, HPlusQA correctly predicted when Eclipse had and had not calculated the dose to within tolerance 92% and 79% of the time, respectively. In 4 of 106 cases, HPlusQA failed to predict when the comparison between measurement and Eclipse's calculation had exceeded the tolerance levels of 3% for

  16. Biological effect of dose distortion by fiducial markers in spot-scanning proton therapy with a limited number of fields: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Sutherland, Kenneth; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Shimizu, Shinichi; Takao, Seishin; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: In accurate proton spot-scanning therapy, continuous target tracking by fluoroscopic x ray during irradiation is beneficial not only for respiratory moving tumors of lung and liver but also for relatively stationary tumors of prostate. Implanted gold markers have been used with great effect for positioning the target volume by a fluoroscopy, especially for the cases of liver and prostate with the targets surrounded by water-equivalent tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that gold markers can cause a significant underdose in proton therapy. This paper focuses on prostate cancer and explores the possibility that multiple-field irradiation improves the underdose effect by markers on tumor-control probability (TCP). Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the dose distortion effect. A spherical gold marker was placed at several characteristic points in a water phantom. The markers were with two different diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm, both visible on fluoroscopy. Three beam arrangements of single-field uniform dose (SFUD) were examined: one lateral field, two opposite lateral fields, and three fields (two opposite lateral fields + anterior field). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was set to 1.1 and a dose of 74 Gy (RBE) was delivered to the target of a typical prostate size in 37 fractions. The ratios of TCP to that without the marker (TCP{sub r}) were compared with the parameters of the marker sizes, number of fields, and marker positions. To take into account the dependence of biological parameters in TCP model, {alpha}/{beta} values of 1.5, 3, and 10 Gy (RBE) were considered. Results: It was found that the marker of 1.5 mm diameter does not affect the TCPs with all {alpha}/{beta} values when two or more fields are used. On the other hand, if the marker diameter is 2 mm, more than two irradiation fields are required to suppress the decrease in TCP from TCP{sub r} by less than 3%. This is especially true when multiple

  17. Scanning near field microwave microscopy based on an active resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Naser; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Ordonez-Romero, Cesar Leonardo

    2014-03-01

    A large number of recent implementations of near field scanning microwave microscopy (NFSMM) have been based on the perturbation of a resonant cavity connected to a sharp scanning probe. In this work we present results from an alternative approach: the perturbation of a microwave source connected to a scanning tip. Based on a yittrium iron garnet (YIG) cavity ring resonator this scanning probe system has a quality factor greater than 106, which allows us to detect very small frequency shifts, which translates to a very high sensitivity in sample impedance measurements. Using a selection of representative semiconductor, metal and biological samples we show how this approach leads to unusually high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Work supported by a grant from PAPIIT, UNAM 104513.

  18. Surface micro-topography causes hot spots of biogeochemical activity in wetland systems: A virtual modeling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, S.; Knorr, K. H.; Peiffer, S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands provide important ecohydrological services by regulating fluxes of nutrients and pollutants to receiving waters, which can in turn mitigate adverse effects on water quality. Turnover of redox-sensitive solutes in wetlands has been shown to take place in distinct spatial and temporal patterns, commonly referred to as hot spots and hot moments. Despite the importance of such patterns for solute fluxes the mechanistic understanding of their formation is still weak and their existence is often explained by variations in soil properties and diffusive transport only. Here we show that surface micro-topography in wetlands can cause the formation of biogeochemical hot spots solely by the advective redistribution of infiltrating water as a result of complex subsurface flow patterns. Surface and subsurface flows are simulated for an idealized section of a riparian wetland using a fully integrated numerical code for coupled surface-subsurface systems. Biogeochemical processes and transport along advective subsurface flow paths are simulated kinetically using the biogeochemical code PHREEQC. Distinct patterns of biogeochemical activity (expressed as reaction rates) develop in response to micro-topography induced subsurface flow patterns. Simulated vertical pore water profiles for various redox-sensitive species resemble profiles observed in the field. This mechanistic explanation of hot spot formation complements the more static explanations that relate hot spots solely to spatial variability in soil characteristics and can account for spatial as well as temporal variability of biogeochemical activity, which is needed to assess future changes in the biogeochemical turnover of wetland systems.

  19. SU-D-304-01: Development of An Applicator for Treating Shallow and Moving Tumors with Respiratory-Gated Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Using Real-Time Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, T; Fujii, Y; Takao, S; Yamada, T; Matsuzaki, Y; Miyamoto, N; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H; Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umegaki, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for treating shallow and moving tumors (e.g., lung tumors) with respiratory-gated spot-scanning proton therapy using real-time image guidance (RTPT). Methods: An applicator was developed which can be installed by hand on the treatment nozzle. The mechanical design was considered such that the Bragg peaks are placed at the patient surface while a sufficient field of view (FOV) of fluoroscopic X-rays was maintained during the proton beam delivery. To reduce the treatment time maintaining the robustness of the dose distribution with respect to motion, a mini-ridge filter (MRF) was sandwiched between two energy absorbers. The measurements were performed to obtain a data for beam modeling and to verify the spot position-invariance of a pencil beam dose distribution. For three lung cancer patients, treatment plans were made with and without the MRF and the effects of the MRF were evaluated. Next, the effect of respiratory motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Results: To scan the proton beam over a 14 x 14 cm area while maintaining the φ16 cm of fluoroscopic FOV, the lower face of the applicator was set 22 cm upstream of the isocenter. With an additional range variance of 2.2 mm and peak-to-peak distance of 4 mm of the MRF, the pencil beam dose distribution was unchanged with the displacement of the spot position. The quality of the treatment plans was not worsened by the MRF. With the MRF, the number of energy layers was reduced to less than half and the treatment time by 26–37%. The simulation study showed that the interplay effect was successfully suppressed by respiratory-gating both with and without MRF. Conclusions: The spot-scanning proton beam was successfully delivered to shallow and moving tumors within a sufficiently short time by installing the developed applicator at the RTPT nozzle.

  20. Scanning L Band Active Passive Validation Experiment 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Patel, H.; Cosh, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    SLAP (Scanning L-band Active Passive) comprises of a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer and fully polarimetric L-band radar with a shared antenna. SLAP is designed to be compatible with several aircrafts; specifically, C-23, Twin Otter, P-3, and C-130. SLAP is designed for simplicity, accuracy, & reliability. It leverages, as much as possible, existing instruments, hardware, and software in order to minimize cost, time, and risk.The SLAP airborne/ground campaign is designed to conduct flight testing and ground truth for the airborne instrument. The campaign took place the third week of December 2013 in Eastern Shore, MD. SLAP contributes to the NASA's core mission because of its ability to serve as an airborne simulator for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission, one of NASA's flagship missions scheduled to launch in January 2015. A 3-day aircraft validation campaign was conducted where the new SLAP instrument flew three separate days over the proposed sampling region. The study area is a mixed agriculture and forest site located about 1 hour east of Washington, DC on the Eastern Shore (of the Chesapeake Bay). This region is located on the Delmarva Peninsula. The advantages of the selected site are: (1) Site was used before in previous field campaign (SMAPVEX08) (2) ARS HRSL has some established sampling sites within region (3) Dynamic variation in land cover (4) Variety of plant structures and densities. The goal of this campaign was to fly the instrument over the proposed site before a rain event, then have 2 other flights after the rain event to capture a dry down. In conjunction with the aircraft, there was in-situ ground sampling. Ground observations were collected concurrent with aircraft flights. These included soil moisture, soil temperature, surface temperature, surface roughness and vegetation parameters. Forest sites were monitored with small temporary networks of in situ sensors installed prior to the first flight. Soil moisture was

  1. SU-E-T-594: Preliminary Active Scanning Results of KHIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C; Yang, T; Chang, S; Kim, H; Lee, H; Kim, J; Jang, H; Han, G; Park, D; Hwang, W; Kim, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify the design criteria on heavy ion beam irradiation, developing a proto type active scanning system was purposed. The active scanning system consists of scanning magnet, power supplies, beam monitors, energy modulation system, and irradiation control system. Methods: Each components of the active scanning system was designed for carbon beam first. For the fast ramping a laminated yoke was purposed. To measure incoming dose and profile, a plate and strip type of ion chambers were designed. Also, ridge filter and range shifter was manufactured. And, the scanning system was modified to adopt 45 MeV of proton beam because of the absence of carbon ion beam in Korea. The system was installed in a beam line at MC-50, KIRAMS. Also, the irradiation control system and planning software was provided. Results: The scanning experiment was performed by drawing KHIMA logo on GaF film. The logo was scanned by 237 scanning points through time normalized intensity modulation. Also, a grid points scanning was performed to measure the scanning resolution and intensity resolution. Conclusion: A prototype active scanning system was successfully designed and manufactured. Also, an initial experiment to print out a drawing on GaF film through the scanning system was completed. More experiments would be required to specify the system performance.

  2. Body tissue activation using micro-spot atmospheric pressure plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takumi; Hirata, Takamichi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Akiya, Masahiro; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been performed involving directly irradiating body tissues with atmospheric pressure plasma for various medical engineering applications of plasmas. Plasma irradiation was used to burn back dermis of rats. Then, healing and improvement of the scald areas were observed. Additionally, we devoted attention to the angiogenesis, which is a key component of the healing mechanism. Plasma irradiated rats and non treatment were performed an intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labelled tomato-lectin. The neo-vascular vessels were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the quantities were calculated. Each quantity was the non treatment: 9.2 +/-- 0.77 and plasma irradiation: 18.4 +/-- 2.9. These data indicates that direct plasma irradiation involving ion/radical may promote angiogenesis, and it promotes living-body activation.

  3. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  4. Preliminary evaluation of multifield and single-field optimization for the treatment planning of spot-scanning proton therapy of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Liu, Wei; Wu, Richard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Li, Yupeng; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using multifield optimization (MFO) can generate highly conformal dose distributions, but it is more sensitive to setup and range uncertainties than SSPT using single-field optimization (SFO). The authors compared the two optimization methods for the treatment of head and neck cancer with bilateral targets and determined the superior method on the basis of both the plan quality and the plan robustness in the face of setup and range uncertainties.Methods: Four patients with head and neck cancer with bilateral targets who received SSPT treatment in the authors' institution were studied. The patients had each been treated with a MFO plan using three fields. A three-field SFO plan (3F-SFO) and a two-field SFO plan (2F-SFO) with the use of a range shifter in the beam line were retrospectively generated for each patient. The authors compared the plan quality and robustness to uncertainties of the SFO plans with the MFO plans. Robustness analysis of each plan was performed to generate the two dose distributions consisting of the highest and the lowest possible doses (worst-case doses) from the spatial and range perturbations at every voxel. Dosimetric indices from the nominal and worst-case plans were compared.Results: The 3F-SFO plans generally yielded D95 and D5 values in the targets that were similar to those of the MFO plans. 3F-SFO resulted in a lower dose to the oral cavity than MFO in all four patients by an average of 9.9 Gy, but the dose to the two parotids was on average 6.7 Gy higher for 3F-SFO than for MFO. 3F-SFO plans reduced the variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the targets by 22.8% compared to the MFO plans. Variations of dosimetric indices under uncertainties in the organs at risk (OARs) varied between organs and between patients, although they were on average 9.2% less for the 3F-SFO plans than for the MFO plans. Compared with the MFO plans, the 2F-SFO plans showed a reduced dose to the

  5. Time-series photometric spot modelling VI. A new computer code and its application to 23 years of photometry of the active giant IM Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribárik, G.; Oláh, K.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    We present and apply a new computer program named SpotModeL to analyze single and multiple bandpass photometric data of spotted stars. It is based on the standard analytical formulae from Budding and Dorren. The program determines the position, size, and temperature of up to three spots by minimizing the fit residuals with the help of the Marquardt-Levenberg non-linear least-squares algorithm. We also expand this procedure to full time-series analysis of differential data, just as real observations would deliver. If multi-bandpass data are available, all bandpasses can be treated simultaneously and thus the spot temperature is solved for implicitly. The program may be downloaded and used by anyone. In this paper, we apply our code to an ~23 year long photometric dataset of the spotted RS CVn giant IM Peg. We extracted and modelled 33 individual light curves, additionally, we fitted the entire V dataset in one run. The resulting spot parameters reflect the long term light variability and reveal two active longitudes on the substellar point and on the antipode. The radius and longitude of the dominant spot show variations with 29.8 and 10.4 years period, respectively. Our multicolour data suggests that the spot temperature is increasing with the brightening of the star. The average spot temperature from V,I_C is 3550+/- 150 K or approximately 900 K below the effective temperature of the star.

  6. Delta spots and great flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold; Liggett, Margaret A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of delta spots and the great flares they produce are reviewed based on 18 years of observations. Delta groups are found to develop in three ways: (1) by the eruption of a single complex active region formed below the surface; (2) by the eruption of large satellite spots near a large older spot; and (3) by the collision of spots of opposite polarity from different dipoles. It is shown that the present sample of 21 delta spots never separate once they lock together, and that the driving force for the shear is spot motion. Indicators for the prediction of the occurrence of great flares are identified.

  7. Hot spot activity and tectonic settings near Amsterdam-St. Paul plateau (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janin, M.; HéMond, C.; Guillou, H.; Maia, M.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Bollinger, C.; Liorzou, C.; Mudholkar, A.

    2011-05-01

    The Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) plateau is located in the central part of the Indian Ocean and results from the interaction between the ASP hot spot and the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). It is located near the diffuse boundary between the Capricorn and Australian plates. The seamount chain of the Dead Poets (CDP) is northeast of the ASP plateau and may represent older volcanism related to the ASP hot spot; this chain consists of two groups of seamounts: (1) large flat-topped seamounts formed 8-10 Ma and (2) smaller conical seamounts formed during the last 2 Myr. The ASP hot spot has produced two pulses of magmatism that have been ponded under the ASP plateau and erupted along the divergent boundary between the Capricorn and Australian plates. The N65° orientation of the CDP as well as the seamount's elongated shapes support an opening motion between the Capricorn and Australian plates along a suture oriented in the N155° direction. This motion compared to the Antarctic plate amounts to an apparent velocity of 7.7 cm/yr northeastward for the Capricorn-Australian block. This motion does not fit with a fixed plume model. We suggest, therefore, that the ASP plume experienced a motion of about 1-2 cm/yr to the SW, which is opposite to the asthenospheric flow in this region and suggests a deep-seated plume.

  8. Dihydropteridine reductase activity in dried blood spots: effects of aging and senile dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed Central

    Jeeps, C M; Silcox, A; Lloyd, B; Clayton, B E

    1986-01-01

    Dihydropteridine reductase (EC 1.6.99.7) (DHPR) activity was measured in blood spots from 50 neonates, 52 healthy adults aged 30-62 years, and 21 elderly controls aged 67-97 years, as well as 32 demented patients of whom 25 had senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Enzyme activity was stable for seven days at 4 degrees C and for at least 14 days at -20 degrees C. No important difference was found between the DHPR activity of venous and capillary blood. DHPR activity was considerably lower in the healthy adult group compared with neonates and the elderly group, and there was no sex difference at any age. The erythrocyte DHPR activity of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type was similar to that of elderly controls. This result differs from that previously reported for leucocytes. PMID:3950042

  9. Environmental Scanning Activities at Public Research and Doctorate-Granting Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meixell, Joan M.

    The study surveyed 134 institutions to determine if significant differences existed between public research and doctorate-granting universities concerning: (1) the most important external environmental areas to scan; and (2) the scanning activities that provide the most information for planning processes. A total of 105 responses (78%) was…

  10. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

    1991-06-01

    From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  12. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  13. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOGICAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-quantitative scanning electron microscope (SEK) analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon (GAC) utilized as media for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment (combined processes). he procedure allows for the objective monitoring, com...

  14. Spotted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2010-11-01

    We describe new scenarios for generating curvature perturbations when inflaton (curvaton) has significant interactions. We consider a ''spot'', which arises from interactions associated with an enhanced symmetric point (ESP) on the trajectory. Our first example uses the spot to induce a gap in the field equation. We observe that the gap in the field equation may cause generation of curvature perturbation if it does not appear simultaneous in space. The mechanism is similar to the scenario of inhomogeneous phase transition. Then we observe that the spot interactions may initiate warm inflation in the cold Universe. Creation of cosmological perturbation is discussed in relation to the inflaton dynamics and the modulation associated with the spot interactions.

  15. Spot Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, Howard

    2012-10-01

    What is the Great Red Spot? What are “spots” in general? The presence of many spots and similar features on Jupiter, the other giant planets, and the sun argues for a simple explanation based on conditions common to these bodies (but generally absent in terrestrial atmospheres). Consider two nearly conserved quantities: potential temperature (θ) and potential vorticity (PV). θ is a measure of entropy, which can only be modified by diabatic processes, and therefore atmospheric motions are predominantly along θ-surfaces. PV is the component of the vorticity perpendicular to the θ-surface. It therefore describes most of the motion along these θ-surfaces. It can be rigorously demonstrated that PV cannot be transported across θ-surfaces. In the deep atmospheres of the giant planets and the sun, the tropopause is a level of minimum θ (with convectively unstable negative θ gradients below in the troposphere and stable gradients above in the stratosphere). These fluid bodies also have strong variations of θ with latitude (belts and zones). Baroclinic instability is a process which leads to longitude variations of θ. So it is possible for θ-surfaces to close on themselves around a minimum, with PV confined to these surfaces. The enclosed volume is a spot. The integrated PV over the spot is 0! (Low PV corresponds to anti-cyclonic motion.) The closed θ-surfaces extend above the tropopause and can have deep roots (since θ gradients in the troposphere are generally smaller in magnitude than those in the stratosphere). Details of the flow within the spot depend on boundary conditions (i.e., the surrounding flow and, for sunspots, magnetic fields) and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio of the spot. Interactions with other spots depend on the θ values of their respective boundaries. In terrestrial atmospheres, the intersection of many low-θ surfaces with the ground inhibits spot formation.

  16. Comparison Between Postprocessing Software and Repeated Scanning to Eliminate Subdiaphragmatic Activity in Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Theerakulpisut, Daris; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful test of evaluation for coronary artery disease, but subdiaphragmatic radiotracer activity often interferes with the interpretation of inferior wall findings. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using software elimination of the subdiaphragmatic activity for the assessment of its efficacy in the correctness of image interpretation and the overall image quality of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). MPS studies from January 2010 to October 2012 at our institution were reviewed. Thirty-two SPECT studies were included, all of which had significant subdiaphragmatic activity in the first scan and needed to be delayed to let the activity clear. Each scan was interpreted by using semiquantitative scoring in 17 segments according to the degree of radiotracer uptake. The first scan, which had interfering activity, was manipulated by masking out the unwanted activity with software native to our image processing software suite. The manipulated images were then compared with delayed images of the same patient, of which the subdiaphragmatic activity was spontaneously cleared with time. The first scan masked by software correlated with the delayed scan for myocardial regions supplied by the left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA), but not the left anterior descending (LAD). However, the quality of the masked scans was perceived by the observer to be better in terms of quality and ease of interpretation. Using software to mask out unwanted subdiaphragmatic activity has no detrimental effect on the interpretation of MPS images when compared with delayed scanning, but it can improve subjective scan quality and ease of interpretation. PMID:27134559

  17. Comparison Between Postprocessing Software and Repeated Scanning to Eliminate Subdiaphragmatic Activity in Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Theerakulpisut, Daris; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful test of evaluation for coronary artery disease, but subdiaphragmatic radiotracer activity often interferes with the interpretation of inferior wall findings. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using software elimination of the subdiaphragmatic activity for the assessment of its efficacy in the correctness of image interpretation and the overall image quality of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). MPS studies from January 2010 to October 2012 at our institution were reviewed. Thirty-two SPECT studies were included, all of which had significant subdiaphragmatic activity in the first scan and needed to be delayed to let the activity clear. Each scan was interpreted by using semiquantitative scoring in 17 segments according to the degree of radiotracer uptake. The first scan, which had interfering activity, was manipulated by masking out the unwanted activity with software native to our image processing software suite. The manipulated images were then compared with delayed images of the same patient, of which the subdiaphragmatic activity was spontaneously cleared with time. The first scan masked by software correlated with the delayed scan for myocardial regions supplied by the left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA), but not the left anterior descending (LAD). However, the quality of the masked scans was perceived by the observer to be better in terms of quality and ease of interpretation. Using software to mask out unwanted subdiaphragmatic activity has no detrimental effect on the interpretation of MPS images when compared with delayed scanning, but it can improve subjective scan quality and ease of interpretation. PMID:27134559

  18. Experimental Active-Site Mapping by Fragments: Hot Spots Remote from the Catalytic Center of Endothiapepsin.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Nedyalka; Krimmer, Stefan G; Stieler, Martin; Fu, Kan; Wang, Xiaojie; Ehrmann, Frederik R; Metz, Alexander; Huschmann, Franziska U; Weiss, Manfred S; Mueller, Uwe; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2016-08-25

    Successful optimization of a given lead scaffold requires thorough binding-site mapping of the target protein particular in regions remote from the catalytic center where high conservation across protein families is given. We screened a 361-entry fragment library for binding to the aspartic protease endothiapepsin by crystallography. This enzyme is frequently used as a surrogate for the design of renin and β-secretase inhibitors. A hit rate of 20% was achieved, providing 71 crystal structures. Here, we discuss 45 binding poses of fragments accommodated in pockets remote from the catalytic dyad. Three major hot spots are discovered in remote binding areas: Asp81, Asp119, and Phe291. Compared to the dyad binders, bulkier fragments occupy these regions. Many of the discovered fragments suggest an optimization concept on how to grow them into larger ligands occupying adjacent binding pockets that will possibly endow them with the desired selectivity for one given member of a protein family. PMID:27463859

  19. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process. PMID:27323202

  20. Anomalous accretion activity and the spotted nature of the DQ Tau binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Bary, Jeffrey S.; Petersen, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    We report the detection of an anomalous accretion flare in the tight eccentric pre-main-sequence binary system DQ Tau. In a multi-epoch survey consisting of randomly acquired low- to moderate-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained over a period of almost 10 yr, we detect a significant and simultaneous brightening of four standard accretion indicators (Ca II infrared triplet, the Paschen and Brackett series H I lines, and He I 1.083 μm), on back-to-back nights (φ = 0.372 and 0.433) with the flare increasing in strength as the system approached apastron (φ = 0.5). The mass accretion rate measured for the anomalous flare is nearly an order of magnitude stronger than the average quiescent rate. While previous observations established that frequent, periodic accretion flares phased with periastron passages occur in this system, these data provide evidence that orbitally modulated accretion flares occur near apastron, when the stars make their closest approach to the circumbinary disk. The timing of the flare suggests that this outburst is due to interactions of the stellar cores (or the highly truncated circumstellar disks) with material in non-axisymmetric structures located at the inner edge of the circumbinary disk. We also explore the optical/infrared spectral type mismatch previously observed for T Tauri stars (TTSs) and successfully model the shape of the spectra from 0.8 to 1.0 μm and the strengths of the TiO and FeH bands as manifestations of large cool spots on the surfaces of the stellar companions in DQ Tau. These findings illustrate that a complete model of near-infrared spectra of many TTSs must include parameters for spot filling factors and temperatures.

  1. Hot Spots on Io: Initial Results From Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly; Davies, A. G.; Carlson, R.; Smythe, W.; Kamp, L.; Soderblom, L.; Leader, F. E.; Mehlman, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on Galileo has monitored the volcanic activity on Io since June 28, 1996. This paper presents preliminary analysis of NIMS thermal data for the first four orbits of the Galileo mission. NIMS has detected 18 new hot spots and 12 others which were previously known to be active. The distribution of the hot spots on Io's surface may not be random, as hot spots surround the two bright, SO2-rich regions of Bosphorus Regio and Colchis Regio. Most hot spots scan to be persistently active from orbit to orbit and 10 of those detected were active in 1979 during the Voyager encounters. We report the distribution of hot spot temperatures and find that they are consistent with silicate volcanism.

  2. RING domain is essential for the antiviral activity of TRIM25 from orange spotted grouper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Min; Zhou, Sheng; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 25 (TRIM25) has been demonstrated to exert crucial roles in the regulation of innate immune signaling. However, the roles of fish TRIM25 in antiviral immune response still remained uncertain. Here, a novel fish TRIM25 gene from orange spotted grouper (EcTRIM25) was cloned and its roles in grouper virus infection were elucidated. EcTRIM25 encoded a 734-aa protein which shared 68% identity to large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Amino acid alignment showed that EcTRIM25 contained three conserved domains, including a RING-finger domain, a B box/coiled-coil domain and a SPRY domain. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcTRIM25 was predominantly detected in skin, spleen and intestine. After stimulation with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or poly I:C, the relative expression of EcTRIM25 in grouper spleen was significantly increased at the early stage of injection. Subcellular localization analysis showed that EcTRIM25 distributed throughout the cytoplasm in grouper cells. Notably, the deletion RING domain affected its accurate localization and displayed microtubule like structures or bright aggregates in GS cells. After incubation with SGIV or red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), overexpression of full length of EcTRIM25 in vitro significantly decreased the viral gene transcription of SGIV and RGNNV. Consistently, the deletion of RING domain obviously affected the inhibitory effect of EcTRIM25. Furthermore, overexpression of EcTRIM25 significantly increased the expression level of interferon related signaling molecules, including interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3, interferon-induced 35-kDa protein (IFP35), MXI, IRF7 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), suggesting that the positive regulation of interferon immune response by EcTRIM25 might affected RGNNV replication directly. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines were differently regulated by the ectopic expression of EcTRIM25

  3. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  4. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-11-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  5. Real-time prompt gamma monitoring in spot-scanning proton therapy using imaging through a knife-edge-shaped slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bom, Victor; Joulaeizadeh, Leila; Beekman, Freek

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on Monte Carlo simulations to investigate real-time monitoring of the track depth profile in particle therapy by measuring prompt gamma ray emissions: a high sensitivity imaging system employing a knife-edge-shaped slit combined with a position-sensitive gamma detector was evaluated. Calculations to test this new concept were performed for a head-sized software phantom. Clear spatial correlation is shown between the distribution of gamma rays detected with energies above 1.5 MeV and the distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted from the phantom. The number of neutrons originating from nuclear reactions in the phantom that are detected at these high energies is small. Most importantly it is shown that under common therapy conditions enough data may be collected during one spot-step (of the order of 10 ms) to locate the distal dose edge with a 1σ accuracy of better than 1 mm. This indicates that simple slit cameras have high potential for accurate real-time particle therapy adjustment and may become a practical way to improve particle therapy accuracy.

  6. Using Activated Transport in Parallel Nanowires for Energy Harvesting and Hot-Spot Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosisio, Riccardo; Gorini, Cosimo; Fleury, Geneviève; Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-01

    We study arrays of parallel doped semiconductor nanowires in a temperature range where the electrons propagate through the nanowires by phonon-assisted hops between localized states. By solving the random-resistor-network problem, we compute the thermopower S , the electrical conductance G , and the electronic thermal conductance Ke of the device. We investigate how those quantities depend on the position—which can be tuned with a back gate—of the nanowire impurity band with respect to the equilibrium electrochemical potential. We show that large power factors can be reached near the band edges, when S self-averages to large values while G is small but scales with the number of wires. Calculating the amount of heat exchanged locally between the electrons inside the nanowires and the phonons of the environment, we show that phonons are mainly absorbed near one electrode and emitted near the other when a charge current is driven through the nanowires near their band edges. This phenomenon could be exploited for a field control of the heat exchange between the phonons and the electrons at submicron scales in electronic circuits. It could be also used for cooling hot spots.

  7. Marine Snow and Gels: Hot Spots of Biogeochemical Cycling, Biological Activity, and Sedimentation in the Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alldredge, A. L.

    2004-12-01

    Much of the organic carbon sequestered in the deep sea and ocean bottom sediments as relatively rare, large detrital particles generically known as marine snow. Because they are enriched in organic matter, microbes, and nutrients, these large particles also serve as hot spots for biological and chemical process in the water column. Recent evidence reveals that abundant carbohydrate gel particles in the ocean, formed from the dissolved exudates of phytoplankton and bacteria, are intricately involved in the formation of marine snow. These discoveries are changing the way we conceptualize the pelagic zone on small scales. We no longer imagine seawater as a relatively homogeneous fluid in which float a spectrum of dispersed molecules, particles, and organisms, but instead see it as a rich hydrated matrix of transparent organic gels, detritus, and cob-web like surfaces which provide microscale physical, chemical, and biological structure. This talk will focus on the origins, fate, and significance of marine snow and gels in the sea, including their role in carbon cycling, sedimentation and carbon flux , food webs, and chemical and biological transformation.

  8. SPOT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jason T.; Welsh, Sam J.; Farinetti, Antonio L.; Wegner, Tim; Blakeslee, James; Deboeck, Toni F.; Dyer, Daniel; Corley, Bryan M.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine; Kramer, Leonard; Zimmerman, Patrick L.; Khatri, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    A Spacecraft Position Optimal Tracking (SPOT) program was developed to process Global Positioning System (GPS) data, sent via telemetry from a spacecraft, to generate accurate navigation estimates of the vehicle position and velocity (state vector) using a Kalman filter. This program uses the GPS onboard receiver measurements to sequentially calculate the vehicle state vectors and provide this information to ground flight controllers. It is the first real-time ground-based shuttle navigation application using onboard sensors. The program is compact, portable, self-contained, and can run on a variety of UNIX or Linux computers. The program has a modular objec-toriented design that supports application-specific plugins such as data corruption remediation pre-processing and remote graphics display. The Kalman filter is extensible to additional sensor types or force models. The Kalman filter design is also strong against data dropouts because it uses physical models from state and covariance propagation in the absence of data. The design of this program separates the functionalities of SPOT into six different executable processes. This allows for the individual processes to be connected in an a la carte manner, making the feature set and executable complexity of SPOT adaptable to the needs of the user. Also, these processes need not be executed on the same workstation. This allows for communications between SPOT processes executing on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Thus, SPOT can be executed in a distributed sense with the capability for a team of flight controllers to efficiently share the same trajectory information currently being computed by the program. SPOT is used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) for Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and International Space Station Program (ISSP) operations, and can also be used as a post -flight analysis tool. It is primarily used for situational awareness, and for contingency situations.

  9. Unusual seismic activity in 2011 and 2013 at the submarine volcano Rocard, Society hot spot (French Polynesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talandier, Jacques; Hyvernaud, Olivier; Maury, René C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two seismic events that occurred on 27 May 2011 and 29 April 2013 at the Rocard submarine volcano which overlies the Society hot spot. The Polynesian Seismic Network recorded for the first time unusual associated short- and long-period signals, with perfectly monochromatic (0.0589 Hz) Rayleigh wave trains of long period and duration. None of the numerous observations of long-period (10-30 s) signals previously associated with volcanic activity in Japan, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Antarctica, and the Hawaiian Islands have the characteristics we observed at Rocard. We propose a tentative model for these unusual and rather enigmatic signals, in which the movement of lava excited the resonance of a shallow open conduit under a high hydrostatic pressure of ~400 bars.

  10. Variable-spot ion beam figuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lixiang; Qiu, Keqiang; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a new scheme of ion beam figuring (IBF), or rather variable-spot IBF, which is conducted at a constant scanning velocity with variable-spot ion beam collimated by a variable diaphragm. It aims at improving the reachability and adaptation of the figuring process within the limits of machine dynamics by varying the ion beam spot size instead of the scanning velocity. In contrast to the dwell time algorithm in the conventional IBF, the variable-spot IBF adopts a new algorithm, which consists of the scan path programming and the trajectory optimization using pattern search. In this algorithm, instead of the dwell time, a new concept, integral etching time, is proposed to interpret the process of variable-spot IBF. We conducted simulations to verify its feasibility and practicality. The simulation results indicate the variable-spot IBF is a promising alternative to the conventional approach.

  11. Solar Spots - Activities to Introduce Solar Energy into the K-8 Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longe, Karen M.; McClelland, Michael J.

    Following an introduction to solar technology which reviews solar heating and cooling, passive solar systems (direct gain systems, thermal storage walls, sun spaces, roof ponds, and convection loops), active solar systems, solar electricity (photovoltaic and solar thermal conversion systems), wind energy, and biomass, activities to introduce solar…

  12. Photometric Variations in Spotted Pleiades Stars as Probes of Long-Term Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenett, E.; Milingo, J. B.; Marschall, L. A.; Backman, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Through the collaborative efforts of undergraduates and faculty at Franklin & Marshall and Gettysburg Colleges, we present new photometric data for 3 K-type stars in the Pleiades. Continuing 8+ years of observations, this data contributes to the long-term study of photometric variations in these stars. These young stars have rotational light curves with V-band amplitudes of a few percent (up to 10% in the most active stars) due to large photospheric active regions or "starspots". Quantifying the level of starspot activity from year to year allows us to look for long-term trends analogous to the solar sunspot cycle. These observations were acquired with the National Undergraduate Research Observatory's (NURO) 31" telescope, which is operated by Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University. This work is supported by Franklin & Marshall College, the Delaware Space Grant Consortium, and Arizona Space Grant (NASA Space Grant programs).

  13. Effects of white spot syndrome virus infection on immuno-enzyme activities and ultrastructure in gills of Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Li; Zuo, Di; Wang, Lan-Mei; Sun, Ting; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yun-Long

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we explored the pathogenic mechanism of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, by investigating activities of enzymes related to innate immune function during infection. After 6-12 h of exposure to WSSV, the activities of four enzymes, phenoloxidase (PO), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lysozyme (LSZ), increased in the gills of C. quadricarinatus but then sharply decreased during longer infection times. Except for PO, the activities of other enzymes in the WSSV-infected crayfish (Group II) were significantly lower than those of the controls at 72 h post-exposure (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the enzyme activities in the group treated with polysaccharides before challenge with WSSV (Group III) were higher than those in Group II. This phenomenon demonstrated that the polysaccharides could improve the immuno-enzyme activities and enhance the organism's antiviral defenses. Morphological examination by transmission electron microscopy revealed abundant WSSV particles and significant damage in the gills of infected crayfish. WSSV infection caused parts of the gill epithelium and microvilli to be reduced in number and size or damaged; meanwhile, the mitochondria morphology changed, with parts of the cristae diminished leaving large vacuoles. Moreover, electron dense deposits appeared and heterochromatinized nuclei could be seen in blood cells with ruptured nuclear membranes and outflow of nucleoplasm. The findings of this study furthers our understanding of the biochemical alterations induced by viral infections, including changes in the antioxidant status, oxidative stress and lysozyme activity, which could help to advance strategies for control of WSSV in crayfish. PMID:22281607

  14. [Estimation of activities caused by black spots in digital radiography systems: analysis of black spots by the low concentrate radioisotopes adhered directly to the surface of the phosphor plate].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Takashi, Satoru; Hanamitsu, Hiroki; Mori, Michiko; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Onuma, Yoji

    2012-01-01

    Because of an accident of the nuclear power plants in the Fukushima, many radioisotopes (RI) have been diffused to the environment. As a result, black spots were appearing on the medical images which were taken by the phosphor plate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activity (Bq) of radioactive contaminated IP based on the experiment using RI. The radioactive material ((134)Cs and/or (137)Cs) in the form of liquid was dropped on filter paper (25 mm(2)), and radioactive sources having 40-240 Bq activities were made. These sources were closely attached to the IP with irradiation times of 2-22 h. Then, we obtained the relationship between pixel values and products of activities and irradiation times. Using these relationships, we evaluated the activity in the contaminated IP. The evaluated value of approximately 7 Bq was in good agreement with a value which was inhered in a chemical wiper used for the decontamination of the IP. Based on the results, we summarized that almost all black spots were created by the RI adhered directly to the IP. PMID:23171768

  15. First experimental results of motion mitigation by continuous line scanning of protons.

    PubMed

    Schätti, A; Meer, D; Lomax, A J

    2014-10-01

    Mitigation of organ motion in active, scanning proton therapy is a challenge. One of the easiest methods to implement is re-scanning, where a treatment plan is applied several times with accordingly smaller weights. As a consequence, motion effects are averaged out. For discrete spot scanning, a major drawback of this method is the treatment time, which increases linearly with the number of re-scans. Continuous line scanning, on the other hand, eliminates the dead time between the positioning of each beam, and in this work, continuous line scanning has been investigated experimentally from the point of view of dose, penumbral width and its effectiveness for re-scanning. As shown by measurements in a homogeneous phantom, dose distributions delivered by continuous line scanning were comparable with those of discrete spot scanning for both geometric and realistic targets, with only a modest degradation of lateral penumbra in the direction of scanning. In addition, delivered dose levels have also been found to agree well between discrete and line scanning. With continuous line scanning, however, more re-scans could be applied without the artefacts seen in discrete spot scanning, with motions of up to 1 cm peak-to-peak amplitude being mitigated by 10 re-scans. For larger motion, in the interest of reducing the volume of irradiated normal tissue re-scanning should be combined with other motion mitigation techniques such as gating or breath-hold. PMID:25197938

  16. First experimental results of motion mitigation by continuous line scanning of protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätti, A.; Meer, D.; Lomax, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    Mitigation of organ motion in active, scanning proton therapy is a challenge. One of the easiest methods to implement is re-scanning, where a treatment plan is applied several times with accordingly smaller weights. As a consequence, motion effects are averaged out. For discrete spot scanning, a major drawback of this method is the treatment time, which increases linearly with the number of re-scans. Continuous line scanning, on the other hand, eliminates the dead time between the positioning of each beam, and in this work, continuous line scanning has been investigated experimentally from the point of view of dose, penumbral width and its effectiveness for re-scanning. As shown by measurements in a homogeneous phantom, dose distributions delivered by continuous line scanning were comparable with those of discrete spot scanning for both geometric and realistic targets, with only a modest degradation of lateral penumbra in the direction of scanning. In addition, delivered dose levels have also been found to agree well between discrete and line scanning. With continuous line scanning, however, more re-scans could be applied without the artefacts seen in discrete spot scanning, with motions of up to 1 cm peak-to-peak amplitude being mitigated by 10 re-scans. For larger motion, in the interest of reducing the volume of irradiated normal tissue re-scanning should be combined with other motion mitigation techniques such as gating or breath-hold.

  17. WE-D-17A-03: Improvement of Accuracy of Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Delivery for Liver Tumor by Real-Time Tumor-Monitoring and Gating System: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, T; Shimizu, S; Miyamoto, N; Takao, S; Toramatsu, C; Nihongi, H; Yamada, T; Shirato, H; Fujii, Y; Umezawa, M; Umegaki, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of spot-scanning proton beam delivery for target in motion, a real-time tumor-monitoring and gating system using fluoroscopy images was developed. This study investigates the efficacy of this method for treatment of liver tumors using simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional position of a fiducial marker inserted close to the tumor is calculated in real time and proton beam is gated according to the marker's distance from the planned position (Shirato, 2012). The efficient beam delivery is realized even for the irregular and sporadic motion signals, by employing the multiple-gated irradiations per operation cycle (Umezawa, 2012). For each of two breath-hold CTs (CTV=14.6cc, 63.1cc), dose distributions were calculated with internal margins corresponding to freebreathing (FB) and real-time gating (RG) with a 2-mm gating window. We applied 8 trajectories of liver tumor recorded during the treatment of RTRT in X-ray therapy and 6 initial timings. Dmax/Dmin in CTV, mean liver dose (MLD), and irradiation time to administer 3 Gy (RBE) dose were estimated assuming rigid motion of targets by using in-house simulation tools and VQA treatment planning system (Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo). Results: Dmax/Dmin was degraded by less than 5% compared to the prescribed dose with all motion parameters for smaller CTV and less than 7% for larger CTV with one exception. Irradiation time showed only a modest increase if RG was used instead of FB; the average value over motion parameters was 113 (FB) and 138 s (RG) for smaller CTV and 120 (FB) and 207 s (RG) for larger CTV. In RG, it was within 5 min for all but one trajectory. MLD was markedly decreased by 14% and 5–6% for smaller and larger CTVs respectively, if RG was applied. Conclusions: Spot-scanning proton beam was shown to be delivered successfully to liver tumor without much lengthening of treatment time. This research was supported by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan and the Japan Society for

  18. Determination of Activity of the Enzymes Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HPRT) and Adenine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (APRT) in Blood Spots on Filter Paper.

    PubMed

    Auler, Kasie; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) deficiency is the cause of Lesch-Nyhan disease. Adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) deficiency causes renal calculi. The activity of each enzyme is readily determined on spots of whole blood on filter paper. This unit describes a method for detecting deficiencies of HPRT and APRT. PMID:26132002

  19. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP) - Recent Results from an Airborne Simulator for SMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP) is a recently-developed NASA airborne instrument specially tailored to simulate the new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite instrument suite. SLAP conducted its first test flights in December, 2013 and participated in its first science campaign-the IPHEX ground validation campaign of the GPM mission-in May, 2014. This paper will present results from additional test flights and science observations scheduled for 2015.

  20. Chronic osteomyelitis: bone and gallium scan patterns associated with active disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Bone and gallium scans are used to assess osteomyelitis patients with prior bone disease. To refine the criteria for interpreting these scans, the data from 136 consecutive patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis were reviewed. Active osteomyelitis was diagnosed with surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 patients, excluded with the same criteria in 16, and excluded by clinical follow-up for at least 6 months in 71. Five different scintigraphic patterns were found. The true-positive and false-positive ratios, the likelihood ratios, and posterior probabilities for active osteomyelitis in each pattern were calculated. Only one pattern (gallium uptake exceeding bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake) was indicative of active disease. Other patterns slightly raised or decreased the probability of disease. The extent of these changes varies directly with the prior probability of disease, determined from patient-specific factors (e.g., clinical data, laboratory data, findings on plain films) known best by the referring clinician.

  1. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  2. Mongolian spots.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Mongolian spots (MS) are birthmarks that are present at birth and their most common location is sacrococcygeal or lumbar area. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually involve < 5% total body surface area. They are macular and round, oval or irregular in shape. The color varies from blue to greenish, gray, black or a combination of any of the above. The size varies from few to more than 20 centimetres. Pigmentation is most intense at the age of one year and gradually fades thereafter. It is rarely seen after the age of 6 years. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although regarded as benign, recent data suggest that MS may be associated with inborn errors of metabolism and neurocristopathies. Mongolian spots usually resolve by early childhood and hence no treatment is generally needed if they are located in the sacral area. However, sometimes it may be required for extrasacral lesions for cosmesis. PMID:23760316

  3. Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease activity by technetium 99m phagocyte scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Pullman, W.E.; Sullivan, P.J.; Barratt, P.J.; Lising, J.; Booth, J.A.; Doe, W.F.

    1988-10-01

    Autologous technetium 99m-labeled phagocyte scanning has been used to assess disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease in 51 consecutive patients. Strong correlations were found between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and the histologic score of mucosal biopsy specimens (rS = 0.84, p less than 0.001, where rS is Spearman's rank correlation coefficient), and between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and a clinical inflammatory bowel disease activity index based on the Crohn's disease activity index (rS = 0.87, p less than 0.001). To develop a clinically useful and objective measure of inflammatory bowel disease activity that did not require a 24-h stool collection, the intensity of bowel uptake on scanning was graded visually from 0 to 4, a ratio of count rates for the region of interest to the iliac crest reference region was calculated, and the rapidity of labeled phagocyte uptake into inflamed bowel was measured as the peak uptake time. Visual grading of disease activity on the scans was validated by comparing it with the ratio of count rates from inflamed bowel regions of interest and those from the iliac crest reference region. The ratio of count rates showed a significant correlation with the clinical disease activity index (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001). The visual scan grade also correlated well with the clinical activity index (r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). Count rates from hourly scans were also used to calculate the time of peak uptake of counts for a given region of interest. There was a strong negative correlation between this peak uptake time and the fecal excretion of isotope (rS = -0.81, p less than 0.001), a clinical activity index (r = -0.60, p less than 0.001), and the histologic score of the mucosal biopsy specimens (r = -0.84, p less than 0.001).

  4. Risk of Active Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Taiwan with Free Access to HIV Care and a Positive T-Spot.TB Test

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liu, Wen-Chun; Su, Yi-Ching; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have been used to identify individuals at risk for developing active tuberculosis (TB). However, data regarding the risk of TB development in HIV-infected patients testing positive for IGRAs remain sparse in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 608 HIV-infected patients without active TB undergoing T-Spot.TB testing were enrolled in this prospective observational study at a university hospital designated for HIV care in Taiwan with a declining TB incidence from 72 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 53 per 100,000 population in 2012. All of the subjects were followed until September 30, 2014. The national TB registry was accessed to identify any TB cases among those lost to follow-up. Results T-Spot.TB tested negative in 534 patients (87.8%), positive in 64 patients (10.5%), and indeterminate in 10 patients (1.6%). In multivariate analysis, positive T-Spot.TB was significantly associated with older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.172 per 10-year increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.022-1.344, P=0.023), past history of TB (AOR, 13.412; 95% CI, 6.106-29.460, P<0.001), and higher CD4 counts at enrollment (AOR, per 50-cell/μl increase, 1.062; 95% CI, 1.017-1.109, P=0.007). Of the 64 patients testing positive for T-Spot.TB, none received isoniazid preventive therapy and all but 5 received combination antiretroviral therapy at the end of follow-up with the latest CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load being 592.8 cells/μL and 1.85 log10 copies/mL, respectively. One patient (1.6%) developed active TB after 167 person-years of follow-up (PYFU), resulting in an incidence rate of 0.599 per 100 PFYU. None of the 534 patients testing negative for T-Spot.TB developed TB after 1380 PYFU, nor did the 24 patients with old TB and positive T-Spot.TB tests develop TB after 62.33 PYFU. Conclusions The risk of developing active TB in HIV-infected patients with positive T-Spot.TB receiving

  5. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  6. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Lipowicz, Hubert-Seweryn; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Lenk, Steve; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-03-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many novel nanoelectronic, NEMS, optical and bio-nanotechnology-based devices. Based on the thermally actuated, piezoresistive cantilever technology we have developed a first prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform able to image, inspect, align and pattern features down to single digit nano regime. The direct, mask-less patterning of molecular resists using active scanning probes represents a promising path circumventing the problems in today's radiation-based lithography. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric field based, current-controlled scanning probe lithography on molecular glass resist calixarene by using the developed tabletop SPL system. We demonstrate the application of a step-and-repeat scanning probe lithography scheme including optical as well as AFM based alignment and navigation. In addition, sequential read-write cycle patterning combining positive and negative tone lithography is shown. We are presenting patterning over larger areas (80 x 80 μm) and feature the practical applicability of the lithographic processes.

  7. Lead acetate does not inhibit dimethylnitrosamine activation and interacts with phenobarbital which is genotoxic in the ST cross of the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Partida, Laura; Heres-Pulido, Ma Eugenia; Guzmán-Rincón, Judith; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Delfín-Alcalá, Irma

    2011-09-01

    Lead acetate (PbAc) is known to inhibit the synthesis of the heme group, needed for hemeproteins like Cytochromes P450 (CYP450s). Dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) requires metabolic activation by CYP450s. The Drosophila wing spot test was performed to establish whether PbAc inhibits DMN activation in the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with different levels of CYP450s. Phenobarbital (PH) was used as an antagonist for its ability to induce CYP450s synthesis. PbAc (0.01, 0.1, 1.0mM) produced significant small spots frequencies in the ST cross, indicating a possible genotoxic activity, however, the total spots frequency was negative at all concentrations. DMN (0.076 mM) was genotoxic in both crosses; surprisingly, PH (12 mM) was genotoxic and the PH-DMN treatment resulted synergic in the ST cross. Interestingly, the PbAc-PH pre-co-treatments showed a possible interaction in the ST cross. The GC-MS analysis showed a drop in the PH content as the PbAc concentration increased. PbAc also seemed to inhibit the genotoxic activity of PH, except at 0.01 mM. It is concluded that PbAc does not inhibit DMN activation by CYP450s in both crosses since it exerted a clear genotoxicity and that PH is genotoxic and interacts with PbAc in the ST but not the HB cross. PMID:21672598

  8. Acaricidal activity and sublethal effects of an oxymatrine-based biopesticide on two-spotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Marčić, Dejan; Međo, Irena

    2014-11-01

    Lethal and sublethal effects of the biopesticide Kingbo (oxymatrine 0.2 % + psoralen 0.4 %) on the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) were investigated in laboratory bioassays. The biopesticide was applied to bean leaf discs or primary leaves by using a Potter spray tower. Acute toxicity tests showed no significant ovicidal action: toxic effect (LC50 = 55.49 μl/l) was the result of a residual activity against larvae that hatched from the treated eggs. Preovipositional females and female teleiochrysales showed similar susceptibility (LC50 = 52.68 and 59.03 μl/l, respectively), whereas larvae, protonymphs and female deutonymphs were the most susceptible stages (LC50 = 6.88, 13.03, and 8.80 μl/l, respectively). In a choice test, females preferred the untreated halves of leaves over the halves treated with 2,000, 1,000, and 500 μl/l in the first 24 h, and their oviposition in those treatments was significantly greater on the untreated halves after 24 and 48 h, as well as the summed oviposition over 72 h. Viability and reproduction of survivors, as well as population growth, were strongly affected after the treatments of preovipositional females and female teleiochrysales with 100, 50 and 25 μl/l. On the other hand, sublethal effects on the females that survived treatment at the egg stage or reached adulthood from the eggs laid on the treated surface (treatments with 50 and 25 μl/l) were significantly weaker. Acaricidal and sublethal effects of the biopesticide Kingbo were discussed as a starting point for further research aimed to improve management of T. urticae populations. Regulatory issues and safety concerns regarding further commercialization of this biopesticide are addressed as well. PMID:24948329

  9. The Rhizosphere Zone: A Hot Spot of Microbial Activity and Methylmercury Production in Saltmarsh Sediments of San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Voytek, M.; Kirshtein, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Agee, J. L.; Cox, M.; Kakouros, E.; Collins, J. N.; Yee, D.

    2008-12-01

    -reducing bacterial DNA in vegetated sites. In contrast to microbial indicators of mercury methylation, no effects of devegetation or seasonal sampling were observed on sediment pools of reactive Hg (Hg(II)R), although the relative abundance of mercuric reductase functional genes (MerA) was reduced by devegetation and was correlated with live root density. These experiments, among others, demonstrate that the presence and activity of emergent wetland plants directly influence Hg cycling in densely rooted surface soils. Development of this shallow and dense rhizosphere is likely to be a primary reason as to why periodically flooded, high elevation marsh sites are a "hot spot" for mercury methylation.

  10. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission Radar: A Novel Conically Scanning SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Chan, Samuel; Veilleux, Louise; Wheeler, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is a NASA mission identified by the NRC "decadal survey" to measure both soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive chan-nels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. The active radar will further utilize SAR processing in order to obtain the sub-footprint resolution necessary for the geophysical retrievals. The SMAP radar has a unique geometry where the antenna footprint is continuously rotated about nadir in a conical fashion, as opposed to the more common side-looking SAR design. In additional to the unconventional scan geometry, the SMAP radar must address the effects of Faraday rotation and radio frequency interference (RFI), both consequences of the L-Band frequency of operation.

  11. Ontario primary care reform and quality improvement activities: an environmental scan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality improvement is attracting the attention of the primary health care system as a means by which to achieve higher quality patient care. Ontario, Canada has demonstrated leadership in terms of its improvement in healthcare, but the province lacks a structured framework by which it can consistently evaluate its quality improvement initiatives specific to the primary healthcare system. The intent of this research was to complete an environmental scan and capacity map of quality improvement activities being built in and by the primary healthcare sector (QI-PHC) in Ontario as a first step to developing a coordinated and sustainable framework of primary healthcare for the province. Methods Data were collected between January and July 2011 in collaboration with an advisory group of stakeholder representatives and quality improvement leaders in primary health care. Twenty participants were interviewed by telephone, followed by review of relevant websites and documents identified in the interviews. Data were systematically examined using Framework Analysis augmented by Prior’s approach to document analysis in an iterative process. Results The environmental scan identified many activities (n = 43) designed to strategically build QI-PHC capacity, identify promising QI-PHC practices and outcomes, scale up quality improvement-informed primary healthcare practice changes, and make quality improvement a core organizational strategy in health care delivery, which were grouped into clusters. Cluster 1 was composed of initiatives in the form of on-going programs that deliberately incorporated long-term quality improvement capacity building through province-wide reach. Cluster 2 represented activities that were time-limited (research, pilot, or demonstration projects) with the primary aim of research production. The activities of most primary health care practitioners, managers, stakeholder organizations and researchers involved in this scan demonstrated a

  12. Four-point probe electrical resistivity scanning system for large area conductivity and activation energy mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Keller, David A.; Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y.; Zaban, Arie

    2014-05-01

    The electrical properties of metal oxides play a crucial role in the development of new photovoltaic (PV) systems. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the determination and analysis of these properties in thin films of new metal oxide based PV materials. A high throughput electrical scanning system, which facilitates temperature dependent measurements at different atmospheres for highly resistive samples, was designed and constructed. The instrument is capable of determining conductivity and activation energy values for relatively large sample areas, of about 72 × 72 mm2, with the implementation of geometrical correction factors. The efficiency of our scanning system was tested using two different samples of CuO and commercially available Fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates. Our high throughput tool was able to identify the electrical properties of both resistive metal oxide thin film samples with high precision and accuracy. The scanning system enabled us to gain insight into transport mechanisms with novel compositions and to use those insights to make smart choices when choosing materials for our multilayer thin film all oxide photovoltaic cells.

  13. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  14. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  15. Four-point probe electrical resistivity scanning system for large area conductivity and activation energy mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Keller, David A; Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2014-05-01

    The electrical properties of metal oxides play a crucial role in the development of new photovoltaic (PV) systems. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the determination and analysis of these properties in thin films of new metal oxide based PV materials. A high throughput electrical scanning system, which facilitates temperature dependent measurements at different atmospheres for highly resistive samples, was designed and constructed. The instrument is capable of determining conductivity and activation energy values for relatively large sample areas, of about 72 × 72 mm(2), with the implementation of geometrical correction factors. The efficiency of our scanning system was tested using two different samples of CuO and commercially available Fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates. Our high throughput tool was able to identify the electrical properties of both resistive metal oxide thin film samples with high precision and accuracy. The scanning system enabled us to gain insight into transport mechanisms with novel compositions and to use those insights to make smart choices when choosing materials for our multilayer thin film all oxide photovoltaic cells. PMID:24880411

  16. Quantitative determination of enzyme activity in single cells by scanning microelectrode coupled with a nitrocellulose film-covered microreactor by means of a scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Sun, Fuchan; Peng, Xuewei; Jin, Wenrui

    2007-02-01

    An electrochemical method for quantitative determination of enzyme activity in single cells was developed by scanning a microelectrode (ME) over a nitrocellulose film-covered microreactor with micropores by means of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). Peroxidase (PO) in neutrophils was chosen as the model system. The microreactor consisted of a microwell with a solution and a nitrocellulose film with micropores. A single cell perforated by digitonin was injected into the microwell. After the perforated cell was lysed and allowed to dry, physiological buffer saline (PBS) containing hydroquinone (H2Q) and H2O2 as substrates of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was added in the microwell. The microwell containing the extract of the lysed cell and the enzyme substrates was covered with Parafilm to prevent evaporation. The solution in the microwell was incubated for 20 min. In this case, the released PO from the cell converted H2Q into benzoquinone (BQ). Then, the Parafilm was replaced by a nitrocellulose film with micropores to fabricate the microreactor. The microreactor was placed in an electrochemical cell containing PBS, H2Q, and H2O2. After a 10-microm-radius Au ME was inserted into the electrochemical cell and approached down to the microreactor, the ME was scanned along the central line across the microreactor by means of a SECM. The scan curve with a peak was obtained by detecting BQ that diffused out from the microreactor through the micropores on the nitrocellulose film. PO activity could be quantified on the basis of the peak current on the scan curve using a calibration curve. This method had two obvious advantages: no electrode fouling and no oxygen interference. PMID:17263362

  17. Development and evaluation of a short-range applicator for treating superficial moving tumors with respiratory-gated spot-scanning proton therapy using real-time image guidance.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Taeko; Fujii, Yusuke; Takao, Seishin; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-02-21

    Treatment of superficial tumors that move with respiration (e.g. lung tumors) using spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) is a high-priority research area. The recently developed real-time image-gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system has proven to be useful for treating moving tumors deep inside the liver. However, when treating superficial tumors, the proton's range is small and so is the sizes of range straggling, making the Bragg-peaks extremely sharp compared to those located in deep-seated tumors. The extreme sharpness of Bragg-peaks is not always beneficial because it necessitates a large number of energy layers to make a spread-out Bragg-peak, resulting in long treatment times, and is vulnerable to motion-induced dose deterioration. We have investigated a method to treat superficial moving tumors in the lung by the development of an applicator compatible with the RGPT system. A mini-ridge filter (MRF) was developed to broaden the pristine Bragg-peak and, accordingly, decrease the number of required energy layers to obtain homogeneous irradiation. The applicator position was designed so that the fiducial marker's trajectory can be monitored by fluoroscopy during proton beam-delivery. The treatment plans for three lung cancer patients were made using the applicator, and four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for the RGPT were performed using patient respiratory motion data. The effect of the MRF on the dose distributions and treatment time was evaluated. With the MRF, the number of energy layers was decreased to less than half of that needed without it, whereas the target volume coverage values (D99%, D95%, D50%, D2%) changed by less than 1% of the prescribed dose. Almost no dose distortion was observed after the 4D dose calculation, whereas the treatment time decreased by 26%-37%. Therefore, we conclude that the developed applicator compatible with RGPT is useful to solve the issue in the treatment of superficial moving tumors with SSPT. PMID:26815927

  18. Development and evaluation of a short-range applicator for treating superficial moving tumors with respiratory-gated spot-scanning proton therapy using real-time image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Fujii, Yusuke; Takao, Seishin; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of superficial tumors that move with respiration (e.g. lung tumors) using spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) is a high-priority research area. The recently developed real-time image-gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system has proven to be useful for treating moving tumors deep inside the liver. However, when treating superficial tumors, the proton’s range is small and so is the sizes of range straggling, making the Bragg-peaks extremely sharp compared to those located in deep-seated tumors. The extreme sharpness of Bragg-peaks is not always beneficial because it necessitates a large number of energy layers to make a spread-out Bragg-peak, resulting in long treatment times, and is vulnerable to motion-induced dose deterioration. We have investigated a method to treat superficial moving tumors in the lung by the development of an applicator compatible with the RGPT system. A mini-ridge filter (MRF) was developed to broaden the pristine Bragg-peak and, accordingly, decrease the number of required energy layers to obtain homogeneous irradiation. The applicator position was designed so that the fiducial marker’s trajectory can be monitored by fluoroscopy during proton beam-delivery. The treatment plans for three lung cancer patients were made using the applicator, and four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for the RGPT were performed using patient respiratory motion data. The effect of the MRF on the dose distributions and treatment time was evaluated. With the MRF, the number of energy layers was decreased to less than half of that needed without it, whereas the target volume coverage values (D99%, D95%, D50%, D2%) changed by less than 1% of the prescribed dose. Almost no dose distortion was observed after the 4D dose calculation, whereas the treatment time decreased by 26%-37%. Therefore, we conclude that the developed applicator compatible with RGPT is useful to solve the issue in the treatment of superficial moving tumors with SSPT.

  19. Noninvasively measuring respiratory activity of rat primary hepatocyte spheroids by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Zhou, Yuanshu; Horiguchi, Yoshiko; Shiku, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Jiro; Saito, Taku; Matsue, Tomokazu; Hisada, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Construction of an in vitro drug screening method for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity by using cells is required instead of the conventional in vivo one that uses animals. In order to realize the in vitro study, analyzing the cellular activity or viability noninvasively in advance of the screening is essential. The aim of the current study is to establish a method that can evaluate the cellular activity depending on spheroid sizes by means of oxygen consumption and to determine the valid diameter of hepatocyte spheroids. To measure the respiratory activity of the spheroids, which were formed on a nanopillar sheet, we applied scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). From the viewpoint of high respiratory activity and its small variation, we determined that spheroids with 70 μm in diameter were adequate. We then performed a gene expression analysis by using a real-time PCR to evaluate the correlation with respiratory activity. As a result, a higher expression level of Hnf4α, which is essential for hepatocytes to fulfill many liver functions and is the indicator of well-differentiated hepatocytes, showed relatively higher respiratory activity. We concluded that the noninvasive SECM technique could evaluate the cellular activity of a single spheroid. Noninvasively measuring cellular activity by SECM makes it possible to evaluate the cellular activity prior to a nonclinical test and enables the continued monitoring of the drug response by using single spheroid. SECM becomes a powerful tool to satisfying the increasing demand for an in vitro system in the course of new drug development. PMID:23890543

  20. Effect of material flow on joint strength in activation spot joining of Al alloy and steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Goro; Yogo, Yasuhiro; Takao, Hisaaki

    2014-08-01

    A new joining method for dissimilar metal sheets was developed where a rotated consumable rod of Al alloy is pressed onto an Al alloy sheet at the part overlapped with a mild steel sheet. The metal flow in the joining region is increased by the through-hole in the Al sheet and consumable Al rod. The rod creates the joint interface and pads out of the thinly joined parts through pressing. This produces a higher joint strength than that of conventional friction stir spot welding. Measurements of the joint interface showed the presence of a 5-10 nm thick amorphous layer consisting of Al and Mg oxides.

  1. Permanent 3D laser scanning system for an active landslide in Gresten (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canli, Ekrem; Höfle, Bernhard; Hämmerle, Martin; Benni, Thiebes; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have widely been used for high spatial resolution data acquisition of topographic features and geomorphic analyses. Existing applications encompass different landslides including rockfall, translational or rotational landslides, debris flow, but also coastal cliff erosion, braided river evolution or river bank erosion. The main advantages of TLS are (a) the high spatial sampling density of XYZ-measurements (e.g. 1 point every 2-3 mm at 10 m distance), particularly in comparison with the low data density monitoring techniques such as GNSS or total stations, (b) the millimeter accuracy and precision of the range measurement to centimeter accuracy of the final DEM, and (c) the highly dense area-wide scanning that enables to look through vegetation and to measure bare ground. One of its main constraints is the temporal resolution of acquired data due to labor costs and time requirements for field campaigns. Thus, repetition measurements are generally performed only episodically. However, for an increased scientific understanding of the processes as well as for early warning purposes, we present a novel permanent 3D monitoring setup to increase the temporal resolution of TLS measurements. This accounts for different potential monitoring deliverables such as volumetric calculations, spatio-temporal movement patterns, predictions and even alerting. This system was installed at the active Salcher landslide in Gresten (Austria) that is situated in the transition zone of the Gresten Klippenbelt (Helvetic) and the Flyschzone (Penninic). The characteristic lithofacies are the Gresten Beds of Early Jurassic age that are covered by a sequence of marly and silty beds with intercalated sandy limestones. Permanent data acquisition can be implemented into our workflow with any long-range TLS system offering fully automated capturing. We utilize an Optech ILRIS-3D scanner. The time interval between two scans is currently set to 24 hours, but can be

  2. Novel ac Heating-dc Detection Method for Active Thermoelectric Scanning Thermal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Tingting; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    A novel and reliable ac heating-dc detection method is developed for active thermoelectric scanning thermal microscopy, which can map out local thermal property imaging by point-heating and point-sensing with nanoscale spatial resolution. The thermoelectric probe is electrically heated by an ac current, and the corresponding dc thermoelectric voltage is detected. Using the measured dc voltage, the temperature information can be extracted with the known Seebeck coefficient of the thermoelectric probe. The validity and accuracy of this method have been verified by a 25.4 \\upmu m thick K-type thermocouple by both experiment and numerical simulation in high vacuum and in air. The experimental results show that the proposed method is reliable and convenient to monitor the temperature of the junction.

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Rotenberg, S A; Mirkin, M V

    2000-08-29

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells, breast cells with a high level of motility (engendered by overexpression of protein kinase Calpha), and highly metastatic breast cancer cells. SECM analysis of the three cell lines reveals reproducible differences with respect to the kinetics of charge transfer by several redox mediators. PMID:10963658

  4. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: Different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Biao; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Mirkin, Michael V.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells, breast cells with a high level of motility (engendered by overexpression of protein kinase Cα), and highly metastatic breast cancer cells. SECM analysis of the three cell lines reveals reproducible differences with respect to the kinetics of charge transfer by several redox mediators. PMID:10963658

  5. Structure and activation dynamics of RBL-2H3 cells observed with scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, D; Spudich, A

    1994-01-01

    Surface and subsurface dynamics of Rat Basophilic Leukemia cells, a model system of stimulated secretion, were imaged using Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) at a rate of 50-60 s/image. Cytoskeletal elements and organelles were tracked within quiescent cells and those activated after IgE receptor crosslinking. In addition, surface waves were observed moving within the plasma membrane. The structures seen in quiescent and activated cells can be correlated with those seen in electron micrographs and topographic SFM images of fixed detergent-extracted cells. Furthermore, images of the detergent-extracted nuclei reveal the presence of numerous nuclear pore complexes. High-magnification images of the nuclear pore complexes show evidence of subunit structure and exhibit dimensions consistent with those reported previously using electron microscopy. The behavior and overall change in morphology of cells observed during activation was consistent with that observed under similar conditions with Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. This study demonstrates that SFM, unlike other techniques, can be used to provide high-resolution information in both fixed and living cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8061220

  6. Activity and cool spots on the surfaces of G-type stars with superflares from observations with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The properties of active regions (cool spots) on the surfaces of 279 G-type stars in which more than 1500 superflares with energies of 1033-1036 erg were detected are analyzed. Diagrams plotting the superflare energy against activity parameters of the stars (the area of their magnetic spots) are considered, and a more extensive study of the activity of two stars with the highest numbers of flares is presented. The range of variation of the superflare energies (up to two orders of magnitude) is realized over the entire interval of rotation periods. It is proposed that the plot of superflare energy vs. rotational period is bimodal. There are probably no appreciable differences in the maximum flare energies for the two groups of objects, which have rotational periods of more than and less than 10 days. Three groups of stars with different surface spottednesses can be distinguished in a plot of superflare energy vs. cool-spot area. The range of variation of the flare energy within a group is roughly the same for these three groups. Most of the points on this diagram lie to the right of the dependence corresponding to B = 3000Gand an inclination i = 90° (the first two groups of objects). It is confirmed that the flare activity is not related directly to circumpolar active regions, since the majority of the points on the diagram lie to the right of the dependence for B = 1000 G and i = 3°. Analysis of stars from the sample, including objects with more than 20 superflares, shows that large variations of the energy (by up to two orders of magnitude) can be reached with small variations of the spottedness parameter S for a single star. Appreciable variability of the spottedness (by factors of five to six) was detected for only two objects from the sample (KIC 10422252 and KIC 11764567). These stars displayed an increase in the flare energy by orders of magnitude for any spottedness level. The activity of KIC 11551430 and KIC 11764567 is analyzed in detail using all

  7. Location and activity of ulcerative and Crohn's colitis by /sup 111/In leukocyte scan. A prospective comparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.T.; Gray, G.M.; Gregory, P.B.; Anderson, M.; Goodwin, D.A.; McDougall, I.R.

    1983-02-01

    A prospective blinded study comparing the /sup 111/In leukocyte scan to barium enema, colonoscopy, or surgery or a combination of these, was carried out in 15 patients (10 with active ulcerative colitis and 5 with active Crohn's colitis). Correlation of disease location to colonic regions between indium scan and other diagnostic studies was excellent in 11 instances, good in 2, and poor in 3. In 2 of the 3 studies where major disagreement occurred, the comparative barium enema was performed greater than 2 mo after the indium scan. Disease activity, estimated by the intensity of radionuclide uptake, was compared to clinical disease activity assessed by the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for both forms of colitis. The relative degree of inflammation estimated by the indium scan correlated well with the independent clinical assessment (correlation coefficient . 0.81). The indium 111 leukocyte scan appears to be an accurate, noninvasive method for assessing the extent and the severity of the inflammation in patients with acute ulcerative or Crohn's colitis.

  8. Styles of eruptive activity on intraplate volcanoes in the Society and Austral hot spot regions - Bathymetry, petrology, and submersible observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binard, N.; Hekinian, R.; Cheminee, J. L.; Stoffers, P.

    1992-09-01

    A model relating the style of volcanism to the depth of eruption on large intraplate seamounts is proposed on the basis of submersible observations carried out in the Society and Austral hot spot regions (South Pacific) during the Teahitia II cruise (1988-1989). The bases of volcanic edifices are characterized by broad flat flows formed during a high rate of discharge of a very fluid magma on the sea floor. The edifices' flanks deeper than 500 m are mainly made up of bulbous tubular pillows and large drained lava tunnels occurring on slopes steeper than 60-70 deg. Volcanic ejecta due to hydromagmatic eruptions occur at shallow depths (less than 500 m). Volcanic shards, produced by the shattering of the vesiculated glassy margins of the flows, are observed on the edifices' slopes at all depths (from 3000 m to the sea surface), concentrated between pillows or covering large areas, and forming thin indurated layers of mixed shard, sediment, and hydrothermal deposits.

  9. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. ... Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. The ...

  10. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a ...

  11. Evaluation of the Two-Dimensional Performances of Low Activity Planar Catalysts: Development and Validation of a True Scanning Reactor.

    PubMed

    Marelli, M; Nemenyi, A; Dal Santo, V; Psaro, R; Ostinelli, L; Monticelli, D; Dossi, C; Recchia, S

    2016-01-11

    The development of a scanning reactor for planar catalysts is presented here. With respect to other existing models, this reactor is able to scan catalysts even with low turnover frequencies with a minimum sensed circular area of approximately 6 mm in diameter. The downstream gas analysis is performed with a quaprupole mass spectrometer. The apparatus performances are presented for two different reactions: the hydrogenation of butadiene over palladium films and the oxidation of CO over a gold/titania catalyst. With the final setup, true scans in both X and Y directions (or even in a previously defined complex directional pattern) are possible within a scan speed ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 mm/min. Finally, this apparatus aims at becoming a valuable tool for high throughput and combinatorial experimentation to test patterned active surfaces and catalytic libraries. PMID:26616670

  12. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J. Trompier, F.; Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M.; Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C.; Trinkl, S.; Dufek, V.; Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P.; Kubancak, J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  13. Abnormal Tc-99m-MDP/GA-67 scan patterns in association with active chronic osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.; McNeil, B.J.

    1985-05-01

    In this study the authors reviewed data from 136 patients (pts) in order to refine the interpretive criteria used to diagnose active osteomyelitis (AOM) in patients with previous bone disease (e.g., old osteomyelitis, fractures, orthopedic devices excluding prostheses). They evaluated bone (Tc-99mMDP) and gallium 67 studies and obtained followup in all pts. AOM was diagnosed by surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 pts and was excluded by the same criteria in 16 pts. An additional 71 pts had the diagnosis excluded by followup clinical criteria. Five patterns were found. T1: abnormal Tc-99m-MDP, normal Ga-67. T2: diffuse increased uptake of both radiopharmaceuticals with Tc-99m-MDP greater than Ga-67. T3: different geographic distribution, but similar intensities of uptake of both. T4: very similar uptake and distribution of both. T5: Ga-67 exceeded Tc-99m-MDP. The authors conclude that T5 is diagnostic of AOM, T3 and T4 raise the probability of AOM than before scanning, T1 and T2 decrease it.

  14. Electrodeposition and Screening of Photoelectrochemical Activity in Conjugated Polymers Using Scanning Electrochemical Cell Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Barak D B; Garoz-Ruiz, Jesus; Byers, Joshua C; Colina, Alvaro; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-11-24

    A number of renewable energy systems require an understanding and correlation of material properties and photoelectrochemical activity on the micro to nanoscale. Among these, conducting polymer electrodes continue to be important materials. In this contribution, an ultrasensitive scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) platform is used to electrodeposit microscale thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) on an optically transparent gold electrode and to correlate the morphology (film thickness and structural order) with photoactivity. The electrochemical growth of P3HT begins with a thin ordered film up to 10 nm thick, after which a second more disordered film is deposited, as revealed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A decrease in photoactivity for the thicker films, measured in situ immediately following film deposition, is attributed to an increase in bulk film disorder that limits charge transport. Higher resolution ex situ SECCM phototransient measurements, using a smaller diameter probe, show local variations in photoactivity within a given deposit. Even after aging, thinner, more ordered regions within a deposit exhibit sustained enhanced photocurrent densities compared to areas where the film is thicker and more disordered. The platform opens up new possibilities for high-throughput combinatorial correlation studies, by allowing materials fabrication and high spatial resolution probing of processes in photoelectrochemical materials. PMID:26502089

  15. Preliminary results, obtained by using a proton beam, for an active scanning system to installed on the KHIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Lee, Hwa-Ryun; Jang, Sea Duk; Kim, Hyunyong; Hahn, Garam; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Jang, Hong Suk; Park, Dong Wook; Hwang, Won Taek; Yang, Tae-Keun

    2015-08-01

    The active scanning technique is a pencil beam delivery method in particle therapy. The active scanning beam delivery system consists of a beam scanner, beam monitor, energy modulator, and related programs, such as the irradiation control and planning programs. A proposed prototype active scanning system was designed and installed on MC-50 at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS) with a 45-MeV proton beam. The laminated magnetic yoke of the scanning magnet supported fast ramping. The beam intensity and the beam profile monitors were designed for measuring the beam's properties. Both the range shifter and the ridge filter modulate the incoming beam energy. The LabVIEW®-based beam-irradiation-control program operates the system in a sequential operation manner for use with the MC-50 cyclotron. In addition, an in-housecoded irradiation-planning program generates an optimal irradiation path. A scanning experiment was successfully completed to print the logo of the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) on GaF film. Moreover, the beam's position accuracy was measured as 0.62 mm in the x-direction and as 0.83 mm in the y-direction.

  16. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency. PMID:27159046

  17. Scanning, Scanning, Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia; Myers, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses uses of scanning (process of copying or converting text, images, and objects into information that the computer can recognize and manipulate) in schools and notes possible desktop publishing projects. Describes popular scanners and ways to edit a scanned image. A sidebar gives costs and telephone numbers for nine scanners. (AEF)

  18. Scanning technique for tracking small eye-movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. H.; Crane, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Scanning technique images spot of blue light on fundus, measures variations in reflectance of spot and compares reflectance pattern with a stored reference pattern. Method then converts the difference from stored pattern into infrared eye motion.

  19. Object-oriented classification of a high-spatial resolution SPOT5 image for mapping geology and landforms of active volcanoes: Semeru case study, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassouk, Zeineb; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Solikhin, Akhmad; Liew, Soo Chin

    2014-09-01

    The present work explores the object-oriented classification (OOC) of high-spatial resolution (HSR) satellite panchromatic imagery for mapping the geology of the persistently active Semeru volcano and its ring plain, east Java, Indonesia. A panchromatic SPOT5 image and a digital elevation model (DEM) have been used to identify geologic units, structures, landforms and deposits. The panchromatic image was georeferenced and enhanced using histogram equalization. The enhanced image was segmented into polygons using the EnviFx (©Exelis) Software. The polygons were delineated and classified on the basis of spectral (panchromatic hues and textures), topographic (slope, elevation) information and geologic/geomorphic processes. The validity of classification was evaluated by interpreting Google Earth images, aerial photographs and limited field observations. The classification consists of three hierarchical levels across the volcanic area of about 745 km2. The first operational spatial level includes seven large volcano domains based on the spectral content of the volcanic, tectonic and lithological structures, and principal catchments. The second operational level, based on contextual relationships (topography, drainage network, vegetation cover type, stratigraphy and slope dynamics), encompasses 20 geological units that range between 30 and 80 km2 in area. Among the units, the third operational level distinguishes as many as 47 geomorphological sub-units (0.25-25 km2) according to slope gradient, deposit type, mass-wasting process and weathering. The resulting map provides a detailed pattern of geologic and geomorphic features unlike previous geologic maps that identified only 11 stratigraphic units. We show that the high-spatial resolution panchromatic SPOT5 scene can help to safely map the geology and landforms of persistently active volcanoes such as Semeru. We have applied the OOC technique on one HSR GeoEye panchromatic image to map another active volcano, Merapi

  20. Asesssment of mobile gamma-scanning van activities in Edgemont, South Dakota. [UMTRA program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    All accessible thoroughfares in an area in Edgemont, South Dakota, comprising approximately 800 properties, were traversed by a mobile gamma-ray scanning van operated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the mobile survey was to identify residual radioactive contamination on properties in the vicinity of the nearby uranium tailings pile. The properties identified by mobile scanning (herein referred to as anomalies) were compared with results from walk-on measurements conducted by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). The mobile scan was successful in identifying 48% of the properties previously identified as contaminated by PNL walk-on measurements. Modification of the algorithm used by the mobile scanning van to identify radioactive contamination from the measured gamma radiation resulted in mixed success; the number of successful identifications increased but the number of false identifications increased disproportionately and unacceptably.

  1. Purification, characterization, and biological activity of insulins from the spotted dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula, and the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W Gary; Ali, Mohamed F; Einarsdóttir, Ingibjörg E; Schäffer, Lauge; Hazon, Neil; Conlon, J Michael

    2002-03-01

    Insulin was purified from pancreatic extracts of two elasmobranch species belonging to different families in the order Carcharhiniformes, the European spotted dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula (Scyliorhinidae), and the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini (Carcharhinidae). The amino acid sequence of dogfish insulin was established as A-chain GIVDHCCRNT(10)CSLYDLEGYC(20)NQ and B-chain LPSQHLCGSH(10)LVETLYFVCG(20)QKGFYYVPKV(30). The primary structure of hammerhead shark insulin was similar to that of dogfish insulin with only 2 amino acid substitutions at A8 (R --> H) and B30 (V --> I). The elasmobranch insulins were markedly different from human insulin (17 amino acid substitutions) but all the residues in human insulin that are believed to be important in determining the receptor binding conformation (B6, B8, B11, B13, B23, B24, B25, A2, A3, and A19) have been conserved in the elasmobranch insulins with the exception of the conservative substitution Phe --> Tyr at B25. Consistent with this, dogfish and human insulin showed almost identical binding affinity to the recombinant solubilized human insulin receptor (K(D) values of 14.0 and 18.6 pM, respectively; relative potency 133%). Previous studies have shown that bovine insulin produces severe and sustained hypoglycemia in elasmobranchs but the effect is of slow onset. Bolus arterial injections of dogfish insulin (10 nmol x kg(-1)) into unanesthetized, fasting dogfish (n = 9) produced no changes in blood glucose, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate concentrations over a 4-h period. In a second series of experiments (n = 7), dogfish insulin (10 nmol x kg(-1)) produced a significant (P < 0.05) fall in blood glucose after 12 h that persisted for at least 48 h, but no change in ketone body concentrations. The data indicate that the metabolic actions of an endogenous elasmobranch insulin in an elasmobranch are similar to those previously described for mammalian insulin. PMID:11944972

  2. Scanned proton radiotherapy for mobile targets—the effectiveness of re-scanning in the context of different treatment planning approaches and for different motion characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, Antje-Christin; Hong, Theodore S.; Lomax, Antony

    2011-11-01

    The most advanced delivery technique for proton radiotherapy is active spot scanning. So far, predominantly static targets have been treated with active spot scanning, since mobile targets in combination with dynamic treatment delivery can lead to interplay effects, causing inhomogeneous dose distributions. One way to mitigate motion effects is re-scanning. In this study we investigate the effectiveness of re-scanning in relation to different plan parameters (number of fields, field directions, number of re-scans) as well as in respect to different motion parameters (motion amplitude, motion starting phase). A systematic study was performed for three liver patients, for which ten different plans have been calculated, respectively. The treatment plans were evaluated for three different scenarios (static, motion/single-scan-delivery, motion/re-scanned-delivery). The choice of motion parameters was based on an evaluation of the 4D CT data sets of the three patients. It is shown that the effect of motion/re-scanning per fraction is largest the fewer fields per plan are used and the more the field direction differs from the main motion direction. For amplitudes up to 6 mm, re-scanning may not be required if multiple fields are used, since only dose blurring effects appear that cannot be compensated by re-scanning. For larger motion amplitudes two planning strategies are proposed.

  3. Environmental Scanning Activities in Higher Education as Reported at the 1986 Annual Meetings of AAHE, AIR, and SCUP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.

    Environmental scanning activities in higher education were described in forums at the 1986 annual meetings of the American Association for Higher Education (AAHE), the Association for Institutional Research (AIR), and the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP). The forums were held to determine the extent of environmental scanning…

  4. Modulation of the DNA scanning activity of the Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.W.; Lloyd, R.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease incises DNA at the sites of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced pyrimidine dimers. The mechanism of incision has been previously shown to be a glycosylic bond cleavage at the 5'-pyrimidine of the dimer followed by an apyrimidine endonuclease activity which cleaves the phosphodiester backbone between the pyrimidines. The process by which M. luteus UV endonuclease locates pyrimidine dimers within a population of UV-irradiated plasmids was shown to occur, in vitro, by a processive or sliding mechanism on non-target DNA as opposed to a distributive or random hit mechanism. Form I plasmid DNA containing 25 dimers per molecule was incubated with M. luteus UV endonuclease in time course reactions. The three topological forms of plasmid DNA generated were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. When the enzyme encounters a pyrimidine dimer, it is significantly more likely to make only the glycosylase cleavage as opposed to making both the glycosylic and phosphodiester bond cleavages. Thus, plasmids are accumulated with many alkaline-labile sites relative to single-stranded breaks. In addition, reactions were performed at both pH 8.0 and pH 6.0, in the absence of NaCl, as well as 25,100, and 250 mM NaCl. The efficiency of the DNA scanning reaction was shown to be dependent on both the ionic strength and pH of the reaction. At low ionic strengths, the reaction was shown to proceed by a processive mechanism and shifted to a distributive mechanism as the ionic strength of the reaction increased. Processivity at pH 8.0 is shown to be more sensitive to increases in ionic strength than reactions performed at pH 6.0.

  5. Photocatalysis: effect of light-activated nanoscale formulations of TiO(2) on Xanthomonas perforans and control of bacterial spot of tomato.

    PubMed

    Paret, Mathews L; Vallad, Gary E; Averett, Devron R; Jones, Jeffrey B; Olson, Stephen M

    2013-03-01

    Protection of crops from bacterial diseases presents a continuing challenge, mandating the development of novel agents and approaches. Photocatalysis is a process where chemically reactive oxygen species are catalytically generated by certain minerals in the presence of light. These reactive oxygen species have the capacity to destroy organic molecular structures critical to pathogen viability. In this study, the antibacterial potential of photocatalytic nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), nanoscale TiO(2) doped (incorporation of other materials into the structure of TiO(2)) with silver (TiO(2)/Ag), and nanoscale TiO(2) doped with zinc (TiO(2)/Zn; AgriTitan) was evaluated against Xanthomonas perforans, the causal agent for bacterial spot disease of tomato. In vitro experiments on photocatalytic activity and dose dependency were conducted on glass cover slips coated with the nanoscale formulations by adding a known population of X. perforans strain Xp-F7 and illuminating the cover slips under a visible light source. TiO(2)/Ag and TiO(2)/Zn had high photocatalytic activity against X. perforans within 10 min of exposure to 3 × 10(4) lux. Greenhouse studies on naturally and artificially infected transplants treated with TiO(2)/Zn at ≈500 to 800 ppm significantly reduced bacterial spot severity compared with untreated and copper control. Protection was similar to the grower standard, copper + mancozeb. The use of TiO(2)/Zn at ≈500 to 800 ppm significantly reduced disease incidence in three of the four trials compared with untreated and copper control, and was comparable to or better than the grower standard. The treatments did not cause any adverse effects on tomato yield in any of the field trials. PMID:23190116

  6. Biological effects of passive versus active scanning proton beams on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao W; Wroe, Andrew J; Luo-Owen, Xian

    2015-02-01

    The goal was to characterize differences in cell response after exposure to active beam scanning (ABS) protons compared to a passive delivery system. Human lung epithelial (HLE) cells were evaluated at various locations along the proton depth dose profile. The dose delivered at the Bragg peak position was essentially identical (∼4 Gy) with the two techniques, but depth dose data showed that ABS resulted in lower doses at entry and more rapid drop-off after the peak. Average dose rates for the passive and ABS beams were 1.1 Gy/min and 5.1 Gy/min, respectively; instantaneous dose rates were 19.2 Gy/min and 2,300 Gy/min (to a 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2) voxel). Analysis of DNA synthesis was based on (3)H-TdR incorporation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done to determine expression of genes related to p53 signaling and DNA damage; a total of 152 genes were assessed. Spectral karyotyping and analyses of the Golgi apparatus and cytokines produced by the HLE cells were also performed. At or near the Bragg peak position, ABS protons resulted in a greater decrease in DNA synthesis compared to passively delivered protons. Genes with >2-fold change (P < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy) after passive proton irradiation at one or more locations within the Bragg curve were BTG2, CDKN1A, IFNB1 and SIAH1. In contrast, many more genes had >2-fold difference with ABS protons: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDC25A, CDC25C, CCNB2, CDK1, DMC1, DNMT1, E2F1, EXO1, FEN1, GADD45A, GTSE1, IL-6, JUN, KRAS, MDM4, PRC1, PTTG1, RAD51, RPA1, TNF, WT1, XRCC2, XRCC3 and XRCC6BP1. Spectral karyotyping revealed numerous differences in chromosomal abnormalities between the two delivery systems, especially at or near the Bragg peak. Percentage of cells staining for the Golgi apparatus was low after exposure to passive and active proton beams. Studies such as this are needed to ensure patient safety and make modifications in ABS delivery, if necessary. PMID:24325134

  7. Poisson's spot with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, Thomas; Holst, Bodil; Patel, Amil A.; Smith, Henry I.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo

    2009-05-15

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  8. Poisson's spot with molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil A.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-05-01

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson’s spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson’s spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  9. Spot addressing for microarray images structured in hexagonal grids.

    PubMed

    Giannakeas, Nikolaos; Kalatzis, Fanis; Tsipouras, Markos G; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2012-04-01

    In this work, an efficient method for spot addressing in images, which are generated by the scanning of hexagonal structured microarrays, is proposed. Initially, the blocks of the image are separated using the projections of the image. Next, all the blocks of the image are processed separately for the detection of each spot. The spot addressing procedure begins with the detection of the high intensity objects, which are probably the spots of the image. Next, the Growing Concentric Hexagon algorithm, which uses the properties of the hexagonal grid, is introduced for the detection of the non-hybridized spots. Finally, the Voronoi diagram is applied to the centers of the detected spots for the gridding of the image. The method is evaluated using spots generated from the scanning of the Beadchip of Illumina, which is used for the detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the human genome, and uses hexagonal structure for the location of the spots. For the evaluation, the detected centers for each of the spot in the image are compared to the centers of the annotation, obtaining up to 98% accuracy for the spot addressing procedure. PMID:21924515

  10. A hot-spot-active magnetic graphene oxide substrate for microRNA detection based on cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Sai; Chen, Min; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Dong, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Herein, a cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (C-CRET) process was demonstrated from horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme-catalyzed luminol-H2O2 to fluorescein and further to graphene oxide (GO) when HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein was in close proximity to the GO surface. The proposed C-CRET system was successfully implemented to construct three modes of C-CRET hot-spot-active substrates (modes I, II and III) by covalently immobilizing HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein-labeled hairpin DNAs (hot-spot-generation probes) on magnetic GO (MGO), resulting in a signal ``off'' state due to the quenching of the luminol/H2O2/HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein CRET system by GO. Upon the introduction of microRNA-122 (miRNA-122), the targets (mode I) or the new triggers that were generated through a strand displacement reaction (SDR) initiated by miRNA-122 (modes II and III) hybridized with the loop domains of hairpin probes on MGO to form double-stranded (modes I and II) or triplex-stem structures (mode III), causing an ``open'' configuration of the hairpin probe and a CRET signal ``on'' state, thus achieving sensitive and selective detection of miRNA-122. More importantly, the substrate exhibited excellent controllability, reversibility and reproducibility through SDR and magnetic separation (modes II and III), especially sequence-independence for hairpin probes in mode III, holding great potential for the development of a versatile platform for optical biosensing.Herein, a cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (C-CRET) process was demonstrated from horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme-catalyzed luminol-H2O2 to fluorescein and further to graphene oxide (GO) when HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein was in close proximity to the GO surface. The proposed C-CRET system was successfully implemented to construct three modes of C-CRET hot-spot-active substrates (modes I, II and III) by covalently immobilizing HRP-mimicking DNAzyme

  11. A hot-spot-active magnetic graphene oxide substrate for microRNA detection based on cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Chen, Min; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Dong, Ying

    2015-02-28

    Herein, a cascaded chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (C-CRET) process was demonstrated from horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme-catalyzed luminol-H2O2 to fluorescein and further to graphene oxide (GO) when HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein was in close proximity to the GO surface. The proposed C-CRET system was successfully implemented to construct three modes of C-CRET hot-spot-active substrates (modes I, II and III) by covalently immobilizing HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein-labeled hairpin DNAs (hot-spot-generation probes) on magnetic GO (MGO), resulting in a signal "off" state due to the quenching of the luminol/H2O2/HRP-mimicking DNAzyme/fluorescein CRET system by GO. Upon the introduction of microRNA-122 (miRNA-122), the targets (mode I) or the new triggers that were generated through a strand displacement reaction (SDR) initiated by miRNA-122 (modes II and III) hybridized with the loop domains of hairpin probes on MGO to form double-stranded (modes I and II) or triplex-stem structures (mode III), causing an "open" configuration of the hairpin probe and a CRET signal "on" state, thus achieving sensitive and selective detection of miRNA-122. More importantly, the substrate exhibited excellent controllability, reversibility and reproducibility through SDR and magnetic separation (modes II and III), especially sequence-independence for hairpin probes in mode III, holding great potential for the development of a versatile platform for optical biosensing. PMID:25644330

  12. Lethal, oedema, haemorrhagic activity of spotted butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract and its neutralization by antiserum and pharmacological antagonists.

    PubMed

    Muhuri, D; Dasgupta, S C; Gomes, A

    2005-06-01

    An attempt has been made in this communication to develop antiserum in rabbit against Scatophagus. argus sting extract. Antiserum did not neutralized the sting extract induced proinflammatory and haemorrhagic activity but successfully neutralized lethality upto 2LD50. Cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW 755C pretreatment significantly reduced sting extract induced proinflammatory activity. The haemorrhagic activity of sting extract was significantly inhibited by temperature, UV-exposure, EDTA, cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW 755C pretreatment. The results conclude that the local effects of S.argus venom is likely to be mediated through release of mediators and may be encountered by pharmacological antagonists better than the antiserum. PMID:15991572

  13. The Necessity of Environmental Scanning Prior to Long-Range Planning Activities at Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Ty J.

    Formal environmental scanning procedures can provide key administrators of higher education institutions with valuable external information regarding both the probability and impact of external trends and forces. Such information may then be used in various strategic planning stages including scenario development, institutional mission and goals…

  14. Optimization of oncocin for antibacterial activity using a SPOT synthesis approach: extending the pathogen spectrum to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Knappe, Daniel; Ruden, Serge; Langanke, Stefanie; Tikkoo, Tarun; Ritzer, Jennifer; Mikut, Ralf; Martin, Lisandra L; Hoffmann, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The identification of lead molecules against multidrug-resistant bacteria ensuing the development of novel antimicrobial drugs is an urgent task. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides are highly active in vitro and in vivo, but only against a few Gram-negative human pathogens, with rather weak activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. This reduced level of efficacy could be related to inadequate uptake mechanisms or structural differences of the intracellular target proteins, i.e., the 70S ribosome or chaperone DnaK. Here we synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membranes using cleavable linkers to release the free individual peptides for further antimicrobial tests. Thus, a library of singly substituted oncocin analogs was produced by replacing each residue by all other 19 canonical amino acids yielding a set of 361 individual peptides to be evaluated against a luminescent P. aeruginosa strain. Thirteen substitutions appeared promising and their improved antibacterial activities were confirmed for different bacteria after larger scale synthesis of these analogs. By combining two favorable substitutions into one peptide, we finally obtained an oncocin analog that was ten times more active against P. aeruginosa and even 100-fold more active against S. aureus than the original oncocin, providing minimal inhibitory concentrations of 4-8 and 0.5 µg/mL, respectively. PMID:26334348

  15. Neptune's small dark spot (D2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This bulls-eye view of Neptune's small dark spot (D2) was obtained by Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera. Banding surrounding the feature indicates unseen strong winds, while structures within the bright spot suggest both active upwelling of clouds and rotation about the center. A rotation rate has not yet been measured, but the V-shaped structure near the right edge of the bright area indicates that the spot rotates clockwise. Unlike the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, which rotates counterclockwise, if the D2 spot on Neptune rotates clockwise, the material will be descending in the dark oval region. The fact that infrared data will yield temperature information about the region above the clouds makes this observation especially valuable. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  16. Jupiter's Great Red spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This color composite made from Voyager 2 narrow-angle camera frames shows the Great Red Spot during the late Jovian afternoon. North of the Red Spot lies a curious darker section of the South Equatorial Belt (SEB), the belt in which the Red Spot is located. A bright eruption of material passing from the SEB northward into the diffuse equatorial clouds has been observed on all occasions when this feature passes north of the Red Spot. The remnants of one such eruption are apparent in this photograph. To the lower left of the Red Spot lies one of the three long-lived White Ovals. This photograph was taken on June 29, 1979, when Voyager 2 was over 9 million kilometers (nearly 6 million miles) from Jupiter. The smallest features visible are over 170 kilometers (106 miles) across.

  17. Poisson's Spot with Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-03-01

    In the Poisson-Spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. The Poisson spot is the last of the classical optics experiments to be realized with neutral matter waves. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's Spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength-independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large-molecule diffraction and coherence in atom-lasers to patterning with large molecules.

  18. Insulating behavior of magnetic spots in proton-bombarded graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, K.; García, N.; Esquinazi, P.; Ohldag, H.

    2008-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements on micrometer small magnetic spots produced by proton bombardment on bulk graphite reveal a charge transfer from the center of the spot to an external ring with potential variation on the order of 50 mV. The total charge in the spot is neutral. The results can be well understood in terms of practically unscreened potentials, an insulating property, although the nonbombarded, surrounding graphite region exhibits good conductance. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy measurements on magnetic spots prepared on graphitic films reveal similar charge distribution. The insulating behavior is fundamental to understand the magnetism in graphite.

  19. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  20. Scanning Terahertz Heterodyne Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter; Dengler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging systems are now at an early stage of development. In a basic scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging system, (see Figure 1) two far-infrared lasers generate beams denoted the local-oscillator (LO) and signal that differ in frequency by an amount, denoted the intermediate frequency (IF), chosen to suit the application. The LO beam is sent directly to a mixer as one of two inputs. The signal beam is focused to a spot on or in the specimen. After transmission through or reflection from the specimen, the beams are focused to a spot on a terahertz mixer, which extracts the IF outputs. The specimen is mounted on a translation stage, by means of which the focal spot is scanned across the specimen to build up an image.

  1. Optical scanning tests of complex CMOS microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M. E.; Erickson, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The new test method was based on the use of a raster-scanned optical stimulus in combination with special electrical test procedures. The raster-scanned optical stimulus was provided by an optical spot scanner, an instrument that combines a scanning optical microscope with electronic instrumentation to process and display the electric photoresponse signal induced in a device that is being tested.

  2. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  3. Application of space-time scan statistics to describe geographic and temporal clustering of visible drug activity.

    PubMed

    Linton, Sabriya L; Jennings, Jacky M; Latkin, Carl A; Gomez, Marisela B; Mehta, Shruti H

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the geographic and temporal clustering of drug activity can inform where health and social services are needed and can provide insight on the potential impact of local policies on drug activity. This ecologic study assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of drug activity in Baltimore, Maryland, prior to and following the implementation of a large urban redevelopment project in East Baltimore, which began in 2003. Drug activity was measured by narcotic calls for service at the neighborhood level. A space-time scan statistic approach was used to identify statistically significant clusters of narcotic calls for service across space and time, using a discrete Poisson model. After adjusting for economic deprivation and housing vacancy, clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in Southeast, Northeast, Northwest, and West Baltimore from 2001 to 2010. Clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in East Baltimore from 2001 to 2003, indicating a decrease in narcotic calls thereafter. A large proportion of clusters occurred among neighborhoods located in North and Northeast Baltimore after 2003, which indicated a potential spike during this time frame. These findings suggest potential displacement of drug activity coinciding with the initiation of urban redevelopment in East Baltimore. Space-time scan statistics should be used in future research to describe the potential implications of local policies on drug activity. PMID:25078036

  4. A Hot-spot of In-frame Duplications Activates the Oncoprotein AKT1 in Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bessière, Laurianne; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Auguste, Aurélie; Sarnacki, Sabine; Flatters, Delphine; Legois, Bérangère; Sultan, Charles; Kalfa, Nicolas; Galmiche, Louise; Veitia, Reiner A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian granulosa cell tumors are the most common sex-cord stromal tumors and have juvenile (JGCTs) and adult forms. In a previous study we reported the occurrence of activating somatic mutations of Gαs, which transduces mitogenic signals, in 30% of the analyzed JGCTs. Methods We have searched for alterations in other proteins involved in ovarian mitogenic signaling. We focused on the PI3K–AKT axis. As we found mutations in AKT1, we analyzed the subcellular localization of the mutated proteins and performed functional explorations using Western-blot and luciferase assays. Findings We detected in-frame duplications affecting the pleckstrin-homology domain of AKT1 in more than 60% of the tumors occurring in girls under 15 years of age. The somatic status of the mutations was confirmed when peritumoral DNA was available. The JGCTs without duplications carried point mutations affecting highly conserved residues. Several of these substitutions were somatic lesions. The mutated proteins carrying the duplications had a non-wild-type subcellular distribution, with a marked enrichment at the plasma membrane. This led to a striking degree of AKT1 activation demonstrated by a strong phosphorylation level and by reporter assays. Interpretation Our study incriminates somatic mutations of AKT1 as a major event in the pathogenesis of JGCTs. The existence of AKT inhibitors currently tested in clinical trials opens new perspectives for targeted therapies for these tumors, which are currently treated with standard non-specific chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26137586

  5. Radiometry spot measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Harry H.; Lawn, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    The radiometry spot measurement system (RSMS) has been designed for use in the Diffusive And Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire) experiment, currently under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The RSMS can measure the radiation emitted from a spot of specific size located on the surface of a distant radiation source within a controlled wavelength range. If the spot is located on a blackbody source, its radiation and temperature can be measured directly or indirectly by the RSMS. This report presents computer simulation results used to verify RSMS performance.

  6. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  7. Imaging the activity of nitrate reductase by means of a scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Zaumseil, J; Wittstock, G; Bahrs, S; Steinrücke, P

    2000-06-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used to characterize immobilized nitrate reductase (NaR) from Pseudonomonas stutzeri (E.C. 1.7.99.4). Nitrate reductase with membrane fragment was embedded in a polyurethane hydrogel in a capillary and solubilized NaR without membrane fragment was covalently coupled to a diaminoethyl-cellulose-carbamitate film on glass. After systematic studies of possible mediators, SECM feedback imaging of both forms of immobilized NaR was accomplished with methylviologen as redox mediator. PMID:11225859

  8. A Portable Hot Spot Recognition Loop Transfers Sequence Preferences from APOBEC Family Members to Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase*

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Rahul M.; Abrams, Shaun R.; Gajula, Kiran S.; Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Stivers, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes of the AID/APOBEC family, characterized by the targeted deamination of cytosine to generate uracil within DNA, mediate numerous critical immune responses. One family member, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), selectively introduces uracil into antibody variable and switch regions, promoting antibody diversity through somatic hypermutation or class switching. Other family members, including APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G, play an important role in retroviral defense by acting on viral reverse transcripts. These enzymes are distinguished from one another by targeting cytosine within different DNA sequence contexts; however, the reason for these differences is not known. Here, we report the identification of a recognition loop of 9–11 amino acids that contributes significantly to the distinct sequence motifs of individual family members. When this recognition loop is grafted from the donor APOBEC3F or 3G proteins into the acceptor scaffold of AID, the mutational signature of AID changes toward that of the donor proteins. These loop-graft mutants of AID provide useful tools for dissecting the biological impact of DNA sequence preferences upon generation of antibody diversity, and the results have implications for the evolution and specialization of the AID/APOBEC family. PMID:19561087

  9. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Lenk, Steve; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-07-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many devices. Driven by the thermally actuated piezoresistive cantilever technology, we have developed a prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform which is able to image, inspect, align, and pattern features down to the single digit nanoregime. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric-field based current-controlled scanning probe lithography. In particular, individual patterning tests are carried out on calixarene by using our developed table-top SPL system. We have demonstrated the application of a step-and-repeat SPL method including optical as well as atomic force microscopy-based navigation and alignment. The closed-loop lithography scheme was applied to sequentially write positive and negative tone features. Due to the integrated unique combination of read-write cycling, each single feature is aligned separately with the highest precision and inspected after patterning. This routine was applied to create a pattern step by step. Finally, we have demonstrated the patterning over larger areas, over existing topography, and the practical applicability of the SPL processes for lithography down to 13-nm pitch patterns. To enhance the throughput capability variable beam diameter electric field, current-controlled SPL is briefly discussed.

  10. Reactor hot spot analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Lincoln's Spot Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1988-01-01

    Examines the events leading to and immediately following the declaration of war on Mexico in 1846. Includes the second and third pages of Abraham Lincoln's "Spot Resolutions" and presents teaching suggestions for interpreting the document and assessing public opinion. (GEA)

  12. Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft. The image was created using two filters, violet and near-infrared, at each of two camera positions. The Great Red Spot is a storm in Jupiter's atmosphere and is at least 300 years-old. Winds blow counterclockwise around the Great Red Spot at about 400 kilometers per hour (250 miles per hour). The size of the storm is more than one Earth diameter (13,000 kilometers or 8,000 miles) in the north-south direction and more than two Earth diameters in the east-west direction. In this oblique view, where the Great Red Spot is shown on the planet's limb, it appears longer in the north-south direction. The image was taken on June 26, 1996.

    The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePlus

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  14. Activating Transcription Factor 4 and X Box Binding Protein 1 of Litopenaeus vannamei Transcriptional Regulated White Spot Syndrome Virus Genes Wsv023 and Wsv083

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Yun; Pang, Li-Ran; Chen, Yong-Gui; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Chen, Yi-Hong; He, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    In response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the signaling pathway termed unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated. To investigate the role of UPR in Litopenaeus vannamei immunity, the activating transcription factor 4 (designated as LvATF4) which belonged to a branch of the UPR, the [protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase, (PERK)]-[eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit alpha (eIF2α)] pathway, was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvATF4 was 1972 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1299 bp long that encoded a 432 amino acid protein. LvATF4 was highly expressed in gills, intestines and stomach. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, LvATF4 was upregulated in the gills after 3 hpi and increased by 1.9-fold (96 hpi) compared to the mock-treated group. The LvATF4 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in a lower cumulative mortality of L. vannamei under WSSV infection. Reporter gene assays show that LvATF4 could upregulate the expression of the WSSV gene wsv023 based on the activating transcription factor/cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate response element (ATF/CRE). Another transcription factor of L. vannamei, X box binding protein 1 (designated as LvXBP1), has a significant function in [inositol-requiring enzyme-1(IRE1) – (XBP1)] pathway. This transcription factor upregulated the expression of the WSSV gene wsv083 based on the UPR element (UPRE). These results suggest that in L. vannamei UPR signaling pathway transcription factors are important for WSSV and might facilitate WSSV infection. PMID:23638122

  15. Ocular hazards of industrial spot welding.

    PubMed

    Chou, B R; Cullen, A P

    1996-06-01

    Any welding process is perceived to be a radiation hazard to the eye. Site visits were made to an automotive assembly plant to assess the levels of optical radiation and other hazards on the production line. Measurements were taken with a scanning spectro-radiometer and optical power and energy meters at operating working distances at spot welding stations where nonrobotic procedures were performed. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiance levels produced while spot welding with electrodes operating at 10 to 15 kA and 10 to 20 V were several orders of magnitude below recommended safety limits for industrial exposure. Flashes were rich in visible light and infrared (IR) radiation, but not at hazardous levels. The principal hazards in manual spot welding with high-current electrodes are high-speed droplets of molten metal produced by the process. These are easily defended against by wraparound polycarbonate eye shields. PMID:8807655

  16. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy with an active scanned delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Furukawa, T; Inaniwa, T

    2014-10-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, secondary neutrons contribute to an undesired dose outside the target volume, and consequently the increase of secondary cancer risk is a growing concern. In this study, neutron ambient dose equivalents in carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) with an active beam delivery system were measured with a rem meter, WENDI-II, at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When the same irradiation target was assumed, the measured neutron dose with an active beam was at most ∼15 % of that with a passive beam. This percentage became smaller as larger distances from the iso-centre. Also, when using an active beam delivery system, the neutron dose per treatment dose in CIRT was comparable with that in proton radiotherapy. Finally, it was experimentally demonstrated that the use of an active scanned beam in CIRT can greatly reduce the secondary neutron dose. PMID:24126486

  17. Influence of Agathi grandiflora active principles inhibit viral multiplication and stimulate immune system in Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus against white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bindhu, Francis; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Five herbs including Adathoda vasica, Agathi grandiflora, Leucas aspera, Psoralea corylifolia, and Quercus infectoria were selected to screen the antiviral and immunostimulant activity against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio harveyi respectively using different organic polar and non-polar solvents. Based on the initial screening results, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of A. grandiflora had strong antiviral and immunostimulant activities. Those extracts incubated with WSSV injected Fenneropenaeus indicus got only 20% mortality and no PCR positive signals were seen in two step PCR amplification. The methanolic extracts of A. grandiflora were further purified through silica column chromatography and the fractions screened again for antiviral and immunostimulant activity. The secondary screening results revealed that, the fractions of F5 to F7 had effectively controlled the WSSV multiplication and V. harveyi growth. The pooled fractions (F5 to F7) was structurally characterized by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and few compounds were identified including 3,7.11,15-Tetramethyl-2-Hexane-1-ol, pytol and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisooctyl ester. The pooled fractions were mixed with the basal feed ingredients at the concentration of 100 (D-1), 200 (D-2), 300 (D-3) and 400 (D-4) mg kg(-1) and the diets fed to the F. indicus (9.0 ± 0.5 g) for 30 days. After the completion of feeding trail, they were challenged with virulent WSSV and studied the cumulative mortality, molecular diagnosis by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), biochemical, haematological and immunological parameters. The control diet fed F. indicus succumbed to death 100% within 3 days whereas the D-3 and D-4 helped to reduced the cumulative mortality of 60-80% respectively. The qRT-PCR revealed that, the WSSV copy number was gradually decreased when increasing concentration of A. grandiflora extract active fraction in the diets. The diets D-3 and D-4 helped to

  18. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  19. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan ... Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, et al. eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ...

  20. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  1. Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felver, Bernhard; King, David C.; Lea, Simon C.; Price, Gareth J.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2008-06-01

    Ultrasonic dental scalers are clinically used to remove deposits from tooth surfaces. A metal probe, oscillating at ultrasonic frequencies, is used to chip away deposits from the teeth. To reduce frictional heating, water flows over the operated probe in which a bi-product, cavitation, may be generated. The aim of this study is characterise probe oscillations using scanning laser vibrometry and to relate the recorded data to the occurrence of cavitation that is mapped in the course of this research. Scanning laser vibrometry (Polytec models 300-F/S and 400-3D) was used to measure the movement of various designs of operating probes and to locate vibration nodes / anti-nodes at different generator power settings and contact loads (100g and 200g). Cavitation mapping was performed by photographing the emission from a luminol solution with a digital camera (Artemis ICX285). The scaler design influences the number and location of vibration node / anti-node points. For all ultrasonic probes, the highest displacement amplitude values were recorded at the tip. The highest amounts of cavitation around the probes were recorded at the second anti-node measured from the tip. Broad, beaver-tale shaped probes produced more cavitation than slim shaped ones. The design also influences the amount of inertial cavitation around the operated instrument. The clinical relevance is that broad, beaver-tale shaped probes are unlikely to reach subgingival areas of the tooth. Further research is required to design probes that will be clinically superior to cleaning this area of the tooth.

  2. Laser Scanning In Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Patricia; Baker, Lionel R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper is a review of the applications of laser scanning in inspection. The reasons for the choice of a laser in flying spot scanning and the optical properties of a laser beam which are of value in a scanning instrument will be given. The many methods of scanning laser beams in both one and two dimensions will be described. The use of one dimensional laser scanners for automatic surface inspection for transmitting and reflective products will be covered in detail, with particular emphasis on light collection techniques. On-line inspection applications which will be mentioned include: photographic film web, metal strip products, paper web, glass sheet, car body paint surfaces and internal cylinder bores. Two dimensional laser scanning is employed in applications where increased resolution, increased depth of focus, and better contrast are required compared with conventional vidicon TV or solid state array cameras. Such examples as special microscope laser scanning systems and a TV compatible system for use in restricted areas of a nuclear reactor will be described. The technical and economic benefits and limitations of laser scanning video systems will be compared with conventional TV and CCD array devices.

  3. Lysine-scanning Mutagenesis Reveals an Amendable Face of the Cyclotide Kalata B1 for the Optimization of Nematocidal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Colgrave, Michelle L.; Clark, Richard J.; Kotze, Andrew C.; Craik, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclotides are a family of macrocyclic peptides that combine the unique features of a head-to-tail cyclic backbone and a cystine knot motif, the combination of which imparts them with extraordinary stability. The prototypic cyclotide kalata B1 is toxic against two economically important gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. A lysine scan was conducted to examine the effect of the incorporation of positive charges into the kalata B1 cyclotide framework. Each of the non-cysteine residues in this 29-amino acid peptide was successively substituted with lysine, and the nematocidal and hemolytic activities of the suite of mutants were determined. Substitution of 11 residues within kalata B1 decreased the nematocidal activity dramatically. On the other hand, six other residues that are clustered on the surface of kalata B1 were tolerant to Lys substitution, and indeed the introduction of positively charged residues into this region increased nematocidal activity. This activity was increased further in double and triple lysine mutants, with a maximal increase (relative to the native kalata B1) of 13-fold obtained with a triple lysine mutant (mutated at positions Thr-20, Asn-29, and Gly-1). Hemolytic activity correlated with the nematocidal activity of all lysine mutants. Our data clearly highlight the residues crucial for nematocidal and hemolytic activity in cyclotides, and demonstrate that the nematocidal activity of cyclotides can be increased by incorporation of basic amino acids. PMID:20103593

  4. An approach for addressing hard-to-detect hot spots.

    PubMed

    Abelquist, Eric W; King, David A; Miller, Laurence F; Viars, James A

    2013-05-01

    The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) survey approach is comprised of systematic random sampling coupled with radiation scanning to assess acceptability of potential hot spots. Hot spot identification for some radionuclides may not be possible due to the very weak gamma or x-ray radiation they emit-these hard-to-detect nuclides are unlikely to be identified by field scans. Similarly, scanning technology is not yet available for chemical contamination. For both hard-to-detect nuclides and chemical contamination, hot spots are only identified via volumetric sampling. The remedial investigation and cleanup of sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act typically includes the collection of samples over relatively large exposure units, and concentration limits are applied assuming the contamination is more or less uniformly distributed. However, data collected from contaminated sites demonstrate contamination is often highly localized. These highly localized areas, or hot spots, will only be identified if sample densities are high or if the environmental characterization program happens to sample directly from the hot spot footprint. This paper describes a Bayesian approach for addressing hard-to-detect nuclides and chemical hot spots. The approach begins using available data (e.g., as collected using the standard approach) to predict the probability that an unacceptable hot spot is present somewhere in the exposure unit. This Bayesian approach may even be coupled with the graded sampling approach to optimize hot spot characterization. Once the investigator concludes that the presence of hot spots is likely, then the surveyor should use the data quality objectives process to generate an appropriate sample campaign that optimizes the identification of risk-relevant hot spots. PMID:23528274

  5. Peel resistance characterization of localized polymer film bonding via thin film adhesive thermally activated by scanned CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, Colin; Dowding, Robert; Griffiths, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Thermal laser polymer bonding is a non-contact process for the joining of polymer laminates using thermally activated adhesives. Conventional, contact based bonding techniques suffer from mechanical wear, geometric inflexibility and poor energy efficiency. The application of lasers offers the potential for highly localized delivery of energy and increased process flexibility whilst achieving controlled and repeatable bonding of polymer laminates in a contact free process. Unlike previously reported techniques, here it is reported that laser based non-contact bonding is both viable and highly desirable due to the increased levels of control it affords the user. In this work, laser polymer bonding of 75 μm thick linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) film backed with a thermally activated adhesive to a 640 μm thick polypropylene (PP) substrate was conducted using continuous wave 10.6 μm laser radiation and scanning galvanometric optics. The effect of laser power and scanning traverse speed on the peel resistance properties of the bonded polymer laminates is presented, with a threshold specific energy density for successful adhesive activation determined.

  6. Thermal stability of extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus: determination of activation parameters by optical spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric studies.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Patrícia S; Carvalho, José Wilson P; Domingues, Marco M; Santos, Nuno C; Tabak, Marcel

    2010-11-01

    Glossoscolex paulistus hemoglobin (HbGp) was studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS), optical absorption spectroscopy (UV-VIS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). At pH 7.0, cyanomet-HbGp is very stable, no oligomeric dissociation is observed, while denaturation occurs at 56°C, 4°C higher as compared to oxy-HbGp. The oligomeric dissociation of HbGp occurs simultaneously with some protein aggregation. Kinetic studies for oxy-HbGp using UV-VIS and DLS allowed to obtain activation energy (E(a)) values of 278-262 kJ/mol (DLS) and 333 kJ/mol (UV-VIS). Complimentary DSC studies indicate that the denaturation is irreversible, giving endotherms strongly dependent upon the heating scan rates, suggesting a kinetically controlled process. Dependence on protein concentration suggests that the two components in the endotherms are due to oligomeric dissociation effect upon denaturation. Activation energies are in the range 200-560 kJ/mol. The mid-point transition temperatures were in the range 50-65 °C. Cyanomet-HbGp shows higher mid-point temperatures as well as activation energies, consistent with its higher stability. DSC data are reported for the first time for an extracellular hemoglobin. PMID:20875698

  7. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  8. Recent rock fall activity in the Wetterstein Mountains revealed by a time series of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpa, Anne; Baewert, Henning; Cook, Kristen; Morche, David

    2015-04-01

    The north face of the Hochwanner in the Reintal valley, Wetterstein Mountains, southern Germany, has been a site of frequent rock fall activity for the past several hundred years. The so-called 'Steingerümpel' rock fall included an estimated volume of 2.3-2.7 x 106 m3 and led to damming of the Partnach river. This event was dated to 1400-1600 AD. The rock fall left a prominent scar in the rock face where subsequent rock fall activity was concentrated, postulated to be a 'delayed consequence' of the Steingerümpel event. Previous workers used airborne and terrestrial laser scan data to evaluate the volume of the detached material and the deposits on the talus cone at the foot of the slope from the 'delayed consequence' activity between 2006 and 2008 (Heckmann et al., 2012). The largest event during this period was a 5 x 104 m3 rock fall in August 2007. We compared the data of six terrestrial laser scans, which were acquired in June and September 2008, September 2010, June 2011, August 2013, October and November 2014, in order to assess the volumes of detached material after the large rock fall event of 2007. The aim is to investigate the post-event activity at a site of a large rock fall in order to give estimates about the timing when the activity is back to normal conditions in relation to the magnitude of the large event. Although no large rock fall occurred in the observation period, the comparison of the laser scan data indicate that the average rock wall retreat at this site is still higher compared to the mean annual rock wall retreat rate of 0.54 mm/yr for the last millennium in the Reintal valley (Krautblatter et al., 2012). This shows that sites of large rock falls remain active even years after the event. Heckmann, T.; Bimböse, M.; Krautblatter, M.; Haas, F.; Becht, M.; Morche, D. (2012): From geotechnical analysis to quantification and modelling using LiDAR data: a study on rockfall in the Reintal catchment, Bavarian Alps, Germany; Earth Surface

  9. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    You may feel a sharp sting when the needle with the tracer is placed into your vein. A PET scan causes no pain. The table may be ... The amount of radiation used in a PET scan is about the same amount as used in most CT scans. These scans use ...

  10. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Assay for Biofilm-Active Antibiotics Commonly Used for Treatment of Prosthetic Implant Infections.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Ben; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Salman, Sam; Clark, Ben; Dyer, John; Batty, Kevin T; Davis, Timothy M E; Manning, Laurens

    2016-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. We sought to develop, validate, and apply a DBS assay for rifampin (RIF), fusidic acid (FUS), and ciprofloxacin (CIP). These antibiotics are considered active against organisms in biofilms and are therefore commonly used for the treatment of infections associated with prosthetic implants. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy DBS assay was developed and validated, including red cell partitioning and thermal stability for each drug and the rifampin metabolite desacetyl rifampin (Des-RIF). Plasma and DBS concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and the concentration-time profiles were incorporated into population PK models. The limits of quantification for RIF, Des-RIF, CIP, and FUS in DBS were 15 μg/liter, 14 μg/liter, 25 μg/liter, and 153 μg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations for each antibiotic (r > 0.95; P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable. These drugs were stable in DBSs for at least 10 days at room temperature and 1 month at 4°C. The present DBS antibiotic assays are robust and can be used as surrogates for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including therapeutic drug monitoring or studies of implant infections. PMID:27270283

  11. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  12. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  13. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  14. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  15. Active/passive scanning. [airborne multispectral laser scanners for agricultural and water resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfill, J. R.; Thomson, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the design, construction, and applications of an active/passive multispectral scanner combining lasers with conventional passive remote sensors. An application investigation was first undertaken to identify remote sensing applications where active/passive scanners (APS) would provide improvement over current means. Calibration techniques and instrument sensitivity are evaluated to provide predictions of the APS's capability to meet user needs. A preliminary instrument design was developed from the initial conceptual scheme. A design review settled the issues of worthwhile applications, calibration approach, hardware design, and laser complement. Next, a detailed mechanical design was drafted and construction of the APS commenced. The completed APS was tested and calibrated in the laboratory, then installed in a C-47 aircraft and ground tested. Several flight tests completed the test program.

  16. The biochemical adaptations of spotted wing drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to fresh fruits reduced fructose concentrations and glutathione-S transferase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America, because the females have a serrated ovipositor enabling them to infest ripening almost all small fruits before harvest. Also flies are strongly attracted to fresh fruits rath...

  17. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  18. Characterizing active volcanic processes at Kilauea volcano using LiDAR scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Patrick, M. R.; Anderson, S. W.; Orr, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Active craters and lava lakes evolve in response to a variety of volcanic processes. Quantifying those changes can be difficult or even impossible, for safety reasons, due to the technical limitations of sensors that require a minimum standoff distance. In recent years, advancements in ground-based Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) scanners and accessibility to these systems have enhanced our ability to capture data in a diversity of volcanic settings at the highest spatial and temporal resolutions yet seen. Moreover, advancements in full-waveform digitization have significantly improved the ability to acquire data in environments where ash, steam, and sulfur dioxide emissions have historically hampered efforts. Kilauea's ongoing summit eruption, which began in March 2008, has been characterized in part by the evolution of its vent into a 160-meter diameter collapse crater holding an active lava lake. This process has been documented in detail by field and webcam observations, but has not been accurately quantified. Our research focuses on acquiring repeat, high-resolution full-waveform LiDAR data throughout 2012 to monitor changes in the geometry of Kilauea's active lava lake and the crater to which it is confined. We collected LiDAR data in February and July 2012, with plans for an additional survey in October 2012. Our results show changes in the shape of the vent walls and the shape and level of the confined lava lake. Specifically, the LiDAR data has revealed 1) changes in the lava lake level, corresponding to tiltmeter observations of pressure fluctuations in the summit magma reservoir, 2) enlargement of the vent cavity, due to frequent rock falls, and 3) modifications to the lake size and surrounding lava ledges due to competing processes of accretion and collapse. The rapid acquisition of repeat, high-resolution topographic data enables researchers to more accurately characterize shape and volume changes involved in a range of eruptive systems, while

  19. Clustered-charge to alanine scanning mutagenesis of the Mal63 MAL-activator C-terminal regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara E; Bali, Mehtap; Michels, Corinne A

    2003-12-01

    The MAL-activator genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode regulatory proteins required for the expression of the structural genes encoding maltose permease and maltase. Residues within the C-terminal region of the Mal63 protein required for negative regulation were previously identified. Evidence suggested that the C-terminal domain is also involved in positive regulatory functions, such as inducer responsiveness and transactivation in the context of a full-length protein. Charged-cluster to alanine scanning mutagenesis of the regulatory domain of MAL63 and the constitutive MAL43-C were undertaken to identify distinct regions within Mal63p involved in positive functions and to define their roles in induction. Mutations that affect the ability to activate transcription in the inducible MAL63 but have no effect in the constitutive MAL43-C define regions that function in induction. Those that affect both the inducible and constitutive alleles define regions involved in activation more generally. Mutations in MAL63 fell into three classes, those that have little or no impact on activity, those that decrease activity, and those that enhance function. Mutations from these classes mapped to distinct regions of the protein, identifying a region of approximately 90 residues (residues 331-423) involved in maltose sensing and an approximately 50-residue region at the extreme C-terminus (residues 420-470) required for activation, such as the formation and/or maintenance of an active state. These studies support a model for MAL-activator function which involves complex protein-protein interactions and overlapping negative and positive regulatory regions. PMID:14508602

  20. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  1. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  2. Single live cell topography and activity imaging with the shear-force-based constant-distance scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) has become an important tool in topography and activity studies on single live cells. The used analytical probes ("SECM tips") are voltammetric micro- or nanoelectrodes. The tips may be tracked across a live cell in constant-height or constant-distance mode, while kept at potentials that enable tracing of the spatiotemporal dynamics of functional chemical species in the immediate environment. Depending on the type of single live cells studied, cellular processes addressable by SECM range from the membrane transport of metabolites to the stimulated release of hormones and neurotransmitters and processes such as cell respiration or cell death and differentiation. In this chapter, we provide the key practical details of the constant-distance mode of SECM, explaining the establishment, and operation of the tailored distance control unit that maintains a stable tip-to-cell separation during scanning. The continuously maintained tip positioning of the system takes advantage of the decreasing impact of very short-range hydrodynamic tip-to-surface shear-forces on the vibrational amplitude of an oscillating SECM tip, as the input for a computer-controlled feedback loop regulation. Suitable microelectrode probes that are nondestructive to soft cells are a prerequisite for the success of this methodology and their fabrication and successful application are the other topics covered. PMID:22264538

  3. The Blind Spot: Re-Educating Ourselves about Visual Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Donnelly, K. M.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    A simple blind spot activity has been devised to help students discard misconceptions about image formation by lenses. Our hands-on experiment, in which students determine the location and size of their blind spots, is suitable for various age groups at different educational levels. The activity provides an opportunity to teach students how to…

  4. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. How ... a 3-phase bone scan. To evaluate metastatic bone disease, images are taken only after the 3- to ...

  5. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET scan Skin ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid ...

  6. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    A bone scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. ... A bone scan involves injecting a very small amount of radioactive material (radiotracer) into a vein. The substance travels through ...

  7. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  8. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  9. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  10. Imaging of enzyme activity by scanning electrochemical microscope equipped with a feedback control for substrate-probe distance.

    PubMed

    Oyamatsu, Daisuke; Hirano, Yu; Kanaya, Norihiro; Mase, Yoshiaki; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2003-08-01

    The enzymatic activity of diaphorase (Dp) immobilized on a solid substrate was characterized using a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) with shear force feedback to control the substrate-probe distance. The shear force between the substrate and the probe was monitored with a tuning fork-type quartz crystal and used as the feedback control to set the microelectrode probe close to the substrate surface. The sensitivity and the contrast of the SECM image were improved in the constant distance mode (distance, 50 nm) with the shear force feedback compared to the image in the constant height mode without the feedback. By using this system, the SECM and topographic images of the immobilized diaphorase were simultaneously measured. The microelectrode tip used in this study was ground aslant like a syringe needle in order to obtain the shaper topographic images. This shape was also effective for avoiding the interference during the diffusion of the enzyme substrates. PMID:12893317

  11. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  12. CORTICAL REPRESENTATION OF SPACE AROUND THE BLIND SPOT

    PubMed Central

    Awater, Holger; Kerlin, Jess R.; Evans, Karla K.; Tong, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The neural mechanism that mediates perceptual filling-in of the blind spot is still under discussion. One hypothesis proposes that the cortical representation of the blind spot is activated only under conditions that elicit perceptual filling-in, and requires congruent stimulation on both sides of the blind spot. Alternatively, the passive remapping hypothesis proposes that inputs from regions surrounding the blind spot infiltrate the representation of the blind spot in cortex. This theory predicts that independent stimuli presented to the left and right of the blind spot should lead to neighboring/overlapping activations in visual cortex when the blind-spot eye is stimulated, but separated activations when the fellow eye is stimulated. Using functional MRI, we directly tested the remapping hypothesis by presenting flickering checkerboard wedges to the left or right of the spatial location of the blind spot, either to the blind-spot eye or to the fellow eye. Irrespective of which eye was stimulated, we found separate activations corresponding to the left and right wedges. We identified the centroid of the activations on a cortical flat map and measured the distance between activations. Distance measures of the cortical gap across the blind spot were accurate and reliable (mean distance 6-8 mm across subjects, SD ~1 mm within subjects). Contrary to the predictions of the remapping hypothesis, cortical distances between activations to the two wedges were equally large for the blind-spot eye and fellow eye in areas V1 and V2/V3. Remapping therefore appears unlikely to account for perceptual filling-in at an early cortical level. PMID:16033933

  13. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution. PMID:21353575

  14. Post-injection transmission scans in a PET camera operating without septa with simultaneous measurement of emission activity contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.; Karp, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    The authors report here on methods developed to reliably perform attenuation correction by post-injection transmission in a volume imaging PET scanner. The method directly measures the emission contamination during the transmission study, using a virtual transmission source position offset by 20{degree} from the actual {sup 68}Ge transmission source. Events are recorded only if they meet a co-linearity requirement with either the real or virtual source position. The simultaneous measurements of the emission contamination and transmission data remove the need for complex corrections to the emission data and are not subject to activity redistributions between emission and transmission scans performed sequentially. Correction is necessary, however, for the extra deadtime that varies with the amount of emission activity in the FOV. The extra deadtime is determined from a lookup table of deadtime as a function of detector countrates, which are recorded during the study. The lookup table is based upon phantom measurements. Using patient and phantom data, with both pre- and post-injection transmission measurements, this method is shown to be reliable for attenuation correction in the body. In addition, it enables the calculation of Standardized Uptake Values for analyzing tumor activity.

  15. Poisson Spot with Magnetic Levitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Matthew; Everhart, Michael; D'Arruda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a unique method for obtaining the famous Poisson spot without adding obstacles to the light path, which could interfere with the effect. A Poisson spot is the interference effect from parallel rays of light diffracting around a solid spherical object, creating a bright spot in the center of the shadow.

  16. Poisson spot with magnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Matthew; Everhart, Michael; D'Arruda, Jose

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we describe a unique method for obtaining the famous Poisson spot without adding obstacles to the light path, which could interfere with the effect. A Poisson spot is the interference effect from parallel rays of light diffracting around a solid spherical object, creating a bright spot in the center of the shadow.

  17. Great Red Spot (GRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A huge permanent anticyclone in Jupiter's southern hemisphere, visible as a reddish oval at just over 20 °S. The earliest unequivocal observation was by Heinrich Schwabe in 1831 (the often-quoted sighting by Robert Hooke in 1664 now seems to have been of a similar but different spot). The GRS became a striking feature around 1880, when it developed a deep red coloration. It was also prominent in ...

  18. The dark spots of Arago.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Pascal; Skelton, Susan E; Leburn, Christopher G; Streuber, Casey T; Wright, Ewan M; Dholakia, Kishan

    2007-09-17

    We explore the diffraction and propagation of Laguerre- Gaussian beams of varying azimuthal index past a circular obstacle both experimentally and numerically. When the beam and obstacle centers are aligned the famous spot of Arago, which arises for zero azimuthal index, is replaced for non-zero azimuthal indices by a dark spot of Arago, a simple consequence of the conserved phase singularity at the beam center. We explore how the dark spot of Arago behaves as the beam and obstacle centers are progressively misaligned, and find that the central dark spot may break into several dark spots of Arago for higher incident azimuthal index beams. PMID:19547549

  19. Detection of macrophage activity in atherosclerosis in vivo using multichannel, high-resolution laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Ashvin N.; Kohler, Rainer; Aikawa, Elena; Weissleder, Ralph; Jaffer, Farouc

    2006-03-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms of atherogenesis and its treatment are largely being unraveled by in vitro techniques. We describe methodology to directly image macrophage cell activity in vivo in a murine model of atherosclerosis using laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and a macrophage-targeted, near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) magnetofluorescent nanoparticle (MFNP). Atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE -/-) mice (n=10) are injected with MFNP or 0.9% saline, and wild-type mice (n=4) are injected with MFNP as additional controls. After 24 h, common carotid arteries are surgically exposed and prepared for LSFM. Multichannel LSFM of MFNP-enhanced carotid atheroma (5×5-µm in-plane resolution) shows a strong focal NIRF signal, with a plaque target-to-background ratio of 3.9+/-1.8. Minimal NIRF signal is observed in control mice. Spectrally resolved indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiograms confirm the intravascular location of atheroma. On ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging, greater NIRF plaque signal is seen in apoE -/- MFNP mice compared to controls (p<0.01). The NIRF signal correlates well with immunostained macrophages, both by stained surface area (r=0.77) and macrophage number (r=0.86). The validated experimental methodology thus establishes a platform for investigating macrophage activity in atherosclerosis in vivo, and has implications for the detection of clinical vulnerable plaques.

  20. Visual Scanning Training, Limb Activation Treatment, and Prism Adaptation for Rehabilitating Left Neglect: Who is the Winner?

    PubMed Central

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Passarini, Laura; Pilosio, Cristina; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We compared, for the first time, the overall and differential effects of three of the most widely used left neglect (LN) treatments: visual scanning training (VST), limb activation treatment (LAT), and prism adaptation (PA). Thirty-three LN patients were assigned in quasi-random order to the three groups (VST, LAT, or PA). Each patient received only one type of treatment. LN patients’ performance on everyday life tasks was assessed four times (over a period of 6 weeks): A1 and A2 (i.e., the two pre-treatment assessments); A3 and A4 (i.e., the two post-treatment assessments). LN patients in each of the three treatment conditions were treated for the same number of sessions (i.e., 20). The results showed that improvements were present in the majority of the tests assessing the peripersonal space in everyday life activities. Our findings were independent of unspecific factors and lasted for at least 2 weeks following the end of the treatments. There were no interactions, however, between LN treatments and assessments. We suggest that all three treatments can be considered as valid rehabilitation interventions for LN and could be employed for ameliorating LN signs. PMID:23847520

  1. Whole body bone scan. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, C.E.; Morayati, S.J.; Carichner, S.; Winkes, B.; Cassisi, R.; McGraw, R.; Schane, E.

    1988-03-01

    The authors present the case example of a patient whose bone scan did not reveal an ulnar abnormality because the ulnae were not included on the whole body scan image. This interesting case demonstrates the importance of positioning the patient for the whole body scan to include the entire skeleton or obtaining additional spot views of the appendicular or axial skeleton not included on whole body images.

  2. Ion Implantation with Scanning Probe Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Liddle, J.A.; Schenkel, T.; Bokor, J.; Ivanov, Tzv.; Rangelow, I.W.

    2005-07-12

    We describe a scanning probe instrument which integrates ion beams with the imaging and alignment function of a piezo-resistive scanning probe in high vacuum. The beam passes through several apertures and is finally collimated by a hole in the cantilever of the scanning probe. The ion beam spot size is limited by the size of the last aperture. Highly charged ions are used to show hits of single ions in resist, and we discuss the issues for implantation of single ions.

  3. Long-term market brisk, spot remains sluggish

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Spot market activity totaled almost 54,000 lbs of U3O8 equivalent. The restricted uranium spot market price range had a slight increase from a high last month of $15.60/lb U3O8 to a hgih this month of $16.00/lb U3O8. The unrestricted uranium spot market price range remained at last month`s prices for the first time in recent weeks. Spot prices for conversion and SWU also held steady at their March levels.

  4. Space Object Tracking (SPOT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivitz, Robert; Kendrick, Richard; Mason, James; Bold, Matthew; Kubo, Tracy; Bock, Kevin; Tyler, David

    2014-07-01

    Lockheed Martin has built a Space Object Tracking (SPOT) facility at our Santa Cruz test site in Northern California. SPOT consists of three 1 meter optical telescopes controlled by a common site management system to individually or cooperatively task each system to observe orbital debris and earth orbiting satellites. The telescopes are mounted in Az/El fork mounts capable of rapid repointing and arc-sec class open loop tracking. Each telescope is installed in a separate clam shell dome and has aft mounted benches to facilitate installing various instrument suites. The telescope domes are mounted on movable rail carts that can be positioned arbitrarily along tracks to provide variable baselines for sparse aperture imaging. The individual telescopes achieved first light in June 2012 and have been used since to observe satellites and orbital debris. Typical observations consist of direct photometric imaging at visible and near infrared wavelengths, and also include spectroscopic and hypertemporal measurements. Rayleigh beacon adaptive optical systems for atmospheric aberration correction and high rate J-Band trackers for each telescope will be added in 2015. Coherent combinations of the three telescopes as an interferometric imaging array using actively stabilized free space variable delay optical paths and fringe tracking sensors is also planned. The first narrow band (I band) interferometric fringes will be formed in the summer of 2014, with wide band (R, I, H) interferometric imaging occurring by early 2015.

  5. Tree Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Maxwell, Taylor; Posada, David; Stengård, Jari H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    We use evolutionary trees of haplotypes to study phenotypic associations by exhaustively examining all possible biallelic partitions of the tree, a technique we call tree scanning. If the first scan detects significant associations, additional rounds of tree scanning are used to partition the tree into three or more allelic classes. Two worked examples are presented. The first is a reanalysis of associations between haplotypes at the Alcohol Dehydrogenase locus in Drosophila melanogaster that was previously analyzed using a nested clade analysis, a more complicated technique for using haplotype trees to detect phenotypic associations. Tree scanning and the nested clade analysis yield the same inferences when permutation testing is used with both approaches. The second example is an analysis of associations between variation in various lipid traits and genetic variation at the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in three human populations. Tree scanning successfully identified phenotypic associations expected from previous analyses. Tree scanning for the most part detected more associations and provided a better biological interpretative framework than single SNP analyses. We also show how prior information can be incorporated into the tree scan by starting with the traditional three electrophoretic alleles at APOE. Tree scanning detected genetically determined phenotypic heterogeneity within all three electrophoretic allelic classes. Overall, tree scanning is a simple, powerful, and flexible method for using haplotype trees to detect phenotype/genotype associations at candidate loci. PMID:15371364

  6. Auroral bright spots on the dayside oval

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. ); Venkatesan, D.; Murphree, J.S. )

    1989-05-01

    Global auroral images from the ultraviolet imager on the Viking spacecraft are used to investigate spatially periodic bright spots on the dayside auroral oval that resemble beads on a string. The newly achieved temporal resolution of 1 min. or less in monitoring worldwide auroral distributions by the Viking imager contributes significant to the capability of observing this phenomenon. It is found that these are frequently seen in the 1,400-1,600 MLT sector. The series of bright spots are not, however, limited to this unique local time sector, since they are seen to extend into the prenoon sector on some occasions. They occur often during substorm intervals but are also seen unaccompanied by substorm activities in the nightside. There is neither a consistent north-south nor east-west direction of motion for all the dayside bright spots observed so far. The observation of the time scales for the transient intensifications of bright spots and the lack of consistent directions of their motion are consistent with the characteristics expected from the suggestion that these bright spots are related to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability occurring within the magnetosphere.

  7. Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Activities at UNAVCO: From GeoEarthScope to INTERFACE and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.

    2009-05-01

    UNAVCO leads and supports airborne and terrestrial laser scanning (ALS and TLS) activities in support of a wide range of earth science applications. UNAVCO acquired nearly 6,000 km2 of high resolution ALS data as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the National Science Foundation. GeoEarthScope ALS targets in most cases were 1- to 2-km wide corridors centered along active faults including the San Andreas, Hayward, Calaveras, Maacama, Green Valley, Little Salmon, Elsinore, San Cayetano, Garlock, Calico, Lenwood, Blackwater, Helendale, Panamint Valley, Ash Hill, Owens Valley, Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley, Wasatch, Teton, Denali and Totschunda faults. Acquisitions were planned and conducted based on community recommendations with respect to target identification and data collection practices. Particular care was taken to ensure the highest data quality possible within scope and budget, with special considerations given to effective ground point density and geodetic control. Data products are freely available from http://opentopography.org. TLS projects include numerous investigations in polar regions, such as the first TLS survey of the lava lake at Mount Erebus, Antarctica, in January 2009, and activities related to INTERFACE (INTERdisciplinary alliance for digital Field data ACquisition and Exploration), a Collaborative project currently funded by NSF and managed at UNAVCO which includes specialized TLS data processing and visualization software tools developed specifically for geoscience applications. We will present an overview of ALS and TLS project highlights; resources for data collection, accessibility and analysis; and potential use of these data for scientific research and as a framework for future endeavors.

  8. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in Litopenaeus vannamei captured from the Gulf of California near an area of extensive aquaculture activity.

    PubMed

    Mijangos-Alquisires, Z; Quintero-Arredondo, N; Castro-Longoria, R; Grijalva-Chon, J M; Ramos-Paredes, J

    2006-07-11

    For the shrimp farming industry of Mexico, disease outbreaks caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) are relatively recent. Efforts to control the virus are assisted by monitoring for its prevalence in aquaculture systems, but few attempts have been made to search for it in carriers from coastal waters. To search for WSSV carriers in the Gulf of California, we made surveys off the coast of Sinaloa, Mexico, in March 2001, November 2001, and September 2003 using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays and histopathology. WSSV-positive shrimp were detected only in November 2001, after hurricane Julliete. This suggested possible dispersal of WSSV to the marine environment from infected shrimp farms. PMID:16922004

  9. Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie shows counterclockwise atmospheric motion around Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The clip was made from blue-filter images taken with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft during seven separate rotations of Jupiter between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000.

    The clip also shows the eastward and westward motion of the zonal jets, seen as the horizontal stripes flowing in opposite directions. The zonal jets circle the planet. As far as can be determined from both Earth-based and spacecraft measurements, the positions and speeds of the jets have not changed for 100 years. Since Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid boundary, the jet speeds are measured relative to Jupiter's magnetic field, which rotates, wobbling like a top because of its tilt, every 9 hours 55.5 minutes. The movie shows motions in the magnetic reference frame, so winds to the west correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than the magnetic field, and eastward winds correspond to features rotating a little faster.

    Because the Red Spot is in the southern hemisphere, the direction of motion indicates it is a high-pressure center. Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Scientists suspect these small white features are lightning storms. The storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for the large-scale features.

    The smallest features in the movie are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across. The spacing of the movie frames in time is not uniform; some consecutive images are separated by two Jupiter rotations, and some by one. The images have been re-projected using a simple cylindrical map projection. They show an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east-west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet

  10. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP)—FLIGHT Results from a New Airborne Simulator for Smap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Wu, A.; Patel, H.

    2014-12-01

    1. Introduction and BackgroundThis paper introduces a new NASA airborne instrument, the Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP), which is specially tailored to simulate SMAP. 2. Description of SLAPSLAP has both passive (radiometer) and active (radar) microwave L-band imaging capabilities. The radiometer observes at 1.4 GHz using duplicate front end hardware from the SMAP satellite radiometer. It also includes a duplicate of the digital backend development unit for SMAP, thus the novel Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation features and algorithms for SMAP are duplicated with very high fidelity in SLAP. The digital backend provides 4-Stokes polarization capability. The real-aperture radar operates in the 1215-1300 MHz band with quad-pol capability. Radar and radiometer share one antenna via diplexers that are spare units from the Aquarius satellite instrument. 3. Flight ResultsSLAP's initial flights were conducted in Dec 2013 over the eastern shore of Maryland and successfully demonstrated radiometer imaging over 2 full SMAP 36x36 km grid cells at 1km resolution within 3 hrs, easily meeting the SMAP post-launch cal/val airborne mapping requirements. A second flight on the same day also demonstrated SLAP's quick-turn abilities and high-resolution/wide-swath capabilities with 200m resolution across a 1500m swath from 2000 ft AGL. Additional flights were conducted as part of the GPM iPHEX campaign in May, 2014. 4. ConclusionThis paper presents flight data and imagery, as well as details of the radiometer and radar performance and calibration. The paper will also describe the mission performance achievable on the King Air and other platforms.

  11. On the interpretation of differential scanning calorimetry results for thermoelastic martensitic transformations: Athermal versus thermally activated kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Van Humbeeck, J.; Planes, A.

    1996-05-01

    Experimentally, two distinct classes of martensitic transformations are considered: athermal and isothermal. In the former class, on cooling, at some well-defined start temperature (M{sub s}), isolated small regions of the martensitic product begin to appear in the parent phase. The transformation at any temperature appears to be instantaneous in practical time scales, and the amount of transformed material (x) does not depend on time, i.e., it increases at each step of lowering temperature. The transition is not completed until the temperature is lowered below M{sub f} (martensite finish temperature). The transformation temperatures are only determined by chemical (composition and degree of order) and microstructural factors. The external controlling parameter (T or applied stress) determines the free energy difference between the high and the low temperature phases, which provides the driving force for the transition. In the development of athermal martensite activation kinetics is secondary. Athermal martensite, as observed in the well known shape memory alloys Cu-Zn-Al, Cu-Al-Ni and Ni-Ti, cannot be attributed to a thermally activated mechanism for which kinetics are generally described by the Arrhenius rate equation. However, the latter has been applied by Lipe and Morris to results for the Martensitic Transformation of Cu-Al-Ni-B-Mn obtained by conventional Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). It is the concern of the authors of this letter to point out the incongruences arising from the analysis of calorimetric results, corresponding to forward and reverse thermoelastic martensitic transformations, in terms of standard kinetic analysis based on the Arrhenius rate equation.

  12. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  13. Indium 111-granulocyte scanning in the assessment of disease extent and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. A comparison with colonoscopy, histology, and fecal indium 111-granulocyte excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Camilleri, M.; Rees, H.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1986-05-01

    Indium 111-leukocyte scanning has recently been introduced as a new method for imaging inflammatory bowel disease. The technique has recently been made more specific for acute inflammation by labeling a pure granulocyte fraction rather than the conventional mixed leukocyte preparation. We now report a prospective study comparing 111In-granulocyte scanning with endoscopy, histology, and fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion for the assessment of disease extent and severity in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. In 52 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, disease extent and severity were assessed macroscopically, histologically, or by scanning using a numerical grading system. Excellent correlations were found between both endoscopy and histology and 111In scans (r = 0.90 (endoscopy) and r = 0.90 (histology) for extent; r = 0.86 and r = 0.91 for disease activity). Severity graded by scanning also showed a close correlation with fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion (r = 0.90). Indium 111-granulocyte scans are a rapid, accurate, noninvasive means of assessing both disease extent and severity of colonic involvement in inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Meniscal mineralisation in little spotted cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the stifle joints of little spotted cats in captivity using radiographic and CT studies. The hypothesis was that these animals would have meniscal mineralisation that could be detectable by imaging studies. Twelve intact little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus), 2 females and 10 males, aged from 1.5 to 11.11 years old and weighing 1.9–3.05 kg were studied. These animals, which were living in the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoo, had no symptoms or known disease processes at the time of the study. The plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans of both stifle joints were performed under general anaesthesia. Sequential transverse images were acquired on a spiral scanner. Results No signs of articular disease were observed in any of the animals. Radiographically, the meniscal mineralisation was detected as an oval radiopacity in the cranial compartment on the mediolateral projection, located within the area of the medial meniscus. On craniocaudal projection, the mineralisation was more difficult to visualise. In one of the animals, it was not possible to identify the meniscal mineralisation in either of the stifle joints. Using CT, meniscal mineralisation was best identified in the transverse plane images. Conclusions Meniscal mineralisation appears to be a normal anatomic feature in little spotted cats. PMID:23506083

  15. Hot-spot tectonics on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis is that extensional tectonics and low-angle detachment faults probably occur on Io in association with the hot spots. These processes may occur on a much shorter timescale on Ion than on Earth, so that Io could be a natural laboratory for the study of thermotectonics. Furthermore, studies of heat and detachment in crustal extension on Earth and the other terresrial planets (especially Venus and Mars) may provide analogs to processes on Io. The geology of Io is dominated by volcanism and hot spots, most likely the result of tidal heating. Hot spots cover 1 to 2% of Io's surface, radiating at temperatures typically from 200 to 400 K, and occasionally up to 700K. Heat loss from the largest hot spots on Io, such as Loki Patera, is about 300 times the heat loss from Yellowstone, so a tremendous quantity of energy is available for volcanic and tectonic work. Active volcanism on Io results in a resurfacing rate as high as 10 cm per year, yet many structural features are apparent on the surface. Therefore, the tectonics must be highly active.

  16. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions inside your body. They use a special camera that detects radioactivity. Before the test, you receive ... you lie still on a table while the camera makes images. Most scans take 20 to 45 ...

  17. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  18. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Dynes, Joseph L; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and 'skimming plane' imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes. PMID:26308212

  19. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kyle L.; Dynes, Joseph L.; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and ‘skimming plane’ imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes. PMID:26308212

  20. Spotting words in handwritten Arabic documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srihari, Sargur; Srinivasan, Harish; Babu, Pavithra; Bhole, Chetan

    2006-01-01

    The design and performance of a system for spotting handwritten Arabic words in scanned document images is presented. Three main components of the system are a word segmenter, a shape based matcher for words and a search interface. The user types in a query in English within a search window, the system finds the equivalent Arabic word, e.g., by dictionary look-up, locates word images in an indexed (segmented) set of documents. A two-step approach is employed in performing the search: (1) prototype selection: the query is used to obtain a set of handwritten samples of that word from a known set of writers (these are the prototypes), and (2) word matching: the prototypes are used to spot each occurrence of those words in the indexed document database. A ranking is performed on the entire set of test word images-- where the ranking criterion is a similarity score between each prototype word and the candidate words based on global word shape features. A database of 20,000 word images contained in 100 scanned handwritten Arabic documents written by 10 different writers was used to study retrieval performance. Using five writers for providing prototypes and the other five for testing, using manually segmented documents, 55% precision is obtained at 50% recall. Performance increases as more writers are used for training.

  1. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    PubMed Central

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  2. Exserohilum Leaf Spot on Tigergrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tigergrass (Thysanolaena maxima (Roxb.) Kuntze ) is a popular ornamental grass grown throughout landscapes in South Florida. In the summer of 2006, a leaf spot was observed on tigergrass in the landscape and a commercial nursery in Homestead, FL. The causal agent of the leaf spot was isolated, cha...

  3. Two New Hot Spots on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on Galileo obtained this image of half of Io's disk in darkness on September 19, 1997. This image, at 5 microns, shows several hot spots on Io, which are volcanic regions of enhanced thermal emission. The area shown is part of the leading hemisphere of Io.

    Two new hot spots are shown and indicated in the image (New, and Shamshu). Neither of these hot spots were seen by NIMS or the Solid State Imaging Experiment, (SSI) prior to this observation, becoming only recently active. Several other previously known hot spots are labelled in the image. Galileo was at a distance of 342,000 km from Io when this observation was made.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  4. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J; Trompier, F; Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P; Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M; Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M; Dufek, V; Frojdh, E; George, S; Harrison, R; Kubancak, J; Ploc, O; Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S; and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  5. Infrared Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    United Scanning Technologies, Inc.'s Infrared thermography is a relatively new noncontact, nondestructive inspection and testing tool which makes temperatures visible to the human eye. Infrared scanning devices produce images that show, by color or black and white shading differences, heat losses through damaged or inadequately insulated walls or roofs. The MISS Aeroscan services are designed to take the guesswork out of industrial roof maintenance and provide companies big savings by identifying the location of moisture damage from roof leaks, effectively targeting maintenance attention.

  6. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method).

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread. PMID:27370454

  7. ‘Neanderthal bone flutes’: simply products of Ice Age spotted hyena scavenging activities on cave bear cubs in European cave bear dens

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2015-01-01

    Punctured extinct cave bear femora were misidentified in southeastern Europe (Hungary/Slovenia) as ‘Palaeolithic bone flutes’ and the ‘oldest Neanderthal instruments’. These are not instruments, nor human made, but products of the most important cave bear scavengers of Europe, hyenas. Late Middle to Late Pleistocene (Mousterian to Gravettian) Ice Age spotted hyenas of Europe occupied mainly cave entrances as dens (communal/cub raising den types), but went deeper for scavenging into cave bear dens, or used in a few cases branches/diagonal shafts (i.e. prey storage den type). In most of those dens, about 20% of adult to 80% of bear cub remains have large carnivore damage. Hyenas left bones in repeating similar tooth mark and crush damage stages, demonstrating a butchering/bone cracking strategy. The femora of subadult cave bears are intermediate in damage patterns, compared to the adult ones, which were fully crushed to pieces. Hyenas produced round–oval puncture marks in cub femora only by the bone-crushing premolar teeth of both upper and lower jaw. The punctures/tooth impact marks are often present on both sides of the shaft of cave bear cub femora and are simply a result of non-breakage of the slightly calcified shaft compacta. All stages of femur puncturing to crushing are demonstrated herein, especially on a large cave bear population from a German cave bear den. PMID:26064624

  8. 'Neanderthal bone flutes': simply products of Ice Age spotted hyena scavenging activities on cave bear cubs in European cave bear dens.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Cajus G

    2015-04-01

    Punctured extinct cave bear femora were misidentified in southeastern Europe (Hungary/Slovenia) as 'Palaeolithic bone flutes' and the 'oldest Neanderthal instruments'. These are not instruments, nor human made, but products of the most important cave bear scavengers of Europe, hyenas. Late Middle to Late Pleistocene (Mousterian to Gravettian) Ice Age spotted hyenas of Europe occupied mainly cave entrances as dens (communal/cub raising den types), but went deeper for scavenging into cave bear dens, or used in a few cases branches/diagonal shafts (i.e. prey storage den type). In most of those dens, about 20% of adult to 80% of bear cub remains have large carnivore damage. Hyenas left bones in repeating similar tooth mark and crush damage stages, demonstrating a butchering/bone cracking strategy. The femora of subadult cave bears are intermediate in damage patterns, compared to the adult ones, which were fully crushed to pieces. Hyenas produced round-oval puncture marks in cub femora only by the bone-crushing premolar teeth of both upper and lower jaw. The punctures/tooth impact marks are often present on both sides of the shaft of cave bear cub femora and are simply a result of non-breakage of the slightly calcified shaft compacta. All stages of femur puncturing to crushing are demonstrated herein, especially on a large cave bear population from a German cave bear den. PMID:26064624

  9. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  10. Hot spot-ridge crest convergence in the northeast Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Karsten, J.L.; Delaney, J.R. )

    1989-01-10

    Evolution of the Juan de Fuca Ridge during the past 7 m.y. has been reconstructed taking into account both the propagating rift history and migration of the spreading center in the 'absolute' (fixed hot spot) reference frame. Northwestward migration of the spreading center (at a rate of 30 km/m.y.) has resulted in progressive encroachment of the ridge axis on the Cobb Hot Spot and westward jumping of the central third of the ridge axis more recently than 0.5 Ma. Seamounts in the Cobb-Eickelberg chain are predicted to display systematic variations in morphology and petrology, and a reduction in the age contrast between the edifice and underlying crust, as a result of the ridge axis approach. Relative seamount volumes also indicate that magmatic output of the hot spot varied during this interval, with a reduction in activity between 2.5 and 4.5 Ma, compared with relatively more robust activity before and after this period. Spatial relationships determined in this reconstruction allow hypotheses relating hot spot activity and rift propagation to be evaluated. In most cases, rift propagation has been directed away from the hot spot during the time period considered. Individual propagators show some reduction in propagation rate as separation between the propagating rift tip and hot spot increases, but cross comparison of multiple propagators does not uniformly display the same relationship. No obvious correlation exists between propagation rate and increasing proximity of the hot spot to the ridge axis or increasing hot spot output. Taken together, these observations do not offer compelling support for the concept of hot spot driven rift propagation. However, short-term reversals in propagation direction at the Cobb Offset coincide with activity of the Heckle melting anomaly, suggesting that local propagation effects may be related to excess magma supply at the ridge axis.

  11. Saturn's Hot Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the sharpest image of Saturn's temperature emissions taken from the ground; it is a mosaic of 35 individual exposures made at the W.M. Keck I Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii on Feb. 4, 2004.

    The images to create this mosaic were taken with infrared radiation. The mosaic was taken at a wavelength near 17.65 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's upper troposphere. The prominent hot spot at the bottom of the image is right at Saturn's south pole. The warming of the southern hemisphere was expected, as Saturn was just past southern summer solstice, but the abrupt changes in temperature with latitude were not expected. The tropospheric temperature increases toward the pole abruptly near 70 degrees latitude from 88 to 89 Kelvin (-301 to -299 degrees Fahrenheit) and then to 91 Kelvin (-296 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole.

    Ring particles are not at a uniform temperature everywhere in their orbit around Saturn. The ring particles are orbiting clockwise in this image. Particles are coldest just after having cooled down in Saturn's shadow (lower left). As they orbit Saturn, the particles increase in temperature up to a maximum (lower right) just before passing behind Saturn again in shadow.

    A small section of the ring image is missing because of incomplete mosaic coverage during the observing sequence.

  12. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Comer, K M

    1991-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is an endemic tickborne disease found throughout the United States and other regions of the world. Exposure may result in a spectrum of disease from subclinical infection to severe or fatal multiorgan collapse. The disease is maintained in nature in Ixodid tick vectors and their hosts. The most important ticks in the United States are Dermacentor variabilis and Dermacentor andersoni. Small mammals are the natural reservoirs in the wild. Dogs become infected when a tick harboring Rickettsia rickettsii feeds on the dog. Dogs do not develop sufficient rickettsemia to act as a reservoir in the transmission of Rickettsia rickettsii. Thus, although dogs act as sentinels to the presence of the disease, they cannot directly transmit infection. Signs in early stages of disease often are nonspecific. The most characteristic laboratory abnormality is thrombocytopenia, but serologic testing is necessary for confirmation of infection. Tetracycline and chloramphenicol are effective antibiotics to treat infection. Treatment should continue for 14 to 21 days to allow host immune defenses to develop and eradicate the organism. Prevention requires avoidance of tick-infested areas and rapid removal of ticks should exposure occur. PMID:2014623

  13. Empathy's blind spot.

    PubMed

    Slaby, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to mount a philosophical challenge to the currently highly visible research and discourse on empathy. The notion of empathetic perspective-shifting-a conceptually demanding, high-level construal of empathy in humans that arguably captures the core meaning of the term-is criticized from the standpoint of a philosophy of normatively accountable agency. Empathy in this demanding sense fails to achieve a true understanding of the other and instead risks to impose the empathizer's self-constitutive agency upon the person empathized with. Attempts to 'simulate' human agency, or attempts to emulate its cognitive or emotional basis, will likely distort their target phenomena in profound ways. Thus, agency turns out to be empathy's blind spot. Elements of an alternative understanding of interpersonal relatedness are also discussed, focusing on aspects of 'interaction theory'. These might do some of the work that high-level constructs of empathy had been supposed to do without running into similar conceptual difficulties. PMID:24420745

  14. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  15. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated and developed the use of holographic optical elements (HOE) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. By rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis, a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope is possible. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOES for use with the first three harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, and designed, built, and tested two lidar systems based on this technology.

  16. Johann Schroeter's 'Extremely Dark Spots Of Jupiter'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, T.; Sheehan, W.

    1997-06-01

    Physical observations of Jupiter from the 18th century are rare. The most diligent observer of the planet of that era was Johann Schroeter, who in 1785-86 recorded multiple short-term, transient dark spots. Schroeter's observations are discussed in detail. Though somewhat reminiscent of the recent Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact events, the authors conclude that Schroeter's observations furnish a unique record of SEBn activity in the 18th century.

  17. High-speed massively parallel scanning

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    2010-07-06

    A new technique for recording a series of images of a high-speed event (such as, but not limited to: ballistics, explosives, laser induced changes in materials, etc.) is presented. Such technique(s) makes use of a lenslet array to take image picture elements (pixels) and concentrate light from each pixel into a spot that is much smaller than the pixel. This array of spots illuminates a detector region (e.g., film, as one embodiment) which is scanned transverse to the light, creating tracks of exposed regions. Each track is a time history of the light intensity for a single pixel. By appropriately configuring the array of concentrated spots with respect to the scanning direction of the detection material, different tracks fit between pixels and sufficient lengths are possible which can be of interest in several high-speed imaging applications.

  18. Projections of scan patterns on human retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. H.; Crane, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Fundus camera tracks eye movements by using camera optics with the aid of an inverted system. Camera provides a flying-spot circular scanning light source in the normal film plane and a broadband photodetector in position normally occupied by light source.

  19. Scanning For Hotspots In Lamp Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.; Van Sant, Tim; Leidecker, Henning

    1993-01-01

    Scanning photometer designed for use in investigation of failures of incandescent lamp filaments. Maps brightness as function of position along each filament to identify bright (hot) spots, occurring at notches and signifying incipient breaks or rewelds. Also used to measure nonuniformity in outputs of such linear devices as light-emitting diodes, and to measure diffraction patterns of lenses.

  20. Coupling scanning tunneling microscope and supersonic molecular beams: A unique tool for in situ investigation of the morphology of activated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerieri, M.; Reichelt, R.; Savio, L.; Vattuone, L.; Rocca, M.

    2012-09-01

    We report here on a new experimental apparatus combining a commercial low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with a supersonic molecular beam. This setup provides a unique tool for the in situ investigation of the topography of activated adsorption systems and opens thus new interesting perspectives. It has been tested towards the formation of the O/Ag(110) added rows reconstruction and of their hydroxylation, comparing data recorded upon O2 exposure at thermal and hyperthermal energies.

  1. Jupiter Great Red Spot Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was taken by Voyager 1 in early March 1979. Distance from top to bottom of the picture is 15,000 miles (24,000 kilometers). Smallest features visible are about 20 miles (30 kilometers) across. The white feature below the Great Red Spot is one of several white ovals that were observed to form about 40 years ago; they move around Jupiter at a different velocity from the Red Spot. During the Voyager 1 encounter period, material was observed to revolve around the center of the spot with a period of six days. The Voyager project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  2. Jupiter's Great Red Spot Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This mosaic of the Great Red Spot shows that the region has changed significantly since the Voyager 1 encounter three months ago. Around the northern boundary a white cloud is seen, which extends to east of the region. The presence of this cloud prevents small cloud vertices from circling the spot in the manner seen in the Voyager 1 encounter. Another white oval cloud (different from the one present in this position three months ago) is seen south of the Great Red Spot. The internal structure of these spots is identical. Since they both rotate in an anticyclonic manner these observations indicate that they are meteorologically similar. This image was taken on July 6 from a range of 2,633,003 kilometers.

  3. Weird Warm Spot on Exoplanet

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates an unexpected warm spot on the surface of a gaseous exoplanet. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that the hottest part of the planet, shown here as bright, orange...

  4. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  5. Experimental random spot testing for drugs in sportsmen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucking, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-eight active international athletes agreed to be available for random spot urine collections at their homes, places of work and training. Suitable briefed collectors were arranged to conduct the spot collections and forward the specimens for analysis. An average number of 3.4 collections per athlete was made in the 9 month period of the trial. Overall there was a "failure to collect" percentage of 14 during the winter months and 54 during the summer months. The average time interval between initial contact with the athlete and collection was 11 hours 50 minutes. It is concluded that random spot collections of urine from active athletes in training is possible and practical. Improved collection rates could be achieved by additional spot collection at athletic events during the summer and by using regionally based mobile collectors responsible for several athletes. Images p33-a PMID:7248679

  6. Evaluation of SPOT imagery data

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Z.; Brovey, R.L.; Merembeck, B.F.; Hopkins, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    SPOT, the French satellite imaging system that became operational in April 1986, provides two major advances in satellite imagery technology: (1) a significant increase in spatial resolution of the data to 20 m multispectral and 10 m panchromatic, and (2) stereoscopic capabilities. The structural and stratigraphic mapping capabilities of SPOT data and compare favorably with those of other available space and airborne remote sensing data. In the Rhine graben and Jura Mountains, strike and dip of folded strata can be determined using SPOT stereoscopic imagery, greatly improving the ability to analyze structures in complex areas. The increased spatial resolution also allows many features to be mapped that are not visible on thematic mapper (TM) imagery. In the San Rafael swell, Utah, TM spectral data were combined with SPOT spatial data to map lithostratigraphic units of the exposed Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks. SPOT imagery provides information on attitude, geometry, and geomorphic expressions of key marker beds that is not available on TM imagery. Over the Central Basin platform, west Texas, SPOT imagery, compared to TM imagery, provided more precise information on the configuration of outcropping beds and drainage patterns that reflect the subtle surface expression of buried structures.

  7. Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Analysis of Binding Energy Hot Spots at the NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO)/IKKβ Protein-Protein Interface

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Mary S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Sayeg, Marianna; Zerbe, Brandon S.; Villar, Elizabeth A.; Beglov, Dmitri; Sazinsky, Stephen L.; Georgiadis, Rosina M.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Whitty, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    We report a comprehensive analysis of binding energy hot spots at the protein-protein interaction (PPI) interface between NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO) and IκB kinase subunit β (IKKβ), an interaction that is critical for NF-κB pathway signaling, using experimental alanine scanning mutagenesis and also the FTMap method for computational fragment screening. The experimental results confirm that the previously identified NBD region of IKKβ contains the highest concentration of hot spot residues, the strongest of which are W739, W741 and L742 (ΔΔG = 4.3, 3.5 and 3.2 kcal/mol, respectively). The region occupied by these residues defines a potentially druggable binding site on NEMO that extends for ~16 Å to additionally include the regions that bind IKKβ L737 and F734. NBD residues D738 and S740 are also important for binding but do not make direct contact with NEMO, instead likely acting to stabilize the active conformation of surrounding residues. We additionally found two previously unknown hot spot regions centered on IKKβ residues L708/V709 and L719/I723. The computational approach successfully identified all three hot spot regions on IKKβ. Moreover, the method was able to accurately quantify the energetic importance of all hot spots residues involving direct contact with NEMO. Our results provide new information to guide the discovery of small molecule inhibitors that target the NEMO/IKKβ interaction. They additionally clarify the structural and energetic complementarity between “pocket-forming” and “pocket occupying” hot spot residues, and further validate computational fragment mapping as a method for identifying hot spots at PPI interfaces. PMID:23506214

  8. Jupiter - Its Red Spot and disturbances in 1970-1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Photographic observations of Jupiter and its Red Spot between Dec. 11, 1970, and Oct. 12, 1971, are reported. The Red Spot had a mean rotation period of 9 hr 55 min 38.5 sec, the shortest to be observed since the apparition of 1931-1932. The outstanding event of the apparition was an outburst of activity in the South Equatorial Belt which was similar in many ways to the great disturbance of 1928.

  9. Turbulent Region Near Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    True and false color mosaics of the turbulent region west of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot is on the planetary limb on the right hand side of each mosaic. The region west (left) of the Great Red Spot is characterized by large, turbulent structures that rapidly change in appearance. The turbulence results from the collision of a westward jet that is deflected northward by the Great Red Spot into a higher latitude eastward jet. The large eddies nearest to the Great Red Spot are bright, suggesting that convection and cloud formation are active there.

    The top mosaic combines the violet (410 nanometers) and near infrared continuum (756 nanometers) filter images to create a mosaic similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundance of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The lower mosaic uses the Galileo imaging camera's three near-infrared (invisible) wavelengths (756 nanometers, 727 nanometers, and 889 nanometers displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Light blue clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are deep, and white clouds are high and thick. Purple most likely represents a high haze overlying a clear deep atmosphere. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.

    The mosaic is centered at 16.5 degrees south planetocentric latitude and 85 degrees west longitude. The north-south dimension of the Great Red Spot is approximately 11,000 kilometers. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. North is at the top of the picture. The images used were taken on June 26, 1997 at a range of 1.2 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology

  10. Interpretation of the Jupiter red spot. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The LPL research programs on Jupiter include continuing photographic coverage of the planet in color and in several wavelength bands; IR image scans especially around 5 microns; medium and high-resolution spectral studies in the photographic and the lead-sulfide regions, with laboratory comparisons; photometric and polarimetric studies; far-IR measurements at high altitudes; chemical studies designed to match formation of Jovian cloud particles; and participation in the NASA Pioneer missions. Some preliminary interpretative remarks are given which are in part suggested by the remarkable IR spectra and IR images of the earth and Mars obtained at NASA-Goddard. This leads to a discussion of the Red Spot and the White Ovals.

  11. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  12. A Simple and Rapid Method Based on Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Measurement of α-L-Iduronidase Activity in Dried Blood Spots: An Application to Mucopolysaccharidosis I (Hurler) Screening

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Soo; Min, Hye Kyeong; Oh, Hyeon Ju; Woo, Hye In; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan

    2015-01-01

    Background We developed an analytical method to measure α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) activity in dried blood spots. This was achieved by using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. Methods Chromatographic separation was completed using mobile phase involving water-formic acid and acetonitrile-formic acid over 2.8 min of run time on a column with a Kinetex XB-C18 (Phenomenex, USA). The detection of column effluent was performed using a Xevo TQ-S triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (Waters, USA) in the multiple-reaction monitoring mode. This method was verified with blank and control samples at four activity levels: base, low, medium, and high. Control materials were provided from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results Intra- and inter-day precisions were between 2.6% and 16.5% and between 7.9% and 17.0%, respectively. A correlative regression study on the IDUA activity in CDC-control samples performed to assess the validity of the developed method showed a highly significant linear association (r2=0.9976) between the calculated and CDC-reported values and an obvious difference in activity among the four levels. This reliable analytical method was applied to mucopolysaccharidosis I (Hurler) screening of patients under treatment (n=4) and in normal controls (n=129). IDUA activity ranged from 8.98 to 77.12 µmol/hr/L) in normal controls, and patients undergoing medical treatment showed low IDUA activity. Conclusions This method had advantages of simplicity, rapid sample preparation, and liquid chromatographic separation, which efficiently inhibited ionization suppression induced by matrix effects in mass spectrometric detection. PMID:25553279

  13. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  14. Laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microcope: two important tools for device testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Eberhard

    1991-03-01

    The optical beam induced current (OBIC) produced in devices by a laser scan microscope (LSM) is used to localize hot spots, leakage currents, electrostatic discharge defects and weak points. The LSM also allows photoluminescence measurements with high spatial and energy resolution. Using the infrared laser scan microscope (IR LSM), defects in the metallization and latch-up sensitive region could be detected from the back of the device.

  15. Impact Modeling of Spot Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey, Robert N.

    2004-06-01

    Resistance spot welds in most current finite element crash models are characterized as a rigid link at the location of the weld which transfers the load but is not designed to fail. Newer weld elements in the popular finite element analysis codes include the option of incorporating a failure criteria for the weld element. As many automotive companies move towards the use of high-strength steels, the dynamic behavior of the spot welds will become increasingly important and the failure of any welds should be incorporated during the simulation. The failure criteria will be influenced by mesh size, weld element properties, weld element type, surrounding material properties, strain rate, and weld placement. The influence of some of these parameters using current spot weld modeling techniques will be discussed along with recommendations for future work in this area.

  16. Spots on T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, J.; Bertout, C.

    1989-02-01

    Periodic light curves were recorded for the following 15 T Tauri stars (for nine of which this was the first detection of periodic variability): V 410 Tau, DF Tau, UX Tau A, FK 1, FK 2, WK 2, DN Tau, GW Ori, SY Cha, LH(alpha) 332-20, LH(alpha) 332-21, CoD-33-deg 10685, RY Lup, SR 12, and SR 9. The previously reported periodic variability of the SY Cha and RY Lup stars was confirmed. These periodic variations are thought to result from rotational modulation by a group of spots at the stellar surface. The properties of spots on 11 stars were deduced from extensive light-curve synthesis. In most cases, they were found to be comparable to the properties of spots found on RS CVn stars.

  17. Cold Spots in Protein Binding.

    PubMed

    Shirian, Jason; Sharabi, Oz; Shifman, Julia M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the energetics and architecture of protein-binding interfaces is important for basic research and could potentially facilitate the design of novel binding domains for biotechnological applications. It is well accepted that a few key residues at binding interfaces (binding hot spots) are responsible for contributing most to the free energy of binding. In this opinion article, we introduce a new concept of 'binding cold spots', or interface positions occupied by suboptimal amino acids. Such positions exhibit a potential for affinity enhancement through various mutations. We give several examples of cold spots from different protein-engineering studies and argue that identification of such positions is crucial for studies of protein evolution and protein design. PMID:27477052

  18. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  19. Color tunable LED spot lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, C.; Ansems, J.; Deurenberg, P.; van Duijneveldt, W.; Peeters, M.; Steenbruggen, G.; Treurniet, T.; Valster, A.; ter Weeme, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    A new trend in illumination is to use dynamic light to set or dynamically vary the ambience of a room or office. For this we need color tunable spots that can reliably vary over at least a wide range of color temperatures, and preferably also more saturated colors. LEDs are in principle ideally suited for this application thanks to their nature of emitting light in a relatively narrow band. For color tunable spot lighting based on the concept of mixing RGB LED colors, the key results have been presented before. Limitations of these 3-intrinsic-color mixing systems with high color rendering properties are found in a limited operating temperature range due to wavelength shifts, a limited color temperature range, and a low maximum operating temperature due to a strong flux decrease with increasing temperature. To overcome these limitations, a 3-color R pcGB system with phosphor-converted red (R pc) and a 4-color RAGB system have been investigated. With both systems, a CRI of at least 80 can be maintained over the relevant color temperature range of approximately 2700 K to 6500 K. In this paper we compare these concepts on overall system aspects and report on the performance of prototype spot lamps. The main features of the RAGB and R pcGB spot lamp concepts can be summarized as: 1) The RAGB spot overcomes CRI and gamut shortcomings of RGB light sources and gives much freedom in wavelength selection, but suffers from temperature sensitivity and complex controls; 2) The R pcGB spot overcomes shortcomings concerning CRI and thermal dependence of RGB sources and enables relatively simple controls, but needs an improved overall red efficacy. With both color concepts, prototype spot lamps have been built. The amber to red emitting nitridosilicate-based phosphors can be wavelength-tuned for optimal performance, which is found at a peak emission around 610 nm for high color quality systems. This results in a simple and very robust system with good color consistency. For the

  20. Stabilized dried blood spot collection.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Darren; Chung, Dwayne Chung Kim; Toth, Monika; Liew, Oi Wah; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-01

    During the collection phase of the dried blood spot method, practitioners need to ensure that there is no smearing of the blood sample on the filter paper or else readings from it will be invalid. This can be difficult to accomplish in the field if there is relative motion between the site of blood discharge on the finger and the filter paper. In this article, a gyroscope stabilization method is introduced and demonstrated to provide consistent and improved dried blood spot collection within a circular guide region notwithstanding the presence of rocking. PMID:27156813

  1. Multiband Photometry of the Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System IM Peg—the Guide Star for the Gravity Probe B Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.; Messina, Sergio; Lanza, Antonino F.; Wasatonic, Richard; McCook, George P.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the starspot properties of IM Pegasi—the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of general relativity—the frame-dragging and geodetic effects—via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot ≈ 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can potentially cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light center (photocenter) of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter ~1 Msolar (main-sequence early G-type star) component. Since 2000, we have carried out multiband high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby intermediate-band filters, VRI filters, and TiO (720/750 nm) narrowband filter sets. Measurements were made relative to nearby comparison and check stars using 0.8 m and 0.25 m telescopes. Analysis of TiO and multiband continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures, and surface distributions. The photometry has been modeled using the maximum entropy and Tikhonov regularizations to determine the properties of starspots and to evaluate the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. Our results indicate that IM Peg's activity should not affect the GP-B mission. We also present a study of IM Peg's long-term starspot cycle, which shows evidence of being 20 yr long. Lastly, we have determined the intrinsic (unspotted) brightness of the star to be V mag = 5.62 ± 0.03.

  2. A post-scan method for correcting artefacts of slow geometry changes during micro-tomographic scans.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P L; Liu, X; Sasov, A

    2009-01-01

    Micro-CT imaging of objects at very high magnification runs into the problem of small geometric movements of the x-ray emission spot relative to the object, thermally induced or otherwise, causing magnified shifts in the projection images during scanning. This produces movement artefacts in the reconstructed images. Here a technique is described to correct such movements by adding a short reference scan at the end of a high magnification scan, with a very large rotation step. Where geometry changes during a scan are slow, such movements can be considered minimal during this very short "post-scan". Registration of the post-scan images with corresponding images in the main scan allow X/Y pixel shifts in the projection images associated with the geometry movement to be calculated, and corrected during reconstruction. This post-scan correction method was applied here to scans of three small objects, all with a voxel size less than one micron, in a desktop micro-CT and a nano-CT scanner. The method substantially reduced movement artefacts from the reconstructed images, improving image quality and resolution. Where the geometry movement results largely from thermal movement of the x-ray micro-focus emission spot, the post-scan method allows the reconstruction of the spatio-temporal trajectory of this spot movement. PMID:19696469

  3. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (-54.52 %), hemoglobin (-36.98 %), packed cell volume (-36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (-1.41 %) and oxygen (O2) carrying capacity (-37.04 %) declined significantly over reference fish, however total leukocyte count (+25.43 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+33.52 %) and mean corpuscular volume (+35.49 %) showed elevation. High frequency of micronuclei (1133.3 %) and lobed nuclei (150 %) were observed in exposed fish which may indicate mutagenesis. Activities of pathological marker enzymes ALP, AST, ALT and CK increased significantly in serum of exposed fish. The ratio of ALT: AST in exposed fish was beyond 1 which indicates manifestation of pathological processes. These biomarkers show that fish have macrocytic hypochromic anemia. Leukocytosis showed general defence response against heavy metal toxicity and marker enzymes showed tissue degeneration. In conclusion, thermal power plant effluent has strong potential to induce micronuclei, tissue pathology, making the fish anemic, weak, stressed and vulnerable to diseases. PMID:27386247

  4. SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors fabricated using scanning atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang-Han; Chiu, Yi-Fan; Yeh, Po-Wei; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    SnO2/CNT electrodes for supercapacitors are fabricated by first screen-printing pastes containing SnO2 nanoparticles and CNTs on carbon cloth, following which nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sintering is performed at various APPJ scan rates. The APPJ scan rates change the time intervals for which the reactive plasma species and the heat of the nitrogen APPJs influence the designated sintering spot on the carbon cloth, resulting in APPJ-sintered SnO2/CNT nanocomposites with different properties. The water contact angle decreases with the APPJ scan rate. The improved wettability can facilitate the penetration of the electrolyte into the nanopores of the SnO2/CNT nanocomposites, thereby improving the charge storage and specific capacitance of the supercapacitors. Among the three tested APPJ scan rates, 1.5, 3, and 6 mm s‑1, the SnO2/CNT supercapacitor sintered by APPJ under the lowest APPJ scan rate of 1.5 mm s‑1 shows the best specific capacitance of ∼90 F g‑1 as evaluated by cyclic voltammetry under a potential scan rate of 2 mV s‑1. A high APPJ scan rate may result in low degree of materials activation and sintering, leading to poorer performance of SnO2/CNT supercapacitors. The results suggest the feasibility of an APPJ roll-to-roll process for the fabrication of SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors.

  5. Distribution, foraging behavior, and capture results of the spotted bat (Euderma maculatum) in central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodhouse, T.J.; McCaffrey, M.F.; Wright, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    The spotted bat (Euderma maculatum) has been virtually unknown in Oregon despite the existence of potential habitat in many areas of the state. In 2002 and 2003 we searched for spotted bats along the John Day, Deschutes, and Crooked Rivers and at a remote dry canyon southeast of the city of Bend in central Oregon. The species was documented through the use of mist-nets, a bat detector, and recognition of audible spotted bat calls. Spotted bats were found at 11 locations in 6 Oregon counties. Nightly activity patterns of spotted bats were unpredictable. Spotted bats were found in 78% of search areas but on only 48% of survey nights. We observed spotted bats foraging above fields and low upland slopes adjacent to rivers and creeks and along the rims of cliffs. Estimated flying heights of spotted bats ranged from 3 m to 50 m aboveground. The species was difficult to capture and was captured only after considerable experimentation with methods and materials. Three spotted bats were captured toward the end of the project in 2003 and accounted for only 0.5% of all bats captured during the study. Although we attached radio transmitters to 2 spotted bats, we found no roost locations. We believe additional spotted bat surveys in Oregon are warranted, especially in higher-elevation habitats, but recommend that to increase their effectiveness, surveys accommodate the unique foraging behavior of the species.

  6. Submicron elemental mapping with the oxford scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Watt, F.; Chapman, J. R.

    1987-03-01

    Following recent modifications to the Oxford scanning proton microprobe (SPM) a beam spot diameter of 0.5 μm has been achieved at a beam current of 20-30 pA of 4 MeV protons. This has been confirmed by scanning both a copper test grid and microcrystals of barium sulphate. The potential of using high spatial resolutions in microbiology has been explored by scanning a single mouse cell.

  7. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past five or so years blueberry growers in south Mississippi have discovered the disease Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot on some of their blueberry plants. In the past this disease was considered to be of minor importance occurring infrequently on isolated farms. But in recent years it ...

  8. A measurement concept for hot-spot BRDFs from space

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1996-09-01

    Several concepts for canopy hot-spot measurements from space have been investigated. The most promising involves active illumination and bistatic detection that would allow hot-spot angular distribution (BRDF) measurements from space in a search-light mode. The concept includes a pointable illumination source, such as a laser operating at an atmospheric window wavelength, coupled with a number of high spatial-resolution detectors that are clustered around the illumination source in space, receiving photons nearly coaxial with the reto-reflection direction. Microwave control and command among the satellite cluster would allow orienting the direction of the laser beam as well as the focusing detectors simultaneously so that the coupled system can function like a search light with almost unlimited pointing capabilities. The concept is called the Hot-Spot Search-Light (HSSL) satellite. A nominal satellite altitude of 600 km will allow hot-spot BRDF measurements out to about 18 degrees phase angle. The distributed are taking radiometric measurements of the intensity wings of the hot-spot angular distribution without the need for complex imaging detectors. The system can be operated at night for increased signal-to-noise ratio. This way the hot-spot angular signatures can be quantified and parameterized in sufficient detail to extract the biophysical information content of plant architectures.

  9. The Guiding Light: Vri/uvby & Tio Photometry Of The Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System Im Peg - The Guide-star For The Gravity Probe-b Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, E.; Messina, S.; Wasatonic, R.; McCook, G.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the starspot and chromospheric properties of IM Pegasi - the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of General Relativity - frame-dragging and geodetic effects, via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. IM Peg was selected as the mission's guide star as it is not only bright enough to be seen with GP-B's onboard optical telescope but it is also a bright radio source. Thus, ground-based radio telescope observations can easily and accurately correct for IM Peg's motions in space. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light-center of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter dK component. Since 2000 we have carried out multi-band high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby filters, VRCIC filters and TiO (719/755 nm ) narrow-band filter sets. Measurements were made relative to neaby comparsion & check stars using a robotic 0.8-m telescope (located in AZ) and 0.25-m telescope (located in PA). The TiO- and multi-band continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures and distributions. The photometry is being modeled to determine the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. The results of our analysis and possible impacts on the GP-B Mission will be discussed. This research is supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST- 0507536 and AST- 0507542 which we gratefully acknowledge.

  10. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy: HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... test results. This test is combined with other imaging (such as CT or ultrasound). After the gallbladder ...

  11. Prospects for titanium alloy comparison control by electron beam scan frequency manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Pal, U.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1996-12-31

    Using mathematical modelling, the authors evaluate the prospects for using beam spot size and scan frequency to control titanium-aluminum alloy composition in electron beam melting and refining. Composition control is evaluated in terms of attainable steady-state extremes of composition, and the time scales required to change hearth and mold composition between those extremes. Mathematical models predict spot size-evaporation and frequency-evaporation relationships by simulating heat transfer in the surface of the melt, and predict overall composition change using simplifying assumptions about the fluid flow field in a melting hearth. Corroborating experiments were run on the electron beam furnace at Sandia National Laboratories in order to verify predicted relationships between frequency and evaporation and to calculate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in titanium.

  12. Effects of a Fipronil Spot-Treatment on field colonies of Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This field study investigated the colony effect of a Fipronil spot-treatment applied to active infestations of Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki. Spot-treatments were applied to a single active independent monitor from each of four colonies in which multiple independent m...

  13. Fly pollination of Gorteria diffusa (Asteraceae), and a possible mimetic function for dark spots on the capitulum.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S; Midgley, J

    1997-04-01

    We investigated the functional significance of raised black spots on the ray florets of Gorteria diffusa (Asteraceae) in South Africa. Field observations showed that G. diffusa is pollinated by a small bee-fly, Megapalpus nitidus (Bombyliidae), which is strikingly similar to the raised spots that occur on some of the ray florets. Removal of the spots resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of fly visits to capitula, but did not significantly affect seed set. Replacement of the spots with simple ink spots also significantly reduced the rate of pollinator visits, suggesting that flies respond to details in the structure of the spots. Investigations using scanning electron microscopy showed that the spots of G. diffusa consist of a complex of different cell types. Differences in epidermal sculpturing may partly explain the UV reflectance pattern of these spots, which is similar to that of the flies. Male flies are strongly attracted to the spots, as well as to other flies sitting in the capitula, although female flies also visit the capitula. We conclude that the spots of G. diffusa mimic resting flies, thereby eliciting mate-seeking and aggregation responses in fly pollinators. Similar dark spots have evolved in unrelated South African Gazania, Dimorphotheca, and Pelargonium species pollinated by bee-flies. PMID:21708596

  14. Spots, plages, and flares on λ Andromedae and II Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, A.; Biazzo, K.; Taş, G.; Evren, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:We present the results of a contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of two RS CVn binaries, namely λ And and II Peg. The aim of this work is to investigate the behavior of surface inhomogeneities in the atmospheres of the active components of these systems that have nearly the same temperatures but different gravities. Methods: The light curves and the modulation of the surface temperature, as recovered from line-depth ratios (LDRs), were used to map the photospheric spots, while the Hα emission was used as an indicator of chromospheric inhomogeneities. The spot temperatures and sizes were derived from a spot model applied to the contemporaneous light and temperature curves. Results: We find larger and cooler spots on II Peg (T_sp ≃ 3600 K) than on λ And (T_sp ≃ 3900 K); this could be the result of both the difference in gravity and the higher activity level of the former. Moreover, we find a clear anti-correlation between the Hα emission and the photospheric diagnostics (temperature and light curves). We have detected a modulation in the intensity of the He I D3 line with the star rotation, suggesting surface features also in the upper chromosphere of these stars. A rough reconstruction of the 3D structure of their atmospheres was also performed by applying a spot/plage model to the light and temperature curves and to the Hα flux modulation. In addition, a strong flare affecting the Hα, the He I D3, and the cores of Na I D{1,2} lines has been observed on II Peg. Conclusions: The spot/plage configuration has been reconstructed in the visible component of λ And and II Peg, which have nearly the same temperature but very different gravities and rotation periods. A close spatial association of photospheric and chromospheric active regions, at the time of our observations, was found in both stars. Larger and cooler spots were found on II Peg, the system with the active component of higher gravity and a higher activity level. The area

  15. Geant4 simulation for a study of a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the active scanning system at CNAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, E.; Piersimoni, P.; Riccardi, C.; Rimoldi, A.; Tamborini, A.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams (delivered with active scanning modality) for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO). The promising aspect of carbon ions radiotherapy for the treatment of this disease lies in its superior relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE). The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 toolkit was used to simulate the complete CNAO extraction beamline, with the active and passive components along it. A human eye modeled detector, including a realistic target tumor volume, was used as target. Cross check with previous studies at CNAO using protons allowed comparisons on possible benefits on using such a technique with respect to proton beams. Experimental data on proton and carbon ion beams transverse distributions were used to validate the simulation.

  16. Characterization of Talbot pattern illumination for scanning optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangshuo; Yang, Changhuei; Wu, Jigang

    2013-09-01

    We studied the use of Talbot pattern illumination in scanning optical microscopy (SOM). Unlike conventional illumination spots used in SOM, the focal spots in Talbot pattern are more complicated and do not have a simple Gaussian intensity distribution. To find out the resolution of SOM using Talbot pattern, we characterized the evolution of the full-width-at-half-maximum spot size of the Talbot focal spots by computer simulation. We then simulated the SOM imaging under Talbot pattern illumination using the razor blade and the U.S. Air Force target as the sample objects, and compared the results with those performed with Gaussian spots as illumination. Using several foci searching algorithms, the optimal focal distances were found to be shorter than the theoretical Talbot distances. The simulation results were consistent with the experiment results published previously. We then provide a practical guidance for searching for optimal focal distances in the SOM based on these studies.

  17. Laser beam scanning by rotary mirrors. I. Modeling mirror-scanning devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Katz, J

    1995-10-01

    Avector approach to tracing the path of a laser beam through an optical system containing movable plane mirrors is described, which permits a unified treatment of a number of basic mirror-scanning devices. We show that the scan field produced by the mirror-scanning system is a curved surface with a straight line as its generating element. The cross section of the scan field can be a circle, an ellipse, or a curve in the shape of an egg. Based on this understanding, some advanced topics are addressed, e.g., the relationship between the scan field and the scan pattern, the dependence of the scan pattern on the location and orientation of the observation surface, optical distortions in a scan pattern, spot-size enlargement caused by non-normal incidence of the scan beam on the observation plane, and so on. Design equations and curves are derived for the mirror-scanning devices that most frequently exist in linear and circular scan technology. Part II contains an analysis of the galvanometer-based optical scanner paddle scanner and the regular polygon. In Part III, X-Y scanning systems are studied. PMID:21060488

  18. Scanned optical fiber confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickensheets, David L.; Kino, Gordon S.

    1994-04-01

    The size and weight of conventional optical microscopes often makes them inconvenient for use on the human body or for in-situ examination during materials processing. We describe a new fiber-optic scanning confocal optical microscope which could have a total outside diameter as small as 1 mm, and should lend itself to applications in endoscopy or to optical in vivo histology. The first experimental device utilizes a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and detection. The scanning element is a mechanically resonant fused silica cantilever 1.5 cm long and 0.8 mm across, with a micromachined two-phase zone plate objective mounted at one end. The cantilever is electrostatically scanned near resonance in two dimensions, generating a Lissajous pattern which is scan converted to conventional video for real time display or digitization. The objective lens has N.A. equals 0.25 at (lambda) equals 0.6328 micrometers , with a measured spot size of 1.8 micrometers FWHM.

  19. Line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Ustun, Teoman E.; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Webb, Robert H.

    2006-07-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a powerful imaging tool with specialized applications limited to research and ophthalmology clinics due in part to instrument size, cost, and complexity. Conversely, low-cost retinal imaging devices have limited capabilities in screening, detection, and diagnosis of diseases. To fill the niche between these two, a hand-held, nonmydriatic line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO) is designed, constructed, and tested on normal human subjects. The LSLO has only one moving part and uses a novel optical approach to produce wide-field confocal fundus images. Imaging modes include multiwavelength illumination and live stereoscopic imaging with a split aperture. Image processing and display functions are controlled with two stacked prototype compact printed circuit boards. With near shot-noise limited performance, the digital LSLO camera requires low illumination power (<500 µW) at near-infrared wavelengths. The line-scanning principle of operation is examined in comparison to SLO and other imaging modes. The line-scanning approach produces high-contrast confocal images with nearly the same performance as a flying-spot SLO. The LSLO may significantly enhance SLO utility for routine use by ophthalmologists, optometrists, general practitioners, and also emergency medical personnel and technicians in the field for retinal disease detection and other diverse applications.

  20. ``Hot spots'' growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    ``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials.``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a

  1. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  2. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  3. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  4. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  5. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  6. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  7. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  8. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    SciTech Connect

    S. Brunner; E. Valeo

    2001-08-30

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background.

  9. Ultrasonic versus sonic activation of the final irrigant in root canals instrumented with rotary/reciprocating files: An in-vitro scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khalap, Neha Deepak; Kokate, Sharad; Hegde, Vibha

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the smear layer and debris removal in root canals instrumented with two different kinematic motions after ultrasonic and sonic irrigation activation. Materials and Methods: Eighty freshly extracted teeth were selected for the study and randomly divided the samples into two groups (n = 40) for instrumentation with either rotary ProTaper NEXT (PTN) or reciprocating WaveOne (WO) file systems. These (n = 40) were further divided into two groups (n = 20) where the final irrigant was activated using either Ultrasonics (Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation; PUI) or Sonics (EndoActivator; EA). Group 1: PTN + EA; Group 2: PTN + PUI; Group 3: WO + EA; and Group 4: WO + PUI. During instrumentation, a total of 4 ml of 5.25% NaOCl was used for irrigation. The final irrigation protocol included NaOCl and Smear Clear Solution. The samples were processed by scanning electron microscopic examination for debris and smear layer scoring, and statistical analysis was done. Results: The mean debris and smear layer score was less in the group instrumented by PTN with sonic activation of the irrigant. Conclusion: A combination of PTN instrumentation with sonic irrigation activation by EA is more effective in debris and smear layer removal in the groups tested. PMID:27563189

  10. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions. PMID:19273533

  11. Numerical simulations of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael L.

    Numerical simulations of hot spots and their associated jets are examined with emphasis on their dynamical variability. Attention is given to two-dimensional simulations, which incorporate dynamically passive and important magnetic fields in the ideal MHD limit. Distributions of total and polarized radio brightness have been derived for comparison with observations. The move toward three-dimensional simulations is documented, and hydrodynamical models for multiple hot spots are discussed. It is suggested that useful insights can be obtained from two-dimensional slab jet simulation, which relax the axisymmetric constraints while allowing high numerical resolution. In particular the dentist-drill model of Scheuer (1982) for working-surface variability is substantiated, and it is shown to result from self-excited jet instabilities near the working surface.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  14. Neptune - Changes in Great Dark Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    These images show changes in the clouds around Neptune's Great Dark Spot (GDS) over a four and one-half-day period. From top to bottom the images show successive rotations of the planet an interval of about 18 hours. The GDS is at a mean latitude of 20 degrees south, and covers about 30 degrees of longitude. The violet filter of the Voyager narrow angle camera was used to produce these images at distances ranging from 17 million kilometers (10.5 million miles) at the top, to 10 million kilometers (6.2 million miles) at bottom. The images have been mapped on to a rectangular latitude longitude grid to remove the effects of changing viewing geometry and the changing distance to Neptune. The sequence shows a large change in the western end (left side) of the GDS, where a dark extension apparent in the earlier images converges into an extended string of small dark spots over the next five rotations. This 'string of beads' extends from the GDS at a surprisingly large angle relative to horizontal lines of constant latitude. The large bright cloud at the southern (bottom) border of the GDS is a more or less permanent companion of the GDS. The apparent motion of smaller clouds at the periphery of the GDS suggests a counterclockwise rotation of the GDS reminiscent of flow around the Great Red Spot in Jupiter's atmosphere. This activity of the GDS is surprising because the total energy flux from the sun and from Neptune's interior is only 5 percent as large as the total energy flux on Jupiter.

  15. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  16. Measurement of laser spot quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, T. D.; Treptau, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several ways of measuring spot quality are compared. We examine in detail various figures of merit such as full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at 1/(e exp 2) maximum, Strehl ratio, and encircled energy. Our application is optical data storage, but results can be applied to other areas like space communications and high energy lasers. We found that the optimum figure of merit in many cases is Strehl ratio.

  17. Arbitrary-scan imaging for two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botcherby, Edward; Smith, Christopher; Booth, Martin; Juskaitis, Rimas; Wilson, Tony

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we present details of a scanning two-photon fluorescence microscope we have built with a nearisotropic scan rate. This means that the focal spot can be scanned at high speed along any direction in the specimen, without introducing systematic aberrations. We present experimental point spread function measurements for this system using an Olympus 0.8 NA 40X water dipping objective lens that demonstrates an axial range of operation greater than 200 μm. We give details of a novel actuator device used to displace the focusing element and demonstrate axial scan responses up to 3.5 kHz. Finally, we present a bioscience application of this system to image dendritic processes that follow non-linear paths in three-dimensional space. The focal spot was scanned along one such process at 400 Hz with an axial range of more than 90 μm.

  18. Using genetic algorithms to optimize an active sensor network on a stiffened aerospace panel with 3D scanning laser vibrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, R.; Clarke, A.; Featherston, C.; Kawashita, L.; Paget, C.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of aircraft structures and materials there is an essential need to continually monitor the structure for damage. This also drives the requirement for optimizing the location of sensors for damage detection to ensure full damage detection coverage of the structure whilst minimizing the number of sensors required, hence reducing costs, weight and data processing. An experiment was carried out to investigate the optimal sensor locations of an active sensor network for detecting adhesive disbonds of a stiffened panel. A piezoelectric transducer was coupled to two different stiffened aluminium panels; one healthy and one with a 25.4mm long disbond. The transducer was positioned at five individual locations to assess the effectiveness of damage detection at different transmission locations. One excitation frequency of 100kHz was used for this study. The panels were scanned with a 3D scanning laser vibrometer which represented a network of ‘ideal’ receiving transducers. The responses measured on the disbonded panel were cross- correlated with those measured on the healthy panel at a large number of potential sensor locations. This generated a cost surface which a genetic algorithm could interrogate in order to find the optimal sensor locations for a given size of sensor network. Probabilistic techniques were used to consider multiple disbond location scenarios, in order to optimise the sensor network for maximum probability of detection across a range of disbond locations.

  19. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  20. High resolution obtained by photoelectric scanning techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Several applications of linear scanning of different types of objects are described; examples include double stars, satellites, the Red Spot of Jupiter and a landing site on the moon. This technique allows one to achieve a gain of about an order of magnitude in resolution over conventional photoelectric techniques; it is also effective in providing sufficient data for removing background effects and for the application of deconvolution procedures. Brief consideration is given to two-dimensional scanning, either at the telescope or of electronographic images in the laboratory. It is suggested that some of the techniques described should be given serious consideration for space applications.

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in a spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Goodnight, Andrea L; Traslavina, Ryan P; Emanuelson, Karen; Affolter, Verena K; Gaffney, Patricia M; Vernau, William; Williams, Colette; Wu, Connie I-kuan; Sturges, Beverly K; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2013-12-01

    A 25-yr-old spayed female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) developed intermittent right pelvic limb lameness that persisted following conservative medical therapy. No obvious musculoskeletal lesions were noted on initial physical exam; however, spinal radiography was suspicious for possible intervertebral degenerative joint disease or discospondylitis. Despite prolonged medical therapy, the lameness progressed to minimal weight bearing and marked muscle atrophy of the right pelvic limb. Electromyography showed spontaneous activity in the muscles of right sciatic nerve distribution. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities in the right tibial and peroneal nerves were undetectable and markedly reduced, respectively. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a large, space-occupying mass on the right side of the sacrum and pelvis. Antemortem fine-needle aspiration of the mass and postmortem histopathology resulted in diagnosis of a high-grade squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac is very rare in domestic dogs and previously unreported in spotted hyenas. PMID:24450071

  2. Hot spots on Io: Initial results from Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; Davies, A.G.; Carlson, R.; Smythe, W.; Kamp, L.; Soderblom, L.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on Galileo has monitored the volcanic activity on Io since June 28, 1996. This paper presents preliminary analysis of NIMS thermal data for the first four orbits of the Galileo mission. NIMS has detected 18 new hot spots and 12 others which were previously known to be active. The distribution of the hot spots on Io's surface may not be random, as hot spots surround the two bright, SO2-rich regions of Bosphorus Regio and Colchis Regio. Most hot spots seem to be persistently active from orbit to orbit and 10 of those detected were active in 1979 during the Voyager encounters. We report the distribution of hot spot temperatures and find that they are consistent with silicate volcanism. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Nanoscale thermometry by scanning thermal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Menges, Fabian; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Measuring temperature is a central challenge in nanoscience and technology. Addressing this challenge, we report the development of a high-vacuum scanning thermal microscope and a method for non-equilibrium scanning probe thermometry. The microscope is built inside an electromagnetically shielded, temperature-stabilized laboratory and features nanoscopic spatial resolution at sub-nanoWatt heat flux sensitivity. The method is a dual signal-sensing technique inferring temperature by probing a total steady-state heat flux simultaneously to a temporally modulated heat flux signal between a self-heated scanning probe sensor and a sample. Contact-related artifacts, which so far limit the reliability of nanoscopic temperature measurements by scanning thermal microscopy, are minimized. We characterize the microscope's performance and demonstrate the benefits of the new thermometry approach by studying hot spots near lithographically defined constrictions in a self-heated metal interconnect. PMID:27475585

  4. Nanoscale thermometry by scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Fabian; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Measuring temperature is a central challenge in nanoscience and technology. Addressing this challenge, we report the development of a high-vacuum scanning thermal microscope and a method for non-equilibrium scanning probe thermometry. The microscope is built inside an electromagnetically shielded, temperature-stabilized laboratory and features nanoscopic spatial resolution at sub-nanoWatt heat flux sensitivity. The method is a dual signal-sensing technique inferring temperature by probing a total steady-state heat flux simultaneously to a temporally modulated heat flux signal between a self-heated scanning probe sensor and a sample. Contact-related artifacts, which so far limit the reliability of nanoscopic temperature measurements by scanning thermal microscopy, are minimized. We characterize the microscope's performance and demonstrate the benefits of the new thermometry approach by studying hot spots near lithographically defined constrictions in a self-heated metal interconnect.

  5. ESA uncovers Geminga's `hot spot'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    16 July 2004 Astronomers using ESA’s X-ray observatory XMM-Newton have detected a small, bright ‘hot spot’ on the surface of the neutron star called Geminga, 500 light-years away. The hot spot is the size of a football field and is caused by the same mechanism producing Geminga’s X-ray tails. This discovery identifies the missing link between the X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Geminga. hi-res Size hi-res: 1284 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot This figure shows the effects of charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere of Geminga. Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of particles kicked out by Geminga’s strong magnetic field, trail the neutron star as it moves about in space. Panel (b) shows how electrically charged particles interact with Geminga’s magnetic field. For example, if electrons (blue) are kicked out by the star, positrons (in red) hit the star’s magnetic poles like in an ‘own goal’. Panel (c) illustrates the size of Geminga’s magnetic field (blue) compared to that of the star itself at the centre (purple). The magnetic field is tilted with respect to Geminga’s rotation axis (red). Panel (d) shows the magnetic poles of Geminga, where charged particles hit the surface of the star, creating a two-million degrees hot spot, a region much hotter than the surroundings. As the star spins on its rotation axis, the hot spot comes into view and then disappears, causing the periodic colour change seen by XMM-Newton. An animated version of the entire sequence can be found at: Click here for animated GIF [low resolution, animated GIF, 5536 KB] Click here for AVI [high resolution, AVI with DIVX compression, 19128 KB] hi-res Size hi-res: 371 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot, panel (a) Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of

  6. A 2D optomechanical focused laser spot scanner: analysis and experimental results for microstereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P. S.; Deshmukh, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes and analyzes a 2D optomechanical-focused laser spot scanning system (patent pending) which allows uniform intensity focused spot scanning with high speed and high resolution over a large range of scan. Such scanning is useful where variation of focused spot characteristics affects the performance of applications such as micro-/nano-stereolithography, laser micro-machining, scanning optical tweezers, optical scanning microscopy, and so on. Proposed scanning is achieved by using linear movement of mirrors and lens maintaining the alignment of motion and optical axis of laser. Higher speed and high resolution at the same time are achieved by use of two serial double parallelogram flexural mechanisms with mechatronics developed around them. Optical analysis is carried out to demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed system numerically and is further supported by the experimental results. Additional analysis is carried out to demonstrate robustness of the scanner in the case of small misalignment errors incurred in actual practice. Although the proposed scanner is useful in general in several applications mentioned above, discussion in this paper is focused on microstereolithography.

  7. Impact of electrolyte composition on the reactivity of a redox active polymer studied through surface interrogation and ion-sensitive scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Mark; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Cheng, Kevin J; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-06-21

    Elucidating the impact of interactions between the electrolyte and electroactive species in redox active polymers is key to designing better-performing electrodes for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Here, we present on the improvement of the electrochemical activity of poly(para-nitrostyrene) (PNS) in solution and as a film by exploiting the ionic interactions between reduced PNS and K(+), which showed increased reactivity when compared to tetrabutylammonium (TBA(+))- and Li(+)-containing electrolytes. While cyclic voltammetry enabled the study of the effects of cations on the electrochemical reversibility and the reduction potential of PNS, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provided new tools to probe the ionic and redox reactivity of this system. Using an ion-sensitive Hg SECM tip allowed to probe the ingress of ions into PNS redox active films, while surface interrogation SECM (SI-SECM) measured the specific kinetics of PNS and a solution phase mediator in the presence of the tested electrolytes. SI-SECM measurements illustrated that the interrogation kinetics of PNS in the presence of K(+) compared to TBA(+) and Li(+) are greatly enhanced under the same surface concentration of adsorbed radical anion, exhibiting up to a 40-fold change in redox kinetics. We foresee using this new application of SECM methods for elucidating optimal interactions that enhance polymer reactivity for applications in redox flow batteries. PMID:27064026

  8. Objective assessment of urban built environment related to physical activity — development, reliability and validity of the China Urban Built Environment Scan Tool (CUBEST)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some aspects of the neighborhood built environment may influence residents’ physical activity, which in turn, affects their health. This study aimed to develop an urban built environment evaluation tool and conduct necessary reliability and validity tests. Methods A 41-item urban built environment scan tool was developed to objectively assess the neighborhood built environment features related to physical activity. Six neighborhoods in Hangzhou were selected from three types of administrative planning units. A pair of auditors independently assessed all of the 205 street segments at the same time. Half of the segments (n = 104) were audited twice by the same auditor after a two-week time interval. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing the audits of paired observers, while intra-rater reliability was evaluated by comparing an auditor’s repeated assessments of the same segments. The construct validity was tested using factor analysis. Results The inter-rater reliability for most items was above 0.8. The intra-rater reliability for most items was above 0.4, and was lower than corresponding inter-rater reliability. Six factors were extracted by factor analysis and the factor loading matrix showed good construct validity. Conclusions The CUBEST is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to assess the physical activity-related built environment in Hangzhou, and potentially other cities in China. PMID:24495676

  9. "Hot spots" growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    "Hot spots" - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. "hot spots" on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag(+) to form the "hot spots" on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of "hot spots" is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent "hot spots" is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials. PMID:27240743

  10. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes. PMID:25815820

  11. SOAP 2.0: Spot Oscillation And Planet 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2015-04-01

    SOAP (Spot Oscillation And Planet) 2.0 simulates the effects of dark spots and bright plages on the surface of a rotating star, computing their expected radial velocity and photometric signatures. It includes the convective blueshift and its inhibition in active regions.

  12. Watermarking spot colors in packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Alastair; Filler, TomáÅ.¡; Falkenstern, Kristyn; Bai, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In January 2014, Digimarc announced Digimarc® Barcode for the packaging industry to improve the check-out efficiency and customer experience for retailers. Digimarc Barcode is a machine readable code that carries the same information as a traditional Universal Product Code (UPC) and is introduced by adding a robust digital watermark to the package design. It is imperceptible to the human eye but can be read by a modern barcode scanner at the Point of Sale (POS) station. Compared to a traditional linear barcode, Digimarc Barcode covers the whole package with minimal impact on the graphic design. This significantly improves the Items per Minute (IPM) metric, which retailers use to track the checkout efficiency since it closely relates to their profitability. Increasing IPM by a few percent could lead to potential savings of millions of dollars for retailers, giving them a strong incentive to add the Digimarc Barcode to their packages. Testing performed by Digimarc showed increases in IPM of at least 33% using the Digimarc Barcode, compared to using a traditional barcode. A method of watermarking print ready image data used in the commercial packaging industry is described. A significant proportion of packages are printed using spot colors, therefore spot colors needs to be supported by an embedder for Digimarc Barcode. Digimarc Barcode supports the PANTONE spot color system, which is commonly used in the packaging industry. The Digimarc Barcode embedder allows a user to insert the UPC code in an image while minimizing perceptibility to the Human Visual System (HVS). The Digimarc Barcode is inserted in the printing ink domain, using an Adobe Photoshop plug-in as the last step before printing. Since Photoshop is an industry standard widely used by pre-press shops in the packaging industry, a Digimarc Barcode can be easily inserted and proofed.

  13. Visceral leishmaniasis with Roth spots

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Jagdish; Juneja, Monica; Mishra, Devendra; Vats, Pallavi; Pawaria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani and transmitted by the bite of infected sandfly Phlebotomus argentipes. The protozoa is obliged intracellularly and causes a wide spectrum of clinical syndromes: VL (‘kala azar’), cutaneous leishmaniasis and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (espundia). Kala azar is the most aggressive form and if untreated causes high mortality. Here, we describe a case of VL that presented to us with high-grade fever and found to have Roth spots that were resolved after 15 days of therapy. PMID:25988048

  14. Cold-spots and glassy nematicity in underdoped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmin; Kivelson, Steven A.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2016-07-01

    There is now copious direct experimental evidence of various forms of (short-range) charge order in underdoped cuprate high temperature superconductors, and spectroscopic signatures of a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in the structure of the single-particle spectral functions. In this context we analyze the Bogoliubov quasiparticle spectrum in a superconducting nematic glass. The coincidence of the superconducting "nodal points" and the nematic "cold-spots" on the Fermi surface naturally accounts for many of the most salient features of the measured spectral functions (from angle-resolved photoemission) and the local density of states (from scanning tunneling microscopy).

  15. [Assessment of solitary hot spots of bone scintigraphy in patients with extraskeletal malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Y; Ishino, Y; Nakata, H

    2001-11-01

    Bone scintigraphy is widely used to detect bone metastasis owing to its high sensitivity, but solitary focus of increased uptake often causes diagnostic problem because of its low specificity. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of solitary hot spot detected in patients with extraskeletal malignancies. We reviewed 1,167 consecutive bone scintigraphies of patients with history of lung, breast or prostatic cancer. There was 185 bone scans showing solitary hot spot (lung; 121, breast; 36, prostate; 28). Of the solitary hot spots, 30 (24.8%) in lung cancer, 8 (22.2%) in breast cancer, and 4 (14.3%) in prostatic cancer were a result of metastatic disease. There was no significant difference in the frequency of bone metastasis according to the site of primary tumor. It was relatively higher in the location of pelvis, scapula and thoracic spine. Clinical symptoms, particularly local bone pain, were helpful to diagnose the solitary hot spot. PMID:11806083

  16. Dopant Diffusion and Activation in Silicon Nanowires Fabricated by ex Situ Doping: A Correlative Study via Atom-Probe Tomography and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Hazut, Ori; Huang, Bo-Chao; Chiu, Ya-Ping; Chang, Chia-Seng; Yerushalmi, Roie; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Seidman, David N

    2016-07-13

    Dopants play a critical role in modulating the electric properties of semiconducting materials, ranging from bulk to nanoscale semiconductors, nanowires, and quantum dots. The application of traditional doping methods developed for bulk materials involves additional considerations for nanoscale semiconductors because of the influence of surfaces and stochastic fluctuations, which may become significant at the nanometer-scale level. Monolayer doping is an ex situ doping method that permits the post growth doping of nanowires. Herein, using atom-probe tomography (APT) with subnanometer spatial resolution and atomic-ppm detection limit, we study the distributions of boron and phosphorus in ex situ doped silicon nanowires with accurate control. A highly phosphorus doped outer region and a uniformly boron doped interior are observed, which are not predicted by criteria based on bulk silicon. These phenomena are explained by fast interfacial diffusion of phosphorus and enhanced bulk diffusion of boron, respectively. The APT results are compared with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, which yields information concerning the electrically active dopants. Overall, comparing the information obtained by the two methods permits us to evaluate the diffusivities of each different dopant type at the nanowire oxide, interface, and core regions. The combined data sets permit us to evaluate the electrical activation and compensation of the dopants in different regions of the nanowires and understand the details that lead to the sharp p-i-n junctions formed across the nanowire for the ex situ doping process. PMID:27351447

  17. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  18. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  19. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  20. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  1. Segmentation of 2D gel electrophoresis spots using a Markov random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeflich, Christopher S.; Corso, Jason J.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a statistical model-based approach for the segmentation of fragments of DNA as a first step in the automation of the primarily manual process of comparing two or more images resulting from the Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (RLGS) method. These 2D gel electrophoresis images are the product of the separation of DNA into fragments that appear as spots on X-ray films. The goal is to find instances where a spot appears in one image and not in another since a missing spot can be correlated with a region of DNA that has been affected by a disease such as cancer. The entire comparison process is typically done manually, which is tedious and very error prone. We pose the problem as the labeling of each image pixel as either a spot or non-spot and use a Markov Random Field (MRF) model and simulated annealing for inference. Neighboring spot labels are then connected to form spot regions. The MRF based model was tested on actual 2D gel electrophoresis images.

  2. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  3. Still from Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is one of seven from the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft assembled as a brief movie of cloud movements on Jupiter. It was taken with a blue filter. The smallest features visible are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across.

    Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Based on data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft, scientists suspect that these small white features are lightning storms, where falling raindrops create an electrical charge. The lightning storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for these large-scale features. Imaging observations of the darkside of the planet in the weeks following Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter on Dec. 30, 2000 will search for lightning storms like these.

    This image was re-projected by cylindrical-map projection of an image taken in the first week of October 2000. It shows an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  4. Spot and Runway Departure Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon Chul

    2013-01-01

    The Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a research prototype of a decision support tool for ATC tower controllers to assist in manging and controlling traffic on the surface of an airport. SARDA employs a scheduler to generate an optimal runway schedule and gate push-back - spot release sequence and schedule that improves efficiency of surface operations. The advisories for ATC tower controllers are displayed on an Electronic Flight Strip (EFS) system. The human-in-the-loop simulation of the SARDA tool was conducted for east operations of Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) to evaluate performance of the SARDA tool and human factors, such as situational awareness and workload. The results indicates noticeable taxi delay reduction and fuel savings by using the SARDA tool. Reduction in controller workload were also observed throughout the scenario runs. The future plan includes modeling and simulation of the ramp operations of the Charlotte International Airport, and develop a decision support tool for the ramp controllers.

  5. Instructor Debrief Training in SPOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lynne; Orasanu, Judith; Villeda, Eric; Conners, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One way to enhance the effectiveness of Special Purpose Operational Training' (SPOT) debriefing sessions may be for instructors to make explicit connections between the Crew Resource Management (CRM) concepts a carrier advocates and the behaviors displayed by the crew in question. A tool listing key behaviors from the scenario was devised, accompanied by an instructors' training session in which links were made between the behaviors and the underlying CRM processes they reflect. The aim of the tool is to assist instructors to focus the debriefing on the key SPOT/ CRM issues, in this case on planning. A second tool suggested ways to facilitate the discussion. Fourteen instructors at a major U.S. carrier took part in the training session and used the toolkit in their subsequent debriefs. Pre- and post-training debriefing samples from each instructor were compared to assess whether there were any changes in instructors' approaches to discussions in terms of the topics they covered and how they raised the points.

  6. Crabs and Butterflies: Does WY Cancri Have Latitudinal Spot Migration Patterns?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckert, P. A.

    2001-05-01

    The short-period eclipsing RS CVn system, WY Cancri, displayed secular luminosity increases in 1988 (possibly 1986-88) and in 1997. On the basis of longitudinal spot migration reversals, Heckert (2001, AJ; 121, 1076) suggests that these luminosity increases signal the start of a new magnetic activity cycle. Are there associated latitudinal spot migration patterns? Keeping in mind that the latitude is the most difficult, and hence least reliable, spot parameter to model, I examine the modeled spot latitudes from 1988 to 2001 to address this question. Plotting latitude vs. year shows that the highest latitude spots occurred in 1990 and 2000, a few years after the luminosity increases and longitudinal migration reversals noted above. The spot latitudes then tend to decrease with time. With the caveats that spot latitudes are difficult to model and that it takes several cycles to demonstrate cyclic behavior, this plot is reminiscent of the solar butterfly diagram. With the present data, it appears that active regions occur at maximum latitudes a few years after the secular luminosity increases then migrate to lower latitudes. I examine plots both with and without sorting the spots by active longitude belts. Continued observations are needed to test this trend. I acknowledge generous amounts of observing time at Mt. Laguna Observatory over many years. I also acknowledge support from the Cottrel College Science Program of the Research Corporation, the AAS small grants program, and Western Carolina University.

  7. Integrating Sustainable Hunting in Biodiversity Protection in Central Africa: Hot Spots, Weak Spots, and Strong Spots

    PubMed Central

    Fa, John E.; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Ángel; Márquez, Ana Luz; Vargas, Juan Mario; Real, Raimundo; Nasi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat) for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165) in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots) and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS) of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability), weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting. PMID:25372705

  8. Integrating sustainable hunting in biodiversity protection in Central Africa: hot spots, weak spots, and strong spots.

    PubMed

    Fa, John E; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Ángel; Márquez, Ana Luz; Vargas, Juan Mario; Real, Raimundo; Nasi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat) for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165) in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots) and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS) of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability), weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting. PMID:25372705

  9. Dynamical Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy

    2013-10-01

    Although it has been known for some time that Jupiter's Great Red Spot {GRS} is shrinking in longitudinal extent {becoming more 'round'}, it has recently undergone an unprecedented acceleration of that shrinkage. At the same time, there is significant convective activity along the South Temperate Belt's {STB} northern edge. Using amateur data, there now appears to be a correlation between this nearby activity and interactions with the GRS, driving vorticity changes. We hypothesize that this activity is responsible for the change in GRS aspect, and with corresponding changes in the GRS's internal flow field and vorticity, but this is only measureable from Hubble because of the required spatial resolution. These observations cannot wait until Cycle 22, as the STB activity is expected to cease around May 2014, based on historical accounts of longevity of this type of activity; in addition, Jupiter enters solar exclusion in May. Capturing the interaction would be a major achievement in understanding the energetic feeding of the GRS and constraining the mechanism that governs its long life.

  10. Characterizing flash-radiography source spots.

    PubMed

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2011-12-01

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a venerable diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. The size of the radiographic source spot is often quoted as an indication of the resolving power of a particular flash-radiography machine. A variety of techniques for measuring spot size have evolved at the different laboratories, as well as different definitions of spot size. Some definitions are highly dependent on the source spot intensity distributions, and not necessarily well correlated with resolution. The concept of limiting resolution based on bar target measurements is introduced, and shown to be equivalent to the spatial wavenumber at a modulation transfer function value of 5%. This resolution is shown to be better correlated with the full width at half-maximum of the spot intensity distribution than it is with other definitions of spot size. PMID:22193263

  11. Origin of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    SciTech Connect

    Luchkov, B.

    1981-09-01

    The Great Red Spot, a giant vortex in the Jovian atmosphere, may owe its origin to the structure of Jupiter's magnetic field and radiation belt. Several Spot parameters resemble those of the Brazil anomaly, a negative anomaly in the terrestrial field. It is shown qualitatively that the Spot has developed at the site of a negative anomaly in the Jovian field and is continually supplied by precipitation of energetic radiation-belt particles into the planet's atmosphere.

  12. Effectiveness of Four Different Final Irrigation Activation Techniques on Smear Layer Removal in Curved Root Canals : A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Puneet; Nandini, Suresh; Ballal, Suma; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of apical negative pressure (ANP), manual dynamic agitation (MDA), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) and needle irrigation (NI) as final irrigation activation techniques for smear layer removal in curved root canals. Materials and Methods: Mesiobuccal root canals of 80 freshly extracted maxillary first molars with curvatures ranging between 25° and 35° were used. A glide path with #08–15 K files was established before cleaning and shaping with Mtwo rotary instruments (VDW, Munich, Germany) up to size 35/0.04 taper. During instrumentation, 1 ml of 2.5% NaOCl was used at each change of file. Samples were divided into 4 equal groups (n=20) according to the final irrigation activation technique: group 1, apical negative pressure (ANP) (EndoVac); group 2, manual dynamic agitation (MDA); group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI); and group 4, needle irrigation (NI). Root canals were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer at coronal, middle and apical levels was evaluated by superimposing 300-μm square grid over the obtained photomicrographs using a four-score scale with X1,000 magnification. Results: Amongst all the groups tested, ANP showed the overall best smear layer removal efficacy (p < 0.05). Removal of smear layer was least effective with the NI technique. Conclusion: ANP (EndoVac system) can be used as the final irrigation activation technique for effective smear layer removal in curved root canals. PMID:24910670

  13. Hot spot and trench volcano separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    It is suggested that the distribution of separations between trench volcanos located along subduction zones reflects the depth of partial melting, and that the separation distribution for hot spot volcanoes near spreading centers provides a measure of the depth of mantle convection cells. It is further proposed that the lateral dimensions of mantle convection cells are also represented by the hot-spot separations (rather than by ridge-trench distances) and that a break in the distribution of hot spot separations at 3000 km is evidence for both whole mantle convection and a deep thermal plume origin of hot spots.

  14. Multi-perspective scanning microscope based on Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yangyang; Pang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We report a multi-perspective scanning microscope based on the Talbot effect of a periodic focal spot array. Talbot illumination decouples the lateral scanning and the focal spots tuning. Large field of view fluorescence Talbot Microscope has been demonstrated by globally changing the incident wavefront gradient. Here, we explore the design freedom of adjusting the wavefront locally within each period and thus engineer the point spread function of the focal spots. We demonstrate an imaging system capable of reconstructing multi-perspective microscopic images in both bright field and fluorescence mode. With the multi-perspective imaging capability, we envision a more robust microscopic imaging system for large field of view fluorescence microscopy applications. This method is also suitable for compact imaging systems for multi-layer microfluidic systems.

  15. A comparison of the Great Red Spot with temporary spots on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, G. C.; Meadows, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The International Planetary Patrol collection of Jupiter photographs is used to examine the development of a temporary spot that was visible in the northern equatorial zone for a total of 211 days. The motion and color of this spot are compared with those of the Great Red Spot. It is shown that the temporary spot was bluer than the Great Red Spot and has a longitudinal oscillation of approximately 4 deg with a period of about 45 days, implying that it may have possessed a significant dynamical property in common with other temporary spots and the Great Red Spot. It is concluded that the present spot is more likely to have been associated with a hole in the cloud deck rather than with an elevated surface feature.

  16. Voyager 1 Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows the portion of Jupiter around the Great Red Spot as it swirls through more than 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storm shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  17. Ambystoma maculatum (spotted salamander). Reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glorioso, Brad M.; Waddle, Hardin; Hefner, Jeromi

    2012-01-01

    The Spotted Salamander is a wide-ranging salamander of the eastern United States that typically breeds in winter or early spring in ephemeral pools in lowland forests. Ambystoma maculatum is known to deposit 2-4 egg masses per year, each containing 1-250 eggs. As part of ongoing research into the ecology and reproductive biology of Spotted Salamanders in the Kisatchie District of Kisatchie National Forest in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, USA, we have been counting the number of embryos per egg mass. We captured seven female A. maculatum in a small pool, six of which were still gravid. We took standard measurements, including SVL, and then implanted a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) into each adult female as was the protocol. About an hour after processing these animals we marked new A. maculatum egg masses found in the same small pool using PVC pin flags pushed carefully through the outer jelly. We did not have enough time to process them that evening, and it was not until a few days later that we photographed those masses. We discovered that one of the masses contained a PIT tag in the outer jelly that corresponded to one of the six gravid females that were marked that same evening. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PIT tags being the means, albeit coincidentally, by which a particular egg mass of Ambystoma maculatum has been assigned to a particular female. For our purposes, losing the PIT tag from the adult female is counter to the goals of our study of this population, and we will no longer be implanting PIT tags into gravid females.

  18. Alanine Scanning of Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) 2B Protein Identifies Different Positions for Cell-To-Cell Movement and Gene Silencing Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Katalin; Gellért, Ákos; Balázs, Ervin; Salánki, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa) to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA) overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA), and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA), which are not essential for suppressor activity. PMID:25380036

  19. Evaluation of the extracellular polymeric substances by confocal laser scanning microscopy in conventional activated sludge and advanced membrane bioreactors treating hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Alrhmoun, Mousaab; Carrion, Claire; Casellas, Magali; Dagot, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) combined with fluorescent viability indicators, was used in this study to investigate the impact of hospital wastewaters on floc structure and composition. In this work, three pilot-scale projects, two membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with a submerged or external membrane bioreactor and a conventional activated sludge, were installed and operated for 65 days. They were fed with an influent sampled directly from the hospital drainage system, which contained micropollutant concentrations ranging from ng/L to mg/L. Samples of flocs were observed using CLSM to characterize the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) stained with concanavalin A-tetra methylrhodamine and fluorescein isothiocyanate solution and combined with a fluorescent viability indicator (Baclight(®) Bacterial Viability Kit, Molecular Probes), allowing visualization of isolated stained cells in the three-dimensional structure of flocs (damaged or not). The results of CLSM of the sludge composition were compared with classical biochemical analysis of EPS made through a thermal extraction method. The results showed a good relation between these analyses and the statistical treatment of microscopic pictures. PMID:24901624

  20. Alanine scan and (2)H NMR analysis of the membrane-active peptide BP100 point to a distinct carpet mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Carreras, Héctor; Strandberg, Erik; Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Bürck, Jochen; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Bruix, Marta; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-06-01

    The short membrane-active peptide BP100 [KKLFKKILKYL-NH2] is known as an effective antimicrobial and cell penetrating agent. For a functional alanine scan each of the 11 amino acids was replaced with deuterated Ala-d3, one at a time. MIC assays showed that a substitution of Lys did not affect the antimicrobial activity, but it decreased when a hydrophobic residue was replaced. In most cases, a reduction in hydrophobicity led to a decrease in hemolysis, and some peptide analogues had an improved therapeutic index. Circular dichroism showed that BP100 folds as an amphiphilic α-helix in a bilayer. Its alignment was determined from (2)H NMR in oriented membranes of different composition. The azimuthal rotation angle was the same under all conditions, but the average helix tilt angle and the dynamical behavior of the peptide varied in a systematic manner. In POPC/POPG bilayers, with a negative spontaneous curvature, the peptide was found to lie flat on the bilayer surface, and with little wobble. In DMPC/DMPG, with a positive spontaneous curvature, BP100 at higher concentrations became tilted obliquely into the membrane, with the uncharged C-terminus inserted more deeply into the lipid bilayer, experiencing significant fluctuations in tilt angle. In DMPC/DMPG/lyso-MPC, with a pronounced positive spontaneous curvature, the helix tilted even further and became even more mobile. The 11-mer BP100 is obviously too short to form transmembrane pores. We conclude that BP100 operates via a carpet mechanism, whereby the C-terminus gets inserted into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which leads to membrane perturbation and induces transient permeability. PMID:26975251

  1. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings.more » The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.« less

  2. The blind spot: re-educating ourselves about visual images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, N.; Donnelly, K. M.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2004-05-01

    A simple blind spot activity has been devised to help students discard misconceptions about image formation by lenses. Our hands-on experiment, in which students determine the location and size of their blind spots, is suitable for various age groups at different educational levels. The activity provides an opportunity to teach students how to measure objects indirectly using triangles and encourages them to think about the number of measurements needed to gain confidence in a value. It also gives teachers another interesting experiment in which to discuss the nature of uncertainties and how to deal with them. Student responses to the activity, performed with pre-engineering students and non-science majors, are discussed.

  3. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Bard, Allen J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Mirkin, Michael V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-07-01

    This review describes work done in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) since 2000 with an emphasis on new applications and important trends, such as nanometer-sized tips. SECM has been adapted to investigate charge transport across liquid/liquid interfaces and to probe charge transport in thin films and membranes. It has been used in biological systems like single cells to study ion transport in channels, as well as cellular and enzyme activity. It is also a powerful and useful tool for the evaluation of the electrocatalytic activities of different materials for useful reactions, such as oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. SECM has also been used as an electrochemical tool for studies of the local properties and reactivity of a wide variety of materials, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Finally, SECM has been combined with several other nonelectrochemical techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, to enhance and complement the information available from SECM alone.

  4. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  5. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  6. Spotted knapweed, Centaurea stoebe, control options

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted knapweed is a non native perennial forb that is spreading rapidly in the Western United States. This plant species produces a compound that retards the growth of many native plants, giving it a competitive advantage. Spotted knapweed has been identified in several areas of Alaska. A descript...

  7. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  8. 7 CFR 1421.11 - Spot checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spot checks. 1421.11 Section 1421.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF... ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 General § 1421.11 Spot checks. (a)...

  9. Differential spot-size focus servo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, T. D.; Wang, M. S.; Froehlich, F. F.; Kann, J. L.; Treptau, J. P.; Erwin, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    We describe performance of a differential spot-size (wax-wane) focus servo. Crosstalk from the tracks are analyzed in the single detector and differential focus circuits. Magnitude of the crosstalk is reduced by a factor of three in the differential circuit. A false focus-error signal (FES) is present when the spot crosses sector marks at an angle.

  10. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  11. Predation by Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) on Western toads (Bufo boreas) in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Hayes, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toads of the genus Bufo co-occur with true frogs (family Ranidae) throughout their North American ranges. Yet, Bufo are rarely reported as prey for ranid frogs, perhaps due to dermal toxins that afford them protection from some predators. We report field observations from four different localities demonstrating that Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) readily consume juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) at breeding sites in Oregon. Unpalatability thought to deter predators of selected taxa and feeding mode may not protect juvenile stages of western toads from adult Oregon spotted frogs. Activity of juvenile western toads can elicit ambush behavior by Oregon spotted frog adults. Our review of published literature suggests that regular consumption of toadlets sets Oregon spotted frogs apart from most North American ranid frogs. Importance of the trophic context of juvenile western toads as a seasonally important resource to Oregon spotted frogs needs critical investigation.

  12. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations. PMID:26938537

  13. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J M; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations. PMID:26938537

  14. TEVA-SPOT Toolkit 1.2

    2007-07-26

    The TEVA-SPOT Toolkit (SPOT) supports the design of contaminant warning systems (CWSs) that use real-time sensors to detect contaminants in municipal water distribution networks. Specifically, SPOT provides the capability to select the locations for installing sensors in order to maximize the utility and effectiveness of the CWS. SPOT models the sensor placement process as an optimization problem, and the user can specify a wide range of performance objectives for contaminant warning system design, including populationmore » health effects, time to detection, extent of contamination, volume consumed and number of failed detections. For example, a SPOT user can integrate expert knowledge during the design process by specigying required sensor placements or designating network locations as forbidden. Further, cost considerations can be integrated by limiting the design with user-specified installation costs at each location.« less

  15. Improved MRF spot characterization with QIS metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, Sandi; Hall, Christopher; DeMarco, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Careful characterization of the removal function of sub-aperture polishing tools is critical for optimum polishing results. Magnetorheological finishing (MRF®) creates a polishing tool, or "spot", that is unique both for its locally high removal rate and high slope content. For a variety of reasons, which will be discussed, longer duration spots are beneficial to improving MRF performance, but longer spots yield higher slopes rendering them difficult to measure with adequate fidelity. QED's Interferometer for Stitching (QIS™) was designed to measure the high slope content inherent to non-null sub-aperture stitching interferometry of aspheres. Based on this unique capability the QIS was recently used to measure various MRF spots in an attempt to see if there was a corresponding improvement in MRF performance as a result of improved knowledge of these longer duration spots. The results of these tests will be presented and compared with those of a standard general purpose interferometer.

  16. Element spots in HgMn stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.

    2014-11-01

    A fraction of late B-type stars, the so-called HgMn stars, exhibit enhanced absorption lines of certain chemical elements, notably Hg and Mn, combined with an underabundance of He. For about a decade it has been known that the elements with anomalously high abundances in HgMn stars are distributed inhomogeneously over the stellar surface. Observation of the temporal evolution of those spots has been reported in a few HgMn stars, first of a secular evolution of the mercury spots in α And, and more recently of a fast evolution of yttrium and strontium spots in HD 11753. The fast evolution of spots in HD 11753 is combined with a slower change in the overall abundance of the elements affected. In this paper I review what is known about these ``elemental spots'' in HgMn stars and their secular and fast temporal evolution.

  17. Imaging Surface Spots from Space-Borne Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    A general introduction to the foundations of spot modelling is given. It considers geometric models of the surface brightness distribution in late-type stars as can be derived from their wide-band optical light curves. Spot modelling is becoming more and more important thanks to the high-precision, high duty-cycle photometric time series made available by space-borne telescopes designed to search for planets through the method of transits. I review approaches based on a few spots as well as more sophisticated techniques that assume a continuous distributions of active regions and adopt regularization methods developed to solve ill-posed problems. The use of transit light curves to map spots occulted by a planet as it moves across the disc of its host star is also briefly described. In all the cases, the main emphasis is on the basic principles of the modelling techniques and on their testing rather than on the results obtained from their application.

  18. Transiting exoplanets and magnetic spots characterized with optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Mourard, D.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Perraut, K.; Chiavassa, A.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Stellar activity causes difficulties in the characterization of transiting exoplanets. In particular, the magnetic spots present on most exoplanet host stars can lead to false detections with radial velocity, photometry, or astrometry techniques. Studies have been performed to quantify their impact on infrared interferometry, but no such studies have been performed in the visible domain. This wavelength domain, however, allows reaching better angular resolution than in the infrared and is also the wavelength most often used for spectroscopic and photometric measurements. Aims: We use a standard case to completely analyse the impact of an exoplanet and a spot on interferometric observables and relate it to current instrument capabilities, taking into account realistic achievable precisions. Methods: We built a numerical code called COMETS using analytical formulae to perform a simple comparison of exoplanet and spot signals. We explored instrumental specificities needed to detect them, such as the required baseline length, the accuracy, and signal-to-noise ratio. We also discuss the impact of exoplanet and spot parameters on squared visibility and phase: exoplanet diameter and size, exoplanet position, spot temperature, star diameter. Results: According to our study, the main improvement to achieve is the instrument sensitivity. The accuracy on squared visibilities has to be improved by a factor 10 to detect an exoplanet of 0.10 mas, leading to <0.5% precision, along with phase measurements of ~5° accuracy beyond the first null of visibility. For an exoplanet of 0.05 mas, accuracies of ~0.1% and ~1° from the first null are required on squared visibilities and phases. Magnetic spots can mimic these signals, leading to false exoplanet characterization. Phase measurements from the third lobe are needed to distinguish between the spot and the exoplanet if they have the same radius. Conclusions: By increasing interferometer sensitivity, more objects will

  19. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Light Spotted Cotton § 28.413 Middling Light Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between...

  20. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. For example, rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  1. Geo Spots and Vortex Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straser, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    ), when limited to particular regions, may have created in the past and perhaps still do to this day torsions in localized spots of the Earth's crust (Geo Spots), which over time have conditioned the distribution of tectonic stresses on the surface of the Earth at a regional scale.

  2. Method of rotation angle measurement in machine vision based on calibration pattern with spot array

    SciTech Connect

    Li Weimin; Jin Jing; Li Xiaofeng; Li Bin

    2010-02-20

    We propose a method of rotation angle measurement with high precision in machine vision. An area scan CCD camera, imaging lens, and calibration pattern with a spot array make up the measurement device for measuring the rotation angle. The calibration pattern with a spot array is installed at the rotation part, and the CCD camera is set at a certain distance from the rotation components. The coordinates of the spots on the calibration pattern is acquired through the vision image of the calibration pattern captured by the CCD camera. At the initial position of the calibration pattern, the camera is calibrated with the spot array; the mathematical model of distortion error of the CCD camera is built. With the equation of coordinate rotation measurement, the rotation angle of the spot array is detected. In the theoretic simulation, noise of different levels is added to the coordinates of the spot array. The experiment results show that the measurement device can measure the rotation angle precisely with a noncontact method. The standard deviation of rotation angle measurement is smaller than 3 arc sec. The measurement device can measure both microangles and large angles.

  3. Method of rotation angle measurement in machine vision based on calibration pattern with spot array.

    PubMed

    Li, Weimin; Jin, Jing; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin

    2010-02-20

    We propose a method of rotation angle measurement with high precision in machine vision. An area scan CCD camera, imaging lens, and calibration pattern with a spot array make up the measurement device for measuring the rotation angle. The calibration pattern with a spot array is installed at the rotation part, and the CCD camera is set at a certain distance from the rotation components. The coordinates of the spots on the calibration pattern is acquired through the vision image of the calibration pattern captured by the CCD camera. At the initial position of the calibration pattern, the camera is calibrated with the spot array; the mathematical model of distortion error of the CCD camera is built. With the equation of coordinate rotation measurement, the rotation angle of the spot array is detected. In the theoretic simulation, noise of different levels is added to the coordinates of the spot array. The experiment results show that the measurement device can measure the rotation angle precisely with a noncontact method. The standard deviation of rotation angle measurement is smaller than 3 arc sec. The measurement device can measure both microangles and large angles. PMID:20174168

  4. A novel multi-scale Hessian based spot enhancement filter for two dimensional gel electrophoresis images.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi, Sina; Miran Baygi, Mohammad Hossein; Azarian, Bahareh; Gooya, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) is a useful method for studying proteins in a wide variety of applications including identifying post-translation modification (PTM), biomarker discovery, and protein purification. Computerized segmentation and detection of the proteins are the two main processes that are carried out on the scanned image of the gel. Due to the complexities of 2DGE images and the presence of artifacts, the segmentation and detection of protein spots in these images are non-trivial, and involve supervised and time consuming processes. This paper introduces a new spot filter for enhancing, and separating the closely overlapping spots of protein in 2DGE images based on the multi-scale eigenvalue analysis of the image Hessian. Using a Gaussian spot model, we have derived closed form equations to compute the eigen components of the image Hessian of two overlapping spots in a multi-scale fashion. Based on this analysis, we have proposed a novel filter that suppresses the overlapping area and results in a better spot separation. The performance of the proposed filter has been evaluated on the synthetic and real 2DGE images. The comparison with three conventional techniques and a commercial software package reveals the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed filter. PMID:26409228

  5. An automated decision-tree approach to predicting protein interaction hot spots.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Steven J; Page, David; Mitchell, Julie C

    2007-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be altered by mutating one or more "hot spots," the subset of residues that account for most of the interface's binding free energy. The identification of hot spots requires a significant experimental effort, highlighting the practical value of hot spot predictions. We present two knowledge-based models that improve the ability to predict hot spots: K-FADE uses shape specificity features calculated by the Fast Atomic Density Evaluation (FADE) program, and K-CON uses biochemical contact features. The combined K-FADE/CON (KFC) model displays better overall predictive accuracy than computational alanine scanning (Robetta-Ala). In addition, because these methods predict different subsets of known hot spots, a large and significant increase in accuracy is achieved by combining KFC and Robetta-Ala. The KFC analysis is applied to the calmodulin (CaM)/smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) interface, and to the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)/BMP receptor-type I (BMPR-IA) interface. The results indicate a strong correlation between KFC hot spot predictions and mutations that significantly reduce the binding affinity of the interface. PMID:17554779

  6. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.

    2009-06-15

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  7. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  8. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  9. Dark Dune Spots: possible biomarkers on Mars?

    PubMed

    Gánti, Tibor; Horváth, András; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Gesztesi, Albert; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2003-10-01

    Dark Dune Spots (DDSs) are transitional geomorphologic formations in the frost-covered polar regions of Mars. Our analysis of the transformations and arrangements of subsequent stages of DDSs into time sequence revealed their: (i) hole-like characteristics, (ii) development and formation from the bottom of the frosted layer till the disapperance of the latter, (iii) repeated (seasonal and annual) appearance in a pattern of multiple DDSs on the surface, and (iv) probable origin. We focused our studies on a model in which DDSs were interpreted as objects triggered by biological activity involved in the frosting and melting processes. We discuss two competing interpretations of DDSs: development by defrosting alone, and by defrosting and melting enhanced by the activity of Martian Surface Organisms (MSOs). MSOs are hypothetical Martian photosynthetic surface organisms thought to absorb sunlight. As a result they warm up by late winter and melt the ice around them, whereby their growth and reproduction become possible. The ice cover above the liquid water lens harbouring the MSOs provides excellent heat and UV insulation, prevents fast evaporation, and sustains basic living conditions until the ice cover exists. When the frost cover disappears MSOs go to a dormant, desiccated state. We propose further studies to be carried out by orbiters and landers travelling to Mars and by analysis of partial analogues on earth. PMID:14604189

  10. HUBBLE FINDS NEW DARK SPOT ON NEPTUNE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a new great dark spot, located in the northern hemisphere of the planet Neptune. Because the planet's northern hemisphere is now tilted away from Earth, the new feature appears near the limb of the planet. The spot is a near mirror-image to a similar southern hemisphere dark spot that was discovered in 1989 by the Voyager 2 probe. In 1994, Hubble showed that the southern dark spot had disappeared. Like its predecessor, the new spot has high altitude clouds along its edge, caused by gasses that have been pushed to higher altitudes where they cool to form methane ice crystal clouds. The dark spot may be a zone of clear gas that is a window to a cloud deck lower in the atmosphere. Planetary scientists don t know how long lived this new feature might be. Hubble's high resolution will allow astronomers to follow the spot's evolution and other unexpected changes in Neptune's dynamic atmosphere. The image was taken on November 2, 1994 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, when Neptune was 2.8 billion miles (4.5 billion kilometers) from Earth. Hubble can resolve features as small as 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) across in Neptune's cloud tops. Credit: H. Hammel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and NASA

  11. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  12. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  13. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  14. Breast PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007469.htm Breast PET scan To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. A breast positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that uses a radioactive ...

  15. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... any concerns you have about radiation with the health care provider who recommends the test. ... Usually the health care provider will recommend this scan based on ... the scan. For this reason, this test is not often done anymore.

  16. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  17. Electron beam spot size stabilization for radiographic application

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have demonstrated through computer simulations that self-biasing the target can effectively control the ion column which causes radial pinching of the electron beam, resulting in the growth of spot size on target. This method has the unique features in simplicity and non-intrusiveness in its implementation into radiographic systems. The concept is being actively explored experimentally at the Integrated Test Stand (ITS).

  18. Rocky mountain spotted fever on the arm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is a disease transmitted to humans by a tick bite. The spots begin as flat (macular) red (erythematous) patches that may bleed into the skin, causing purplish spots (purpura). The disease ...

  19. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  20. Optical scanning cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a technique called optical scanning cryptography (OSC). The technique can perform encryption on-the-fly using laser beams and can be implemented using an optical heterodyne scanning. We shall first describe the optical heterodyne scanning system and then provide some computer simulations to clarify and confirm the idea of encryption and decryption.

  1. CMB cold spot from inflationary feature scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2016-05-01

    We propose a "feature-scattering" mechanism to explain the cosmic microwave background cold spot seen from WMAP and Planck maps. If there are hidden features in the potential of multi-field inflation, the inflationary trajectory can be scattered by such features. The scattering is controlled by the amount of isocurvature fluctuations, and thus can be considered as a mechanism to convert isocurvature fluctuations into curvature fluctuations. This mechanism predicts localized cold spots (instead of hot ones) on the CMB. In addition, it may also bridge a connection between the cold spot and a dip on the CMB power spectrum at ℓ ∼ 20.

  2. Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot14 enhances catalysis of fatty acid synthase in lactating mammary epithelium[S

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Michael C.; Wellberg, Elizabeth A.; Lewis, Andrew S.; Terrell, Kristina L.; Merz, Andrea L.; Maluf, N. Karl; Serkova, Natalie J.; Anderson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot 14 has been consistently associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis activity in multiple tissues, including the lactating mammary gland, which synthesizes large quantities of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) exclusively via FASN. However, the molecular function of Spot14 remains undefined during lactation. Spot14-null mice produce milk deficient in total triglyceride and de novo MCFA that does not sustain optimal neonatal growth. The lactation defect was rescued by provision of a high fat diet to the lactating dam. Transgenic mice overexpressing Spot14 in mammary epithelium produced total milk fat equivalent to controls, but with significantly greater MCFA. Spot14-null dams have no diminution of metabolic gene expression, enzyme protein levels, or intermediate metabolites that accounts for impaired de novo MCFA. When [13C] fatty acid products were quantified in vitro using crude cytosolic lysates, native FASN activity was 1.6-fold greater in control relative to Spot14-null lysates, and add back of Spot14 partially restored activity. Recombinant FASN catalysis increased 1.4-fold and C = 14:0 yield was enhanced 4-fold in vitro following addition of Spot14. These findings implicate Spot14 as a direct protein enhancer of FASN catalysis in the mammary gland during lactation when maximal MCFA production is needed. PMID:24771867

  3. Laser Scanning-Assisted Tip-Enhanced Optical Microscopy for Robust Optical Nanospectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yano, Taka-Aki; Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Mochizuki, Masahito; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko

    2016-07-01

    Laser-scanning-assisted tip-enhanced optical microscopy was developed for robust optical nanospectroscopy. The laser-scanning system was utilized to automatically set and keep the center of a tight laser-focusing spot in the proximity of a metallic tip with around 10 nm precision. This enabled us to efficiently and stably induce plasmon-coupled field enhancement at the apex of the metallic probe tip. The laser-scanning technique was also applied to tracking and compensating the thermal drift of the metallic tip in the spot. This technique is usable for long-term tip-enhanced optical spectroscopy without any optical degradation. PMID:27412187

  4. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  5. Finding your innovation sweet spot.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Jacob; Horowitz, Roni; Levav, Amnon; Mazursky, David

    2003-03-01

    Most new product ideas are either uninspired or impractical. So how can developers hit the innovation sweet spot--far enough from existing products to attract real interest but close enough that they are feasible to make and market? They can apply five innovation patterns that manipulate existing components of a product and its immediate environment to come up with something both ingenious and viable, say the authors. The subtraction pattern works by removing product components, particularly those that seem desirable or indispensable. Think of the legless high chair that attaches to the kitchen table. The multiplication pattern makes one or more copies of an existing component, then alters those copies in some important way. For example, the Gillette double-bladed razor features a second blade that cuts whiskers at a slightly different angle. By dividing an existing product into its component parts--the division pattern--you can see something that was an integrated whole in an entirely different light. Think of the modern home stereo--it has modular speakers, tuners, and CD and tape players, which allow users to customize their sound systems. The task unification pattern involves assigning a new task to an existing product element or environmental attribute, thereby unifying two tasks in a single component. An example is the defrosting filament in an automobile windshield that also serves as a radio antenna. Finally, the attribute dependency pattern alters or creates the dependent relationships between a product and its environment. For example, by creating a dependent relationship between lens color and external lighting conditions, eyeglass developers came up with a lens that changes color when exposed to sunlight. PMID:12632810

  6. A Dark Spot on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft of Jupiter's icy moon Europa focuses on a dark, smooth region whose center is the lowest area in this image. To the west (left), it is bounded by a cliff and terraces, which might have been formed by normal faulting. The slopes toward the east (right) leading into the dark spot are gentle.

    Near the center of the dark area, it appears the dark materials have covered some of the bright terrain and ridges. This suggests that when the dark material was deposited, it may have been a fluid or an icy slush.

    Only a few impact craters are visible, with some of them covered or flooded by dark material. Some appear in groups, which may indicate that they are secondary craters formed by debris excavated during a larger impact event. A potential source for these is the nearby crater Mannann`an.

    North is to the top of the picture which is centered at 1 degree south latitude and 225 degrees west longitude. The images in this mosaic have been re-projected to 50 meters (55 yards) per picture element. They were obtained by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on March 29, 1998, during Galileo's fourteenth orbit of Jupiter, at ranges as close as 1940 kilometers (1,200 miles) from Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. An innovative technique in scanning land areas with a multi-FIDLER system.

    PubMed

    Marianno, C M; Higley, K A; Hunter, D

    2001-05-01

    Remediation can be a long and tedious effort. One possible step in this process is the scanning of land to locate elevated areas of radiological contamination. By adapting existing global positioning technology with radiation detection systems, this process can be significantly accelerated. The Field Instrument for Detecting Low Energy Radiation (FIDLER) was used in conjunction with a Global Positioning System (GPS) and Trimble data logger. With this system two different land areas were scanned using two different scanning methods. In the first method, three FIDLERs were attached to a baby jogger and were used to scan a 20-acre site devoid of vegetation. The second technique involved individuals carrying the instruments over a 15-acre site that contained vegetation. Here the FIDLERs were waved in front of the workers in 50-cm arcs. In all cases, radiological and position data were collected by the data loggers. Using these results, accurate maps were generated for each site clearly illustrating areas and spots of elevated activity. By employing this technique over 250,000 data points pertaining to position and count rate were used to map nearly 40 acres of land in under 3 wk. PMID:11316088

  8. Suspension system for gimbal supported scanning payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Gimballed scanning devices or instruments are the subject of this invention. Scanning is an important aspect of space science. To achieve a scan pattern some means must be provided which impart to the payload an oscillatory motion. Various forms of machines have been employed for controllably conferring on scanning instruments predetermined scan patterns. They include control moment gyroscopes, reaction wheels, torque motors, reaction control systems, and the like. But rotating unbalanced mass (RUM) devices are a new and efficient way to generate scans in gimballed payloads. RUM devices are superior to previous scanning apparatus, but they require power consuming and frequently complex auxiliary control systems to position and reposition the particular scan pattern relative to a target or a number of targets. Herein the control system is simplified. The most frequently employed method for achieving the various scan patterns is to gimbal the scanning device. Gimbals are suspended in such a way that they can be activated to generate the scan pattern. The suspension means described is for payloads supported in gimbals wherein the payload rotation is restricted by a flex pivot so that the payload oscillates, thereby moving in a scan pattern.

  9. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  10. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  11. The sweet spot of a baseball bat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    1998-09-01

    The sweet spot of a baseball bat, like that of a tennis racket, can be defined either in terms of a vibration node or a centre of percussion. In order to determine how each of the sweet spots influences the "feel" of the bat, measurements were made of the impact forces transmitted to the hands. Measurements of the bat velocity, and results for a freely suspended bat, were also obtained in order to assist in the interpretation of the force waveforms. The results show that both sweet spots contribute to the formation of a sweet spot zone where the impact forces on the hands are minimised. The free bat results are also of interest since they provided particularly elegant examples of wave excitation and propagation, suitable for a student demonstration or experiment.

  12. Ultrasonic hammer produces hot spots in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Sizhu; Chen, Ming-Wei; Dlott, Dana D.; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical action can produce dramatic physical and mechanochemical effects when the energy is spatially or temporally concentrated. An important example of such phenomena in solids is the mechanical initiation of explosions, which has long been speculated to result from ‘hot spot’ generation at localized microstructures in the energetic material. Direct experimental evidence of such hot spots, however, is exceptionally limited; mechanisms for their generation are poorly understood and methods to control their locations remain elusive. Here we report the generation of intense, localized microscale hot spots in solid composites during mild ultrasonic irradiation, directly visualized by a thermal imaging microscope. These ultrasonic hot spots, with heating rates reaching ~22,000 K s-1, nucleate exclusively at interfacial delamination sites in composite solids. Introducing specific delamination sites by surface modification of embedded components provides precise and reliable control of hot spot locations and permits microcontrol of the initiation of reactions in energetic materials including fuel/oxidizer explosives.

  13. How Many Spots Does a Cheetah Have?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Kristine M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes first grade students' mathematical investigation of the number of spots on a cheetah. The exploration of counting and estimation strategies that grew from the investigation gives evidence that mathematicians come in all ages. (ASK)

  14. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  15. Quantitation of proteinuria by spot urine sampling.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Indira; Kirubakaran, Chellam; Markandeyulu; Selvakumar

    2004-07-01

    Few studies have shown that calculation of protein/creatinine ratio in a spot urine sample correlates well with the 24-hour urine collection. A study was conducted to compare the accuracy of a spot urinary protein/creatinine ratio (P/C ratio) and urinary dipstick (albustix) with the 24-hour urine protein (24-HUP). Fifty samples from 26 patients were collected. This included a 24-hour urine sample followed by the next voided spot sample. The protein/creatinine ratio was calculated and dipstick (albustix) was performed on the spot sample. This was compared with the 24-hour urine protein excretion. The correlation between the three samples was statistically highly significant (p=<0.001) for all levels of proteinuria. The normal value of protein/creatinine ratio in Indian children was also estimated on 100 normal children attending the OPD and was calculated to be 0.053 (S.E of mean±0.003). PMID:23105455

  16. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  17. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  18. Features of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This montage features activity in the turbulent region of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS). Four sets of images of the GRS were taken through various filters of the Galileo imaging system over an 11.5 hour period on 26 June, 1996 Universal Time. The sequence was designed to reveal cloud motions. The top and bottom frames on the left are of the same area, northeast of the GRS, viewed through the methane (732 nm) filter but about 70 minutes apart. The top left and top middle frames are of the same area and at the same time, but the top middle frame is taken at a wavelength (886 nm) where methane absorbs more strongly. (Only high clouds can reflect sunlight in this wavelength.) Brightness differences are caused by the different depths of features in the two images. The bottom middle frame shows reflected light at a wavelength (757 nm) where there are essentially no absorbers in the Jovian atmosphere. The white spot is to the northwest of the GRS; its appearance at different wavelengths suggests that the brightest elements are 30 km higher than the surrounding clouds. The top and bottom frames on the right, taken nine hours apart and in the violet (415 nm) filter, show the time evolution of an atmospheric wave northeast of the GRS. Visible crests in the top right frame are much less apparent 9 hours later in the bottom right frame. The misalignment of the north-south wave crests with the observed northwestward local wind may indicate a shift in wind direction (wind shear) with height. The areas within the dark lines are 'truth windows' or sections of the images which were transmitted to Earth using less data compression. Each of the six squares covers 4.8 degrees of latitude and longitude (about 6000 square kilometers). North is at the top of each frame.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment

  19. The hot spot of vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, Ranga B.; Kanemasu, Edward T.

    1988-01-01

    A conventional radiometer is used to identify the hot spot (the peak in reflected radiation in the retrosolar direction) of vegetation. A multiwavelength-band radiometer collected radiances on fully grown dense wheat and maize canopies on several clear sunny days. It is noted that the hot spot is difficult to detect in the near IR wavelengths because the shadows are much darker. In general, the retrosolar brightness is found to be higher for smaller sun polar angles than for larger angles.

  20. White-spot disease of salmon fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazuranich, J.J.; Nielson, W.E.

    1959-01-01

     White-spot disease, sometimes referred to as coagulated-yolk disease, has been associated with excessive mortalities occurring among the fry and early fingerling stages of the fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytacha) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Stations at Carson, Cook, Underwood, and Willard, Washington. This disease of eggs and fry should not be confused with the "white-spot" infection that is caused in fingerlings by members of the protozoan genus Ichthyophthirius.