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Sample records for active spreading center

  1. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  2. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  3. How Leaky Are Seafloor Spreading Center Axes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Haymon, R. M.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.; Ferrini, V.

    2013-12-01

    Some 500 active vent sites, both focused and diffuse, have now been located along spreading centers by either visual confirmation or instrumental detection of the discharging plume. Discovery of the large majority of these sites was made easier by high-volume discharge of particle-laden plumes. These observations led to estimates (as can be derived from the InterRidge Vents Database) of site frequency from ~0.5-5/100 km, generally increasing with spreading rate. Over the last decade, however, the increasing use of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP (mV)) (aka Eh) sensors capable of detecting minute concentrations of reduced hydrothermal chemicals (e.g., Fe+2, sulfides, Mn+2, H2, and others) suggests that these frequency estimates may be far too conservative. This hypothesis is consistent with earlier results from a few large-scale, high-resolution camera tows on some EPR segments. ORP data provide two important advantages for site identification not available with other commonly used continuously recording sensors: (1) detection of low-temperature, particle-scarce plumes, and (2) detection of reduced chemical species with very short residence times, thus increasing the location specificity of the discharge source. Here, we present high-resolution distributions of ORP anomalies observed in past plume surveys along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (19.5°-22.5°S) in 2004 and 2008, the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.6°-86°W) in 2005/6 and 2011, as well as new data (2011) from the East Pacific Rise (9°-10°N). Except for the 2011 GSC data (a standard CTD tow-yo), all data were collected during continuous horizontal tows of ORP sensors at various depths <~120 m above the seafloor. We used two approaches to verify that ORP anomalies were authentic hydrothermal signals and not (especially in the case of small anomalies) produced by some other transient chemical anomaly. First, on the 2008 ELSC and 2011 EPR tows we compared temperature (ΔT) and ORP (ΔORP) data from

  4. Information spreading and development of cultural centers.

    PubMed

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-05-01

    The historical interplay between societies is governed by many factors, including in particular the spreading of languages, religion, and other symbolic traits. Cultural development, in turn, is coupled to the emergence and maintenance of information spreading. Strong centralized cultures exist due to attention from their members, whose faithfulness in turn relies on the supply of information. Here we discuss a culture evolution model on a planar geometry that takes into account aspects of the feedback between information spreading and its maintenance. Features of the model are highlighted by comparing it to cultural spreading in ancient and medieval Europe, where it suggests in particular that long-lived centers should be located in geographically remote regions. PMID:23004830

  5. Information spreading and development of cultural centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-05-01

    The historical interplay between societies is governed by many factors, including in particular the spreading of languages, religion, and other symbolic traits. Cultural development, in turn, is coupled to the emergence and maintenance of information spreading. Strong centralized cultures exist due to attention from their members, whose faithfulness in turn relies on the supply of information. Here we discuss a culture evolution model on a planar geometry that takes into account aspects of the feedback between information spreading and its maintenance. Features of the model are highlighted by comparing it to cultural spreading in ancient and medieval Europe, where it suggests in particular that long-lived centers should be located in geographically remote regions.

  6. Geodetic measurements at sea floor spreading centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiess, F. N.

    1978-01-01

    A network of 8 or more precision transponder units mounted on the sea floor and interrogated periodically from an instrument package towed near bottom through the area to provide the necessary spatial averaging could provide a practical system for observing the pattern of buildup of strain at intermediate and fast spreading centers.

  7. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  8. Subaerial Seafloor Spreading in Iceland: Segment-Scale Processes and Analogs for Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, Jeffrey; Varga, Robert; Siler, Drew; Horst, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The nature of oceanic crust and spreading center processes are derived from direct observations of surface features and geophysics at active spreading centers as well as from deep crustal drilling, tectonic windows into the upper oceanic crust, and ophiolites. Integrating active spreading processes with deeply eroded crustal structures in Iceland provides an additional perspective on subsurface processes that are likely to be important at mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. Spreading in Iceland strongly resembles second-order segment-scale processes of the fast-spreading centers. Along axis, major processes including subsidence, magmatic construction, and hydrothermal activity vary systematically over tens of kilometers from segment centers to ends. Near spreading segment centers ("central volcanoes") subsidence and crustal thickening are greatest. The intrusion of high-level sill and cone sheet complexes and small gabbroic plutons contribute substantially to upper crustal thickening. Both magma supply and tectonic movements have a very strong vertical component. In contrast, near segment ends (fissure swarms in active spreading areas) subsidence is limited, most thickening occurs in the lava units and lateral dike injection is likely to dominate. In both Iceland and fast-spread crust, where the magma supply is relatively high, subaxial subsidence is the key process that controls the construction and modification of the crust during spreading. Seafloor studies on fast-spreading ridge show lava flows fed by dike intrusion events focused along a narrow (<1 km) axial region with very limited relief. However, subsurface structures reveal that axial lavas must subside hundreds of meters immediately beneath the axis as the overlying lava pile thickens. Similar relationships occur in Iceland but over a wider region of active magmatism (neovolcanic zone tens of kilometers wide) and building a much thicker upper crust (~5 km). For both cases, in order for the lava units to

  9. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  10. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity From the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reysenbach, A.; Banta, A.; Kelly, S.; Kirshstein, J.; Voytek, M.

    2005-12-01

    Due to the diversity of venting styles, geological settings and variations in fluid geochemistry, the Valu Fa Ridge and Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) provide a unique opportunity to explore the effects geological and geochemical variables on patterns of microbial phylogenetic and metabolic diversity. High temperature sulfides, diffuse flow fluids and microbial mats were collected from six active vent fields on the Valu Fa Ridge and Eastern Lau Spreading Center during the R/V Melville cruise TUIM05MV. All samples were subsampled for molecular and microbial culturing purposes. The archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR from a selection of samples. Additionally, the presence of Aquificales and an unidentified lineage, the DHVE archaeal group, was explored using PCR primers specific for these groups. A selection of DNAs were also screened for functional genes that are diagnostic for certain pathways, viz, aclB (reductive TCA cycle), mcrA (methanogenesis), nirS and nirK (nitrite reduction), amoA (ammonia oxidation). Culturing of thermophiles, both acidophiles and neutrophiles, was initiated. Over 20 hydrogen oxidizing (hydrogen and oxygen) or nitrate reducing (hydrogen and nitrate) chemolithoautotrophs were isolated as colonies and grow at 70 degrees C. All are related to Persephonella hydrogenophila, with the exception of 2 cultures that perhaps represent new species of Hydrogenivirga and Aquifex. Preliminary analysis of patterns of Aquificales diversity using both culturing and molecular approaches suggest that the distributions of this group alone are very different from that observed at other hydrothermal sites such as along the East Pacific Rise or Central Indian Ridge. As yet, the most commonly isolated Aquificales, P. marina, has not been detected in enrichment cultures from ELSC, and the diversity of Aquificales-related sequences is much greater than detected from sites along the EPR. It is therefore also likely, that patterns of

  11. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading, which is one of a handful of fundamental global tectonic processes. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments are perpendicular to transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with the non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. For our analysis, instead of comparing the strike of mid-ocean ridges with the strike of nearby transform faults, the azimuth of which can be uncertain, we compare with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMet, Gordon, and Argus 2010]. The advantages of our approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. Moreover, the strike may vary considerably within a single ridge segment bounded by transform faults. This is especially evident near overlapping spreading centers along with the strike varies rapidly with distance along a ridge segment. We use various bathymetric data sets to make our estimates including ETOPO1 [Amante and Eakins, 2009] and GeoMapApp [Ryan et al., 2009]. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, it appears that some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate significantly from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs

  12. Magma to Microbe: Modeling Hydrothermal Processes at Ocean Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Metaxas, Anna; Perfit, Michael R.

    Hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers reflect the complex interactions among transport, cooling and crystallization of magma, fluid circulation in the crust, tectonic processes, water-rock interaction, and the utilization of hydrothermal fluids as a metabolic energy source by microbial and macro-biological ecosystems. The development of mathematical and numerical models that address these complex linkages is a fundamental part the RIDGE 2000 program that attempts to quantify and model the transfer of heat and chemicals from "mantle to microbes" at oceanic ridges. This volume presents the first "state of the art" picture of model development in this context. The most outstanding feature of this volume is its emphasis on mathematical and numerical modeling of a broad array of hydrothermal processes associated with oceanic spreading centers. By examining the state of model development in one volume, both cross-fertilization of ideas and integration across the disparate disciplines that study seafloor hydrothermal systems is facilitated. Students and scientists with an interest in oceanic spreading centers in general and more specifically in ridge hydrothermal processes will find this volume to be an up-to-date and indispensable resource.

  13. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments is perpendicular to nearby transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. To estimate non-orthogonality, we compare ridge-segment strikes with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMets et al., 2010]. The advantages of this approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs where seafloor spreading is the fastest on the planet. If a plume lies near the ridge segment, we assume it contributes to magma overpressure along the ridge segment [Abelson & Agnon, 1997]. We further assume that the contribution to magma overpressure is proportional to the buoyancy flux of the plume [Sleep, 1990] and inversely proportional to the distance between the mid-ocean ridge segment and a given plume. We find that the non-orthogonal angle tends to decrease with increasing spreading rate and with increasing distance between ridge segment and plume.

  14. Hydrothermal circulation at the Cleft-Vance overlapping spreading center: Results of a magnetometric resistivity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, R.L.; Webb, S.C.; Jegen, M.; Sananikone, K.

    1998-01-01

    We report on a magnetometric resistivity sounding carried out in the overlapping spreading center between the Cleft and Vance segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The data collected reveal a strong three dimensionality in the crustal electrical resistivity structure on wavelengths of a few kilometers. Areas of reduced crustal electrical resistivities, with values approaching that of seawater, are seen beneath the neovolcanic zones of both active spreading centers. We interpret these reduced resistivities as evidence of active hydrothermal circulation within the uppermost 1 km of hot, young oceanic crust.

  15. The oceanic crustal structure at the extinct, slow to ultraslow Labrador Sea spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delescluse, Matthias; Funck, Thomas; Dehler, Sonya A.; Louden, Keith E.; Watremez, Louise

    2015-07-01

    Two seismic refraction lines were acquired along and across the extinct Labrador Sea spreading center during the Seismic Investigations off Greenland, Newfoundland and Labrador 2009 cruise. We derived two P wave velocity models using both forward modeling (RAYINVR) and traveltime tomography inversion (Tomo2D) with good ray coverage down to the mantle. Slow-spreading Paleocene oceanic crust has a thickness of 5 km, while the Eocene crust created by ultraslow spreading is as thin as 3.5 km. The upper crustal velocity is affected by fracturation due to a dominant tectonic extension during the waning stage of spreading, with a velocity drop of 0.5 to 1 km/s when compared to Paleocene upper crustal velocities (5.2-6.0 km/s). The overall crustal structure is similar to active ultraslow-spreading centers like the Mohns Ridge or the South West Indian Ridge with lower crustal velocities of 6.0-7.0 km/s. An oceanic core complex is imaged on a 50 km long segment of the ridge perpendicular line with serpentinized peridotites (7.3-7.9 km/s) found 1.5 km below the basement. The second, ridge-parallel line also shows extremely thin crust in the extinct axial valley, where 8 km/s mantle velocity is imaged just 1.5 km below the basement. This thin crust is interpreted as crust formed by ultraslow spreading, which was thinned by tectonic extension.

  16. Spread of epileptic activity in human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, John

    1997-03-01

    For many patients with medically refractory epilepsy surgical resection of the site of seizure onset (epileptic focus) offers the best hope for cure. Determination of the nature of seizure propagation should lead to improved methods for locating the epileptic focus (and hence reduce patient morbidity) and possibly to new treatment modalities directed at blocking seizure spread. Theoretical studies of neural networks emphasize the role of traveling waves for the propagation of activity. However, the nature of seizure propagation in human brain remains poorly characterized. The spread of epileptic activity in patients undergoing presurgical evaluation for epilepsy surgery was measured by placing subdural grids of electrodes (interelectrode spacings of 3-10 mm) over the frontal and temporal lobes. The exact location of each electrode relative to the surface of the brain was determined using 3--D MRI imaging techniques. Thus it is possible to monitor the spread of epileptic activity in both space and time. The observations are discussed in light of models for seizure propagation.

  17. Hydrothermal Plume Geochemistry along the East Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, J. A.; Baker, E.; Martinez, F.; Buck, N.; Walker, S.; Seewald, J.; Proskurowski, G.; Lupton, J.; Wheat, G.

    2008-12-01

    In 2004 and 2008, we conducted extensive surveys of hydrothermal plumes along the East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Lau Back Arc Basin. The survey in 2008 is the most comprehensive plume survey conducted on any ridge to date. It covered 100 km2 by towing the 120 kHz side scan sonar and associated sensors from 19.9 to 21° S at 1 km intervals extending 5km on each side of the ridge crest. This part of the survey encompassed the known vent fields, Tow Cam, ABE, and Kila Moana. A fourth major vent field north of ABE was also identified. Near the ABE vent field survey lines were done at 0.5km intervals. The Valu Fa Ridge from 21.9 to 22.4°S was also surveyed using 7 lines at 0.7km spacing. The side scan sonar was towed ~ 100m above the sea floor with plume sensing instruments on the towline, clump weight, sonar, and on a line extended below the clump weight. Plume sensors included the Vents In Situ Analyzer, optical backscatter, Oxidation Reduction Potential, and CTD. Vertical and towed hydrocasts were located in areas of interest to collect sea water samples for chemical characterization of the plumes. While the surveys indicate that robust (high temperature) venting was restricted to an area within 1km of the ridge axis, there was some limited evidence of lower temperature venting further form the axis. The plume data from the sensors and discrete samples will be used to chemically characterize the hydrothermal plumes found along the ELSC. Emphasis will be placed on known vent fields and the North ABE field. 3He and Mn in the plumes will be compared to vent fluid data at the known sites. Although the N. ABE field appears to be the largest of the vent fields in this region, vent fluids from it have not yet been collected. The plumes above N. ABE have the most elevated levels of 3He and Mn of all of the plumes sampled along the ELSC and Valu Fa Ridges. This vent field is located closer to the transitions between andesitic rocks in the south and basaltic rocks in

  18. The SHEBA Ridge : a Particular Spreading Center or an End-member of the Slow Spreading Processes ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENTE, P.; LEROY, S.; BLAIS, A.; d'ACREMONT, E.; PATRIAT, P.; FLEURY, J.; MAIA, M.; PERROT, J.; FOURNIER, M.

    2001-12-01

    We analyze multibeam bathymetry, acoustic imagery, magnetic and gravity data collected during the Encens-Sheba cruise of the NO Marion Dufresne. The survey covered the axis and the flanks up to the continental margins of the Sheba Ridge between 52oE and 54o30'E, at the oriental extremity of the Aden gulf. The full spreading rate in this young oceanic basin is about 2 cmy since the continental rifting. Three second-order segments, one presenting an anomalously shallow axis, characterize this part of the Sheba ridge. The new bathymetry data reveal a particular fabric on the flanks and at the axis for the long (120 km) and shallow spreading center. The flanks, like the ridge axis, are marked by large, more or less circular, volcanic domes. They are built by a few large volcanoes (5-10 km diameter) and by several smaller (1-2 km diameter) edifices. Many of these volcanoes present a well-developed caldera. These volcanic constructions are well developed in the southern part of the axis. Close to the axis, the higher reliefs culminate at a depth of 1000 m. Tectonic scarps limit a deep axial valley at the extremities of this long segment. The deformation, diffuse at the ends, becomes more focused toward the center of this segment and is arranged in an hourglass pattern. A negative mantle Bouguer anomaly elongated in the spreading direction marks this segment. The differences in MBA (~70 mgals) and in depth (more than 2 km) between the center and the ends of this segment are the largest, highest of the slow spreading ridges. Acoustic imagery, axial magnetic and mantle Bouguer anomalies generally permit to precise the location of the spreading axis. In this segment, if the axial area is clearly defined, the neovolcanic zone is more difficult to localize. This suggests a diffuse volcanism at the center of the segment at the origin of the numerous small volcanoes. The other segments of the Sheba ridge present a more typical slow spreading axial valley. The discontinuities

  19. The L-SCAN Experiment: Mapping the Axial Magma Chamber Beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Dunn, R.; Brooks, K.; Conder, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Conley, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    The L-SCAN (Lau Spreading Center Active-source Investigation) seismic experiment was designed to examine the relationship between melt supply and magmatic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (a RIDGE2000 focus site). This 3-D active-source ocean-bottom-seismometer experiment covers a 100-km-long section of the spreading center, which exhibits significant along-strike variability in seafloor morphology, tectonics, crustal magma storage, and hydrothermal venting. Presumably these changes arise from variations in mantle melt supply. During the seismic experiment, we deployed 84 4-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS), obtained from the OBSIP national instrument pool, over a 40 x 100 sq. km area centered on the ridge at 20°30'S. Sixty-five seismic lines (50-150 km in length) were shot using the R/V M. G. Langseth's 36-element airgun source, generating ~1 million seismic travel time observations. The experiment extends across three ridge segments, separated by two overlapping spreading centers. The southern segment exhibits an ‘inflated’ cross-sectional area and is underlain by an axial-magma-chamber seismic reflector (as detected by a previous MCS seismic study). We present a preliminary analysis of the L-SCAN refraction data collected along this ridge segment. Travel times of P-wave seismic energy were measured and compared for ray paths as a function of distance from the ridge axis, thereby allowing us to map, to first order, the location of the crustal low-velocity zone that extends beneath the AMC reflector. Only P-wave energy that has traveled within ~2-3 km of the ridge axis clearly exhibits the travel time delays indicative of a crustal low-velocity "mush” zone. We have not yet examined the deeper, Moho- and mantle-turning P-wave arrivals. It has been previously observed that high-temperature venting along this ridge segment is restricted to a narrow region at the ridge axis. We suggest a model in which a

  20. Contribution of myosin II activity to cell spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Paknikar, Aishwarya; Köster, Sarah; Zemel, Assaf

    2016-01-14

    Myosin II activity and actin polymerization at the leading edge of the cell are known to be essential sources of cellular stress. However, a quantitative account of their separate contributions is still lacking; so is the influence of the coupling between the two phenomena on cell spreading dynamics. We present a simple analytic elastic theory of cell spreading dynamics that quantitatively demonstrates how actin polymerization and myosin activity cooperate in the generation of cellular stress during spreading. Consistent with experiments, myosin activity is assumed to polarize in response to the stresses generated during spreading. The characteristic response time and the overall spreading time are predicted to determine different evolution profiles of cell spreading dynamics. These include, a (regular) monotonic increase of cell projected area with time, a non-monotonic (overshooting) profile with a maximum, and damped oscillatory modes. In addition, two populations of myosin II motors are distinguished based on their location in the lamella; those located above the major adhesion zone at the cell periphery are shown to facilitate spreading whereas those in deeper regions of the lamella are shown to oppose spreading. We demonstrate that the attenuation of myosin activity in the two regions may result in reciprocal effects on spreading. These findings provide important new insight into the function of myosin II motors in the course of spreading. PMID:26481613

  1. The East Pacific Rise: An Active Not Passive Spreading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, D. B.; Rowan, C. J.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Grand, S. P.; Simmons, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional plate tectonic interpretations of mid-oceanic ridges regard spreading as an entirely passive phenomenon. From this one would assume that the oceanic ridges will move over the mantle in response to the geodynamics of the diverging plates, and do not remain fixed spatially over any protracted period of time. An analysis of the kinematics of ridge motions in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference since 83 Ma generally supports this view, with the notable exception of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The Pacific-Nazca/Farallon segment of the EPR north of Easter Island (27°S) is oriented essentially N-S, and has produced more than 9500km of E-W spreading in the past 80 Ma, making it the dominant ridge in the world's plate system over this interval of time. Yet despite the large amount of E-W divergence, the spreading center has maintained its longitudinal position to within <±250 km of the current ridge axis. Global mantle convective flow modeling indicates that the EPR, unlike any other extensive segment of the mid-oceanic ridge system, is underlain by an active upwelling system extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We suggest that the lack of E-W motion of the EPR apparent from the kinematics is a consequence of these mantle dynamics; this ridge is thus not behaving as a passive plate boundary, but is actively and directly linked to, and controlled by, whole mantle upwelling. This observation overturns the notion that ridges are always entirely passive features of the plate system. Subduction of the northern EPR beneath western North America has thus resulted in the overriding of an active upwelling system that has contributed significantly to the evolution of Basin and Range kinematics and superimposed dynamics, including significant contributions from dynamic topography.

  2. A reexamination of the spreading center hypothesis for Ovda and Thetis regiones, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1990-01-01

    Crumpler et al. (1987) proposed that Ovda and Thetis Regiones are spreading centers. The strong positive correlation between geoid and topography observed in ovda and Thetis is unlike that observed for terrestrial spreading centers. The maximum elevation expected for spreading centers on Venus is 1.5 km, and a cooling plate thermal model predicts a maximum geoid anomaly of 8 m, both much less than observed. Even if a spreading center is operative in Ovda and Thetis, most of the geoid and topography must be due to other mechanisms. Crumplet et al. also proposed the existence of 'cross-strike discontinuities', interpreted as transform fault zones, but the evidence for these structures is not conclusive.

  3. Age-Related Changes in Spreading Activation during Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Rachel; Walker, Joanne; Gross, Julien; Hayne, Harlene

    2014-01-01

    The concept of spreading activation describes how retrieval of one memory cues retrieval of other memories that are associated with it. This study explored spreading activation in 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old infants. Infants (n = 144) learned two tasks within the same experimental session; one task, deferred imitation (DI), is typically remembered…

  4. Wide-angle Seismic Constraints On The Evolution of Galapagos Hotspot - Cocos Nazca Spreading Center Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, V.; Charvis, Ph.; Flueh, E. R.; Bialas, J.; Walther, C.

    The Nazca and Cocos plates include several blocks of thickened oceanci crust thought to have originated from the interaction between the Galapagos hotspot and the Cocos- Nazca spreading center during the last 20 Ma. The most prominent are the Cocos, Malpelo, and Carnegie Ridges. In this work we compare the crustal seismic structure of these ridges along five wide-angle profiles acquired during the PAGANINI-1999 and SALIERI-2001 experiments. Two of these profiles are located on the Cocos Ridge and another one in Malpelo. The last two profiles (Carnegie Ridge) are in the conjugate positions with Malpelo (at~20 Ma) and southern Cocos (at~12 Ma). The results show that maximum crustal thickness along these profiles is highly vari- able, ranging from 19-20 km in northern Cocos, Malpelo, and its conjugate position, to 16.5 km in southern Cocos and only 13 km in its conjugate position. Oceanic Layer 2 thickness is quite uniform regardless of total crustal thickness variations, and thus crustal thickening is mainly accomodated in Layer 3. The mean seismic velocities of Layer 3 are similar in all profiles, and generally lower where the crust is the thick- est. This leads to an overall anticorrelation between crustal thickness and bulk lower crustal velocities. These observations suggest, on one hand, the existence of important variations on the Galapagos hotspot activity and on its relative location with respect to the spreading center. At 20 Ma, the hotspot-ridge system would be dominated by a vig- orous on-ridge magmatic activity, while at 12 Ma it would show a significantly lower, off-ridge centered activity. On the other hand, the obtained velocity-thickness rela- tionship differs from that expected for a crust generated by decompression melting of an abnormally hot mantle. We suggest that other parameters such as active upwelling, or variations in water content and/or composition of the mantle source must be taken into account.

  5. Petrogenesis of Davidson Seamount lavas and its implications for fossil spreading center and intraplate magmatism in the eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. R.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Lonsdale, P. F.

    2010-02-01

    Seafloor spreading causes abundant magmatism along active ocean spreading centers, but the cause of magmatism along fossil spreading centers is enigmatic. Samples collected from Davidson Seamount, a typical volcanic ridge along an abandoned spreading center in the eastern Pacific, consist of an alkalic basalt to trachyte lava series; transitional basalts were sampled from another part of the abandoned axis, 20 km from the seamount. All samples experienced complex fractional crystallization prior to eruption, but they all share a common, compositionally heterogeneous mantle source. The parental magmas of the transitional basalts were produced from this source at higher degree of melting than those of the alkalic lava series. The composition of Davidson lavas overlaps with those of ridges along other fossil spreading centers and isolated near- and off-ridge seamounts in the eastern Pacific. Together they define a compositional continuum ranging from tholeiitic, normal mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like to alkalic, ocean island basalt (OIB)-like, similar to lavas that form linear island chains and ridges. We propose that this entire compositional spectrum of intraplate lavas that do not form linear volcanic chains in the eastern Pacific results from variations in the degree of partial melting of a common, compositionally heterogeneous mantle source. This source consists of more easily melted, geochemically enriched components of varying sizes and amounts embedded in a depleted lherzolitic matrix. Large degree of partial melting produces normal MORB-like melts represented by some near-ridge seamount lavas, whereas small degree of melting produces OIB-like fossil spreading center lavas. The small degree of partial melting beneath recently abandoned spreading centers results from either buoyancy-driven decompression melting of the hot lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle material beneath active spreading centers or rapid motion, with respect to the underlying

  6. Spreading Dynamics Following Bursty Activity Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Alexei

    The dynamics of many social, technological and economic phenomena are driven by individual human actions, turning the quantitative understanding of human behavior into a central question of modern science. Recent empirical evidence indicates that the timing of individual human actions follow non-Poisson statistics, characterized by bursts of rapidly occurring events separated by long periods of inactivity. In this work we analyze how this bursty dynamics impacts the dynamics of spreading processes in computer and social systems. We demonstrate that the non-Poisson nature of the contact dynamics results in prevalence decay times significantly larger than predicted by the standard Poisson process based models. Thanks to this slow dynamics the spreading entity, namely a virus, rumor, etc., can persist in the system for long times.

  7. Geomagnetic paleointensity constraints on eruption timing at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, J. A.; Ab Fatah, A.; Colman, A.; McClinton, J. T.; Sinton, J. M.; White, S. M.; Rubin, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The intermediate-spreading-rate Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) experiences decreasing magma supply along axis with increasing distance from the nearby Galapagos hotspot. This allows us to explore the effects of variable magma supply on eruptive frequency, size, and style. Two contrasting sites on the GSC were mapped using high-resolution swath bathymetry, submersible observations, and camera tow photography. Individual eruptive units have been identified on the basis of these data and observations, as well sample geochemistry. In order to construct an eruptive history and to make broader interpretations regarding eruptive processes, it is necessary to place relative and absolute age constraints on these units. We present age determinations derived from geomagnetic paleointensity experiments at one of the study sites, centered at ~91°55'W, where increased magma supply from the hotspot results in an axial high. Due to the near monotonic decrease in geomagnetic paleointensity over the past ~500+ years, it is possible to infer relative age and to place approximate age constraints on eruptive units on the basis of their experimentally-determined paleointensity. Four of the largest identified units have been selected as a test case. Results suggest that the youngest flow is approximately 40 ± 30 years old. This flow unit is ~5 km long by 1 km wide, centered on the rise axis. An older flow (~180 ± 30 years old), also centered along the rise axis, lies to the west and its ~7 km along-axis exposure is interrupted by a large, flat-topped seamount. A number of active hydrothermal chimneys sit atop this flow unit, the heat source for which we infer to be related to the younger flow to the east or to a more recent shallow intrusion. The oldest documented flow is roughly 400 years old and is exposed slightly off-axis to the north of the two younger flows. The paleointensity-derived flow ages are consistent with available geological constraints on relative age. Based on

  8. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  9. Imaging the seismic structure beneath oceanic spreading centers using ocean bottom geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang

    This dissertation focuses on imaging the crustal and upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath oceanic spreading centers. The goals are to provide a better understanding of the crustal magmatic system and the relationship between mantle melting processes, crustal architecture and ridge characteristics. To address these questions I have analyzed ocean bottom geophysical data collected from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center using a combination of ambient noise tomography and seafloor compliance analysis. To characterize the crustal melt distribution at fast spreading ridges, I analyze seafloor compliance - the deformation under long period ocean wave forcing - measured during multiple expeditions between 1994 and 2007 at the East Pacific Rise 9º - 10ºN segment. A 3D numerical modeling technique is developed and used to estimate the effects of low shear velocity zones on compliance measurements. The forward modeling suggests strong variations of lower crustal shear velocity along the ridge axis, with zones of possible high melt fractions beneath certain segments. Analysis of repeated compliance measurements at 9º48'N indicates a decrease of crustal melt fraction following the 2005 - 2006 eruption. This temporal variability provides direct evidence for short-term variations of the magmatic system at a fast spreading ridge. To understand the relationship between mantle melting processes and crustal properties, I apply ambient noise tomography of ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) data to image the upper mantle seismic structure beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The seismic images reveal an asymmetric upper mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the ELSC, representing a zone of partial melt. As the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc, the LVZ becomes increasingly offset and separated from the sub-arc low velocity zone. The separation of the ridge and arc low velocity zones is spatially coincident

  10. "Near-bottom sonar mapping along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Edwards, M.; Dunn, R.; Baker, E. T.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from high resolution sidescan sonar mapping at the Ridge 2000 Lau Integrated Studies Site, a back-arc spreading center in the Southwest Pacific. The survey covered segments of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), which exhibit strong contrasts in geologic and geophysical characteristics, including variations in ridge morphology, volcanic and tectonic structures, lava composition and texture, magma production, and spreading rate. The bulk of the data were collected in 2008 aboard R/V Kilo Moana (KM0804), using the deep-towed IMI120 (DSL120A) sonar, with an array of miniature autonomous plume recorder's (MAPR's) tethered to the tow cable to detect hydrothermal plume signatures in the water column. The ELSC survey covered an area ~10 km wide by 100 km long centered on the spreading axis, with tracks spaced ~1 km apart, but as close as ~500 m in the vicinity of the ABE hydrothermal vent field, and also included the Tow Cam and Kilo Moana vent fields. The VFR survey covered a ~5 km wide by 100 km long area with ~700 m-spaced tracks, including the Vai Lili, Mariner, and Tui Malila vent sites. The IMI120 has a resolution of ~1-2 meters, giving the first detailed view of the on- and off-axis structures in the two focus regions. Navigational corrections to the sidescan data were made through feature-matching between the deep-towed data and a lower resolution background ship bathymetry grid, using software developed by the Hawaiian Mapping and Research Group. Background bathymetry and lower resolution (~100 m) sidescan data were compiled from previous cruises on R/V Kilo Moana, and an early-2009 seismic survey on R/V Marcus G. Langseth (L-SCAN). Hydrothermal plume data collected with the MAPR's are coregistered with the deep-towed sidescan data to illuminate correlations between seafloor structures and plume signatures. The axis of the VFR in the south forms a peaked ridge, inflated by abundant melt supply, and draped with

  11. Venus trough-and-ridge tessera - Analog to earth oceanic crust formed at spreading centers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The similarity between the morphologies of Venus trough-and-ridge tessera and the earth's ocean floor is discussed. The hypothesis that tessera texture might be related to a crustal fabric produced at spreading centers is examined. It is suggested that the proccesses that produce the ocean floor fabric on earth are good candidates for the origin and production of the trough-and-ridge tessera. To support this hypothesis, the characteristics of the trough-and-ridge terrain in Laima Tessera are described and compared to the seafloor at spreading centers.

  12. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  13. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  14. Upper mantle electrical resistivity structure beneath back-arc spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seama, N.; Shibata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Shindo, H.; Matsuno, T.; Nogi, Y.; Okino, K.

    2011-12-01

    We compare four electrical resistivity structure images of the upper mantle across back-arc spreading centers (Mariana Trough at 18 N and 13 N, and the Eastern Lau at 19.7 S and 21.3 S) to provide geophysical constraints on issues of mantle dynamics beneath the back-arc spreading system related to the subducting slab. The central Mariana Trough at 18 N has the full spreading rate of 25 km/Myr, and shows characteristic slow-spreading features; existence of median valley neovolcanic zone and "Bull's eyes" mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) along the axes. On the other hand, the southern Mariana Trough at 13 N shows an EPR type axial relief in morphology and lower MBA than that in the central Mariana Trough (Kitada et al., 2006), suggesting abundance of magma supply, even though the full spreading rate is 35 km/Myr that is categorized as a slow spreading ridge. At the Eastern Lau spreading center, crustal thickness and morphology vary systematically with arc proximity and shows the opposed trends against spreading rate: The full spreading rate increases from 65 km/Myr at 21.3 S to 85 km/Myr at 19.7 S, while the crustal thicknesses decrease together with morphology transitions from shallow peaked volcanic highs to a deeper flat axis (Martinez et al., 2006). Matsuno et al. (2010) provides a resistivity structure image of the upper mantle across the central Mariana subduction system, which contains several key features: There is an uppermost resistive layer with a thickness of 80-100 km beneath the central Mariana Trough, suggesting dry residual from the plate accretion process. But there is no evidence for a conductive feature beneath the back-arc spreading center at 18 N, and this feature is clearly independent from the conductive region beneath the volcanic arc below 60 km depth that reflects melting and hydration driven by water release from the subducting slab. The resultant upper mantle resistivity structure well support that the melt supply is not abundant, resulting in

  15. Seismic anisotropy indicates ridge-parallel asthenospheric flow beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, William; Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.; Blackman, Donna K.

    2015-02-01

    Seismic anisotropy beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) is investigated using both Rayleigh waves and shear waves, using data from the 2009-2010 ELSC ocean bottom seismograph experiment. Phase velocities of Rayleigh waves determined by ambient noise cross correlation are inverted for azimuthally anisotropic phase velocity maps. Splitting of S waves from five intermediate and deep focus earthquakes was determined by waveform analysis. Taken together, Rayleigh wave and S wave data indicate that significant (~2%) anisotropy extends to at least 300 km depth. Both data sets indicate a fast direction aligned within a few degrees of the N10°E striking ELSC and somewhat oblique to the N25°E strike of the neighboring volcanic arc. We therefore describe the fast direction as spreading perpendicular, not convergence perpendicular and interpret it as due to ridge-parallel flow of the asthenosphere. However, the region arcward (east) of the ELSC has the stronger anisotropy, suggesting that the strongest flow gradients may occur in the region between the spreading center and the arc, in contrast to being centered beneath the ELSC. Fluids released from the underlying plate may produce anisotropic hydrous materials, but more importantly lower the viscosity, thus enhancing along-strike flow. Both could contribute to an along-strike fast direction signature. Seafloor spreading diminishes south of the seismic array, ceasing altogether south of latitude 25°S (500 km south of the array center), a region dominated by much slower tectonic extension, suggesting that asthenosphere is inflowing from the north to accommodate the increase in asthenospheric volume associated with the seafloor spreading.

  16. Widespread, Off-axis Magmatism at a Young Oceanic Rift, the Sedimented Guaymas Basin Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, S.; Lizarralde, D.; Seewald, J.; Proskurowski, G.

    2010-12-01

    A thick layer of sediment commonly blankets spreading centers within young rifted margins such as the Guaymas Basin within the Gulf of California. The shallow oceanic crust in these environments differs significantly from deep-water, unsedimented ridges in that there is little to no extrusive volcanism, and crust is accreted by the intrusion of magmatic sills into sediments. From initial observations at the seafloor and through drill holes in the S. Guaymas Basin, a model of magmatic accretion similar to that of deep-water mid-ocean ridges was proposed wherein sills are intruded at the rift axis and subsequently buried by sediments as they are rafted off axis. Seismic reflection data collected throughout the N. Guaymas basin in 2002, however, found that sills do not deepen with off-axis distance suggesting that sill intrusion to shallow levels within the sediment pile occurs throughout the basin out to 50 km from the plate boundary (spreading age of 2 Ma). This suggests that magmatic accretion within the shallow crust is active over a very wide area (10-20 times larger than at deep-water mid-ocean ridges) independent of spreading age. During a cruise to the Guaymas Basin in 2009, we collected deep-towed sidescan sonar, sub-bottom imaging, multibeam bathymetry, near-bottom photographs, and bottom water samples across the N. Guaymas Basin to test this hypothesis. Acoustic backscatter imagery revealed nearly 100 localized, acoustically bright seafloor reflectors scattered throughout the survey area. Some of these backscatter anomalies were investigated with a deep-towed camera system and found to contain authigenic carbonate, tubeworms, clams, bacterial mats, and indurated sediment outcrops. Some sites showed small thermal anomalies in near-bottom waters, methane concentrations well in excess of background, and high 3He anomalies. Where coverage overlaps, these sites correlate with the position of seismically imaged subsurface sills. In this presentation, we present

  17. Information Retrieval by Constrained Spreading Activation in Semantic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Paul R.; Kjeldsen, Rick

    1987-01-01

    Describes GRANT, an expert system for finding sources of funding given research proposals. The architecture of GRANT and the implementation of constrained spreading activation (a modified search algorithm based on semantic memory) are described, and recall and precision rates are analyzed. (Author/LRW)

  18. Inward spread of activation in vertebrate muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    González-Serratos, H.

    1971-01-01

    1. A method for detecting the activation of individual myofibrils or groups of myofibrils within an isolated muscle fibre is described. It consists in making all the myofibrils wavy by setting the fibre in gelatine and compressing it longitudinally; active shortening of myofibrils can then be recognized by the straightening out of the waves. 2. The time course of this straightening during a twitch was found by high-speed ciné micrography. 3. There is a delay of activation between the superficial and central myofibrils, from which the velocity of inward spread of activation can be found. 4. This velocity has a Q10 of 2, and is about 7 cm/sec at 20° C. The mechanism of the inward spread of activation is discussed. 5. On relaxation the waves reappear, showing that there is a spontaneous elongation of the myofibrils. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3Plate 4 PMID:5557071

  19. The seismic structure of crust formed in back-arc spreading centers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, Cesar R.; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    About 3/4 of the Earth crust and most past subducted crust have been formed at oceanic spreading centers. Seismic experiments on oceanic crust that underlies most of the world ocean basins have defined a ubiquitous three-velocity-layers structure. Layer 1 is identified as sediment, but interpretation of layers 2 and 3 has remained a topic of intense research for more than half century. The nature of oceanic crust at basins has been mainly inferred from indirect geophysical measurements and rocks sampled at the seafloor. Current models propose that the formation of oceanic crust at mid ocean ridges (MOR) -away from hotspot anomalies- is essentially controlled by the rate of plate separation, with crustal types classified as ultraslow, slow, intermediate, and fast spreading crust. We present the first modern extensive seismic study of back-arc oceanic crust providing constrains on accretion processes. The depth-velocity distribution of back-arc crust resembles MOR layered structure, but velocities are systematically different to MOR crust formed at any spreading rate. In particular, Layer 3 display lower velocities, indicating either a considerable different rock composition or deformation process. Integrating our observations with data from other back-arc basins of the world indicates a considerable variety of crustal velocities. The seismic structure of the crust indicates that back-arc spreading represents a class of spreading in its own.

  20. Modeling hydrothermal processes at ocean spreading centers: Magma to microbe—An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Metaxas, Anna; Perfit, Michael R.

    Hydrothermal processes at oceanic spreading centers encompass a number of highly interconnected processes ranging from the transport of mantle melts beneath spreading centers to the evolution of ocean chemistry and Earth's climate. This volume, which stems from a RIDGE Theoretical Institute held at Mammoth Lakes, California in June 2006, contains papers that address the complex connections among magmatic heat supply, crustal formation, seismicity, and hydrothermal circulation as well as the complex linkages among hydrothermal circulation, vent chemistry, carbon cycling, and microbial and macrofaunal ecosystems. The last paper in this volume explores the connection between hydrothermal venting and the chemical evolution of the oceans during the Phanerozoic. From reading these papers, one should recognize the wide variety of modeling approaches used and the uneven state of model development within various subdisciplines. Models of hydrothermal circulation and vent chemistry tend to be more quantitative, whereas models of carbon cycling and biological processes tend to be more conceptual. Although many of the complex linkages among the subdisciplines are understood at a conceptual level, considerable effort must be undertaken to develop integrated quantitative models of hydrothermal processes at oceanic spreading centers.

  1. Degassing of carbon dioxide from basaltic magma at spreading centers: II. mid-oceanic ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1989-11-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the CO 2 in basalt supplied to mid-oceanic spreading centers escapes by degassing from magma chambers of the oceanic crust. The approach employs mass balance calculations, stepped-heating data for carbon in sea-floor mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs), and the CO 2 content determined in part I for transitional basalt supplied to the Erta'Ale spreading center in the Afar depression. It is also shown as part of the analysis that carbon data acquired for sea-floor MORBs by single-heating techniques give systematically high values that are difficult to reconcile with solubility data for CO 2 in MORB liquid and the depths of subridge magma chambers. The results confirm the hypothesis. A conservative estimate of the average loss of CO 2 during degassing from subridge magma chambers is between 30 and 65% of the CO 2 initially present in the magma. The conservative estimate for CO 2 degassing at depth is between two and seven times greater than the maximum amount of volcanic CO 2 degassing from MORB. CO 2 degassing from subridge magma chambers is sufficient to supply much (perhaps most) of the mantle carbon discharged from the global mid-oceanic spreading system to the oceans. CO 2 degassing from subridge magma chambers has several important implications. It may be more important than hydrothermal stripping in supplying mantle carbon to mid-oceanic hydrothermal vents. It is an effective mechanism for removing most of the heavier rare gases (Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and much of the He and Ne in magma supplied to mid-oceanic spreading centers and for transporting them and possibly other volatiles from subridge magma chambers to the ocean-atmosphere system. It should also be an effective mechanism for fractionating carbon isotopes in MORB.

  2. Seismic refraction data constrain along-axis structure of the Mid-Cayman spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Harding, J.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) is an ultraslow (15 mm/yr) spreading ridge between the Caribbean and North American plates. From north to south the MCSC is just ~140 km long, as it is bounded to the north by the Oriente transform fault, and to the south by the Swan Islands and Walton fault systems. The neovolcanic zone is characterized by an axial valley with depths to 6000 m, and a few off-axis bathymetric highs that can be as shallow as 2000 m. The role of tectonic and magmatic processes in the creation of this bathymetric relief is not yet understood. In the 2015 CaySEIS experiment, a collaboration between German, US and UK scientists, we gathered ocean-bottom seismic refraction data along five lines across and parallel to the MCSC to determine its crustal structure. We here present the tomographic analysis of marine seismic refractions recorded along the spreading axis. The presence of thin crust here shows that the bathymetric relief of the MCSC is at least in part isostatically compensated. Much of the older ultraslow spread crust on the flanks of the MCSC may not have accreted along the deep axial valley, but it may instead have formed by exhumation of gabbros along extensional faults in the adjacent seafloor.

  3. A study of epidemic spreading on activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yijiang; Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic spreading was explored on activity-driven networks (ADNs), accounting for the study of dynamics both on and of the ADN. By employing the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model, two aspects were considered: (1) the infection rate of susceptible agent (depending on the number of its infected neighbors) evolves due to the temporal structure of ADN, rather than being a constant number; (2) the susceptible and infected agents generate unequal links while being activated, namely, the susceptible agent gets few contacts with others in order to protect itself. Results show that, in both cases, the larger epidemic threshold and smaller outbreak size were obtained.

  4. Distribution of diffuse flow megafauna in two sites on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center, Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podowski, Elizabeth L.; Moore, Tom S.; Zelnio, Kevin A.; Luther, George W., III; Fisher, Charles R.

    2009-11-01

    Hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by large gradients of toxic chemicals and high temperatures, which play a significant role in defining species' distributions. We used high-resolution imagery and spatially explicit in-situ physico-chemical measurements analyzed within a Geographic Information System (GIS) in order to characterize the spatial relations among different groups of megafauna, temperature, and chemistry within two discrete vent communities (40 and 50 m 2) on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Chemical (sulfide and O 2 concentrations) and temperature data were obtained from approximately 75 different locations within each community using in-situ instruments. All data were integrated into a GIS, which served as a visualization tool and enabled the data to be analyzed in a spatial context. Our results confirm the importance of abiotic variables in defining the distributions of some fauna and elucidate several biological associations that are consistent between the two communities. The provannid snail, Alviniconcha spp., appears to actively avoid temperatures above 32-46 °C and/or sulfide concentrations exceeding approximately 260 μM. Slightly higher average sulfide concentrations and temperatures were measured among aggregations of Ifremeria nautilei compared to aggregations of the mussel Bathymodiolus brevior; however, the presence of mixed aggregations of the two species indicates an overlap in requirements. The brachyuran crab, Austinograea spp., was consistently observed directly on symbiont-containing species, particularly Alviniconcha spp. The solitary snail, Eosipho desbruyeresi, was rarely observed on biological substrata, but was often (60% of its population at the most active site) within 5 cm of symbiont-containing fauna, indicating a tolerance and preference for proximity to areas of high productivity. Densities and coverage of species differed substantially between the two communities despite high species overlap

  5. Spreading a patient-centered medical home redesign: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Clarissa; Coleman, Katie; Ross, Tyler R; Johnson, Eric; Fishman, Paul A; Larson, Eric B; Liss, David; Trescott, Claire; Reid, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Health care leaders and policymakers are turning to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model to contain costs, improve the quality of care, and create a more positive primary care work environment. We describe how Group Health, an integrated delivery system, developed and implemented a PCMH intervention that included standardized structural and practice level changes. This intervention was spread to a diverse set of 26 primary care practices in 14 months using Lean Management principles. Group Health's experience provides valuable insights that can be used to improve the design and implementation of future PCMH models. PMID:22415283

  6. Signatures of present and past melt distribution along fast and intermediate spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Milena

    The work presented in this dissertation depicts past and present signatures of melt distribution at fast and intermediate spreading centers. The primary goal of the studies included in this thesis is to provide better understanding of melt distribution and variation in melt physical properties within and at the base of oceanic crust formed at these spreading centers. Furthermore, this work examines effects that melt presence might have on formation and structural characteristics of oceanic crust. To explore the above we use geophysical data collected during two expeditions conducted along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (intermediate) and the East Pacific Rise (fast). The major part of the thesis is based on the work conducted on high resolution reflection seismic data that investigate present day intracrustal melt distribution along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis extending between 8°20' and 10°10'N. Here, the character of the melt reservoir is examined from different aspects and by using different seismic data analysis methods. By systematic analysis of the seismic reflection data, we show that the axial melt lens (AML) is segmented at different segment scales. Locations of the mapped disruptions in the AML correspond to previously identified tectonic discontinuities well expressed in the seafloor bathymetry. The above result corroborates genetic relationship between tectonic and magmatic segmentation. To examine melt distribution along the EPR, here for the first time we use amplitude variation with angle of incidence (AVA) crossplotting technique that was developed by oil and gas industry experts to look for presence of hydrocarbons. Further data examination for the first time for the mid-ocean ridges show presence of deeper lenses (lenses that are present below the AML). Presence of gaps in these sub-events and their collocation with what is believed to be the location of origin of the last documented eruption occurred in 2005--06, may shed light on the mechanisms

  7. Methane Distribution In Plumes Of The South Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, T.; Hirota, A.; Tsunogai, U.; Gamo, T.; Nakamura, K.; Noguchi, T.; Taira, N.; Oomori, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Utsumi, M.

    2004-12-01

    In the South Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center, two methane plumes were observed in water column based on analysis of methane in seawater samples collected during the R/V Thompson expeditions in 2003 around water depth of 2,700 m over the Fryer site on the ridge-axis seamount (12\\deg57.22N, 143\\deg37.16E, depth: 2,850 m). The estimated end-member isotopic compositions of methane in the two plumes are \\delta13C_{CH4} = -5‰ PDB and -50‰ PDB. These values indicated that the two plumes were originated from the different sources. During YK03-09 cruise using the submersible Shinkai 6500 from October to November in 2003, detailed seafloor observation discovered sulfide chimneys emitting black and clear hydrothermal fluid on the off-axis seamount at Pika site (12°55.15N, 143°36.96E, depth: 2,773 m). The result of analysis of isotopic composition of methane in the hydrothermal fluids recovered from the off-axis hydrothermal vents using WHATS (Water and Hydrothermal Atsuryoku Tight Sampler) was averaged value of -4‰ PDB (standard deviation = 1‰ PDB, n = 3). Hydrothermal fluids from the Fryer site were also sampled and were measured: average value = -6.7‰ PDB, standard deviation = 0.3‰ PDB, n = 3. During the R/V Thompson expeditions in March 2004 using ROV ROPOS, 11 ROPOS dives and CTD-RMS plume surveys were conducted, and newly discovered a huge hydrothermal structure with active fluid venting at Achaean site on the ridge skirt (12°56.37N, 143°37.92E, depth: 2,990 m). The δ ^{13}C_{CH4} value of the fluid sample from the site using ROCS (Rotary Clean Seawater sampler) was -14.7‰ PDB. Analysis of isotopic composition of methane in the plume samples collected using the CTD-hydrocast at water depth of 2,500 m over the Archaean site showed -45‰ PDB. Source of methane (δ ^{13}C_{CH4} = -50‰ PDB), however, in the two plumes of the South Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center has been missing. The δ ^{13}C of methane cannot be considered in sediment

  8. Hydrothermal Chimney Distribution from AUV Sentry bathymetry and Alvin at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Lee, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Drivers of hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges are crustal permeability and heat derived from magma, but their relative contributions remain enigmatic, thus raising the question why vents occur where they do. Currently, observational data are ambiguous and biased toward actively venting sites. However, new AUV Sentry bathymetric data from the 92W segment of the Galapagos Spreading Center from the 2010 GRUVEE expedition provide 0.5 m gridded maps that resolve individual chimneys, at least 2m tall and 0.75 m wide, directly. Comparing chimney features from the 23 vents found in the Alvin video with the AUV Sentry bathymetry establishes criteria that allow many other vents to be identified in our study area using only bathymetric data and without need for direct visual observation. Thus, we have a nearly complete record of both active and inactive hydrothermal chimneys over the entire length of a mid-ocean ridge segment to correlate with other seafloor features for further analysis. We use lava morphology, extent of mapped lava flow units, and volcanic features such as tumuli and pillow mounds as proxies for volcanic heat. Magmatic heat input, on a longer timescale, may be estimated by using seismic data on the thickness of layer 2A, depth to the magma lens, or crustal thickness as proxies. For permeability proxies, over 350 fault segments and 150+ fissures have been cataloged on this segment. By analyzing the locations of all these features relative to hydrothermal chimneys, it is possible to correlate crustal permeability and lava morphology with the distribution of vents and to provide empirical constraints on whether certain types of seafloor terrain are more conducive to hosting hydrothermal chimneys. Preliminary analysis suggests a strong correlation between chimneys and nearby mounds and major faults. All 23 chimneys seen with Alvin, inactive and active, are within 30 m of mounds. Considering both chimneys seen from Alvin and a partial catalog of those only

  9. Petrology of gabbroic rocks from the Mid-Cayman rise spreading center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elthon, Don

    1987-01-01

    Mineral analyses of oxide and silicate phases from a suite (collected with the DSRV Alvin in January 1976 and July 1977) of 48 gabbroic rocks collected from the vicinity of the Mid-Cayman Rise spreading center are reported. Mineral compositions of these anorthosites, leuco-troctolite, leuco-olivine gabbros, olivine gabbros, leuco-gabbros, and gabbros indicate the cumulate rocks have been produced by the crystal fractionation of basaltic liquids. Certain features of these rocks are inconsistent with the occurrence of this fractionation at low pressures (1 atm to 2 kbar). Although the experimental data are not available to conclusively demonstrate that the effects seen were produced at moderate pressures (5-10 kbar), the effects are similar to those predicted thermodynamically and to those observed in limited experimental studies within this pressure range. It is therefore suggested that the most likely scenario for the production of these gabbroic rocks is the moderate-pressure crystallization of basaltic magmas within deep-seated magma chambers underneath this slow-spreading center.

  10. Degassing of carbon dioxide from basaltic magma at spreading centers: I. Afar transitional basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1989-11-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the CO 2 in basalt supplied to axial volcanic ranges of spreading centers in the Afar depression, escapes by degassing during residence in crustal magma reservoirs. The investigation employs volcanic gas data to test the degassing hypothesis. Volcanic gases emitted from source vents at Erta'Ale lava lake are used to represent volatiles present in the basalt supplied to magma reservoirs underlying Afar spreading centers. For comparison, volcanic gases from a large fissure eruption at Ardoukoba are used to represent volatiles in basalt after a period of storage in the Afar magma reservoirs. The results confirm the hypothesis. Gases from the lava lake and fissure eruption are the same except for CO 2. They lie along a common CO 2 control line. The fissure eruption gases are six-fold depleted in CO 2 compared to gases from the continuously supplied lava lake. This difference corresponds to a loss of approximately 85% of the initial CO 2. Moreover, gases from the fissure eruption are nearly identical to those emitted by Kilauea basalts that have lost CO 2 by magma reservoir degassing. Mass balance modeling indicates an initial CO 2 content for Afar basalt of 0.12 wt.% compared to CO 2 concentrations as low as 0.02 wt.% after degassing at depth.

  11. Initial Modeling of Hydrothermal Circulation at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, R. P.; Garber, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal plume data and other observations were used to parameterize the Piccard (PHF) and Von Damm (VDHF) hydrothermal fields on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center. The PHF is hosted in basalt at a seafloor depth of nearly 5000 m where a number of active sites vent with temperatures as high as 400°C from an area of approximately 105 m2. A neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume occurs at a height of approximately 500 m above the PHF. Buoyant plume theory yields a buoyancy flux of ~4 x10-2 m4/s3 and a heat flux of ~160 MW. Using a single-pass model, this heat output and maximum vent temperature yields a mass flow rate of ~80 kg/s and a crustal permeability of ~2 x 10-14 m2. A neutrally buoyant plume noted in 2010 at a height of approximately 1000 m above the seafloor corresponds to a buoyancy flux of ~ 0.64, yielding a heat output ~ 2.6 GW and a mass flow rate of ~1280 kg/s, which is much larger than any known system to date. We suspect that the plume observed at 1000 m was an event plume rather than a chronic plume. The PHF is likely driven by a subsurface magma source that exhibited a magmatic event in 2010. The VDHF, hosted in ultramafic rocks near the top of an OCC approximately 13 km west of the neovolcanic zone, lies at a depth of approximately 2300 m. Venting occurs from a conical mound approximately 100 m in diameter. A plume signal at a height of ~300 m above the VDHF yields a buoyancy flux of ~ 5 x 10-3 m4/s3 and a heat output of ~20 MW. Assuming a vent temperature of 150°C based on the presence of anhydrite near the vents, the single-pass model yields a mass flow rate of ~ 30 kg/s and a permeability of 10-11 m2. The low estimated heat output for the VDHF suggests that is likely driven by circulation through a deep-seated fault or fracture system rather than by subsurface magma. The vent temperature, heat output, and permeability estimates, provide useful parameters for constructing mathematical and numerical models of the PHF and the VDHF.

  12. Asymmetric active seismicity along the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, John R.; Voss, Peter H.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading ridges are frequently characterised by spreading segments that are largely magma starved. Spreading along such segments does not occur by crustal creation/accretion processes such as intrusions, diking and volcanism, but rather by mechanical extension of the lithosphere, exposing the mantle to seafloor where it interacts with seawater to form serpentinite. Such exhumation is thought to occur along detachment faults that form concave down surfaces and produce an extensional geometry that is highly asymmetric. A consequence of all models that have been developed to simulate this type of extension is that stress and strain is focused primarily on the footwall block of the spreading system. This would predict that at any given time, only one side of the system should show active seismicity. In 2001, the Gakkel Ridge was extensively sampled by dredging during the AMORE cruise. These samples showed that the ridge is divided into distinct segments that today are either magmatically robust (only basalts recovered) or magmatically starved (dominantly serpentinised peridotite and gabbros recovered). We extracted earthquake data along the Gakkel Ridge from the global catalogs to investigate if these distinct segments exhibit any differences in active seismicity. We show that the western volcanic zone shows symmetric active seismicity, with earthquakes occurring on both sides of the ridge axis along a relatively restricted region. In contrast, the sparsely magmatic zone shows active seismicity dominantly along along the southern half of the ridge, with comparatively little seismicity to the north. These results are consistent with the proposed models for the formation of amagmatic spreading centers.

  13. Epidemic spreading and immunization in node-activity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Chen, Shufang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading in node-activity networks, where an individual participates in social networks with a certain rate h. There are two cases for h: the state-independent case and the state-dependent case. We investigate the epidemic threshold as a function of h compared to the static network. Our results suggest the epidemic threshold cannot be exactly predicted by using the analysis approach in the static network. In addition, we further propose a local information-based immunization protocol on node-activity networks. Simulation analysis shows that the immunization can not only eliminate the infectious disease, but also change the epidemic threshold via increasing the immunization parameter.

  14. Structure of modern oceanic crust and ophiolites and implications for faulting and magmatism at oceanic spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilek, Yildirim; Moores, Eldridge M.; Furnes, Harald

    -gabbro boundary in oceanic crust are affected by the vertical temperature gradient in the oceanic lithosphere and the magma supply, both of which are associated with the presence (or absence) of an active magma lens at shallow crustal depths during seafloor spreading. Limited magma supply in slow-spreading "cold" ridge systems facilitates amagmatic extension via development of planar to listric normal faults, causing block rotations in sheeted dikes and detachment surfaces and shear zones at the dike-gabbro boundaries and within the upper plutonic sequences. Extensive fracturing and faulting of upper and lower crust during periods of amagmatic extension facilitates vigorous hydrothermal circulation and hence results in alteration of the crust and serpentinization of the upper mantle. Denudation of crust and uplift of the serpentinized peridotites are a result of tectonic extension along detachment surfaces at segment ends. Subsequent replenishment of magma supply results in emplacement of dike swarms through extended crust and of shallow-level plutons, and in extrusion of lavas on unroofed plutons and upper mantle rocks. Robust magmatism at intermediate- to fast-spreading centers is a product of a melt lens perched in shallow crustal depths, creating a "hot" environment in which little magma freezing occurs, and generates relatively undeformed oceanic crust without extensive faulting and crustal thinning.

  15. Evidence for variations in magma production along oceanic spreading centers - A critical appraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karson, J. A.; Elthon, D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent geologic, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the oceanic lithosphere near fracture zones have resulted in the proposal that the 'magma budget,' defined as the amount of magma delivered to magma chambers or conduits beneath a spreading center for a given amount of spreading, decreases as fracture zones are approached. Seismic reflection and refraction studies indicate that the crust becomes anomalously thin near fracture zones, but reference must be made to the boundary between residual upper mantle peridotites and overlying cumulate rocks in order to assess potential variations in the magma budget. The position of this interface, however, generally is not constrained by geophysical studies. Geochemical variations in basaltic glasses collected near fracture zones are consistent with a decrease in partial melting as fracture zones are approached, but they could also be produced by variations in open-system magmatic processes with no change in the extent of partial melting. Although a decrease in the magma budget as fracture zones are approached is consistent with these data, so are alternative models that incorporate a constant magma budget.

  16. Characterization of vent fauna at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouviez, Sophie; Jacobson, Alixandra; Wu, Mengyou; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea have a global distribution on mid-ocean ridges and comprise at least six biogeographic provinces. A geographically isolated vent system was recently discovered on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC). Here, we describe the faunal assemblages associated with this system and their relationship to known biogeographic provinces. Taxa from MCSC vents were sorted based on morphology and barcoded using the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S) genes for identification. Distinct faunal assemblages were recognized around vent chimneys at two hydrothermal vent fields (Von Damm and Beebe) separated by a distance of ~13 km and >2.5-km depth along the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center. These results suggest that depth and/or local conditions structure faunal assemblages in this region. COI and microsatellite markers were then used to explore the genetic structure of the shrimp Rimicaris hybisae, the only abundant species shared between the shallow Von Damm and the deep Beebe vent fields. R. hybisae was not genetically differentiated between the Von Damm Spire and Beebe chimneys, suggesting this species is better adapted for bathymetric dispersal and the differences in local conditions than other MCSC species. In addition, a third faunal assemblage dominated by two species of tubeworms was identified at Von Damm in association with weakly diffuse flow sites (including the site known as "Marker X18"). The Marker X18 assemblage shares species with seeps in the region. Fauna shared with both vents and seeps at the MCSC reinforces the need for a global biogeographic study of deep-sea chemosynthetic fauna that is not focused on specific habitats.

  17. Rifted Structure of the Vietnam Continental Margin Near the South China Sea Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. D.; Fyhn, M. B.; Boldreel, L. O.; Nielsen, L. H.; Duc, N. A.; Huyen, N. T.; Thang, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    The extinct spreading center of the South China Sea intersects the continental margin off Vietnam, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of these two features. As part of a collaborative project between the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, the University of Copenhagen and the Vietnam Petroleum Institute, the crustal structure of this area has been investigated by the use of seismic reflection profiles, to provide control on the sedimentary and basement structure, combined with modelling of gravity data from global satellite altimetry, to constrain the crustal thickness. A complex pattern of rifting is seen, which may be ascribed to the complex stress fields of the propagating rift axis, together with an apparent progression in structure. In the more oceanic area, the rifting is relatively sharp, with fairly rapid crustal thnning of about 10 km. Towards the continent, in the region of the tip of the rift axis, the crustal thinning is less, around 5-7 km, and takes place over a greater distance. In the absence of data on the deep crustal structure it is not possible to determine the absolute crustal thickness with certainty, but the gravity modelling suggests that the pre-existing crust was no more than 20 km thick, having been thinned in earlier stages of formation of the South China Sea. A preliminary analysis of the isostatic balance along the various transects was inconclusive but suggests that the sedimentary sequences are largely isostatically compensated, rather than being supported by lithospheric rigidity. Detailed modelling of the rifting and subsidence may provide further insight into the processes that occur when an oceanic spreading center intersects and propagates into a continental margin.

  18. Melt Inclusion Evidence for Subduction-modified Mantle Beneath the Woodlark Spreading Center, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, J.; Turner, A.; Collins, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Woodlark Spreading Center (WSC) to the east of Papua New Guinea separates the Indo-Australian plate and Solomon Sea microplate. At its eastern terminus, the WSC is being subducted at the New Britain trench, forming a triple junction near the New Georgia Group arc in the Solomon Islands. Previous studies have shown that lavas recovered from greater than 100 km from the trench on the WSC are N-MORB, but closer to the trench they have arc-like Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios, enrichments in LILE, and depletions in HFSE. In the complex triple junction area of the WSC on the Simbo and Ghizo Ridges, island arc tholeiites to medium-K calc-alkaline andesites and dacites have been recovered, many with trace element and isotopic characteristics that are similar to the true arc lavas in the New Georgia Group on the other side of the trench. We suggest that subduction-modified arc mantle migrates through slab windows created by the subduction of the WSC as the plates continue to diverge after subduction. This transfer of mantle across the plate boundary leads to variable mixing between arc and N-MORB end-members, forming the hybrid to arc-like lavas recovered on the WSC. To test this hypothesis and to characterize the end-member compositions, we have analyzed melt inclusions in olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase phenocrysts in Simbo and Ghizo Ridge lava samples. Major elements were analyzed using the electron microprobe facility at Fayetteville State University and volatiles were analyzed on the ion probe facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The melt inclusions show a wide diversity of magmas from basalts to dacites, and mixing modeling shows that most Woodlark Spreading Center lava compositions are explained by mixing between the most extreme mafic (MORB) and felsic (arc) inclusion compositions.

  19. Hydrothermal Exploration of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center: Isolated Evolution on Earth’s Deepest Mid-Ocean Ridge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Huber, J. A.; Seewald, J.; van Dover, C.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D.; Connelly, D.; Honig, D. L.; Jakuba, M.; Kinsey, J. C.; McDermott, J.; Nakamura, K.; Sands, C.; Smith, J.; Sylva, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first systematic exploration for and characterization of hydrothermal vents and vent ecosystems on the short (~110 km), deep (> 5000 m), ultra-slow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) Mid-Cayman Rise in the Caribbean Sea. This work was carried out aboard the RV Cape Hatteras in October-November 2009 as part of the ChEss Project of the Census of Marine Life, funded through NASA’s ASTEP program and represents the first scientific field program funded to use WHOI’s new hybrid deep submergence vehicle, Nereus, first in AUV mode then in ROV mode. Prior to this work, evidence for hydrothermal venting had been found on every active spreading center investigated, including the comparably ultra-slow spreading ridges in the SW Indian Ocean and in the Arctic (Mohns, Knipovich & Gakkel Ridges). The organisms colonizing vents are renowned for their endemicity, their adaptations to the extreme chemical and physical conditions encountered and for differences in species level from one ocean basin to another. Consequently, the identification of any organisms colonizing vents of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center offers a critical opportunity to build upon our understanding of the dispersion of vent species and the potential role of the rise of the Isthmus of Panama (dating from ~5 Ma) as a vicariant event leading to the evolutionary divergence of Atlantic and Pacific vent faunas. Further, the MCSC is so deep that any vents present may occur at depths greater than all previously known vent systems, extending the known limits to life on our planet in terms of pressure, temperature, and vent-fluid chemistry. Finally, hydrothermal circulation through ultramafic rocks can generate abiotic synthesis of organic matter: an analog for the prebiotic basis for the origin of life on early Earth and Mars. In future years of this 4-year study, therefore, we will also aim to assess the relative importance of abiotic organic synthesis versus recycling of bio-organic material and/or chemical

  20. Cortical spreading depression activates and upregulates MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin; Qiu, Jianhua; Matsuoka, Norihiro; Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Bermpohl, Daniela; Jin, Hongwei; Wang, Xiaoying; Rosenberg, Gary A.; Lo, Eng H.; Moskowitz, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a propagating wave of neuronal and glial depolarization and has been implicated in disorders of neurovascular regulation such as stroke, head trauma, and migraine. In this study, we found that CSD alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability by activating brain MMPs. Beginning at 3–6 hours, MMP-9 levels increased within cortex ipsilateral to the CSD, reaching a maximum at 24 hours and persisting for at least 48 hours. Gelatinolytic activity was detected earliest within the matrix of cortical blood vessels and later within neurons and pia arachnoid (≥3 hours), particularly within piriform cortex; this activity was suppressed by injection of the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 or in vitro by the addition of a zinc chelator (1,10-phenanthroline). At 3–24 hours, immunoreactive laminin, endothelial barrier antigen, and zona occludens-1 diminished in the ipsilateral cortex, suggesting that CSD altered proteins critical to the integrity of the BBB. At 3 hours after CSD, plasma protein leakage and brain edema developed contemporaneously. Albumin leakage was suppressed by the administration of GM6001. Protein leakage was not detected in MMP-9–null mice, implicating the MMP-9 isoform in barrier disruption. We conclude that intense neuronal and glial depolarization initiates a cascade that disrupts the BBB via an MMP-9–dependent mechanism. PMID:15146242

  1. Photographic analysis of seafloor geologic features at the 9 N Overlapping Spreading Center, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunnery, A.; Klein, E.; White, S.; Perfit, M.; Fornari, D.; Soule, A.; Mason, J.

    2007-12-01

    In March and April 2007, a cruise to the overlapping spreading center (OSC) at 9 deg 03' N on the East Pacific Rise collected geological, geochemical, and hydrothermal activity data along both limbs of the OSC and within the overlap basin to explore linkages between the melt lenses identified by Kent et al. (2000) and surficial geological processes. Here we report preliminary results of photographic data obtained by the ROV Jason II (4 lowerings; covering ~ 20.4 km; ~7000 digital photographs; 213 hrs continuous video for each of the three video streams) and the WHOI TowCam (7 lowerings; covering 29.3 km; ~ 10,000 digital photographs). The majority of our work focused on and adjacent to the eastern (propagating) limb of the OSC. Along the east limb, lavas (including pillow/lobate and sheet/hackly flows) with the freshest and most abundant glass, least sediment cover, and most delicate ornamentation are present along the bathymetrically elevated portion of the ridge between ~9 deg 7'- 10'N. This area also includes lava lake-style collapse structures with remnant pillars, as well as the only hydrothermal vent site observed in this study (at 9 deg 8.3' N). Further south along the east limb, to 9 deg 0' N, sediment cover and tectonic features (predominantly ~N-S-trending fissures) gradually increase, only lobate flows are observed, and glassy surfaces on the lavas are less abundant. Along the southernmost portion of the east limb, the melt lens plunges and cuts east across the ridge axis fabric. Above the location of the plunging melt lens, heavily sedimented lavas are observed with no evidence of recent volcanism. Photographs collected west of the bathymetrically robust portion of the east limb, overlying the wide, off-axis melt lens, generally show volcanism older than that found on-axis at the same latitude, although some areas associated with an elevated NW-trending ridge appear younger than surrounding terrane. Our study of the west (dying) limb of the OSC extends

  2. Hydrothermal cooling along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center: No evidence for discharge beyond the neovolcanic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Martinez, Fernando; Resing, Joseph A.; Walker, Sharon L.; Buck, Nathaniel J.; Edwards, Margo H.

    2010-08-01

    Heat transported from the mantle beneath spreading centers creates an astonishingly narrow ribbon of convective heat discharge at plate boundaries, as apparently demonstrated by exhaustive exploration for hydrothermal discharge sites over the last three decades. Recent observations and models are now challenging this assumption of exclusively axis-centric high-temperature venting. One example is the proposal that intense cooling along the vertical boundaries of a broad low-velocity volume (LVV) of hot crust could generate high-temperature fluids several kilometers off axis. To test the hypothesis that substantial hydrothermal discharge might occur beyond the LVV, we conducted a dense survey grid of the ridge and surrounding seafloor (up to ±5 km) along 175 km of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge (˜1800 km of track line). Our sampling array extended from ˜50 to 400 m above bottom and included light-scattering, oxidation-reduction potential, and hydrographic sensors attached to the tow line and beneath the IMI120 sonar mapping system. The surveys successfully mapped plumes from several vent fields in the neovolcanic zone (˜±1.5 km about the axis) but did not detect evidence of significant discharge anywhere farther off-axis. At a few locations on the Valu Fa Ridge, however, we did record oxidation-reduction potential anomalies with hydrographic density signatures that imply low-temperature hydrothermal sources on the axial flank. Although these sites are hundreds of meters deeper than the adjacent crest, they are above, not beyond, the previously mapped LVV. Our results thus do not support a simple picture of high-temperature fluids ascending undiluted through the crust to the seafloor several kilometers off-axis. However, we cannot exclude the possibilities that the largely unmapped LVV is narrower here than seen on other ridges, that hydrothermal fluids formed beyond the LVV are channeled to the axis, or that discharge beyond the neovolcanic

  3. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E,37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon

  4. Hydrothermal plumes over spreading-center axes: Global distributions and geological inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Elderfield, Henry

    Seafloor hydrothermal circulation is the principal agent of energy and mass exchange between the ocean and the earth's crust. Discharging fluids cool hot rock, construct mineral deposits, nurture biological communities, alter deep-sea mixing and circulation patterns, and profoundly influence ocean chemistry and biology. Although the active discharge orifices themselves cover only a minuscule percentage of the ridge-axis seafloor, the investigation and quantification of their effects is enhanced as a consequence of the mixing process that forms hydrothermal plumes. Hydrothermal fluids discharged from vents are rapidly diluted with ambient seawater by factors of 104-105 [Lupton et al., 1985]. During dilution, the mixture rises tens to hundreds of meters to a level of neutral buoyancy, eventually spreading laterally as a distinct hydrographic and chemical layer with a spatial scale of tens to thousands of kilometers [e.g., Lupton and Craig, 1981; Baker and Massoth, 1987; Speer and Rona, 1989].

  5. Hydrothermal vent community zonation along environmental gradients at the Lau back-arc spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Stacy; Hammerstrom, Kamille

    2012-04-01

    The Lau back-arc spreading center exhibits gradients in hydrothermal vent habitat characteristics from north to south. Biological zonation within a few meters of vents has been described as temperature driven. We constructed georeferenced photomosaics of the seafloor out to tens of meters beyond vents to describe peripheral zonation and explore correlations between environmental conditions and the biological community. Cluster analysis separated northern sites from southern sites, corresponding to a break in substrate from basalt in the north to andesite in the south. Northern sites were dominated by anemones, and southern by sponges. A previous suggestion that dominants may be dependent on friability of the substrate was not supported; when visually distinguishable, individual species within taxa showed different patterns. Northern sites hosted proportionally more suspension feeding species. Sulfide that can support microbial food sources is at higher concentrations at these sites, though bathymetry that may enhance bottom currents is less rugged. Northern sites had higher diversity that may result from the overall northwards flow, which would generally permit easier dispersal downcurrent, though we observed no difference in dispersal strategies at different sites.

  6. Hydrothermal Processes at Seafloor Spreading Centers: Report on a NATO Advanced Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    Evidence developed during the past 10 years indicating that seawater convects through oceanic crust driven by heat derived from the creation of lithosphere at the earth-encircling oceanic ridge-rift system of sea-floor spreading centers has stimulated multiple lines of research. The research has profound implications for the earth's thermal regime, geochemical cycles, and mass balances of the elements; sustenance of biological communities; and concentration of metallic mineral deposits. The first workshop devoted to interdisciplinary consideration of this entire field was convened by a committee consisting of P.A. Rona (Chairman; NOAA, Miami), K. Böstrom (University of Stockholm), L. Laubier (CNEXO, Paris), and K. Smith (University of California, La Jolla) under the auspices of a NATO Advanced Research Institute held April 5-8, 1982, at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, England. The workshop assembled 75 scientists from 15 nations for presentations of the state of knowledge in this field that reflected the predominance of U.S. and French scientists in current research and for discussions that encouraged development of a wider base of scientific participation.

  7. Investigation of spreading center ecolution by joint inversion of seafloor magnetic anomaly and tectonic fabric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    Spreading center segments that have experienced a complex tectonic history including rift propagation may have a complicated signature in bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data. To gain insight into the history of such regions, we have developed techniques in which both the magnetic anomaly patterns and seafloor fabric trends are predicted theoretically, and the combined predictions are compared numerically with the data to estimate best fitting parameters for the propagation history. Fitting functions are constructed to help determine which model best matches the digitized fabric and magnetic anomaly data. Such functions offer statistical criteria for choosing the best fit model. We use this approach to resolve the propagation history of the Cobb Offset along the Juan de Fuca ridge. In this example, the magnetic anomaly data prove more useful in defining the geometry of the propagation events, while the fabric, with its greater temporal resolution, is more useful for constraining the rate of propagation. It thus appears that joint inversion of magnetic and seafloor fabric data can be valuable in tectonic analyses.

  8. The mode of transverse spread of contraction initiated by local activation in single frog muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sugi, H; Ochi, R

    1967-10-01

    Isolated single frog muscle fibers were locally activated by applying negative current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fiber surface. In contrast to the graded inward spread of contraction initiated by a moderate depolarization, the contraction in response to a strong negative current was observed to spread transversely around the whole perimeter but not through the center of the fiber. This response was elicited only with pipettes of more than 6 micro diameter. The response was still present if the sodium of the Ringer solution was replaced by choline, or the chloride was replaced by nitrate or propionate. The duration of the response appeared to be independent of the duration of stimulating current in fresh fibers, while the contraction lasted as long as the current went on in deteriorated fibers. The contraction was first initiated at the area of fiber surface covered by the pipette, and spread around the perimeter of the fiber with a velocity of 0.8-6 cm/sec. Possible mechanisms of the response are discussed in connection with the properties of the transverse tubular system, the possibility of some self-propagating process along the walls of the tubules being suggested. PMID:6064146

  9. Sources of Melt beneath the Lau Back Spreading Center and Tonga Arc as Indicated by Local and Teleseismic Bodywave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A. N.; Wiens, D. A.; Conder, J. A.; Barklage, M.; Wei, S. S.; Cai, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Lau Backarc Spreading Center (LBSC) and the Tonga Arc are an exemplary location for studying melt production and migration in a complex subduction system. The LBSC is an archetype of backarc spreading centers, but displays significant variation along strike and is composed of three primary segments, the Central Lau Spreading Center, the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC), and the Valu Fa Spreading Center (VFSC). Magma geochemistry varies with decreasing distance to the arc from north to south, with increasing concentrations of water and fluid-mobile elements in the south. This study uses body wave tomography to investigate the mantle structure and processes associated with these surficial along-strike variations. We invert more than 50,000 arrival times from local events recorded by 51 ocean bottom seismometers and 16 broadband land stations in 2009-2010, arrivals from a previous experiment in 1994, and teleseismic arrivals for P- and S-wave velocity models. These body wave velocity models show distinct low velocity regions within the upper 100 km beneath the volcanic arc and ELSC, but these separate anomalies merge beneath the VFSC, indicating a common source for arc and backarc magmas in the south. At depths greater than 50 km, we find slower velocities beneath the ELSC than beneath the VFSC, consistent with previous studies suggesting greater in situ-melt concentration beneath the ELSC. This has been interpreted as resulting from faster and more efficient melt extraction in the south due to the higher water contents (Wei et al., 2015). A dominant first-order feature at depths greater than 100km is a north-south low velocity zone beneath the ELSC that extends to at least 300km depth, tilting westward with increasing depth. This suggests that the melt source region for the ELSC occurs along the upper part of a rising mantle flow pattern sourced at depths of at least 300 km depth in the far backarc region.

  10. Characterization of Magma-Driven Hydrothermal Systems at Oceanic Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Corrigan, R.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid circulation in high-temperature hydrothermal systems involves complex water-rock chemical reactions and phase separation. Numerical modeling of reactive transport in multi-component, multiphase systems is required to obtain a full understanding of the characteristics and evolution of hydrothermal vent systems. We use a single-pass parameterized model of high-temperature hydrothermal circulation at oceanic spreading centers constrained by observational parameters such as vent temperature, heat output, and vent field area, together with surface area and depth of the sub-axial magma chamber, to deduce fundamental hydrothermal parameters such as mass flow rate, bulk permeability, conductive boundary layer thickness at the base of the system, magma replenishment rate, and residence time in the discharge zone. All of these key subsurface characteristics are known for fewer than 10 sites out of 300 known hydrothermal systems. The principal limitations of this approach stem from the uncertainty in heat output and vent field area. For systems where data are available on partitioning of heat and chemical output between focused and diffuse flow, we determined the fraction of high-temperature vent fluid incorporated into diffuse flow using a two-limb single pass model. For EPR 9°50` N and ASHES, the diffuse flow temperatures calculated assuming conservative mixing are nearly equal to the observed temperatures indicating that approximately 80%-90% of the hydrothermal heat output occurs as high-temperature flow derived from magmatic heat even though most of the heat output appears as low-temperature diffuse discharge. For the Main Endeavour Field and Lucky Strike, diffuse flow fluids show significant conductive cooling and heating respectively. Finally, we calculate the transport of various geochemical constituents in focused and diffuse flow at the vent field scale and compare the results with estimates of geochemical transports from the Rainbow hydrothermal field where

  11. Wide-Angle Refraction Tomographic Inversion of Mid Cayman Spreading Center and its Oceanic Core Complex, CaySEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CaySEIS experiment, conducted in April 2015, is a multi-national collaborative seismic study of the Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultra-slow spreading center [15 mm/yr fr] in the Caribbean Sea. Ultra-slow spreading centers are thought to have very thin crust and a paucity of magmatism due to cooler mantle conditions. However, the suggestion that gabbro-cored oceanic core complexes (OCCs), volcanic deposits, and multiple layers of hydrothermal vents are widespread in the MCSC and other ultra-slow spreading centers has led to questions about the relationship between seafloor spreading rates and magmatism. To investigate this further, we conducted the CaySEIS experiment, with five wide-angle seismic refraction lines parallel and perpendicular to the neovolcanic zone. This analysis is based on two east-west oriented 100-km-long seismic refraction lines, which were each occupied by 18 ocean bottom seismometers. Line 2 lies across the central MCSC and an OCC called Mt. Dent. Line 3 crosses the northern end of the MCSC near the Oriente Transform Zone. With the wide-angle OBS data we can image the seismic velocity structure of Mt. Dent and distinguish between two models of OCCs - either Mt. Dent is composed of mostly gabbro with peridotite lenses identified by a low velocity gradient, or it is composed of mostly peridotite with gabbroic bodies identified by a constant velocity gradient. The crustal structure of both lines gives more insight into the asymmetry of the MCSC and the style of seafloor spreading to the east vs. the west. The 2-D velocity models reveal Mt. Dent has thick crust of 8 km with a low velocity gradient, supporting the magmatic gabbroic origin of OCCs. The surrounding crust to the west of the MCSC is highly variable, with areas of very thin crust. The crust to the east of the MCSC has an approximately constant thickness of 4 km. The development of OCCs may contribute to the crustal heterogeneity of ultra-slow spreading centers.

  12. The Masked Semantic Priming Effect Is Task Dependent: Reconsidering the Automatic Spreading Activation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Bianca; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Semantic priming effects are popularly explained in terms of an automatic spreading activation process, according to which the activation of a node in a semantic network spreads automatically to interconnected nodes, preactivating a semantically related word. It is expected from this account that semantic priming effects should be routinely…

  13. Masked Priming Effects in Aphasia: Evidence of Altered Automatic Spreading Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silkes, JoAnn P.; Rogers, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has suggested that impairments of automatic spreading activation may underlie some aphasic language deficits. The current study further investigated the status of automatic spreading activation in individuals with aphasia as compared with typical adults. Method: Participants were 21 individuals with aphasia (12 fluent, 9…

  14. Seismic structure of the Tonga Arc and Lau Backarc Spreading Center from joint inversion of local and teleseismic body wave arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A. N.; Wiens, D. A.; Blackman, D. K.; Webb, S. C.; Dunn, R. A.; Conder, J. A.; Zhao, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau Backarc Spreading Center and Tonga Arc provide an excellent environment in which to the study the dynamics of melt production and migration. The Lau Backarc Spreading Center is comprised of three segments, Central Lau Spreading Center, Eastern Lau Spreading Center, and the Valu Fa Spreading Center. The segments show very different spreading and magma production rates as a function of their distance to the arc and slab, which decreases from north to south. Geochemical studies also indicate a systematic change in magma composition along strike of the Lau Back-Arc Spreading Center with more water and fluid-mobile elements in the south. From 2009-2010, 16 broadband seismometers and 51 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were installed for one year across the Lau backarc spreading centers and in Fiji and Tonga to image the along-strike structural variation of the subduction zone and the dynamics of the melt production region. We present preliminary results from the joint inversion of P and S wave arrivals from local and teleseismic events recorded by this network. Arrivals from local events were picked manually, while travel time residuals for teleseismic arrivals were determined via the adaptive stacking method developed by Rawlinson and Kennett (2004). Travel times for local events and residuals for teleseismic events are inverted using TOMOG3D (Zhao et al., 1994) to solve for three dimensional velocity structure along strike of the Lau Backarc Spreading Center and Tonga Arc. Preliminary results show a clearly defined westward-dipping low velocity region beneath the Eastern Lau and Valu Fa Spreading Centers, which is most pronounced at depths less than 150 km. The low velocities beneath the Eastern Lau and Valu Fa Spreading Centers are more pronounced relative to those associated with the Tonga Arc.

  15. Dynamic Assessment of Fibroblast Mechanical Activity during Rac-induced Cell Spreading in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Ma, Lisha; Kim, Areum; Ly, Linda; Vishwanath, Mridula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the morphological and sub-cellular mechanical effects of Rac activation on fibroblasts within 3-D collagen matrices. Corneal fibroblasts were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 1 to 2 days in serum-free media. Time-lapse imaging was then performed using Nomarski DIC. After an acclimation period, perfusion was switched to media containing PDGF. In some experiments, Y-27632 or blebbistatin were used to inhibit Rho-kinase (ROCK) or myosin II, respectively. PDGF activated Rac and induced cell spreading, which resulted in an increase in cell length, cell area, and the number of pseudopodial processes. Tractional forces were generated by extending pseudopodia, as indicated by centripetal displacement and realignment of collagen fibrils. Interestingly, the pattern of pseudopodial extension and local collagen fibril realignment was highly dependent upon the initial orientation of fibrils at the leading edge. Following ROCK or myosin II inhibition, significant ECM relaxation was observed, but small displacements of collagen fibrils continued to be detected at the tips of pseudopodia. Taken together, the data suggests that during Rac-induced cell spreading within 3-D matrices, there is a shift in the distribution of forces from the center to the periphery of corneal fibroblasts. ROCK mediates the generation of large myosin II-based tractional forces during cell spreading within 3-D collagen matrices, however residual forces can be generated at the tips of extending pseudopodia that are both ROCK and myosin II-independent. PMID:18452153

  16. Davidson Seamount: A Volcano Slowly Built on an Abandoned Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Castillo, P.; Duncan, R.; Lonsdale, P.; Devogelaere, A.

    2007-12-01

    Davidson Seamount is located 80 km off Big Sur, California, and rises from the 3500 m abyssal plain to 1254 m depth. The elongated volcanic edifice consists of a series of parallel ridges serrated with steep cones, built over millions of years above an abandoned spreading center. It has been explored and sampled with the ROV Tiburon, and the lithologic distribution, glass chemistry, and ages of the rocks are presented here. Large, bulbous pillow lavas are common deep on the seamount. The shallower cones are mainly composed of blocky flows that provide substrate for large corals and sponges. The cones are draped with volcaniclastic rocks ranging from sandstone to breccia as thick, layered pavements that are now eroded with pits and potholes. This fragmental material is evidence of explosive eruptions. A perched lava pond was discovered in high-resolution maps made by MBARI's Mapping AUV and explored with the ROV Tiburon. Nothing like it has been found elsewhere on Davidson or the other seamounts off the California continental margin. The pond lies between high ridges near the summit. It was a vigorous flow that overtopped its levees with elongate pillows, and then drained, leaving collapse pits a few meters deep veneered with "bathtub rings" and no lava pillars. Deeper than 2000 m, glass from pillow rinds and breccias are basalt and hawaiite. Shallower than 2000 m depth, the rocks include basalt and hawaiite, and also fractionated lavas of mugearite and trachyte. The lavas were all submarine erupted, even the fragmental material, as inferred from high sulfur content in the glasses. Ages of the lavas range from 9.8 to 14.8 Ma. The oldest rocks are along the central ridge, and the youngest rocks are on the flanks and southern end of the edifice. The volcano erupted onto much older crust, which is inferred to be 20 Ma from magnetic anomalies. The numerous small cones of disparate chemistry and long eruptive period suggest episodic growth of the volcano over 5 to 10

  17. Radiative Ignition and the Transition to Flame Spread Investigated in the Japan Microgravity Center's 10-sec Drop Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Radiative Ignition and Transition to Spread Investigation (RITSI) is a shuttle middeck Glovebox combustion experiment developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center, the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), and Aerospace Design and Fabrication (ADF). It is scheduled to fly on the third United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-3) mission in February 1996. The objective of RITSI is to experimentally study radiative ignition and the subsequent transition to flame spread in low gravity in the presence of very low speed air flows in two- and three-dimensional configurations. Toward this objective, a unique collaboration between NASA, NIST, and the University of Hokkaido was established to conduct 15 science and engineering tests in Japan's 10-sec drop shaft. For these tests, the RITSI engineering hardware was mounted in a sealed chamber with a variable oxygen atmosphere. Ashless filter paper was ignited during each drop by a tungsten-halogen heat lamp focused on a small spot in the center of the paper. The flame spread outward from that point. Data recorded included fan voltage (a measure of air flow), radiant heater voltage (a measure of radiative ignition energy), and surface temperatures (measured by up to three surface thermocouples) during ignition and flame spread.

  18. Spatial patterns of Aquificales in deep-sea vents along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (SW Pacific).

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Isabel; Banta, Amy B; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2014-09-01

    The microbial diversity associated with actively venting deep-sea hydrothermal deposits is tightly connected to the geochemistry of the hydrothermal fluids. Although the dominant members of these deposits drive the structure of the microbial communities, it is less well understood whether the lower abundance groups are as closely connected to the geochemical milieu, or driven perhaps by biotic factors such as microbial community interactions. We used the natural geochemical gradients that exist in the back-arc basin, Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu-Fa Ridge (ELSC/VFR) in the Southwestern Pacific, to explore whether the chemolithotrophic Aquificales are influenced by geographical location, host-rock of the vent field or deposit type. Using a combination of cloning, DNA fingerprinting (DGGE) and enrichment culturing approaches, all genera of this order previously described at marine vents were detected, i.e., Desulfurobacterium, Thermovibrio, Aquifex, Hydrogenivirga, Persephonella and Hydrogenothermus. The comparison between clone libraries and DGGE showed similar patterns of distribution of different Aquificales whereas results differed for the enrichment cultures that were retrieved. However, the use of cultivation-based and -independent methods did provide complementary phylogenetic diversity overview of the Aquificales in these systems. Together, this survey revealed that the ELSC/VFR contains some of the largest diversity of Aquificales ever reported at a deep-sea vent area, that the diversity patterns are tied to the geography and geochemistry of the system, and that this geochemical diverse back-arc basin may harbor new members of the Aquificales. PMID:24862554

  19. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  20. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge axes is ubiquitous, associated with mass, chemical, and heat exchanges between the deep lithosphere and the overlying envelopes, and sustaining chemiosynthetic ecosystems at the seafloor. Compared with hydrothermal fields at fast-spreading ridges, those at slow spreading ones show a large variability as their location and nature is controlled or influenced by several parameters that are inter-related: a) tectonic setting, ranging from 'volcanic systems' (along the rift valley floor, volcanic ridges, seamounts), to 'tectonic' ones (rift-bounding faults, oceanic detachment faults); b) the nature of the host rock, owing to compositional heterogeneity of slow-spreading lithosphere (basalt, gabbro, peridotite); c) the type of heat source (magmatic bodies at depth, hot lithosphere, serpentinization reactions); d) and the associated temperature of outflow fluids (high- vs.- low temperature venting and their relative proportion). A systematic review of the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal fields along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity is concentrated either at oceanic detachment faults, or along volcanic segments with evidence of robust magma supply to the axis. A detailed study of the magmatically robust Lucky Strike segment suggests that all present and past hydrothermal activity is found at the center of the segment. The association of these fields to central volcanos, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the remaining of the ridge segment, suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity in these volcanic systems is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build these volcanic edifices. In this setting, hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust exploit permeable fault zones to circulate. While

  1. Correlation of Seafloor Surface Features and Underlying Melt Bodies at the 9° N Overlapping Spreading Center, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunnery, A.; Klein, E. M.; Perfit, M. R.; White, S.; Mason, J.; Zaino, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent seismic surveys of the 9°N Overlapping Spreading Center (OSC) have imaged the complex geometry of melt sills in the mid to upper crust beneath the east and west limbs of the OSC (Kent 2000). Photographic data were collected in Spring 2007 using the ROV Jason II (~7000 digital photographs) and the WHOI TowCam (~10,000 digital photographs) to explore possible connections between seafloor features and underlying melt bodies. Photographic analyses of relative seafloor age and tectonic features along both limbs of the OSC and the overlap basin has been utilized to determine their relationships to underlying melt sills. Photographs were analyzed for relative seafloor age using a classification system based on percentage of sediment cover, pillow ornamentation, presence of glass, rock relief and rock fracture. At the 9°N OSC apparently youngest seafloor is located primarily along the bathymetrically high east limb. An active hydrothermal vent site was found along the ridge at 9°8.3' N. Moving south on the east limb, where the paths of the ridge crest and the underlying melt sill diverge, young ocean crust is imaged only along bathymetrically elevated ridge crest, and only old crust is observed over the plunging melt sill to its east. It is possible that magma erupted along the southern ridge crest was supplied by a source originating in the north via dikes rather than the plunging melt sill to its east. Fault scarps and fissures are abundant along the east limb oriented approximately parallel to the ridge axis. Surprisingly, relatively recent volcanism is present in the northern portion of the overlap basin above the off- axis melt lens. A wide range of lava morphologies is present, including pillows, lobates, and sheet flows. Fault scarps and fissures are abundant in this region, overlying the location of the off-axis melt sill. Orientations of these features appear to be ~orthogonal to spreading direction. Along the west limb, where the melt sill lies beneath

  2. Recent MBARI Mapping AUV Surveys of Slumps, Scours, Gas Seeps, and Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Paull, C. K.; Clague, D. A.; Conlin, D.; Thompson, D.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J.

    2011-12-01

    conducted surveys along the axis of Eel Canyon above the gas seep site and of the seaward deep sea fan. The canyon survey mapped a number of scour features along the canyon thalweg, and the fan surveys covered two large scour features extending up to 3.4 km long by 1.4 km across, and 100 m deep. During 2008 the Mapping AUV conducted three surveys at Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, covering 13 km of the spreading center axis including the known hydrothermal vent fields. This year MBARI extended the high-resolution coverage 11 km to the north of the earlier surveys. During 2006 to 2009, MBARI mapped the summit of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in 1 m resolution bathymetry. These surveys covered the entire summit caldera floor, the caldera walls and rim, and the south rift area of the 1998 eruption and flow. A July 2011 NOAA-PMEL expedition discovered a recent (April 2011) eruption and flow on the Axial Volcano south rift. The MBARI Mapping AUV was redirected from planned operations to survey the new flow and surrounding region on August 3. Comparison of the previous and new 1-m-scale bathymetry will delineate the location, extent, and volume of the new flow. Additional MBARI ROV dives are scheduled during August 2011 at the Eel Canyon gas seep and scour sites and the recent Axial Seamount eruption site.

  3. Determining the origin of slab-derived fluids beneath back-arc spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, M. L.; Kelley, K. A.; Hauri, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    range for MORB, the spreading centers are > 450km from the arc and H2O/Ce is within 2σ of global MORB, suggesting no influence of slab-derived fluids within the back-arc source. The Mariana Trough and Lau Basin SSTs at 4 GPa are both warmer than their respective arcs. Slab surface temperatures derived from geodynamic models correlate with H2O/Ce SST, showing that the Lau Basin taps the coldest slab (~750°C) and East Scotia the hottest (~1015°C). These results indicate that slab-derived fluids that reach the back-arc mantle wedge come from greater depth in the subducting plate than do fluids that reach arcs.

  4. Water-column Observations During a Seafloor Eruption on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Resing, J.; Baumberger, T.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Lavelle, J. W.; Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Greene, R.

    2009-12-01

    Midocean ridge eruptions offer rare opportunities to study the creation of new ocean crust and the accelerated release of heat and chemicals into the ocean. Only 7 such events have been documented since the first observation of eruption-induced fluid discharge in 1986. Their hallmark is “event plumes,” symmetrical boluses of hydrothermally rich water typically ~0.5 km thick and 5-20 km in diameter. Past sampling of such plumes has occurred from 10 days to months after an eruption. In Nov. 2008 on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center, we detected not a typical event plume but a uniquely different series of young, apparently eruption-generated plumes. At 0700 UTC on 20 Nov., a CTD tow detected layers of thin (<100 m) plumes between 600 and 1200 m depth, above a local ridge depth of ~1600 m. These plumes had unusually intense light-scattering (NTU>0.6), oxidation-reduction potential (ORP or “Eh”) (>250 mv), temperature (ΔT >0.7°C), and H2 (6873 nM) anomalies, plus abundant glass shards (>50μm). These characteristics imply a very young plume. 21 hours later, another tow mapped abundant plume layers extending from 900 m depth to the seafloor, marking the probable eruption site as 15.39°S, 174.25°W. High H2 (up to 9031 nM) and low 3He (68 δ(3He)%) in the shallowest plumes suggests their source was magma-seawater contact. In contrast, low H2 (33 nM) and high 3He (up to 146 δ(3He)%) in the deeper plumes implies their source was a more evolved hydrothermal fluid. CO2 values were high in all plumes. By 24 Nov. shallow plumes were absent above the eruption site, with only weak remnants found a few km south. By 27 Nov. no plumes shallower than 1450 m were found within our ~5 km sampling radius. Bottom-water temperature anomalies over the eruption site declined during the same time frame. Three near-bottom tows (15-50 mab) consistently identified bottom waters with significant ΔT between 15.405° and 15.380°S (~4 km) along the ridge crest. Maximum ΔT seen on the

  5. Impact of Non-Poissonian Activity Patterns on Spreading Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Alexei; Rácz, Balázs; Lukács, András; Barabási, Albert-László

    2007-04-01

    Halting a computer or biological virus outbreak requires a detailed understanding of the timing of the interactions between susceptible and infected individuals. While current spreading models assume that users interact uniformly in time, following a Poisson process, a series of recent measurements indicates that the intercontact time distribution is heavy tailed, corresponding to a temporally inhomogeneous bursty contact process. Here we show that the non-Poisson nature of the contact dynamics results in prevalence decay times significantly larger than predicted by the standard Poisson process based models. Our predictions are in agreement with the detailed time resolved prevalence data of computer viruses, which, according to virus bulletins, show a decay time close to a year, in contrast with the 1 day decay predicted by the standard Poisson process based models.

  6. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Linda L.

    Energy activities are provided in this student activity book. They include: (1) an energy walk; (2) forms of energy in the home; (3) energy conversion; (4) constructing a solar hot dog cooker (with instructions for drawing a parabola); (5) interviewing senior citizens to learn about energy use in the past; (6) packaging materials; (7) insulation;…

  7. Intra-segment Variations in Geologic Characteristics Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.

    2012-12-01

    Backarc spreading centers located within ~150 km of the arc volcanic front display systematic departures from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) characteristics. The close association of these departures with slab-derived materials in erupted lavas suggests that subduction-related chemical effects are their primary cause. We examine variations in geologic characteristics at the second- and third-order scale along six segments of the arc-proximal Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau backarc basin, southwest Pacific, using ship multibeam and deep-towed side-scan sonars. Together, the ELSC and VFR constitute a first-order spreading center which progressively approaches the Tofua arc volcanic front southward from ~100-30 km as spreading rates decrease from ~97-39 mm/yr. Second-order segments within VFR (VFR1/VFR2), ~30-50 km from the arc, have axial high morphologies indicative of excess magmatism compared to MOR's spreading at similar rates and erupt increasingly hydrous, vesicular and silicic lavas as the axis approaches the arc. Along-axis topographic highs indicative of locally increased magma supply are located at second-order segment ends, in contrast to the classic MOR model. Along VFR, third-order segments are defined by constructional volcanic ridges, following the classic model of increasing depth toward segment ends, and along VFR2 appear to erupt volcaniclastics at segment centers and lava flows near the ends. Along the southernmost second-order segment of the ELSC (ELSC4), located ~50-60 km from the arc, axial morphology becomes lower relief and much more variable, but still follows the general VFR pattern, where segment ends are shallower and higher relief than the center. Third-order segments form both volcanic ridges that deepen toward the ends, and tectonic grabens that shoal toward the ends, opposite of the MOR model. Beyond ~70 km from the arc, second-order segments become abruptly deeper, erupt less vesicular basaltic lavas, and

  8. The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

  9. SAN-RL: combining spreading activation networks and reinforcement learning to learn configurable behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J.; Gaines, D. M.; Wilkes, M.; Kusumalnukool, K.; Thongchai, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2001-01-01

    This approach provides the agent with a causal structure, the spreading activation network, relating goals to the actions that can achieve those goals. This enables the agent to select actions relative to the goal priorities.

  10. Hydrothermal venting along Earth's fastest spreading center: East Pacific Rise, 27.5°-32.3°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Hey, R. N.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Feely, R. A.; Gharib, J. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Sansone, F. J.; Kleinrock, M.; Martinez, F.; Naar, D. F.; Rodrigo, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D.; Pardee, D.

    2002-07-01

    During March/April 1998 we conducted detailed mapping and sampling of hydrothermal plumes along six segments of Earth's fasting spreading mid-ocean ridge, 27.5°-32.3°S on the East Pacific Rise. We compared the distribution and chemistry of hydrothermal plumes to geological indicators of long-term (spreading rate) and moderate-term (ridge inflation) variations in magmatic budget. In this large-offset, propagating rift setting, these geological indices span virtually the entire range found along fast spreading ridges worldwide. Hydrothermal plumes overlaid ~60% of the length of superfast (>130 km/Myr) spreading axis surveyed and defined at least 14 separate vent fields. We observed no plumes over the slower spreading propagating segments. Finer-scale variations in the magmatic budget also correlated with hydrothermal activity, as the location of the five most intense plumes corresponded to subsegment peaks in ridge inflation. Along the entire ridge crest, the more inflated a ridge location the more likely it was to be overlain by a hydrothermal plume. Plume chemistry mostly reflected discharge from mature vent fields apparently unperturbed by magmatic activity within the last few years. Plume samples with high volatile/metal ratios, generally indicating recent seafloor volcanism, were scarce. Along-axis trends in both volatile (3He; CH4; ΔpH, a proxy for CO2; and particulate S) and nonvolatile (Fe, Mn) species showed a first-order agreement with the trend of ridge inflation. Nevertheless, a broad correspondence between the concentration of volatile species in plumes and geological proxies of magma supply identifies a pervasive magmatic imprint on this superfast spreading group of ridge segments.

  11. Seismological imaging of ridge-arc interaction beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center from OBS ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.; Wei, S. Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A.; Blackman, Donna K.; Menke, William; Dunn, Robert A.; Conder, James A.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau Basin displays large along-strike variations in ridge characters with the changing proximity of the adjacent subduction zone. The mechanism governing these changes is not well understood but one hypotheses relates them to interaction between the arc and back-arc magmatic systems. We present a 3D seismic velocity model of the shallow mantle beneath the Eastern Lau back-arc Spreading Center (ELSC) and the adjacent Tofua volcanic arc obtained from ambient noise tomography of ocean bottom seismograph data. Our seismic images reveal an asymmetric upper mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the ELSC. Two major trends are present as the ridge-to-arc distance increases: (1) the LVZ becomes increasingly offset from the ridge to the north, where crust is thinner and the ridge less magmatically active; (2) the LVZ becomes increasingly connected to a sub-arc low velocity zone to the south. The separation of the ridge and arc low velocity zones is spatially coincident with the abrupt transition in crustal composition and ridge morphology. Our results present the first mantle imaging confirmation of a direct connection between crustal properties and uppermost mantle processes at ELSC, and support the prediction that as ELSC migrates away from the arc, a changing mantle wedge flow pattern leads to the separation of the arc and ridge melting regions. Slab-derived water is cutoff from the ridge, resulting in abrupt changes in crustal lava composition and crustal porosity. The larger offset between mantle melt supply and the ridge along the northern ELSC may reduce melt extraction efficiency along the ridge, further decreasing the melt budget and leading to the observed flat and faulted ridge morphology, thinner crust and the lack of an axial melt lens.

  12. Activity of nodes reshapes the critical threshold of spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Zhou, Li-xin; Fan, Chong-jun; Huo, Liang-an; Tian, Zhan-wei

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate spreading dynamics on complex networks with active nodes based on SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed) model. Different from previous studies, each node of the network rotates between active state and inactive state according to certain probabilities. An active susceptible node can be infected by all its infected neighbors, while an inactive susceptible node can only be infected by its active infected neighbors. By means of ​mean-field approach and numerical simulations, we explore the critical phenomenon by the combined effects of activity rate and infection rate on spreading dynamics. We show that the critical threshold of infection rate is increased by node activity, and node activity also shows a critical phenomenon given certain infection rate. On the whole, there exists a critical curve consists of pairs of critical activity rate and infection rate. We also analyze theoretically the impact of activity rate and infection rate on the final size of spreading dynamics, which is verified by numerical simulations. This work complements our understanding of spreading dynamics with active nodes and may be used to develop more feasible and more economical methods to control spreading dynamics.

  13. Diverse magma flow directions during construction of sheeted dike complexes at fast- to superfast-spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Varga, R. J.; Gee, J. S.; Karson, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dike intrusion is a fundamental process during upper oceanic crustal accretion at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges. Based on the distribution of magma along fast-spreading centers inferred from marine geophysical data, models predict systematic steep flow at magmatically robust segment centers and shallow magma flow toward distal segment ends. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabrics from 48 fully-oriented block samples of dikes from upper oceanic crust exposed at Hess Deep Rift and Pito Deep Rift reveal a wide range of magma flow directions that are not consistent with such simple magma supply models. The AMS is interpreted to arise from distribution anisotropy of titanomagnetite crystals based on weak shape-preferred orientation of opaque oxide and plagioclase crystals generally parallel to AMS maximum eigenvectors. Most dike samples show normal AMS fabrics with maximum eigenvector directions ranging from subvertical to subhorizontal. The distributions of inferred magma flow lineations from maximum eigenvectors show no preferred flow pattern, even after structural correction. We use a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test) to show that the distribution of bootstrapped flow lineation rakes from Pito Deep are not statistically distinct from Hess Deep, and neither are distinguishable from Oman and Troodos Ophiolite AMS data. Magma flow directions in sheeted dikes from these two seafloor escarpments also do not correlate with available geochemistry in any systematic way as previously predicted. These results indicate distinct compositional sources feed melt that is injected into dikes at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges with no preference for subhorizontal or subvertical magma flow. Collectively, results imply ephemeral melt lenses at different along-axis locations within the continuous axial magma chamber and either direct injection or intermingling of melt from other deeper ridge-centered or off-axis sources.

  14. Controls on segmentation and morphology along the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, Jonathan D.; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Back-arc spreading centers increasingly depart from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) characteristics with proximity to the arc volcanic front. The close association of these departures with slab-derived materials in erupted lavas suggests that subduction-related chemical effects are their primary cause. The Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) are type examples of this process. Together they constitute a first-order spreading center in the Lau back-arc basin that progressively converges on the Tofua arc volcanic front from north to south. Here we use ship multibeam and deep-towed side-scan sonar data to examine variations in axial morphology and volcanism at the second- and third-order segment scale along these ridges and develop a model for the processes that control them. Closest to the arc, VFR, and the southern segment of the ELSC shoal toward second-order segment ends, in contrast to MORs. Northward and beyond ~70 km from the arc, the axis becomes abruptly deeper and flatter and no longer shoals toward second-order segment ends. At VFR, along-axis topographic highs correlate with the location of arc volcanoes along slab flow lines. These correlations are weaker along the southernmost ELSC segment and absent along ELSC segments farther north. The observations show a modulation of back-arc segmentation with arc proximity that rapidly diminishes with distance. They support a model of the mantle wedge with a strongly hydrous domain within ~70 km of the arc within which the arc and ridge interact and a much less hydrous domain farther from the arc without evident arc-ridge interactions.

  15. Spread of activation and deactivation in the brain: does age matter?

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Brian A.; Tse, Chun-Yu; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional aging functional MRI results are sometimes difficult to interpret, as standard measures of activation and deactivation may confound variations in signal amplitude and spread, which however, may be differentially affected by age-related changes in various anatomical and physiological factors. To disentangle these two types of measures, here we propose a novel method to obtain independent estimates of the peak amplitude and spread of the BOLD signal in areas activated (task-positive) and deactivated (task-negative) by a Sternberg task, in 14 younger and 28 older adults. The peak measures indicated that, compared to younger adults, older adults had increased activation of the task-positive network, but similar levels of deactivation in the task-negative network. Measures of signal spread revealed that older adults had an increased spread of activation in task-positive areas, but a starkly reduced spread of deactivation in task-negative areas. These effects were consistent across regions within each network. Further, there was greater variability in the anatomical localization of peak points in older adults, leading to reduced cross-subject overlap. These results reveal factors that may confound the interpretation of studies of aging. Additionally, spread measures may be linked to local connectivity phenomena and could be particularly useful to analyze age-related deactivation patterns, complementing the results obtained with standard peak and region of interest analyses. PMID:25360115

  16. Enhancing Prospective Teachers' Coordination of Center and Spread: A Window into Teacher Education Material Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hollylynne S.; Lee, J. Todd

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a development and evaluation process used to create teacher education materials that help prepare middle and secondary mathematics teachers to teach data analysis and probability concepts with technology tools. One aspect of statistical reasoning needed for teaching is the ability to coordinate understandings of center and…

  17. Life Centered Career Education: Activity Book Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glascoe, Lynda Gayle; And Others

    The book provides suggestions for activities designed to infuse life skills into the basic curriculum for adolescents and older students with disabilities. Modeled after the Life Centered Career Education approach, the book presents activities geared to three domains (sample competencies in parentheses): (1) daily living skills (managing family…

  18. ARCO moves to spark U. S. activity, spread risk

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1992-07-13

    This paper reports that one US major oil company has taken the offensive to combat tightness of drilling capital in the US and the overseas flight of interest in elephant hunting. ARCO Oil and Gas Co., with substantial acreage and seismic data covering most of the US Lower 48 states, s communicating with a broad audience to try to make activity happen on its properties. ARCO is looking to bring others in on its prospects, hawk seismic data, and take deals from others. On some acreage that internal funds are not available to evaluate, ARCO was offering 100% farmounts.

  19. Hybrid spreading mechanisms and T cell activation shape the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M; Jolly, Clare

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments' influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  20. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  1. Volcanism and massive sulfide formation at a sedimented spreading center, Escanaba Trough, Gorda Ridge, northeast Pacific.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, J.L.; Holmes, M.L.; Koski, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic-reflection profiles over the sediment-filled Escanaba Trough at the southern Gorda Ridge reveal a series of volcanic centers that pierce the sediment. The volcanic edifices are 3 to 6 km in diameter and are spaced at 15 to 20 km intervals along the axis of the trough. Composition and form of sulfide samples obtained from the bank suggest significant interaction between hydrothermal fluids and sediment at depth, and deposition of sulfide within the sediment pile.-from Authors

  2. Influence of emotional valence and arousal on the spread of activation in memory.

    PubMed

    Jhean-Larose, Sandra; Leveau, Nicolas; Denhière, Guy

    2014-11-01

    Controversy still persists on whether emotional valence and arousal influence cognitive activities. Our study sought to compare how these two factors foster the spread of activation within the semantic network. In a lexical decision task, prime words were varied depending on the valence (pleasant or unpleasant) or on the level of emotional arousal (high or low). Target words were carefully selected to avoid semantic priming effects, as well as to avoid arousing specific emotions (neutral). Three SOA durations (220, 420 and 720 ms) were applied across three independent groups. Results indicate that at 220 ms, the effect of arousal is significantly higher than the effect of valence in facilitating spreading activation while at 420 ms, the effect of valence is significantly higher than the effect of arousal in facilitating spreading activation. These findings suggest that affect is a sequential process involving the successive intervention of arousal and valence. PMID:24715543

  3. Discovery and drilling of on- and off-axis hydrothermal sites in backarc spreading center of southern Mariana Trough, Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Maruyama, A.; Marumo, K.; Seama, N.; Utsumi, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Mariana Trough is an actively spreading backarc basin that is located along the eastern margin of Philippine Sea Plate. GPS monitoring indicates that the rate of spreading is about 45 mm/yr in the southern section (Kato et al., 2003). No transform fault offsets exist despite significant changes in the trend of the spreading center. Fryer et al. (1998) pointed out the close proximity of submarine arc volcanoes to the spreading center and tectonic fabric that is at a high angle to the trend of the spreading center on the eastern flank. Three hydrothermal sites were discovered along such tectonic lineament in southern Mariana Trough (12o55-57'N, 143o37-39'E). On-axis site (so-called Fryer site, depth: 2,850 m) consists of a hydrothermal mound about 20 m in diameter that develops on pillow lava of a segment center of the spreading axis. The segment is characterized by highly variable rock composition (up to 68% SiO2). Repeated temperature measurements revealed rapid cooling of the hydrothermal system from 240oC in April 2003, through 112oC in October 2003 to 69oC in March 2004. On the other hand, two off-axis sites seem to have longevity of life: The Archaean site which locates about 2 km off-axis on the eastern (arc side) skirt is characterized by its huge sulfide spire; 50 m in height and 20 m in diameter. It is composed of pyrite, chalcopyrite and sphalerite, and is emanating hydrothermal fluids up to 220oC. In the third site (Pika site), active black smokers (max. temp. = 330oC), numerous dead chimneys and sulfide mounds were found on a basaltic seamount about 5 km off-axis. These lines of evidence support the idea of Fryer et al. (1998) that the backarc magma is replenished by arc/off-axis magma along the tectonic lineation. The first and third sites been drilled and cased using a tethered, submarine rock-drill system BMS (Benthic Multi-coring System) on-board the R/V Hakurei-Maru # 2 as a part of Archaean Park Project*. Rocks from two holes (7.5 m and 4.1 m

  4. How rifting and spreading center interaction created the architecture of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameselle, Alejandra L.; Ranero, César R.; Franke, Dieter; Barckhausen, Udo

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the formation of rifted continental margins suggest a wider range of structural evolution that challenges the classical extensional models. State-of-the-art of processing techniques - including multiple attenuation by both radon filtering and wave-equation-based surface-related multiple elimination and time migration - have been used to reprocess regional multichannel seismic profiles from the NW, SW and E subbasins of the South China Sea. The resulting seismic images show the geometry and crustal architecture of the rifted margin. A range of features including post-rift and syn-rift sediments, the structure of fault-bounded basement blocks, intra-basement fault reflections, and crust-mantle boundary reflections are visible in the images. Differences in crustal thickness and its lateral variations, internal basement reflectivity, morphology of the top of the basement, faulting style, fault-block geometry, and geometry of overlying sediments permit to distinguish the continental and oceanic domains. The improved resolution of the images allows interpreting the relationship between the changes in tectonic structure and crustal thickness as deformation focused across the ocean continent boundary (COB). The structure, extension and location of the COB has been used to study the role of strain localization throughout the rift history. The clear definition of the COB and high-quality images of the crustal structure support that rifting was largely a-magmatic, but that seafloor spreading occurred abruptly after break up. The regional character of the seismic lines - crossing over the entire basin - permits to study the symmetry/asymmetry of conjugated margins, and to study the processes controlling their contrasting geometry and crustal architecture. The COB can be interpreted in seismic profiles in both conjugated margins of the subbasins. The several transects along the strike of the margins provide the variation of crustal structure

  5. Epidemic spreading with activity-driven awareness diffusion on multiplex network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Yifang; Huo, Guanying; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing interest in exploring the interplay between epidemic spreading with human response, since it is natural for people to take various measures when they become aware of epidemics. As a proper way to describe the multiple connections among people in reality, multiplex network, a set of nodes interacting through multiple sets of edges, has attracted much attention. In this paper, to explore the coupled dynamical processes, a multiplex network with two layers is built. Specifically, the information spreading layer is a time varying network generated by the activity driven model, while the contagion layer is a static network. We extend the microscopic Markov chain approach to derive the epidemic threshold of the model. Compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, the method shows high accuracy for the prediction of the epidemic threshold. Besides, taking different spreading models of awareness into consideration, we explored the interplay between epidemic spreading with awareness spreading. The results show that the awareness spreading can not only enhance the epidemic threshold but also reduce the prevalence of epidemics. When the spreading of awareness is defined as susceptible-infected-susceptible model, there exists a critical value where the dynamical process on the awareness layer can control the onset of epidemics; while if it is a threshold model, the epidemic threshold emerges an abrupt transition with the local awareness ratio α approximating 0.5. Moreover, we also find that temporal changes in the topology hinder the spread of awareness which directly affect the epidemic threshold, especially when the awareness layer is threshold model. Given that the threshold model is a widely used model for social contagion, this is an important and meaningful result. Our results could also lead to interesting future research about the different time-scales of structural changes in multiplex networks. PMID:27131489

  6. Epidemic spreading with activity-driven awareness diffusion on multiplex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Yifang; Huo, Guanying; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing interest in exploring the interplay between epidemic spreading with human response, since it is natural for people to take various measures when they become aware of epidemics. As a proper way to describe the multiple connections among people in reality, multiplex network, a set of nodes interacting through multiple sets of edges, has attracted much attention. In this paper, to explore the coupled dynamical processes, a multiplex network with two layers is built. Specifically, the information spreading layer is a time varying network generated by the activity driven model, while the contagion layer is a static network. We extend the microscopic Markov chain approach to derive the epidemic threshold of the model. Compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, the method shows high accuracy for the prediction of the epidemic threshold. Besides, taking different spreading models of awareness into consideration, we explored the interplay between epidemic spreading with awareness spreading. The results show that the awareness spreading can not only enhance the epidemic threshold but also reduce the prevalence of epidemics. When the spreading of awareness is defined as susceptible-infected-susceptible model, there exists a critical value where the dynamical process on the awareness layer can control the onset of epidemics; while if it is a threshold model, the epidemic threshold emerges an abrupt transition with the local awareness ratio α approximating 0.5. Moreover, we also find that temporal changes in the topology hinder the spread of awareness which directly affect the epidemic threshold, especially when the awareness layer is threshold model. Given that the threshold model is a widely used model for social contagion, this is an important and meaningful result. Our results could also lead to interesting future research about the different time-scales of structural changes in multiplex networks.

  7. Large scale organization of rat sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large activation spreads

    PubMed Central

    Frostig, Ron D.; Xiong, Ying; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Kvašňák, Eugen; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Parcellation according to function (e.g., visual, somatosensory, auditory, motor) is considered a fundamental property of sensorimotor cortical organization, traditionally defined from cytoarchitectonics and mapping studies relying on peak evoked neuronal activity. In the adult rat, stimulation of single whiskers evokes peak activity at topographically appropriate locations within somatosensory cortex and provides an example of cortical functional specificity. Here, we show that single whisker stimulation also evokes symmetrical areas of supra- and sub-threshold neuronal activation that spread extensively away from peak activity, effectively ignoring cortical borders by spilling deeply into multiple cortical territories of different modalities (auditory, visual and motor), where they were blocked by localized neuronal activity blocker injections and thus ruled out as possibly due to ‘volume conductance’. These symmetrical activity spreads were supported by underlying border-crossing, long-range horizontal connections as confirmed with transection experiments and injections of anterograde neuronal tracer experiments. We found such large evoked activation spreads and their underlying connections irrespective of whisker identity, cortical layer, or axis of recorded responses, thereby revealing a large scale nonspecific organization of sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large symmetrical activation spreads. Because the large activation spreads and their underlying horizontal connections ignore anatomical borders between cortical modalities, sensorimotor cortex could therefore be viewed as a continuous entity rather than a collection of discrete, delineated unimodal regions – an organization that could co-exist with established specificity of cortical organization and that could serve as a substrate for associative learning, direct multimodal integration and recovery of function following injury. PMID:19052219

  8. Large-scale organization of rat sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large activation spreads.

    PubMed

    Frostig, Ron D; Xiong, Ying; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H; Kvasnák, Eugen; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2008-12-01

    Parcellation according to function (e.g., visual, somatosensory, auditory, motor) is considered a fundamental property of sensorimotor cortical organization, traditionally defined from cytoarchitectonics and mapping studies relying on peak evoked neuronal activity. In the adult rat, stimulation of single whiskers evokes peak activity at topographically appropriate locations within somatosensory cortex and provides an example of cortical functional specificity. Here, we show that single whisker stimulation also evokes symmetrical areas of suprathreshold and subthreshold neuronal activation that spread extensively away from peak activity, effectively ignoring cortical borders by spilling deeply into multiple cortical territories of different modalities (auditory, visual and motor), where they were blocked by localized neuronal activity blocker injections and thus ruled out as possibly caused by "volume conductance." These symmetrical activity spreads were supported by underlying border-crossing, long-range horizontal connections as confirmed with transection experiments and injections of anterograde neuronal tracer experiments. We found such large evoked activation spreads and their underlying connections regardless of whisker identity, cortical layer, or axis of recorded responses, thereby revealing a large scale nonspecific organization of sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large symmetrical activation spreads. Because the large activation spreads and their underlying horizontal connections ignore anatomical borders between cortical modalities, sensorimotor cortex could therefore be viewed as a continuous entity rather than a collection of discrete, delineated unimodal regions, an organization that could coexist with established specificity of cortical organization and that could serve as a substrate for associative learning, direct multimodal integration and recovery of function after injury. PMID:19052219

  9. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Richardson, S M

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates. PMID:11539654

  10. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates - The Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Richardson, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Eocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  11. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Richardson, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  12. Hydrothermal Venting in the Southern Most Portion of the Mariana Backarc Spreading Center at 12.57 Degrees N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. G.; Fryer, P.; Hulme, S.; Becker, N.; Curtis, A.; Moyer, C.

    2003-12-01

    The southernmost portion of the Mariana Trough is a complex zone of deformation and magmatism. The centerpiece of the trough is the Malaguana-Gadao Spreading Center Ridge, which has a morphology that is inflated relative to all of the other spreading segments in the Mariana Backarc Basin. This inflated morphology is similar to that of the EPR and is consistent with a high rate of eruption. Samples of lavas from the spreading center are island arc tholeiites, which typically contain higher concentrations of CO2 relative to MORBs. In February 2003 the NOAA VENTS program conducted two CTD tow-yos in this area, revealing a hydrothermal plume consistent with the presence of a high temperature hydrothermal site. In May 2003 we used the ROV Jason II to survey a hydrothermal site at 12 degrees 57.214'N, 143 degrees 37.147'E in a water depth of ~2860 m. Here we collected vent fluids, sulfides, basalt, microbial mats, and macrofauna. Two styles of venting were identified within an 80 m by 70 m area. Higher temperature venting was located in cracks among extinct mounds that were 2-5 m high and wide and are nearly monomineralic (sphalerite) in composition. The exterior is soft and vuggy in contrast to the interior that has crystalline layers with bladed habit lining the orifices. Maximum temperatures of 248 degrees C were recorded 30 cm into these cracks, which were covered with abundant large provannid snails, Alvinoconcha Hessleri, and crabs. In contrast, lower temperature diffuse venting (77 degrees C) emanated from mounds that have a porous structure that is composed of amorphous iron oxide and opal. These mounds are covered with microbial mats, which exhibit a high degree of biomass as detected by Cyto-13 nucleic acid epifluorescent staining. Filament and amorphous particulate morphotypes are observed in association with microbial cells, but sheaths have not been detected. These mats have a morphology that is similar to that of neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria. Fluid

  13. The 2008 Puipui eruption and morphology of the Northeast Lau Spreading Center between Maka and Tafu (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Rubin, K. H.; Paduan, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    An event plume was discovered in the water column between Maka and Tafu volcanoes on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center in Nov. 2008. A Rapid Response cruise in May 2009 found that eruptive activity had ceased after observations on two Jason II ROV dives and one MBARI Mapping AUV survey that mapped most of the axis and flanks at 1.5-m resolution. Jason II located a recent lava flow, which was named Puipui. The small ridge of mounds aligned along two overlapping fissures extend for 1.8 km. The pillow ridge cuts obliquely across the ridge axis. The dive observations show mainly pillow lavas near the NE end and sheet flows near the SE end. A central 340 m portion observed by Jason II as predominantly ponded lobate flows was not mapped by the AUV. The Puipui and prior eruptions produced abundant vesicular angular glass fragments, Pele’s hair, and less abundant limu o Pele pyroclasts that thinly blanket the axial plateau and cascade down the steep flanks, mixing debris from many eruptions. Electron probe analyses of 91 fragments show that 15 Puipui pyroclasts are compositionally variable (normalized 6.5-7.2% MgO, ~49.6% SiO2) and distinct from prior eruptions in the area that have lower TiO2, K2O, Na2O, and K2O; and 52.3-53.7% SiO2. Pyroclasts of all compositions are highly degassed (<0.025% S) prior to eruption. The NE-trending segment, anchored by Maka volcano at the SE end, includes the Puipui flow. The morphology changes dramatically over short distances. The 1 km SW end is characterized by multiple extensional faults that parallel the ridge axis. The AUV survey ends on a sheet flow with drained ponds. To the NE, Maka is a 1.2 km diameter central volcano rising 300 m above the adjacent ridge to a summit at 1515 m. The ridge axis deepens steadily to 2140 m at the NE survey end and 1900 m to the SW. Rift zones on Maka parallel the ridge axis and are constructed of overlapping lava deltas. The NW and SE flanks are smooth like those at actively erupting West Mata

  14. Ischaemia triggered by spreading neuronal activation is inhibited by vasodilators in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Jens P; Petzold, Gabor; Tille, Katrin; Lindauer, Ute; Arnold, Guy; Heinemann, Uwe; Einhäupl, Karl M; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    It has been previously shown that spreading neuronal activation can generate a cortical spreading ischaemia (CSI) in rats. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether vasodilators cause CSI to revert to a normal cortical spreading depression (CSD). A KCl-induced CSD travelled from an open cranial window to a closed window where the cortex was superfused with physiological artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF). At the closed window, recordings revealed a short-lasting negative slow potential shift accompanied by a variable, small and short initial hypoperfusion followed by hyperaemia and then oligaemia. In contrast, spreading neuronal activation locally induced CSI at the closed window when ACSF contained a NO. synthase (NOS) inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine, and an increased K+ concentration ([K+]ACSF). CSI was characterised by a sharp and prolonged initial cerebral blood flow decrease to 29 ± 11 % of the baseline and a prolonged negative potential shift. Co-application of a NO. donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and NOS inhibitor with high [K+]ACSF re-established a short-lasting negative potential shift and spreading hyperaemia typical of CSD. Similarly, the NO.-independent vasodilator papaverine caused CSI to revert to a pattern characteristic of CSD. In acute rat brain slices, NOS inhibition and high [K+]ACSF did not prolong the negative slow potential shift compared to that induced by high [K+]ACSF alone. The data indicate that the delayed recovery of the slow potential was caused by vasoconstriction during application of high [K+]ACSF and a NOS inhibitor in vivo. This supports the possibility of a vicious circle: spreading neuronal activation induces vasoconstriction, and vasoconstriction prevents repolarisation during CSI. Speculatively, this pathogenetic process could be involved in migraine-induced stroke. PMID:11230523

  15. The Roles of Spreading Activation and Retrieval Mode in Producing False Recognition in the DRM Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Michelle L.; Watson, Jason M.; Balota, David A.; Roediger, Henry L., III

    2007-01-01

    The nature of persisting spreading activation from list presentation in eliciting false recognition in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm was examined in two experiments. We compared the time course of semantic priming in the lexical decision task (LDT) and false alarms in speeded recognition under identical study and test conditions. The…

  16. Spreading Activation in an Attractor Network with Latching Dynamics: Automatic Semantic Priming Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Localist models of spreading activation (SA) and models assuming distributed representations offer very different takes on semantic priming, a widely investigated paradigm in word recognition and semantic memory research. In this study, we implemented SA in an attractor neural network model with distributed representations and created a unified…

  17. Relatedness Proportion Effects in Semantic Categorization: Reconsidering the Automatic Spreading Activation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Bianca; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Semantic priming effects at a short prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony are commonly explained in terms of an automatic spreading activation process. According to this view, the proportion of related trials should have no impact on the size of the semantic priming effect. Using a semantic categorization task ("Is this a living…

  18. Seismicity and active tectonic processes in the ultra-slow spreading Lena Trough, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läderach, C.; Schlindwein, V.; Schenke, H.-W.; Jokat, W.

    2011-03-01

    With its remote location in the ice-covered Fram Strait, Lena Trough is a poorly known segment of the global mid-ocean ridge system. It is a prominent member of the ultra-slow spreading mid-ocean ridges but its spreading mechanisms are not well understood. We relocalized teleseismically recorded earthquakes from the past five decades to identify tectonic processes in Lena Trough and the adjacent Spitsbergen Fracture Zone (FZ). During two cruises with RV Polarstern in 2008 and 2009 we deployed seismic arrays on ice floes to record the local seismicity of Lena Trough. We could identify and localize microseismic events which we assume to be present in the entire rift valley. In contrast, our relocalization of teleseismically recorded earthquakes shows an asymmetric epicentre distribution along Lena Trough with earthquakes occurring predominately along the western valley flanks of Lena Trough. In 2009 February/March, several high-magnitude earthquakes peaking in an Mb 6.6 event occurred in an outside-corner setting of the Spitsbergen FZ. This is the strongest earthquake which has ever been recorded in Fram Strait and its location at the outside-corner high of the ultra-slow spreading ridge is exceptional. Comparing the seismicity with the magnetic anomalies and high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, we divide Lena Trough in a symmetrically spreading northern part and an asymmetrically spreading southern part south of the South Lena FZ. We propose that a complex interaction between the former De Geer Megashear zone, which separated Greenland from Svalbard starting at Late Mesozoic/Early Cenozoic times, and the developing rift in the southern Lena Trough resulted an increasing eastward dislocation towards the Spitsbergen FZ between older spreading axes and the recent active spreading axis which we believe to be located west of the bathymetric rift valley flanks in a wide extensional plain.

  19. Determination of Wetting Behavior, Spread Activation Energy, and Quench Severity of Bioquenchants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, K. Narayan; Fernandes, Peter

    2007-08-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the suitability of vegetable oils such as sunflower, coconut, groundnut, castor, cashewnut shell (CNS), and palm oils as quench media (bioquenchants) for industrial heat treatment by assessing their wetting behavior and severity of quenching. The relaxation of contact angle was sharp during the initial stages, and it became gradual as the system approached equilibrium. The equilibrium contact angle decreased with increase in the temperature of the substrate and decrease in the viscosity of the quench medium. A comparison of the relaxation of the contact angle at various temperatures indicated the significant difference in spreading of oils having varying viscosity. The spread activation energy was determined using the Arrhenius type of equation. Oils with higher viscosity resulted in lower cooling rates. The quench severity of various oil media was determined by estimating heat-transfer coefficients using the lumped capacitance method. Activation energy for spreading determined using the wetting behavior of oils at various temperatures was in good agreement with the severity of quenching assessed by cooling curve analysis. A high quench severity is associated with oils having low spread activation energy.

  20. Effects of heterogeneity on active spreading strategies to remediate contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Piscopo, A. N.; Neupauer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) to remediate contaminated aquifers is constrained by the amount of contact between the groundwater contaminant and the injected oxidant. Contaminant degradation during ISCO can be enhanced using innovative active spreading strategies, which involve injecting and extracting water at wells in the vicinity of the plume to generate flow fields that spread the contaminant and oxidant plumes in a manner that increases their contact. Because aquifer heterogeneity affects the transport of the contaminant and oxidant during injection and extraction, aquifer heterogeneity also affects the amount of contact and the degree of contaminant degradation achieved using active spreading strategies during ISCO. Consequently, we can improve the effectiveness of active spreading strategies by generating sequences of injection and extraction that take the aquifer heterogeneity into account. In this study, we optimize sequences of injections and extractions to maximize contaminant degradation in aquifers with zonal and spatially-correlated heterogeneity for three contaminant-oxidant pairings with different reaction kinetics. Analysis of the transport and degradation corresponding to the optimal sequences of injection and extraction demonstrates that the underlying aquifer and contaminant properties are reflected by the optimal sequences.

  1. Heat transfer through the sediments of the Mounds Hydrothermal Area, Galapagos Spreading Center at 86°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Keir; von Herzen, Richard P.

    1983-01-01

    Heat transfer processes at the mounds area of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 86°W are revealed by temperatures measured at ≈ 10-m intervals in the 30±10m sediment at each of 12 holes at DSDP Leg 70 Sites 506-509 and by temperatures of up to five thermistors on eleven 8-12 m long piston cores. The 325 needle-probe values show a significant linear increase of thermal conductivity with depth in each core. About half of the temperature-thermal resistance profiles are nonlinear and are fit to a steady state, vertical pore water advection model. Results indicate high and variable total heat flow and localized hydrothermal discharge at ≈ 10-8 m/s, associated with individual mounds. Recharge is indicated at similar rates in the low heat flow belt ≈ 5 km south of the mounds and is suggested at slower rates in the intermediate heat flow (0.17-0.42 W/m2) belt surrounding the mounds heat flow high. Possible slow entrained recharge within ≈ 100 m of discharging mounds is suggested. Also suggested is strong local discharge along the major fault bounding the mounds crustal block to the north. About 95 km north of the spreading axis, at DSDP Site 510, temperatures in the 114-m sediment cover on 2.7-m.y. crust are linear, consistent with the suggestion that the hydraulic resistance of this layer is sufficient to seal off free hydrothermal exchange between basement and bottom water. The combination of heat flow data and the physical properties data of Karato and Becker (this issue) suggests that ≈ 50 m of sediment may be a threshold thickness for sealing of hydrothermal circulation within basement, where the topography is smooth. We suggest that the formation of mounds may be associated with the forced localization of hydrothermal discharge through the sediment, as its thickness approaches this threshold value.

  2. Galapagos hotspot-spreading center system: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83/sup 0/W-101/sup 0/W)

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.; Kingsley, R.H.; Devine, J.D.

    1982-07-10

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40--50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83/sup 0/W and 101/sup 0/W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of 'whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's (1976) model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial asthenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling (1973) with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey (1977a). We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's (1979) information Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Crusz, Shanika A; Diggle, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term 'comets', which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet 'tail'; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  4. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Eric J. G.; Crusz, Shanika A.; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term ‘comets’, which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet ‘tail’; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  5. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  6. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville fracture zone. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in 1 yr by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  7. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate-dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville FZ. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in one year by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  8. New Geochemical Analyses Reveal Crustal Accretionary Processes at The Overlapping Spreading Center Near 3 N East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithka, I. N.; Perfit, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MORs) are the sites of oceanic lithosphere creation and construction. Ridge discontinuities are a global phenomenom but are not as well understood as ridge axes. Geochemical analyses provide insights into upper mantle processes since elements fractionate with melting and freezing as well as reside in material to retain source signature. Lavas collected from ridge discontinuities consist of greater chemical diversity and represent variations in source, melting parameters, and local crustal processes. The small overlapping spreading center (OSC) near the third parallel north on the East Pacific Rise has been superficially analyzed previously, but here we present new isotope analyses and expand our understanding of MOR processes and processes near OSCs. Initial analyses of lavas collected in 2000 on AHA-NEMO2 revealed normal MOR basalt trends in rare earth element enrichments as well as in major element concentrations. Crystal fractionation varies along the tips of both axes, with MgO and TiO2 concentrations increasing towards the OSC basin. Newly analyzed Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios will further constrain the nature of geochemical diversity along axis. As the northern tip seems to be propagating and the southern tip dying, lavas collected from each may reflect two different underlying mantle melting and magma storage processes.

  9. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  10. Subalkaline andesite from Valu Fa Ridge, a back-arc spreading center in southern Lau Basin: petrogenesis, comparative chemistry, and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Jenner, G.A.; Frey, F.A.; Gill, J.B.; Davis, A.S.; Volpe, A.M.; Hawkins, J.W.; Morris, J.D.; Cawood, Peter A.; Morton, J.L.; Scholl, D. W.; Rautenschlein, M.; White, W.M.; Williams, Ross W.; Stevenson, A.J.; White, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Tholeiitic andesite was dredged from two sites on Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), a back-arc spreading center in Lau Basin. Valu Fa Ridge, at least 200 km long, is located 40-50 km west of the active Tofua Volcanic Arc (TVA) axis and lies about 150 km above the subducted oceanic plate. One or more magma chambers, traced discontinuously for about 100 km along the ridge axis, lie 3-4 km beneath the ridge. The mostly aphyric and glassy lavas had high volatile contents, as shown by the abundance and large sizes of vesicles. An extensive fractionation history is inferred from the high SiO2 contents and FeO* MgO ratios. Chemical data show that the VFR lavas have both volcanic arc and back-arc basin affinities. The volcanic arc characteristics are: (1) relatively high abundances of most alkali and alkaline earth elements; (2) low abundances of high field strength elements Nb and Ta; (3) high U/Th ratios; (4) similar radiogenic isotope ratios in VFR and TVA lavas, in particular the enrichment of 87Sr 86Sr relative to 206Pb 204Pb; (5) high 238U 230Th, 230Th 232Th, and 226Ra 230Th activity ratios; and (6) high ratios of Rb/Cs, Ba/Nb, and Ba/La. Other chemical characteristics suggest that the VFR lavas are related to MORB-type back-arc basin lavas. For example, VFR lavas have (1) lower 87Sr 86Sr ratios and higher 143Nd 144Nd ratios than most lavas from the TVA, except samples from Ata Island, and are similar to many Lau Basin lavas; (2) lower Sr/REE, Rb/Zr, and Ba/Zr ratios than in arc lavas; and (3) higher Ti, Fe, and V, and higher Ti/V ratios than arc lavas generally and TVA lavas specifically. Most characteristics of VFR lavas can be explained by mixing depleted mantle with either small amounts of sediment and fluids from the subducting slab and/or an older fragment of volcanic arc lithosphere. The eruption of subalkaline andesite with some arc affinities along a back-arc spreading ridge is not unique. Collision of the Louisville and Tonga ridges probably activated back-arc extension

  11. Heat transfer through the sediments of the mounds hydrothermal area, Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.P.

    1983-02-10

    Heat transfer processes at the mounds area of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W are revealed by temperatures measured at roughly-equal10-m intervals in the 30 +- 10 m sediment at each of 12 holes at DSDP Leg 70 Sites 506--509 and by temperatures of up to five thermistors on eleven 8--12 m long piston cores. The 325 needle-probe values show a significant linear increase of thermal conductivity with depth in each core. About half of the temperature-thermal resistance profiles are nonlinear and are fit to a steady state, vertical pore water advection model. Results indicate high and variable total heat flow and localized hydrothermal discharge at roughly-equal10/sup -8/ m/s, associated with individual mounds. Recharge is indicated at similar rates in the low heat flow belt roughly-equal5 km south of the mounds and is suggested at slower rates in the intermediate heat flow (0.17--0.42 W/m/sup 2/) belt surrounding the mounds heat flow high. Possible slow entrained recharge within roughly-equal100 m of discharging mounds is suggested. Also suggested is strong local discharge along the major fault bounding the mounds crustal block to the north. About 95 km north of the spreading axis, at DSDP Site 510, temperatures in the 114-m sediment cover on 2.7-m.y. crust are linear, consistent with the suggestion that the hydraulic resistance of this layer is sufficient to seal off free hydrothermal exchange between basement and bottom water. The combination of heat flow data and the physical properties data of Karato and Becker (this issue) suggests that roughly-equal50 m of sediment may be a threshold thickness for sealing of hydrothermal circulation within basement, where the topography is smooth. We suggest that the formation of mounds may be associated with the forced localization of hydrothermal discharge through the sediment, as its thickness approaches this threshold value.

  12. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  13. Metagenomic resolution of microbial functions in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal plumes affect ocean biogeochemistry on global scales. In rising hydrothermal plumes, a combination of microbial metabolism and particle formation processes initiate the transformation of reduced chemicals like hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, methane, iron, manganese and ammonia that are abundant in hydrothermal vent fluids. Despite the biogeochemical importance of this rising portion of plumes, it is understudied in comparison to neutrally buoyant plumes. Here we use metagenomics and bioenergetic modeling to describe the abundance and genetic potential of microorganisms in relation to available electron donors in five different hydrothermal plumes and three associated background deep-sea waters from the Eastern Lau Spreading Center located in the Western Pacific Ocean. Three hundred and thirty one distinct genomic 'bins' were identified, comprising an estimated 951 genomes of archaea, bacteria, eukarya and viruses. A significant proportion of these genomes is from novel microorganisms and thus reveals insights into the energy metabolism of heretofore unknown microbial groups. Community-wide analyses of genes encoding enzymes that oxidize inorganic energy sources showed that sulfur oxidation was the most abundant and diverse chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism in the community. Genes for sulfur oxidation were commonly present in genomic bins that also contained genes for oxidation of hydrogen and methane, suggesting metabolic versatility in these microbial groups. The relative diversity and abundance of genes encoding hydrogen oxidation was moderate, whereas that of genes for methane and ammonia oxidation was low in comparison to sulfur oxidation. Bioenergetic-thermodynamic modeling supports the metagenomic analyses, showing that oxidation of elemental sulfur with oxygen is the most dominant catabolic reaction in the hydrothermal plumes. We conclude that the energy metabolism of microbial communities inhabiting rising

  14. Emplacement of submarine lava flow fields: A geomorphological model from the Niños eruption at the Galápagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, J. Timothy; White, Scott M.

    2015-03-01

    In the absence of any direct observations of an active submarine eruption at a mid-ocean ridge (MOR), our understanding of volcanic processes there is based on the interpretation of eruptive products. Submarine lava flow morphology serves as a primary indicator of eruption and emplacement processes; however, there is typically a lack of visual observations and bathymetric data at a scale and extent relevant to submarine lava flows, which display meter to submeter-scale morphological variability. In this paper, we merge submersible-based visual observations with high-resolution multibeam bathymetry collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and examine the fine-scale geomorphology of Niños, a submarine lava flow field at the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC).We identify separate morphological facies (i.e., morphofacies) within the lava flow field, each having distinct patterns of lava flow morphology and volcanic structures. The spatial and stratigraphic arrangement of morphofacies suggests that they were emplaced sequentially as the eruption progressed, implying that the Niños eruption consisted of at least three eruptive phases. We estimate eruption parameters and develop a chronological model that describes the construction of the Niños lava flow field. An initial phase with high effusion rates emplaced sheet flows, then an intermediate phase emplaced a platform of lobate lavas, and then an extended final phase with low effusion rates emplaced a discontinuous row of pillow lava domes. We then compare this model to mapped lava flow fields at other MORs. Despite disparities in scale, the morphological similarities of volcanic features at MORs with different spreading rates suggest common emplacement processes that are primarily controlled by local magma supply.

  15. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  16. The Relationships of Plate Triple-junction Evolution, Trench-Arc Lengthening, Boninite Generation, and SSZ Spreading Centers to Ophiolite Formation, High-Temperature Soles, and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J.; Dewey, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    A review of modern-day island arcs, the locations of boninite eruptions, the conditions necessary for hot upper plate spreading, potential regions of shallow SSZ flux melting, and formation of high-temperature metamorphic soles along the subduction channels indicates that many future, recent and ancient large slab ophiolite obduction events can be related to triple junctions that link SSZ spreading centers with trenches. These subduction systems leading to large slab ophiolite obduction events typically face stable continental margins. Boninitic melt generation requires hydrous melting of refractory mantle peridotite under an extremely high-temperature and low-pressure condition. This condition is generally explained by the addition of slab-derived fluids into a hot young oceanic mantle asthenosphere and lithosphere, which previously likely experienced melt extraction. Metamorphic conditions associated with metamorphic soles formation likewise require a hot upper plate lithosphere that, based on sole protolith, geochronologic and thermochronologic data, rapidly heats and then refrigerates and decompresses MORB-OIB type subcreted lithosphere. Numerous examples of present-day and recent SSZ spreading centers that link with two trenches or a trench and transform are considered ideal sites for ophiolite and boninite generation. The SZZ fore-arc spreading centers that link to the trench lines and triple junctions at the front of the arc may also continue towards the arc and back arc, creating no distinction between fore-arc and back-arc spreading episodes or to the transform-linked spreading centers from fore-arc to back arc. These SSZ spreading centers, which may be transiently produced during arc evolution over short or protracted time periods, act to open gaps in the arc massif and lengthen the trench, fore-arc and the arc crustal massif. They lead to an evolving arc magmatic front that begins in the infant fore-arc where ophiolite generation occurs at, near or in

  17. Low-latitude equinoctial spread-F occurrence at different longitude sectors under low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, M.; Zuccheretti, E.; Abadi, P.; de Abreu, A. J.; de Jesus, R.; Fagundes, P. R.; Supnithi, P.; Rungraengwajiake, S.; Nagatsuma, T.; Tsugawa, T.; Cabrera, M. A.; Ezquer, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of a comparative study of spread-F signatures over five low-latitude sites: Chiangmai (CGM; 18.8° N, 98.9° E, mag. Lat. 8.8° N), Thailand; Tanjungsari (TNJ; 6.9° S, 107.6° E, mag. Lat. 16.9° S), Indonesia; Palmas (PAL; 10.2° S, 311.8° E, mag. Lat. 0.9° S) and São José Dos Campos (SJC; 23.2° S, 314.1° E, mag. Lat. 14.0° S), Brazil; and Tucumán (TUC; 26.9° S, 294.6° E, mag. Lat. 16.8° S), Argentina. The investigation was based on simultaneous ionograms recorded by an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) at CGM, an IPS-71 (digital ionosonde from KEL aerospace) at TNJ, a CADI (Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde) at PAL and SJC, and an AIS-INGV (Advanced Ionospheric Sounder - Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) at TUC, during the equinoctial periods March-April (R12 = 2.0 and R12 = 2.2) and September-October (R12 = 6.1 and R12 = 7.0) 2009, for very low solar activity. Spread-F signatures were categorized into two types: the range spread-F (RSF) and the frequency spread-F (FSF). The study confirms that the dynamics and the physical processes responsible for these phenomena are actually complicated. In fact, the features that arise from the investigation are different, depending on both the longitude sector and on the hemisphere. For instance, TUC, under the southern crest of the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), shows a predominance of RSF signatures, while both SJC, under the southern crest of EIA but in a different longitude sector, and CGM, under the northern crest of EIA, show a predominance of FSF signatures. Moreover, the spread-F occurrence over the longitude sector that includes CGM and TNJ is significantly lower than the spread-F occurrence over the longitude sector of PAL, SJC, and TUC.

  18. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activation suppresses alpha2beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through inhibition of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Chau-Zen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Upregulation and overexpression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) have been implied in the regulation of kidney development and progression of cancers. Our previous studies with Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells showed that overexpression of DDR1 inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative DDR1 promoted cell spreading on collagen-coated dish. Cell spreading is an important characteristic for cell differentiation and survival. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of DDR1 in cell spreading. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of DDR1 consisting of Cdc42 that regulates the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeleton and cell spreading in MDCK cells. Cell spreading involves the organization of cytoskeleton that is mainly regulated by Rho-family GTPases. We assessed the activity of Rho-family GTPases and transfected MDCK cells with constitutively active or dominant negative GTPases, and quantified the extent of cell spreading. These results showed that DDR1 decreased the filamentous actin ratio and Rac1/Cdc42 activities, but had no effects on RhoA activity. Neither constitutively active nor dominant negative Rac1 altered DDR1-inhibited cell spreading. Constitutively active Cdc42 could rescue the DDR1-inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative Cdc42 inhibited cell spreading, indicating that DDR1-inhibited cell spreading is Cdc42 dependent. With the use of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin blocking antibody, we showed that collagen-induced Cdc42 activation was mediated by alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. Moreover, ectopic FAK expression enhanced the Cdc42 activity. Reducing FAK activity by dominant negative FAK (FRNK) markedly abolished the Cdc42 activity. These findings show that DDR1a/b activation inhibits cell spreading through suppressing alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-mediated Cdc42 activation. PMID:18780290

  19. Cell spreading analysis with directed edge profile-guided level set active contours.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, I; Bunyak, F; Palaniappan, K; Sun, M; Forgacs, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading within the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in cell motility, cell growth and tissue organization. Measuring cell spreading dynamics enables the investigation of cell mechanosensitivity to external mechanical stimuli, such as substrate rigidity. A common approach to measure cell spreading dynamics is to take time lapse images and quantify cell size and perimeter as a function of time. In our experiments, differences in cell characteristics between different treatments are subtle and require accurate measurements of cell parameters across a large population of cells to ensure an adequate sample size for statistical hypothesis testing. This paper presents a new approach to estimate accurate cell boundaries with complex shapes by applying a modified geodesic active contour level set method that directly utilizes the halo effect typically seen in phase contrast microscopy. Contour evolution is guided by edge profiles in a perpendicular direction to ensure convergence to the correct cell boundary. The proposed approach is tested on bovine aortic endothelial cell images under different treatments, and demonstrates accurate segmentation for a wide range of cell sizes and shapes compared to manual ground truth. PMID:18979769

  20. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  1. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Amy N; Neupauer, Roseanna M; Kasprzyk, Joseph R

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume. PMID:27153361

  2. Distribution of mega fauna on sulfide edifices on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Arunima; Becker, Erin L.; Podowski, Elizabeth L.; Wickes, Leslie N.; Ma, Shufen; Mullaugh, Katherine M.; Hourdez, Stéphane; Luther, George W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrothermal vent sulfide edifices contain some of the most extreme thermal and chemical conditions in which animals are able to live. As a result, sulfide edifices in the East Pacific Rise, Juan de Fuca Ridge, and Mid Atlantic Ridge vent systems often contain distinct faunal assemblages. In this study, we used high-resolution imagery and in-situ physico-chemical measurements within the context of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to examine community structure and niche differentiation of dominant fauna on sulfide edifices in the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our results show that ELSC and VFR sulfide edifices host two distinct types of communities. One type, that covers the majority of sulfide edifice faces, is overall very similar to nearby lava communities and biomass is dominated by the same chemoautotrophic symbiont-containing molluscs that dominate lava communities, namely the provannid gastropods Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei and the mytilid bivalve Bathymodiolus brevior. The spatial distribution of the dominant molluscs is often a variation of the pattern of concentric rings observed on lavas, with Alviniconcha spp. at the tops of edifices where exposure to vent flow is the highest, and I. nautilei and B. brevior below. Our physico-chemical measurements indicate that because of rapid dispersion of vent fluid, habitable area for symbiont-containing fauna is quite limited on sulfide edifices, and the realized niches of the mollusc groups are narrower on sulfide edifices than on lavas. We suggest that competition plays an important role in determining the realized distributions of the mollusc groups on edifices. The other habitat, present in small patches of presumably hot, new anhydrite, is avoided by the dominant symbiont-containing molluscs and inhabited by crabs, shrimp and polynoids that are likely more heat tolerant. The ratio of sulfide concentration to temperature anomaly of

  3. Tuning spreading and avalanche-size exponents in directed percolation with modified activation probabilities.

    PubMed

    Landes, François; Rosso, Alberto; Jagla, E A

    2012-10-01

    We consider the directed percolation process as a prototype of systems displaying a nonequilibrium phase transition into an absorbing state. The model is in a critical state when the activation probability is adjusted at some precise value p(c). Criticality is lost as soon as the probability to activate sites at the first attempt, p(1), is changed. We show here that criticality can be restored by "compensating" the change in p(1) by an appropriate change of the second time activation probability p(2) in the opposite direction. At compensation, we observe that the bulk exponents of the process coincide with those of the normal directed percolation process. However, the spreading exponents are changed and take values that depend continuously on the pair (p(1),p(2)). We interpret this situation by acknowledging that the model with modified initial probabilities has an infinite number of absorbing states. PMID:23214572

  4. Magma system along fast-spreading centers controlled by ridge segmentation: Evidence from the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Sumio; Adachi, Yoshiko

    2013-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are segmented at various scales with a hierarchy, from the biggest 1st- order to the smallest 4th-order segments. These segment structures control magmatic processes beneath the mid-ocean ridges such as mantle upwelling, partial melting of the upper mantle, and magma delivery system to form the oceanic crust (Macdonald, 1998). However, systematic studies on the segment control for magmatic processes are rare at modern mid-ocean ridges due to the difficulty of obtaining in-situ samples from different crustal-lithospheric depths. Sampling at ocean floors is generally exclusively limited only to the surface (i.e. the seafloor). Furthermore, the samples obtained from the surface of the ocean floor may likely represent the products of off-axis magmatism (Kusano et al., 2012). Therefore, studies of ocean ridge segmentation in ophiolites provide important constraints for the magmatic processes beneath seafloor spreading centers, because the precise 3-D architecture of the upper mantle and the crust (all the way to the uppermost extrusive layer) and their lateral variations could be observed and investigated in ophiolites. We have studied the northern Oman ophiolite where a complete succession from the upper mantle peridotites to the uppermost extrusive rocks is well exposed. Miyashita et al. (2003), Adachi and Miyashita (2003) and Umino et al. (2003) proposed a segment structure in the northern Oman ophiolite; the Wadi Fizh area is regarded as a northward propagating tip of a mid-ocean ridge based on geological evidence (Adachi and Miyashita. 2003). On the other hand, the Wadi Thuqbah area, about 25 km south of Wadi Fizh, is regarded as a segment center based on the thickest Moho transition zone, well developed EW-trending lineations in the MTZ and layered gabbro, and the comparatively primitive compositions of the layered gabbros. Furthermore, the southern margin of the Hilti block (Salahi block), about 40 km south of Wadi Thuqbah, is inferred to be the

  5. Three-dimensional inversion of marine magnetic anomalies on the equatorial Atlantic Ridge (St. Paul Fracture Zone): Delayed magnetization in a magmatically starved spreading center?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichler, Bertrand; HéKinian, Roger

    2002-12-01

    The St. Paul Fracture Zone (FZ) in the equatorial Atlantic is interrupted by three intratransform ridge (ITR) spreading centers. A detailed magnetic survey, corrected for the diurnal variations using a moored magnetic station, six submersible dives, and three bottom-towed video camera tracks provide data on the most eastern ITR (0°37'N, 25°27'W). Visual observations and submersible sampling displayed a high ultramafic/volcanic ratio, supporting the assumption that the ITR is in a magmatically starved state. Volcanics were mainly found on the rift valley floor from 4700 to 4000 m and as a thin cap (<160 m) on the top of the eastern rift crest (2700 m). Most of the rift walls consist essentially of serpentinized peridotites and gabbros. The magnetic data show a well-defined ridge centered anomaly. A generalized inversion method was applied to the field data to calculate the crustal equivalent magnetization, assuming that the seafloor is broken down into elementary cells of 1 × 1 × 0.5 km3 which fit the topography. The average of absolute value of equivalent magnetization is 2.7 A m-1. The width of the central normal polarity (Brunhes epoch) is wider (at least 34 km) than that indicated by the NUVEL-1 kinematic model (24.5 km). This 40% excess is believed to be significant and is thought to be the result of prolonged chemical remanent magnetization acquired during the serpentinization of peridotites. In a magmatically starved accretion segment, we suggest that peridotites could continue to acquire magnetization as long as tectonic activities facilitate the circulation of seawater in the upper mantle.

  6. Rhyolite, dacite, andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt volcanism on the Alarcon Rise spreading-center, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Castillo, P. R.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcon Rise is a ~50 km long intermediate-rate (~50mm/a) spreading segment at the southern end of the Gulf of California. The Rise is bounded by the Tamayo and Pescadero transforms to the south and north. In Spring 2012, an MBARI-led expedition mapped a ~1.5- 3km wide swath of the ridge axis at 1-m resolution and completed 9 ROV dives (Clague et al., this session). Sampling during the ROV dives was supplemented by use of a wax-tip corer to recover volcanic glass: 194 glassy lava samples were recovered from the Rise. The vast majority of lava flows along the axis are basalt and rare basaltic andesite. More than half the basalts are plagioclase-phyric to ultraphyric (Martin et al., this session), and the rest are aphyric. Rare samples also include olivine or olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Analyses of half of the recovered glass basalt rinds range in MgO from 4.3 to 8.5 wt.% and those with MgO > 6 wt % have K2O/TiO2 = 0.07-0.11. The basalts are broadly characterized as normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB). E-MORB is also present near the center of the ridge segment, but has been found only as pyroclasts in sediment cores. A much greater range in lava composition is associated with an unusual volcanic dome-like edifice that lies ~9 km south of the Pescadero transform. Two dives in the vicinity of the dome collected lava and volcaniclastic samples consisting of moderately to sparsely phyric light brown to colorless volcanic glass. Feldspar is the dominant phase, but magnetite, fayalitic olivine, light tan and light green clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, zircon, and rare pyrite blebs also occur. Melt-inclusions are common in many phenocrysts, especially of plagioclase. Hydrous mineral phases are not observed. These samples have rhyolitic glass compositions (75.8- 77.4 SiO2 wt %), but their whole-rock compositions will be somewhat less silicic. Pillow flows to the immediate west have dacitic glass compositions (67.4- 68.8 wt % SiO2). Basaltic andesitic

  7. A high-temperature hydrothermal deposit on the seabed at a Gulf of California spreading center ( Guaymas Basin).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lonsdale, P.F.; Bischoff, J.L.; Burns, V.M.; Kastner, M.; Sweeney, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A submersible dive on a turbidite-covered spreading axis in Guaymas Basin photographed and sampled extensive terraces and ledges of talc. The rock contains siliceous microfossils, smectite, and euhedral pyrrhotite as well as rather pure iron-rich talc. S and O isotopes indicate precipitation around a hydrothermal vent, at about 2800C. - Authors

  8. Hotspot activity and plume pulses recorded by geometry of spreading axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Meir; Agnon, Amotz

    2001-06-01

    Anomalous plan view geometry (planform) of spreading axes is shown to be a faithful indicator of hotspot influence, possibly capable of detecting pulses of hotspot discharge. A planform anomaly (PA) occurs when the orientation of second-order ridge segments is prominently oblique to the spreading direction. PA is found in the vicinity of hotspots at shallow ridges (<1.5 km), suggesting hotspot influence. In places the PA and shallow bathymetry are accompanied by geochemical anomalies, corroborating hotspot influence. This linkage is best expressed in the western Gulf of Aden, where the extent of the PA from the Afar hotspot coincides with the extent of La/Sm and Sr isotopic anomalies. Using fracture mechanics we predict PA to reflect overpressurized melt that dominates the stresses in the crust, consistent with hotspot regime. Accordingly, the temporal variations of the planform previously inferred from magnetic anomalies around the Kolbeinsey Ridge (KR), north of Iceland, record episodes of interaction with the hotspot and major pulses of the plume. This suggestion is corroborated by temporal correlation of episodes showing PA north of Iceland with plume pulses previously inferred by the V-shaped ridges around the Reykjanes Ridge (RR), south of Iceland. In contrast to the RR, the temporal correlation suggests simultaneous incidence of the plume pulses at Iceland and KR, hundreds of kilometers to the north. A deep northward branch of the Iceland plume active during pulse-periods may explain these observations.

  9. Hurricane activity and the large-scale pattern of spread of an invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6-35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  10. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P.; Cronin, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6–35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  11. Centering Activities for Gifted/Talented Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are centering techniques to help gifted and talented students stimulate and further develop the ability to incubate, or to pay attention to the imagery continuously going on in the brain's right hemisphere. (CL)

  12. Land spreading of olive mill wastewater: effects on soil microbial activity and potential phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Ibrahim; Laor, Yael; Raviv, Michael; Medina, Shlomit

    2007-01-01

    Extremely high organic load and the toxic nature of olive mill wastewater (OMW) prevent their direct discharge into domestic wastewater treatment systems. In addition to the various treatment schemes designed for such wastewater, controlled land spreading of untreated OMW has been suggested as an alternative mean of disposal. A field study was conducted between October 2004 and September 2005 to assess possible effects of OMW on soil microbial activity and potential phytotoxicity. The experiment was carried out in an organic orchard located on a Vertisol-type soil (Jezre'el Valley, Israel) and included two application levels of OMW (36 and 72m(3)ha(-1)). Total microbial counts, and to less extent the hydrolytic activity and soil respiration were increased following the high OMW application level. A bench-scale lab experiment showed that the rate of OMW mineralization was mainly dependent on the general status of soil activity and was not related to previous acclimatization of the soil microflora to OMW. Soil phytotoxicity (% germination and root elongation) was assessed in soil extracts of samples collected before and after each OMW application, using germinating cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seeds. We found direct short-term effect of OMW application on soil phytotoxicity. However, the soil was partly or completely recovered between successive applications. No further phytotoxicity was observed in treated soils as compared with control soil, 3 months after OMW application. Such short-term phytotoxicity was not in correlation with measured EC and total polyphenols in the soil extracts. Overall, the results of this study further support a safe controlled OMW spreading on lands that are not associated with sensitive aquifers. PMID:16814841

  13. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased. PMID:27003366

  14. Activities of the Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at the University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The college has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction is prominent evidence of this record. At the inception of CSC, the center was primarily founded on the need for research on in-space construction of large space systems like space stations and interplanetary space vehicles. The scope of CSC's research has now evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. Within this broadened scope, our research projects seek to impact the underlying technological basis for such spacecraft as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites, and other special purpose spacecraft, as well as the technological basis for large space platforms. The center's research focuses on three areas: spacecraft structures, spacecraft operations and control, and regolith and surface systems. In the area of spacecraft structures, our current emphasis is on concepts and modeling of deployable structures, analysis of inflatable structures, structural damage detection algorithms, and composite materials for lightweight structures. In the area of spacecraft operations and control, we are continuing our previous efforts in process control of in-orbit structural assembly. In addition, we have begun two new efforts in formal approach to spacecraft flight software systems design and adaptive attitude control systems. In the area of regolith and surface systems, we are continuing the work of characterizing the physical properties of lunar

  15. Telerobotic activities at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center telerobotic efforts span three major thrusts: (1) sustaining and expanding the capability of the Shuttle manipulator; (2) developing and integrating the multiple telerobotic system of the Space Station; and (3) fostering and applying research in all areas of telerobotics technology within the government, private, and academic sectors.

  16. A conceptual model for the formation of a km-scale gabbroic body in a fossil slow spreading center (Corsica ophiolites, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribuzio, R.; Sanfilippo, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Pineto gabbroic sequence from Jurassic ophiolites of Corsica (France) represents a lower crustal section of an embryonic slow spreading center. The sequence has a thickness of ~2 km and mostly consists of troctolites and minor olivine-gabbros in its lower portion, and clinopyroxene-rich gabbros at higher stratigraphic levels. The gabbroic sequence also includes sparse olivine-rich troctolites, olivine-gabbronorites and oxide-gabbros and locally encloses up to 100 m thick bodies of mantle peridotites. Primitive troctolites occur at different stratigraphic heights, in both lower and upper portions of the sequence, thereby indicating that the building of the gabbroic section involved different primitive melt injections. Petrological variations and cooling rate estimates (from -2.2 to -1.7 °c/yr log units) as a function of the stratigraphic eight allowed us to define a conceptual model for the growth of the km-scale gabbroic sequence. The proposed conceptual model shows that the primitive melts are intruded within a lithospheric mantle, cooled by active hydrothermal circulation. These primitive melts crystallize in situ, thereby forming sills consisting of primitive troctolites. The melts residual after the formation of the troctolites migrate through focused flow and develop sills that are progressively more evolved upward. When new primitive melt injections involve the lithospheric section, these primitive melts may intrude the lithospheric mantle at different depths forming primitive troctolites at different stratigraphic levels. The melts residual after the formation of the second stage primitive troctolites migrate upward and yield a series of variably evolved sills intruding the first stage sill series. This model shows that evolved gabbroic sills derived from different primitive melt injections may be physically associated explaning the complex architecture of the gabbroic complex.

  17. Design for efficient Suburban Activity Centers. Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-19

    The advent of Suburban Activity Centers has had a radical effect on the shape and function of regions throughout the country. These centers are typically made up of large concentrations of office space, retail uses, and more recently, light industrial and manufacturing facilities. Very few Suburban Activity Centers include significant residential components, much less parks, schools, and other civic buildings. While SACs come in many sizes and shapes, there appear to be a number of distinctive common characteristics. The overall purpose of the study is to identify methods for designing Activity Centers so that they minimize traffic congestion, improve pedestrian, bicycle, and transit model shares and contribute to healthy regions.

  18. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  19. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  20. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  1. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  2. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  3. Effect of individual behavior on epidemic spreading in activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Frasca, Mattia; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    In this work we study the effect of behavioral changes of individuals on the propagation of epidemic diseases. Specifically, we consider a susceptible-infected-susceptible model over a network of contacts that evolves in a time scale that is comparable to the individual disease dynamics. The phenomenon is modeled in the context of activity-driven networks, in which contacts occur on the basis of activity potentials. To offer insight into behavioral strategies targeting both susceptible and infected individuals, we consider two separate behaviors that may emerge in respiratory syndromes and sexually transmitted infections. The first is related to a reduction in the activity of infected individuals due to quarantine or illness. The second is instead associated with a selfish self-protective behavior of susceptible individuals, who tend to reduce contact with the rest of the population on the basis of a risk perception. Numerical and theoretical results suggest that behavioral changes could have a beneficial effect on the disease spreading, by increasing the epidemic threshold and decreasing the steady-state fraction of infected individuals.

  4. Dynamic characteristics of an active coastal spreading area using ambient noise measurements—Anchor Bay, Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Farrugia, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Anchor Bay and surrounding regions are located on the northwest coast of the island of Malta, Central Mediterranean. The area is characterized by a coastal cliff environment having an outcropping layer of hard coralline limestone (UCL) resting on a thick (up to 50 m) layer of clays and marls (Blue Clay, BC). This configuration gives rise to coastal instability effects, in particular lateral spreading phenomena and rock falls. Previous and ongoing studies have identified both lateral spreading rates and vertical motions of several millimetres per year. The area is an interesting natural laboratory as coastal detachment processes in a number of different stages can be identified and are easily accessible. We investigate the site dynamic characteristics of this study area by recording ambient noise time-series at more than 30 points, over an area of 0.07 km2, using a portable three-component seismograph. The time-series are processed to give both horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio graphs (H/V) as well as frequency-dependent polarisation analysis. The H/V graphs illustrate and quantify aspects of site resonance effects due both to underlying geology as well as to mechanical resonance of partly or wholly detached blocks. The polarization diagrams indicate the degree of linearity and predominant directions of vibrational effects. H/V curves closer to the cliff edge show complex responses at higher frequencies, characteristic of the dynamic behaviour of individual detached blocks. Particle motion associated with the higher frequencies shows strongly directional polarization and a high degree of linearity at well-defined frequencies, indicative of normal-mode vibration. The stable plateau areas, on the other hand, show simple, single-peak H/V curves representative of the underlying stratification and no predominant polarization direction. These results, which will be compared with those from other experiments in the area, have important implications for the

  5. Flow rates and reaction rates in the Galapagos Rise spreading center hydrothermal system as inferred from 228Ra/226Ra in vesicomyid clam shells

    PubMed Central

    Turekian, Karl K.; Cochran, J. Kirk

    1986-01-01

    The 228Ra/226Ra ratios in a previously dated vesicomyid clam shell were used to determine that seawater was in contact with mid-oceanic-ridge basalt glass for 22-45 years prior to arrival to the surface at 350°C at the Galapagos Rise Spreading Center. The minimum rate of reaction for the 45-year sojourn time, based on a water/rock ratio of 2.8 derived from 226Ra concentrations, is 8 g of basalt altered per kg of seawater per year. PMID:16593746

  6. C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 deg W - A laser decrepitation mass spectrometry study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonover, Robert N.; Sinton, John M.; Gibson, Everett K.; Sommer, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Ratios of C, O, and H dissolved in silicate glass inclusions and pillow rind glasses in samples from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 deg W were analyzed (using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry), and the data were assessed in terms of mantle source compositions, oxygen fugacity, kinetic fractionation, and magmatic degassing. It was found that glass inclusions in the Galapagos failing rift lavas are higher and more variable in CO2/H2O (about 0.641) relative to inclusions in propagating rift lavas (about 0.245). This difference is considered to reflect different degrees of degassing during contrasting magmatic histories of the two regions.

  7. Focal hyperemia followed by spreading oligemia and impaired activation of rCBF in classic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, J.; Larsen, B.; Lauritzen, M.

    1981-04-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 254 areas of a hemisphere with the xenon 133 intraarterial injection method. Six cases of classic migraine were followed from the normal state into the prodromal phase, and in 3 cases further into the headache phase. One patient with common migraine was similarly followed during his only classic attack. The attacks were initiated by focal hyperemia in 3 patients. During prodromes all patients displayed occipitoparietal rCBF reduction (oligemia), but in only 1 case did the reduction approach critical values. Oligemia gradually spread anteriorly in the course of 15 to 45 minutes. In 4 patients a global oligemia was observed. In 4 patients severe headache was present concomitantly with oligemia and with no sign of hyperemia or nonhomogeneous brain perfusion. The normal rCBF increase during cortical activity (hand movement, speech, and similar activities) was impaired in 6 patients. The results indicate that the vasospastic model of the migraine attack is too simplistic.

  8. Spread of electrical activity at cortical level after repetitive magnetic stimulation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lorenzano, C; Gilio, F; Inghilleri, M; Conte, A; Fofi, L; Manfredi, M; Berardelli, A

    2002-11-01

    In normal subjects, focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the hand motor area evokes muscle potentials (MEPs) from muscles in the hand (target muscles) and the arm (non-target muscles). In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the spread of MEPs induced by focal rTMS in non-target muscles. rTMS was delivered with a Magstim stimulator and a figure-of-eight coil placed over the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) motor area of the left hemisphere. Trains of 10 stimuli were given at a suprathreshold intensity (120% of motor threshold) and at frequencies of 5, 10 and 20 Hz at rest. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded simultaneously from the FDI (target muscle) and the contralateral biceps muscle and from the FDI muscle ipsilateral to the side of stimulation (non-target muscle). rTMS delivered in trains to the FDI motor area of the left hemisphere elicited MEPs in the contralateral FDI (target muscle) that gradually increased in amplitude over the course of the train. Focal rTMS trains also induced MEPs in the contralateral biceps (non-target muscle) but did so only after the second or third stimulus; like target-muscle MEPs, in non-target muscle MEPs progressively increased in amplitude during the train. At no frequency did rTMS elicit MEPs in the FDI muscle ipsilateral to the site of stimulation. rTMS left the latency of EMG responses in the FDI and biceps muscles unchanged during the trains of stimuli. The latency of biceps MEPs was longer after rTMS than after a single TMS pulse. In conditioning-test experiments designed to investigate the cortical origin of the spread, a single TMS pulse delivered over the left hemisphere at an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 50, 100 and 150 ms reduced the amplitude of the test MEP evoked by a single TMS pulse delivered over the right hemisphere; and a conditioning rTMS train delivered over the left hemisphere increased the amplitude of the test MEP evoked by a single TMS pulse over the

  9. Recruitment of marine invertebrates to hard substrates at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Berg, Carl J.; Turner, Ruth D.

    1988-10-01

    Recruitment panels were placed at and near hydrothermal vent communities at three sites on the Galapagos spreading center and one site on the East Pacific Rise at 21°N. Deployment periods ranged from 26 days (Clam Acres, 21°N) to 260-320 days (Rose Garden, Garden of Eden, Mussel Bed, GSC) to 1216 days (Clam Acres). Recruitment of gastropod post-larvae and juveniles was observed on arrays deployed at Clam Acres for 26 days. Regardless of length of deployment, populations of polychaetes, mollusks, and barnacles colonizing the panels were predominantly post-larval, juvenile, or sub-adult stages. We suggest that some combination of competition, migration, and predation maintains these populations in immature stages. Size distributions of individuals within a taxon on panels deployed for 1216 days are broad, suggesting intermittent or continuous recruitment in many of the vent-associated species rather than a single episodic recruitment event. Folliculinid and foraminiferan protozoans were the most abundant eucaryotic organisms colonizing long-term deployments at Clam Acres. On the Galapagos spreading center, level of recruitment differed among the vent sites, with Rose Garden > Garden of Eden ≫ Mussel Bed. Recruitment of vent-associated species was greater on panels placed within vent communities compared to panels placed adjacent to these communities. This observation is consistent with the maintenance of vent communities in discrete regions of hydrothermal flux.

  10. Technical activities 1980: Center for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtman, J. B., Jr.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1980-10-01

    Part of the National Measurement Laboratory, one of the principal laboratories comprising the National Bureau of Standards, the Materials Science Center is organized in six divisions, each having responsibility in different areas of materials science appropriate to the major classes of materials metals, polymers, and ceramics and glass. These Divisions vary in their balance between theory and experiments, between direct standards work and research, and in their orientation toward industrial and Government needs and the needs of other components of the scientific and technical community. Achievements reported relate to signal processing and imaging; fracture theory; conformational changes in polymers; chemical stability and corrosion; fracture deformation; polymer science and standards; metallurgy and alloys; ceramics, glass, and solid state; and reactor radiation.

  11. Marshall Space Flight Center ECLSS technology activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology activities are presented. Topics covered include: analytical development; ECLSS modeling approach; example of water reclamation modeling needs; and hardware development and testing.

  12. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  13. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  14. An Ontology-Based Tourism Recommender System Based on Spreading Activation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahramian, Z.; Abbaspour, R. Ali

    2015-12-01

    A tourist has time and budget limitations; hence, he needs to select points of interest (POIs) optimally. Since the available information about POIs is overloading, it is difficult for a tourist to select the most appreciate ones considering preferences. In this paper, a new travel recommender system is proposed to overcome information overload problem. A recommender system (RS) evaluates the overwhelming number of POIs and provides personalized recommendations to users based on their preferences. A content-based recommendation system is proposed, which uses the information about the user's preferences and POIs and calculates a degree of similarity between them. It selects POIs, which have highest similarity with the user's preferences. The proposed content-based recommender system is enhanced using the ontological information about tourism domain to represent both the user profile and the recommendable POIs. The proposed ontology-based recommendation process is performed in three steps including: ontology-based content analyzer, ontology-based profile learner, and ontology-based filtering component. User's feedback adapts the user's preferences using Spreading Activation (SA) strategy. It shows the proposed recommender system is effective and improves the overall performance of the traditional content-based recommender systems.

  15. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  16. Active spreading processes at ultraslow-spreading ridges: Relocalization and analysis of the 1999 earthquake swarm at Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korger, Edith; Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten

    2010-05-01

    Gakkel Ridge is situated within the Arctic Ocean and spans from eastern Greenland to the continental Siberian shelf. It is termed an ultraslow spreading ridge (full spreading rate 6-14 mm/yr). At ultraslow spreading ridges, heat loss by conductive cooling is thought to decrease magma supply and focus magmatism in widely spaced discrete volcanic centres. In 1999 lasting over 7 months, the largest ever earthquake swarm at a mid-ocean ridge was teleseismically registered worldwide. It originated from around 85°E which was postulated to be a volcanic complex and featured 252 recorded events, including 11 events with a magnitude mb > 5.0. The unprecedented duration, magnitude and number of events ran counter to expectations at this location. Preliminary analysis with unreviewed datasets showed changing source-mechanisms from extensional to events with a greater non-double-couple component at around March, 4th and an abrupt decrease in the number of events on the 15th of April. Also the epicentres of the larger events seemed to migrate with advancing time to the NW, farther away from the volcanic centre. As these analyses were based on preliminary datasets it seemed indicated to relocalize the earthquakes when the reviewed bulletin of the International Seismological Centre was released. This relocalization was done with the earthquake localization programme NonLinLoc using a probabilistic approach and grid-search. The calculation of travel times used as velocity model both AK135 and IASP91 combined with a regional velocity model for recording stations with epicentral distance < 30°. We tested extensively the influence of localization algorithm, velocity model, station coverage and weighting on the localization result. The new locations of the epicentres show a clustering of events within the central rift valley and the southern rift flank. The dataset was further reviewed with regard to the quality of the localization and reduced to 93 well located events whose

  17. Sustained NMDA receptor activation by spreading depolarizations can initiate excitotoxic injury in metabolically compromised neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; Shuttleworth, C William

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are slowly propagating waves of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization. SDs have been recorded in patients with brain injury, and the incidence of SD significantly correlates with outcome severity. Although it is well accepted that the ionic dyshomeostasis of SD presents a severe metabolic burden, there is currently limited understanding of SD-induced injury processes at a cellular level. In the current study we characterized events accompanying SD in the hippocampal CA1 region of murine brain slices, using whole-cell recordings and single-cell Ca2+ imaging. We identified an excitatory phase that persisted for approximately 2 min following SD onset, and accompanied with delayed dendritic ionic dyshomeostasis. The excitatory phase coincided with a significant increase in presynaptic glutamate release, evidenced by a transient increase in spontaneous EPSC frequency and paired-pulse depression of evoked EPSCs. Activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) during this late excitatory phase contributed to the duration of individual neuronal depolarizations and delayed recovery of extracellular slow potential changes. Selectively targeting the NMDAR activation following SD onset (by delayed pressure application of a competitive NMDAR antagonist) significantly decreased the duration of cellular depolarizations. Recovery of dendritic Ca2+ elevations following SD were also sensitive to delayed NMDA antagonist application. Partial inhibition of neuronal energy metabolism converted SD into an irrecoverable event with persistent Ca2+ overload and membrane compromise. Delayed NMDAR block was sufficient to prevent these acute injurious events in metabolically compromised neurons. These results identify a significant contribution of a late component of SD that could underlie neuronal injury in pathological circumstances. PMID:22907056

  18. Calculation method using Clarkson integration for the physical dose at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajiri, Minoru; Maeda, Takamasa; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Kuroiwa, Toshitaka; Tanimoto, Katsuyuki; Shibayama, Koichi; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In broad-beam carbon-ion radiotherapy performed using the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba, the number of monitor units is determined by measuring the physical dose at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) for the treatment beam. The total measurement time increases as the number of treatment beams increases, which hinders the treatment of an increased number of patients. Hence, Kusano et al.[Jpn. J. Med. Phys. 23(Suppl. 2), 65-68 (2003)] proposed a method to calculate the physical dose at the center of the SOBP for a treatment beam. Based on a recent study, the authors here propose a more accurate calculation method.Methods: The authors measured the physical dose at the center of the SOBP while varying the circular field size and range-shifter thickness. The authors obtained the physical dose at the center of the SOBP for an irregularly shaped beam using Clarkson integration based on these measurements.Results: The difference between the calculated and measured physical doses at the center of the SOBP varied with a change in the central angle of the sector segment. The differences between the calculated and measured physical doses at the center of the SOBP were within {+-}1% for all irregularly shaped beams that were used to validate the calculation method.Conclusions: The accuracy of the proposed method depends on both the number of angular intervals used for Clarkson integration and the fineness of the basic data used for calculations: sampling numbers for the field size and thickness of the range shifter. If those parameters are properly chosen, the authors can obtain a calculated monitor unit number with high accuracy sufficient for clinical applications.

  19. Evidence of recent volcanic activity on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M H; Kurras, G J; Tolstoy, M; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Coakley, B J; Cochran, J R

    2001-02-15

    Seafloor spreading is accommodated by volcanic and tectonic processes along the global mid-ocean ridge system. As spreading rate decreases the influence of volcanism also decreases, and it is unknown whether significant volcanism occurs at all at ultraslow spreading rates (<1.5 cm yr(-1)). Here we present three-dimensional sonar maps of the Gakkel ridge, Earth's slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, located in the Arctic basin under the Arctic Ocean ice canopy. We acquired this data using hull-mounted sonars attached to a nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Hawkbill. Sidescan data for the ultraslow-spreading (approximately 1.0 cm yr(-1)) eastern Gakkel ridge depict two young volcanoes covering approximately 720 km2 of an otherwise heavily sedimented axial valley. The western volcano coincides with the average location of epicentres for more than 250 teleseismic events detected in 1999, suggesting that an axial eruption was imaged shortly after its occurrence. These findings demonstrate that eruptions along the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge are focused at discrete locations and appear to be more voluminous and occur more frequently than was previously thought. PMID:11236991

  20. NASA Glenn Research Center Battery Activities Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon and GRC's involvement in their development. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EVA) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  1. The characteristics of hydrothermal plumes observed in the Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field, the Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Zhou, J.; Deng, X.; Tao, W.; Zhang, G.; Liu, W.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field (PSMHF) is located on the southern rim of the Galapagos Microplate. It was found at the 3rd leg of the 2009 Chinese DY115-21 expedition on board R/V Dayangyihao. It is efficient to learn the distribution of hydrothermal plumes and locate the hydrothermal vents by detecting the anomalies of turbidity and temperature. Detecting seawater turbidity by MAPR based on deep-tow technology is established and improved during our cruises. We collected data recorded by MAPR and information from geological sampling, yielding the following results: (1)Strong hydrothermal turbidity and temperature anomalies were recorded at 1.23°N, southeast and northwest of PSMHF. According to the CTD data on the mooring system, significant temperature anomalies were observed over PSMHF at the depth of 1,470 m, with anomalies range from 0.2℃ to 0.4℃, which gave another evidence of the existence of hydrothermal plume. (2)At 1.23°N (101.4802°W/1.2305°N), the nose-shaped particle plume was concentrated at a depth interval of 1,400-1,600 m, with 200 m thickness and an east-west diffusion range of 500 m. The maximum turbidity anomaly (0.045 △NTU) was recorded at the depth of 1,500 m, while the background anomaly was about 0.01△NTU. A distinct temperature anomaly was also detected at the seafloor near 1.23°N. Deep-tow camera showed the area was piled up by hydrothermal sulfide sediments. (3) In the southeast (101.49°W/1.21°N), the thickness of hydrothermal plume was 300 m and it was spreading laterally at a depth of 1,500-1,800 m, for a distance about 800 m. The maximum turbidity anomaly of nose-shaped plume is about 0.04 △NTU at the depth of 1,600 m. Distinct temperature anomaly was also detected in the northwest (101.515°W/1.235°N). (4) Terrain and bottom current were the main factors controlling the distribution of hydrothermal plume. Different from the distribution of hydrothermal plumes on the mid-ocean ridges, which was mostly

  2. Five million years of compositionally diverse, episodic volcanism: Construction of Davidson Seamount atop an abandoned spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Duncan, R. A.; Huard, J. J.; Davis, A. S.; Castillo, P. R.; Lonsdale, P.; Devogelaere, A.

    2009-12-01

    Davidson Seamount, a volcano located about 80 km off the central California coast, has a volume of ˜320 km3 and consists of a series of parallel ridges serrated with steep cones. Davidson was sampled and its morphology observed during 27 ROV Tiburon dives. During those dives, 286 samples of lava, volcaniclastite, and erratics from the continental margin were collected, with additional samples from one ROV-collected push core and four gravity cores. We report glass compositions for 99 samples and 40Ar-39Ar incremental heating age data for 20 of the samples. The glass analyses are of hawaiite (62%), mugearite (13%), alkalic basalt (9%), and tephrite (8%), with minor transitional basalt (2%), benmoreite (2%), and trachyandesite (2%). The lithologies are irregularly distributed in space and time. The volcano erupted onto crust inferred to be 20 Ma from seafloor magnetic anomalies. Ages of the lavas range from 9.8 to 14.8 Ma. The oldest rocks are from the central ridge, and the youngest are from the flanks and southern end of the edifice. The compositions of the 18 reliably dated volcanic cones vary with age such that the oldest lavas are the most fractionated. The melts lost 65% to nearly 95% of their initial S because of bubble loss during vesiculation, and the shallowest samples have S contents similar to lava erupted subaerially in Hawaii. Despite this similarity in S contents, there is scant other evidence to suggest that Davidson was ever an island. The numerous small cones of disparate chemistry and the long eruptive period suggest episodic growth of the volcano over at least 5 Myr and perhaps as long as 10 Myr if it began to grow when the spreading ridge was abandoned.

  3. the P-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading center: The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed analysis of short period travel time, and waveform data reveals the upper mantle structure beneath an oceanic ridge to depths of 900 km. More than 1400 digital seismograms from earthquakes in Mexico and central America recorded at SCARLET yield 1753 travel times and 58 direct measurements of short period travel time as well as high quality, stable waveforms. The 29 events combine to form a continuous record section from 9 deg to 40 deg with an average station spacing of less than 5 km. First the travel times are inverted. Further constraints arise from the observed relative amplitudes of mantle phases, which are modeled by trial and error.

  4. Discovery and Distribution of Black Smokers on the Western Galapagos Spreading Center: Implications for Spatial and Temporal Controls on High Temperature Venting at Ridge/Hotspot Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P. G.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Though nearly one-fifth of the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lies on or near hotspots, it has been debated whether hotspots increase or decrease MOR hydrothermal flux, or affect vent biota. Despite hotspot enhancement of melt supply, high-temperature vent plumes are enigmatically sparse along two previously-surveyed ridge- hotspot intersections [Reykjanes Ridge (RR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR)]. This has been attributed to crustal thickening by excess volcanism. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 540 km-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot at lon. 94.5 -89.5 deg. W. Although MOR hydrothermal springs were first found along the eastern GSC crest in 1977 near lon. 86 deg. W, the GalAPAGoS smokers are the first active high-temperature vents to be found anywhere along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary. Active and/or recently-inactive smokers were located beneath plumes at 5 sites on the seafloor between lon. 91 deg. W and 94.5 deg. W (see Anderson et al., this session) during near-bottom, real-time fiber-optic Medea camera surveys. Smokers occur along eruptive seafloor fissures atop axial volcanic ridges near the middles of ridge segments, mainly in areas underlain by relatively shallow, continuous axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors. These findings (1) support magmatic, rather than tectonic, control of GSC smoker distribution; (2) demonstrate that thick crust at MOR-hotspot intersections does not prevent high-temperature hydrothermal vents from forming; and, (3) appear to be inconsistent with models suggesting that enhanced hydrothermal cooling causes abrupt deepening of the AMC and transition from non-rifted to rifted GSC morphology near lon. 92.7 deg. W. The widely-spaced smoker sites located on different GSC segments exhibit remarkably similar characteristics and seafloor settings. Most sites are mature or extinct, and are on lava

  5. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-01-01

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95oW and 85oW on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P2O5/K2O ratio implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns. The sequence of fractionated lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95oW. The mantle source regions for these two areas are interpreted to be depleted in incompatible (and volatile?) elements, although the source region beneath 95oW is less severely depleted in La and K. -Authors

  6. Idaho Senior Center Activities, Activity Participation Level, and Managers' Perceptions of Activity Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girvan, James T.; Harris, Frances

    A survey completed by managers of 77 senior centers in Idaho revealed that meals, blood pressure screening, and games and trips were the most successful activities offered. Alzheimer's support groups, library books for loan, and exercise classes were the least successful. Possible reasons for the success or failure of these activities were…

  7. Leishmania infection modulates beta-1 integrin activation and alters the kinetics of monocyte spreading over fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Cláudio Pereira; Carvalhal, Djalma Gomes Ferrão; Almeida, Rafaela Andrade; Hermida, Micely d’ El-Rei; Touchard, Dominique; Robert, Phillipe; Pierres, Anne; Bongrand, Pierre; dos-Santos, Washington LC

    2015-01-01

    Contact with Leishmania leads to a decreases in mononuclear phagocyte adherence to connective tissue. In this work, we studied the early stages of bond formation between VLA4 and fibronectin, measured the kinetics of membrane alignment and the monocyte cytoplasm spreading area over a fibronectin-coated surface, and studied the expression of high affinity integrin epitope in uninfected and Leishmania-infected human monocytes. Our results show that the initial VLA4-mediated interaction of Leishmania-infected monocyte with a fibronectin-coated surface is preserved, however, the later stage, leukocyte spreading over the substrate is abrogated in Leishmania-infected cells. The median of spreading area was 72 [55–89] μm2 for uninfected and 41 [34–51] μm2 for Leishmania-infected monocyte. This cytoplasm spread was inhibited using an anti-VLA4 blocking antibody. After the initial contact with the fibronectrin-coated surface, uninfected monocyte quickly spread the cytoplasm at a 15 μm2 s−1 ratio whilst Leishmania-infected monocytes only made small contacts at a 5.5 μm2 s−1 ratio. The expression of high affinity epitope by VLA4 (from 39 ± 21% to 14 ± 3%); and LFA1 (from 37 ± 32% to 18 ± 16%) molecules was reduced in Leishmania-infected monocytes. These changes in phagocyte function may be important for parasite dissemination and distribution of lesions in leishmaniasis. PMID:26249106

  8. Microbiological Oxidation Of Sulfide Chimney Promoted By Warm Diffusing Flow In CDE Hydrothermal Field In Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Li, J.; Yang, Q.

    2008-12-01

    A hydrothermal field named as "CDE"(COMRA Discovery Expedition) at 176°11'W, 20° 40'S, about 4 miles south of known ABE hydrothermal field, was discovered by R/V DaYang YiHao in May, 2007. There are amounts of anemones and white microbe mats attached on some pillar sulfide chimneys (from less than one meter to more than 5 meters in height). Some crabs, fishes and microbe mats could be seen in/near chimney groups. Abnormal signatures of turbidity, temperature and CH4 are very strong shown by intensive surveys in deep waters above/near the CDE hydrothermal field by MAPR, CTD and onboard GC analysis of water samplers, respectively. Another prominent characteristics of the chimneys in the CDE is that they are cover with thick oxides/hydroxides crust. It is interesting to notice that there are considerable amounts of Fe oxidant bacteria (FeOB) clones exist in sample of oxide crust according to the phylogenetic analysis by 16S rRNA genes libraries construction. The FeOB clones have higher similarity (>94%) with those known Fe oxidant bacteria such as the genus of Gallionella and Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. In addition, abundant spiral, sheath-like textures known typical sign of FeOB are observed in the samples by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). Optimum grow temperature of isolations similar to our clones is 20- 35°C. The heat, supporting to colonization of anemones, microbe mats and FeOB with oxides crust, could be supplied by probably neighboring high temperature active venting in the field as there are no visible black or white plumes associated with those video-imaged chimneys during our survey. Another alternative speculation is that those chimneys are warm. After extinction of high temperature venting, diffuse flow with a temperature lower than about 100°C are still active through porous structure in the chimney. The warm chimney provides the ideal habitats of some biologic colonization. In turn, oxidation promoted by FeOB activities makes a

  9. Learning to Characterize Submarine Lava Flow Morphology at Seamounts and Spreading Centers using High Definition Video and Photomosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundis, A. T.; Sautter, L. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Kerr-Riess, M.; Denny, A. R.; Elend, M.

    2010-12-01

    In August, 2010 the UW ENLIGHTEN ’10 expedition provided ~140 hours of seafloor HD video footage at Axial Seamount, the most magmatically robust submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During this expedition, direct imagery from an Insite Pacific HD camera mounted on the ROV Jason 2 was used to classify broad expanses of seafloor where high power (8 kw) and high bandwidth (10 Gb/s) fiber optic cable will be laid as part of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF funded Ocean Observatories Initiative. The cable will provide power and two-way, real-time communication to an array of >20 sensors deployed at the summit of the volcano and at active sites of hydrothermal venting to investigate how active processes within the volcano and at seafloor hot springs within the caldera are connected. In addition to HD imagery, over 10,000 overlapping photographs from a down-looking still camera were merged and co-registered to create high resolution photomosaics of two areas within Axial’s caldera. Thousands of additional images were taken to characterize the seafloor along proposed cable routes, allowing optimal routes to be planned well in advance of deployment. Lowest risk areas included those free of large collapse basins, steep flow fronts and fissures. Characterizing the modes of lava distribution across the seafloor is crucial to understanding the construction history of the upper oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges. In part, reconstruction of crustal development and eruptive histories can be inferred from surface flow morphologies, which provide insights into lava emplacement dynamics and effusion rates of past eruptions. An online resource is under development that will educate students about lava flow morphologies through the use of HD video and still photographs. The objective of the LavaFlow exercise is to map out a proposed cable route across the Axial Seamount caldera. Students are first trained in appropriate terminology and background content

  10. Galapagos Hot Spot-Spreading Center System: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83°W-101°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, J.-G.; Kingsley, R. H.; Devine, J. D.

    1982-07-01

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40-50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83°W and 101°W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of `whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's [1976] model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial astenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling [1973] with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey [1977a]. We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's [1979] information. Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  11. Reconstructing lava flow emplacement processes at the hot spot-affected Galápagos Spreading Center, 95°W and 92°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, Tim; White, Scott M.; Colman, Alice; Sinton, John M.

    2013-08-01

    Volcanic eruptions at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) control the permeability, internal structure, and architecture of oceanic crust, thus establishing the foundation for the evolution of the ocean basins. To better understand the emplacement of submarine lava flows at MORs, we have integrated submersible-based geologic mapping with remote sensing techniques to characterize the lava flow morphology within previously mapped lava flow fields produced during single eruptive episodes at the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC). Detailed attributes describing the surface geometry and texture of the lava flows have been extracted from high-resolution sonar data and combined with georeferenced visual observations from submersible dives and camera tows; based on signatures contained in these data, a fuzzy logic-based classification algorithm categorized lava flow morphology as pillows, lobates, or sheets. The resulting digital thematic maps offer an unprecedented view of GSC lava morphology, collectively covering 77 km2 of ridge axis terrain at a resolution of 2 m × 2 m. Error assessments with independent visual reference data indicate approximately 90% agreement, comparable to subaerial classification studies. The digital lava morphology maps enable quantitative, spatially comprehensive measurements of the abundance and distribution of lava morphologies over large areas of seafloor and within individual eruptive units. A comparison of lava flow fields mapped at lower- and higher-magma-supply settings (95° and 92°W, respectively) indicates that effusion rates increase along with magma supply and independent of spreading rate at the GSC, although a complete range of eruptive behavior exists at each setting.

  12. Insights on the Biology of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center from Studies on the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. R.; Sen, A.; Becker, E.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal of the Ridge 2000 program was to conduct comparable interdisciplinary studies at a few fundamentally different sites that would facilitate comparisons among sites and development of concepts with broad application across deep ocean ridge spreading centers. Although the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) was the least known of the three Integrated Study Sites, we were able to make amazingly fast progress on understanding this system because we could draw on technology and experience developed during the RIDGE program to plan and conduct the work, and now interpret our findings in the context of the rich literature and Ridge 2000 studies on East Pacific Rise (EPR) , Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), and Mid Atlantic Ridge communities. The ELSC communities not only house different species than those of the other regions, but unlike the often tubeworm dominated E. Pacific vents, they are structured by symbiont reliant species that are mobile; snails and mussels. Although there is some variation with lava type on the ELSC, the 4 species of large, symbiont-containing snails largely occupy the niches filled by tubeworms and mussels on the EPR, while the niche of the mussel in the W. Pacific vents is quite different from that of its EPR cousin. Although we have not observed any significant tectonic or magmatic events during our studies of the ELSC, 4 years of study considered in the context of what we have learned on the EPR and JdFR allow us to formulate and begin testing hypotheses about temporal change and succession in these very different and much less visited ecosystems. Furthermore, athough Paralvinella fijiensis are only found in limited areas on some chimneys and flanges, unlike the situation on the EPR and JdFR ,the ELSC chimney communities are largely composed of the same species as are found in diffuse flow on the lavas. The ELSC chimney communities are also remarkably stable, hosting some of the largest and apparently oldest individuals found on the

  13. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an Hα luminosity of L {sub Hα} = (4.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ∼0.''29 ± 0.''05 (corresponding to ∼14.3 ± 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  14. Geologic mapping on the deep seafloor: Reconstructing lava flow emplacement and eruptive history at the Galápagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, J. T.; White, S.; Colman, A.; Sinton, J. M.; Bowles, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The deep seafloor imposes significant difficulties on data collection that require the integration of multiple data sets and the implementation of unconventional geologic mapping techniques. We combine visual mapping of geological contacts by submersible with lava flow morphology maps and relative and absolute age constraints to create a spatiotemporal framework for examining submarine lava flow emplacement at the intermediate-spreading, hotspot-affected Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC). We mapped 18 lava flow fields, interpreted to be separate eruptive episodes, within two study areas at the GSC using visual observations of superposition, surface preservation and sediment cover from submersible and towed camera surveys, augmented by high-resolution sonar surveys and sample petrology [Colman et al., Effects of variable magma supply on mid-ocean ridge eruptions: Constraints from mapped lava flow fields along the Galápagos Spreading Center; 2012 G3]. We also mapped the lava flow morphology within the majority of these eruptive units using an automated, machine-learning classification method [McClinton et al., Neuro-fuzzy classification of submarine lava flow morphology; 2012 PE&RS]. The method combines detailed geometric, acoustic, and textural attributes derived from high-resolution sonar data with visual observations and a machine-learning algorithm to classify submarine lava flow morphology as pillows, lobates, or sheets. The resulting lava morphology maps are a valuable tool for interpreting patterns in the emplacement of submarine lava flows at a mid-ocean ridge (MOR). Within our study area at 92°W, where the GSC has a relatively high magma supply, high effusion rate sheet and lobate lavas are more abundant in the oldest mapped eruptive units, while the most recent eruptions mostly consist of low effusion rate pillow lavas. The older eruptions (roughly 400yrs BP by paleomagnetic intensity) extend up to 1km off axis via prominent channels and tubes, while the

  15. Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory development activities. 2: Langley Research Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, T. G.; Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis activities at the Langley Research Center are resulting in efficient and accurate analytical methods for predicting both far- and near-field radiation characteristics of large offset multiple-beam multiple-aperture mesh reflector antennas. The utilization of aperture integration augmented with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction in analyzing the large reflector antenna system is emphasized.

  16. Mapping lava morphology of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 92°W: fuzzy logic provides a classification of high-resolution bathymetry and backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, J. T.; White, S. M.; Sinton, J. M.; Rubin, K. H.; Bowles, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Differences in axial lava morphology along the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) can indicate variations in magma supply and emplacement dynamics due to the influence of the adjacent Galapagos hot spot. Unfortunately, the ability to discriminate fine-scale lava morphology has historically been limited to observations of the small coverage areas of towed camera surveys and submersible operations. This research presents a neuro-fuzzy approach to automated seafloor classification using spatially coincident, high-resolution bathymetry and backscatter data. The classification method implements a Sugeno-type fuzzy inference system trained by a multi-layered adaptive neural network and is capable of rapidly classifying seafloor morphology based on attributes of surface geometry and texture. The system has been applied to the 92°W segment of the western GSC in order to quantify coverage areas and distributions of pillow, lobate, and sheet lava morphology. An accuracy assessment has been performed on the classification results. The resulting classified maps provide a high-resolution view of GSC axial morphology and indicate the study area terrain is approximately 40% pillow flows, 40% lobate and sheet flows, and 10% fissured or faulted area, with about 10% of the study area unclassifiable. Fine-scale features such as eruptive fissures, tumuli, and individual pillowed lava flow fronts are also visible. Although this system has been applied to lava morphology, its design and implementation are applicable to other undersea mapping applications.

  17. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  18. Vehicle Engineering Development Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.; Champion, Robert H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    New initiatives in the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center include an emphasis on Vehicle Engineering to enhance the strong commitment to the Directorate's projects in the development of flight hardware and flight demonstrators for the advancement of space transportation technology. This emphasis can be seen in the activities of a newly formed organization in the Transportation Directorate, The Vehicle Subsystems Engineering Group. The functions and type of activities that this group works on are described. The current projects of this group are outlined including a brief description of the status and type of work that the group is performing. A summary section is included to describe future activities.

  19. Activities at the FAA aging aircraft NDI validation center

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtleff, W.

    1994-08-01

    Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) was established by the FAA Technical Center (FAATC) at Sandia National Laboratories in August of 1991. The Validation Center supports the inspection portion of the FAA`s National Aging Aircraft Program which was mandated by Congress in the 1988 Aviation Safety Act. The ultimate customers of the AANC include the FAA, airframe and engine manufacturers, airlines, and third party maintenance facilities. One goal of the AANC is to provide independent validation of technologies intended to enhance the structural inspection of aging commuter and transport aircraft. Another goal is to assist in transferring emerging inspection technology from other parts of the FAA`s program to the aircraft industry. The deliverables from both these activities are an assessment of the reliability and cost benefits of an inspection technology as applied to a particular inspection or class of inspections. The validation process consists of a quantitative and systematic assessment of the reliability and cost/benefits on a Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) process. A NDI process is defined as the NDI systems and procedures used for inspections. This includes the NDI operator, inspection environment, and the object being inspected. The phases of the validation process are: 1. Conceptual, 2. Preliminary design, 3. Final design, and 4. Field implementation. The AAANC usually gets involved in the validation process during Phases 2 and 3. The Center supports field trials with a full array of test specimens and established procedures for conducting the trials. Phase 4 reliability includes field trials using independent inspectors either at the Center`s hangar or at outside maintenance facilities. Three activities are summarized below where inspection technology has been validated in the field. These are: (1) eddy current inspection reliability experiment; (2) magneto optic imager validation; and (3) inspection tool improvement.

  20. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  1. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: Unusual seismicity at the amagmatic Lena Trough, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läderach, Christine; Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten

    2010-05-01

    Lena Trough is the southern continuation of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge and with its position in the Fram Strait between Greenland and Spitsbergen it is the only deep-sea gateway to the Arctic Ocean. DFG funded Emmy Noether group 'Mid-Ocean Volcanoes and Earthquakes' located at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is focusing on the seismicity of ultraslow spreading ridges and is especially interested in Lena Trough as an ultraslow spreading ridge in a developing stage. The southern Lena Trough shows similarities to the northern Red Sea spreading centre which is in the early stage of development from continental to oceanic rift. Cochran postulated in 2003 that the continental crust within the water-covered Red Sea is less than 10 km thick and that the northern part of the Red Sea rift spreads ultraslow as well. At Lena Trough an actively spreading mid-ocean ridge with a narrow rift valley has already developed but continental crust lies within a short distance. Lena Trough is extending from 83°N/5°W to 80.3°N/2°W where it passes into the transform fault of the Spitsbergen Fracture Zone. The geometry of Lena Trough and certain asymmetric structures in the rift valley indicate oblique spreading and mostly tectonic and amagmatic rifting. There are several topographic highs west of the ridge axis which could be bounded by deep faults with normal faulting or detachment character exposing mantle material at the surface. Seismicity at the Lena Trough shows apparently the same asymmetric character with epicenters of teleseismically recorded earthquakes concentrating predominantly west of the ridge axis. The most frequent focal mechanism of the earthquakes within the rift valley is normal faulting, whereas strike-slip faults occur in the Spitsbergen Fracture Zone. We relocalized teleseismic earthquakes recorded from May 1973 to April 2009 in the region using a refined localization algorithm and could confirm systematic asymmetry in the

  2. Visualization of the spread of electrical activity in rat hippocampal slices by voltage-sensitive optical probes

    PubMed Central

    Grinvald, A.; Manker, A.; Segal, M.

    1982-01-01

    1. Voltage-sensitive membrane-bound dyes and a matrix of 100 photodetectors were used to detect the spread of evoked electrical activity at the CA1 region of rat hippocampus slices. A display processor was designed in order to visualize the spread of electrical activity in slow motion. 2. The stimulation of the Schaffer collateral-commissural path in the stratum radiatum evoked short latency (2-4 msec) fast optical signals, followed by longer latency (4-15 msec) slow signals which decayed within 20-50 msec. Multiple fast signals were frequently detected at the stratum pyramidale; they propagated toward the stratum oriens with an approximate conduction velocity of 0.1 m/sec. 3. The fast signals were unaltered in a low Ca2+ high Mg2+ medium but were blocked by tetrodotoxin. These signals probably represent action potentials in the Schaffer collateral axons. Their conduction velocity was about 0.2 m/sec and their refractory period about 3-4 msec. 4. The slow signals were absent in a low Ca2+ medium and probably represent excitatory post-synaptic potentials (e.p.s.p.s) generated in the apical dendrites of the pyramidal cells. They were generated in the stratum radiatum, where the presynaptic signals were seen, and spread into somata and basal dendrites (the stratum pyramidale and oriens, respectively). 5. The timing of the signals with fast rise-time, which were detected at the statum pyramidale, approximately coincided with the timing of the extracellularly recorded field potentials. These multiple discharges probably represent action potentials of the pyramidal cells. They spread back into the apical dendrites but with significant attenuation of the amplitudes of the high frequency components of the pyramidal action potentials. 6. Hyperpolarizing potentials could be detected when strong stimuli were applied to the stratum radiatum or alveus. The net hyperpolarizations were detected only in the stratum pyramidale and the border region between the stratum pyramidale

  3. Reconstruction of the Flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 28° to 29° N: Implications for Evolution of Young Oceanic Lithosphere at Slow-Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, H.; Patriat, P.

    2004-12-01

    We reconstruct the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 28° and 29° N from 1 to 10 Ma at intervals of 1 Myr for the purpose of investigating evolution of young oceanic lithosphere morphology and its variation through time using an innovative method that combines seafloor subsidence correction with interpolated isochrons and rotation poles. Reconstruction results are consistent with formation of abyssal hills every 1 to 2 Myr in 2-3 Myr old lithosphere at the outer edge of the ridge mountains as a result of transition from dynamic regime near the axis to isostatic regime of the flanks. The oblique passage of structures formed at the axial valley walls through this transition zone may play a role in the development of inside corner high bathymetry. Asymmetric juxtaposition of abyssal hill morphology in reconstruction is indicative of independent formation and evolution of the morphotectonic fabric on opposing flanks. The two major factors affecting asymmetric ridge flank morphology are found to be sense of axial offset and fluctuation of magmatic activity at the segment scale. Sense of axial offset determines the relative distribution of inside and outside corner bathymetry on the flanks. Enhanced magma supply and associated segment propagation may contribute to half-spreading rate asymmetry, accretion of thicker crust, and formation of larger abyssal hills on the faster-spreading flank. Consistent alignment in reconstruction of the base of the steep walls bounding inside corner bathymetry confirms that they mark the boundaries between segments on the flanks and that the deep sediment filled basins, typically identified as discordant zones, are attributable to outside corner bathymetry.

  4. Structure of the SE Greenland margin from seismic reflection and refraction data: Implications for nascent spreading center subsidence and asymmetric crustal accretion during North Atlantic opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, John R.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Holbrook, W. Steven; Larsen, Hans Christian; Lizarralde, Dan; Korenaga, Jun; Kent, Graham M.; Kelemen, Peter B.

    2003-05-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data from the SE Greenland margin provide a detailed view of a volcanic rifted margin from Archean continental crust to near-to-average oceanic crust over a spatial scale of 400 km. The SIGMA III transect, located ˜600 km south of the Greenland-Iceland Ridge and the presumed track of the Iceland hot spot, shows that the continent-ocean transition is abrupt and only a small amount of crustal thinning occurred prior to final breakup. Initially, 18.3 km thick crust accreted to the margin and the productivity decreased through time until a steady state ridge system was established that produced 8-10 km thick crust. Changes in the morphology of the basaltic extrusives provide evidence for vertical motions of the ridge system, which was close to sea level for at least 1 m.y. of subaerial spreading despite a reduction in productivity from 17 to 13.5 km thick crust over this time interval. This could be explained if a small component of active upwelling associated with thermal buoyancy from a modest thermal anomaly provided dynamic support to the rift system. The thermal anomaly must be exhaustible, consistent with recent suggestions that plume material was emplaced into a preexisting lithospheric thin spot as a thin sheet. Exhaustion of the thin sheet led to rapid subsidence of the spreading system and a change from subaerial, to shallow marine, and finally to deep marine extrusion in ˜2 m.y. is shown by the morphological changes. In addition, comparison to the conjugate Hatton Bank shows a clear asymmetry in the early accretion history of North Atlantic oceanic crust. Nearly double the volume of material was emplaced on the Greenland margin compared to Hatton Bank and may indicate east directed ridge migration during initial opening.

  5. Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

  6. Curvaceous female bodies activate neural reward centers in men

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Kristen Rae

    2010-01-01

    Facial symmetry, masculinity and shoulder-to-hip ratios in men convey information to mates about reproductive/genetic quality, the so-called “good genes” hypothesis. On the other hand waist-to-hip ratio conveys important reproductive information about women to men. Here using fMRI, men showed activation in neural reward centers when they viewed and rated the attractiveness of surgically optimally configured female bodies. PMID:20714414

  7. Intracellular Zn2+ accumulation enhances suppression of synaptic activity following spreading depolarization.

    PubMed

    Carter, Russell E; Seidel, Jessica L; Lindquist, Britta E; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a feed-forward wave that propagates slowly throughout brain tissue and recovery from SD involves substantial metabolic demand. Presynaptic Zn(2+) release and intracellular accumulation occurs with SD, and elevated intracellular Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+) ]i ) can impair cellular metabolism through multiple pathways. We tested here whether increased [Zn(2+) ]i could exacerbate the metabolic challenge of SD, induced by KCl, and delay recovery in acute murine hippocampal slices. [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD, by transient ZnCl2 application with the Zn(2+) ionophore pyrithione (Zn/Pyr), delayed recovery of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, prolonged DC shifts, and significantly increased extracellular adenosine accumulation. These effects could be due to metabolic inhibition, occurring downstream of pyruvate utilization. Prolonged [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation prior to SD was required for effects on fEPSP recovery and consistent with this, endogenous synaptic Zn(2+) release during SD propagation did not delay recovery from SD. The effects of exogenous [Zn(2+) ]i loading were also lost in slices preconditioned with repetitive SDs, implying a rapid adaptation. Together, these results suggest that [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD can provide significant additional challenge to brain tissue, and could contribute to deleterious effects of [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation in a range of brain injury models. PMID:23495967

  8. Infrared Detector Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Amzajerdian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared detector development and characterization at NASA Langley Research Center will be reviewed. These detectors were intended for ground, airborne, and space borne remote sensing applications. Discussion will be focused on recently developed single-element infrared detector and future development of near-infrared focal plane arrays (FPA). The FPA will be applied to next generation space-based instruments. These activities are based on phototransistor and avalanche photodiode technologies, which offer high internal gain and relatively low noise-equivalent-power. These novel devices will improve the sensitivity of active remote sensing instruments while eliminating the need for a high power laser transmitter.

  9. Harnessing online tools to track-and treat-pediatric illness: new tools are giving researchers, physicians, and child-care centers insight into the spread of disease.

    PubMed

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Measles. A strange polio-like paralysis. Ebola. In the last year, the spread of infectious disease has become standard fare for the nightly news. As such diseases grab headlines, child-care providers, families, schools, and public health officials are turning to new ways of understanding and coping with the spread of disease. PMID:25974910

  10. Slab-derived water and the petrogenesis of distinct zones of oceanic crust along spreading centers in the Lau back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Deborah; Dunn, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Back-arc basin crust formed along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) exhibits dramatic and abrupt changes in magmatic processes and crustal formation with proximity to the nearby Tofua Arc. Systematic variations in seafloor morphology, crustal thickness, seismic properties, and lava composition reflect a decreasing 'subduction influence' with increasing distance from the arc. Results from seismic tomography indicate that the crust that forms near the arc is abnormally thick and compositionally stratified, with a thick low-velocity upper crust and an abnormally high-velocity lower crust. As the ridge moves away from the arc, there is a step-like transition in crustal properties towards crustal velocities and thicknesses more typical of oceanic crust produced at mid-ocean ridges. Likewise, lava compositions exhibit abrupt changes in slab-derived volatiles and trace element enrichments, with silicic, arc-like compositions at the Valu Fa Ridge and southern half of the ELSC, located near the arc, and relatively depleted basalts along the northern ELSC, which is located further from the arc. We attribute the observed changes in the physical and chemical makeup of the crust to excess mantle melting coupled with higher degrees of crustal differentiation near the arc due to higher mantle water contents. We propose a model for the formation of the arc-proximal layered crust whereby water-rich basaltic melts stall and differentiate in the lower crust. High-pressure crystallization concentrates water in the residual melts, decreasing their viscosity and density. Eventually the lighter, more felsic residual melts are extracted from the lower crust, leaving behind a dense, mafic cumulate layer, and go on to produce a silica-rich, porous volcanic layer. We present results of thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibria and develop a petrological model for the formation of this unusual "hydrous" form of oceanic crust.

  11. Mantle source variations beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and the nature of subduction components in the Lau basin-Tonga arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escrig, S.; BéZos, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    New high-density sampling of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center provides constraints on the processes that affect the mantle wedge beneath a back-arc environment, including the effect of the subduction input on basalt petrogenesis and the change in subduction input with distance from the Tonga arc. We obtained trace element and Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of 64 samples distributed between 20.2°S and 22.3°S with an average spacing of ˜3.6 km. The trace element and isotope variations do not vary simply with distance from the arc and reflect variations in the mantle wedge composition and the presence of multiple components in the subduction input. The mantle wedge composition varies form north to south, owing to the southward migration of Indian-like mantle, progressively replacing the initially Pacific-like mantle wedge. The mantle wedge compositions also require an enriched mid-ocean ridge basalt-like trace element enrichment that has little effect on isotope ratios, suggesting recent low-degree melt enrichment events. The composition of the subduction input added to the mantle wedge is geographically variable and mirrors the changes observed in the Tonga arc island lavas. The combination of the back-arc and arc data allows identification of several components contributing to the subduction input. These are a fluid derived from the altered oceanic crust with a possible sedimentary contribution, a pelagic sediment partial melt, and, in the southern Lau basin, a volcaniclastic sediment partial melt. While on a regional scale, there is a rough decrease in subduction influence with the distance from the arc, on smaller scales, the distribution of the subduction input reflects different mechanisms of the addition of the subduction input to a variable mantle wedge.

  12. Influence of Geologic Setting on the Morphology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry of Vent Deposits Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M. K.; Evans, G. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    Establishment of links between lithology, vent fluid chemistry, and vent deposit characteristics along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) was made possible using deep submergence vehicles and technology. ROV Jason was used to collect ultrahigh-resolution (submeter) bathymetric data sufficient to quantify characteristics of volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal features; differences within vent fields from north to south include a change from low-relief volcanic domes cut by faults and fissures to higher aspect ratio volcanic domes dominated by aa-type lava morphologies (Ferrini et al., G-cubed, 2008). Highest temperature fluids are associated with crosscutting faults at all but Mariner vent field where faults are not observed. The detailed maps were used to target areas within vent fields for observations and sampling. Vent deposit morphologies are similar at the northernmost vent fields (Kilo Moana, TowCam, Tahi Moana), with black smokers and diffusers present on branched edifices. Vent deposits at the more southerly ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner vent fields vary in morphology, despite similar substrate lithology. Examples include abundant flanges at ABE and Tui Malila and ~20m-tall spires and squat barite-rich edifices at Mariner. Geochemical analyses and petrographic observations document the influence of lithology, fluid temperature, pH, and extents of seawater mixing on deposit formation. Concentrations of As, which increase from north to south, reflect lithologic control. Sb, Pb, and Ba concentrations also reflect lithologic control, but are affected as well by low pH and/or extents of seawater mixing. The significant differences in Mariner deposits reflect formation from very high temperature, low pH (<3 vs >4) fluids that keep Zn in solution, combined with local subsurface mixing. Overall, results document the influence of the Tonga Subduction Zone on vent deposits through its affects on lithology and vent fluid composition.

  13. Understanding the Composition and Distribution of Megafauna at Diffuse Flow Sites in the East Lau Basin Back-Arc Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podowski, L.; Fisher, C.; Luther, G.; Kim, S.; Waite, T.; Moore, T.; Zelnio, K.; Zook, B.; Telesnicki, G.; Hsu, H.; Paschal, A.; Hourdez, S.; Desbruyères, D.

    2005-12-01

    Ridge 2000 research at the Lau Basin Integrated Studies Site spans a range of scales, from hundreds of kilometers to fractions of a centimeter. Here we report on an interdisciplinary study of the relations between megafaunal distribution and diffuse flow chemistry, conducted in an area of about 30 m2. This work was enabled by, and interpretation will be nested within, the results from the three cruises that preceded our field effort. In June 2005, the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Jason II collected a series of geo-referenced, high-resolution images using the Insite Scorpio digital still camera at the ABE vent site (176°11'29''W, 20°45'47''S) in the East Lau Basin back-arc spreading center. Twenty pictures were mosaicked together at sea, using a MatLab program (courtesy of Tim Shank, Dana Yoerger, Hanu Singh, and Vicki Ferrini of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) to create one seamless image of the biological community covering an area of approximately 30 m2. The mosaic was used to guide electrochemical and temperature scans during a subsequent dive to provide data on the concentrations of reactive sulfur species and oxygen, temperature, and pH at 60 different locations within the community. To allow quantification of the biomass within the imaged community and obtain data on smaller and/or cryptic fauna, five area-specific quantitative-samples of representative animal aggregations were collected from within the same area and analyzed. Separate layers for each dataset (imagery, chemistry, temperature, community composition, and biomass) are being created with GIS to visualize and analyze trends in each individual layer, such as the co-occurrence of different megafaunal species and changes in chemical speciation. Overlays and statistical analyses of these layers in GIS are used to elucidate correlations between datasets that will contribute to our ultimate goal of understanding the distribution patterns of the megafauna in this spatially and temporally

  14. Reconstruction of fire spread within wildland fire events in Northern Eurasia from the MODIS active fire product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loboda, T. V.; Csiszar, I. A.

    2007-04-01

    Russian boreal forests have been reshaped by wildland fire for millennia. While fire is a natural component of boreal ecosystems, it impacts various aspects of the environment and affects human well-being. Often fires occur over large remote areas with limited access, which makes their ground-based observation difficult. A significant progress has been made in mapping burned area from satellite imagery, which provides consistent and fairly unbiased estimates of fire impact on areas of interest at multiple scales. Although the information provided by burned area products is highly important, the spatio-temporal dynamics of individual fire events and their impact are less known. In high northern latitudes of Northern Eurasia, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) makes up to four daily observations from each of the Terra and Aqua satellites providing consistent data on fire development with high temporal frequency. Here we introduce an approach to reconstruct the development of fire events based on active fire detections from MODIS. Fire Spread Reconstruction (FSR) provides a means for characterization of fire occurrence over large territories from remotely sensed data. Individual fire detections are clustered within a GIS environment based on a set of rules determining proximity between fire observations in space and time. FSR determines the number of fire events, their approximate size, duration, and fire spread rate and allows for the analysis of fire occurrence and spread as a function of vegetation, fire season, fire weather and other parameters. FSR clusters were compared to burned scars mapped from Landsat7/ETM+ imagery over Yakutia (Russia). While some smaller burn scars were found to be formed through a continuous burning of a single fire event, large burned areas in Siberia were created by a constellation of fire events incorporating over 100 individual fire clusters. Geographic regions were found to have a stronger influence on the rates of

  15. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  16. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  17. GHRC: NASAs Hazardous Weather Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2016-01-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC; ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov) is one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers responsible for providing access to NASA's Earth science data to users worldwide. Each of NASA's twelve DAACs focuses on a specific science discipline within Earth science, provides data stewardship services and supports its research community's needs. Established in 1991 as the Marshall Space Flight Center DAAC and renamed GHRC in 1997, the data center's original mission focused on the global hydrologic cycle. However, over the years, data holdings, tools and expertise of GHRC have gradually shifted. In 2014, a User Working Group (UWG) was established to review GHRC capabilities and provide recommendations to make GHRC more responsive to the research community's evolving needs. The UWG recommended an update to the GHRC mission, as well as a strategic plan to move in the new direction. After a careful and detailed analysis of GHRC's capabilities, research community needs and the existing data landscape, a new mission statement for GHRC has been crafted: to provide a comprehensive active archive of both data and knowledge augmentation services with a focus on hazardous weather, its governing dynamical and physical processes, and associated applications. Within this broad mandate, GHRC will focus on lightning, tropical cyclones and storm-induced hazards through integrated collections of satellite, airborne, and in-situ data sets. The new mission was adopted at the recent 2015 UWG meeting. GHRC will retain its current name until such time as it has built substantial data holdings aligned with the new mission.

  18. [Activities of Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The final report of NASA funded activities at Iowa State University (ISU) for the period between 1/96 and 1/99 includes two main areas of activity. The first is the development and delivery of an x-ray simulation package suitable for evaluating the impact of parameters affects the inspectability of an assembly of parts. The second area was the development of images processing tools to remove reconstruction artifacts in x-ray laminagraphy images. The x-ray simulation portion of this work was done by J. Gray and the x-ray laminagraphy work was done by J. Basart. The report is divided into two sections covering the two activities respectively. In addition to this work reported the funding also covered NASA's membership in the NSF University/Industrial Cooperative Research Center.

  19. Functional imaging of focal brain activation in conscious rats: impact of [(14)C]glucose metabolite spreading and release.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nancy F; Ball, Kelly K; Dienel, Gerald A

    2007-11-15

    Labeled glucose and its analogs are widely used in imaging and metabolic studies of brain function, astrocyte-neuron interactions, and neurotransmission. Metabolite shuttling among astrocytes and neurons is essential for cell-cell transfer of neurotransmitter precursors and supply and elimination of energy metabolites, but dispersion and release of labeled compounds from activated tissue would reduce signal registration in metabolic labeling studies, causing underestimation of focal functional activation. Processes and pathways involved in metabolite trafficking and release were therefore assessed in the auditory pathway of conscious rats. Unilateral monotonic stimulation increased glucose utilization (CMR(glc)) in tonotopic bands in the activated inferior colliculus by 35-85% compared with contralateral tissue when assayed with [(14)C]deoxyglucose (DG), whereas only 20-30% increases were registered with [1- or 6-(14)C]glucose. Tonotopic bands were not evident with [1-(14)C]glucose unless assayed during halothane anesthesia or pretreatment with probenecid but were detectable with [6-(14)C]glucose. Extracellular lactate levels transiently doubled during acoustic stimulation, so metabolite spreading was assessed by microinfusion of [(14)C]tracers into the inferior colliculus. The volume of tissue labeled by [1-(14)C]glucose exceeded that by [(14)C]DG by 3.2- and 1.4-fold during rest and acoustic activation, respectively. During activation, the tissue volume labeled by U-(14)C-labeled glutamine and lactate rose, whereas that by glucose fell 50% and that by DG was unchanged. Dispersion of [1-(14)C]glucose and its metabolites during rest was also reduced 50% by preinfusion of gap junction blockers. To summarize, during brain activation focal CMR(glc) is underestimated with labeled glucose because of decarboxylation reactions, spreading within tissue and via the astrocyte syncytium, and release from activated tissue. These findings help explain the fall in CMR(O2)/CMR

  20. Time-clustering behavior of spreading-center seismicity between 15 and 35°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: observations from hydroacoustic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Tolstoy, Maya; Smith, Deborah K.; Fox, Christopher G.; Dziak, Robert P.

    2003-07-01

    An earthquake catalog derived from the detection of seismically-generated T-waves is used to study the time-clustering behavior of moderate-size (≳3.0 M) earthquakes between 15 and 35°N along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Within this region, the distribution of inter-event times is consistent with a non-periodic, non-random, clustered process. The highest degrees of clustering are associated temporally with large mainshock-aftershock sequences; however, some swarm-like activity also is evident. Temporal fluctuations characterized by a power spectral density P( f) that decays as 1/ fα are present within the time sequence, with α ranging from 0.12 to 0.55 for different regions of the spreading axis. This behavior is negligible at time scales less than ˜5×10 3 s, and earthquake occurrence becomes less clustered (smaller α) as increasing size thresholds are applied to the catalog. A power-law size-frequency scaling for Mid-Atlantic Ridge earthquakes also can be demonstrated using the distribution of acoustic magnitudes, or source levels. Although fractal seismic behavior has been linked to the structure of the underlying fault population in other environments, power-law fault size distributions have not been observed widely in the mid-ocean ridge setting.

  1. 75 FR 49946 - National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Response System. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC... Intelligence Center, Fifth Floor, 319 Washington Street, Johnstown, PA 15901. Written comments and...

  2. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  3. Probing active electron transfer branch in photosystem I reaction center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Martinsson, Peter; Chitnis, Parag

    2003-03-01

    Complimentary point mutations were introduced at the primary electron acceptor sites in A and B branches of the photosystem I (PS I) reaction center (RC) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and their effect on the kinetics of the electron transfer process was studied by means of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. The results indicate that in these species the electron transfer occurs primarily along the A-branch. Previous optical experiments on PS I complexes from Chlorella sorokiniana demonstrated that both branches of RC are equally active. That suggests that the directionality of electron transfer in PS I is species dependent.

  4. Editors and author resource centers actively used by attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, as in previous years, the Editors Resource Center located on the second floor of Moscone West was buzzing with activity: editors talking with other editors, collaborating with associate editors, speaking with authors, and meeting with students. In addition, several editors took part in "Meet the Editor" informal sessions, a new feature introduced for the 2011 meeting to strengthen the partnership between authors and editors. The map "Where are you from?" (see photo), outside the Editors Resource Center, drew the attention of many attendees who were eager to place their colored dots on the map. The Author Resource Center, located in the AGU Marketplace, became a hub for AGU veteran authors and potential authors alike. Staff were there to answer both editorial and technical questions, especially the most frequent one: What happens after my paper is accepted? The running slideshow that described all aspects of the AGU publications program sparked a myriad of questions, which AGU staff were happy to answer.

  5. Architecture and evolution of Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Rosen, Wayne; Sherman, Mark; Pease, Phil

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to enhance Earth Science research by improved access to remote sensor earth science data. Building and operating an archive, even one of a moderate size (a few Terabytes), is a challenging task. One of the critical components of this system is Unitree, the Hierarchical File Storage Management System. Unitree, selected two years ago as the best available solution, requires constant system administrative support. It is not always suitable as an archive and distribution data center, and has moderate performance. The Data Archive and Distribution System (DADS) software developed to monitor, manage, and automate the ingestion, archive, and distribution functions turned out to be more challenging than anticipated. Having the software and tools is not sufficient to succeed. Human interaction within the system must be fully understood to improve efficiency to improve efficiency and ensure that the right tools are developed. One of the lessons learned is that the operability, reliability, and performance aspects should be thoroughly addressed in the initial design. However, the GSFC DAAC has demonstrated that it is capable of distributing over 40 GB per day. A backup system to archive a second copy of all data ingested is under development. This backup system will be used not only for disaster recovery but will also replace the main archive when it is unavailable during maintenance or hardware replacement. The GSFC DAAC has put a strong emphasis on quality at all level of its organization. A Quality team has also been formed to identify quality issues and to propose improvements. The DAAC has conducted numerous tests to benchmark the performance of the system. These tests proved to be extremely useful in identifying bottlenecks and deficiencies in operational procedures.

  6. Activity spread and breathers induced by finite transmission speeds in two-dimensional neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Axel; Rougier, Nicolas

    2010-11-01

    The work studies the spatiotemporal activity propagation in a two-dimensional spatial system involving a finite transmission speed. We derive a numerical scheme in detail to integrate the corresponding evolution equation and validate the derived algorithm by a study of a spatially periodic system. Finally, the work demonstrates numerically transmission delay-induced breathers subjected to anisotropic external input.

  7. Spreading Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, Andrea; Delaney, Paul T.; Denlinger, Roger P.

    As volcanoes grow, they become ever heavier. Unlike mountains exhumed by erosion of rocks that generally were lithified at depth, volcanoes typically are built of poorly consolidated rocks that may be further weakened by hydrothermal alteration. The substrates upon which volcanoes rest, moreover, are often sediments lithified by no more than the weight of the volcanic overburden. It is not surprising, therefore, that volcanic deformation includes-and in the long term is often dominated by-spreading motions that translate subsidence near volcanic summits to outward horizontal displacements around the flanks and peripheries. We review examples of volcanic spreading and go on to derive approximate expressions for the time volcanoes require to deform by spreading on weak substrates. We also demonstrate that shear stresses that drive low-angle thrust faulting from beneath volcanic constructs have maxima at volcanic peripheries, just where such faults are seen to emerge. Finally, we establish a theoretical basis for experimentally derived scalings that delineate volcanoes that spread from those that do not.

  8. Spreading volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgia, A.; Delaney, P.T.; Denlinger, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    As volcanoes grow, they become ever heavier. Unlike mountains exhumed by erosion of rocks that generally were lithified at depth, volcanoes typically are built of poorly consolidated rocks that may be further weakened by hydrothermal alteration. The substrates upon which volcanoes rest, moreover, are often sediments lithified by no more than the weight of the volcanic overburden. It is not surprising, therefore, that volcanic deformation includes-and in the long term is often dominated by-spreading motions that translate subsidence near volcanic summits to outward horizontal displacements around the flanks and peripheries. We review examples of volcanic spreading and go on to derive approximate expressions for the time volcanoes require to deform by spreading on weak substrates. We also demonstrate that shear stresses that drive low-angle thrust faulting from beneath volcanic constructs have maxima at volcanic peripheries, just where such faults are seen to emerge. Finally, we establish a theoretical basis for experimentally derived scalings that delineate volcanoes that spread from those that do not.

  9. Constraints from melt inclusions on depths of magma residence at intermediate magma supply along the Galápagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, Alice; Sinton, John M.; Wanless, V. Dorsey

    2015-02-01

    Shallow, seismically imaged melt lenses are a ubiquitous feature of mid-ocean ridges with high magma supply; melt lenses deepen and become less continuous along axis as the rate of magma supply decreases. Despite compelling petrologic evidence for evolution of magma within the crust prior to eruption at lower magma supply, melt lenses are rarely detected along ridge segments with rates of magma supply less than 0.3 ×106m3 /yr /km, and the depths of sub-axial magma reservoirs are therefore poorly known. We use ion microprobe measurements of H2O and CO2 concentrations of olivine-hosted melt inclusions to calculate vapor saturation pressures that constrain crystallization depths at two locations along the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.2°W and 95°W). These sites were chosen to examine crystallization pressures in the presence (94.2°W) and absence (95°W) of a seismically imaged melt lens. At 95°W, where magma supply is too low to sustain a seismically resolvable melt lens, samples were selected from each of the three most recent eruptive units, allowing us to document temporal variations in vapor saturation pressures and the depth of magma residence at this location. Clusters in melt inclusion entrapment depths for these eruptions range from 3.0 to 3.4 km below the seafloor, indicating that magmas at 95°W resided at a narrow range of mid-crustal depths prior to eruption, generally consistent with the global trend of increasing melt lens depth with decreasing rate of magma supply. A discrepancy between seismic data and the peak in melt inclusion entrapment depths at 94.2°W may reflect temporal variability of magmatic systems at this location. This study demonstrates the potential for using measurements of the concentrations of H2O and CO2 in olivine-hosted melt inclusions to determine the depths of crustal magmatic systems that feed mid-ocean ridge eruptions, even in locations where seismic studies have not detected melt lenses.

  10. Formation of Zn- and Fe-sulfides near hydrothermal vents at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center: implications for sulfide bioavailability to chemoautotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Tsang, Jeffrey J; Yucel, Mustafa; Luther, George W

    2008-01-01

    Background The speciation of dissolved sulfide in the water immediately surrounding deep-ocean hydrothermal vents is critical to chemoautotrophic organisms that are the primary producers of these ecosystems. The objective of this research was to identify the role of Zn and Fe for controlling the speciation of sulfide in the hydrothermal vent fields at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the southern Pacific Ocean. Compared to other well-studied hydrothermal systems in the Pacific, the ELSC is notable for unique ridge characteristics and gradients over short distances along the north-south ridge axis. Results In June 2005, diffuse-flow (< 50°C) and high-temperature (> 250°C) vent fluids were collected from four field sites along the ELSC ridge axis. Total and filtered Zn and Fe concentrations were quantified in the vent fluid samples using voltammetric and spectrometric analyses. The results indicated north-to-south variability in vent fluid composition. In the high temperature vent fluids, the ratio of total Fe to total Zn varied from 39 at Kilo Moana, the most northern site, to less than 7 at the other three sites. The concentrations of total Zn, Fe, and acid-volatile sulfide indicated that oversaturation and precipitation of sphalerite (ZnS(s)) and pyrite (FeS2(s)) were possible during cooling of the vent fluids as they mixed with the surrounding seawater. In contrast, most samples were undersaturated with respect to mackinawite (FeS(s)). The reactivity of Zn(II) in the filtered samples was tested by adding Cu(II) to the samples to induce metal-exchange reactions. In a portion of the samples, the concentration of labile Zn2+ increased after the addition of Cu(II), indicating the presence of strongly-bound Zn(II) species such as ZnS clusters and nanoparticles. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that Zn is important to sulfide speciation at ELSC vent habitats, particularly at the southern sites where Zn concentrations increase relative to Fe. As the

  11. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: possible link to blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Maren K L; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P

    2012-11-01

    Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood-brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood-brain barrier

  12. Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Nanotube activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization as well as applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A parametric study of the pulsed laser ablation process is recently completed to monitor the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Enhancement of production is achieved by rastering the graphite target and by increasing the target surface temperature with a cw laser. In-situ diagnostics during production included time resolved passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from the plume. The improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymer/nanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large Surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs. Comparison with existing technologies and possible future improvements in the SWCNT materials sill be presented.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2006-01-01

    Research activities on carbon nanotubes at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization and their applications for human space flight. In-situ diagnostics during nanotube production by laser oven process include collection of spatial and temporal data of passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from C2, C3 and Nickel atoms in the plume. Details of the results from the "parametric study" of the pulsed laser ablation process indicate the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymednanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs.

  14. CXCL13 is a plasma biomarker of germinal center activity.

    PubMed

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Lindqvist, Madelene; Heit, Antje; Wu, Jennifer E; Reiss, Samantha M; Kendric, Kayla; Bélanger, Simon; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Landais, Elise; Akondy, Rama S; McGuire, Helen M; Bothwell, Marcella; Vagefi, Parsia A; Scully, Eileen; Tomaras, Georgia D; Davis, Mark M; Poignard, Pascal; Ahmed, Rafi; Walker, Bruce D; Pulendran, Bali; McElrath, M Juliana; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Crotty, Shane

    2016-03-01

    Significantly higher levels of plasma CXCL13 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13] were associated with the generation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV in a large longitudinal cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Germinal centers (GCs) perform the remarkable task of optimizing B-cell Ab responses. GCs are required for almost all B-cell receptor affinity maturation and will be a critical parameter to monitor if HIV bnAbs are to be induced by vaccination. However, lymphoid tissue is rarely available from immunized humans, making the monitoring of GC activity by direct assessment of GC B cells and germinal center CD4(+) T follicular helper (GC Tfh) cells problematic. The CXCL13-CXCR5 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5] chemokine axis plays a central role in organizing both B-cell follicles and GCs. Because GC Tfh cells can produce CXCL13, we explored the potential use of CXCL13 as a blood biomarker to indicate GC activity. In a series of studies, we found that plasma CXCL13 levels correlated with GC activity in draining lymph nodes of immunized mice, immunized macaques, and HIV-infected humans. Furthermore, plasma CXCL13 levels in immunized humans correlated with the magnitude of Ab responses and the frequency of ICOS(+) (inducible T-cell costimulator) Tfh-like cells in blood. Together, these findings support the potential use of CXCL13 as a plasma biomarker of GC activity in human vaccine trials and other clinical settings. PMID:26908875

  15. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  16. The effect of solar activity on the Doppler and multipath spread of HF signals received over paths oriented along the midlatitude trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, A. J.; Warrington, E. M.

    2011-02-01

    Measurements of the Doppler and delay spread associated with HF signals propagating along an oblique (1440 km) path tangential to the midlatitude ionospheric trough are presented for sunspot maximum and minimum. During the day, Doppler spread is independent of solar activity, but for winter and equinoctial nights, it is very much higher at sunspot maximum. The delay spread is also generally higher at sunspot maximum for all seasons and times of day. For sunspot minimum, measurements from a second, longer path (1800 km) are also presented. The observed Doppler and delay spreads are similar for both paths. Finally, a novel method of more accurately deriving the delay spread defined by the International Telecommunication Union (i.e., the largest delay spread including all modes that have a peak power within a user-defined threshold of that of the strongest mode) from Voice of America coverage analysis program (VOACAP) predictions is presented. For the first time, the predicted values are compared with the measured delay spreads and, while there is generally good agreement at sunspot minimum, the agreement at sunspot maximum tends to be poor because the behavior of the high-order ionospheric modes (e.g., 3F2) is not well predicted by VOACAP.

  17. Time-Clustering Behavior of Spreading-Center Seismicity Between 15-35 N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Observations from Hydroacoustic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Smith, D. K.; Fox, C. G.; Dziak, R. P.

    2002-12-01

    An earthquake catalog derived from the detection of seismically-generated Tertiary (T) waves is used to study the time-clustering behavior of moderate-size (> 3.0 M) earthquakes along the north-central Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Because T-waves propagate efficiently within the ocean's sound channel, these data represent a significant improvement relative to the detection capabilities of land-based seismic stations. In addition, hydroacoustic monitoring overcomes many of the spatial and temporal limitations associated with ocean-bottom seismometer data, with the existing array being deployed continuously between 15-35 degrees N during the period February 1999-Februrary 2001.Within this region, the distribution of inter-event times is consistent with a non-random clustered process, with a coefficient of variation greater than 1.0. The clustered behavior is power-law in nature with temporal fluctuations characterized by a power spectral density that decays as 1/fα . Using Allan Factor analysis, α is found to range from 0.12-0.55 for different regions of the spreading axis. This scaling is negligible at time scales less than 3.5 x 103 s, and earthquake occurrence becomes less clustered (smaller α ) as increasing size thresholds are applied to the catalog. The highest degrees of clustering are associated temporally with large mainshock-aftershock sequences; however, some swarm-like activity also is evident. The distribution of acoustic magnitudes, or source levels, is consistent with a power-law size-frequency scaling for earthquakes. Although such behavior has been linked closely to the fractal nature of the underlying fault population in other environments, power-law fault size distributions have not been widely observed in the mid-ocean ridge setting.

  18. The p-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading centre - The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Over 1400 seismograms of earthquakes in Mexico are analyzed and data sets for the travel time, apparent phase velocity, and relative amplitude information are utilized to produce a tightly constrained, detailed model for depths to 900 km beneath an active oceanic ridge region, the Gulf of California. The data are combined by first inverting the travel times, perturbing that model to fit the p-delta data, and then performing trial and error synthetic seismogram modelling to fit the short-period waveforms. The final model satisfies all three data sets. The ridge model is similar to existing upper mantle models for shield, tectonic-continental, and arc-trench regimes below 400 km, but differs significantly in the upper 350 km. Ridge model velocities are very low in this depth range; the model 'catches up' with the others with a very large velocity gradient from 225 to 390 km.

  19. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  20. RLIP76 regulates Arf6-dependent cell spreading and migration by linking ARNO with activated R-Ras at recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Lee, Seunghyung; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay; Ginsberg, Mark H; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2015-11-27

    R-Ras small GTPase enhances cell spreading and motility via RalBP1/RLIP76, an R-Ras effector that links GTP-R-Ras to activation of Arf6 and Rac1 GTPases. Here, we report that RLIP76 performs these functions by binding cytohesin-2/ARNO, an Arf GTPase guanine exchange factor, and connecting it to R-Ras at recycling endosomes. RLIP76 formed a complex with R-Ras and ARNO by binding ARNO via its N-terminus (residues 1-180) and R-Ras via residues 180-192. This complex was present in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes and the presence of ARNO in recycling endosomes required RLIP76, and was not supported by RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192). Spreading and migration required RLIP76(1-180), and RLIP76(Δ1-180) blocked ARNO recruitment to recycling endosomes, and spreading. Arf6 activation with an ArfGAP inhibitor overcame the spreading defects in RLIP76-depleted cells or cells expressing RLIP76(Δ1-180). Similarly, RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192) suppressed Arf6 activation. Together these results demonstrate that RLIP76 acts as a scaffold at recycling endosomes by binding activated R-Ras, recruiting ARNO to activate Arf6, thereby contributing to cell spreading and migration. PMID:26498519

  1. Development of Secondary Archive System at Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Mark; Kodis, John; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Wacker, Chris; Woytek, Joanne; Lynnes, Chris

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test EOS data and information system (EOSDIS) concepts. To ensure that no data is ever lost, each product received at GSFC DAAC is archived on two different media, VHS and digital linear tape (DLT). The first copy is made on VHS tape and is under the control of UniTree. The second and third copies are made to DLT and VHS media under a custom built software package named 'Archer'. While Archer provides only a subset of the functions available with commercial software like UniTree, it supports migration between near-line and off-line media and offers much greater performance and flexibility to satisfy the specific needs of a data center. Archer is specifically designed to maximize total system throughput, rather than focusing on the turn-around time for individual files. The commercial off the shelf software (COTS) hierarchical storage management (HSM) products evaluated were mainly concerned with transparent, interactive, file access to the end-user, rather than a batch-orientated, optimizable (based on known data file characteristics) data archive and retrieval system. This is critical to the distribution requirements of the GSFC DAAC where orders for 5000 or more files at a time are received. Archer has the ability to queue many thousands of file requests and to sort these requests into internal processing schedules that optimize overall throughput. Specifically, mount and dismount, tape load and unload cycles, and tape motion are minimized. This feature did not seem to be available in many COTS pacages. Archer also uses a generic tar tape format that allows tapes to be read by many different systems rather than the proprietary format found in most COTS packages. This paper discusses some of the specific requirements at GSFC DAAC, the

  2. Regulating the nitrite reductase activity of myoglobin by redesigning the heme active center.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Gao, Shu-Qin; You, Yong; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-07-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse functions in living systems, of which nitrite reductase (NIR) activity receives much attention recently. In this study, to better understand the structural elements responsible for the NIR activity, we used myoglobin (Mb) as a model heme protein and redesigned the heme active center, by introducing one or two distal histidines, and by creating a channel to the heme center with removal of the native distal His64 gate (His to Ala mutation). UV-Vis kinetic studies, combined with EPR studies, showed that a single distal histidine with a suitable position to the heme iron, i.e., His43, is crucial for nitrite (NO2(-)) to nitric oxide (NO) reduction. Moreover, creation of a water channel to the heme center significantly enhanced the NIR activity compared to the corresponding mutant without the channel. In addition, X-ray crystallographic studies of F43H/H64A Mb and its complexes with NO2(-) or NO revealed a unique hydrogen-bonding network in the heme active center, as well as unique substrate and product binding models, providing valuable structural information for the enhanced NIR activity. These findings enriched our understanding of the structure and NIR activity relationship of heme proteins. The approach of creating a channel in this study is also useful for rational design of other functional heme proteins. PMID:27108710

  3. Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Aasgaard, Live; Landmark, Bjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers. Methods The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results Four categories, ie, “appreciated activities”, “praised nurses and volunteers”, “being more active”, and “being included in a fellowship”, as well as the overall theme “participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being” emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants’ health and well-being. Conclusion In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers. PMID:25419121

  4. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  5. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  6. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrara (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  7. Coherent Lidar Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing and using coherent lidar systems for many years. The current projects at LaRC are the Global Wind Observing Sounder (GWOS) mission preparation, the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) compact, rugged Doppler wind lidar project, the Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project for lunar landing, and the Skywalker project to find and use thermals to extend UAV flight time. These five projects encompass coherent lidar technology development; characterization, validation, and calibration facilities; compact, rugged packaging; computer simulation; trade studies; data acquisition, processing, and display development; system demonstration; and space mission design. This paper will further discuss these activities at LaRC.

  8. Activities of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1992 to March 1993. New experimental investigations were made on (1) nuclear spectroscopy was initiated by a new (gamma) ray spectrometer; (2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; (3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; (4) the behavior of self interstitial atoms and its migration mechanism in Mo metal; (5) the studies on electronic conduction of metal oxides and bronzes by NMR; (6) Moessbauer studies on Fe-Cr alloy and the RBS analysis of YBCO superconductor films; and (7) a new field was challenged on the micro cluster physics. Nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report.

  9. Antituberculosis Activity of the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network Library

    PubMed Central

    MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; MADDOX, CLINTON; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; WHITE, E. LUCILE; ZHANG, WEI

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein. PMID:19783214

  10. Origin of optical activity in the purple bacterial photoreaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, T.; Gingras, G.

    1995-07-18

    The photoreaction center (RC) of purple bacteria contains four bacteriochlorophyll (Bph) and two bacteriopheophytin (Bph) molecules as prosthetic groups. Their optical activity, as measured by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, is largely increased in situ as compared to organic solutions. The all-exciton hypothesis posits that this enhanced optical activity is entirely due to excitonic interactions between the electronic transitions of all six bacteriochlorin molecules. Using the simple exciton theory, this model predicts that the near-infrared CD spectra should be conservative. The fact that they are not, whether the special pair of Bch (SP) that constitutes the primary electron donor is reduced or oxidized, has been explained by hyperchromic effects. The present work tests this hypothesis by successively eliminating the absorption and, therefore, the optical activity of the Bphs and of the non-special-pair (non-SP) Bchs. This was accomplished by trapping these pigments in their reduced state. RC preparations with the four non-SP bacteriochlorins trapped in their reduced state and, therefore, with an intact SP displayed conservative CD spectra. RC preparations with only the electronic transitions of SP and of one non-SP Bch also showed conservative CD spectra. These conservative CD spectra and their corresponding absorption spectra were simulated using simple exciton theory without assuming hyperchromic effects. Bleaching half of the 755-nm absorption band by phototrapping one of the two Bph molecules led to the complete disappearance of the corresponding CD band. This cannot be explained by the all-exciton hypothesis. These results suggest that the optical activity of the SP alone, or with one non-SP Bch, is due to excitonic interactions. They also suggest that the optical activity of the other three bacteriochlorins is due to other factors, such as pigment-protein interaction. 32 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Experimental constraints on the generation of FeTi basalts, andesites, and rhyodacites at the Galapagos Spreading Center, 85°W and 95°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juster, Thomas C.; Grove, Timothy L.; Perfit, Michael R.

    1989-07-01

    One-atmosphere experiments conducted on a synthetic glass similar to Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) FeTi basalt (POO.82N2), (Byerly et al., 1976) define liquid lines of descent at fO2 values between the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer and 2 log units more oxidizing than the nickle-nickle oxide (NNO) buffer. The experiments provide a framework for understanding the development of FeTi basalts by fractionation at near-ocean floor conditions. GSC lavas from near 85°W initially follow a compositional trend, distinguished by FeO° (= FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) enrichment and SiO2 depletion, which is nearly identical to the trend observed in experiments at QFM to which olivine seeds were added. This compositional trend can be produced by crystallization along an olivine → pigeonite reaction boundary in a shallow crystal-rich magma reservoir. In contrast, GSC lavas from 95°W do not mimic the 1-atm liquid line of descent, but appear to have fractionated at somewhat higher pressure. Basaltic liquids from 95°W underwent fractional crystallization at 1-2 kbar, did not experience FeO° enrichment along an olivine → low-Ca pyroxene reaction boundary, and developed FeO° enrichment concomitant with SiO2 enrichment. This compositional variation is consistent with a differentiation process in which crystals are continually removed from contact with liquid. Rhyodacites from 95°W cannot be related to the basalts and FeTi basalts recovered at 95°W by shallow-level crystal fractionation. Instead, rhyolite liquids were formed either by fractionation of similar parents at greater depth and higher PH2O, or formed by fractionation of different parents. Andesite formed by mixing between basaltic and rhyodacitic liquids. As a consequence, mixed andesites define a trend of decreasing P2O5 which has been previously interpreted to represent apatite saturation at approximately 0.22 wt% P2O5, significantly earlier than at 85°W (where P2O5 decreases at approximately 0.7 wt% P2O5). Our

  12. Active and Repressive Chromatin Are Interspersed without Spreading in an Imprinted Gene Cluster in the Mammalian Genome

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Sloane, Mathew A.; Huang, Ru; Pauler, Florian M.; Warczok, Katarzyna E.; Melikant, Balázs; Radolf, Martin; Martens, Joost H.A.; Schotta, Gunnar; Jenuwein, Thomas; Barlow, Denise P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Igf2r imprinted cluster is an epigenetic silencing model in which expression of a ncRNA silences multiple genes in cis. Here, we map a 250 kb region in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to show that histone modifications associated with expressed and silent genes are mutually exclusive and localized to discrete regions. Expressed genes were modified at promoter regions by H3K4me3 + H3K4me2 + H3K9Ac and on putative regulatory elements flanking active promoters by H3K4me2 + H3K9Ac. Silent genes showed two types of nonoverlapping profile. One type spread over large domains of tissue-specific silent genes and contained H3K27me3 alone. A second type formed localized foci on silent imprinted gene promoters and a nonexpressed pseudogene and contained H3K9me3 + H4K20me3 ± HP1. Thus, mammalian chromosome arms contain active chromatin interspersed with repressive chromatin resembling the type of heterochromatin previously considered a feature of centromeres, telomeres, and the inactive X chromosome. PMID:17679087

  13. The SIRS Model of Epidemic Spreading in Virtual Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R.

    2008-09-01

    center">Dedicated to Professor Dietrich Stauffer on the occasion of his 65th birthday The phenomenon of epidemic spreading in a real social network is described and investigated numerically. On the basis of data concerning amount of time devoted daily to social interactions, the influence of human activity on spreading process is investigated in the frame of SIRS model. It was found that the activity of an individual is positively correlated with its connectivity and the relation has power law form. The influence of control measures on the spreading process is investigated as a function of initial conditions. The cost-effectiveness of mass immunizations campaigns and target vaccinations is compared. It was found that the form of activity distribution has significant influence on the spreading phenomena in the network.

  14. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  15. 75 FR 22438 - Proposed Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment Form) Activity...

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  16. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The rate of magma and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges is thought to decrease with decreasing spreading rate. At ultraslow spreading rates below 10-20 mm/y full rate, heat loss by conduction greatly reduces melt production with less melt produced at increasingly greater depths. Gakkel Ridge, the actively spreading mid-ocean ridge in the Arctic Ocean, opens at rates of 14 mm/y in the west decreasing to less than 6 mm/y at its eastern termination and demonstrates that magma production is not only a function of spreading rate. Whereas amagmatic spreading takes place at rates of about 12-10 mm/y, focussed melt production occurs at even lower spreading rates in long-lived discrete volcanic centres. One such centre is the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge where in 1999 a teleseismically recorded earthquake swarm consisting of more than 250 earthquakes over 9 months signalled the onset of an active spreading episode. The earthquake swarm is believed to be associated with volcanic activity although no concurrent lava effusion was found. We analysed the teleseismic earthquake swarm together with visual observation and microseismic data recorded at this site in 2001 and 2007 and noted the following characteristics which may be indicative for volcanic spreading events at the still poorly explored ultraslow spreading ridges: - unusual duration: The 1999 earthquake swarm lasted over 9 months rather than a few weeks as observed on faster spreading ridges. In addition, in 2001 seismoacoustic sounds which we interpret as gas discharge in Strombolian eruptions and a giant event plume maintained over more than one year indicate waxing and waning volcanic activity since 1999. - unusual strength: The earthquake swarm was detected at teleseismic distances of more than 1000 km and included 11 events with a magnitude >5. No other confirmed mid-ocean ridge eruption released a comparable seismic moment. Rather than focussing in a narrow area or showing pronounced

  17. Adenosine receptor activation is responsible for prolonged depression of synaptic transmission after spreading depolarization in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, B E; Shuttleworth, C W

    2012-10-25

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a slowly propagating, coordinated depolarization of brain tissue, which is followed by a transient (5-10min) depression of synaptic activity. The mechanisms for synaptic depression after SD are incompletely understood. We examined the relative contributions of action potential failure and adenosine receptor activation to the suppression of evoked synaptic activity in murine brain slices. Focal micro-injection of potassium chloride (KCl) was used to induce SD and synaptic potentials were evoked by electrical stimulation of Schaffer collateral inputs to hippocampal area Cornu Ammonis area 1 (CA1). SD was accompanied by loss of both presynaptic action potentials (as assessed from fiber volleys) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs). Fiber volleys recovered rapidly upon neutralization of the extracellular direct current (DC) potential, whereas fEPSPs underwent a secondary suppression phase lasting several minutes. Paired-pulse ratio was elevated during the secondary suppression period, consistent with a presynaptic mechanism of synaptic depression. A transient increase in extracellular adenosine concentration was detected during the period of secondary suppression. Antagonists of adenosine A1 receptors (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine [DPCPX] or 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine [8-CPT]) greatly accelerated fEPSP recovery and abolished increases in paired-pulse ratio normally observed after SD. The duration of fEPSP suppression was correlated with both the duration of the DC shift and the area of tissue depolarized, consistent with the model that adenosine accumulates in proportion to the metabolic burden of SD. These results suggest that in brain slices, the duration of the DC shift approximately defined the period of action potential failure, but the secondary depression of evoked responses was in large part due to endogenous adenosine accumulation after SD. PMID:22864185

  18. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  19. Multilevel Methodology for Simulation of Spatio-Temporal Systems with Heterogeneous Activity; Application to Spread of Valley Fever Fungus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jammalamadaka, Rajanikanth

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a dissertation submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2008. Spatio-temporal systems with heterogeneity in their structure and behavior have two major problems associated with them. The first one is that such complex real world systems extend over very large spatial and temporal domains and consume so many computational resources to simulate that they are infeasible to study with current computational platforms. The second one is that the data available for understanding such systems is limited because they are spread over space and time making it hard to obtain micro and macro measurements. This also makes it difficult to get the data for validation of their constituent processes while simultaneously considering their global behavior. For example, the valley fever fungus considered in this dissertation is spread over a large spatial grid in the arid Southwest and typically needs to be simulated over several decades of time to obtain useful information. It is also hard to get the temperature and moisture data (which are two critical factors on which the survival of the valley fever fungus depends) at every grid point of the spatial domain over the region of study. In order to address the first problem, we develop a method based on the discrete event system specification which exploits the heterogeneity in the activity of the spatio-temporal system and which has been shown to be effective in solving relatively simple partial differential equation systems. The benefit of addressing the first problem is that it now makes it feasible to address the second problem. We address the second problem by making use of a multilevel methodology based on modeling and simulation and systems theory. This methodology helps us in the construction of models with different resolutions (base and

  20. Constraints on Galactic Center Activity: A Search for Enhanced Galactic Center Lithium and Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.; Turner, B. E.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1998-12-01

    The abundances of lithium and boron provide important information about big bang nucleosynthesis, Galactic chemical evolution, stellar evolution, and cosmic-ray spallation reactions. We conducted the first search for the ground-state hyperfine-structure transitions of Li I (2S1/2; F = 2-1 803 MHz) and B I (2P1/2; F = 2-1 732 MHz). We used the 43 m NRAO radio telescope to search for enhanced Galactic center (GC) Li and B expected from models of Galactic activity. We did not detect Li I or B I and obtained upper limits of N(Li I) < 1.9 × 1016 cm-2, (Li/H) < 3.9 × 10-8, N(B I) < 2.2 × 1018 cm-2, and (B/H) < 9.2 × 10-6 for the dense 20 km s-1 Sgr A molecular cloud where our largest sources of uncertainties are Li I/Li, B I/B, and N(H). Our observations imply (Li/H)GC < 22 (Li/H)disk, (Li/H)GC < 39 (Li/H)disk-spallation, (B/H)GC < 1.2 × 104 (B/H)disk, (B/H)GC < 1.5 × 104 (B/H)disk-spallation. For a simple model combining mass loss from AGB stars (only for Li), spallation reactions, and SN ν-nucleosynthesis, we estimate (Li/H)GC = 1.3 × 10-8 (13 times enhancement) and (B/H)GC = 7.4 × 10-9 (10 times enhancement). If Li is primarily produced via spallation reactions from a cosmic-ray proton flux φp(t) with the same energy and trapping as in the disk, then [\\smallint φp(t)dt]GC < 13[\\smallint φp(t)dt]disk. Comparing our results to AGN models, we conclude that the GC has not had an extended period of AGN activity containing a large cosmic-ray flux (LCR <= 1044 ergs s-1 for 108 yr), a large low-energy cosmic-ray flux (less than 100 times the disk flux), or a large γ-ray flux (Lγ < 1042 ergs s-1 for 109 yr). Furthermore, since any Galactic deuterium production will significantly enhance the abundances of Li and B, our results imply that there are no sources of D in the GC or Galaxy. Therefore, all the Galactic D originated from the infall of primordial matter with the current D/H reduced by astration and mixing.

  1. Activity in the Shuttle Action Center (SAC) of the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Launched on June 20, 1996, the STS-78 mission's primary payload was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS), which was managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the 17 day space flight, the crew conducted a diverse slate of experiments divided into a mix of life science and microgravity investigations. In a manner very similar to future International Space Station operations, LMS researchers from the United States and their European counterparts shared resources such as crew time and equipment. Five space agencies (NASA/USA, European Space Agency/Europe (ESA), French Space Agency/France, Canadian Space Agency /Canada, and Italian Space Agency/Italy) along with research scientists from 10 countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the LMS. This photo was taken in the Shuttle Action Center (SAC) of the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC during the mission.

  2. Surface oxide net charge of a titanium alloy: modulation of fibronectin-activated attachment and spreading of osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Rapuano, Bruce E; MacDonald, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we have altered the surface oxide properties of a Ti6Al4V alloy using heat treatment or radiofrequency glow discharge (RFGD) in order to evaluate the relationship between the physico-chemical and biological properties of the alloy's surface oxide. The effects of surface pretreatments on the attachment of cells from two osteogenic cell lines (MG63 and MC3T3) and a mesenchymal stem cell line (C3H10T1/2) to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy were measured. Both heat and RFGD pretreatments produced a several-fold increase in the number of cells that attached to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy at a range of coating concentrations (0.001-10nM FN) for each cell line tested. An antibody (HFN7.1) directed against the central integrin binding domain of fibronectin produced a 65-70% inhibition of cell attachment to fibronectin-coated disks, indicating that cell attachment to the metal discs was dependent on fibronectin binding to cell integrin receptors. Both treatments also accelerated the cell spreading response manifested by extensive flattening and an increase in mean cellular area. The treatment-induced increases in the cell attachment activity of adsorbed fibronectin were correlated with previously demonstrated increases in Ti6Al4V oxide negative net surface charge at physiological pH produced by both heat and RFGD pretreatments. Since neither treatment increased the adsorption mass of fibronectin, these findings suggest that negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in Ti6Al4V can modulate fibronectin's integrin receptor activity by altering the adsorbed protein's conformation. Our results further suggest that negatively charged functional groups in the surface oxide can play a prominent role in the osseointegration of metallic implant materials. PMID:20884181

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1993-03-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  6. Overview of active flow control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-06-01

    The paper summarizes active flow control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state- of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R and D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry.

  7. THE GALACTIC CENTER: NOT AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris

    2013-06-01

    We present 10 {mu}m-35 {mu}m Spitzer spectra of the interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), the central 210 pc Multiplication-Sign 60 pc of the Galactic center (GC). We present maps of the CMZ in ionic and H{sub 2} emission, covering a more extensive area than earlier spectroscopic surveys in this region. The radial velocities and intensities of ionic lines and H{sub 2} suggest that most of the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(0) emission comes from gas along the line-of-sight, as found by previous work. We compare diagnostic line ratios measured in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey to our data. Previous work shows that forbidden line ratios can distinguish star-forming galaxies from low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our GC line ratios agree with star-forming galaxies and not with LINERs or AGNs.

  8. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  10. Chemical characteristics of magma and related seafloor sulfide deposits on back-arc spreading center and off-ridge volcanoes in Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, T.; Kanamori, S.; Ishibashi, J.; Kentaro, K.; Sato, H.; Kato, S.; Toyoda, S.

    2012-12-01

    The back-arc basalt in Mariana Trough is characterized by fluid-dominated components (Stolper and Newman, 1994). They suggested that the H2O-enriched magma of the Mariana Trough is formed as melting mixture between MORB-type mantle source and H2O-rich component which is likely to be derived from the subducting slab. Four active and one inactive hydrothermal sites were found within a distance of 5 km in Southern Mariana Trough; that is, Snail site (12o57.19'N, 143o37.16'E, depth:2861m) and Yamanaka site (12o56.64'N, 143o36.80'E, depth: 2823m) on the spreading-axis, Archean site (12o56.35'N, 143o37.89'E, depth: 2986m), and Pika+Urashima sites (12o55.13'N, 143o38.92'E, depth: 2773m) on the off-axis seamount, respectively. We conducted nine BMS (Benthic Multi-coring System) drillings during the Hakurei-Maru No.2 cruise of TAIGA project (see below) in June 2010. Both basalt glasses and associated seafloor massive sulfide ores from these sites are cored and served for ICP-MS analyses. Multi-element plot of basalt glass indicates that both on-axis and off-axis basalts have similar pattern and are categorized as differentiated MORB and basaltic andesite which cannot be produced by fractionation of MORB, respectively. Sulfide ores at on-axis and off-axis sites show similar mineral assemblage of pyrite/marcasite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, barite, and limited occurrence of galena only at on-axis site. Fluid-mobile elements such as As, Ba, Pb and others in sulfide ores show systematic increase at off-axis sites which reflect the influence of subduction zone fluids towards the Mariana arc. The sulfur isotope composition of pyrite/marcasite from on-axis sites shows values (+6.4 - +7.9 permil) typically observed in arc magma-related hydrothermal deposits (Suzuki, unpubl. data). On the other hand, those observed at off-axis sites (Archean; +3.6 - +6.9 permil, Pika; +0.8 - +3.5 permil) are similar to the composition of sulfides on mid-ocean ridges where the influence of sulfur

  11. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  12. Histopathological investigation of clinically non-affected perilesional scalp in alopecias detected unexpected spread of disease activities.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Okada, Emiko; Amagai, Masayuki; Ohyama, Manabu

    2014-09-01

    Histopathological comparison between clinically affected and intact regions in alopecia patients has been considered to facilitate better understanding of the pathophysiology of ongoing disease. Theoretically, adjacent intact regions should provide ideal controls as they should share close histological characteristics, however, to what extent clinically non-affected neighboring regions maintain their pathological integrity has not been fully assessed. The goal of this study is to delineate histopathological characteristics of clinically intact perilesional regions in the patients with various forms of alopecia. Transverse sections of 4-mm punch biopsy at the levels of isthmus and suprabulbar portion were obtained from seemingly unimpaired perilesional scalp of 50 Japanese alopecia patients (16 alopecia areata [AA] multiplex, 19 scarring alopecia [SA], 15 other conditions) and subject to histopathological investigation. Initial screening detected decrease in anagen (anagen : telogen ratio = 82.4:17.6) when compared with previously reported standard hair counts in normal Asian scalp. This finding prompted further investigation. Unexpectedly, 33 (66%) specimens demonstrated some microscopic abnormalities, 10 (62.5%) AA specimens showed increase in telogen ratio, vellus hair count and miniaturization, while perifollicular inflammatory cell infiltration was detected in 5 (26.3%) SA cases. Exclusion of histologically affected specimens yielded average hair count numbers resembling those reported in Koreans, supporting the pathological integrity of selected samples and, more importantly, indicating normal hair counts in east Asians. These findings indicated a less recognized significance of histopathological investigation of clinically non-affected perilesional scalp in alopecias for better assessment of the spread of disease activities, which should enable better management of hair loss conditions. PMID:25156442

  13. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  14. 77 FR 70211 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Call Center Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB Review

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    2012-11-23

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Call Center Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VBA Call Center Satisfaction Survey. OMB Control Number: 2900-0744. Type of... Veterans; (2) determine what to do to improve the call center experience; and (3) serve to guide...

  15. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  16. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  17. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  18. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  19. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  20. Surficial Expressions of Deeper Processes- Ridge 2000 Spurs Understanding of Mantle-Hydrothermal Connections and the Role of Crustal Processes at Oceanic Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    A decade ago the Ridge 2000 (R2K) program began implementing the Integrated Studies Site (ISS) strategy as a means to advance understanding of the linked magmatic/tectonic/hydrothermal systems that dictate the structure and ecosystems observed in young crust along the spreading axis. Through comparison amongst ISSs and other well-studied sites, where controlling factors such as spreading rate or tectonic/thermal setting differ, a number of new insights have been gained. I will review progress on 3 aspects, emphasizing R2K contributions but also noting a few other recent results: the pattern of magma supply, along and across axis; ridge segmentation and crust/mantle interplay; threshold behavior and limiting processes that are manifested in crustal properties. The results are derived from petrological/geochemical, seismic (imaging, seismicity, compliance), electromagnetic, modeling, and mapping investigations, so I will touch on each of these types of constraint. The breadth of the melt supply zone is an example where R2K results document that influx to at least the lower crust can extend out several km beyond the axial graben. Such knowledge addresses a fundamental problem in Earth Sciences- how magmatism and faulting interact and the potential for hydrothermal circulation to both influence, and be influenced by, their distributions. In addition to briefly summarizing work already completed, I will highlight efforts on the mantle portions of the Juan de Fuca and Lau ISS that are currently underway, using data/modeling from the final phase of R2K, to tease out further connections between mantle processes and crustal structure, within which the now-known-to-be-ubiquitous hydrothermal systems develop.

  1. STS-26 Mission Control Center (MCC) activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A wide angle view shows flight controllers in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) as they listen to a presentation by STS-26 crewmembers on the fourth day of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, orbital mission. Flight Director James M. (Milt) Heflin (standing at center) and astronaut and spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) G. David Low (standing at right) briefly look away from a television image of the crew on a screen in the front of the FCR. Heflin, Low, and other flight controllers listen as each member relates some inner feelings while paying tribute to the 51L Challenger crew.

  2. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  3. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang; Woitzik, Johannes; Scheel, Michael; Wiesenthal, Dirk; Martus, Peter; Winkler, Maren K L; Hartings, Jed A; Fabricius, Martin; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We here report on such spreading convulsions in monopolar subdural recordings in 2 of 25 consecutive aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients in vivo and neocortical slices from 12 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in vitro. The in vitro results suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition protects from spreading convulsions. Moreover, we describe arterial pulse artefacts mimicking epileptic field potentials in three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage that ride on the slow potential peak. Twenty-one of the 25 subarachnoid haemorrhage patients (84%) had 656 spreading depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression

  4. Research Activities Within the Professional Development Center Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Marie J.; And Others

    A cooperative program to improve education in the public schools involving the combined resources of the state department of education, a state university, and the local school districts is described. This Professional Development Center Network (PDC) conducts research to produce decision-making information to upgrade inservice programs in the…

  5. Natural hazards activities of the National Geophysical Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockridge, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC), a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has been given the task of collecting, managing, and disseminating the great mass of inofmation produced by scientific observations of the geophysical environment. This article describes NGDC data bases that speifically relate to natural hazards. 

  6. Composition of plume-influenced mid-ocean ridge lavas and glasses from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Kingsley, Richard; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    The global mid-ocean ridge system is peppered with localities where mantle plumes impinge on oceanic spreading centers. Here, we present new, high resolution and high precision data for 40 trace elements in 573 samples of variably plume-influenced mid-ocean ridge basalts from the Mid-Atlantic ridge, the Easter Microplate and Salas y Gomez seamounts, the Galápagos spreading center, and the Gulf of Aden, in addition to previously unpublished major element and isotopic data for these regions. Included in the data set are the unconventional trace elements Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, W, and Tl, which are not commonly reported by most geochemical studies. We show variations in the ratios Mo/Ce, Cd/Dy, Sn/Sm, Sb/Ce, W/U, and Rb/Tl, which are expected not to fractionate significantly during melting or crystallization, as a function of proximity to plume-related features on these ridges. The Cd/Dy and Sn/Sm ratios show little variation with plume proximity, although higher Cd/Dy may signal increases in the role of garnet in the mantle source beneath some plumes. Globally, the Rb/Tl ratio closely approximates the La/SmN ratio, and thus provides a sensitive tracer of enriched mantle domains. The W/U ratio is not elevated at plume centers, but we find significant enrichments in W/U, and to a lesser extent the Mo/Ce and Sb/Ce ratios, at mid-ocean ridges proximal to plumes. Such enrichments may provide evidence of far-field entrainment of lower mantle material that has interacted with the core by deeply-rooted, upwelling mantle plumes.

  7. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  8. Binocular rivalry: spreading dominance through complex images.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Derek H; James, Bridie; Roseboom, Warrick

    2009-01-01

    When different images are presented to the two eyes, each can intermittently disappear, leaving the other to dominate perception. This is called binocular rivalry. When using radial gratings, focal contrast increments can trigger a traveling wave of perceptual dominance change, originating at the locus of the contrast increment and circling the stimulus. This has been linked to a sweep of activity through V1 that can be traced via fMRI. The dominance of more complex images, like human faces, has been linked to higher level processing structures characterized by more holistic object centered properties. We therefore decided to assess how dominance would spread through more complex images. Using Kanisza squares and human faces we found that dominance tended to spread gradually away from the locus of the contrast increment, often along real or illusory contours. We also found that perceptual dominance was slow to spread between facial regions encoded by different monocular channels. These data are consistent with low-level monocular mechanisms, like those found in V1, playing a determinant role in the spread of perceptual dominance through complex images during binocular rivalry. PMID:20055537

  9. The Internet Alert Project: spreading the word about high-risk sexual activities advertised on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Kachur, R E

    2004-11-01

    The Internet is an emerging venue for facilitating high-risk sexual behavior; in particular, use of the Internet to seek out sex partners has been shown to be associated with high-risk sexual behaviors, such as an increase in number of sexual partners and an increase in anal sex, which can increase the risk of contracting and transmitting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV. In an effort to assist health departments around the country, the Internet Alert Project was developed to provide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) project officers and field staff with information about Internet-advertised, high-risk sexual activities in areas that do not have access to sexually explicit material on the Internet. An evaluation was conducted to determine the utility of the Internet Alert Project, its effect on knowledge and awareness of recipients and on public health efforts. Results of the evaluation show the alerts are a useful and valuable tool. The alerts have helped to increase knowledge about sexually-related uses of the Internet and have also driven public health efforts in the field. The results also indicate the need for project areas to access information found on the Internet in order to keep up with the ever-changing behaviors of at-risk populations. PMID:15511729

  10. Physical Activity in Child-Care Centers: Do Teachers Hold the Key to the Playground?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49…

  11. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  12. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  13. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  14. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  15. Spread Across Liquids Continues to Fly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.

    2001-01-01

    The physics and behavior of a flame spreading across a flammable liquid is an active area of research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Spills of fuels and other liquids often result in considerable fire hazards, and much remains unknown about the details of how a flame, once ignited, moves across a pool. The depth of the liquid or size of the spill, the temperature, and wind, if any, can all complicate the combustion processes. In addition, with the advent of the International Space Station there may be fire hazards associated with cleaning, laboratory, or other fluids in space, and it is essential to understand the role that gravity plays in such situations. The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment is an experimental and computational effort dedicated to understanding the detailed mechanisms of flame spread across a flammable liquid initially below its flashpoint temperature. The experimental research is being carried out in-house by a team of researchers from Glenn, the National Center for Microgravity Combustion, and Zin Technologies, with computer modeling being provided via a grant with the University of California, Irvine. Glenn's Zero Gravity Facility is used to achieve short microgravity periods, and normal gravity testing is done in the Space Experiments Laboratory. To achieve longer periods of microgravity, the showcase SAL hardware flies aboard a sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, approximately once per year. In addition to extended microgravity, this carrier allows the use of detailed diagnostics that cannot be employed in a drop tower.

  16. STS-26 Mission Control Center (MCC) activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Flight controllers in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) listen to a presentation by STS-26 crewmembers on the fourth day of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, orbital mission. Flight Directors Charles W. Shaw and James M. (Milt) Heflin (in the foreground) and other controllers view a television image of Earth on a screen in the front of the FCR while listening to crewmembers.

  17. STS-26 Mission Control Center (MCC) activity at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Flight controllers in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) listen to a presentation by STS-26 crewmembers on the fourth day of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, orbital mission. Instrumentation and Communications Officers (INCOs) Harold Black (left foreground) and John F. Muratore and other controllers view a television (TV) transmission of the crew on a screen in front of the FCR as each member relates some inner feelings while paying tribute to the 51L Challenger crew.

  18. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  19. Aerospace Battery Activities at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has "pioneered" rechargeable secondary battery design, test, infusion and in-orbit battery management among NASA installations. Nickel cadmium batteries of various designs and sizes have been infused for LEO, GEO and Libration Point spacecraft. Nickel-Hydrogen batteries have currently been baselined for the majority of our missions. Li-Ion batteries from ABSL, JSB, SaFT and Lithion have been designed and tested for aerospace application.

  20. Distribution of axial lava domes along a superfast overlapping spreading center, 27-32°S on the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Howell, J. K.; Hey, R. N.

    2008-12-01

    Deep-towed DSL-120 bathymetric data are used to investigate the pattern of lava dome formation along a superfast spreading portion of the southern East Pacific Rise (EPR), including the overlapping limbs of a giant (120 × 120 km) propagator near 29°S. Along the 670 km of the axis surveyed, 1172 small domes were identified using a closed contour algorithm. Their abundance, defined by spatial density, is well correlated with the along-axis relief of the ridge crest. Where the western and eastern limbs plunge toward the overlap zone, densities are high (3-6 km-2); however, where the axial depth profile is shallow and flat, densities are comparably low (0.4 km-2). Volcanic domes within the low abundance areas are characterized by lower ratios of height to basal radius (0.15 versus 0.22), smaller maximum heights (18 versus 40 m), and a larger relative percentage of small versus large mounds. The zone of high dome abundance encompasses the overlapping limbs of the rift and extends more than 100 km to the north and south beyond the overlap zone. Domes form dominantly during low effusion rate, point-source eruptions, which suggests that discontinuous melt lenses underlie the ridge axis proximal to the overlapper. Conversely, fissure-fed sheet flows dominate along the more distal segments, implying the presence of a more continuous axial magma lens. Throughout the survey area, dome abundance increases systematically near second-order segment boundaries. Within the high abundance zone, some third-order offsets also correlate with increased dome production, but local peaks in abundance are not tied exclusively to higher-order ridge offsets. Where dome abundance is low, domes are clustered tightly near second-order offsets and there is no increase in dome abundance near third-order segment boundaries.

  1. Scientists Discover Supernova May Control Activity in the Center of Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-02-01

    degrees by Chandra. Scientists believe the outward shock wave moved the cooler, heavier gas that comprises the intergalactic medium--compressing and plowing that gas past the black hole as the shock wave spread and feeding the black hole in the process. They believe the result was a period of intense feeding of material into the black hole, followed by a period of black hole "starvation." "The important question to be raised here is what effect the plowed gas has on its environment," said Frederick Baganoff, a research associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and lead scientist for Chandra's Galactic Center project. "It is possible that the plowed gas has passed over the supermassive black hole at some time in the recent past. During the passage, a lot of gas could have been captured by the black hole." When black holes pull matter inward, they are able to accelerate those particles to almost the speed of light. The matter accreting into a black hole releases a great deal of energy, much of it in X rays that can ionize the surrounding gas and make it visible with instruments such as ACIS. Because X-ray emissions from the black hole are weak at this time, scientists believe the shock wave already has passed by the black hole. "Radio astronomers already found that the gas in a halo surrounding Sgr A East and the supermassive black hole is largely ionized," said Mark Morris, professor of astronomy and physics at the University of California at Los Angeles. "If the gas plowed by the supernova remnant was pushed past the black hole, the spectacular interaction would very possibly have occurred as recently as a few hundred years ago, and the resulting flash of energy would likely have irradiated and ionized the surrounding gas. This could explain why the ionization of the gas still survives." In a broader sense, that activity might serve as a model for other black holes and other phenomena throughout the universe because the Chandra scientists suggest supernova

  2. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  3. A Paleomagnetic Study of Late Cretaceous Ophiolites in SE Turkey: implications for palaeolatitudes of S Neotethyan spreading centers and emplacement-related tectonic rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mualla, Cinku; Timur, Ustaömer; Osman, Parlak; Mumtaz, Hisarli

    2016-04-01

    Two E-W trending ophiolite belts crop out in SE Turkey, The southerly located ophiolites (Hatay, Koçali) were emplaced onto the Arabian Platform in Late Cretaceous whereas the northerly located ophiolites (Göksun, İspendere, Kömürhan, Guleman) were underthrust the S Tauride margin (i.e. Malatya-Keban Platform) in Late Cretaceous. Different tectonic models exist in the literature for the origin of these different ophiolite belts that we test here by a detailed palaomagnetic study: a) all the ophiolites in Turkey, including those in the study area were rooted from a single ocean basin to the N (i.e. the N Neotethyan Ocean Basin); b) all the ophiolites in SE Turkey were derived from the S Neotethyan Ocean Basin; c) the two ophiolite belts in SE Turkey are believed to have rooted from two different ocean basins; the Berit ocean to the north and the S Neotethys to the S. Our palaeomagnetic study from 72 different sites was focused on to the sheeted dyke complex, cumulate gabbros and extrusive sequences where available of each ophiolite from the N and S belts. We also sampled the unconformable cover units to distinguish emplacement related tectonic rotations from post-emplacement tectonic rotations. Here we report our first results obtained from the Göksun Ophiolite of the northern belt and the Hatay Ophiolite of the southern belt. Rock magnetic experiments showed evidence od magnetite/titanomagnetite as the main magnetic carriers at the majority of sites. Progressive thermal and alternating demagnetization revealed that the characteristic remanent component is removed between 500 and 580 ?C or 30-100 mT, respectively. Our new paleomagnetic results from the ophiolitic rocks emplaced in Arabian platform and the SE Anatolia show important implications to the spreading centre of the former ocean (s). Large counterclockwise rotations up to 100° are obtained from the sheeded dykes of the Hatay ophiolite in the Arabian plate with a paleolatitude of ˜16° , in contrast

  4. Recent Activities of Tsukuba Correlator/Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, K.; Kurihara, S.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has been a member of IVS and taken charge of a Network Station and an IVS Correlator since 1998. In addition, GSI became an IVS Operational Analysis Center in January 2010.The Tsukuba Correlator takes charge of correlation work for approximately 100 IVS-INT02 (INT2) sessions and 10 Japanese domestic sessions every year. In 2011, the number of INT2 sessions dramatically increased, because INT2 sessions were observed twice a day during the weekend from April 2011 to January 2012 due to the change in position of the Tsukuba 32-m antenna by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. The role of the Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center is to produce ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements, sessions with the goal of obtaining a dUT1 solution within 30 minutes after the end of the observation session. The data processing system at the Tsukuba Correlator and Analysis Center was dramatically improved to achieve rapid data processing. It enabled us to shorten the data processing time to one-sixth and to process the IVS VLBI data in near real-time. In 2011, we processed the ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements with the Onsala or Wettzell stations from INT2 sessions or IVS 24-hour sessions, such as R1, RD or T2 sessions. The most successful sessions for ultra-rapid dUT1 measurement was the CONT11 sessions which were a campaign of 15 days of continuous VLBI sessions. During these sessions, we succeeded in estimating continuous dUT1 solutions in near real-time for 15 days.

  5. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above.

  6. Activities of the Structures Division, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Structures Division's 1990 Annual Report is to give a brief, but comprehensive, review of the technical accomplishments of the Division during the past calendar year. The report is organized topically to match the Center's Strategic Plan. Over the years, the Structures Division has developed the technology base necessary for improving the future of aeronautical and space propulsion systems. In the future, propulsion systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance. Achieving these goals is complex and challenging. Our approach has been to work cooperatively with both industry and universities to develop the technology necessary for state-of-the-art advancement in aeronautical and space propulsion systems. The Structures Division consists of four branches: Structural Mechanics, Fatigue and Fracture, Structural Dynamics, and Structural Integrity. This publication describes the work of the four branches by three topic areas of Research: (1) Basic Discipline; (2) Aeropropulsion; and (3) Space Propulsion. Each topic area is further divided into the following: (1) Materials; (2) Structural Mechanics; (3) Life Prediction; (4) Instruments, Controls, and Testing Techniques; and (5) Mechanisms. The publication covers 78 separate topics with a bibliography containing 159 citations. We hope you will find the publication interesting as well as useful.

  7. Recent Activities on the Embrace Space Weather Regional Warning Center: the New Space Weather Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Mendes, Odim; Batista, Inez S.; SantAnna, Nilson; Gatto, Rubens; Takahashi, Hisao; Costa, D. Joaquim; Banik Padua, Marcelo; Campos Velho, Haroldo

    2016-07-01

    On August 2007 the National Institute for Space Research started a task force to develop and operate a space weather program, which is known by the acronyms Embrace that stands for the Portuguese statement "Estudo e Monitoramento BRAasileiro de Clima Espacial" Program (Brazilian Space Weather Study and Monitoring program). The mission of the Embrace/INPE program is to monitor the Solar-Terrestrial environment, the magnetosphere, the upper atmosphere and the ground induced currents to prevent effects on technological and economic activities. The Embrace/INPE system monitors the physical parameters of the Sun-Earth environment, such as Active Regions (AR) in the Sun and solar radiation by using radio telescope, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) information by satellite and ground-based cosmic ray monitoring, geomagnetic activity by the magnetometer network, and ionospheric disturbance by ionospheric sounders and using data collected by four GPS receiver network, geomagnetic activity by a magnetometer network, and provides a forecasting for Total Electronic Content (TEC) - 24 hours ahead - using a version of the SUPIM model which assimilates the two latter data using nudging approach. Most of these physical parameters are daily published on the Brazilian space weather program web portal, related to the entire network sensors available. Regarding outreach, it has being published a daily bulletin in Portuguese and English with the status of the space weather environment on the Sun, the Interplanetary Medium and close to the Earth. Since December 2011, all these activities are carried out at the Embrace Headquarter, a building located at the INPE's main campus. Recently, a comprehensive data bank and an interface layer are under commissioning to allow an easy and direct access to all the space weather data collected by Embrace through the Embrace web Portal. The information being released encompasses data from: (a) the Embrace Digisonde Network (Embrace DigiNet) that monitors

  8. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  9. NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Hydrostatic Bearing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Theodore G.

    1991-01-01

    The basic approach for analyzing hydrostatic bearing flows at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is briefly discussed. The Hydrostatic Bearing Team has responsibility for assessing and evaluating flow codes; evaluating friction, ignition, and galling effects; evaluating wear; and performing tests. The Office of Aerospace and Exploration Technology Turbomachinery Seals Tasks consist of tests and analysis. The MSFC in-house analyses utilize one-dimensional bulk-flow codes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used to enhance understanding of bearing flow physics or to perform parametric analysis that are outside the bulk flow database. As long as the bulk flow codes are accurate enough for most needs, they will be utilized accordingly and will be supported by CFD analysis on an as-needed basis.

  10. Report on Advanced Life Support Activities at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Plant studies at Kennedy Space Center last year focused on selecting cultivars of lettuce, tomato, and pepper for further testing as crops for near-term space flight applications. Other testing continued with lettuce, onion, and radish plants grown at different combinations of light (PPF), temperature, and CO2 concentration. In addition, comparisons of mixed versus mono culture approaches for vegetable production were studied. Water processing testing focused on the development and testing of a rotating membrane bioreactor to increase oxygen diffusion levels for reducing total organic carbon levels and promoting nitrification. Other testing continued to study composting testing for food wastes (NRA grant) and the use of supplemental green light with red/blue LED lighting systems for plant production (NRC fellowship).

  11. Recent and Future Stratospheric Balloon Activities at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemi, Stig

    Esrange Space Center located in northern Sweden has during 45 years been a leading launch site for both sounding rockets and stratospheric balloons. We have a unique combination of maintaining both stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets launch operations. Most balloon flights are normally handled inside Scandinavia but since 2005 PersonNamesemi-circular flights are performed with recovery in northern Canada. The Swedish Government and Swedish National Space Board are now finaliz-ing an agreement with Russia for peaceful uPersonNamese of space, which will permit circumpolar balloon flights. Within this agreement we will soon be able to of-fer the science community long duration balloon flights with durations for PersonNameseveral weeks. The balloon operations at Esrange Space Center are yearly expanding. Both NASA and CNES have long term plans for balloon flights from northern Sweden. We have also received a request from JAXA for future balloon missions. To handle balloon campaigns with large numbers of payloads or build up for two different campaigns a new big assembly hall will be ready for use at the beginning of 2011. January 24 we made an historical balloon flight in a very cold stratosphere with a Zodiac metricconverterProductID402?000 m3402ü ınbsp;000 m3402 000 m3 balloon carrying a 750kg gondola with the German Mipas-B/Telis instrument. The balloon reached 34kms alti-tude after a carefully piloted ascent in temperature levels down to -89 degrees Centigrade. The scientists received unique data during the 13 hours and 30 minutes long sailing at different altitudes during slow descent. The payload was recovered in very good condition 80 kms from the border between country-regionFinland and Russia.

  12. Active surveillance of the aquatic environment for potential prediction, prevention and spread of water borne disease: the cholera paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, A.; Colwell, R.

    2011-12-01

    Based on results of ecological and epidemiological studies, occurrence and spread of certain diseases are more fully understood. Cholera is a major waterborne disease, that is relatively easily treatable and clearly preventable, yet tens of thousands die each year worldwide. A dose dependent disease, the infectious dose can vary from 103-106, depending on health status of the victim. Historically, cholera has been shown to spread from person to person. Furthermore, the disease is caused predominantly via ingestion of contaminated water and most of the outbreaks that have been recorded worldwide originated in a coastal region. Using appropriate detection methods, Vibrio cholerae can be isolated from samples collected from ponds, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters globally. The populations of V. cholerae may vary in numbers during different seasons of the year. It is important to have a clear understanding of the distribution of the causative agent in the environment as such information can assist public health officials in taking action to prevent outbreaks of cholera. Thus an effective monitoring program is critical, particularly in light of climate change with temperature extremes more likely to be occurring. Based on a predictive model and results of ground truth data, temperature has been found to be a factor in the increase of V. cholerae in the environment. Correlation was observed with occurrence of cholera and both temperature and salinity. More recent research indicates additional factors need to be considered in predicting cholera epidemics, including the hydrology and disease dynamics.

  13. Problem-Centered and Experimental Mathematics Activities for Aboriginal Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seputro, Theresia Tirta

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity carried out by aboriginal students that addresses solving a real-life problem that could be linked to number sequence, graph theory, and combinations. Contains 14 references. (ASK)

  14. A Journey into the Active Center of Nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes the reduction of N2 to NH3, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. This article describes our journey toward the definition of a complete molecular structure of the active site of nitrogenase, with an emphasis on the discovery of the interstitial carbide and the radical SAM-dependent insertion of this atom into the active FeMo cofactor site of nitrogenase. PMID:24752864

  15. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  16. Social Inequalities in Body Weight and Physical Activity: Exploring the Role of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Lindsay; Rock, Melanie J.; McElgunn, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Fitness centers are a viable option for physical activity, particularly in climates with significant weather variation. Due to variation in economic and social expressions of exclusivity, fitness centers may have some relation to social inequalities in physical inactivity and related health outcomes; thus, our objective was to explore this…

  17. Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs…

  18. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND...

  19. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND...

  20. 75 FR 25266 - Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. In compliance with the requirement of section...

  1. 78 FR 53013 - Proposed Information Collection (Health Eligibility Center (HEC) New Enrollee Survey); Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Titles: Health Eligibility Center (HEC) New... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Health Eligibility Center (HEC) New Enrollee Survey); Activity... opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of certain information by the agency. Under...

  2. Transmission research activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A joint research program, to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions, consists of analytical and experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing transmission weight and noise, while increasing life and reliability. Recent activities in the areas of transmission and related component research are highlighted. Current areas include specific technologies in support of military rotary wing aviation, gearing technology, transmission noise reduction studies, a recent interest in gearbox diagnostics, and advanced transmission system studies. Results of recent activities are presented along with near term research plans.

  3. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  4. ALOP-active learning in optics and photonics: a UNESCO's program spreading in Colombia through the National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Gómez, Catalina; Monroy-Ramírez, Freddy A.

    2014-07-01

    The National University of Colombia is committed to the spreading of the UNESCO's ALOP program throughout the country by programming a series of workshops (ALOP-NPH) to be held in each of its eight campuses. This huge effort is intended to contribute at a national scale to the training of high school teachers in new pedagogic methodologies. Furthermore, the ALOP Workshop has had large impact in the recently established Master's program on pedagogy of Sciences, a degree program addressed to middle and high school teachers, which has a current enrollment of more than 400 teachers from all over the country. In this paper we also describe the contributions of the team also ALOP-Colombia to the material and electronic devices used in optical transmission modules and data division multiplexing wavelength.

  5. Kidspiration[R] for Inquiry-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L., Jr.; Baggett, Paige V.; Salyer, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Computer technology can be integrated into science inquiry activities to increase student motivation and enhance and expand scientific thinking. Fifth-grade students used the visual thinking tools in the Kidspiration[R] software program to generate and represent a web of hypotheses around the question, "What affects the distance a marble rolls?"…

  6. An Interdisciplinary, Computer-Centered Approach to Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misale, Judi M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a computer-assisted, interdisciplinary course in decision making developed to promote student participation and critical thinking. Students participate in 20 interactive exercises that utilize and illustrate psychological and economic concepts. Follow-up activities include receiving background information, group discussions, text…

  7. Robotics-Centered Outreach Activities: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-del-Solar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, universities are making extensive efforts to attract prospective students to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Thus, outreach is becoming increasingly important, and activities with schoolchildren are being extensively carried out as part of this effort. In this context, robotics is a very attractive and…

  8. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  9. 77 FR 69604 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Educational Opportunity Centers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Educational Opportunity Centers Program (EOC... respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please note that written comments received in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection:...

  10. UAS Related Activities at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is completing its refurbishment and initial flights of one the pre-production Global Hawk aircraft it received from the U.S. Air Force. NASA Dryden has an agreement with the Global Hawk s manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, to partner in the refurbishment and flight operations of the vehicles. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also partnered on the project and is assisting NASA with project management and pilot responsibilities for the aircraft. NASA and NOAA will be using the Global Hawks to conduct earth science research. The earth science community is increasing utilizing UAS of all sizes and capabilities to collect important data on a variety of issues including important global climate change issues. To pursue the data collection needs of the science community there is a growing demand for international collaboration with respect to operating UAS in global airspace. Operations of NASA s Ikhana aircraft continued this past year. The Ikhana is a modified Predator B UAS. A UAS dedicated to research at NASA Dryden is the X-48B blended wing body research aircraft. Flight tests with the 500- pound, remotely piloted test vehicle are now in a block 4 phase involving parameter identification and maneuvers to research the limits of the engine in stall situations. NASA s participation in the blended wing body research effort is focused on fundamental, advanced flight dynamics and structural design concepts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing project, part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program managed through NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Potential benefits of the aircraft include increased volume for carrying capacity, efficient aerodynamics for reduced fuel burn and possibly significant reductions in noise due to propulsion integration options. NASA Dryden continues to support the UAS industry by facilitating access to three specially designated test areas on Edwards Air Force Base for the

  11. City Kids and City Critters! Activities for Urban Explorers from the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Janet Wier; Huelbig, Carole

    This guide contains activities from the Houston Arboretum and Nature Center programs for children ages 8 to 12 years. The multisensory activities help students improve their observational skills and utilize activity sheets, journals, and hands-on projects to involve them. Children observe, draw, and photograph animals in their natural settings and…

  12. Modulating the activity of the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Beringer, Malte

    2008-01-01

    The peptidyl transferase (PT) center of the ribosome catalyzes two nucleophilic reactions, peptide bond formation between aminoacylated tRNA substrates and, together with release factor, peptide release. Structure and function of the PT center are modulated by binding of aminoacyl-tRNA or release factor, thus providing the basis for the specificity of catalysis. Another way by which the function of the PT center is controlled is signaling from the peptide exit tunnel. The SecM nascent peptide induces ribosome stalling, presumably by inhibition of peptide bond formation. Similarly, the release factor-induced hydrolytic activity of the PT center can be suppressed by the TnaC nascent peptide contained in the exit tunnel. Thus, local and long-range conformational rearrangements can lead to changes in the reaction specificity and catalytic activity of the PT center. PMID:18369182

  13. Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) Project Studied "Green House" Effects on Fire Spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Ronney, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) project, slated for flight aboard the International Space Station, reached a major milestone by holding its Science Concept Review this year. REEFS is led by principal investigator Paul Ronney from the University of Southern California in conjunction with a project team from the NASA Glenn Research Center. The study is focusing on flame spread over flat solid fuel beds to improve our understanding of more complex fires, such as those found in manned spacecraft and terrestrial buildings. The investigation has direct implications for fire safety, both for space and Earth applications, and extends previous work with emphasis on the atmospheres and flow environments likely to be present in fires that might occur in microgravity. These atmospheres will contain radiatively active gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion products, and likely gaseous fuels such as carbon monoxide (CO) from incomplete combustion of solid fuel, as well as flows induced by ventilation currents. During tests in the 2.2-Second Drop Tower and KC-135 aircraft at Glenn, the principal investigator introduced the use of foam fuels for flame spread experiments over thermally thick fuels to obtain large spread rates in comparison to those of dense fuels such as PMMA. This enables meaningful results to be obtained even in the 2.2 s available in drop tower experiments.

  14. C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center near 95 degrees W: a laser decrepitation mass spectrometry study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonover, R. N.; Sinton, J. M.; Sommer, M. A.; Gibson, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Volatile ratios (primarily of H2O and CO2) in individual silicate melt (glass) inclusions in minerals have been analyzed using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry. A Nd-glass laser was used to produce 50-micrometer diameter pits in silicate melt inclusions. Released volatiles were analyzed directly with a computer-controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer. The detection limits for CO2 and H2O were on the order of 3 x 10(-14) and 3 x 10(-13) moles, respectively. The reproducibility for CO2/H2O was better than +/- 9%. The total range of volatile ratios from vitreous silicate glass inclusions contained in a suite of Galapagos lavas were: 0.018 to 1.193 for CO2/H2O; 0.002 to 0.758 for CO/H2O; 0 to 0.454 for CH4/H2O; and 0 to 0.432 for Ar/H2O. The mean CO2/H2O from the propagating rift (0.245 +/- 0.068) silicate glass inclusions is significantly lower than that of the actively failing rift (0.641 +/- 0.241); this difference probably reflects different degrees of degassing during magmatic histories for the two regions. Relatively undifferentiated failing rift magmas must have relatively short crustal residence times prior to eruption and, therefore, have not undergone significant degassing of CO2, as would appear to be the case for the more highly fractionated propagating rift magmas. The laser-mass spectrometric system described herein has the ability to act as a point-source probing device that can differentiate between the various volatile sites in minerals and rocks (as well as synthetic materials) on a micrometer scale.

  15. Attitudinal Effects of a Student-Centered Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Allen, Deedee

    2005-06-01

    The importance of attitudes toward science has risen from widely accepted assumptions that achievement and attitude are positively interdependent and that affective variables are as important as cognitive variables in molding student learning. This report examines the effect on student attitudes toward learning chemistry in an active learning environment that has incorporated elements believed to positively influence student attitudes toward science including cooperative learning, hands-on activities, real-world applications, and engaging technology. These elements were considered for synergetic effects and not as individual contributors to the overall results. Two different sections of the same general chemistry course participated. The lecture setting was used as the control. Residualized gain scores were used to compare net changes in student attitudes. Data were analyzed for possible differences in gain for different academic majors. Anxiety in chemistry was monitored for the two class settings in three areas, learning in chemistry, chemistry evaluation, and chemical handling. Qualitative student feedback was also collected and is summarized in this report on the attitudinal aspects of instruction.

  16. Centering Perspectives on Black Women, Hair Politics, and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Versey, H. Shellae

    2014-01-01

    As researchers categorize issues facing Black women’s health, obesity and physical exercise continue to be significant topics of debate. General interventions targeted toward Black women to address obesity and increase physical exercise have been largely ineffective. In this article, I situate the current public health discourse on obesity and related interventions within a sociocultural context of body appearance, with a specific focus on hair. Why do some African American women feel such strong ties to their hair that they will avoid exercise? What can be done to understand this phenomenon and address alternatives that may make both hair maintenance and regular exercise feasible? I map a theoretical argument for why hair matters for some women, and discuss how physical activity intervention strategies might be improved by considering such complexities. PMID:24625146

  17. Constraint based scheduling for the Goddard Space Flight Center distributed Active Archive Center's data archive and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nick, Jr.; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Beane, John

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational since October 1, 1993. Its mission is to support the Earth Observing System (EOS) by providing rapid access to EOS data and analysis products, and to test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) design concepts. One of the challenges is to ensure quick and easy retrieval of any data archived within the DAAC's Data Archive and Distributed System (DADS). Over the 15-year life of EOS project, an estimated several Petabytes (10(exp 15)) of data will be permanently stored. Accessing that amount of information is a formidable task that will require innovative approaches. As a precursor of the full EOS system, the GSFC DAAC with a few Terabits of storage, has implemented a prototype of a constraint-based task and resource scheduler to improve the performance of the DADS. This Honeywell Task and Resource Scheduler (HTRS), developed by Honeywell Technology Center in cooperation the Information Science and Technology Branch/935, the Code X Operations Technology Program, and the GSFC DAAC, makes better use of limited resources, prevents backlog of data, provides information about resources bottlenecks and performance characteristics. The prototype which is developed concurrently with the GSFC Version 0 (V0) DADS, models DADS activities such as ingestion and distribution with priority, precedence, resource requirements (disk and network bandwidth) and temporal constraints. HTRS supports schedule updates, insertions, and retrieval of task information via an Application Program Interface (API). The prototype has demonstrated with a few examples, the substantial advantages of using HTRS over scheduling algorithms such as a First In First Out (FIFO) queue. The kernel scheduling engine for HTRS, called Kronos, has been successfully applied to several other domains such as space shuttle mission scheduling, demand flow manufacturing, and avionics communications

  18. Kinematics of Mid-Ocean Ridge Relative Motions in the Indo-Atlantic Frame of Reference: Passive and Active Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Forte, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    ridge parallel (N-S) motion in the past 30 Ma. Between 80 and 30 Ma, the midpoint of the Nazca-Pacific segment of the EPR moved ~2500 km parallel with the trend of the ridge. The absence of significant longitudinal motion of the EPR extends northward to the now subducted portion beneath eastern North America. We interpret this as an actively spreading ridge segment linked directly to and driven by active mantle upwelling associated with the mantle convective system.

  19. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the initial entry of hydrothermal seawater into deep levels of the oceanic crust, the effectiveness of hydrothermal circulation in cooling the crust, the geometry of hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the hydrothermal circulation and the magma chamber, the reaction of the oceanic crust with the seawater, and the identification of the hydrothermal fluid which alters a rock sample. Topics considered include the crack front, observation relevant to the crack front, the limitations of the crack front hypothesis, the observed pattern of hydrothermal alteration, the nature of the hydrothermal fluid, the physics of large scale convection, and convection through crack zones. Knowledge of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis is based on sampling of the hydrothermal fluid, indirect geophysical measurements of the oceanic crust, and studies of rocks which are believed to have undergone hydrothermal alteration at the ridge axis. Includes 2 drawings.

  20. Excellence in Physics Education Award: SCALE-UP, Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) Project combines curricula and a specially-designed instructional space to enhance learning. SCALE-UP students practice communication and teamwork skills while performing activities that enhance their conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This can be done with small or large classes and has been implemented at more than 250 institutions. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. SCALE-UP classtime is spent primarily on ``tangibles'' and ``ponderables''--hands-on measurements/observations and interesting questions. There are also computer simulations (called ``visibles'') and hypothesis-driven labs. Students sit at tables designed to facilitate group interactions. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Impressive learning gains have been measured at institutions across the US and internationally. This talk describes today's students, how lecturing got started, what happens in a SCALE-UP classroom, and how the approach has spread. The SCALE-UP project has greatly benefitted from numerous Grants made by NSF and FIPSE to NCSU and other institutions.

  1. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities in the USGS Ohio Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Shaffer, Kimberly H.

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been written for use by the Ohio Water Science Center in conducting water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Ohio Water Science Center for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Ohio Water Science Center quality-assurance plans for water-quality monitors, the microbiology laboratory, and surface-water and ground-water activities.

  2. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate....3 What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? A comprehensive... science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields to achieve foreign language...

  3. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate....3 What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? A comprehensive... science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields to achieve foreign language...

  4. Active-Learning versus Teacher-Centered Instruction for Learning Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of "acids and bases". Sample: The sample of this study was…

  5. MANUFACTURING FACILITY FOR ACTIVATED CARBON AND CERAMIC WATER FILTERS AT THE SONGHAI CENTER, BENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ceramic filters will be manufactured at the Songhai Center in Porto-Novo, Benin for cost-effective drinking water treatment. The efficiency of the ceramic filters will be improved by adding activated carbon cartridges to remove organic and inorganic impurities. The activate...

  6. Learner-Centered Activities from the DVD-Format "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Li-Yun

    This paper demonstrates how Taiwanese English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) college teachers and students collaborate and negotiate to design various learner-centered activities based on the Chinese film, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." These activities are intended to enhance students' listening and speaking abilities. The paper demonstrates eight…

  7. Primary centers and secondary concentrations of tectonic activity through time in the western hemisphere of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.C.; Dohm, J.M.; Golombek, M.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Franklin, B.J.; Tanaka, K.L.; Lias, J.; Peer, B.

    2001-01-01

    Five main stages of radial and concentric structures formed around Tharsis from the Noachian through the Amazonian as determined by geologic mapping of 24,452 structures within the stratigraphic framework of Mars and by testing their radial and concentric orientations. Tectonic activity peaked in the Noachian (stage 1) around the largest center, Claritas, an elongate center extending more than 20?? in latitude and defined by about half of the total grabens which are concentrated in the Syria Planum, Thaumasia, and Tempe Terra regions. During the Late Noachian and Early Hesperian (stage 2), extensional structures formed along the length of present-day Valles Marineris and in Thaumasia (with a secondary concentration near Warrego Vallis) radial to a region just to the south of the central margin of Valles Marineris. Early Hesperian (stage 3) radial grabens in Pavonis, Syria, Ulysses, and Tempe Terra and somewhat concentric wrinkle ridges in Lunae and Solis Plana and in Thaumasia, Sirenum, Memnonia, and Amazonis are centered northwest of Syria with secondary centers at Thaumasia, Tempe Terra, Ulysses Fossae, and western Valles Marineris. Late Hesperian/Early Amazonian (stage 4) structures around Alba Patera, the northeast trending alignment of Tharsis Montes, and Olympus Mons appears centered on Alba Patera. Stage 5 structures (Middle-Late Amazonian) represent the last pulse of Tharsis-related activity and are found around the large shield volcanoes and are centered near Pavonis Mons. Tectonic activity around Tharsis began in the Noachian and generally decreased through geologic time to the Amazonian. Statistically significant radial distributions of structures formed during each stage, centered at different locations within the higher elevations of Tharsis. Secondary centers of radial structures during many of the stages appear related to previously identified local magmatic centers that formed at different times and locations throughout Tharsis. Copyright 2001 by

  8. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W. |

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  9. The Spread of Aedes albopictus in Metropolitan France: Contribution of Environmental Drivers and Human Activities and Predictions for a Near Future

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Benjamin; Léger, Lucas; L’Ambert, Grégory; Lacour, Guillaume; Foussadier, Rémi; Besnard, Gilles; Barré-Cardi, Hélène; Simard, Frédéric; Fontenille, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of new territories by insect vector species that can transmit pathogens is one of the most important threats for human health. The spread of the mosquito Aedes albopictus in Europe is emblematic, because of its major role in the emergence and transmission of arboviruses such as dengue or chikungunya. Here, we modeled the spread of this mosquito species in France through a statistical framework taking advantage of a long-term surveillance dataset going back to the first observation of Ae. albopictus in the Metropolitan area. After validating the model, we show that human activities are especially important for mosquito dispersion while land use is a major factor for mosquito establishment. More importantly, we show that Ae. albopictus invasion is accelerating through time in this area, resulting in a geographic range extending further and further year after year. We also show that sporadic “jump” of Ae. albopictus in a new location far from the colonized area did not succeed in starting a new invasion front so far. Finally, we discuss on a potential adaptation to cooler climate and the risk of invasion into Northern latitudes. PMID:25962160

  10. The Spread of Aedes albopictus in Metropolitan France: Contribution of Environmental Drivers and Human Activities and Predictions for a Near Future.

    PubMed

    Roche, Benjamin; Léger, Lucas; L'Ambert, Grégory; Lacour, Guillaume; Foussadier, Rémi; Besnard, Gilles; Barré-Cardi, Hélène; Simard, Frédéric; Fontenille, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of new territories by insect vector species that can transmit pathogens is one of the most important threats for human health. The spread of the mosquito Aedes albopictus in Europe is emblematic, because of its major role in the emergence and transmission of arboviruses such as dengue or chikungunya. Here, we modeled the spread of this mosquito species in France through a statistical framework taking advantage of a long-term surveillance dataset going back to the first observation of Ae. albopictus in the Metropolitan area. After validating the model, we show that human activities are especially important for mosquito dispersion while land use is a major factor for mosquito establishment. More importantly, we show that Ae. albopictus invasion is accelerating through time in this area, resulting in a geographic range extending further and further year after year. We also show that sporadic "jump" of Ae. albopictus in a new location far from the colonized area did not succeed in starting a new invasion front so far. Finally, we discuss on a potential adaptation to cooler climate and the risk of invasion into Northern latitudes. PMID:25962160

  11. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  12. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  13. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  14. Barriers to physical activity in an on-site corporate fitness center.

    PubMed

    Schwetschenau, Heather M; O'Brien, William H; Cunningham, Christopher J L; Jex, Steve M

    2008-10-01

    Many corporations provide employees the option of participating in on-site fitness centers, but utilization rates are low. Perceived barriers to physical activity have been established as important correlates of physical activity, and recent research indicates that barriers may vary across settings. Work-site fitness centers may present unique barriers to participation, but there are currently no standardized measures that assess such barriers. Eighty-eight employees of a midwestern corporation completed a survey designed to identify and evaluate the extent to which barriers influence participation in an on-site corporate fitness center. Regression analyses revealed that external environmental barriers (e.g., inadequate exercise facilities) significantly accounted for not joining the fitness center, and for decreased duration of visits to the facility among members. Internal barriers (e.g., feeling embarrassed to exercise around coworkers) significantly accounted for frequency of fitness center visits among members. This corporate specific measure may lead to more effective interventions aimed to increase use of on-site corporate fitness centers. PMID:18837631

  15. Reconstruction of the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 28° to 29°N: Implications for evolution of young oceanic lithosphere at slow-spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, Heather; Patriat, Philippe

    2004-09-01

    We reconstruct the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between 28° and 29°N from 1 to 10 Ma at intervals of 1 Myr for the purpose of investigating evolution of young oceanic lithosphere morphology and its variation through time using an innovative method that combines seafloor subsidence correction with interpolated isochrons and rotation poles. Reconstruction results are consistent with formation of abyssal hills every 1 to 2 Myr in 2-3 Myr old lithosphere at the outer edge of the ridge mountains as a result of transition from dynamic regime near the axis to isostatic regime of the flanks. The oblique passage of structures formed at the axial valley walls through this transition zone may play a role in the development of inside corner high bathymetry. Asymmetric juxtaposition of abyssal hill morphology in reconstruction is indicative of independent formation and evolution of the morphotectonic fabric on opposing flanks. The two major factors affecting asymmetric ridge flank morphology are found to be sense of axial offset and fluctuation of magmatic activity at the segment scale. Sense of axial offset determines the relative distribution of inside and outside corner bathymetry on the flanks. Enhanced magma supply and associated segment propagation may contribute to half-spreading rate asymmetry, accretion of thicker crust, and formation of larger abyssal hills on the faster spreading flank. Consistent alignment in reconstruction of the base of the steep walls bounding inside corner bathymetry confirms that they mark the boundaries between segments on the flanks and that the deep sediment-filled basins, typically identified as discordant zones, are attributable to outside corner bathymetry.

  16. DISCOVERY OF THE RECOMBINING PLASMA IN THE SOUTH OF THE GALACTIC CENTER: A RELIC OF THE PAST GALACTIC CENTER ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Nobukawa, M.; Uchida, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuru, T. G.; Koyama, K.; Murakami, H.; Uchiyama, H.

    2013-08-10

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter {sup G}C South{sup )} has an angular size of {approx}42' Multiplication-Sign 16' centered at (l, b) {approx} (0. Degree-Sign 0, - 1. Degree-Sign 4) and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at {approx}2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density Multiplication-Sign elapsed time) of 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} s cm{sup -3}. The absorption column density of GC South is consistent with that toward the GC region. Thus, GC South is likely to be located in the GC region ({approx}8 kpc distance). The size of the plasma, the mean density, and the thermal energy are estimated to be {approx}97 pc Multiplication-Sign 37 pc, 0.16 cm{sup -3}, and 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, respectively. We discuss possible origins of the recombination-dominant plasma as a relic of past activity in the GC region.

  17. Resources for physical activity in cancer centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Kristina H; Carr, Lucas J; Stevinson, Clare

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) has many benefits for cancer survivors. However, the available PA resources for survivors at cancer centers throughout the United States are undocumented. The current study surveyed major cancer centers concerning the availability and types (e.g., facilities, programs, counseling, information resources) of PA resources available. Of supportive care services, PA resources were the least commonly reported. Significant correlations were found among availability of PA resources and other supportive care services. Although many cancer centers reported offering PA programming, formal and informal PA guidance and support seem to fall on oncology nurses and other clinicians. Oncology nurses should be reminded that they may be one of the only sources of PA guidance available to survivors at cancer centers. PMID:24305494

  18. The effects of hip external rotator exercises and toe-spread exercises on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking in subjects with pronated foot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toe-spread (TS) exercises and hip external rotator strengthening exercises for pronated feet on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy adults with no present or previous pain, no past history of surgery on the foot or the ankle, and no foot deformities. Ten subjects performed hip external rotator strengthening exercises and TS exercises and the remaining ten subjects performed only TS exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] Less change in navicular drop height occurred in the group that performed hip external rotator exercises than in the group that performed only TS exercises. The group that performed only TS exercises showed increased abductor hallucis muscle activity during both stair-climbing and -descending, and the group that performed hip external rotator exercises showed increased muscle activities of the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis during stair-climbing and increased muscle activity of only the abductor hallucis during stair-descending after exercise. [Conclusion] Stair-walking can be more effectively performed if the hip external rotator muscle is strengthened when TS exercises are performed for the pronated foot. PMID:27134364

  19. Impact of carbon co-implantation on boron distribution and activation in silicon studied by atom probe tomography and spreading resistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Takamizawa, Hisashi; Inoue, Koji; Yano, Fumiko; Kudo, Shuichi; Nishida, Akio; Toyama, Takeshi; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The impact of carbon (C) co-implantation on boron (B) activation in crystalline silicon was investigated. The detailed distribution of B and C atoms and B activation ratios dependent on the C ion-implantation energies were examined based on three-dimensional spatial mappings of B and C obtained by atom probe tomography and from depth profiles of their concentrations from secondary ion mass spectrometry and depth profiles of carrier concentrations with spreading resistance measurements. At all C implantation energies (8, 15, and 30 keV), B out-diffusion during activation annealing was reduced, so that more B atoms were observed in the C co-implanted samples. The carrier concentration was decreased throughout the entire implanted region for C implantation energies of 15 and 30 keV, although it was only increased at greater depths for C co-implantation at 8 keV. Two different effects of C co-implantation, (I) reduction of B out-diffusion and (II) influence of B activation, were confirmed.

  20. A center open to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, L.; Vaquerizo, A.; García-Villadangos, M.

    2015-05-01

    The view to the public of a research center depends, of course, on the quality of its scientific activity but also, to a large extent, on the communication of results and spreading from the center itself. The Center for Astrobiology (CAB, CSIC-INTA) has maintained for some years a place among the leading Spanish scientific centers and the proof is his continued appearance in the media. In this communication we will give an overview of the activities of the Unit for Scientific Culture of CAB to achieve that goal.

  1. The potential role of an unregulated coastal anthropogenic activity in facilitating the spread of a non-indigenous biofoulant.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Eilir Hedd; Richardson, Christopher Alan

    2012-01-01

    Despite an exponential rise in anthropogenically-mediated transfers of non-indigenous species during the last 150 years, several coastal anthropogenic activities remain unregulated under current legislation frameworks. This study investigates the potential role of commercial periwinkle (Littorina littorea) harvesting as an unregulated facilitator of both small- and large-scale geographic range expansion of an invasive oyster epibiont (Ostrea chilensis) within the Menai Strait (North Wales, UK) and beyond. The frequency of oyster-fouled periwinkles was greatest in areas of high adult oyster abundance and restricted to large, market-sized periwinkles (>20 mm) inhabiting the low shore. Active efforts by commercial collectors to reject oyster-fouled periwinkles were found to be inadequate, with oysters of all sizes observed within collected hauls. Whilst the survival of fouled and unfouled periwinkles was comparable under post-collection refrigerated conditions, a significant decrease in both mobility and flesh content was associated with the presence of oyster epibionts. Survival of all but the smallest oyster epibionts under post-collection refrigerated conditions enhances the possibility of accidental non-indigenous oyster transfers. Better interventions during both initial visual inspection and post-griddling stages are recommended, as well as the development of techniques that kill off all non-indigenous epibionts, whilst leaving the freshness and marketability of the periwinkles uncompromised. PMID:22794077

  2. Allosteric mutants show that PrfA activation is dispensable for vacuole escape but required for efficient spread and Listeria survival in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deshayes, Caroline; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Cain, Robert J; Scortti, Mariela; de las Heras, Aitor; Pietras, Zbigniew; Luisi, Ben F; Núñez Miguel, Ricardo; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator PrfA controls key virulence determinants of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. PrfA-dependent gene expression is strongly induced within host cells. While the basis of this activation is unknown, the structural homology of PrfA with the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the finding of constitutively activated PrfA* mutants suggests it may involve ligand-induced allostery. Here, we report the identification of a solvent-accessible cavity within the PrfA N-terminal domain that may accommodate an activating ligand. The pocket occupies a similar position to the cAMP binding site in Crp but lacks the cyclic nucleotide-anchoring motif and has its entrance on the opposite side of the β-barrel. Site-directed mutations in this pocket impaired intracellular PrfA-dependent gene activation without causing extensive structural/functional alterations to PrfA. Two substitutions, L48F and Y63W, almost completely abolished intracellular virulence gene induction and thus displayed the expected phenotype for allosteric activation-deficient PrfA mutations. Neither PrfAallo substitution affected vacuole escape and initial intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes in epithelial cells and macrophages but caused defective cell-to-cell spread and strong attenuation in mice. Our data support the hypothesis that PrfA is allosterically activated during intracellular infection and identify the probable binding site for the effector ligand. They also indicate that PrfA allosteric activation is not required for early intracellular survival but is essential for full Listeria virulence and colonization of host tissues. PMID:22646689

  3. Introductory Astronomy Student-Centered Active Learning at The George Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    The Physics Department at the George Washington University has been successfully using student-centered active learning (SCALE-UP) in physics classes since 2008. In Fall 2011, we began implementing introductory (non-majors) astronomy classes taught in the student-centered active learning mode. Class time is devoted to engaging in hands-on activities and laboratories, and tackling thought-provoking questions and problems. Students work together in small groups to gain a deeper understanding of the material. Multiple instructors circulate to answer questions and engage students in additional contemplation of the material. Research has shown that students who are engaged in this manner have an increased conceptual understanding and are better able to solve problems. This talk will describe our methods, our successes and the associated challenges of integrating active learning into courses entitled “Stars, Planets and Life” and “Introduction to the Cosmos.”

  4. Accomplishments, Administrative Structure, and Activities of the Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center.

    The report lists the staff and states the activities of the Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center (SAEDC). Work accomplished is reviewed, including work on the following; compiled speech output for the DOTSYS Information System; monotype reader; braille embosser; folding canes; pathsounder; Perkins brailler; evaluation of braille; speeded…

  5. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  6. Students´ Perspectives on eLearning Activities in Person-Centered, Blended Learning Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselberger, David; Motsching, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Blended or hybrid learning has become a frequent practice in higher education. In this article our primary research interest was to find out how students perceived eLearning activities in blended learning courses based on the person-centered paradigm. Through analyzing the content of a series of semi-structured interviews we found out that…

  7. [Obstetrical activity of a regional hospital center in the northern Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Ribault, L

    1989-05-01

    Rupture of the uterus remains, in some countries, a frequent occurrence. This report of the obstetrical activity of a Regional Hospital Center in the Ivory Coast, demonstrates all the difficulties of a disconcerting pathology for visiting physicians, not used to this type of accident in Europe. PMID:2544976

  8. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH...

  9. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  10. Can Physical Education and Physical Activity Outcomes Be Developed Simultaneously Using a Game-Centered Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Andrew; Christensen, Erin; Eather, Narelle; Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John; Keay, Jeanne; Lubans, David

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a pilot intervention using a game-centered approach for improvement of physical activity (PA) and physical education (PE) outcomes simultaneously, and if this had an impact on enjoyment of PE. A group-randomized controlled trial with a 7-week wait-list control group was conducted…

  11. Individual Information-Centered Approach for Handling Physical Activity Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Minsoo; Rowe, David A.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Robinson, Terrance S.; Mahar, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate individual information (II)-centered methods for handling missing data, using data samples of 118 middle-aged adults and 91 older adults equipped with Yamax SW-200 pedometers and Actigraph accelerometers for 7 days. We used a semisimulation approach to create six data sets: three physical activity outcome…

  12. Significant Centers of Tectonic Activity as Identified by Wrinkle Ridges for the Western Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R.C.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Golombek, M. P.; Franklin, B. J.; Dohm, J. M.; Lias, J.

    2000-01-01

    The western hemisphere region of Mars has been the site of numerous scientific investigations regarding its tectonic evolution. For this region of Mars, the dominant tectonic region is the Tharsis province. Tharsis is characterized by an enormous system of radiating grabens and a circumferential system of wrinkle ridges. Past investigations of grabens associated with Tharsis have identified specific centers of tectonic activity. A recent structural analysis of the western hemisphere region of Mars which includes the Tharsis region, utilized 25,000 structures to determine the history of local and regional centers of tectonic activity based primarily on the spatial and temporal relationships of extensional features. This investigation revealed that Tharsis is more structurally complex (heterogeneous) than has been previously identified: it consists of numerous regional and local centers of tectonic activity (some are more dominant and/or more long lived than others). Here we use the same approach as Anderson et al. to determine whether the centers of tectonic activity that formed the extensional features also contributed to wrinkle ridge (compressional) formation.

  13. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct? 350.32 Section 350.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH...

  14. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  15. Paris Observatory Analysis Center (OPAR): Report on Activities, January - December 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Sebastien; Barache, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We report on activities of the Paris Observatory VLBI Analysis Center (OPAR) for calendar year 2012 concerning the development of operational tasks, the development of our Web site, and various other activities: monitoring of the Earth's free core nutation, measuring of the post-seismic displacements of some stations, and the analysis of the recent IVS R&D sessions, including observations of quasars close to the Sun.

  16. Partial spread OFDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghariani, Ali; Zoltowski, Michael D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, partial spread OFDM system has been presented and its performance has been studied when different detection techniques are employed, such as minimum mean square error (MMSE), grouped Maximum Likelihood (ML) and approximated integer quadratic programming (IQP) techniques . The performance study also includes applying two different spreading matrices, Hadamard and Vandermonde. Extensive computer simulation have been implemented and important results show that partial spread OFDM system improves the BER performance and the frequency diversity of OFDM compared to both non spread and full spread systems. The results from this paper also show that partial spreading technique combined with suboptimal detector could be a better solution for applications that require low receiver complexity and high information detectability.

  17. From Rifting of a volcanic province to Oceanic Spreading in the Andaman Sea, South-East Asia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, A.; Singh, S. C.; Klinger, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Andaman Sea is an enigmatic feature in the Indian Ocean region. It contains the volcanic provinces of Alcock and Sewell Rises and an active spreading center. The recent rifting in the Andaman Sea initiated 4.5 Ma ago, rifting the Alcock and Seawell Rises that were formed by extensive volcanism between 23-16 Ma. The spreading started with a full spreading rate of 1.6 cm/yr and increased to 3.8 cm/yr in the last 2.5 Ma. We have access to high-resolution deep seismic reflection data crossing the whole spreading center from the rifted volcanic provinces to the spreading center. The data show the whole oceanic crust up to the Moho. The Andaman Sea is covered with a thick pile of sediments that record the tectonic history of the rift system up to the spreading axis, allowing to decipher the whole process from rifting to spreading for the first time. We see a very rapid phase of transition from the rifting of the rises to the spreading in less than 20 km. Then a succession of at least 7 half-grabens is well recorded by the sediments on both sides of the spreading center. These half grabens are separated by outward tilted low angle detachment faults, which form the base of steeply dipping normal faults due to stretching. These low angle faults seem to connect with axial magma chambers that control evolution of the rift valley. We find that new detachment faults develop every 350,000 years, forming a new rift valley. The images of active normal faults within the central rift valley allow us to quantify the formation of oceanic crust by tectonic versus magmatic processes.

  18. Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Report on Activities (UCLA/MIT), 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Carter

    2011-04-18

    The final 'phaseout' year of the CMPD ended July 2010; a no cost extension was requested until May 2011 in order to enable the MIT subcontract funds to be fully utilized. Research progress over this time included verification and validation activities for the BOUT and BOUT++ code, studies of spontaneous reconnection in the VTF facility at MIT, and studies of the interaction between Alfven waves and drift waves in LAPD. The CMPD also hosted the 6th plasma physics winter school in 2010 (jointly with the NSF frontier center the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, significant funding came from NSF for this most recent iteration of the Winter School).

  19. Introductory Astronomy Student-Centered Active Learning at the George Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, B. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Physics Department at the George Washington University has been successfully using student-centered active learning (SCALE-UP) in physics classes since 2008. Recently (since fall 2011), we have been developing and implementing introductory (non-majors) astronomy classes taught in the student-centered active learning mode. Class time is devoted to engaging in hands-on activities and laboratories and tackling questions and problems in a workbook. Students work in small groups, and multiple instructors circulate to answer questions and engage students in the material. Research has shown that students who are engaged in this manner have an increased conceptual understanding of the material. In developing our “Stars, Planets and Life” course into an interactive class, we encountered many challenges, but there have also been positive outcomes. Improvements to this class are ongoing, and in fall of 2013 we will begin full implementation of SCALE-UP in our “Introduction to the Cosmos” course.

  20. Client-centered home modifications improve daily activity performance of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Susan; Landsbaum, Amanda; Palmer, Janice; Somerville, Emily K.; Morris, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Remaining at home is a high priority for many older adults, but the capacity to “age in place” often is threatened by environmental barriers. Purpose To describe a client-centered occupational therapy, home modification intervention program and examine the impact of the intervention on daily activity performance over time. Methods Using a competence-environmental press framework, a client-centered home modification program for older adults was implemented. In this quasi-experimental, single group prospective study, participants’ subjective ratings of daily activity performance were evaluated before and after the intervention (baseline/post/post). Findings After home modification, participants’ perception of their daily activity performance at home improved significantly and was maintained 2 years post-modification. Implications Home modification may benefit older adults attempting to age in place. PMID:19757729

  1. 75 FR 7474 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate February 3, 2010. On January 26, 2010 CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company... & Compliance, CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, P.O. Box 21734, Shreveport, Louisiana 71151, or...

  2. Cdc42 and p190RhoGAP activation by CCN2 regulates cell spreading and polarity and induces actin disassembly in migrating keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Lee, Cameron Cy; Hackl, Florian; Caterson, Edward J; Junker, Johan Pe; Gerdin, Bengt; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-06-01

    Cell migration requires spatiotemporal integration of signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. In response to a migration-promoting agent, cells begin to polarise and extend protrusions in the direction of migration. These cytoskeletal rearrangements are orchestrated by a variety of proteins, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the Rho family of GTPases. CCN2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, has emerged as a regulator of cell migration but the mechanism by which CCN2 regulates keratinocyte function is not well understood. In this article, we sought to elucidate the basic mechanism of CCN2-induced cell migration in human keratinocytes. Immunohistochemical staining was used to demonstrate that treatment with CCN2 induces a migratory phenotype through actin disassembly, spreading of lamellipodia and re-orientation of the Golgi. In vitro assays were used to show that CCN2-induced cell migration is dependent on FAK, RhoA and Cdc42, but independent of Rac1. CCN2-treated keratinocytes displayed increased Cdc42 activity and decreased RhoA activity up to 12 hours post-treatment, with upregulation of p190RhoGAP. An improved understanding of how CCN2 regulates cell migration may establish the foundation for future therapeutics in fibrotic and neoplastic diseases. PMID:25185742

  3. Foraging activity and seasonal food preference of Linepithema micans (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), a species associated with the spread of Eurhizococcus brasiliensis (Hemiptera: Margarodidae).

    PubMed

    Nondillo, Aline; Ferrari, Leonardo; Lerin, Sabrina; Bueno, Odair Correa; Bottona, Marcos

    2014-08-01

    Linepithema micans (Forel) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is the main ant species responsible for the spread of Eurhizococcus brasiliensis (Wille) (Hemiptera: Margarodidae), a soil scale that damages vine plants in southern Brazil. The daily foraging activity of L. micans and its seasonal preference for protein- and carbohydrate-based foods were evaluated. The study was carried out in a greenhouse using seedlings of the Paulsen 1103 rootstock (Vitis berlandieri x Vitis rupestris) planted individually in pots and infested with colonies of L. micans. To determine the daily foraging activity and seasonal preference, a cricket (Gryllus sp.) and a 70% solution of inverted sugar and water were offered once a month for 12 mo. The ants foraging on each food source were counted hourly for 24 h. L. micans foraged from dusk until the end of the next morning, with higher intensity in the spring and summer. Workers of L. micans showed changes in food preference during the year, with a predominance of protein-based food during winter and spring and carbohydrate-based food during autumn. The implications of this behavior for control of the species with the use of toxic baits are discussed. PMID:25195426

  4. Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  5. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  6. Earth Science Data Archive and Access at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), as an integral part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), is the official source of data for several important earth remote sensing missions. These include the Sea-viewing Wide-Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) launched in August 1997, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) launched in November 1997, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) scheduled for launch in mid 1999 as part of the EOS AM-1 instrumentation package. The data generated from these missions supports a host of users in the hydrological, land biosphere and oceanographic research and applications communities. The volume and nature of the data present unique challenges to an Earth science data archive and distribution system such as the DAAC. The DAAC system receives, archives and distributes a large number of standard data products on a daily basis, including data files that have been reprocessed with updated calibration data or improved analytical algorithms. A World Wide Web interface is provided allowing interactive data selection and automatic data subscriptions as distribution options. The DAAC also creates customized and value-added data products, which allow additional user flexibility and reduced data volume. Another significant part of our overall mission is to provide ancillary data support services and archive support for worldwide field campaigns designed to validate the results from the various satellite-derived measurements. In addition to direct data services, accompanying documentation, WWW links to related resources, support for EOSDIS data formats, and informed response to inquiries are routinely provided to users. The current GDAAC WWW search and order system is being restructured to provide users with a simplified, hierarchical access to data. Data Browsers have been developed for several data sets to aid users in ordering data. These Browsers allow users to specify

  7. Flame spread across liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William

    1995-01-01

    Recent reviews of our understanding of flame spread across liquids show that there are many unresolved issues regarding the phenomenology and causal mechanisms affecting ignition susceptibility, flame spread characteristics, and flame spread rates. One area of discrepancy is the effect of buoyancy in both the uniform and pulsating spread regimes. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity (1g) and microgravity (micro g) experiments; and (2) numerical modeling at different gravitational levels. Of special interest to this work, as discussed at the previous workshop, is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread occurs in micro g. Microgravity offers a unique ability to modify and control the gas-phase flow pattern by utilizing a forced air flow over the pool surface.

  8. Distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by myoglobin with a designed heme active center.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Du, Ke-Jie; Gao, Shu-Qin; He, Bo; Wen, Ge-Bo; Tan, Xiangshi; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse biological functions, of which myoglobin (Mb) is a representative protein. In this study, the O2 carrier Mb was shown to cleave double stranded DNA upon aerobic dithiothreitol-induced reduction, which is fine-tuned by an additional distal histidine, His29 or His43, engineered in the heme active center. Spectroscopic (UV-vis and EPR) and inhibition studies suggested that free radicals including singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are responsible for efficient DNA cleavage via an oxidative cleavage mechanism. On the other hand, L29E Mb, with a distinct heme active center involving three water molecules in the met form, was found to exhibit an excellent DNA cleavage activity that was not depending on O2. Inhibition and ligation studies demonstrated for the first time that L29E Mb cleaves double stranded DNA into both the nicked circular and linear forms via a hydrolytic cleavage mechanism, which resembles native endonucleases. This study provides valuable insights into the distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by heme proteins, and lays down a base for creating artificial DNA endonucleases by rational design of heme proteins. Moreover, this study suggests that the diverse functions of heme proteins can be fine-tuned by rational design of the heme active center with a hydrogen-bonding network. PMID:26775281

  9. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care. PMID:22818731

  10. Morphotectonic fabrics of major spreading centers, subduction zones and transform faults in the southern hemisphere -Beagle 2003 cruise by R/V Mirai the round trip in the southern hemisphere-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, W.; Fujioka, K.; Kimura, R.; Okumura, S.; Fujiwara, T.

    2004-12-01

    Precise bathymetric surveys of the world ocean has been made it possible to establish continental drift, sea-floor spearheading and plate tectonics. However the data have mostly been restricted from the oceans in the northern hemisphere. The precise submarine bathymetric data from the southern hemisphere are quite scarce because of the long distance from the major countries and of being always severe sea conditions with bad weather for the bathymetric swath mapping. Well-surveyed areas of the southern hemisphere are the Indian triple junction, SW and SE Indian Ridges, Southern East Pacific Rise from 13\\deg S to 20\\deg S and Scotia arc-trench-backarc system. We had not been known about the vast area of the southern hemisphere. We had a bathymetric survey around the southern hemisphere during the cruise of BEAGLE 2003. The project BEAGLE 2003 started from Brisbane, on 2003 Aug and ended at Fremantle, on Feb 2004 with a great success. In the South Pacific Ocean the line crosses on the 28\\deg S - 32.5\\deg S latitude from Brisbane to Valparaiso via Papeete and in the South Atlantic Ocean on the 30\\deg S latitude from Santos to Cape Town and in the Indian Ocean on the 20\\deg S latitude from Madagascar to Fremantle via Mauritius Island, respectively. We had a precise bathymetric survey by using the narrow multi beam system (SeaBeam 2112) that is installed in the JAMSTEC R/V Mirai. Bathymetric survey lines cross the Tonga-Kermadec Arc-Trench and backarc system, Louisville Ridge, East Pacific Rise spreading center, Peru-Chile Trench, southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Central Indian Ridge, Ninety East ridge and many other oceanic plateaus and seamounts. We had obtained a narrow band data on the morphologic features of the ridges, trenches, seamounts and oceanic plateaus and we compared the data with those from ETOPO2 that was distributed by Sandwell and Smith (1996). These data offer significant information on the plate tectonics and plume tectonics if we think about the

  11. Timing of igneous accretion, composition, and temporal relation of the Kassandra-Sithonia rift-spreading center within the eastern Vardar suture zone, Northern Greece: insights into Jurassic arc/back-arc systems evolution at the Eurasian plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Nikolay; Marchev, Peter; Moritz, Robert; Filipov, Petyo

    2015-10-01

    In the Hellenides of northern Greece, the Kassandra-Sithonia and Central Chalkidiki ophiolites constitute the Vardar suture zone against the Serbo-Macedonian margin of Eurasia. The mafic-intermediate to acid members in the crustal section of the Kassandra-Sithonia ophiolites have N- and E-MORB signatures compatible with an origin in a back-arc spreading center. The MORB mantle source has received subduction zone input from the nearby Paikon arc system as revealed by LILE and LREE enrichments. A diorite from the Gerakini complex presumably belonging to the Central Chalkidiki ophiolites shows more enriched HFSE and REE patterns relative to MORB and Na-rich character compared to the Kassandra-Sithonia ophiolites. The Sithonia ophiolite crystallization spans from 159 to 149 Ma, and the Gerakini complex diorite crystallized at 173 Ma as derived from new U-Pb zircon geochronology. The main cluster of Permo-Carboniferous, a small cluster of Neoproterozoic-Cambrian and few Proterozoic, Ordovician, Devonian, Triassic and Middle Jurassic inherited zircons derive from the Serbo-Macedonian margin units. Thus, a Late Jurassic ca. 10 Ma lasting igneous accretion of the Kassandra-Sithonia back-arc crust within the eastern Vardar zone is now well constrained and corroborated by Berriasian-Early Valanginian supra-ophiolite cover limestones. Instead of an affinity to the Central Chalkidiki ophiolites, the Gerakini diorite exhibits chemical similarity to the Chortiatis arc magmatic suite of the Circum-Rhodope belt within the eastern Vardar zone. The Gerakini diorite predates the Sithonia ophiolite in which the Chortiatis arc suite supplied Middle Jurassic inherited zircons. The Chortiatis arc compared with arc-related Evros ophiolites of the Circum-Rhodope belt in Thrace region shows the same 173-160 Ma life span and tectonic setting, implying the extension of the arc systems across the north Aegean Sea. Based on these new temporal constraints, a tectonic scenario of Jurassic

  12. Spreading depolarization in the brain of Drosophila is induced by inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase and mitigated by a decrease in activity of protein kinase G.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rodríguez, Esteban C; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-09-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is characterized by a massive redistribution of ions accompanied by an arrest in electrical activity that slowly propagates through neural tissue. It has been implicated in numerous human pathologies, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, and thus the elucidation of control mechanisms underlying the phenomenon could have many health benefits. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of SD in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model system, whereby cellular mechanisms can be dissected using molecular genetic approaches. Propagating waves of SD were reliably induced by disrupting the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o), either directly or by inhibition of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with ouabain. The disturbance was monitored by recording the characteristic surges in [K(+)]o using K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes or by monitoring brain activity by measuring direct current potential. With the use of wild-type flies, we show that young adults are more resistant to SD compared with older adults, evidenced by shorter bouts of SD activity and attenuated [K(+)]o disturbances. Furthermore, we show that the susceptibility to SD differs between wild-type flies and w1118 mutants, demonstrating that our ouabain model is influenced by genetic strain. Lastly, flies with low levels of protein kinase G (PKG) had increased latencies to onset of both ouabain-induced SD and anoxic depolarization compared with flies with higher levels. Our findings implicate the PKG pathway as a modulator of SD in the fly brain, and given the conserved nature of the signaling pathway, it could likely play a similar role during SD in the mammalian central nervous system. PMID:27358319

  13. In-situ resource utilization activities at the NASA Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes theoretical and experimental research activities at the NASA Space Engineering Research Center aimed at realizing significant cost savings in space missions through the use of locally available resources. The fundamental strategy involves idea generation, scientific screening, feasibility demonstrations, small-scale process plant design, extensive testing, scale-up to realistic production rates, associated controls, and 'packaging', while maintaining sufficient flexibility to respond to national needs in terms of specific applications. Aside from training, the principal activities at the Center include development of a quantitative figure-of-merit to quickly assess the overall mission impact of individual components that constantly change with advancing technologies, extensive tests on a single-cell test bed to produce oxygen from carbon dioxide, and the use of this spent stream to produce methane.

  14. DETERMINATION OF THE POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION FOR THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FROM ON-ORBIT DATA AND LIMITS ON PAIR HALOS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: mar0@uw.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS and others

    2013-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to detect photons with energies from Almost-Equal-To 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The pre-launch response functions of the LAT were determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizing the angular distribution of reconstructed photons as a function of energy and geometry in the detector is determined here from two years of on-orbit data by examining the distributions of {gamma} rays from pulsars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Above 3 GeV, the PSF is found to be broader than the pre-launch PSF. We checked for dependence of the PSF on the class of {gamma}-ray source and observation epoch and found none. We also investigated several possible spatial models for pair-halo emission around BL Lac AGNs. We found no evidence for a component with spatial extension larger than the PSF and set upper limits on the amplitude of halo emission in stacked images of low- and high-redshift BL Lac AGNs and the TeV blazars 1ES0229+200 and 1ES0347-121.

  15. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bloxham, Saul; Barter, Phil; Scragg, Slafka; Peers, Charles; Jane, Ben; Layden, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person’s Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. PMID:27417616

  16. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bloxham, Saul; Barter, Phil; Scragg, Slafka; Peers, Charles; Jane, Ben; Layden, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person's Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. PMID:27417616

  17. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  18. Flexibility versus “rigidity” of the functional architecture of AChE active center

    PubMed Central

    Shafferman, Avigdor; Barak, Dov; Stein, Dana; Kronman, Chanoch; Velan, Baruch; Greig, Nigel H.; Ordentlich, Arie

    2008-01-01

    Functional architecture of the AChE active center appears to be characterized by both structural “rigidity”, necessary to stabilize the catalytic triad as well as by flexibility in accommodating the different, high affinity AChE ligands. These seemingly conflicting structural properties of the active center are demonstrated through combination of structural methods with kinetic studies of the enzyme and its mutant derivatives with plethora of structurally diverse ligands and in particular with series of stereoselective covalent and noncovalent AChE ligands. Thus, steric perturbation of the acyl pocket precipitates in a pronounced stereoselectivity toward methylphosphonates by disrupting the stabilizing environment of the catalytic histidine rather than through steric exclusion demonstrating the functional importance of the “rigid” environment of the catalytic machinery. The acyl pocket, the cation-binding subsite (Trp86) and the peripheral anionic subsite were also found to be directly involved in HuAChE stereoselectivity toward charged chiral phosphonates, operating through differential positioning of the ligand cationic moiety within the active center. Residue Trp86 is also a part of the “hydrophobic patch” which seems flexible enough to accommodate the structurally diverse ligands like tacrine, galanthamine and the two diastereomers of huperzine A. Also, we have recently discovered further aspects of the role of both the unique structure and the flexibility of the “hydrophobic patch” in determining the reactivity and stereoselectivity of HuAChE toward certain carbamates including analogs of physostigmine. In these cases the ligands are accommodated mostly through hydrophobic interactions and their stereoselectivity delineates precisely the steric limits of the pocket. Hence, the HuAChE stereoselectivity provides a sensitive tool in the in depth exploration of the functional architecture of the active center. These studies suggest that the

  19. Overview of Active Flow Control Actuator Development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Hepner, Timothy E.; Jones, Gregory S.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the actuator development work that is currently underway at NASA Langley Research Center in the context of some of the Active Flow Control research being conducted at NASA Langley. The actuator development effort has provided a focused, centralized location for this work within NASA Langley. The multidisciplinary team approach utilized in this effort has allowed input from multiple disciplines on how various actuator challenges can be addressed and has lead to some unique approaches in actuation.

  20. Features of the electronic structure of the active center of an HbS molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D. Yu.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Features of the electronic structure of the nonprotein part of the mutant form of the human hemoglobin molecule, HbS, are studied along with the magnetic state of the iron ion that is the "nucleus" of the active center of the molecule. It is found that the mutant form of the HbS molecule differs from a normal hemoglobin molecule by the distortion of the local environment of the iron ion, which changes the energy level splitting by a crystal field. As a result of ab initio calculations, the magnetic transition in the iron atom from the high-spin state to the low-spin state upon the addition of molecular oxygen to hemoglobin molecule is reproduced. It is established for the first time that a change in the crystal and electronic structure of the active center as a result of a mutation can lead to a substantial change in the energy of the bond between the active center of the hemoglobin molecule and an oxygen molecule.

  1. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  2. Methane activation by metal-free Lewis acid centers only - a computational design and mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gongli; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-20

    In the present computational study by using the density functional theory (DFT) method, we found that silylboranes, which have metal-free Lewis acid centers only, can break the C-H bond of the exceedingly unreactive methane. The study shows that, unlike the activation mechanism of small molecules by the frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), the Lewis acidic boron center plays a key role in breaking the C-H bond of methane. Detailed analyses indicate that in the transition state the C-H bond is substantially activated by the empty 2p orbital of boron (2pB) primarily due to the orbital interaction between the C-H σ-bonding orbital and 2pB. On the other hand, the orbital interaction between the C-H σ-anti-bonding orbital and the B-Si σ-bonding orbital also contributes to the activation but plays a minor role. A statistical method was used to find the relationship between the reactivity of 57 silylboranes and their electronic properties. The results indicate that the boron center does have more prominent effect on the reactivity, especially the occupancy (n) and energy (ε) of 2pB, where lowering n and ε will increase the reactivity of the silylboranes. Based on the activation mechanism and taking kinetic and thermodynamic possibilities, as well as the possible side reactions, into consideration, three silylboranes suitable for methane activation under mild experimental conditions were designed. The analogous line of thought can be used as a hint for further experimental realizations, even under ambient conditions. This strategy can also be expected to be transplanted to more extensive C-H activation of hydrocarbons. PMID:27064140

  3. Episodic sea-floor spreading in the Southern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalki, Khalid A.; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    The Red Sea represents the most spectacular example of a juvenile ocean basin on the modern Earth. Synthesis of regional aeromagnetic data, gravity data, seismic refraction data coupled with structural mapping from the Farasan Islands suggest that the opening of the Red Sea is complex and episodic. Modeling of magnetic and gravity data constrained by seismic refraction data reveals the Arabian Shelf is underlain by oceanic and transitional crust and that mafic diking and intrusions are focused at the continental-transitional crust boundary. This relationship is interpreted to indicate that early Miocene diking along the Arabian Escarpment heralded termination of oceanic basin formation and a shift in the locus of extension focused from a central mid-ocean ridge spreading center to the continental-transitional crust zone. Uplift along the Arabian Escarpment caused erosion and Middle to Late Miocene sedimentation of the Farasan Bank onto existing oceanic crust, suggesting that the extensive sedimentary banks of the southern Red Sea are not passive margins. Re-initiation of spreading occurred at ca 5 Ma. Pliocene to Pleistocene Shelf reef systems (Farasan Islands), developed on the flanks of the spreading ridge, are extensively overprinted by normal faults, suggesting that not all crustal extension is accommodated by active spreading.

  4. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  5. Reasearch Activities for the Establishment of The Center for Sustainable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Michael Seliger

    2005-08-08

    In 2003, Bronx Community College received a grant of $481,000 through the United States Department of Energy for the purpose of conducting research- related activities leading to the creation of the Center for Sustainable Energy at Bronx Community College. The award, which was administered on behalf of Bronx Community College by the Research Foundation of the City University of New York, was initially for one year, from October 2003 through September 30, 2004. It received a no-cost extension to June 30, 2005. This report presents a summary of the activities and accomplishments attributable to the award.

  6. Activities of the Japanese space weather forecast center at Communications Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Watari, Shinichi; Tomita, Fumihiko

    2002-12-01

    The International Space Environment Service (ISES) is an international organization for space weather forecasts and belongs to the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). There are eleven ISES forecast centers in the world, and Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) runs the Japanese one. We make forecasts on the space environment and deliver them over the phones and through the Internet. Our forecasts could be useful for human activities in space. Currently solar activity is near maximum phase of the solar cycle 23. We report the several large disturbances of space environment occurred in 2001, during which low-latitude auroras were observed several times in Japan. PMID:12793730

  7. Reactive spreading in ceramic/metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2000-11-06

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated mechanistically. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the steps involved in spreading are outlined to permit comparison to the steps in the compound formation that typically accompanies reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. They can all be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. This analysis plus assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than commonly believed, and perhaps is the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the slow spreading rates plus the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  8. BioKnife, a uPA activity-dependent oncolytic Sendai virus, eliminates pleural spread of malignant mesothelioma via simultaneous stimulation of uPA expression.

    PubMed

    Morodomi, Yosuke; Yano, Tokujiro; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Harada, Yui; Saito, Satoru; Kyuragi, Ryoichi; Yoshida, Kumi; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Shoji, Fumihiro; Yoshida, Tsukihisa; Ito, Kensaku; Shikada, Yasunori; Maruyama, Riichiroh; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2012-04-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is highly intractable and readily spreads throughout the surface of the pleural cavity, and these cells have been shown to express urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We here examined the potential of our new and powerful recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV), which shows uPAR-specific cell-to-cell fusion activity (rSeV/dMFct14 (uPA2), named "BioKnife"), for tumor cell killing in two independent orthotopic xenograft models of human. Multicycle treatment using BioKnife resulted in the efficient rescue of these models, in association with tumor-specific fusion and apoptosis. Such an effect was also seen on both MSTO-211H and H226 cells in vitro; however, we confirmed that the latter expressed uPAR but not uPA. Of interest, infection with BioKnife strongly facilitated the uPA release from H226 cells, and this effect was completely abolished by use of either pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) or BioKnife expressing the C-terminus-deleted dominant negative inhibitor for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-IC), indicating that BioKnife-dependent expression of uPA was mediated by the RIG-I/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) axis, detecting RNA viral genome replication. Therefore, these results suggest a proof of concept that the tumor cell-killing mechanism via BioKnife may have significant potential to treat patients with MPM that is characterized by frequent uPAR expression in a clinical setting. PMID:22314292

  9. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  10. Working together may be better: activation of reward centers during a cooperative maze task.

    PubMed

    Krill, Austen L; Platek, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Humans use theory of mind when predicting the thoughts and feelings and actions of others. There is accumulating evidence that cooperation with a computerized game correlates with a unique pattern of brain activation. To investigate the neural correlates of cooperation in real-time we conducted an fMRI hyperscanning study. We hypothesized that real-time cooperation to complete a maze task, using a blind-driving paradigm, would activate substrates implicated in theory of mind. We also hypothesized that cooperation would activate neural reward centers more than when participants completed the maze themselves. Of interest and in support of our hypothesis we found left caudate and putamen activation when participants worked together to complete the maze. This suggests that cooperation during task completion is inherently rewarding. This finding represents one of the first discoveries of a proximate neural mechanism for group based interactions in real-time, which indirectly supports the social brain hypothesis. PMID:22355319

  11. Working Together May Be Better: Activation of Reward Centers during a Cooperative Maze Task

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Austen L.; Platek, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Humans use theory of mind when predicting the thoughts and feelings and actions of others. There is accumulating evidence that cooperation with a computerized game correlates with a unique pattern of brain activation. To investigate the neural correlates of cooperation in real-time we conducted an fMRI hyperscanning study. We hypothesized that real-time cooperation to complete a maze task, using a blind-driving paradigm, would activate substrates implicated in theory of mind. We also hypothesized that cooperation would activate neural reward centers more than when participants completed the maze themselves. Of interest and in support of our hypothesis we found left caudate and putamen activation when participants worked together to complete the maze. This suggests that cooperation during task completion is inherently rewarding. This finding represents one of the first discoveries of a proximate neural mechanism for group based interactions in real-time, which indirectly supports the social brain hypothesis. PMID:22355319

  12. Pathways of lateral spreading.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, U; Schanzer, S; Weigmann, H-J; Patzelt, A; Vergou, T; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2011-01-01

    In the case of topically applied substances, usually both lateral spreading and competitive penetration into the skin occur in parallel. In the present study, the pathways of lateral spreading were studied quantitatively and visually. The local distribution and lateral spreading of the UV filter substance butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane applied in an o/w emulsion was studied on the forearm and the back. The tape stripping procedure was used to determine the recovery rates inside and outside the area of application. The skin characteristics of transepidermal water loss, pH value, hydration of the stratum corneum and sebum rate were determined at both anatomic sites. Photography and laser scanning microscopy were used to visually investigate the lateral spreading of topically applied dyes. On the back, a preferred direction of lateral spreading parallel to the body axis was observed. This result was caused by differences in the network of furrows. The furrows functioned as a pathway for lateral spreading, whereas the follicles formed a reservoir for the topically applied substance. PMID:21455016

  13. Pathology of Perineural Spread.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian S

    2016-04-01

    The perineural space is a compartment located between the nerve axons, supporting cells and tissues, and the epineural fibrous sheath. Tumor cells invade this space in response to a complex interplay of trophic factors in the local microenviroment. This attraction of tumor cells to nerves is referred to as neurotropism. The perineural space provides a conduit for tumor spread beyond the primary site of tumor occurrence. Perineural tumor growth is of two types: perineural invasion, affecting small unnamed nerves; and perineural spread, affecting larger, named nerves and presenting with clinical symptoms related to the involved nerve. Both forms of perineural tumor growth represent an adverse prognostic feature and are an essential element of the histopathologic reporting of malignancies of the head and neck region. Perineural spread is associated with decreased overall survival. Endoneurial invasion frequently accompanies perineural spread. The epineurium is more resistant to invasion and represents an important barrier to tumor spread. Immunohistochemical stains such as broad-spectrum keratin can aid in defining the proximal extent of perineural tumor spread. PMID:27123388

  14. Characterization of in vitro antifungal activities of small and American cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos L. and V. macrocarpon Aiton) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) concentrates in sugar reduced fruit spreads.

    PubMed

    Ermis, Ertan; Hertel, Christian; Schneider, Christin; Carle, Reinhold; Stintzing, Florian; Schmidt, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    In this study, cranberry and lingonberry concentrates were added to commercial sugar-reduced fruit spreads (raspberry-Aloe vera, strawberry-guava, and strawberry-lime), and tested for their antifungal activities. Selected strains of the species Absidia glauca, Penicillium brevicompactum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, as well as xerophilic environmental isolates of the genera Penicillium and Eurotium were used for challenge testing. Initially, varying concentrations of synthetic antifungal agents, such as sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate were tested against these fungi on wort agar containing 31% fructose at different pH values. Subsequently, the experiments were conducted in fruit spreads containing different concentrations of cranberry and lingonberry concentrates. The results of this study demonstrate that these concentrates were able to inhibit growth of visible colonies of xerophilic and non-xerophilic fungi. Cranberry and lingonberry concentrates are interesting candidates for natural preservation against fungal growth in sugar reduced fruit spreads. PMID:25868124

  15. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3–5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children’s physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don’t like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher. PMID:21804083

  16. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  17. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kristen A; Kendeigh, Cassandra A; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Sherman, Susan N

    2012-02-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don't like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher. PMID:21804083

  18. Water-containing hydrogen-bonding network in the active center of channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shota; Kato, Hideaki E; Taniguchi, Reiya; Iwata, Tatsuya; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) functions as a light-gated ion channel in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Passive transport of cations by ChR is fundamentally different from the active transport by light-driven ion pumps such as archaerhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin. These microbial rhodopsins are important tools for optogenetics, where ChR is used to activate neurons by light, while the ion pumps are used for neural silencing. Ion-transport functions by these rhodopsins strongly depend on the specific hydrogen-bonding networks containing water near the retinal chromophore. In this work, we measured protein-bound water molecules in a chimeric ChR protein of ChR1 (helices A to E) and ChR2 (helices F and G) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy at 77 K. We found that the active center of ChR possesses more water molecules (9 water vibrations) than those of other microbial (2-6 water vibrations) and animal (6-8 water vibrations) rhodopsins. We conclude that the protonated retinal Schiff base interacts with the counterion (Glu162) directly, without the intervening water molecule found in proton-pumping microbial rhodopsins. The present FTIR results and the recent X-ray structure of ChR reveal a unique hydrogen-bonding network around the active center of this light-gated ion channel. PMID:24512107

  19. Zika Spreading Rapidly Through Puerto Rico: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... is spread. But, transmission of the virus through sex is more common than previously thought, World Health Organizations officials have said. Women of child-bearing age who live in an active Zika ...

  20. Washington Center for the Improvement of the Quality of Undergraduate Education. Final Report to the Ford Foundation, 1986-88. Volume II: Washington Center Activities, 1985-88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Center for Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education.

    This compilation of materials represents the major activities of the Washington Center for the Improvement of the Quality of Undergraduate Education between 1985 and 1988. The volume includes: (1) a proposal to the Ford Foundation for funding to promote collaborative projects between two- and four-year colleges related to faculty development,…

  1. A 1.5 Ma record of plume-ridge interaction at the Western Galápagos Spreading Center (91°40‧-92°00‧W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Antje; Hauff, Folkmar; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; White, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Shallow (elevated) portions of mid-ocean ridges with enriched geochemical compositions near hotspots document the interaction of hot, geochemically-enriched plume mantle with shallow depleted upper mantle. Whereas the spatial variations in geochemical composition of ocean crust along the ridge axis in areas where plume-ridge interaction is taking place have been studied globally, only restricted information exists concerning temporal variations in geochemistry of ocean crust formed through plume-ridge interaction. Here we present a detailed geochemical study of 0-1.5 Ma ocean crust sampled from the Western Galápagos Spreading Center (WGSC) axis to 50 km north of the axis, an area that is presently experiencing a high influx of mantle material from the Galápagos hotspot. The tholeiitic to basaltic andesitic fresh glass and few bulk rock samples have incompatible element abundances and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions intermediate between depleted normal mid-ocean-ridge basalt (N-MORB) from >95.5°W along the WGSC and enriched lavas from the Galápagos Archipelago, displaying enriched (E-)MORB type compositions. Only limited and no systematic geochemical variations are observed with distance from the ridge axis for <1.0 Ma old WGSC crust, whereas 1.0-1.5 Ma old crust trends to more enriched isotopic compositions in 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb isotope ratios. On isotope correlation diagrams, the data set displays correlations between depleted MORB and two enriched components. Neither the geographically referenced geochemical domains of the Galápagos Archipelago nor the end members used for principal component analysis can successfully describe the observed mixing relations. Notably an off-axis volcanic cone at site DR63 has the appropriate composition to serve as the enriched component for the younger WGSC and could represent a portion of the northern part of the Galápagos plume not sampled south of the WGSC. Similar compositions to samples

  2. Activation of the E1 Ultra High Pressure Propulsion Test Facility at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, Bradley; Messer, Elisabeth; Sewell, Dale; Sass, Jared; Lott, Jeff; Dutreix, Lionel, III

    2001-01-01

    After a decade of construction and a year of activation the El Ultra High Pressure Propulsion Test Facility at NASA's Stennis Space Center is fully operational. The El UHP Propulsion Test Facility is a multi-cell, multi-purpose component and engine test facility . The facility is capable of delivering cryogenic propellants at low, high, and ultra high pressures with flow rates ranging from a few pounds per second up to two thousand pounds per second. Facility activation is defined as a series of tasks required to transition between completion of construction and facility operational readiness. Activating the El UHP Propulsion Test Facility involved independent system checkouts, propellant system leak checks, fluid and gas sampling, gaseous system blow downs, pressurization and vent system checkouts, valve stability testing, valve tuning cryogenic cold flows, and functional readiness tests.

  3. A switch from low to high Shh activity regulates establishment of limb progenitors and signaling centers.

    PubMed

    Zhulyn, Olena; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Vakili, Niki Alizadeh; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Hopyan, Sevan; Hui, Chi-chung

    2014-04-28

    The patterning and growth of the embryonic vertebrate limb is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen that regulates the activity of Gli transcription factors. However, Shh expression is not observed during the first 12 hr of limb development. During this phase, the limb bud is prepatterned into anterior and posterior regions through the antagonistic actions of transcription factors Gli3 and Hand2. We demonstrate that precocious activation of Shh signaling during this early phase interferes with the Gli3-dependent specification of anterior progenitors, disturbing establishment of signaling centers and normal outgrowth of the limb. Our findings illustrate that limb development requires a sweet spot in the level and timing of pathway activation that allows for the Shh-dependent expansion of posterior progenitors without interfering with early prepatterning functions of Gli3/Gli3R or specification of anterior progenitors. PMID:24726283

  4. Activation and implementation of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.F. III

    1989-01-01

    The Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has been assigned the primary responsibility for responding to a major radiological emergency. The initial response to any radiological emergency, however, will probably be conducted under the DOE regional radiological assistance plan (RAP). If the dimensions of the crisis demand federal assistance, the following sequence of events may be anticipated: (1) DOE regional RAP response, (2) activation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assistance Center (FRMAC) requested, (3) aerial measuring systems and DOE/NV advance party respond, (4) FRMAC activated, (5) FRMAC responds to state(s) and cognizant federal agency (CFA), and (6) management of FRMAC transferred to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The paper discusses activation channels, authorization, notification, deployment, and interfaces.

  5. Evaluation design of New York City's regulations on nutrition, physical activity, and screen time in early child care centers.

    PubMed

    Breck, Andrew; Goodman, Ken; Dunn, Lillian; Stephens, Robert L; Dawkins, Nicola; Dixon, Beth; Jernigan, Jan; Kakietek, Jakub; Lesesne, Catherine; Lessard, Laura; Nonas, Cathy; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Osuji, Thearis A; Bronson, Bernice; Xu, Ye; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the multi-method cross-sectional design used to evaluate New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's regulations of nutrition, physical activity, and screen time for children aged 3 years or older in licensed group child care centers. The Center Evaluation Component collected data from a stratified random sample of 176 licensed group child care centers in New York City. Compliance with the regulations was measured through a review of center records, a facility inventory, and interviews of center directors, lead teachers, and food service staff. The Classroom Evaluation Component included an observational and biometric study of a sample of approximately 1,400 children aged 3 or 4 years attending 110 child care centers and was designed to complement the center component at the classroom and child level. The study methodology detailed in this paper may aid researchers in designing policy evaluation studies that can inform other jurisdictions considering similar policies. PMID:25321635

  6. The spreading of disorder.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Kees; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Steg, Linda

    2008-12-12

    Imagine that the neighborhood you are living in is covered with graffiti, litter, and unreturned shopping carts. Would this reality cause you to litter more, trespass, or even steal? A thesis known as the broken windows theory suggests that signs of disorderly and petty criminal behavior trigger more disorderly and petty criminal behavior, thus causing the behavior to spread. This may cause neighborhoods to decay and the quality of life of its inhabitants to deteriorate. For a city government, this may be a vital policy issue. But does disorder really spread in neighborhoods? So far there has not been strong empirical support, and it is not clear what constitutes disorder and what may make it spread. We generated hypotheses about the spread of disorder and tested them in six field experiments. We found that, when people observe that others violated a certain social norm or legitimate rule, they are more likely to violate other norms or rules, which causes disorder to spread. PMID:19023045

  7. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  8. Clinical process analysis and activity-based costing at a heart center.

    PubMed

    Ridderstolpe, Lisa; Johansson, Andreas; Skau, Tommy; Rutberg, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans

    2002-08-01

    Cost studies, productivity, efficiency, and quality of care measures, the links between resources and patient outcomes, are fundamental issues for hospital management today. This paper describes the implementation of a model for process analysis and activity-based costing (ABC)/management at a Heart Center in Sweden as a tool for administrative cost information, strategic decision-making, quality improvement, and cost reduction. A commercial software package (QPR) containing two interrelated parts, "ProcessGuide and CostControl," was used. All processes at the Heart Center were mapped and graphically outlined. Processes and activities such as health care procedures, research, and education were identified together with their causal relationship to costs and products/services. The construction of the ABC model in CostControl was time-consuming. However, after the ABC/management system was created, it opened the way for new possibilities including process and activity analysis, simulation, and price calculations. Cost analysis showed large variations in the cost obtained for individual patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. We conclude that a process-based costing system is applicable and has the potential to be useful in hospital management. PMID:12118815

  9. Reactive Center Loop (RCL) Peptides Derived from Serpins Display Independent Coagulation and Immune Modulating Activities.

    PubMed

    Ambadapadi, Sriram; Munuswamy-Ramanujam, Ganesh; Zheng, Donghang; Sullivan, Colin; Dai, Erbin; Morshed, Sufi; McFadden, Baron; Feldman, Emily; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Tibbetts, Scott; Lucas, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Serpins regulate coagulation and inflammation, binding serine proteases in suicide-inhibitory complexes. Target proteases cleave the serpin reactive center loop scissile P1-P1' bond, resulting in serpin-protease suicide-inhibitory complexes. This inhibition requires a near full-length serpin sequence. Myxomavirus Serp-1 inhibits thrombolytic and thrombotic proteases, whereas mammalian neuroserpin (NSP) inhibits only thrombolytic proteases. Both serpins markedly reduce arterial inflammation and plaque in rodent models after single dose infusion. In contrast, Serp-1 but not NSP improves survival in a lethal murine gammaherpesvirus68 (MHV68) infection in interferon γ-receptor-deficient mice (IFNγR(-/-)). Serp-1 has also been successfully tested in a Phase 2a clinical trial. We postulated that proteolytic cleavage of the reactive center loop produces active peptide derivatives with expanded function. Eight peptides encompassing predicted protease cleavage sites for Serp-1 and NSP were synthesized and tested for inhibitory function in vitro and in vivo. In engrafted aorta, selected peptides containing Arg or Arg-Asn, not Arg-Met, with a 0 or +1 charge, significantly reduced plaque. Conversely, S-6 a hydrophobic peptide of NSP, lacking Arg or Arg-Asn with -4 charge, induced early thrombosis and mortality. S-1 and S-6 also significantly reduced CD11b(+) monocyte counts in mouse splenocytes. S-1 peptide had increased efficacy in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 serpin-deficient transplants. Plaque reduction correlated with mononuclear cell activation. In a separate study, Serp-1 peptide S-7 improved survival in the MHV68 vasculitis model, whereas an inverse S-7 peptide was inactive. Reactive center peptides derived from Serp-1 and NSP with suitable charge and hydrophobicity have the potential to extend immunomodulatory functions of serpins. PMID:26620556

  10. JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) data availability, version 1-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and integrated water vapor. The JPL PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is the United States distribution site for Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  11. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  12. Wind tunnel productivity status and improvement activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Lawrence E.

    1996-01-01

    Over the last three years, a major effort has been underway to re-engineering the way wind tunnel testing is accomplished at the NASA Langley Research Center. This effort began with the reorganization of the LaRC and the consolidation of the management of the wind tunnels in the Aerodynamics Division under one operations branch. This paper provides an overview of the re-engineering activities and gives the status of the improvements in the wind tunnel productivity and customer satisfaction that have resulted from the new ways of working.

  13. Contents of the JPL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive, version 2-91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A. (Editor); Lassanyi, Ruby A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea surface height, surface wind vector, sea surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and surface pigment concentration. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and will be the United States distribution site for the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  14. Galactic Center gamma-ray ''excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    SciTech Connect

    Petrović, Jovana; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela E-mail: serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ∼ 10{sup 52}÷10{sup 53} erg roughly O(10{sup 6}) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ''steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  15. Activation of the binuclear metal center through formation of phosphotriesterase-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Samples, Cynthia R; Raushel, Frank M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2007-03-20

    Phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta is a binuclear metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate nerve agents at rates approaching the diffusion-controlled limit. The proposed catalytic mechanism postulates the interaction of the substrate with the metal center and subsequent nucleophilic attack by the bridging hydroxide. X-band EPR spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the active site of Mn/Mn-substituted PTE upon addition of two inhibitors, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate and triethyl phosphate, and the product of hydrolysis, diethyl phosphate. The effects of inhibitor and product binding on the magnetic properties of the metal center and the hydroxyl bridge were evaluated by measuring changes in the features of the EPR spectra. The EPR spectra support the proposal that the binding of substrate analogues to the binuclear metal center diminishes the population of hydroxide-bridged species. These results, in conjunction with previously published kinetic and crystallographic data, suggest that substrate binding via the phosphoryl oxygen at the beta-metal weakens the coordination of the hydroxide bridge to the beta-metal. The weakened coordination to the beta-metal ion increases the nucleophilic character of the hydroxide and is coupled to the increase in the electrophilic character of the substrate. PMID:17315951

  16. Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Activities in the Payload Operations Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Members of the Fluid Experiment System (FES) group monitor the progress of their experiment through video at the POCC. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administion, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  18. Activities in the Payload Operation Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between the astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  19. Galactic Center gamma-ray ``excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Jovana; Dario Serpico, Pasquale; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 1052÷1053 erg roughly Script O(106) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ``steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  20. A 5-year activity report from the Oral Cancer Center, Tokyo Dental College.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Sato, Kazumichi; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Taiki; Osaka, Ryuta; Kin, Mira; Yoshida, Yoshifumi; Noguchi, Sunaki; Ishizaki, Ken; Takano, Masayuki; Katakura, Akira; Tanaka, Yoichi; Shibahara, Takahiko; Takano, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The Tokyo Dental College Oral Cancer Center was established on April 1st, 2006 at our Ichikawa General Hospital for the purpose of providing multimodal treatment for oral cancer. This report summarizes the Center's activities over the last 5 years. The total number of oral cancer patients treated was 360 (April 2006 to March 2011), with 205 primary cases. We investigated the following treatment-related items: 1) site, 2) age, 3) sex, 4) pathological examination, 5) staging, 6) systemic disorder, 7) double cancer, 8) treatment, and 9) prognosis. Out of 205 patients, 60% were men and 40% were women. Men in their 60s and women in their 80s were seen the most. The most common site was the tongue, at 42%, followed by the mandibular gingiva, maxillary gingiva, oral floor, and buccal mucosa. Squamous cell carcinomas were seen most frequently, at 94% (15% were stage I, 33% stage II, 15% stage III, and 34% stage IV). The most common treatment method was surgical treatment, at 83%. The 5-year survival rate at all stages was 85.4%. At the Oral Cancer Center, oral surgeons take the initiative in establishing treatment in cooperation with other departments and branches. Since the establishment of the Ambulatory Center for Maxillary Prosthetics in October 2011, 26 patients have undergone treatment. Related departments and branches work in teams, enabling comprehensive treatment, from the preoperative state to postoperative functional recovery. We wish to use these strengths to improve oral cancer treatment in Japan and will continue to work toward providing the best possible care for our patients. PMID:24521553

  1. An Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation of Activities Connected with the Operation of Educational Information Service Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, C. Neil; and Others

    This one-year project produced several publications and an evaluative investigation, all having to do with the rapidly growing community of educational information centers. Over 1500 such centers were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their locations, sizes, activities, and holdings. A directory which lists and describes some four hundred…

  2. Kinetics of cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Chamaraux, F; Fache, S; Bruckert, F; Fourcade, B

    2005-04-22

    Cell spreading is a fundamental event where the contact area with a solid substrate increases because of actin polymerization. We propose in this Letter a physical model to study the growth of the contact area with time. This analysis is compared with experimental data using the ameoba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our model couples the stress, which builds up at the margin of the contact area when the cell spreads, to the biochemical processes of actin polymerization. This leads to a scaling analysis of experimental data with a characteristic time whose order of magnitude compares well with our experimental results. PMID:15904192

  3. Kinetics of Cell Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamaraux, F.; Fache, S.; Bruckert, F.; Fourcade, B.

    2005-04-01

    Cell spreading is a fundamental event where the contact area with a solid substrate increases because of actin polymerization. We propose in this Letter a physical model to study the growth of the contact area with time. This analysis is compared with experimental data using the ameoba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our model couples the stress, which builds up at the margin of the contact area when the cell spreads, to the biochemical processes of actin polymerization. This leads to a scaling analysis of experimental data with a characteristic time whose order of magnitude compares well with our experimental results.

  4. Optimizing hybrid spreading in metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Miller, Joel C; Cox, Ingemar J; Chain, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic spreading phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and society. Examples include the spreading of diseases, information, and computer viruses. Epidemics can spread by local spreading, where infected nodes can only infect a limited set of direct target nodes and global spreading, where an infected node can infect every other node. In reality, many epidemics spread using a hybrid mixture of both types of spreading. In this study we develop a theoretical framework for studying hybrid epidemics, and examine the optimum balance between spreading mechanisms in terms of achieving the maximum outbreak size. We show the existence of critically hybrid epidemics where neither spreading mechanism alone can cause a noticeable spread but a combination of the two spreading mechanisms would produce an enormous outbreak. Our results provide new strategies for maximising beneficial epidemics and estimating the worst outcome of damaging hybrid epidemics. PMID:25923411

  5. Optimizing Hybrid Spreading in Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Miller, Joel C.; Cox, Ingemar J.; Chain, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic spreading phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and society. Examples include the spreading of diseases, information, and computer viruses. Epidemics can spread by local spreading, where infected nodes can only infect a limited set of direct target nodes and global spreading, where an infected node can infect every other node. In reality, many epidemics spread using a hybrid mixture of both types of spreading. In this study we develop a theoretical framework for studying hybrid epidemics, and examine the optimum balance between spreading mechanisms in terms of achieving the maximum outbreak size. We show the existence of critically hybrid epidemics where neither spreading mechanism alone can cause a noticeable spread but a combination of the two spreading mechanisms would produce an enormous outbreak. Our results provide new strategies for maximising beneficial epidemics and estimating the worst outcome of damaging hybrid epidemics. PMID:25923411

  6. Activity of daptomycin against staphylococci collected from bloodstream infections in Spanish medical centers.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Betriu, Carmen; Culebras, Esther; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Gómez, María; López, Fátima

    2009-08-01

    We used the broth microdilution method to determine the MICs of daptomycin and 13 comparator agents against 319 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 201 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, and 183 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Isolates were consecutively collected from bloodstream infections in 39 Spanish medical centers during a 3-month period (March through May 2008). Among MRSA, 1 isolate with intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin and 6 isolates resistant to linezolid were found. Nonsusceptibility to teicoplanin was detected in 3.9% of CoNS. Daptomycin was highly active against the staphylococcal blood isolates tested-all were inhibited at the daptomycin susceptibility breakpoint of < or = 1 microg/mL. Daptomycin retained its activity against the isolates that were resistant to teicoplanin or linezolid, or that had reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. These data suggest that daptomycin could be useful for the treatment of bloodstream infections caused by staphylococci. PMID:19631100

  7. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis. PMID:11442093

  8. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine is discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features are presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept is presented.

  9. Activities of the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, J. A.

    2006-10-01

    The Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science is a consortium of universities, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, led by Rutgers University. The purpose of this project, funded by the NNSA/DP Academic Alliance for Stewardship Science program, is to use radioactive ion beams to study low-energy nuclear reactions of importance to stewardship science, as well as to prepare future researchers in applied nuclear science. These studies are enabled by the plethora of unstable accelerated beams available at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge. The initial measurements use neutron-rich beams of uranium fission fragments to study the neutron-transfer (d,p) reaction, a possible surrogate of neutron capture reactions. We also develop new radioactive ion beams of interest to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, and stewardship science. This talk will present an overview of the activities of the Center and the available facilities, describe initial results of a (d,p) reaction with a fission fragment beam, and outline activities proposed for the near term. In collaboration with H.K. Carter, ORAU.

  10. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities. [National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  11. Active Learning and Student-centered Pedagogy Improve Student Attitudes and Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years—1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  12. Active learning and student-centered pedagogy improve student attitudes and performance in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Peter; Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years-1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  13. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  14. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Mike; Purewal, Justin; Xu, Chunchuan; Yang, Jun; Blaser, Rachel; Sudik, Andrea; Siegel, Don; Ming, Yang; Liu, Dong'an; Chi, Hang; Gaab, Manuela; Arnold, Lena; Muller, Ulrich

    2015-06-30

    revealed cost gaps and opportunities that identified a storage system that was lower cost than a 700 bar compressed system. Finally, we led the HSECoE efforts devoted to characterizing and enhancing metal organic framework (MOF) storage materials. This report serves as a final documentation of the Ford-UM-BASF project contributions to the HSECoE during the 6-year timeframe of the Center. The activities of the HSECoE have impacted the broader goals of the DOE-EERE and USDRIVE, leading to improved understanding in the engineering of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. This knowledge is a prerequisite to the development of a commercially-viable hydrogen storage system.

  15. Home-Type Activities at the Day Care Center. (Tipos De Actividades Del Hogar En El Centro De Cuidado Diario.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaronson, May; Moberg, Patricia E.

    This paper argues that home activities comprise a valuable unplanned curriculum and that many of these activities can be transferred to the day care center. It is suggested that these activities foster a closer relationship between child and caregiver and bridge the gap between familiar home environment and novel day care setting. Home activities…

  16. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  17. Asymmetry in the slow-spreading Mariana back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Fujiwara, T.; Goto, T.

    2002-12-01

    The Mariana Trough is an active back-arc basin opening behind the Mariana subduction zone. Its spreading history is fairly complicated, due to ridge segments propagations and trenchward jumps. The basin is asymmetric, with its spreading center located closer to the active arc than next to the West Mariana remnant arc. At latitude 18°N, the spreading axis is located 185 km from the remnant West Mariana Ridge, and 110 km from the active arc to the east. In the central part of the basin, the rift valley has a morphology that is typical of slow-spreading ridges. Its shape varies between a fairly symmetric graben and an asymmetric half-graben with a single large fault scarp on one side of the valley, generally on its eastern side. This asymmetry is well expressed at latitudes 17°20'N and 18°35'N for example. Between 17°40'N and 18°25'N, the neovolcanic zone is expressed as an unfaulted region within the valley floor, which covers an area wide of 6 km in average. The series of hummocky to linear axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) mark the locus of the most active recent accretion. The AVRs ranges in size up to 1 km high, 1-5 km wide, and tens of kilometers long. Along this segment, spreading occurs following a N75E direction at a half rate of 1.4 cm/yr. One striking feature is the location of the Brunhes anomaly, which is not centered on the AVRs. At 18°N for example, the eastern and western sides of the central Brunhes anomaly have markedly different widths, and are 15km and 10km, respectively, from the AVR, suggesting different spreading rates on both sides of the valley. We observe similar pattern more to the north, between latitudes 19°20'N and 19°50'N. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of the Mariana basin is not only due to eastward ridge jumps, but also to asymmetric magmatic accretion. It is probable that the magmatic accretion is one sided with new crust mainly added to the western flank. Along the eastern flank, spreading is mainly accommodated by significant

  18. Does the proposed DSE motif form the active center in the Hermes transposase?

    PubMed

    Michel, K; O'Brochta, D A; Atkinson, P W

    2002-10-01

    Donor cleavage and strand transfer are two functions performed by transposases during transposition of class II transposable elements. Within transposable elements, the only active center described, to date, facilitating both functions, is the so-called DDE motif. A second motif, R-K-H/K-R-H/W-Y, is found in the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine recombinase family. While present in many bacterial insertion sequences as well as in the eukaryotic family of mariner/Tc1 elements, the DDE motif was considered absent in other classes of eukaryotic class II elements such as P, and hAT and piggyBac. Based on sequence alignments of a hobo-like element from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, to a variety of other hAT transposases and several members of the mariner/Tc1 group, Bigot et al. [Gene 174 (1996) 265] proposed the presence of a DSE motif in hAT transposases. In the present study we tested if each of these three residues is required for transposition of the Hermes element, a member of the hAT family commonly used for insect transformation. While D402N and E572Q mutations lead to knock-out of Hermes function, mutations S535A and S535D did not affect transposition frequency or the choice of integration sites. These data give the first experimental support that D402 and E572 are indeed required for transposition of Hermes. Furthermore, this study indicates that the active center of the Hermes transposase differs from the proposed DSE motif. It remains to be shown if other residues also form the active site of this transposase. PMID:12426102

  19. Mask R&D activities at the Advanced Mask Technology Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilger, Markus; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2004-08-01

    The Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) in Dresden is an equally-owned joint venture of Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD), DuPont Photomasks, Inc. (DPI), and Infineon Technologies AG (Infineon) founded in 2002 to create a world-leading mask R&D center for both DRAM and logic applications. The AMTC's primary focus is research and development of sub-70 nm technologies. While 193 nm lithography will be used for 65 nm design rules and is probable for 45 nm design rules, solutions for sub-45 nm design rules are still being studied. Possible solutions include 193 nm immersion, 157 nm immersion, EUV, and EPL or its variants. The AMTC is actively involved in multiple collaborative projects to develop masks for advanced lithographies. This paper presents a sampling of AMTC's development activities on both conventional and EUV masks. Intensive studies on adequate materials and their properties for the respective technology have been performed with key partners in the field. Masks have been produced and analyzed. New repair processes have been developed for the small structures of future nodes, the printing capabilities have been predicted by AIMS measurements and analyzed with printing experiments at the respective wavelengths. In this talk we will present the latest results of simulations, experiments, handling and tool qualifications performed at the AMTC or with its partners. We will especially focus on our activities for the EUV technology and will present results on material and process development as well as on simulations for soft and hard pellicle induced distortions. For the EUV technology we will present preliminary results from our etching experiment on binary masks. First results on the performance of our new nano-machining RAVE tool will be shown.

  20. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  1. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  2. Recent activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  3. CD45RO enriches for activated, highly mutated human germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen M.; Harp, Natessa; Patel, Darshna; Zhang, Jeffrey; Willson, Savannah; Kim, Yoon J.; Clanton, Christian

    2007-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus regarding the influence of different CD45 isoforms during peripheral B-cell development. Examining correlations between surface CD45RO expression and various physiologic processes ongoing during the germinal center (GC) reaction, we hypothesized that GC B cells, like T cells, that up-regulate surface RO should progressively acquire phenotypes commonly associated with activated, differentiating lymphocytes. GC B cells (IgD−CD38+) were subdivided into 3 surface CD45RO fractions: RO−, RO+/−, and RO+. We show here that the average number of mutations per IgVH transcript increased in direct correlation with surface RO levels. Conjunctional use of RO and CD69 further delineated low/moderately and highly mutated fractions. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA was slightly reduced among RO+ GC B cells, suggesting that higher mutation averages are unlikely due to elevated somatic mutation activity. Instead, RO+ GC B cells were negative for Annexin V, comprised mostly (93%) of CD77− centrocytes, and were enriched for CD69+ cells. Collectively, RO+ GC B cells occupy what seems to be a specialized niche comprised mostly of centrocytes that may be in transition between activation states. These findings are among the first to sort GC B cells into populations enriched for live mutated cells solely using a single extracellular marker. PMID:17644737

  4. Recent activities within the aeroservoelasticity branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  5. Multi-Standard Metadata Retrieval Framework at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, N. T.; Huang, T.; Armstrong, E. M.; Gangl, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    With the vast amount of Earth Science data available, providing the user community with high quality metadata to facilitate information retrieval and exchange is integral to scientific research. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archives and distributes data products along with metadata pertinent to the physical state of the ocean. As one of the Earth Science data center for NASA, PO.DAAC is expected to work with multiple metadata standards. Since there is no single metadata standard that meets everyone's needs, a web-based framework has been designed and integrated as part of PO.DAAC's scalable Core Data System to enable users to quickly retrieve metadata in the format that they need. Currently, the framework supports the Open Search specification for data discovery, ISO 19115-2, Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata standards, with new metadata standards still being added. In this talk we will present the architecture behind the framework that makes it possible to support various metadata standards as well as the challenges we encountered.

  6. Sentinel-1 Data System at the Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center (ASF DAAC) has a long history of supporting international collaborations between NASA and foreign flight agencies to promote access to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for US science research. Based on the agreement between the US and the EC, data from the Sentinel missions will be distributed by NASA through archives that mirror those established by ESA. The ASF DAAC is the designated archive and distributor for Sentinel-1 data. The data will be copied from the ESA archive to a rolling archive at the NASA Goddard center, and then pushed to a landing area at the ASF DAAC. The system at ASF DAAC will take the files as they arrive and put them through an ingest process. Ingest will populate the database with the information required to enable search and download of the data through Vertex, the ASF DAAC user interface. Metadata will be pushed to the NASA Common Metadata Repository, enabling data discovery through clients that utilize the repository. Visual metadata will be pushed to the NASA GIBS system for visualization through clients linked to that system. Data files will be archived in the DataDirect Networks (DDN) device that is the primary storage device for the ASF DAAC. A backup copy of the data will be placed in a second DDN device that serves as the disaster recovery solution for the ASF DAAC.

  7. Information spreading on dynamic social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, information spreading on social networks has triggered an explosive attention in various disciplines. Most of previous works in this area mainly focus on discussing the effects of spreading probability or immunization strategy on static networks. However, in real systems, the peer-to-peer network structure changes constantly according to frequently social activities of users. In order to capture this dynamical property and study its impact on information spreading, in this paper, a link rewiring strategy based on the Fermi function is introduced. In the present model, the informed individuals tend to break old links and reconnect to their second-order friends with more uninformed neighbors. Simulation results on the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model with fixed recovery time T=1 indicate that the information would spread more faster and broader with the proposed rewiring strategy. Extensive analyses of the information cascade size distribution show that the spreading process of the initial steps plays a very important role, that is to say, the information will spread out if it is still survival at the beginning time. The proposed model may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of information spreading on dynamical social networks.

  8. Spread spectrum image steganography.

    PubMed

    Marvel, L M; Boncelet, C R; Retter, C T

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method of digital steganography, entitled spread spectrum image steganography (SSIS). Steganography, which means "covered writing" in Greek, is the science of communicating in a hidden manner. Following a discussion of steganographic communication theory and review of existing techniques, the new method, SSIS, is introduced. This system hides and recovers a message of substantial length within digital imagery while maintaining the original image size and dynamic range. The hidden message can be recovered using appropriate keys without any knowledge of the original image. Image restoration, error-control coding, and techniques similar to spread spectrum are described, and the performance of the system is illustrated. A message embedded by this method can be in the form of text, imagery, or any other digital signal. Applications for such a data-hiding scheme include in-band captioning, covert communication, image tamperproofing, authentication, embedded control, and revision tracking. PMID:18267522

  9. Information Spreading in Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dashun; Wen, Zhen; Tong, Hanghang; Lin, Ching-Yung; Song, Chaoming; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2012-02-01

    Information spreading processes are central to human interactions. Despite recent studies in online domains, little is known about factors that could affect the dissemination of a single piece of information. In this paper, we address this challenge by combining two related but distinct datasets, collected from a large scale privacy-preserving distributed social sensor system. We find that the social and organizational context significantly impacts to whom and how fast people forward information. Yet the structures within spreading processes can be well captured by a simple stochastic branching model, indicating surprising independence of context. Our results build the foundation of future predictive models of information flow and provide significant insights towards design of communication platforms.

  10. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases. PMID:26133935

  11. The EOSDIS Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center for physical oceanography and air-sea interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, Jeffrey E.; Collins, Donald J.; Nichols, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will support scientists specializing in physical oceanography and air-sea interaction. As part of the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System Version 0 the DAAC will build on existing capabilities to provide services for data product generation, archiving, distribution and management of information about data. To meet scientist's immediate needs for data, existing data sets from missions such as Seasat, Geosat, the NOAA series of satellites and the Global Positioning Satellite system will be distributed to investigators upon request. In 1992, ocean topography, wave and surface roughness data from the Topex/Poseidon radar altimeter mission will be archived and distributed. New data products will be derived from Topex/Poseidon and other sensor systems based on recommendations of the science community. In 1995, ocean wind field measurements from the NASA Scatterometer will be supported by the DAAC.

  12. Helmet-mounted display and associated research activities recently conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1994-06-01

    To enhance manned extravehicular activity (EVA) utilizing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)(i.e., a space suit and portable life support backpack), NASA has conducted research into implementing helmet mounted display (HMD) and related technology within its next generation of space suits. The NASA/Johnson Space Center has completed four feasibility development programs for the design and development of an EMU HMD, each resulting in the delivery of a binocular or biocular HMD breadboard unit utilizing conventional optical elements (i.e., glass lenses and beamsplitters) and/or holographic optics. Additional research into combining the use of voice recognition for astronaut 'hands- free' access to information via the HMD has also been conducted. Research conducted since 1983 will be summarized along with current shuttle EMU display enhancements. In addition, recommendations for the design of the next generation of displays for use within the EMU will be presented.

  13. Data catalog for JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digby, Susan

    1995-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory contains satellite data sets and ancillary in-situ data for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Geophysical parameters available from the archive include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, surface-wind speed, surface-wind stress vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, integrated water vapor, phytoplankton pigment concentration, heat flux, and in-situ data. PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System and is the United States distribution site for TOPEX/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  14. Global Change Data Center: Mission, Organization, Major Activities, and 2003 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Rapid, efficient access to Earth sciences data from satellites and ground validation stations is fundamental to the nation's efforts to understand the effects of global environmental changes and their implications for public policy. It becomes a bigger challenge in the future when data volumes increase from current levels to terabytes per day. Demands on data storage, data access, network throughput, processing power, and database and information management are increased by orders of magnitude, while budgets remain constant and even shrink.The Global Change Data Center's (GCDC) mission is to develop and operate data systems, generate science products, and provide archival and distribution services for Earth science data in support of the U.S. Global Change Program and NASA's Earth Sciences Enterprise. The ultimate product of the GCDC activities is access to data to support research, education, and public policy.

  15. Implicit trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces activate brain centers involved in reward.

    PubMed

    Platek, Steven M; Krill, Austen L; Wilson, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Hamilton's (Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behavior I, II. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 7, 17-52) theory of inclusive fitness, self-facial resemblance is hypothesized as a mechanism for self-referent phenotypic matching by which humans can detect kin. To understand the mechanisms underlying pro-sociality toward self-resembling faces, we investigated the neural correlates of implicit trustworthiness ratings for self-resembling faces. Here we show that idiosyncratic trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces predict brain activation in the ventral inferior, middle and medial frontal gyri, substrates involved in reward processing. These findings demonstrate that neural reward centers are implicated in evaluating implicit pro-social behaviors toward self-resembling faces. These findings suggest that humans have evolved to use neurocomputational architecture dedicated to face processing and reward evaluation for the differentiation of kin, which drives implicit idiosyncratic affectively regulated social interactions. PMID:18761362

  16. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  17. Stereoselective bimolecular phenoxyl radical coupling by an auxiliary (dirigent) protein without an active center

    SciTech Connect

    Davin, L.B.; Wang, Huai-Bin; Crowell, A.L.

    1997-01-17

    The regio- and stereospecificity of bimolecular phenoxy radical coupling reactions, of especial importance in lignin and lignan biosynthesis, are clearly controlled in some manner in vivo; yet in vitro coupling by oxidases, such as laccases, only produce racemic products. In other words, laccases, peroxidases, and comparable oxidases are unable to control regio- or stereospecificity by themselves and thus some other agent must exist. A 78-kilodalton protein has been isolated that, in the presence of an oxidase or one electron oxidant, effects stereoselective bimolecular phenoxy radical coupling in vitro. Itself lacking a catalytically active (oxidative) center, its mechanism of action is presumed to involve capture of E-coniferyl alcohol-derived free-radical intermediates, with consequent stereoselective coupling to give (+)-pinoresinol. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Combined excitation-emission spectroscopy of bismuth active centers in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Firstov, S V; Khopin, V F; Bufetov, I A; Firstova, E G; Guryanov, A N; Dianov, E M

    2011-09-26

    For the first time, 3-dimensional luminescence spectra (luminescence intensity as a function of the excitation and emission wavelengths) have been obtained for bismuth-doped optical fibers of various compositions in a wide spectral range (450-1700 nm). The bismuth-doped fibers investigated have the following core compositions: SiO(2), GeO(2), Al-doped SiO(2), and P-doped SiO(2). The measurements are performed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Based on the experimental results, the positions of the low-lying energy-levels of the IR bismuth active centers in SiO(2)- and GeO(2)-core fibers have been determined. Similarity of the energy-level schemes for the two core compositions has been revealed. PMID:21996896

  19. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  20. Analysis of the access patterns at GSFC distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore; Bedet, Jean-Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational for more than two years. Its mission is to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) concepts. Over 550,000 files and documents have been archived, and more than six Terabytes have been distributed to the scientific community. Information about user request and file access patterns, and their impact on system loading, is needed to optimize current operations and to plan for future archives. To facilitate the management of daily activities, the GSFC DAAC has developed a data base system to track correspondence, requests, ingestion and distribution. In addition, several log files which record transactions on Unitree are maintained and periodically examined. This study identifies some of the users' requests and file access patterns at the GSFC DAAC during 1995. The analysis is limited to the subset of orders for which the data files are under the control of the Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) Unitree. The results show that most of the data volume ordered was for two data products. The volume was also mostly made up of level 3 and 4 data and most of the volume was distributed on 8 mm and 4 mm tapes. In addition, most of the volume ordered was for deliveries in North America although there was a significant world-wide use. There was a wide range of request sizes in terms of volume and number of files ordered. On an average 78.6 files were ordered per request. Using the data managed by Unitree, several caching algorithms have been evaluated for both hit rate and the overhead ('cost') associated with the movement of data from near-line devices to disks. The algorithm called LRU/2 bin was found to be the best for this workload, but the STbin algorithm also worked well.

  1. Consequences of Rift Propagation for Spreading in Thick Oceanic Crust in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Iceland has long been considered a natural laboratory for processes related to seafloor spreading, including propagating rifts, migrating transforms and rotating microplates. The thick, hot, weak crust and subaerial processes of Iceland result in variations on the themes developed along more typical parts of the global MOR system. Compared to most other parts of the MOR, Icelandic rift zones and transform faults are wider and more complex. Rift zones are defined by overlapping arrays of volcanic/tectonic spreading segments as much as 50 km wide. The most active rift zones propagate N and S away from the Iceland hot spot causing migration of transform faults. A trail of crust deformed by bookshelf faulting forms in their wakes. Dead or dying transform strands are truncated along pseudofaults that define propagation rates close to the full spreading rate of ~20 mm/yr. Pseudofaults are blurred by spreading across wide rift zones and laterally extensive subaerial lava flows. Propagation, with decreasing spreading toward the propagator tips causes rotation of crustal blocks on both sides of the active rift zones. The blocks deform internally by the widespread reactivation of spreading-related faults and zones of weakness along dike margins. The sense of slip on these rift-parallel strike-slip faults is inconsistent with transform-fault deformation. These various deformation features as well as subaxial subsidence that accommodate the thickening of the volcanic upper crustal units are probably confined to the brittle, seismogenic, upper 10 km of the crust. At least beneath the active rift zones, the upper crust is probably decoupled from hot, mechanically weak middle and lower gabbroic crust resulting in a broad plate boundary zone between the diverging lithosphere plates. Similar processes may occur at other types of propagating spreading centers and magmatic rifts.

  2. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and

  3. AVIRIS and TIMS data processing and distribution at the land processes distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, G. R.; Myers, J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Government has initiated the Global Change Research program, a systematic study of the Earth as a complete system. NASA's contribution of the Global Change Research Program is the Earth Observing System (EOS), a series of orbital sensor platforms and an associated data processing and distribution system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the archiving, production, and distribution system for data collected by the EOS space segment and uses a multilayer architecture for processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data. The first layer consists of the spacecraft ground stations and processing facilities that receive the raw data from the orbiting platforms and then separate the data by individual sensors. The second layer consists of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) that process, distribute, and archive the sensor data. The third layer consists of a user science processing network. The EOSDIS is being developed in a phased implementation. The initial phase, Version 0, is a prototype of the operational system. Version 0 activities are based upon existing systems and are designed to provide an EOSDIS-like capability for information management and distribution. An important science support task is the creation of simulated data sets for EOS instruments from precursor aircraft or satellite data. The Land Processes DAAC, at the EROS Data Center (EDC), is responsible for archiving and processing EOS precursor data from airborne instruments such as the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), the Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), and Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS, TIMS, and TMS are flown by the NASA-Ames Research Center ARC) on an ER-2. The ER-2 flies at 65000 feet and can carry up to three sensors simultaneously. Most jointly collected data sets are somewhat boresighted and roughly registered. The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial

  4. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and

  5. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael A.; Duffield, Wendell A.; Fournier, Robert O.; Giorgis, Leake W.; Janik, Cathy J.; Kahsai, Gabreab; Lowenstern, Jacob; Mariam, Kidane W.; Smith, James G.; Tesfai, Theoderos

    1996-01-01

    Alid volcanic center, a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa, straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250 ??C. The history of volcanism and the high reservoir temperature indicated by the Alid fumarole gases suggest that a geothermal resource of electrical grade lies beneath the mountain. Though drilling is needed to determine subsurface conditions, the process of dome formation and the ongoing crustal spreading can create and maintain fracture permeability in the hydrothermal system that feeds the Alid fumaroles.

  6. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's urban research and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Sugiyama, G A; Nasstrom, J

    2007-09-05

    This presentation describes the tools and services provided by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for modeling the impacts of airborne hazardous materials. NARAC provides atmospheric plume modeling tools and services for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear airborne hazards. NARAC can simulate downwind effects from a variety of scenarios, including fires, industrial and transportation accidents, radiation dispersal device explosions, hazardous material spills, sprayers, nuclear power plant accidents, and nuclear detonations. NARAC collaborates on radiological dispersion source terms and effects models with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NARAC was designated the interim provider of capabilities for the Department of Homeland Security's Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center by the Homeland Security Council in April 2004. The NARAC suite of software tools include simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end-user's computers, and Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced modeling tools and expert analyses from the national center at LLNL. Initial automated, 3-D predictions of plume exposure limits and protective action guidelines for emergency responders and managers are available from the center in 5-10 minutes. These can be followed immediately by quality-assured, refined analyses by 24 x 7 on-duty or on-call NARAC staff. NARAC continues to refine calculations using updated on-scene information, including measurements, until all airborne releases have stopped and the hazardous threats are mapped and impacts assessed. Model predictions include the 3-D spatial and time-varying effects of weather, land use, and terrain, on scales from the local to regional to global. Real-time meteorological data and forecasts are provided by redundant communications links to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  7. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's Urban Research and Development Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Sugiyama, G.; Nasstrom, J.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation describes the tools and services provided by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for modeling the impacts of airborne hazardous materials. NARAC provides atmospheric plume modeling tools and services for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear airborne hazards. NARAC can simulate downwind effects from a variety of scenarios, including fires, industrial and transportation accidents, radiation dispersal device explosions, hazardous material spills, sprayers, nuclear power plant accidents, and nuclear detonations. NARAC collaborates on radiological dispersion source terms and effects models with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NARAC was designated the interim provider of capabilities for the Department of Homeland Security's Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center by the Homeland Security Council in April 2004. The NARAC suite of software tools include simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end-user's computers, and Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced modeling tools and expert analyses from the national center at LLNL. Initial automated, 3-D predictions of plume exposure limits and protective action guidelines for emergency responders and managers are available from the center in 5-10 minutes. These can be followed immediately by quality-assured, refined analyses by 24 x 7 on-duty or on-call NARAC staff. NARAC continues to refine calculations using updated on-scene information, including measurements, until all airborne releases have stopped and the hazardous threats are mapped and impacts assessed. Model predictions include the 3-D spatial and time-varying effects of weather, land use, and terrain, on scales from the local to regional to global. Real-time meteorological data and forecasts are provided by redundant communications links to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  8. Increasing Practitioners Knowledge of Participation Among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  9. Increasing Practitioners' Knowledge of Participation among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  10. PHABULOSA Controls the Quiescent Center-Independent Root Meristem Activities in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Zhou, Jing; Tarkowská, Danuše; Tarkowski, Petr; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Kim, Eun-Sol; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth depends on stem cell niches in meristems. In the root apical meristem, the quiescent center (QC) cells form a niche together with the surrounding stem cells. Stem cells produce daughter cells that are displaced into a transit-amplifying (TA) domain of the root meristem. TA cells divide several times to provide cells for growth. SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are key regulators of the stem cell niche. Cytokinin controls TA cell activities in a dose-dependent manner. Although the regulatory programs in each compartment of the root meristem have been identified, it is still unclear how they coordinate one another. Here, we investigate how PHABULOSA (PHB), under the posttranscriptional control of SHR and SCR, regulates TA cell activities. The root meristem and growth defects in shr or scr mutants were significantly recovered in the shr phb or scr phb double mutant, respectively. This rescue in root growth occurs in the absence of a QC. Conversely, when the modified PHB, which is highly resistant to microRNA, was expressed throughout the stele of the wild-type root meristem, root growth became very similar to that observed in the shr; however, the identity of the QC was unaffected. Interestingly, a moderate increase in PHB resulted in a root meristem phenotype similar to that observed following the application of high levels of cytokinin. Our protoplast assay and transgenic approach using ARR10 suggest that the depletion of TA cells by high PHB in the stele occurs via the repression of B-ARR activities. This regulatory mechanism seems to help to maintain the cytokinin homeostasis in the meristem. Taken together, our study suggests that PHB can dynamically regulate TA cell activities in a QC-independent manner, and that the SHR-PHB pathway enables a robust root growth system by coordinating the stem cell niche and TA domain. PMID:25730098

  11. Probing the active massive black hole candidate in the center of NGC 404 with VLBI

    SciTech Connect

    Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Kaaret, P.; Cseh, D.; Kharb, P.

    2014-08-10

    Recently, Nyland et al. argued that the radio emission observed in the center of the dwarf galaxy NGC 404 originates in a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus powered by a massive black hole (MBH, M ≲ 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉}). High-resolution radio detections of MBHs are rare. Here we present sensitive, contemporaneous Chandra X-ray, and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio observations with the European VLBI Network. The source is detected in the X-rays, and shows no long-term variability. If the hard X-ray source is powered by accretion, the apparent low accretion efficiency would be consistent with a black hole (BH) in the hard state. Hard state BHs are known to show radio emission compact on the milliarcsecond scales. However, the central region of NGC 404 is resolved out on 10 mas (0.15-1.5 pc) scales. Our VLBI non-detection of a compact, partially self-absorbed radio core in NGC 404 implies that either the BH mass is smaller than 3{sub −2}{sup +5}×10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}, or the source does not follow the fundamental plane of BH activity relation. An alternative explanation is that the central BH is not in the hard state. The radio emission observed on arcsecond (tens of parsecs) scales may originate in nuclear star formation or extended emission due to AGN activity, although the latter would not be typical considering the structural properties of low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxies with confirmed nuclear activity.

  12. PHABULOSA controls the quiescent center-independent root meristem activities in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Zhou, Jing; Tarkowská, Danuše; Tarkowski, Petr; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Kim, Eun-Sol; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-03-01

    Plant growth depends on stem cell niches in meristems. In the root apical meristem, the quiescent center (QC) cells form a niche together with the surrounding stem cells. Stem cells produce daughter cells that are displaced into a transit-amplifying (TA) domain of the root meristem. TA cells divide several times to provide cells for growth. SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are key regulators of the stem cell niche. Cytokinin controls TA cell activities in a dose-dependent manner. Although the regulatory programs in each compartment of the root meristem have been identified, it is still unclear how they coordinate one another. Here, we investigate how PHABULOSA (PHB), under the posttranscriptional control of SHR and SCR, regulates TA cell activities. The root meristem and growth defects in shr or scr mutants were significantly recovered in the shr phb or scr phb double mutant, respectively. This rescue in root growth occurs in the absence of a QC. Conversely, when the modified PHB, which is highly resistant to microRNA, was expressed throughout the stele of the wild-type root meristem, root growth became very similar to that observed in the shr; however, the identity of the QC was unaffected. Interestingly, a moderate increase in PHB resulted in a root meristem phenotype similar to that observed following the application of high levels of cytokinin. Our protoplast assay and transgenic approach using ARR10 suggest that the depletion of TA cells by high PHB in the stele occurs via the repression of B-ARR activities. This regulatory mechanism seems to help to maintain the cytokinin homeostasis in the meristem. Taken together, our study suggests that PHB can dynamically regulate TA cell activities in a QC-independent manner, and that the SHR-PHB pathway enables a robust root growth system by coordinating the stem cell niche and TA domain. PMID:25730098

  13. HAWAIIAN SKIRT regulates the quiescent center-independent meristem activity in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Sol; Choe, Goh; Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Mao, Linyong; Fei, Zhangjun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2016-06-01

    Root apical meristem (RAM) drives post-embryonic root growth by constantly supplying cells through mitosis. It is composed of stem cells and their derivatives, the transit-amplifying (TA) cells. Stem cell organization and its maintenance in the RAM are well characterized, however, their relationships with TA cells remain unclear. SHORTROOT (SHR) is critical for root development. It patterns cell types and promotes the post-embryonic root growth. Defective root growth in the shr has been ascribed to the lack of quiescent center (QC), which maintains the surrounding stem cells. However, our recent investigation indicated that SHR maintains TA cells independently of QC by modulating PHABULOSA (PHB) through miRNA165/6. PHB controls TA cell activity by modulating cytokinin levels and type B Arabidopsis Response Regulator activity, in a dosage-dependent manner. To further understand TA cell regulation, we conducted a shr suppressor screen. With an extensive mutagenesis screen followed by genome sequencing of a pooled F2 population, we discovered two suppressor alleles with mutations in HAWAIIAN SKIRT (HWS). HWS, encoding an F-box protein with kelch domain, is expressed, partly depending on SHR, in the root cap and in the pericycle of the differentiation zone. Interestingly, root growth in the shr hws was more active than the wild-type roots for the first 7 days after germination, without recovering QC. Contrary to shr phb, shr hws did not show a recovery of cytokinin signaling. These indicate that HWS affects QC-independent TA cell activities through a pathway distinctive from PHB. PMID:26968317

  14. The potential and realized spread of wildfires across Canada.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Parisien, Marc-André; Flannigan, Mike D; Parks, Sean A; Anderson, Kerry R; Little, John M; Taylor, Steve W

    2014-08-01

    Given that they can burn for weeks or months, wildfires in temperate and boreal forests may become immense (eg., 10(0) - 10(4) km(2) ). However, during the period within which a large fire is 'active', not all days experience weather that is conducive to fire spread; indeed most of the spread occurs on a small proportion (e.g., 1 - 15 days) of not necessarily consecutive days during the active period. This study examines and compares the Canada-wide patterns in fire-conducive weather ('potential' spread) and the spread that occurs on the ground ('realized' spread). Results show substantial variability in distributions of potential and realized spread days across Canada. Both potential and realized spread are higher in western than in eastern Canada; however, whereas potential spread generally decreases from south to north, there is no such pattern with realized spread. The realized-to-potential fire-spread ratio is considerably higher in northern Canada than in the south, indicating that proportionally more fire-conducive days translate into fire progression. An exploration of environmental correlates to spread show that there may be a few factors compensating for the lower potential spread in northern Canada: a greater proportion of coniferous (i.e., more flammable) vegetation, lesser human impacts (i.e., less fragmented landscapes), sufficient fire ignitions, and intense droughts. Because a linear relationship exists between the frequency distributions of potential spread days and realized spread days in a fire zone, it is possible to obtain one from the other using a simple conversion factor. Our methodology thus provides a means to estimate realized fire spread from weather-based data in regions where fire databases are poor, which may improve our ability to predict future fire activity. PMID:24700739

  15. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  16. Contributions to Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs by the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  17. NASA Langley Research Center's Contributions to International Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  18. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine will be discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented.

  19. Isolation of human serum spreading factor.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Silnutzer, J

    1983-10-25

    Serum spreading factor (SF) was isolated from human serum by a four-step procedure employing affinity chromatography on glass beads, concanavalin A-Sepharose, DEAE-agarose, and heparin-agarose. The final product was purified approximately 260-fold from the starting material and was maximally active in assays of cell spreading-promoting activity at 300 ng/ml. The isolated human SF preparation consisted of two proteins of apparent molecular weights approximately 65,000 (SF65) and 75,000 (SF75). Both SF65 and SF75 have been shown previously to exhibit cell spreading-promoting activity and to bind monoclonal antibody to human serum SF. PMID:6630199

  20. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by