Science.gov

Sample records for active spreading centers

  1. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  2. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  3. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  4. How Leaky Are Seafloor Spreading Center Axes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Haymon, R. M.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.; Ferrini, V.

    2013-12-01

    Some 500 active vent sites, both focused and diffuse, have now been located along spreading centers by either visual confirmation or instrumental detection of the discharging plume. Discovery of the large majority of these sites was made easier by high-volume discharge of particle-laden plumes. These observations led to estimates (as can be derived from the InterRidge Vents Database) of site frequency from ~0.5-5/100 km, generally increasing with spreading rate. Over the last decade, however, the increasing use of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP (mV)) (aka Eh) sensors capable of detecting minute concentrations of reduced hydrothermal chemicals (e.g., Fe+2, sulfides, Mn+2, H2, and others) suggests that these frequency estimates may be far too conservative. This hypothesis is consistent with earlier results from a few large-scale, high-resolution camera tows on some EPR segments. ORP data provide two important advantages for site identification not available with other commonly used continuously recording sensors: (1) detection of low-temperature, particle-scarce plumes, and (2) detection of reduced chemical species with very short residence times, thus increasing the location specificity of the discharge source. Here, we present high-resolution distributions of ORP anomalies observed in past plume surveys along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (19.5°-22.5°S) in 2004 and 2008, the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.6°-86°W) in 2005/6 and 2011, as well as new data (2011) from the East Pacific Rise (9°-10°N). Except for the 2011 GSC data (a standard CTD tow-yo), all data were collected during continuous horizontal tows of ORP sensors at various depths <~120 m above the seafloor. We used two approaches to verify that ORP anomalies were authentic hydrothermal signals and not (especially in the case of small anomalies) produced by some other transient chemical anomaly. First, on the 2008 ELSC and 2011 EPR tows we compared temperature (ΔT) and ORP (ΔORP) data from

  5. Information spreading and development of cultural centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-05-01

    The historical interplay between societies is governed by many factors, including in particular the spreading of languages, religion, and other symbolic traits. Cultural development, in turn, is coupled to the emergence and maintenance of information spreading. Strong centralized cultures exist due to attention from their members, whose faithfulness in turn relies on the supply of information. Here we discuss a culture evolution model on a planar geometry that takes into account aspects of the feedback between information spreading and its maintenance. Features of the model are highlighted by comparing it to cultural spreading in ancient and medieval Europe, where it suggests in particular that long-lived centers should be located in geographically remote regions.

  6. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  7. Accelerating late Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia Island Group (Solomon island arc) in response to subduction of the recently active Woodlark spreading center and Coleman seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, Frederick W.; Lagoe, Martin B.; Quarles, Andrew; Burr, G.

    1998-10-01

    The New Georgia Island Group of the Solomon Islands is one of four places where an active or recently active spreading ridge has subducted beneath an island arc. We have used coral reef terraces, paleobathymetry of Neogene sedimentary rocks, and existing marine geophysical data to constrain patterns of regional Quaternary deformation related to subduction of the recently active Woodlark spreading center and its overlying Coleman seamount. These combined data indicate the following vertical tectonic history for the central part of the New Georgia Island Group: (1) subsidence of the forearc region (Tetepare and Rendova Islands) to water depths of ˜1500 m and deposition of marine turbidites until after 270 ka; (2) late Quaternary uplift of the forearc to sea level and erosion of an unconformity; (3) subsidence of the forearc to ˜500 m BSL and deposition of bathyal sediments; and (4) uplift of the forearc above sea level with Holocene uplift rates up to at least 7.5 mm/yr on Tetepare and 5 mm/yr on Rendova. In the northeastern part of the New Georgia Island Group, our combined data indicate a slightly different tectonic history characterized by lower-amplitude vertical motions and a more recent change from subsidence to uplift. Barrier reefs formed around New Georgia and Vangunu Islands as they subsided >300 m. By 50-100 ka, subsidence was replaced by uplift that accelerated to Holocene rates of ˜1 mm/yr on the volcanic arc compared with rates up to ˜7.5 mm/yr in the forearc area of Tetepare and Rendova. Uplift mechanisms, such as thermal effects due to subduction of spreading ridges, tectonic erosion, or underplating of deeply subducted bathymetric features, are not likely to function on the 270-ka period that these uplift events have occurred in the New Georgia Island Group. A more likely uplift mechanism for the post-270-ka accelerating uplift of the forearc and volcanic arc of the New Georgia Island Group is progressive impingement of the Coleman seamount or

  8. Seismicity at interactions of spreading centers and transform faults

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlett, H.

    1981-05-10

    Ocean-bottom seismographs were used in a microearthquake monitoring experiment at the eastern junction of the Oceanographer transform with the mid-Atlantic ridge at 35 /sup 0/N. Microearthquake activity at the junction occurred over a broad area (>7 km). These microearthquakes 'cut across' the corner between the transform and median valley and are associated with fault scarps that form the inner walls on the west and north sides of the median and transform valleys. At intersections of other major fracture zones (>100-km offset) and slow to moderate spreading centers microearthquake activity is also diffuse and cuts across the corner between the spreading center and transform fault. The narrow zone of decoupling (approx.1 km) observed between spreading center and transform boundaries by detailed geological studies at the Tamayo/East Pacific Rise and Vema/mid-Atlantic Ridge interactions suggest that the diffuse seismicity (20 to 30 km in width) does not reflect a diffuse plate boundary at the transition from rift to transform valley. Instead, the faulting probably reflects internal deformation of the corner by secondary faults off of the plate boundary.

  9. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  10. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading, which is one of a handful of fundamental global tectonic processes. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments are perpendicular to transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with the non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. For our analysis, instead of comparing the strike of mid-ocean ridges with the strike of nearby transform faults, the azimuth of which can be uncertain, we compare with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMet, Gordon, and Argus 2010]. The advantages of our approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. Moreover, the strike may vary considerably within a single ridge segment bounded by transform faults. This is especially evident near overlapping spreading centers along with the strike varies rapidly with distance along a ridge segment. We use various bathymetric data sets to make our estimates including ETOPO1 [Amante and Eakins, 2009] and GeoMapApp [Ryan et al., 2009]. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, it appears that some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate significantly from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs

  11. Magma to Microbe: Modeling Hydrothermal Processes at Ocean Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Metaxas, Anna; Perfit, Michael R.

    Hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers reflect the complex interactions among transport, cooling and crystallization of magma, fluid circulation in the crust, tectonic processes, water-rock interaction, and the utilization of hydrothermal fluids as a metabolic energy source by microbial and macro-biological ecosystems. The development of mathematical and numerical models that address these complex linkages is a fundamental part the RIDGE 2000 program that attempts to quantify and model the transfer of heat and chemicals from "mantle to microbes" at oceanic ridges. This volume presents the first "state of the art" picture of model development in this context. The most outstanding feature of this volume is its emphasis on mathematical and numerical modeling of a broad array of hydrothermal processes associated with oceanic spreading centers. By examining the state of model development in one volume, both cross-fertilization of ideas and integration across the disparate disciplines that study seafloor hydrothermal systems is facilitated. Students and scientists with an interest in oceanic spreading centers in general and more specifically in ridge hydrothermal processes will find this volume to be an up-to-date and indispensable resource.

  12. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments is perpendicular to nearby transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. To estimate non-orthogonality, we compare ridge-segment strikes with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMets et al., 2010]. The advantages of this approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs where seafloor spreading is the fastest on the planet. If a plume lies near the ridge segment, we assume it contributes to magma overpressure along the ridge segment [Abelson & Agnon, 1997]. We further assume that the contribution to magma overpressure is proportional to the buoyancy flux of the plume [Sleep, 1990] and inversely proportional to the distance between the mid-ocean ridge segment and a given plume. We find that the non-orthogonal angle tends to decrease with increasing spreading rate and with increasing distance between ridge segment and plume.

  13. Hydrothermal circulation at the Cleft-Vance overlapping spreading center: Results of a magnetometric resistivity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, R.L.; Webb, S.C.; Jegen, M.; Sananikone, K.

    1998-01-01

    We report on a magnetometric resistivity sounding carried out in the overlapping spreading center between the Cleft and Vance segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The data collected reveal a strong three dimensionality in the crustal electrical resistivity structure on wavelengths of a few kilometers. Areas of reduced crustal electrical resistivities, with values approaching that of seawater, are seen beneath the neovolcanic zones of both active spreading centers. We interpret these reduced resistivities as evidence of active hydrothermal circulation within the uppermost 1 km of hot, young oceanic crust.

  14. Structure and topography of the Siqueiros transform fault system: Evidence for the development of intra-transform spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, Daniel J.; Gallo, David G.; Edwards, Margo H.; Madsen, John A.; Perfit, Michael R.; Shor, Alexander N.

    1989-12-01

    -parallel structures within the transform domain. The morphology and structure of the axes and flanks of spreading centers A and B in the western and central portion of Siqueiros reflect this type of evolution and suggest that magmatism associated with these intra-transform spreading centers has been active for the past ≈0.5 1.0 Ma.

  15. Viscoelastic solutions to tectonic problems of extinct spreading centers, earthquake triggering, and subduction zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Andrew Mark

    This dissertation uses a finite element technique to explore the role of viscoelastic behavior in a wide range of plate tectonic processes. We consider problems associated with spreading centers, earthquake triggering, and subduction zone dynamics. We simulated the evolution of a slow-spreading center upon cessation of active spreading in order to predict long-term changes in the axial valley morphology. Results suggest that the axial valley created at a slow-spreading center persists because the crust is too strong to deform ductily and because no effective mechanism exists to reverse the topography created by rift-bounding normal faults. These results suggest that the persistence of axial valleys at extinct spreading centers is consistent with a lithospheric stretching model based on dynamic forces for active slow-spreading ridges. In our study of earthquake triggering, results suggest that if a ductile lower crust or upper mantle flows viscously following a thrust event, relaxation may cause a transfer of stress to the upper crust. Under certain conditions this may lead to further increases and a lateral expansion of high Coulomb stresses along the base of the upper crust. Analysis of experimentally determined non-Newtonian flow laws suggests that wet granitic, quartz, and feldspar aggregates may yield a viscosity on the order of 10sp{19} Pa-s. The calculated rate of stress transfer from a viscous lower crust or upper mantle to the upper crust becomes faster with increasing values of the power law exponent and the presence of a regional compressive strain rate. In our study of subduction zone dynamics, we model the density and strength structures that drive the Nazca and South American plates. Results suggest that chemical buoyancy and phase changes associated with a cool subducting slab strongly influence the magnitude of driving forces, and the downgoing slab behaves weaker than the strength that would be expected based solely on temperature. Additionally

  16. Centered CW interference rejection using spread spectrum techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholtz, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for the rejection of CW interference by spread spectrum techniques. When this interference is known to be exactly at the carrier frequency of the spread spectrum signal, this information can be used to design optimal IF filtering prior to despreading. The application of this approach to the pilot beam receiver of the Solar Power Satellite is considered as an example.

  17. The SHEBA Ridge : a Particular Spreading Center or an End-member of the Slow Spreading Processes ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENTE, P.; LEROY, S.; BLAIS, A.; d'ACREMONT, E.; PATRIAT, P.; FLEURY, J.; MAIA, M.; PERROT, J.; FOURNIER, M.

    2001-12-01

    We analyze multibeam bathymetry, acoustic imagery, magnetic and gravity data collected during the Encens-Sheba cruise of the NO Marion Dufresne. The survey covered the axis and the flanks up to the continental margins of the Sheba Ridge between 52oE and 54o30'E, at the oriental extremity of the Aden gulf. The full spreading rate in this young oceanic basin is about 2 cmy since the continental rifting. Three second-order segments, one presenting an anomalously shallow axis, characterize this part of the Sheba ridge. The new bathymetry data reveal a particular fabric on the flanks and at the axis for the long (120 km) and shallow spreading center. The flanks, like the ridge axis, are marked by large, more or less circular, volcanic domes. They are built by a few large volcanoes (5-10 km diameter) and by several smaller (1-2 km diameter) edifices. Many of these volcanoes present a well-developed caldera. These volcanic constructions are well developed in the southern part of the axis. Close to the axis, the higher reliefs culminate at a depth of 1000 m. Tectonic scarps limit a deep axial valley at the extremities of this long segment. The deformation, diffuse at the ends, becomes more focused toward the center of this segment and is arranged in an hourglass pattern. A negative mantle Bouguer anomaly elongated in the spreading direction marks this segment. The differences in MBA (~70 mgals) and in depth (more than 2 km) between the center and the ends of this segment are the largest, highest of the slow spreading ridges. Acoustic imagery, axial magnetic and mantle Bouguer anomalies generally permit to precise the location of the spreading axis. In this segment, if the axial area is clearly defined, the neovolcanic zone is more difficult to localize. This suggests a diffuse volcanism at the center of the segment at the origin of the numerous small volcanoes. The other segments of the Sheba ridge present a more typical slow spreading axial valley. The discontinuities

  18. Near-seafloor magnetic field observations at the Mariana Trough back-arc spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Toshiya; Asada, Miho; Umino, Susumu; Koike, Yuki; Kanamatsu, Toshiya

    2010-05-01

    We surveyed the Mariana Trough back-arc basin in the western Pacific with the Japanese submersible Shinkai 6500 to understand detailed crustal formation process at the 17° N segment [Fujiwara et al., 2008]. The 17° N segment is suggested to be in vigorous magmatic stage. Sheet lava flows, suggesting a high rate of eruption, occupy the seafloor of the segment even the slow spreading with a full-rate of ~3 cm/yr [Deschamps et al., 2005; Asada et al., 2007]. The objective of magnetic field measurements is to investigate magnetization of lava flows at the seafloor. Near-seafloor observations provide us high-resolution magnetic anomaly that is valuable for the studies of the detailed magnetization structure of ocean crust and paleointensity recorded in the ocean crust. Magnetization intensities relate to age of lava, therefore deep-sea magnetic data may provide geophysical evidence for discussion of relative age differences of the lava flows. Three submersible dives were made in the axial valley situated in the spreading center. One of the dives traversed the axial valley a distance of ~2 km from the center of the valley toward off-axis, roughly parallel to the spreading direction. We observed magnetic anomalies with large-amplitude (up to 5000 nT) and short-wavelength (several tens of meters). We evaluated fine-scale across-axis magnetic structure along the dive path from the anomalies. High magnetization intensity (up to 50 A/m) was estimated at the center of the axial valley, and therefore the lava flows in the area was likely young in age. The magnetization intensity decreased toward the off-axis. The result suggests the seafloor age increases toward the off-axis. However the detailed variation of the magnetization distribution does not show simple seafloor age increment in proportion to distance from the spreading center. It implies the complexity of the crustal formation process. There is no clear correlation between the distribution of magnetization intensity

  19. A reexamination of the spreading center hypothesis for Ovda and Thetis regiones, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1990-01-01

    Crumpler et al. (1987) proposed that Ovda and Thetis Regiones are spreading centers. The strong positive correlation between geoid and topography observed in ovda and Thetis is unlike that observed for terrestrial spreading centers. The maximum elevation expected for spreading centers on Venus is 1.5 km, and a cooling plate thermal model predicts a maximum geoid anomaly of 8 m, both much less than observed. Even if a spreading center is operative in Ovda and Thetis, most of the geoid and topography must be due to other mechanisms. Crumplet et al. also proposed the existence of 'cross-strike discontinuities', interpreted as transform fault zones, but the evidence for these structures is not conclusive.

  20. Formation of ferrobasalt at east Pacific midocean spreading centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clague, D. A.; Bunch, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical modeling using a least squares petrologic mixing program demonstrates that ridge ferrobasalts from three east Pacific regions are generated from normal midocean ridge balsalt by crystal fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and minor olivine at shallow mantle depths. Clinopyroxene is an important fractionating phase in this model in contrast to most previously proposed fractionation models. Calculations demonstrate that the ferrobasalts represent a much smaller percentage of residual liquid than has previously been proposed. Implications of extensive shallow crystal fractionation for the determination of depths of magma generation are discussed. The different fields on an anorthite-olivine-hypersthene ternary diagram for basalts from east Pacific fast and moderate spreading ridges can be explained by variable degrees of shallow crystal fractionation rather than by different depths of magma generation as suggested by Bass (1971) and Scheidegger (1973).

  1. Geomagnetic paleointensity constraints on eruption timing at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, J. A.; Ab Fatah, A.; Colman, A.; McClinton, J. T.; Sinton, J. M.; White, S. M.; Rubin, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The intermediate-spreading-rate Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) experiences decreasing magma supply along axis with increasing distance from the nearby Galapagos hotspot. This allows us to explore the effects of variable magma supply on eruptive frequency, size, and style. Two contrasting sites on the GSC were mapped using high-resolution swath bathymetry, submersible observations, and camera tow photography. Individual eruptive units have been identified on the basis of these data and observations, as well sample geochemistry. In order to construct an eruptive history and to make broader interpretations regarding eruptive processes, it is necessary to place relative and absolute age constraints on these units. We present age determinations derived from geomagnetic paleointensity experiments at one of the study sites, centered at ~91°55'W, where increased magma supply from the hotspot results in an axial high. Due to the near monotonic decrease in geomagnetic paleointensity over the past ~500+ years, it is possible to infer relative age and to place approximate age constraints on eruptive units on the basis of their experimentally-determined paleointensity. Four of the largest identified units have been selected as a test case. Results suggest that the youngest flow is approximately 40 ± 30 years old. This flow unit is ~5 km long by 1 km wide, centered on the rise axis. An older flow (~180 ± 30 years old), also centered along the rise axis, lies to the west and its ~7 km along-axis exposure is interrupted by a large, flat-topped seamount. A number of active hydrothermal chimneys sit atop this flow unit, the heat source for which we infer to be related to the younger flow to the east or to a more recent shallow intrusion. The oldest documented flow is roughly 400 years old and is exposed slightly off-axis to the north of the two younger flows. The paleointensity-derived flow ages are consistent with available geological constraints on relative age. Based on

  2. Age-Related Changes in Spreading Activation during Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Rachel; Walker, Joanne; Gross, Julien; Hayne, Harlene

    2014-01-01

    The concept of spreading activation describes how retrieval of one memory cues retrieval of other memories that are associated with it. This study explored spreading activation in 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old infants. Infants (n = 144) learned two tasks within the same experimental session; one task, deferred imitation (DI), is typically remembered…

  3. Overlapping Spreading Centers: Implications from Crack Growth Simulation by the Displacement Discontinuity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempere, Jean-Christophe; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1986-02-01

    Overlapping spreading centers (OSC's) are a fundamental aspect of accretionary processes at intermediate and fast-spreading centers and typically occur at deep points along the axial depth profile. They have a characteristic geometry consisting of two en echelon overlapping, curving ridges separated by an elongated depression. The length to width ratio of this overlap basin is typically 3∶1. We have been successful in reproducing the overlapping spreading center geometry by modelling the growth of two initially parallel elastic cracks of given length and offset in a tensile stress field at infinity. A boundary element displacement discontinuity method was used to solve this problem. Our calculated results are compared with seafloor observations in terms of the size and shape of the overlap region. For small OSC's, there is a very good agreement between calculations and observations but, for large ones, the overlap basin tends to be longer than our predicted results indicate. This suggests that the assumptions made in the model (i.e., perfectly elastic, isotropic and homogeneous medium) are perhaps valid for the brittle lid above the magma chamber that underlies OSC's with small offsets (< 2 km) but oversimplified for OSC's with large offsets. Our modelling shows that the initial interaction of closely spaced surface ruptures along spreading centers is to deflect away from one another as they approach. The deflection will be the greatest for small misalignments of the fracture systems, thus even minor misalignments of the spreading centers may result in the development of OSC's. Where the misalignment is less than the width of the cracking front, the fracture systems may meet head-on creating a saddle point along the axial depth profile. Our results support the hypothesis suggested by Macdonald et al. [1984] in which overlapping spreading centers develop where two magmatic pulses migrate toward each other along the strike of the spreading center following fracture

  4. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  5. Imaging the seismic structure beneath oceanic spreading centers using ocean bottom geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang

    This dissertation focuses on imaging the crustal and upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath oceanic spreading centers. The goals are to provide a better understanding of the crustal magmatic system and the relationship between mantle melting processes, crustal architecture and ridge characteristics. To address these questions I have analyzed ocean bottom geophysical data collected from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center using a combination of ambient noise tomography and seafloor compliance analysis. To characterize the crustal melt distribution at fast spreading ridges, I analyze seafloor compliance - the deformation under long period ocean wave forcing - measured during multiple expeditions between 1994 and 2007 at the East Pacific Rise 9º - 10ºN segment. A 3D numerical modeling technique is developed and used to estimate the effects of low shear velocity zones on compliance measurements. The forward modeling suggests strong variations of lower crustal shear velocity along the ridge axis, with zones of possible high melt fractions beneath certain segments. Analysis of repeated compliance measurements at 9º48'N indicates a decrease of crustal melt fraction following the 2005 - 2006 eruption. This temporal variability provides direct evidence for short-term variations of the magmatic system at a fast spreading ridge. To understand the relationship between mantle melting processes and crustal properties, I apply ambient noise tomography of ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) data to image the upper mantle seismic structure beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The seismic images reveal an asymmetric upper mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the ELSC, representing a zone of partial melt. As the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc, the LVZ becomes increasingly offset and separated from the sub-arc low velocity zone. The separation of the ridge and arc low velocity zones is spatially coincident

  6. Venus trough-and-ridge tessera - Analog to earth oceanic crust formed at spreading centers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The similarity between the morphologies of Venus trough-and-ridge tessera and the earth's ocean floor is discussed. The hypothesis that tessera texture might be related to a crustal fabric produced at spreading centers is examined. It is suggested that the proccesses that produce the ocean floor fabric on earth are good candidates for the origin and production of the trough-and-ridge tessera. To support this hypothesis, the characteristics of the trough-and-ridge terrain in Laima Tessera are described and compared to the seafloor at spreading centers.

  7. Venus trough-and-ridge tessera - Analog to earth oceanic crust formed at spreading centers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.

    1990-05-01

    The similarity between the morphologies of Venus trough-and-ridge tessera and the earth's ocean floor is discussed. The hypothesis that tessera texture might be related to a crustal fabric produced at spreading centers is examined. It is suggested that the proccesses that produce the ocean floor fabric on earth are good candidates for the origin and production of the trough-and-ridge tessera. To support this hypothesis, the characteristics of the trough-and-ridge terrain in Laima Tessera are described and compared to the seafloor at spreading centers.

  8. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  9. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  10. Radiometric ages of brachyuran crabs from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.T.; Turekian, K.K.

    1984-09-01

    The ages of four crab carapaces from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield were determined radiometrically using members of the U and Th decay chains. One animal had an age of 0.1 years and therefore had undergone molting just before collection; the other three had last molted 3-4 years before collection.

  11. Upper mantle electrical resistivity structure beneath back-arc spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seama, N.; Shibata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Shindo, H.; Matsuno, T.; Nogi, Y.; Okino, K.

    2011-12-01

    We compare four electrical resistivity structure images of the upper mantle across back-arc spreading centers (Mariana Trough at 18 N and 13 N, and the Eastern Lau at 19.7 S and 21.3 S) to provide geophysical constraints on issues of mantle dynamics beneath the back-arc spreading system related to the subducting slab. The central Mariana Trough at 18 N has the full spreading rate of 25 km/Myr, and shows characteristic slow-spreading features; existence of median valley neovolcanic zone and "Bull's eyes" mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) along the axes. On the other hand, the southern Mariana Trough at 13 N shows an EPR type axial relief in morphology and lower MBA than that in the central Mariana Trough (Kitada et al., 2006), suggesting abundance of magma supply, even though the full spreading rate is 35 km/Myr that is categorized as a slow spreading ridge. At the Eastern Lau spreading center, crustal thickness and morphology vary systematically with arc proximity and shows the opposed trends against spreading rate: The full spreading rate increases from 65 km/Myr at 21.3 S to 85 km/Myr at 19.7 S, while the crustal thicknesses decrease together with morphology transitions from shallow peaked volcanic highs to a deeper flat axis (Martinez et al., 2006). Matsuno et al. (2010) provides a resistivity structure image of the upper mantle across the central Mariana subduction system, which contains several key features: There is an uppermost resistive layer with a thickness of 80-100 km beneath the central Mariana Trough, suggesting dry residual from the plate accretion process. But there is no evidence for a conductive feature beneath the back-arc spreading center at 18 N, and this feature is clearly independent from the conductive region beneath the volcanic arc below 60 km depth that reflects melting and hydration driven by water release from the subducting slab. The resultant upper mantle resistivity structure well support that the melt supply is not abundant, resulting in

  12. Seismic anisotropy indicates ridge-parallel asthenospheric flow beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, William; Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.; Blackman, Donna K.

    2015-02-01

    Seismic anisotropy beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) is investigated using both Rayleigh waves and shear waves, using data from the 2009-2010 ELSC ocean bottom seismograph experiment. Phase velocities of Rayleigh waves determined by ambient noise cross correlation are inverted for azimuthally anisotropic phase velocity maps. Splitting of S waves from five intermediate and deep focus earthquakes was determined by waveform analysis. Taken together, Rayleigh wave and S wave data indicate that significant (~2%) anisotropy extends to at least 300 km depth. Both data sets indicate a fast direction aligned within a few degrees of the N10°E striking ELSC and somewhat oblique to the N25°E strike of the neighboring volcanic arc. We therefore describe the fast direction as spreading perpendicular, not convergence perpendicular and interpret it as due to ridge-parallel flow of the asthenosphere. However, the region arcward (east) of the ELSC has the stronger anisotropy, suggesting that the strongest flow gradients may occur in the region between the spreading center and the arc, in contrast to being centered beneath the ELSC. Fluids released from the underlying plate may produce anisotropic hydrous materials, but more importantly lower the viscosity, thus enhancing along-strike flow. Both could contribute to an along-strike fast direction signature. Seafloor spreading diminishes south of the seismic array, ceasing altogether south of latitude 25°S (500 km south of the array center), a region dominated by much slower tectonic extension, suggesting that asthenosphere is inflowing from the north to accommodate the increase in asthenospheric volume associated with the seafloor spreading.

  13. Modeling hydrothermal processes at ocean spreading centers: Magma to microbe—An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Metaxas, Anna; Perfit, Michael R.

    Hydrothermal processes at oceanic spreading centers encompass a number of highly interconnected processes ranging from the transport of mantle melts beneath spreading centers to the evolution of ocean chemistry and Earth's climate. This volume, which stems from a RIDGE Theoretical Institute held at Mammoth Lakes, California in June 2006, contains papers that address the complex connections among magmatic heat supply, crustal formation, seismicity, and hydrothermal circulation as well as the complex linkages among hydrothermal circulation, vent chemistry, carbon cycling, and microbial and macrofaunal ecosystems. The last paper in this volume explores the connection between hydrothermal venting and the chemical evolution of the oceans during the Phanerozoic. From reading these papers, one should recognize the wide variety of modeling approaches used and the uneven state of model development within various subdisciplines. Models of hydrothermal circulation and vent chemistry tend to be more quantitative, whereas models of carbon cycling and biological processes tend to be more conceptual. Although many of the complex linkages among the subdisciplines are understood at a conceptual level, considerable effort must be undertaken to develop integrated quantitative models of hydrothermal processes at oceanic spreading centers.

  14. Seismic refraction data constrain along-axis structure of the Mid-Cayman spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Harding, J.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) is an ultraslow (15 mm/yr) spreading ridge between the Caribbean and North American plates. From north to south the MCSC is just ~140 km long, as it is bounded to the north by the Oriente transform fault, and to the south by the Swan Islands and Walton fault systems. The neovolcanic zone is characterized by an axial valley with depths to 6000 m, and a few off-axis bathymetric highs that can be as shallow as 2000 m. The role of tectonic and magmatic processes in the creation of this bathymetric relief is not yet understood. In the 2015 CaySEIS experiment, a collaboration between German, US and UK scientists, we gathered ocean-bottom seismic refraction data along five lines across and parallel to the MCSC to determine its crustal structure. We here present the tomographic analysis of marine seismic refractions recorded along the spreading axis. The presence of thin crust here shows that the bathymetric relief of the MCSC is at least in part isostatically compensated. Much of the older ultraslow spread crust on the flanks of the MCSC may not have accreted along the deep axial valley, but it may instead have formed by exhumation of gabbros along extensional faults in the adjacent seafloor.

  15. Distribution of diffuse flow megafauna in two sites on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center, Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podowski, Elizabeth L.; Moore, Tom S.; Zelnio, Kevin A.; Luther, George W., III; Fisher, Charles R.

    2009-11-01

    Hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by large gradients of toxic chemicals and high temperatures, which play a significant role in defining species' distributions. We used high-resolution imagery and spatially explicit in-situ physico-chemical measurements analyzed within a Geographic Information System (GIS) in order to characterize the spatial relations among different groups of megafauna, temperature, and chemistry within two discrete vent communities (40 and 50 m 2) on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Chemical (sulfide and O 2 concentrations) and temperature data were obtained from approximately 75 different locations within each community using in-situ instruments. All data were integrated into a GIS, which served as a visualization tool and enabled the data to be analyzed in a spatial context. Our results confirm the importance of abiotic variables in defining the distributions of some fauna and elucidate several biological associations that are consistent between the two communities. The provannid snail, Alviniconcha spp., appears to actively avoid temperatures above 32-46 °C and/or sulfide concentrations exceeding approximately 260 μM. Slightly higher average sulfide concentrations and temperatures were measured among aggregations of Ifremeria nautilei compared to aggregations of the mussel Bathymodiolus brevior; however, the presence of mixed aggregations of the two species indicates an overlap in requirements. The brachyuran crab, Austinograea spp., was consistently observed directly on symbiont-containing species, particularly Alviniconcha spp. The solitary snail, Eosipho desbruyeresi, was rarely observed on biological substrata, but was often (60% of its population at the most active site) within 5 cm of symbiont-containing fauna, indicating a tolerance and preference for proximity to areas of high productivity. Densities and coverage of species differed substantially between the two communities despite high species overlap

  16. Signatures of present and past melt distribution along fast and intermediate spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Milena

    The work presented in this dissertation depicts past and present signatures of melt distribution at fast and intermediate spreading centers. The primary goal of the studies included in this thesis is to provide better understanding of melt distribution and variation in melt physical properties within and at the base of oceanic crust formed at these spreading centers. Furthermore, this work examines effects that melt presence might have on formation and structural characteristics of oceanic crust. To explore the above we use geophysical data collected during two expeditions conducted along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (intermediate) and the East Pacific Rise (fast). The major part of the thesis is based on the work conducted on high resolution reflection seismic data that investigate present day intracrustal melt distribution along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis extending between 8°20' and 10°10'N. Here, the character of the melt reservoir is examined from different aspects and by using different seismic data analysis methods. By systematic analysis of the seismic reflection data, we show that the axial melt lens (AML) is segmented at different segment scales. Locations of the mapped disruptions in the AML correspond to previously identified tectonic discontinuities well expressed in the seafloor bathymetry. The above result corroborates genetic relationship between tectonic and magmatic segmentation. To examine melt distribution along the EPR, here for the first time we use amplitude variation with angle of incidence (AVA) crossplotting technique that was developed by oil and gas industry experts to look for presence of hydrocarbons. Further data examination for the first time for the mid-ocean ridges show presence of deeper lenses (lenses that are present below the AML). Presence of gaps in these sub-events and their collocation with what is believed to be the location of origin of the last documented eruption occurred in 2005--06, may shed light on the mechanisms

  17. Methane Distribution In Plumes Of The South Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, T.; Hirota, A.; Tsunogai, U.; Gamo, T.; Nakamura, K.; Noguchi, T.; Taira, N.; Oomori, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Utsumi, M.

    2004-12-01

    In the South Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center, two methane plumes were observed in water column based on analysis of methane in seawater samples collected during the R/V Thompson expeditions in 2003 around water depth of 2,700 m over the Fryer site on the ridge-axis seamount (12\\deg57.22N, 143\\deg37.16E, depth: 2,850 m). The estimated end-member isotopic compositions of methane in the two plumes are \\delta13C_{CH4} = -5‰ PDB and -50‰ PDB. These values indicated that the two plumes were originated from the different sources. During YK03-09 cruise using the submersible Shinkai 6500 from October to November in 2003, detailed seafloor observation discovered sulfide chimneys emitting black and clear hydrothermal fluid on the off-axis seamount at Pika site (12°55.15N, 143°36.96E, depth: 2,773 m). The result of analysis of isotopic composition of methane in the hydrothermal fluids recovered from the off-axis hydrothermal vents using WHATS (Water and Hydrothermal Atsuryoku Tight Sampler) was averaged value of -4‰ PDB (standard deviation = 1‰ PDB, n = 3). Hydrothermal fluids from the Fryer site were also sampled and were measured: average value = -6.7‰ PDB, standard deviation = 0.3‰ PDB, n = 3. During the R/V Thompson expeditions in March 2004 using ROV ROPOS, 11 ROPOS dives and CTD-RMS plume surveys were conducted, and newly discovered a huge hydrothermal structure with active fluid venting at Achaean site on the ridge skirt (12°56.37N, 143°37.92E, depth: 2,990 m). The δ ^{13}C_{CH4} value of the fluid sample from the site using ROCS (Rotary Clean Seawater sampler) was -14.7‰ PDB. Analysis of isotopic composition of methane in the plume samples collected using the CTD-hydrocast at water depth of 2,500 m over the Archaean site showed -45‰ PDB. Source of methane (δ ^{13}C_{CH4} = -50‰ PDB), however, in the two plumes of the South Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center has been missing. The δ ^{13}C of methane cannot be considered in sediment

  18. A study of epidemic spreading on activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yijiang; Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic spreading was explored on activity-driven networks (ADNs), accounting for the study of dynamics both on and of the ADN. By employing the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model, two aspects were considered: (1) the infection rate of susceptible agent (depending on the number of its infected neighbors) evolves due to the temporal structure of ADN, rather than being a constant number; (2) the susceptible and infected agents generate unequal links while being activated, namely, the susceptible agent gets few contacts with others in order to protect itself. Results show that, in both cases, the larger epidemic threshold and smaller outbreak size were obtained.

  19. Initial Modeling of Hydrothermal Circulation at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, R. P.; Garber, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal plume data and other observations were used to parameterize the Piccard (PHF) and Von Damm (VDHF) hydrothermal fields on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center. The PHF is hosted in basalt at a seafloor depth of nearly 5000 m where a number of active sites vent with temperatures as high as 400°C from an area of approximately 105 m2. A neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume occurs at a height of approximately 500 m above the PHF. Buoyant plume theory yields a buoyancy flux of ~4 x10-2 m4/s3 and a heat flux of ~160 MW. Using a single-pass model, this heat output and maximum vent temperature yields a mass flow rate of ~80 kg/s and a crustal permeability of ~2 x 10-14 m2. A neutrally buoyant plume noted in 2010 at a height of approximately 1000 m above the seafloor corresponds to a buoyancy flux of ~ 0.64, yielding a heat output ~ 2.6 GW and a mass flow rate of ~1280 kg/s, which is much larger than any known system to date. We suspect that the plume observed at 1000 m was an event plume rather than a chronic plume. The PHF is likely driven by a subsurface magma source that exhibited a magmatic event in 2010. The VDHF, hosted in ultramafic rocks near the top of an OCC approximately 13 km west of the neovolcanic zone, lies at a depth of approximately 2300 m. Venting occurs from a conical mound approximately 100 m in diameter. A plume signal at a height of ~300 m above the VDHF yields a buoyancy flux of ~ 5 x 10-3 m4/s3 and a heat output of ~20 MW. Assuming a vent temperature of 150°C based on the presence of anhydrite near the vents, the single-pass model yields a mass flow rate of ~ 30 kg/s and a permeability of 10-11 m2. The low estimated heat output for the VDHF suggests that is likely driven by circulation through a deep-seated fault or fracture system rather than by subsurface magma. The vent temperature, heat output, and permeability estimates, provide useful parameters for constructing mathematical and numerical models of the PHF and the VDHF.

  20. Epidemic spreading and immunization in node-activity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Chen, Shufang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading in node-activity networks, where an individual participates in social networks with a certain rate h. There are two cases for h: the state-independent case and the state-dependent case. We investigate the epidemic threshold as a function of h compared to the static network. Our results suggest the epidemic threshold cannot be exactly predicted by using the analysis approach in the static network. In addition, we further propose a local information-based immunization protocol on node-activity networks. Simulation analysis shows that the immunization can not only eliminate the infectious disease, but also change the epidemic threshold via increasing the immunization parameter.

  1. Evidence for variations in magma production along oceanic spreading centers - A critical appraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karson, J. A.; Elthon, D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent geologic, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the oceanic lithosphere near fracture zones have resulted in the proposal that the 'magma budget,' defined as the amount of magma delivered to magma chambers or conduits beneath a spreading center for a given amount of spreading, decreases as fracture zones are approached. Seismic reflection and refraction studies indicate that the crust becomes anomalously thin near fracture zones, but reference must be made to the boundary between residual upper mantle peridotites and overlying cumulate rocks in order to assess potential variations in the magma budget. The position of this interface, however, generally is not constrained by geophysical studies. Geochemical variations in basaltic glasses collected near fracture zones are consistent with a decrease in partial melting as fracture zones are approached, but they could also be produced by variations in open-system magmatic processes with no change in the extent of partial melting. Although a decrease in the magma budget as fracture zones are approached is consistent with these data, so are alternative models that incorporate a constant magma budget.

  2. Rifted Structure of the Vietnam Continental Margin Near the South China Sea Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. D.; Fyhn, M. B.; Boldreel, L. O.; Nielsen, L. H.; Duc, N. A.; Huyen, N. T.; Thang, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    The extinct spreading center of the South China Sea intersects the continental margin off Vietnam, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of these two features. As part of a collaborative project between the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, the University of Copenhagen and the Vietnam Petroleum Institute, the crustal structure of this area has been investigated by the use of seismic reflection profiles, to provide control on the sedimentary and basement structure, combined with modelling of gravity data from global satellite altimetry, to constrain the crustal thickness. A complex pattern of rifting is seen, which may be ascribed to the complex stress fields of the propagating rift axis, together with an apparent progression in structure. In the more oceanic area, the rifting is relatively sharp, with fairly rapid crustal thnning of about 10 km. Towards the continent, in the region of the tip of the rift axis, the crustal thinning is less, around 5-7 km, and takes place over a greater distance. In the absence of data on the deep crustal structure it is not possible to determine the absolute crustal thickness with certainty, but the gravity modelling suggests that the pre-existing crust was no more than 20 km thick, having been thinned in earlier stages of formation of the South China Sea. A preliminary analysis of the isostatic balance along the various transects was inconclusive but suggests that the sedimentary sequences are largely isostatically compensated, rather than being supported by lithospheric rigidity. Detailed modelling of the rifting and subsidence may provide further insight into the processes that occur when an oceanic spreading center intersects and propagates into a continental margin.

  3. Melt Inclusion Evidence for Subduction-modified Mantle Beneath the Woodlark Spreading Center, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, J.; Turner, A.; Collins, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Woodlark Spreading Center (WSC) to the east of Papua New Guinea separates the Indo-Australian plate and Solomon Sea microplate. At its eastern terminus, the WSC is being subducted at the New Britain trench, forming a triple junction near the New Georgia Group arc in the Solomon Islands. Previous studies have shown that lavas recovered from greater than 100 km from the trench on the WSC are N-MORB, but closer to the trench they have arc-like Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios, enrichments in LILE, and depletions in HFSE. In the complex triple junction area of the WSC on the Simbo and Ghizo Ridges, island arc tholeiites to medium-K calc-alkaline andesites and dacites have been recovered, many with trace element and isotopic characteristics that are similar to the true arc lavas in the New Georgia Group on the other side of the trench. We suggest that subduction-modified arc mantle migrates through slab windows created by the subduction of the WSC as the plates continue to diverge after subduction. This transfer of mantle across the plate boundary leads to variable mixing between arc and N-MORB end-members, forming the hybrid to arc-like lavas recovered on the WSC. To test this hypothesis and to characterize the end-member compositions, we have analyzed melt inclusions in olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase phenocrysts in Simbo and Ghizo Ridge lava samples. Major elements were analyzed using the electron microprobe facility at Fayetteville State University and volatiles were analyzed on the ion probe facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The melt inclusions show a wide diversity of magmas from basalts to dacites, and mixing modeling shows that most Woodlark Spreading Center lava compositions are explained by mixing between the most extreme mafic (MORB) and felsic (arc) inclusion compositions.

  4. Characterization of vent fauna at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouviez, Sophie; Jacobson, Alixandra; Wu, Mengyou; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea have a global distribution on mid-ocean ridges and comprise at least six biogeographic provinces. A geographically isolated vent system was recently discovered on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC). Here, we describe the faunal assemblages associated with this system and their relationship to known biogeographic provinces. Taxa from MCSC vents were sorted based on morphology and barcoded using the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S) genes for identification. Distinct faunal assemblages were recognized around vent chimneys at two hydrothermal vent fields (Von Damm and Beebe) separated by a distance of ~13 km and >2.5-km depth along the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center. These results suggest that depth and/or local conditions structure faunal assemblages in this region. COI and microsatellite markers were then used to explore the genetic structure of the shrimp Rimicaris hybisae, the only abundant species shared between the shallow Von Damm and the deep Beebe vent fields. R. hybisae was not genetically differentiated between the Von Damm Spire and Beebe chimneys, suggesting this species is better adapted for bathymetric dispersal and the differences in local conditions than other MCSC species. In addition, a third faunal assemblage dominated by two species of tubeworms was identified at Von Damm in association with weakly diffuse flow sites (including the site known as "Marker X18"). The Marker X18 assemblage shares species with seeps in the region. Fauna shared with both vents and seeps at the MCSC reinforces the need for a global biogeographic study of deep-sea chemosynthetic fauna that is not focused on specific habitats.

  5. Inhibition of Colony-spreading Activity of Staphylococcus aureus by Secretion of δ-Hemolysin*

    PubMed Central

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed “colony spreading.” Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin. PMID:22411996

  6. Differential lexical and semantic spreading activation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul S; Drago, Valeria; Yung, Raegan C; Pearson, Jaclyn; Stringer, Kristi; Giovannetti, Tania; Libon, David; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to be associated with disruption in semantic networks. Previous studies examining changes in spreading activation in AD have used a lexical decision task paradigm. We have used a paradigm based on average word frequencies obtained from the words generated on the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) and the Animal Naming (AN) test. The COWAT and AN tests were administered to a group of 25 patients with AD and 20 control participants. We predicted that the patients with AD would have higher average word frequencies on the COWAT and AN tests than the control participants. The results indicated that the AD group generated words with a higher average word frequency on the AN test but a lower average word frequency on the COWAT. The reasons for the discrepancy in average word frequencies on the AN test and COWAT are discussed.

  7. Hydrothermal Exploration of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center: Isolated Evolution on Earth’s Deepest Mid-Ocean Ridge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Huber, J. A.; Seewald, J.; van Dover, C.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D.; Connelly, D.; Honig, D. L.; Jakuba, M.; Kinsey, J. C.; McDermott, J.; Nakamura, K.; Sands, C.; Smith, J.; Sylva, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first systematic exploration for and characterization of hydrothermal vents and vent ecosystems on the short (~110 km), deep (> 5000 m), ultra-slow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) Mid-Cayman Rise in the Caribbean Sea. This work was carried out aboard the RV Cape Hatteras in October-November 2009 as part of the ChEss Project of the Census of Marine Life, funded through NASA’s ASTEP program and represents the first scientific field program funded to use WHOI’s new hybrid deep submergence vehicle, Nereus, first in AUV mode then in ROV mode. Prior to this work, evidence for hydrothermal venting had been found on every active spreading center investigated, including the comparably ultra-slow spreading ridges in the SW Indian Ocean and in the Arctic (Mohns, Knipovich & Gakkel Ridges). The organisms colonizing vents are renowned for their endemicity, their adaptations to the extreme chemical and physical conditions encountered and for differences in species level from one ocean basin to another. Consequently, the identification of any organisms colonizing vents of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center offers a critical opportunity to build upon our understanding of the dispersion of vent species and the potential role of the rise of the Isthmus of Panama (dating from ~5 Ma) as a vicariant event leading to the evolutionary divergence of Atlantic and Pacific vent faunas. Further, the MCSC is so deep that any vents present may occur at depths greater than all previously known vent systems, extending the known limits to life on our planet in terms of pressure, temperature, and vent-fluid chemistry. Finally, hydrothermal circulation through ultramafic rocks can generate abiotic synthesis of organic matter: an analog for the prebiotic basis for the origin of life on early Earth and Mars. In future years of this 4-year study, therefore, we will also aim to assess the relative importance of abiotic organic synthesis versus recycling of bio-organic material and/or chemical

  8. Hydrothermal cooling along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center: No evidence for discharge beyond the neovolcanic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Martinez, Fernando; Resing, Joseph A.; Walker, Sharon L.; Buck, Nathaniel J.; Edwards, Margo H.

    2010-08-01

    Heat transported from the mantle beneath spreading centers creates an astonishingly narrow ribbon of convective heat discharge at plate boundaries, as apparently demonstrated by exhaustive exploration for hydrothermal discharge sites over the last three decades. Recent observations and models are now challenging this assumption of exclusively axis-centric high-temperature venting. One example is the proposal that intense cooling along the vertical boundaries of a broad low-velocity volume (LVV) of hot crust could generate high-temperature fluids several kilometers off axis. To test the hypothesis that substantial hydrothermal discharge might occur beyond the LVV, we conducted a dense survey grid of the ridge and surrounding seafloor (up to ±5 km) along 175 km of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge (˜1800 km of track line). Our sampling array extended from ˜50 to 400 m above bottom and included light-scattering, oxidation-reduction potential, and hydrographic sensors attached to the tow line and beneath the IMI120 sonar mapping system. The surveys successfully mapped plumes from several vent fields in the neovolcanic zone (˜±1.5 km about the axis) but did not detect evidence of significant discharge anywhere farther off-axis. At a few locations on the Valu Fa Ridge, however, we did record oxidation-reduction potential anomalies with hydrographic density signatures that imply low-temperature hydrothermal sources on the axial flank. Although these sites are hundreds of meters deeper than the adjacent crest, they are above, not beyond, the previously mapped LVV. Our results thus do not support a simple picture of high-temperature fluids ascending undiluted through the crust to the seafloor several kilometers off-axis. However, we cannot exclude the possibilities that the largely unmapped LVV is narrower here than seen on other ridges, that hydrothermal fluids formed beyond the LVV are channeled to the axis, or that discharge beyond the neovolcanic

  9. Hydrothermal vent community zonation along environmental gradients at the Lau back-arc spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Stacy; Hammerstrom, Kamille

    2012-04-01

    The Lau back-arc spreading center exhibits gradients in hydrothermal vent habitat characteristics from north to south. Biological zonation within a few meters of vents has been described as temperature driven. We constructed georeferenced photomosaics of the seafloor out to tens of meters beyond vents to describe peripheral zonation and explore correlations between environmental conditions and the biological community. Cluster analysis separated northern sites from southern sites, corresponding to a break in substrate from basalt in the north to andesite in the south. Northern sites were dominated by anemones, and southern by sponges. A previous suggestion that dominants may be dependent on friability of the substrate was not supported; when visually distinguishable, individual species within taxa showed different patterns. Northern sites hosted proportionally more suspension feeding species. Sulfide that can support microbial food sources is at higher concentrations at these sites, though bathymetry that may enhance bottom currents is less rugged. Northern sites had higher diversity that may result from the overall northwards flow, which would generally permit easier dispersal downcurrent, though we observed no difference in dispersal strategies at different sites.

  10. Investigation of spreading center ecolution by joint inversion of seafloor magnetic anomaly and tectonic fabric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    Spreading center segments that have experienced a complex tectonic history including rift propagation may have a complicated signature in bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data. To gain insight into the history of such regions, we have developed techniques in which both the magnetic anomaly patterns and seafloor fabric trends are predicted theoretically, and the combined predictions are compared numerically with the data to estimate best fitting parameters for the propagation history. Fitting functions are constructed to help determine which model best matches the digitized fabric and magnetic anomaly data. Such functions offer statistical criteria for choosing the best fit model. We use this approach to resolve the propagation history of the Cobb Offset along the Juan de Fuca ridge. In this example, the magnetic anomaly data prove more useful in defining the geometry of the propagation events, while the fabric, with its greater temporal resolution, is more useful for constraining the rate of propagation. It thus appears that joint inversion of magnetic and seafloor fabric data can be valuable in tectonic analyses.

  11. 238U, 226Ra and 210Pb in some vent waters of the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswami, S.; Turekian, K. K.

    1982-08-01

    The concentrations of 226Ra, 238U and 210Pb have been measured in waters from the Mussel Bed and the Rose Garden thermal fields at the Galapagos spreading center over a temperature range of ˜2.5-16°C. The 226Ra-T plots yield slopes of 0.112 and 0.036 dpm/kg°C for the Mussel Bed and the Rose Garden respectively yielding a global hydrothermal 226Ra flux less than 5% of that required to sustain the oceanic inventory. 238U concentration in waters <9°C is the same as that in ambient sea water whereas water hotter than ˜9°C shows a decreasing trend with temperature to zero 238U at ˜29°C. 210Pb concentration in Mussel Bed increases with temperature, and extrapolated to ˜350°C yields a 210Pb concentration considerably less than that expected from 222Rn decay and basalt alteration.

  12. Chemical and biological interactions in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field, Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Childress, James J.; Hessler, Robert R.; Sakamoto-Arnold, Carole M.; Beehler, Carl L.

    1988-10-01

    The concentrations of a suite of redox reactive chemicals were measured in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field of the Galapagos spreading center. Sulfide, silicate, oxygen and temperature distributions were measured in situ with a submersible chemical analyser. In addition, 15 chemical species were measured in discrete samples. Variability in the slope of the temperature-silicate plots indicates that heat is lost from these relatively low temperatures (<15°C) solutions by conduction to the solid phase. Consumption of oxygen, sulfide and nitrate from the hydrothermal solution as it flows past the vent animals is apparent from the distributions measured in situ and in the discrete samples. The fraction of sulfide and nitrate removed from the solution by consumption appears to have increased between 1979-1985. Sulfide and oxygen appear to be consumed under different conditions: sulfide is removed primarily from the warmest solutions, and oxygen is consumed only from the cold seawater. This separation may be driven primarily by the increased gradients of each chemical under these conditions. There is no evidence for the consumption of significant amounts of manganese(II) by the vent organisms. The analysis of other data sets from this vent field indicate no significant consumption of methane by the vent organisms, as well.

  13. Hydrothermal plumes over spreading-center axes: Global distributions and geological inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Elderfield, Henry

    Seafloor hydrothermal circulation is the principal agent of energy and mass exchange between the ocean and the earth's crust. Discharging fluids cool hot rock, construct mineral deposits, nurture biological communities, alter deep-sea mixing and circulation patterns, and profoundly influence ocean chemistry and biology. Although the active discharge orifices themselves cover only a minuscule percentage of the ridge-axis seafloor, the investigation and quantification of their effects is enhanced as a consequence of the mixing process that forms hydrothermal plumes. Hydrothermal fluids discharged from vents are rapidly diluted with ambient seawater by factors of 104-105 [Lupton et al., 1985]. During dilution, the mixture rises tens to hundreds of meters to a level of neutral buoyancy, eventually spreading laterally as a distinct hydrographic and chemical layer with a spatial scale of tens to thousands of kilometers [e.g., Lupton and Craig, 1981; Baker and Massoth, 1987; Speer and Rona, 1989].

  14. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E,37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon

  15. Crustal thickness variations along the Galapagos Spreading Center west of the Galapagos hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, G.; Canales, J.; Detrick, R.; Sinton, J.

    2001-12-01

    Wide-angle seismic refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data reveal crustal thickness variations along the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) 98° -91.5° W. Travel-time and amplitude modeling of wide-angle refraction data constrain the seismic velocity structure and thickness of mature crust along three ridge-parallel profiles centered at 96.8° W, 94.25° W, and 92.2° W. In addition, MCS data along ridge-parallel, off-axis profiles image reflections from the base of the crust (Moho) west of 95.5° W. Where MCS and refraction data coincide, zero-offset arrival times of Moho reflections agree closely between the two data sets. To compute crustal thickness from the Moho reflections, we interpolate velocity-depth profiles between the refraction sites using cubic splines. We observe the thinnest crust (5.6 km) along the GSC near 96.8° W. To the east, the crust thickens gradually toward the Galapagos hotspot (along-axis gradient ~0.01 km/km) to 5.9 km near 94.25° W. Near the 95.5° W-propagating rift tip we do not resolve a local thinning of the crust that would otherwise be attributed to a "propagator effect". East of 94.25° W the GSC crust thickens more rapidly (along-axis gradient ~0.05 km/km), reaching a thickness of 8 km at our closest approach to the hotspot near 91.5° W. Constraints on along-axis crustal thickness variations are valuable in understanding processes of mantle melting as well as factors leading to changes in ridge morphology. The rapid thickening of the GSC crust east of ~94° W suggests that the hottest and/or most rapidly upwelling mantle is confined to a distance of ~400 km from the center of the Galapagos hotspot. West of ~94° W the hotspot effect on crustal thickness is minimal though gravity and bathymetry anomalies extend 200-400 km further west [Canales et al. this meeting]. A prominent axial valley is sustained west of ~95° W where crustal thickness is <5.9 km. East of ~94° W, where crustal thickness is >6 km, the

  16. Deep-tow studies of the overlapping spreading centers at 9°03&primeN on the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempere, Jean-Christophe; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1986-10-01

    The deeply-towed instrument package of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography was used to study for the first time the fine scale structure of an overlapping spreading center (OSC) system: the 9°03'N OSC on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The eastern and western limbs of this OSC system which are 8 km apart and overlap by 27 km show marked differences. Away from the tips, the spreading centers are highly tectonized and differ greatly from the ridge tips. The western ridge tip exhibits a few fissures but no sign of recent volcanic activity whereas the eastern ridge tip is highly fissured and has experienced more recent volcanic episodes which are confined to a narrow zone within this highly fissured area. In both cases, the ridge tip fissures are 10°-15° oblique to the strike of the faults that occur on the flanks of the adjacent portion of the opposite spreading axis, indicating a recent change in the direction of deviatoric tension and suggesting that the eastern and western spreading centers have been propagating southward and northward respectively. The eastern ridge tip fissures are transecting the flank of the western spreading axis suggesting that the eastern spreading center is about to become the through-going trace of the East Pacific Rise. In contrast, the western spreading center disappears into abyssal hill terrain that was presumably created at the eastern ridge axis. Some of the very few tectonic features observed in the overlap basin may reflect the existence of a short-lived shear couple due to the interaction of the two overlapping spreading centers. Sediment cover over the whole area and especially in the overlap basin is relatively thick, supporting the idea of a time-averaged deficit in the magmatic budget at this OSC. We suggest that the 9°03'N OSC developed where two magmatic pulses, independent in space and time and propagating along the strike of the East Pacific Rise away from the loci of melt emplacement, failed to meet. Misalignment of

  17. Characterization of Magma-Driven Hydrothermal Systems at Oceanic Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Corrigan, R.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid circulation in high-temperature hydrothermal systems involves complex water-rock chemical reactions and phase separation. Numerical modeling of reactive transport in multi-component, multiphase systems is required to obtain a full understanding of the characteristics and evolution of hydrothermal vent systems. We use a single-pass parameterized model of high-temperature hydrothermal circulation at oceanic spreading centers constrained by observational parameters such as vent temperature, heat output, and vent field area, together with surface area and depth of the sub-axial magma chamber, to deduce fundamental hydrothermal parameters such as mass flow rate, bulk permeability, conductive boundary layer thickness at the base of the system, magma replenishment rate, and residence time in the discharge zone. All of these key subsurface characteristics are known for fewer than 10 sites out of 300 known hydrothermal systems. The principal limitations of this approach stem from the uncertainty in heat output and vent field area. For systems where data are available on partitioning of heat and chemical output between focused and diffuse flow, we determined the fraction of high-temperature vent fluid incorporated into diffuse flow using a two-limb single pass model. For EPR 9°50` N and ASHES, the diffuse flow temperatures calculated assuming conservative mixing are nearly equal to the observed temperatures indicating that approximately 80%-90% of the hydrothermal heat output occurs as high-temperature flow derived from magmatic heat even though most of the heat output appears as low-temperature diffuse discharge. For the Main Endeavour Field and Lucky Strike, diffuse flow fluids show significant conductive cooling and heating respectively. Finally, we calculate the transport of various geochemical constituents in focused and diffuse flow at the vent field scale and compare the results with estimates of geochemical transports from the Rainbow hydrothermal field where

  18. Microbial Community Structure in Hydrothermal Plumes of the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, M. B.; Haymon, R.; Valentine, D. L.; Carlson, C.; Resing, J.; Baker, E.; Lebon, G.; Walker, S.; Ehrhardt, C.; Swan, B.

    2006-12-01

    Prior studies indicate that prokaryotes affect the chemical evolution of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes and nourish higher trophic levels in and above plumes. A few studies of microbial community composition within hydrothermal plumes have been undertaken, but it is unknown how plume microbial community structure varies geographically, or how it relates to chemical composition of plumes. To investigate microbial diversity in plumes, we collected a suite of 60 filtered water samples along a 300 nautical-mile section of the Galapagos Spreading Center during the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS Expedition. Samples were collected within and outside of plumes from both high and low temperature hydrothermal environments at varying stages of maturity. These samples were collected in parallel with measurements and samples taken for physical and chemical characterization of plumes. Initial work with the microbial samples focuses on characterizing community fingerprints from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from both Bacteria and Archaea. Preliminary investigation of a vertical cast through a plume in the Iguanas Vent Field (located at lat./long. 2.10428/-91.9356) suggest there are distinct microbial groups that exist throughout the vertical profile, other groups that are only present within the plume, and certain groups that are only found outside of the plume. Preliminary results also suggest that there are changes in overall diversity patterns within and outside of the plume. Further work is in progress to verify and expand on these initial results. This suite of Galapagos samples promises new insights into biogeochemical cycles of vent- influenced areas of the deep-sea.

  19. Wide-Angle Refraction Tomographic Inversion of Mid Cayman Spreading Center and its Oceanic Core Complex, CaySEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CaySEIS experiment, conducted in April 2015, is a multi-national collaborative seismic study of the Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultra-slow spreading center [15 mm/yr fr] in the Caribbean Sea. Ultra-slow spreading centers are thought to have very thin crust and a paucity of magmatism due to cooler mantle conditions. However, the suggestion that gabbro-cored oceanic core complexes (OCCs), volcanic deposits, and multiple layers of hydrothermal vents are widespread in the MCSC and other ultra-slow spreading centers has led to questions about the relationship between seafloor spreading rates and magmatism. To investigate this further, we conducted the CaySEIS experiment, with five wide-angle seismic refraction lines parallel and perpendicular to the neovolcanic zone. This analysis is based on two east-west oriented 100-km-long seismic refraction lines, which were each occupied by 18 ocean bottom seismometers. Line 2 lies across the central MCSC and an OCC called Mt. Dent. Line 3 crosses the northern end of the MCSC near the Oriente Transform Zone. With the wide-angle OBS data we can image the seismic velocity structure of Mt. Dent and distinguish between two models of OCCs - either Mt. Dent is composed of mostly gabbro with peridotite lenses identified by a low velocity gradient, or it is composed of mostly peridotite with gabbroic bodies identified by a constant velocity gradient. The crustal structure of both lines gives more insight into the asymmetry of the MCSC and the style of seafloor spreading to the east vs. the west. The 2-D velocity models reveal Mt. Dent has thick crust of 8 km with a low velocity gradient, supporting the magmatic gabbroic origin of OCCs. The surrounding crust to the west of the MCSC is highly variable, with areas of very thin crust. The crust to the east of the MCSC has an approximately constant thickness of 4 km. The development of OCCs may contribute to the crustal heterogeneity of ultra-slow spreading centers.

  20. Dynamical consequences of compositional and thermal density stratification beneath spreading centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotin, C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamical consequences of compositional buoyancy and the combined effects of compositional and thermal buoyancy on mantle flow and crustal production are explored. The results show that for a low enough mantle viscosity, buoyant upwelling can significantly enhance the crustal thickness relative to that which would be produced by plate spreading alone, while for a mantle viscosity of 10 to the 22nd Pa s, upwelling due to plate spreading is dominant and crustal thickness is predicted to be a function of spreading rate. The results indicate that thermal and compositional density variations result in opposing buoyancy forces that can cause time-dependent upwelling.

  1. Seismic structure of the Tonga Arc and Lau Backarc Spreading Center from joint inversion of local and teleseismic body wave arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A. N.; Wiens, D. A.; Blackman, D. K.; Webb, S. C.; Dunn, R. A.; Conder, J. A.; Zhao, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau Backarc Spreading Center and Tonga Arc provide an excellent environment in which to the study the dynamics of melt production and migration. The Lau Backarc Spreading Center is comprised of three segments, Central Lau Spreading Center, Eastern Lau Spreading Center, and the Valu Fa Spreading Center. The segments show very different spreading and magma production rates as a function of their distance to the arc and slab, which decreases from north to south. Geochemical studies also indicate a systematic change in magma composition along strike of the Lau Back-Arc Spreading Center with more water and fluid-mobile elements in the south. From 2009-2010, 16 broadband seismometers and 51 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were installed for one year across the Lau backarc spreading centers and in Fiji and Tonga to image the along-strike structural variation of the subduction zone and the dynamics of the melt production region. We present preliminary results from the joint inversion of P and S wave arrivals from local and teleseismic events recorded by this network. Arrivals from local events were picked manually, while travel time residuals for teleseismic arrivals were determined via the adaptive stacking method developed by Rawlinson and Kennett (2004). Travel times for local events and residuals for teleseismic events are inverted using TOMOG3D (Zhao et al., 1994) to solve for three dimensional velocity structure along strike of the Lau Backarc Spreading Center and Tonga Arc. Preliminary results show a clearly defined westward-dipping low velocity region beneath the Eastern Lau and Valu Fa Spreading Centers, which is most pronounced at depths less than 150 km. The low velocities beneath the Eastern Lau and Valu Fa Spreading Centers are more pronounced relative to those associated with the Tonga Arc.

  2. Hydrothermal Plume Mapping Along the Hotspot-affected Galapagos Spreading Center Finds High-Temperature Vent Sites are Anomalously Scarce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Walker, S. L.; Lebon, G. T.; Nakamura, K.; Haymon, R. M.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Systematic searches for hydrothermal activity along midocean ridges (MORs) demonstrate that the spatial density of hydrothermal activity is a robust linear function of spreading rate. This trend argues that the availability of mantle heat is the first order control on the distribution of seafloor vent fields. However, some crustal thermal models predict that the thicker, hotter, more ductile crust associated with hotspots substantially reduces convective hydrothermal cooling, explaining observations of axial magma chambers (AMC) at shallower depths than found on normal MORs. In Dec-Jan 2006 we tested this hypothesis by mapping hydrothermal plumes overlying the hotspot-affected Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) from 95°-89.6°W, using a dual-pass, side-scan deep tow with an array of plume sensors spanning 50- 250 m above bottom. The western GSC near 91°-92.5°W has axial-high morphology, shallow and quasi-continuous AMC, and thick (8 km) crust, changing to a transitional morphology, deeper and more discontinuous AMC, and normal (6 km) crust from 93° to 95°W. The eastern GSC, 90.5°- 89.6°W is also an axial high and presumably has crustal characteristics similar to the western GSC at 91°-92.5°W. We identified hydrothermal plumes by anomalies in light backscattering (NTU) from a vertical array of MAPR sensors along the tow line, plus redox potential (Eh) measured continuously in-situ on the tow body at a nominal elevation of 100 m. Many plumes were subsequently confirmed by CTD tows and sampling. Only three areas of extensive and intense plumes were observed: 90.52°-90.63°W, 91.78°- 91.96°W, and 94°-94.1°W. Maximum plume rise at the latter two sites exceeded 200 m, indicative of high-temperature venting that was confirmed by camera tows. Some 25 other NTU and Eh anomalies were detected along ~1000 km of trackline, but none were >5 km in length. The primary result of our survey is that hydrothermal plumes were scarce for a ridge spreading at ~60 mm

  3. Three dimensional modeling of mantle melt underneath the Lau Back-Arc spreading center and Tofua Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Scott

    Valu Fa and Eastern Lau's (two regions along Lau's back-arc spreading center) observed axial morphology suggest that Valu Fa is more magmatically robust than Eastern Lau despite Eastern Lau's spreading rate nearly doubling Valu Fa's. Early geochemical [Pearce et al., 1994] and geophysical [Martinez and Taylor, 2002] studies predict a gradational decrease in melting moving north from Valu Fa to Eastern Lau, but more recent geochemical and seismic observations ([Escrig, .et al 2009]; [Dunn and Martinez, 2011]; [Dunn et al., 2011]) show a sharper stepwise decrease in melting as the spreading center's ridge axis sweeps away from the Tofua Volcanic-Arc. As the ridge sweeps away from the volcanic-arc, the influence of the slab hydrated mantle in the melting structure of the ridge decreases. Furthermore, Eastern Lau produces a thinner crust than expected for a robust spreading center. 2-D numerical studies [Harmon and Blackmon, 2010] show a gradational decrease in melting from Valu Fa to Eastern Lau but with no corresponding thinning of Eastern Lau's crust. To understand the melting dynamics underneath Lau's back-arc spreading center and the Tofua Volcanic-Arc implementing the effects of 3-D mantle flow and slab hydration appears to be required. To explain the observed geochemical and seismic observations, three 3-D numerical were performed, using a community developed mantle convection solver (CitcomS). The first model shows that observed geometric and surface kinematic boundary conditions cause a steep gradational increase in relative melting area (anhydrous) moving northward with increasing spreading rate along the ridge axis from Valu Fa to Eastern Lau caused by a northwestern along axis mantle flow. A peak in the relative melting area appears particularly close to Eastern Lau where crust is thinnest. These predictions run in opposition to the observations. The second model shows including a viscosity reduction in the mantle wedge due to slab hydration causes a more

  4. Davidson Seamount: A Volcano Slowly Built on an Abandoned Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Castillo, P.; Duncan, R.; Lonsdale, P.; Devogelaere, A.

    2007-12-01

    Davidson Seamount is located 80 km off Big Sur, California, and rises from the 3500 m abyssal plain to 1254 m depth. The elongated volcanic edifice consists of a series of parallel ridges serrated with steep cones, built over millions of years above an abandoned spreading center. It has been explored and sampled with the ROV Tiburon, and the lithologic distribution, glass chemistry, and ages of the rocks are presented here. Large, bulbous pillow lavas are common deep on the seamount. The shallower cones are mainly composed of blocky flows that provide substrate for large corals and sponges. The cones are draped with volcaniclastic rocks ranging from sandstone to breccia as thick, layered pavements that are now eroded with pits and potholes. This fragmental material is evidence of explosive eruptions. A perched lava pond was discovered in high-resolution maps made by MBARI's Mapping AUV and explored with the ROV Tiburon. Nothing like it has been found elsewhere on Davidson or the other seamounts off the California continental margin. The pond lies between high ridges near the summit. It was a vigorous flow that overtopped its levees with elongate pillows, and then drained, leaving collapse pits a few meters deep veneered with "bathtub rings" and no lava pillars. Deeper than 2000 m, glass from pillow rinds and breccias are basalt and hawaiite. Shallower than 2000 m depth, the rocks include basalt and hawaiite, and also fractionated lavas of mugearite and trachyte. The lavas were all submarine erupted, even the fragmental material, as inferred from high sulfur content in the glasses. Ages of the lavas range from 9.8 to 14.8 Ma. The oldest rocks are along the central ridge, and the youngest rocks are on the flanks and southern end of the edifice. The volcano erupted onto much older crust, which is inferred to be 20 Ma from magnetic anomalies. The numerous small cones of disparate chemistry and long eruptive period suggest episodic growth of the volcano over 5 to 10

  5. The Masked Semantic Priming Effect Is Task Dependent: Reconsidering the Automatic Spreading Activation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Bianca; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Semantic priming effects are popularly explained in terms of an automatic spreading activation process, according to which the activation of a node in a semantic network spreads automatically to interconnected nodes, preactivating a semantically related word. It is expected from this account that semantic priming effects should be routinely…

  6. Masked Priming Effects in Aphasia: Evidence of Altered Automatic Spreading Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silkes, JoAnn P.; Rogers, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has suggested that impairments of automatic spreading activation may underlie some aphasic language deficits. The current study further investigated the status of automatic spreading activation in individuals with aphasia as compared with typical adults. Method: Participants were 21 individuals with aphasia (12 fluent, 9…

  7. Radiative Ignition and the Transition to Flame Spread Investigated in the Japan Microgravity Center's 10-sec Drop Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Radiative Ignition and Transition to Spread Investigation (RITSI) is a shuttle middeck Glovebox combustion experiment developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center, the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), and Aerospace Design and Fabrication (ADF). It is scheduled to fly on the third United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-3) mission in February 1996. The objective of RITSI is to experimentally study radiative ignition and the subsequent transition to flame spread in low gravity in the presence of very low speed air flows in two- and three-dimensional configurations. Toward this objective, a unique collaboration between NASA, NIST, and the University of Hokkaido was established to conduct 15 science and engineering tests in Japan's 10-sec drop shaft. For these tests, the RITSI engineering hardware was mounted in a sealed chamber with a variable oxygen atmosphere. Ashless filter paper was ignited during each drop by a tungsten-halogen heat lamp focused on a small spot in the center of the paper. The flame spread outward from that point. Data recorded included fan voltage (a measure of air flow), radiant heater voltage (a measure of radiative ignition energy), and surface temperatures (measured by up to three surface thermocouples) during ignition and flame spread.

  8. Spatial patterns of Aquificales in deep-sea vents along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (SW Pacific).

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Isabel; Banta, Amy B; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2014-09-01

    The microbial diversity associated with actively venting deep-sea hydrothermal deposits is tightly connected to the geochemistry of the hydrothermal fluids. Although the dominant members of these deposits drive the structure of the microbial communities, it is less well understood whether the lower abundance groups are as closely connected to the geochemical milieu, or driven perhaps by biotic factors such as microbial community interactions. We used the natural geochemical gradients that exist in the back-arc basin, Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu-Fa Ridge (ELSC/VFR) in the Southwestern Pacific, to explore whether the chemolithotrophic Aquificales are influenced by geographical location, host-rock of the vent field or deposit type. Using a combination of cloning, DNA fingerprinting (DGGE) and enrichment culturing approaches, all genera of this order previously described at marine vents were detected, i.e., Desulfurobacterium, Thermovibrio, Aquifex, Hydrogenivirga, Persephonella and Hydrogenothermus. The comparison between clone libraries and DGGE showed similar patterns of distribution of different Aquificales whereas results differed for the enrichment cultures that were retrieved. However, the use of cultivation-based and -independent methods did provide complementary phylogenetic diversity overview of the Aquificales in these systems. Together, this survey revealed that the ELSC/VFR contains some of the largest diversity of Aquificales ever reported at a deep-sea vent area, that the diversity patterns are tied to the geography and geochemistry of the system, and that this geochemical diverse back-arc basin may harbor new members of the Aquificales.

  9. Dynamic Assessment of Fibroblast Mechanical Activity during Rac-induced Cell Spreading in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Ma, Lisha; Kim, Areum; Ly, Linda; Vishwanath, Mridula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the morphological and sub-cellular mechanical effects of Rac activation on fibroblasts within 3-D collagen matrices. Corneal fibroblasts were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 1 to 2 days in serum-free media. Time-lapse imaging was then performed using Nomarski DIC. After an acclimation period, perfusion was switched to media containing PDGF. In some experiments, Y-27632 or blebbistatin were used to inhibit Rho-kinase (ROCK) or myosin II, respectively. PDGF activated Rac and induced cell spreading, which resulted in an increase in cell length, cell area, and the number of pseudopodial processes. Tractional forces were generated by extending pseudopodia, as indicated by centripetal displacement and realignment of collagen fibrils. Interestingly, the pattern of pseudopodial extension and local collagen fibril realignment was highly dependent upon the initial orientation of fibrils at the leading edge. Following ROCK or myosin II inhibition, significant ECM relaxation was observed, but small displacements of collagen fibrils continued to be detected at the tips of pseudopodia. Taken together, the data suggests that during Rac-induced cell spreading within 3-D matrices, there is a shift in the distribution of forces from the center to the periphery of corneal fibroblasts. ROCK mediates the generation of large myosin II-based tractional forces during cell spreading within 3-D collagen matrices, however residual forces can be generated at the tips of extending pseudopodia that are both ROCK and myosin II-independent. PMID:18452153

  10. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  11. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge axes is ubiquitous, associated with mass, chemical, and heat exchanges between the deep lithosphere and the overlying envelopes, and sustaining chemiosynthetic ecosystems at the seafloor. Compared with hydrothermal fields at fast-spreading ridges, those at slow spreading ones show a large variability as their location and nature is controlled or influenced by several parameters that are inter-related: a) tectonic setting, ranging from 'volcanic systems' (along the rift valley floor, volcanic ridges, seamounts), to 'tectonic' ones (rift-bounding faults, oceanic detachment faults); b) the nature of the host rock, owing to compositional heterogeneity of slow-spreading lithosphere (basalt, gabbro, peridotite); c) the type of heat source (magmatic bodies at depth, hot lithosphere, serpentinization reactions); d) and the associated temperature of outflow fluids (high- vs.- low temperature venting and their relative proportion). A systematic review of the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal fields along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity is concentrated either at oceanic detachment faults, or along volcanic segments with evidence of robust magma supply to the axis. A detailed study of the magmatically robust Lucky Strike segment suggests that all present and past hydrothermal activity is found at the center of the segment. The association of these fields to central volcanos, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the remaining of the ridge segment, suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity in these volcanic systems is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build these volcanic edifices. In this setting, hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust exploit permeable fault zones to circulate. While

  12. Water-column Observations During a Seafloor Eruption on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Resing, J.; Baumberger, T.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Lavelle, J. W.; Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Greene, R.

    2009-12-01

    Midocean ridge eruptions offer rare opportunities to study the creation of new ocean crust and the accelerated release of heat and chemicals into the ocean. Only 7 such events have been documented since the first observation of eruption-induced fluid discharge in 1986. Their hallmark is “event plumes,” symmetrical boluses of hydrothermally rich water typically ~0.5 km thick and 5-20 km in diameter. Past sampling of such plumes has occurred from 10 days to months after an eruption. In Nov. 2008 on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center, we detected not a typical event plume but a uniquely different series of young, apparently eruption-generated plumes. At 0700 UTC on 20 Nov., a CTD tow detected layers of thin (<100 m) plumes between 600 and 1200 m depth, above a local ridge depth of ~1600 m. These plumes had unusually intense light-scattering (NTU>0.6), oxidation-reduction potential (ORP or “Eh”) (>250 mv), temperature (ΔT >0.7°C), and H2 (6873 nM) anomalies, plus abundant glass shards (>50μm). These characteristics imply a very young plume. 21 hours later, another tow mapped abundant plume layers extending from 900 m depth to the seafloor, marking the probable eruption site as 15.39°S, 174.25°W. High H2 (up to 9031 nM) and low 3He (68 δ(3He)%) in the shallowest plumes suggests their source was magma-seawater contact. In contrast, low H2 (33 nM) and high 3He (up to 146 δ(3He)%) in the deeper plumes implies their source was a more evolved hydrothermal fluid. CO2 values were high in all plumes. By 24 Nov. shallow plumes were absent above the eruption site, with only weak remnants found a few km south. By 27 Nov. no plumes shallower than 1450 m were found within our ~5 km sampling radius. Bottom-water temperature anomalies over the eruption site declined during the same time frame. Three near-bottom tows (15-50 mab) consistently identified bottom waters with significant ΔT between 15.405° and 15.380°S (~4 km) along the ridge crest. Maximum ΔT seen on the

  13. Recent MBARI Mapping AUV Surveys of Slumps, Scours, Gas Seeps, and Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Paull, C. K.; Clague, D. A.; Conlin, D.; Thompson, D.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J.

    2011-12-01

    conducted surveys along the axis of Eel Canyon above the gas seep site and of the seaward deep sea fan. The canyon survey mapped a number of scour features along the canyon thalweg, and the fan surveys covered two large scour features extending up to 3.4 km long by 1.4 km across, and 100 m deep. During 2008 the Mapping AUV conducted three surveys at Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, covering 13 km of the spreading center axis including the known hydrothermal vent fields. This year MBARI extended the high-resolution coverage 11 km to the north of the earlier surveys. During 2006 to 2009, MBARI mapped the summit of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in 1 m resolution bathymetry. These surveys covered the entire summit caldera floor, the caldera walls and rim, and the south rift area of the 1998 eruption and flow. A July 2011 NOAA-PMEL expedition discovered a recent (April 2011) eruption and flow on the Axial Volcano south rift. The MBARI Mapping AUV was redirected from planned operations to survey the new flow and surrounding region on August 3. Comparison of the previous and new 1-m-scale bathymetry will delineate the location, extent, and volume of the new flow. Additional MBARI ROV dives are scheduled during August 2011 at the Eel Canyon gas seep and scour sites and the recent Axial Seamount eruption site.

  14. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Linda L.

    Energy activities are provided in this student activity book. They include: (1) an energy walk; (2) forms of energy in the home; (3) energy conversion; (4) constructing a solar hot dog cooker (with instructions for drawing a parabola); (5) interviewing senior citizens to learn about energy use in the past; (6) packaging materials; (7) insulation;…

  15. Impact of Non-Poissonian Activity Patterns on Spreading Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Alexei; Rácz, Balázs; Lukács, András; Barabási, Albert-László

    2007-04-01

    Halting a computer or biological virus outbreak requires a detailed understanding of the timing of the interactions between susceptible and infected individuals. While current spreading models assume that users interact uniformly in time, following a Poisson process, a series of recent measurements indicates that the intercontact time distribution is heavy tailed, corresponding to a temporally inhomogeneous bursty contact process. Here we show that the non-Poisson nature of the contact dynamics results in prevalence decay times significantly larger than predicted by the standard Poisson process based models. Our predictions are in agreement with the detailed time resolved prevalence data of computer viruses, which, according to virus bulletins, show a decay time close to a year, in contrast with the 1 day decay predicted by the standard Poisson process based models.

  16. The Hydrologic Cycle Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Danny M.; Goodman, H. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Huntsville, Alabama supports the acquisition, production, archival and dissemination of data relevant to the study of the global hydrologic cycle. This paper describes the Hydrologic Cycle DAAC, surveys its principle data holdings, addresses future growth, and gives information for accessing the data sets.

  17. Hydrothermal venting along Earth's fastest spreading center: East Pacific Rise, 27.5°-32.3°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Hey, R. N.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Feely, R. A.; Gharib, J. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Sansone, F. J.; Kleinrock, M.; Martinez, F.; Naar, D. F.; Rodrigo, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D.; Pardee, D.

    2002-07-01

    During March/April 1998 we conducted detailed mapping and sampling of hydrothermal plumes along six segments of Earth's fasting spreading mid-ocean ridge, 27.5°-32.3°S on the East Pacific Rise. We compared the distribution and chemistry of hydrothermal plumes to geological indicators of long-term (spreading rate) and moderate-term (ridge inflation) variations in magmatic budget. In this large-offset, propagating rift setting, these geological indices span virtually the entire range found along fast spreading ridges worldwide. Hydrothermal plumes overlaid ~60% of the length of superfast (>130 km/Myr) spreading axis surveyed and defined at least 14 separate vent fields. We observed no plumes over the slower spreading propagating segments. Finer-scale variations in the magmatic budget also correlated with hydrothermal activity, as the location of the five most intense plumes corresponded to subsegment peaks in ridge inflation. Along the entire ridge crest, the more inflated a ridge location the more likely it was to be overlain by a hydrothermal plume. Plume chemistry mostly reflected discharge from mature vent fields apparently unperturbed by magmatic activity within the last few years. Plume samples with high volatile/metal ratios, generally indicating recent seafloor volcanism, were scarce. Along-axis trends in both volatile (3He; CH4; ΔpH, a proxy for CO2; and particulate S) and nonvolatile (Fe, Mn) species showed a first-order agreement with the trend of ridge inflation. Nevertheless, a broad correspondence between the concentration of volatile species in plumes and geological proxies of magma supply identifies a pervasive magmatic imprint on this superfast spreading group of ridge segments.

  18. [Impact of market place activity on the spread of STI/AIDS in Sikasso, Mali].

    PubMed

    Maiga, Y; Cissoko, Y; Toloba, Y; Samake, A; Kampo, B; Bougoudogo, F

    2010-02-01

    Since the beginning of the global HIV pandemic, more than 47 million people have been infected and more than 14 millions of people have died with 95% living in developing countries. Mali is located in West Africa that has been relatively less affected. However Mali is a country with a migratory culture. This study was conducted in primary health care centers located on the main road to neighboring countries with higher HIV prevalence. Attention was focused on healthcare services provided around market places in the main cities where diverse populations converge on a weekly basis. Attendance measured at five health centers on market day was compared with attendance on the other days of the week. In addition the level of sexually transmitted infections (STI) diagnosed on market days was determined to compare prevalence in the resident versus non-resident population in function of market activity. Attendance at all the centers was significantly higher on market days. This increase was due mainly to the non-resident population (60.2% vs. 46.5%; p=0.005). Findings also showed that the proportion of STI diagnosed was higher in the non-resident than resident population, but the difference was not statistically significant (15.6% vs. 11.3%; p=0.320). These results indicate that migration has an impact on the spread of STI. This is probably the same for HIV since these pathologies are known to be linked. Control strategies to fight against STI/AIDS could be improved by taking into account market place activity that is common in all localities of Mali and Africa.

  19. SAN-RL: combining spreading activation networks and reinforcement learning to learn configurable behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J.; Gaines, D. M.; Wilkes, M.; Kusumalnukool, K.; Thongchai, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2001-01-01

    This approach provides the agent with a causal structure, the spreading activation network, relating goals to the actions that can achieve those goals. This enables the agent to select actions relative to the goal priorities.

  20. Diverse magma flow directions during construction of sheeted dike complexes at fast- to superfast-spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Varga, R. J.; Gee, J. S.; Karson, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dike intrusion is a fundamental process during upper oceanic crustal accretion at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges. Based on the distribution of magma along fast-spreading centers inferred from marine geophysical data, models predict systematic steep flow at magmatically robust segment centers and shallow magma flow toward distal segment ends. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabrics from 48 fully-oriented block samples of dikes from upper oceanic crust exposed at Hess Deep Rift and Pito Deep Rift reveal a wide range of magma flow directions that are not consistent with such simple magma supply models. The AMS is interpreted to arise from distribution anisotropy of titanomagnetite crystals based on weak shape-preferred orientation of opaque oxide and plagioclase crystals generally parallel to AMS maximum eigenvectors. Most dike samples show normal AMS fabrics with maximum eigenvector directions ranging from subvertical to subhorizontal. The distributions of inferred magma flow lineations from maximum eigenvectors show no preferred flow pattern, even after structural correction. We use a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test) to show that the distribution of bootstrapped flow lineation rakes from Pito Deep are not statistically distinct from Hess Deep, and neither are distinguishable from Oman and Troodos Ophiolite AMS data. Magma flow directions in sheeted dikes from these two seafloor escarpments also do not correlate with available geochemistry in any systematic way as previously predicted. These results indicate distinct compositional sources feed melt that is injected into dikes at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges with no preference for subhorizontal or subvertical magma flow. Collectively, results imply ephemeral melt lenses at different along-axis locations within the continuous axial magma chamber and either direct injection or intermingling of melt from other deeper ridge-centered or off-axis sources.

  1. Enhancing Prospective Teachers' Coordination of Center and Spread: A Window into Teacher Education Material Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hollylynne S.; Lee, J. Todd

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a development and evaluation process used to create teacher education materials that help prepare middle and secondary mathematics teachers to teach data analysis and probability concepts with technology tools. One aspect of statistical reasoning needed for teaching is the ability to coordinate understandings of center and…

  2. Center for Radiation Research. 1990 technical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyatt, C.E.

    1991-02-01

    The report summarizes research projects, measurement method development, calibration and testing and data evaluation activities that were carried out during Fiscal Year 1990 in the NIST Center for Radiation Research. These activities fall in the areas of radiometric physics, radiation sources and instrumentation, and ionizing radiation.

  3. Mantle control of a dynamically evolving spreading center: Mid-Atlantic Ridge 31-34 deg S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Peter J.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Blackman, Donna K.; Fox, Paul J.; Hanan, Barry B.; Harding, Alistair J.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Orcutt, John A.; Tolstoy, Maya

    1994-02-01

    A segment of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 33 deg S changes dramatically as its center is approached. Towards the center of the segment, the axis shoals from 3900 to 2400 m and a deep median valley nearly disappears. There is a prominent bullseye gravity low centered over the shallow summit, indicating thicker crust or lower density mantle or both. Incompatible element and radiogenic isotope ratios in MORB increase, creating a 'spike high' centered on the summit of the segment. The basalts' enrichment is confined to this robust ridge sement alone and is geochemically unlike the nearby hotspots at Tristan da Cunha, Gough and Discovery Islands. The average extent of mantle melting for the entire segment, as determined from mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) major element chemistry, is slightly greater than for adjacent segments. The segment has lengthened to 100 km by ridge propagation at both ends during the past 3.5 m.y., and is presently the longest and shallowest segment in the region. Although the ridge crest anomalies of this ridge segment strongly resemble those caused by the interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle hotspots, the geochemical and geophysical evidence suggests that they may instead be related to interaction of the ridge with a passively embedded chemical heterogeneity in the mantle.

  4. How the heterogeneous infection rate effect on the epidemic spreading in activity-driven network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Chen, Chao; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we research the impact of the heterogeneous infection rate on the epidemic spread in the activity-driven networks. By using the mean field approximation, the epidemic threshold is theoretically obtained. Several immunization strategies that could curb the epidemic spread are presented. Based on the theoretical analysis and simulation results, we obtain that the epidemic would be prevented effectively if the infection rate strongly correlates with the individual activity. However, if infection rate has a little correlation with the individual activity, most of the individuals may be infected. In addition, the epidemic can be suppressed soon if the individuals with high activity are immunized preferentially.

  5. ARCO moves to spark U. S. activity, spread risk

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1992-07-13

    This paper reports that one US major oil company has taken the offensive to combat tightness of drilling capital in the US and the overseas flight of interest in elephant hunting. ARCO Oil and Gas Co., with substantial acreage and seismic data covering most of the US Lower 48 states, s communicating with a broad audience to try to make activity happen on its properties. ARCO is looking to bring others in on its prospects, hawk seismic data, and take deals from others. On some acreage that internal funds are not available to evaluate, ARCO was offering 100% farmounts.

  6. Hybrid spreading mechanisms and T cell activation shape the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M; Jolly, Clare

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments' influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  7. Major and trace-element speciation in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes of Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, J. V.; Toner, B.; Dick, G.; Breier, J. A.; Jiang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridge systems results in the flux of heat and chemical species from the crust to the cold, oxic waters of the deep ocean. The mixing of these fluids creates a buoyant, rising plume with dynamic biogeochemical processes and rapid physical mixing. The global distribution of these vent systems makes hydrothermal plumes an important source and sink of biogeochemically active elements to ocean basins. The goal of this study is to characterize the transport and fate of the chemical species within individual hydrothermal plumes. By doing so, we hope to understand the interrelationship of physical-chemical gradients present in plumes with trace element uptake by plume particles. To achieve this goal a field study was undertaken at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The larger study will include analysis of all sites, however here we report the geochemical and trace-element speciation of a single buoyant plume within ABE vent field. A series of replicate sample sets were collected by in situ filtration at 0.5m, 40m, 200m within a buoyant plume using the ROV JASON. Above plume background and near bottom background sample sets were also collected. Hydrothermal plume particles in sample replicates have been analysed for bulk geochemistry, chemical speciation, and particle-by-particle mineralogy. The speciation of iron, a major particle forming element, and the distribution of select trace elements (arsenic, vanadium) is described using chemical mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Particle morphology and carbon speciation are described using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). This data is being integrated into a physical-geochemical model, and will be used to estimate the energy available to chemlithoautotrophic organisms in plumes. The distribution of minerals and incorporated trace elements (e.g. arsenic) will be used to interpret uptake mechanisms. The research will help us understand processes

  8. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  9. How rifting and spreading center interaction created the architecture of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameselle, Alejandra L.; Ranero, César R.; Franke, Dieter; Barckhausen, Udo

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the formation of rifted continental margins suggest a wider range of structural evolution that challenges the classical extensional models. State-of-the-art of processing techniques - including multiple attenuation by both radon filtering and wave-equation-based surface-related multiple elimination and time migration - have been used to reprocess regional multichannel seismic profiles from the NW, SW and E subbasins of the South China Sea. The resulting seismic images show the geometry and crustal architecture of the rifted margin. A range of features including post-rift and syn-rift sediments, the structure of fault-bounded basement blocks, intra-basement fault reflections, and crust-mantle boundary reflections are visible in the images. Differences in crustal thickness and its lateral variations, internal basement reflectivity, morphology of the top of the basement, faulting style, fault-block geometry, and geometry of overlying sediments permit to distinguish the continental and oceanic domains. The improved resolution of the images allows interpreting the relationship between the changes in tectonic structure and crustal thickness as deformation focused across the ocean continent boundary (COB). The structure, extension and location of the COB has been used to study the role of strain localization throughout the rift history. The clear definition of the COB and high-quality images of the crustal structure support that rifting was largely a-magmatic, but that seafloor spreading occurred abruptly after break up. The regional character of the seismic lines - crossing over the entire basin - permits to study the symmetry/asymmetry of conjugated margins, and to study the processes controlling their contrasting geometry and crustal architecture. The COB can be interpreted in seismic profiles in both conjugated margins of the subbasins. The several transects along the strike of the margins provide the variation of crustal structure

  10. SAPIENS: Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures. Technical Report No. 296.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortony, Andrew; Radin, Dean I.

    The product of researchers' efforts to develop a computer processor which distinguishes between relevant and irrelevant information in the database, Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures (SAPIENS) exhibits (1) context sensitivity, (2) efficiency, (3) decreasing activation over time, (4) summation of…

  11. Effect of geomagnetic activity on equatorial radio VHF scintillations and spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, R.G.; Mullen, J.P.; MacKenzie, E.

    1981-05-01

    The paper discusses the occurrence of scintillations of ATS 3 (137 MHz) beacons recorded at Huancayo on geomagnetically quiet and disturbed days during the years 1969--1976 and compared the results with the corresponding occurrence of range and frequency spread F at Huancayo. During the equinoctial months and the December solstical months the geomgnetic activity reduces the equatorial scintillations during premidnight hours but increases their occurrence during the postmidnight hours. These features are very similar to the effect of geomagnetic activity on the occurrence of the range type of equatorial spread F rather than on the occurrence of frequency spread, which decreases for any hour of the night during geomagnetic active periods. During the June solsticial months, the occurrence of both scintillations and spread F is very much reduced; however, both the phenomena are more frequent on disturbed than on quiet days for any of the hours of the night. These effects are consistently the same for any of the years within the solar cycle. It is suggested that the equatorial radio scintillations at 137 MHz during the nighttime are produced primarily by the occurrence of the range type of spread F. The geomagnetic effects are due to the modifications of the equatorial electric field by the geomagnetic disturbance and thereby affect the development of F region irregularities causing scintillations.

  12. Epidemic spreading with activity-driven awareness diffusion on multiplex network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Yifang; Huo, Guanying; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing interest in exploring the interplay between epidemic spreading with human response, since it is natural for people to take various measures when they become aware of epidemics. As a proper way to describe the multiple connections among people in reality, multiplex network, a set of nodes interacting through multiple sets of edges, has attracted much attention. In this paper, to explore the coupled dynamical processes, a multiplex network with two layers is built. Specifically, the information spreading layer is a time varying network generated by the activity driven model, while the contagion layer is a static network. We extend the microscopic Markov chain approach to derive the epidemic threshold of the model. Compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, the method shows high accuracy for the prediction of the epidemic threshold. Besides, taking different spreading models of awareness into consideration, we explored the interplay between epidemic spreading with awareness spreading. The results show that the awareness spreading can not only enhance the epidemic threshold but also reduce the prevalence of epidemics. When the spreading of awareness is defined as susceptible-infected-susceptible model, there exists a critical value where the dynamical process on the awareness layer can control the onset of epidemics; while if it is a threshold model, the epidemic threshold emerges an abrupt transition with the local awareness ratio α approximating 0.5. Moreover, we also find that temporal changes in the topology hinder the spread of awareness which directly affect the epidemic threshold, especially when the awareness layer is threshold model. Given that the threshold model is a widely used model for social contagion, this is an important and meaningful result. Our results could also lead to interesting future research about the different time-scales of structural changes in multiplex networks. PMID:27131489

  13. Epidemic spreading with activity-driven awareness diffusion on multiplex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Yifang; Huo, Guanying; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing interest in exploring the interplay between epidemic spreading with human response, since it is natural for people to take various measures when they become aware of epidemics. As a proper way to describe the multiple connections among people in reality, multiplex network, a set of nodes interacting through multiple sets of edges, has attracted much attention. In this paper, to explore the coupled dynamical processes, a multiplex network with two layers is built. Specifically, the information spreading layer is a time varying network generated by the activity driven model, while the contagion layer is a static network. We extend the microscopic Markov chain approach to derive the epidemic threshold of the model. Compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, the method shows high accuracy for the prediction of the epidemic threshold. Besides, taking different spreading models of awareness into consideration, we explored the interplay between epidemic spreading with awareness spreading. The results show that the awareness spreading can not only enhance the epidemic threshold but also reduce the prevalence of epidemics. When the spreading of awareness is defined as susceptible-infected-susceptible model, there exists a critical value where the dynamical process on the awareness layer can control the onset of epidemics; while if it is a threshold model, the epidemic threshold emerges an abrupt transition with the local awareness ratio α approximating 0.5. Moreover, we also find that temporal changes in the topology hinder the spread of awareness which directly affect the epidemic threshold, especially when the awareness layer is threshold model. Given that the threshold model is a widely used model for social contagion, this is an important and meaningful result. Our results could also lead to interesting future research about the different time-scales of structural changes in multiplex networks.

  14. Large scale organization of rat sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large activation spreads

    PubMed Central

    Frostig, Ron D.; Xiong, Ying; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Kvašňák, Eugen; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Parcellation according to function (e.g., visual, somatosensory, auditory, motor) is considered a fundamental property of sensorimotor cortical organization, traditionally defined from cytoarchitectonics and mapping studies relying on peak evoked neuronal activity. In the adult rat, stimulation of single whiskers evokes peak activity at topographically appropriate locations within somatosensory cortex and provides an example of cortical functional specificity. Here, we show that single whisker stimulation also evokes symmetrical areas of supra- and sub-threshold neuronal activation that spread extensively away from peak activity, effectively ignoring cortical borders by spilling deeply into multiple cortical territories of different modalities (auditory, visual and motor), where they were blocked by localized neuronal activity blocker injections and thus ruled out as possibly due to ‘volume conductance’. These symmetrical activity spreads were supported by underlying border-crossing, long-range horizontal connections as confirmed with transection experiments and injections of anterograde neuronal tracer experiments. We found such large evoked activation spreads and their underlying connections irrespective of whisker identity, cortical layer, or axis of recorded responses, thereby revealing a large scale nonspecific organization of sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large symmetrical activation spreads. Because the large activation spreads and their underlying horizontal connections ignore anatomical borders between cortical modalities, sensorimotor cortex could therefore be viewed as a continuous entity rather than a collection of discrete, delineated unimodal regions – an organization that could co-exist with established specificity of cortical organization and that could serve as a substrate for associative learning, direct multimodal integration and recovery of function following injury. PMID:19052219

  15. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Richardson, S M

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  16. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Richardson, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  17. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates - The Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Richardson, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Eocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  18. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Richardson, S M

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates. PMID:11539654

  19. Relatedness Proportion Effects in Semantic Categorization: Reconsidering the Automatic Spreading Activation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Bianca; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Semantic priming effects at a short prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony are commonly explained in terms of an automatic spreading activation process. According to this view, the proportion of related trials should have no impact on the size of the semantic priming effect. Using a semantic categorization task ("Is this a living…

  20. The Roles of Spreading Activation and Retrieval Mode in Producing False Recognition in the DRM Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Michelle L.; Watson, Jason M.; Balota, David A.; Roediger, Henry L., III

    2007-01-01

    The nature of persisting spreading activation from list presentation in eliciting false recognition in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm was examined in two experiments. We compared the time course of semantic priming in the lexical decision task (LDT) and false alarms in speeded recognition under identical study and test conditions. The…

  1. Spreading Activation in an Attractor Network with Latching Dynamics: Automatic Semantic Priming Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Localist models of spreading activation (SA) and models assuming distributed representations offer very different takes on semantic priming, a widely investigated paradigm in word recognition and semantic memory research. In this study, we implemented SA in an attractor neural network model with distributed representations and created a unified…

  2. Galapagos hotspot-spreading center system: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83/sup 0/W-101/sup 0/W)

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.; Kingsley, R.H.; Devine, J.D.

    1982-07-10

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40--50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83/sup 0/W and 101/sup 0/W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of 'whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's (1976) model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial asthenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling (1973) with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey (1977a). We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's (1979) information Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  3. Volcanic episodicity and a non-steady state rift valley along northeast Pacific Spreading Centers: Evidence from Sea MARCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    appel, Ellen S.; Ryan, William B. F.

    1986-12-01

    Sea MARCI side-looking sonar images and Sea Beam bathymetry along a 400-km stretch of the Juan de Fuca Ridge crest provide evidence that excessive extrusive volcanism periodically builds a crestal ridge along the axis of seafloor spreading. An elongate summit depression (ESD), or rift valley, is commonly observed in the spine of this crestal ridge. The crestal ridge volcanic landform has a distinctive shape that is recognized in bathymetric contours both along the spreading axis and at least up to 30 km away from the axis. The landform has a plan-form shape that resembles a side view of an archer's bow with the long dimension of the bow form parallel to the strike of the ridge. In cross section, the bow form is flat on top and has steep flanks. These bow-form shapes can be explained by magma that rises into the crust at a discrete center and flows laterally into belts of ridge-parallel diskes, similar to Icelandic fissure eruptions. Both the variable dimensions of the ESD along axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the relationship among volcanic flow morphologies within and beyond the ESD suggest the four different segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented in detail here display different stages in a cycle of oceanic crust accretion. This cycle includes episodes in which there is (1) extrusive volcanic construction which widen the crestal ridge prior to the collapse of the summit depression, (2) collapse within the summit region of the crestal ridge to form an ESD during a phase of volcanic inactivity, and (3) renewed magmatism in the ESD as its floor widens by extension and brittle fracture of the upper crust. This episodic model implies that the width of the young seafloor affected by volcanic extrusion or dominated by tectonic stretching varies through time.

  4. Volcanic Episodicity and a Non-Steady State Rift Valley Along Northeast Pacific Spreading Centers: Evidence From Sea MARC I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappel, Ellen S.; Ryan, William B. F.

    1986-12-01

    Sea MARC I side-looking sonar images and Sea Beam bathymetry along a 400-km stretch of the Juan de Fuca Ridge crest provide evidence that excessive extrusive volcanism periodically builds a crestal ridge along the axis of seafloor spreading. An elongate summit depression (ESD), or rift valley, is commonly observed in the spine of this crestal ridge. The crestal ridge volcanic landform has a distinctive shape that is recognized in bathymetric contours both along the spreading axis and at least up to 30 km away from the axis. The landform has a plan-form shape that resembles a side view of an archer's bow with the long dimension of the bow form parallel to the strike of the ridge. In cross section, the bow form is flat on top and has steep flanks. These bow-form shapes can be explained by magma that rises into the crust at a discrete center and flows laterally into belts of ridge-parallel dikes, similar to Icelandic fissure eruptions. Both the variable dimensions of the ESD along axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the relationship among volcanic flow morphologies within and beyond the ESD suggest the four different segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented in detail here display different stages in a cycle of oceanic crust accretion. This cycle includes episodes in which there is (1) extrusive volcanic construction which widen the crestal ridge prior to the collapse of the summit depression, (2) collapse within the summit region of the crestal ridge to form an ESD during a phase of volcanic inactivity, and (3) renewed magmatism in the ESD as its floor widens by extension and brittle fracture of the upper crust. This episodic model implies that the width of the young seafloor affected by volcanic extrusion or dominated by tectonic stretching varies through time.

  5. Determination of Wetting Behavior, Spread Activation Energy, and Quench Severity of Bioquenchants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, K. Narayan; Fernandes, Peter

    2007-08-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the suitability of vegetable oils such as sunflower, coconut, groundnut, castor, cashewnut shell (CNS), and palm oils as quench media (bioquenchants) for industrial heat treatment by assessing their wetting behavior and severity of quenching. The relaxation of contact angle was sharp during the initial stages, and it became gradual as the system approached equilibrium. The equilibrium contact angle decreased with increase in the temperature of the substrate and decrease in the viscosity of the quench medium. A comparison of the relaxation of the contact angle at various temperatures indicated the significant difference in spreading of oils having varying viscosity. The spread activation energy was determined using the Arrhenius type of equation. Oils with higher viscosity resulted in lower cooling rates. The quench severity of various oil media was determined by estimating heat-transfer coefficients using the lumped capacitance method. Activation energy for spreading determined using the wetting behavior of oils at various temperatures was in good agreement with the severity of quenching assessed by cooling curve analysis. A high quench severity is associated with oils having low spread activation energy.

  6. Effects of heterogeneity on active spreading strategies to remediate contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Piscopo, A. N.; Neupauer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) to remediate contaminated aquifers is constrained by the amount of contact between the groundwater contaminant and the injected oxidant. Contaminant degradation during ISCO can be enhanced using innovative active spreading strategies, which involve injecting and extracting water at wells in the vicinity of the plume to generate flow fields that spread the contaminant and oxidant plumes in a manner that increases their contact. Because aquifer heterogeneity affects the transport of the contaminant and oxidant during injection and extraction, aquifer heterogeneity also affects the amount of contact and the degree of contaminant degradation achieved using active spreading strategies during ISCO. Consequently, we can improve the effectiveness of active spreading strategies by generating sequences of injection and extraction that take the aquifer heterogeneity into account. In this study, we optimize sequences of injections and extractions to maximize contaminant degradation in aquifers with zonal and spatially-correlated heterogeneity for three contaminant-oxidant pairings with different reaction kinetics. Analysis of the transport and degradation corresponding to the optimal sequences of injection and extraction demonstrates that the underlying aquifer and contaminant properties are reflected by the optimal sequences.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Crusz, Shanika A; Diggle, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term 'comets', which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet 'tail'; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  8. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Eric J. G.; Crusz, Shanika A.; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term ‘comets’, which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet ‘tail’; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  9. East Pacific Rise from Siqueiros to Orozco Fracture Zones: Along-strike continuity of axial neovolcanic zone and structure and evolution of overlapping spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ken; Sempere, Jean-Christophe; Fox, P. J.

    1984-07-01

    features are associated with along-strike minima in the magmatic budget. We suggest that major phases of volcanic activity propagate episodically along the axis away from centers of magmatic inflation and that OSC's develop where magmatic pulses fail to meet due to misalignment of fracture systems, sinuous bends in the rise axis, or other heterogeneities. Transform faults fail to develop on fast spreading centers where the lateral offsets are small (<15 km) because the lithosphere is too thin and weak to maintain a classic rigid plate ridge/transform fault pattern. The OSC geometry is unstable and evolves rapidly, and the overlapping rises may propagate at rates faster than the local spreading rate. One of the two OSC's prevails, while the other is abandoned. While the locations of OSC's may not be fixed relative to the rise axis, they may tend to recur near the same place, creating scars in older lithosphere which resemble fracture zones, but whose fine-scale structure is quite different. There is excellent agreement between the observed structure of OSC's and laboratory studies of OSC's using wax models, photoelastic studies of overlapping cracks, and boundary element modeling of overlapping cracks. Seismic refraction and reflection near two OSC's suggests that large offset OSC's have separate magma chambers beneath the offset rise axes, while small offset OSC's may share a single axial magma chamber. Three-dimensional inversion of magnetic anomalies suggests that significant petrologic anomalies may occur near some OSC tips. Waxing and waning of overlapping magma chambers may give rise to the eruption of highly fractionated FeTi basalts and associated magnetic anomalies.

  10. Catawba Science Center solar activities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    Two demonstration solar water heaters were built. One was to be used at the Science Center and the other with traveling programs. This was completed and both units are being used for these programs which continue. We were able to build a library of 99 solar energy books and booklets that are available to the public for reference. We also conducted programs for 683 students of all ages. The culminating activity was the planned Energy Awareness Festival. This was held on September 26, 1981 and attracted 450 area citizens. We offered free exhibit space and hosted 17 exhibitors.

  11. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville fracture zone. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in 1 yr by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  12. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate-dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville FZ. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in one year by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  13. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  14. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  15. Subalkaline andesite from Valu Fa Ridge, a back-arc spreading center in southern Lau Basin: petrogenesis, comparative chemistry, and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Jenner, G.A.; Frey, F.A.; Gill, J.B.; Davis, A.S.; Volpe, A.M.; Hawkins, J.W.; Morris, J.D.; Cawood, Peter A.; Morton, J.L.; Scholl, D. W.; Rautenschlein, M.; White, W.M.; Williams, Ross W.; Stevenson, A.J.; White, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Tholeiitic andesite was dredged from two sites on Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), a back-arc spreading center in Lau Basin. Valu Fa Ridge, at least 200 km long, is located 40-50 km west of the active Tofua Volcanic Arc (TVA) axis and lies about 150 km above the subducted oceanic plate. One or more magma chambers, traced discontinuously for about 100 km along the ridge axis, lie 3-4 km beneath the ridge. The mostly aphyric and glassy lavas had high volatile contents, as shown by the abundance and large sizes of vesicles. An extensive fractionation history is inferred from the high SiO2 contents and FeO* MgO ratios. Chemical data show that the VFR lavas have both volcanic arc and back-arc basin affinities. The volcanic arc characteristics are: (1) relatively high abundances of most alkali and alkaline earth elements; (2) low abundances of high field strength elements Nb and Ta; (3) high U/Th ratios; (4) similar radiogenic isotope ratios in VFR and TVA lavas, in particular the enrichment of 87Sr 86Sr relative to 206Pb 204Pb; (5) high 238U 230Th, 230Th 232Th, and 226Ra 230Th activity ratios; and (6) high ratios of Rb/Cs, Ba/Nb, and Ba/La. Other chemical characteristics suggest that the VFR lavas are related to MORB-type back-arc basin lavas. For example, VFR lavas have (1) lower 87Sr 86Sr ratios and higher 143Nd 144Nd ratios than most lavas from the TVA, except samples from Ata Island, and are similar to many Lau Basin lavas; (2) lower Sr/REE, Rb/Zr, and Ba/Zr ratios than in arc lavas; and (3) higher Ti, Fe, and V, and higher Ti/V ratios than arc lavas generally and TVA lavas specifically. Most characteristics of VFR lavas can be explained by mixing depleted mantle with either small amounts of sediment and fluids from the subducting slab and/or an older fragment of volcanic arc lithosphere. The eruption of subalkaline andesite with some arc affinities along a back-arc spreading ridge is not unique. Collision of the Louisville and Tonga ridges probably activated back-arc extension

  16. Heat transfer through the sediments of the mounds hydrothermal area, Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.P.

    1983-02-10

    Heat transfer processes at the mounds area of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W are revealed by temperatures measured at roughly-equal10-m intervals in the 30 +- 10 m sediment at each of 12 holes at DSDP Leg 70 Sites 506--509 and by temperatures of up to five thermistors on eleven 8--12 m long piston cores. The 325 needle-probe values show a significant linear increase of thermal conductivity with depth in each core. About half of the temperature-thermal resistance profiles are nonlinear and are fit to a steady state, vertical pore water advection model. Results indicate high and variable total heat flow and localized hydrothermal discharge at roughly-equal10/sup -8/ m/s, associated with individual mounds. Recharge is indicated at similar rates in the low heat flow belt roughly-equal5 km south of the mounds and is suggested at slower rates in the intermediate heat flow (0.17--0.42 W/m/sup 2/) belt surrounding the mounds heat flow high. Possible slow entrained recharge within roughly-equal100 m of discharging mounds is suggested. Also suggested is strong local discharge along the major fault bounding the mounds crustal block to the north. About 95 km north of the spreading axis, at DSDP Site 510, temperatures in the 114-m sediment cover on 2.7-m.y. crust are linear, consistent with the suggestion that the hydraulic resistance of this layer is sufficient to seal off free hydrothermal exchange between basement and bottom water. The combination of heat flow data and the physical properties data of Karato and Becker (this issue) suggests that roughly-equal50 m of sediment may be a threshold thickness for sealing of hydrothermal circulation within basement, where the topography is smooth. We suggest that the formation of mounds may be associated with the forced localization of hydrothermal discharge through the sediment, as its thickness approaches this threshold value.

  17. Retrograde spread of 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas in patients with active ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Campieri, M.; Lanfranchi, G.A.; Brignola, C.; Bazzocchi, G.; Gionchetti, P.; Minguzzi, M.R.; Cappello, I.P.; Corbelli, C.; Boschi, S.

    1986-02-01

    In an attempt to know the exact retrograde spread of high-dosage 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas, we have studied eight patients with active left-sided colitis, by adding a small amount of barium sulfate to the enemas and by checking the spread radiologically after 15 minutes, 1 hour, and 6 hours. Four grams of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas and 4 gm in 200-ml enemas were used. The same experiment was repeated in a subsequent attack, with enemas labeled with technetium-99m and checked by scintiscans in five of these patients. We always have observed a volume-dependent spread of enemas but, interestingly, in the patients studied with technetium-99m there was always a wider spread than that which was detected with barium enemas. In all five patients, 100-ml enemas reached the splenic flexure. In two patients with total colitis, a progression of 100-ml technetium-99m enemas was performed in the transverse colon, but the maximum opacity remained in the left side. We can conclude that 4 gm of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas can be suitable for treating patients with left-sided colitis, and will represent a valid addition for patients with more extensive colitis.

  18. Metagenomic resolution of microbial functions in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal plumes affect ocean biogeochemistry on global scales. In rising hydrothermal plumes, a combination of microbial metabolism and particle formation processes initiate the transformation of reduced chemicals like hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, methane, iron, manganese and ammonia that are abundant in hydrothermal vent fluids. Despite the biogeochemical importance of this rising portion of plumes, it is understudied in comparison to neutrally buoyant plumes. Here we use metagenomics and bioenergetic modeling to describe the abundance and genetic potential of microorganisms in relation to available electron donors in five different hydrothermal plumes and three associated background deep-sea waters from the Eastern Lau Spreading Center located in the Western Pacific Ocean. Three hundred and thirty one distinct genomic 'bins' were identified, comprising an estimated 951 genomes of archaea, bacteria, eukarya and viruses. A significant proportion of these genomes is from novel microorganisms and thus reveals insights into the energy metabolism of heretofore unknown microbial groups. Community-wide analyses of genes encoding enzymes that oxidize inorganic energy sources showed that sulfur oxidation was the most abundant and diverse chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism in the community. Genes for sulfur oxidation were commonly present in genomic bins that also contained genes for oxidation of hydrogen and methane, suggesting metabolic versatility in these microbial groups. The relative diversity and abundance of genes encoding hydrogen oxidation was moderate, whereas that of genes for methane and ammonia oxidation was low in comparison to sulfur oxidation. Bioenergetic-thermodynamic modeling supports the metagenomic analyses, showing that oxidation of elemental sulfur with oxygen is the most dominant catabolic reaction in the hydrothermal plumes. We conclude that the energy metabolism of microbial communities inhabiting rising

  19. Seafloor photo-geology and sonar terrain modeling at the 9°N overlapping spreading center, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Emily M.; White, Scott M.; Nunnery, James Andrew; Mason-Stack, Jessica L.; Wanless, V. Dorsey; Perfit, Michael R.; Waters, Christopher L.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Zaino, Anne J.; Ridley, W. Ian

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal in the study of mid-ocean ridges is to understand the relationship between the distribution of melt at depth and seafloor features. Building on geophysical information on subsurface melt at the 9°N overlapping spreading center on the East Pacific Rise, we use terrain modeling (DSL-120A side scan and bathymetry), photo-geology (Jason II and WHOI TowCam), and geochemical data to explore this relationship. Terrain modeling identified four distinct geomorphic provinces with common seafloor characteristics that correspond well to changes in subsurface melt distribution. Visual observations were used to interpret terrain modeling results and to establish a relative seafloor age scale, calibrated with radiometric age dates, to identify areas of recent volcanism. On the east limb, recent eruptions in the north are localized over the margins of the 4 km wide asymmetric melt sill, forming a prominent off-axis pillow ridge. Along the southern east limb, recent eruptions occur along a neovolcanic ridge that hugs the overlap basin and lies several kilometers west of the plunging melt sill. Our results suggest that long-term southward migration of the east limb occurs through a series of diking events with a net southward propagation direction. Examining sites of recent eruptions in the context of geophysical data on melt distribution in the crust and upper mantle suggests melt may follow complex paths from depth to the surface. Overall, our findings emphasize the value of integrating information obtained from photo-geology, terrain modeling, lava geochemistry and petrography, and geophysics to constrain the nature of melt delivery at mid-ocean ridges.

  20. Metagenomic resolution of microbial functions in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal plumes affect ocean biogeochemistry on global scales. In rising hydrothermal plumes, a combination of microbial metabolism and particle formation processes initiate the transformation of reduced chemicals like hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, methane, iron, manganese and ammonia that are abundant in hydrothermal vent fluids. Despite the biogeochemical importance of this rising portion of plumes, it is understudied in comparison to neutrally buoyant plumes. Here we use metagenomics and bioenergetic modeling to describe the abundance and genetic potential of microorganisms in relation to available electron donors in five different hydrothermal plumes and three associated background deep-sea waters from the Eastern Lau Spreading Center located in the Western Pacific Ocean. Three hundred and thirty one distinct genomic 'bins' were identified, comprising an estimated 951 genomes of archaea, bacteria, eukarya and viruses. A significant proportion of these genomes is from novel microorganisms and thus reveals insights into the energy metabolism of heretofore unknown microbial groups. Community-wide analyses of genes encoding enzymes that oxidize inorganic energy sources showed that sulfur oxidation was the most abundant and diverse chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism in the community. Genes for sulfur oxidation were commonly present in genomic bins that also contained genes for oxidation of hydrogen and methane, suggesting metabolic versatility in these microbial groups. The relative diversity and abundance of genes encoding hydrogen oxidation was moderate, whereas that of genes for methane and ammonia oxidation was low in comparison to sulfur oxidation. Bioenergetic-thermodynamic modeling supports the metagenomic analyses, showing that oxidation of elemental sulfur with oxygen is the most dominant catabolic reaction in the hydrothermal plumes. We conclude that the energy metabolism of microbial communities inhabiting rising

  1. From Basalt to Dacite: Examining Magmatic Evolution at the 9° 03'N Overlapping Spreading Center, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, D.; Perfit, M.; Ridley, W. I.; Klein, E.; Zaino, A.

    2007-12-01

    Over 280 rock samples were collected in the spring of 2007 from the 9°03' N Overlapping Spreading Center (OSC) using the ROV Jason II. This was done in combination with an extensive DSL 120A side-scan sonar survey, providing one of the most detailed sampling suites from an OSC. The site was also the focus of past geophysical studies that indicated the presence of an extensive magma lens in the region. Lava geochemistry at 9°03' N covers a wide range of compositions (Mg# from 17 to 56), including evolved MORB, FeTi basalts, andesites, and dacites (~67 wt% SiO2). The diversity in composition at the OSC appears to be related to geologic setting of the erupted lavas, shallow magma chamber processes, and variations in magma supply. The 9°03' N OSC can be divided into three main sections: the eastern limb propagating southward, the western receding limb, and an overlap basin separating the two limbs. Lavas erupted within the neovolcanic zone on the eastern limb span the range of compositions erupted at the OSC (7.29 to 0.67 wt% MgO), while those erupted over the northern portion of the overlap basin are more limited in composition (6.47 to 7.23 wt% MgO). Preliminary results suggest that the on-axis major element variations may be due to mixing of evolved MORB and a silica-rich melt beneath eastern limb axis. Magma mixing is also supported by petrographic and macroscopic textural observations. Eruptions on the southern tip of the east limb, which is propagating into cold crust, are more primitive in composition and contain large phenocrysts suggesting that both thermal conditions in the crust and low magma supply may be important factors in the magmatic evolution. The phenocryst abundance and composition of lavas erupted on the dying western limb may also be related to similar factors.

  2. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  3. Emplacement of submarine lava flow fields: A geomorphological model from the Niños eruption at the Galápagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, J. Timothy; White, Scott M.

    2015-03-01

    In the absence of any direct observations of an active submarine eruption at a mid-ocean ridge (MOR), our understanding of volcanic processes there is based on the interpretation of eruptive products. Submarine lava flow morphology serves as a primary indicator of eruption and emplacement processes; however, there is typically a lack of visual observations and bathymetric data at a scale and extent relevant to submarine lava flows, which display meter to submeter-scale morphological variability. In this paper, we merge submersible-based visual observations with high-resolution multibeam bathymetry collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and examine the fine-scale geomorphology of Niños, a submarine lava flow field at the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC).We identify separate morphological facies (i.e., morphofacies) within the lava flow field, each having distinct patterns of lava flow morphology and volcanic structures. The spatial and stratigraphic arrangement of morphofacies suggests that they were emplaced sequentially as the eruption progressed, implying that the Niños eruption consisted of at least three eruptive phases. We estimate eruption parameters and develop a chronological model that describes the construction of the Niños lava flow field. An initial phase with high effusion rates emplaced sheet flows, then an intermediate phase emplaced a platform of lobate lavas, and then an extended final phase with low effusion rates emplaced a discontinuous row of pillow lava domes. We then compare this model to mapped lava flow fields at other MORs. Despite disparities in scale, the morphological similarities of volcanic features at MORs with different spreading rates suggest common emplacement processes that are primarily controlled by local magma supply.

  4. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  5. Spreading topsoil encourages ecological restoration on embankments: soil fertility, microbial activity and vegetation cover.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M; Costa-Tenorio, Marga; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  6. Galapagos Plume Ridge Interaction Part 1: Morphologic Variations Along the Eastern Galapagos Spreading Center. Results From the SO158 MEGAPRINT Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauff, F.; Christie, D. C.; Wintersteller, P.; Werner, R.; Hanan, B. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2001-12-01

    During the MEGAPRINT expedition (R/V Sonne Cruise SO158), we mapped and sampled the eastern Galapagos spreading center (GSC) between 85\\deg and 92.5\\deg W using the newly installed SIMRAD EM120 multibeam echosounder. The new maps reveal a wide range of axial morphologies, ranging through several axial valley types, some with pronounced graben structures, to both narrow and broad axial highs. The GSC shoals from 2700 meters at 86\\deg W to as little as 1500 meters in the 89\\deg - 90\\deg W area, where it lies closest to the Galapagos platform. The eastern GSC encompasses the known range of morphologies for intermediate spreading ridges with frequent transitions presumably reflecting local variations in melt supply and eruption frequency. Periods in which spreading exceeds extrusive construction are characterized by axial valleys and, in one case by a rifted axial volcano at 87\\deg W. The 91\\deg W transform fault is marked by a 3500m deep pull-apart basin containing two small recently active volcanic cones. The western GSC between 90\\deg and 92.5\\deg W is characterized by two broad axial highs separated by axial lows (see also Sinton et al. 2000). The axial highs are connected with southeastward trending chains of seamounts and small ridges, sub-parallel to the larger Wolf Darwin lineament (WDL), commonly thought to reflect today's primary plume ridge connection. The junction of the WDL and the GSC is, however, an axial low suggesting that the maximum geochemical influence of the plume (e.g., Verma and Schilling 1982), may not correlate with the WDL. Seamounts in the region between the WDL and the 91\\deg W transform are shallow and several display morphologic terraces. Dredge samples from several include rounded cobbles and nearshore sediment (beach deposits) suggesting that these seamounts may represent submerged ocean islands. It is yet not clear whether these are on-axis volcanoes or if they may have formed on older crust anologous to some of the seamounts

  7. Complex relationships between surficial geology, rock geochemistry and subsurface melt bodies at the 9N Overlapping Spreading Center, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, E. M.; Perfit, M. R.; Wanless, V.; White, S. M.; Nunnery, J. A.; Waters, C. L.; Sims, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    A fundamental goal in the study of mid-ocean ridges is to understand the relationships between the distribution and characteristics of melt at depth and of the lavas erupted on the seafloor. Our investigation (AT15-15) of the surficial geology and geochemistry of lavas erupted at the 9N Overlapping Spreading Center on the East Pacific Rise builds on an unusually detailed seismic characterization of subsurface melt distribution, and thus allows us to explore these relationships. We surveyed 200 sq. km. with DSL-120A; imaged and sampled with the ROV Jason II and the WHOI TowCam; and surveyed (CTD and MAPR) for hydrothermal activity, identifying one hydrothermal vent field. Our photographic results, calibrated with radiometric data to estimate seafloor age, reveal unexpectedly complex spatial relations between the distribution of crustal melt bodies and the loci and composition of recent eruptions. Beneath the northern portion of the East Limb, a wide asymmetric melt lens extends from the ridge axis 4 km westward (Kent et al., 2000). Where it underlies the spreading axis on the east, abundant andesites and dacites were recovered. Off-axis, along the western edge of the melt lens, young-looking ferrobasaltic lavas comprise a north-south trending ridge. Based on calculated spreading age, seafloor along this ridge would be expected to be >40kyr, while radiometric age dating of lavas from this ridge suggests lavas are substantially younger (C.L. Waters, PhD Thesis, 2010). This off-axis ridge, likely fault controlled, extends ~10 km to the north of our study area where sparse seismic data suggest a similarly wide asymmetric melt lens that may represent the continuation of the well-characterized melt sill to its south. A disparity between position of the melt lens and recent volcanism is also observed along the East Limb tip, where only old crust is present overlying the eastward plunging melt sill, and the locus of recent volcanism is confined to the western inside corner

  8. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  9. Low-latitude equinoctial spread-F occurrence at different longitude sectors under low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, M.; Zuccheretti, E.; Abadi, P.; de Abreu, A. J.; de Jesus, R.; Fagundes, P. R.; Supnithi, P.; Rungraengwajiake, S.; Nagatsuma, T.; Tsugawa, T.; Cabrera, M. A.; Ezquer, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of a comparative study of spread-F signatures over five low-latitude sites: Chiangmai (CGM; 18.8° N, 98.9° E, mag. Lat. 8.8° N), Thailand; Tanjungsari (TNJ; 6.9° S, 107.6° E, mag. Lat. 16.9° S), Indonesia; Palmas (PAL; 10.2° S, 311.8° E, mag. Lat. 0.9° S) and São José Dos Campos (SJC; 23.2° S, 314.1° E, mag. Lat. 14.0° S), Brazil; and Tucumán (TUC; 26.9° S, 294.6° E, mag. Lat. 16.8° S), Argentina. The investigation was based on simultaneous ionograms recorded by an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) at CGM, an IPS-71 (digital ionosonde from KEL aerospace) at TNJ, a CADI (Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde) at PAL and SJC, and an AIS-INGV (Advanced Ionospheric Sounder - Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) at TUC, during the equinoctial periods March-April (R12 = 2.0 and R12 = 2.2) and September-October (R12 = 6.1 and R12 = 7.0) 2009, for very low solar activity. Spread-F signatures were categorized into two types: the range spread-F (RSF) and the frequency spread-F (FSF). The study confirms that the dynamics and the physical processes responsible for these phenomena are actually complicated. In fact, the features that arise from the investigation are different, depending on both the longitude sector and on the hemisphere. For instance, TUC, under the southern crest of the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), shows a predominance of RSF signatures, while both SJC, under the southern crest of EIA but in a different longitude sector, and CGM, under the northern crest of EIA, show a predominance of FSF signatures. Moreover, the spread-F occurrence over the longitude sector that includes CGM and TNJ is significantly lower than the spread-F occurrence over the longitude sector of PAL, SJC, and TUC.

  10. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activation suppresses alpha2beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through inhibition of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Chau-Zen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Upregulation and overexpression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) have been implied in the regulation of kidney development and progression of cancers. Our previous studies with Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells showed that overexpression of DDR1 inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative DDR1 promoted cell spreading on collagen-coated dish. Cell spreading is an important characteristic for cell differentiation and survival. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of DDR1 in cell spreading. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of DDR1 consisting of Cdc42 that regulates the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeleton and cell spreading in MDCK cells. Cell spreading involves the organization of cytoskeleton that is mainly regulated by Rho-family GTPases. We assessed the activity of Rho-family GTPases and transfected MDCK cells with constitutively active or dominant negative GTPases, and quantified the extent of cell spreading. These results showed that DDR1 decreased the filamentous actin ratio and Rac1/Cdc42 activities, but had no effects on RhoA activity. Neither constitutively active nor dominant negative Rac1 altered DDR1-inhibited cell spreading. Constitutively active Cdc42 could rescue the DDR1-inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative Cdc42 inhibited cell spreading, indicating that DDR1-inhibited cell spreading is Cdc42 dependent. With the use of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin blocking antibody, we showed that collagen-induced Cdc42 activation was mediated by alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. Moreover, ectopic FAK expression enhanced the Cdc42 activity. Reducing FAK activity by dominant negative FAK (FRNK) markedly abolished the Cdc42 activity. These findings show that DDR1a/b activation inhibits cell spreading through suppressing alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-mediated Cdc42 activation. PMID:18780290

  11. Accelerating efforts to prevent childhood obesity: spreading, scaling, and sustaining healthy eating and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debbie I; Gertel-Rosenberg, Allison; Snyder, Kim

    2014-12-01

    During the past decade, progress has been made in addressing childhood obesity through policy and practice changes that encourage increased physical activity and access to healthy food. With the implementation of these strategies, an understanding of what works to prevent childhood obesity is beginning to emerge. The task now is to consider how best to spread, scale, and sustain promising childhood obesity prevention strategies. In this article we examine a project led by Nemours, a children's health system, to address childhood obesity. We describe Nemours's conceptual approach to spreading, scaling, and sustaining a childhood obesity prevention intervention. We review a component of a Nemours initiative in Delaware that focused on early care and education settings and its expansion to other states through the National Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative to prevent childhood obesity. We also discuss lessons learned. Focusing on the spreading, scaling, and sustaining of promising strategies has the potential to increase the reach and impact of efforts in obesity prevention and help ensure their impact on population health.

  12. Distribution of mega fauna on sulfide edifices on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Arunima; Becker, Erin L.; Podowski, Elizabeth L.; Wickes, Leslie N.; Ma, Shufen; Mullaugh, Katherine M.; Hourdez, Stéphane; Luther, George W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrothermal vent sulfide edifices contain some of the most extreme thermal and chemical conditions in which animals are able to live. As a result, sulfide edifices in the East Pacific Rise, Juan de Fuca Ridge, and Mid Atlantic Ridge vent systems often contain distinct faunal assemblages. In this study, we used high-resolution imagery and in-situ physico-chemical measurements within the context of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to examine community structure and niche differentiation of dominant fauna on sulfide edifices in the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our results show that ELSC and VFR sulfide edifices host two distinct types of communities. One type, that covers the majority of sulfide edifice faces, is overall very similar to nearby lava communities and biomass is dominated by the same chemoautotrophic symbiont-containing molluscs that dominate lava communities, namely the provannid gastropods Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei and the mytilid bivalve Bathymodiolus brevior. The spatial distribution of the dominant molluscs is often a variation of the pattern of concentric rings observed on lavas, with Alviniconcha spp. at the tops of edifices where exposure to vent flow is the highest, and I. nautilei and B. brevior below. Our physico-chemical measurements indicate that because of rapid dispersion of vent fluid, habitable area for symbiont-containing fauna is quite limited on sulfide edifices, and the realized niches of the mollusc groups are narrower on sulfide edifices than on lavas. We suggest that competition plays an important role in determining the realized distributions of the mollusc groups on edifices. The other habitat, present in small patches of presumably hot, new anhydrite, is avoided by the dominant symbiont-containing molluscs and inhabited by crabs, shrimp and polynoids that are likely more heat tolerant. The ratio of sulfide concentration to temperature anomaly of

  13. Activities of Z-ajoene against tumour and viral spreading in vitro.

    PubMed

    Terrasson, Jerome; Xu, Bo; Li, Min; Allart, Sophie; Davignon, Jean-Luc; Zhang, Li-he; Wang, Kui; Davrinche, Christian

    2007-06-01

    Z-ajoene is a garlic-derived compound with known anti-tumour properties. This report argues in favour of pro-apoptotic and cell cycle blockage activities of Z-ajoene on various cell lines involving activation of the p53-family gene products, p53, p63 and p73, at indicated doses. According to its known anti-proteasome activity, Z-ajoene induced a downregulation of MHC-class I expression at the surface of treated cells but did not impair their recognition by CD8+ T cells. We further demonstrated a new activity of Z-ajoene against human cytomegalovirus spreading in vitro that was mediated by an increased number of apoptotic cells after infection. Altogether our data point at the ubiquitous efficiency of Z-ajoene as a new compound to fight against cancers of various origins including those that put up viruses.

  14. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  15. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Amy N; Neupauer, Roseanna M; Kasprzyk, Joseph R

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  16. Magma system along fast-spreading centers controlled by ridge segmentation: Evidence from the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Sumio; Adachi, Yoshiko

    2013-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are segmented at various scales with a hierarchy, from the biggest 1st- order to the smallest 4th-order segments. These segment structures control magmatic processes beneath the mid-ocean ridges such as mantle upwelling, partial melting of the upper mantle, and magma delivery system to form the oceanic crust (Macdonald, 1998). However, systematic studies on the segment control for magmatic processes are rare at modern mid-ocean ridges due to the difficulty of obtaining in-situ samples from different crustal-lithospheric depths. Sampling at ocean floors is generally exclusively limited only to the surface (i.e. the seafloor). Furthermore, the samples obtained from the surface of the ocean floor may likely represent the products of off-axis magmatism (Kusano et al., 2012). Therefore, studies of ocean ridge segmentation in ophiolites provide important constraints for the magmatic processes beneath seafloor spreading centers, because the precise 3-D architecture of the upper mantle and the crust (all the way to the uppermost extrusive layer) and their lateral variations could be observed and investigated in ophiolites. We have studied the northern Oman ophiolite where a complete succession from the upper mantle peridotites to the uppermost extrusive rocks is well exposed. Miyashita et al. (2003), Adachi and Miyashita (2003) and Umino et al. (2003) proposed a segment structure in the northern Oman ophiolite; the Wadi Fizh area is regarded as a northward propagating tip of a mid-ocean ridge based on geological evidence (Adachi and Miyashita. 2003). On the other hand, the Wadi Thuqbah area, about 25 km south of Wadi Fizh, is regarded as a segment center based on the thickest Moho transition zone, well developed EW-trending lineations in the MTZ and layered gabbro, and the comparatively primitive compositions of the layered gabbros. Furthermore, the southern margin of the Hilti block (Salahi block), about 40 km south of Wadi Thuqbah, is inferred to be the

  17. A high-temperature hydrothermal deposit on the seabed at a Gulf of California spreading center ( Guaymas Basin).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lonsdale, P.F.; Bischoff, J.L.; Burns, V.M.; Kastner, M.; Sweeney, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A submersible dive on a turbidite-covered spreading axis in Guaymas Basin photographed and sampled extensive terraces and ledges of talc. The rock contains siliceous microfossils, smectite, and euhedral pyrrhotite as well as rather pure iron-rich talc. S and O isotopes indicate precipitation around a hydrothermal vent, at about 2800C. - Authors

  18. Dynamics of Dike Intrusions and Three-Dimensional Velocity Structure beneath an Incipient Seafloor Spreading Center in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yihun, Manahloh Belachew

    A rifting episode started in September 2005 with an intrusion of a 60 km-long mega-dike along the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) rift segment in Afar, Ethiopia. Between 2005 and 2009 thirteen smaller volume dikes intruded different portions of the rift segment. Out of the 13 dikes, 9 were recorded on a temporary network of 44 three-component broadband stations. The dynamics of the dike intrusions are studied using the detailed analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of dike-induced earthquakes and their source mechanisms. In addition, a 3D model of seismic velocity structure is determined using local earthquake travel time tomography algorithm. The dike-induced migration patterns of the earthquakes show the dikes were fed from a ˜5 km-radius zone at the middle of the DMH segment, and traveled northward and southward along the rift axis. The dikes that propagated north of the mid-segment have higher propagation rates and short migration duration relative to the dikes that propagated south. Faulting and graben formation above the dikes occurs hours after the passage of the dike tip, coincident with the onset of low-frequency earthquakes, and accounts for the large percentage of seismic energy release during an intrusion. The large deficit between total seismic and geodetic moment estimates, and the similarity between total seismic slip and geodetic slip estimates on normal faults above the dikes indicates that dike inflation and most of plate boundary deformation occurs largely aseismically. Local earthquake travel time tomography reveals low velocity zones at depths >13 km beneath the Dabbahu volcanic complex, and a broad zone of low velocity beneath the mid-segment. These regions are interpreted to be the magma source zones at different stages of the rifting cycle along the DMH rift segment. However, the lack of migrating seismicity originating from the Dabbahu volcano suggest that only the magma source zone beneath the Ado'Ale Volcanic Complex is actively

  19. Inward spread of activation in frog muscle fibres investigated by means of high-speed microcinematography

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, H.

    1974-01-01

    1. Single fast muscle fibres of the frog were locally activated by applying current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fibre surface, and the resulting local contractions were recorded with a high-speed ciné-camera at 1000-3000 frames/sec. 2. In some but not all of the fibres examined, a moderate membrane depolarization of 20-30 mV initiated a phasic type of local contraction, which showed a definite threshold and relaxed spontaneously while the depolarization still continued. 3. The phasic contraction was sometimes followed by a smaller steady contraction, which lasted as long as the depolarization went on and was regarded to be indentical with the graded type of local contraction. 4. With pipettes of 20-40 μm diameter, the phasic contraction was first initiated at the depolarized fibre surface, and spread to some extent inwards with a velocity of 0·7-2 cm/sec at 18-26° C. The velocity of inward spread of contraction had a Q10 of about 2·3. 5. With larger pipettes of more than 50-60 μm diameter, the phasic response was first initiated at the inner part definitely distant from the fibre surface, and the extent of contraction was greater at this part than at the superficial part during the course of the response. Furthermore, with depolarizations of nearly the threshold value, the steady contraction following the phasic one was seen only at the inner part, suggesting the reversal of the gradient of depolarization along the T tubules. 6. The phasic contraction spread inwards or transversely with a considerable decrement. The response spreading across the whole diameter of the fibre could be observed only in some cases. 7. The phasic response was not always sensitive to tetrodotoxin or to the removal of external sodium ions. 8. These results not only give information about the nature of the regenerative mechanism within the T system, but also suggest that the organization of the T tubule network is such that the electrotonic depolarization

  20. Activities of the Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at the University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The college has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction is prominent evidence of this record. At the inception of CSC, the center was primarily founded on the need for research on in-space construction of large space systems like space stations and interplanetary space vehicles. The scope of CSC's research has now evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. Within this broadened scope, our research projects seek to impact the underlying technological basis for such spacecraft as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites, and other special purpose spacecraft, as well as the technological basis for large space platforms. The center's research focuses on three areas: spacecraft structures, spacecraft operations and control, and regolith and surface systems. In the area of spacecraft structures, our current emphasis is on concepts and modeling of deployable structures, analysis of inflatable structures, structural damage detection algorithms, and composite materials for lightweight structures. In the area of spacecraft operations and control, we are continuing our previous efforts in process control of in-orbit structural assembly. In addition, we have begun two new efforts in formal approach to spacecraft flight software systems design and adaptive attitude control systems. In the area of regolith and surface systems, we are continuing the work of characterizing the physical properties of lunar

  1. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P.; Cronin, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6–35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  2. Hotspot activity and plume pulses recorded by geometry of spreading axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Meir; Agnon, Amotz

    2001-06-01

    Anomalous plan view geometry (planform) of spreading axes is shown to be a faithful indicator of hotspot influence, possibly capable of detecting pulses of hotspot discharge. A planform anomaly (PA) occurs when the orientation of second-order ridge segments is prominently oblique to the spreading direction. PA is found in the vicinity of hotspots at shallow ridges (<1.5 km), suggesting hotspot influence. In places the PA and shallow bathymetry are accompanied by geochemical anomalies, corroborating hotspot influence. This linkage is best expressed in the western Gulf of Aden, where the extent of the PA from the Afar hotspot coincides with the extent of La/Sm and Sr isotopic anomalies. Using fracture mechanics we predict PA to reflect overpressurized melt that dominates the stresses in the crust, consistent with hotspot regime. Accordingly, the temporal variations of the planform previously inferred from magnetic anomalies around the Kolbeinsey Ridge (KR), north of Iceland, record episodes of interaction with the hotspot and major pulses of the plume. This suggestion is corroborated by temporal correlation of episodes showing PA north of Iceland with plume pulses previously inferred by the V-shaped ridges around the Reykjanes Ridge (RR), south of Iceland. In contrast to the RR, the temporal correlation suggests simultaneous incidence of the plume pulses at Iceland and KR, hundreds of kilometers to the north. A deep northward branch of the Iceland plume active during pulse-periods may explain these observations.

  3. Hurricane activity and the large-scale pattern of spread of an invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6-35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species.

  4. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent.

  5. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent. PMID:27656691

  6. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased. PMID:27003366

  7. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  8. Parafoveal versus foveal N400s dissociate spreading activation from contextual fit.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Franziska; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Using concurrent electroencephalogram and eye movement measures to track natural reading, this study shows that N400 effects reflecting predictability are dissociable from those owing to spreading activation. In comparing predicted sentence endings with related and unrelated unpredicted endings in antonym constructions ('the opposite of black is white/yellow/nice'), fixation-related potentials at the critical word revealed a predictability-based N400 effect (unpredicted vs. predicted words). By contrast, event-related potentials time locked to the last fixation before the critical word showed an N400 only for the nonrelated unpredicted condition (nice). This effect is attributed to a parafoveal mismatch between the critical word and preactivated lexical features (i.e. features of the predicted word and its associates). In addition to providing the first demonstration of a parafoveally induced N400 effect, our results support the view that the N400 is best viewed as a component family.

  9. Telerobotic activities at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center telerobotic efforts span three major thrusts: (1) sustaining and expanding the capability of the Shuttle manipulator; (2) developing and integrating the multiple telerobotic system of the Space Station; and (3) fostering and applying research in all areas of telerobotics technology within the government, private, and academic sectors.

  10. Chemical trends in the activation energies of DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, O.; Kawai, H.; Mori, Y.; Kaneko, K.

    1984-12-01

    The activation energies of DX centers in AlGaAs doped with six different impurities (S, Se, Te, Si, Ge, and Sn) are measured by deep level transient spectroscopy. Remarkable trends are established, in which the activation energies of DX centers with group IV impurities become shallower as the mass number of the impurity increases, while those with group VI impurities remain constant.

  11. Marketing backgrounds and activities of community mental health center CEOs.

    PubMed

    Whyte, E G; Smith, M; Reidenbach, E N; Sharpe, T R

    1989-01-01

    More than 300 directors of community mental health centers responded to a survey concerning their marketing training and the marketing activities in which their centers had been engaged. Formal marketing training was found to be in the backgrounds of few of the respondents. The majority had not been engaged in a listing of marketing activities.

  12. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  13. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  14. 29 CFR 525.23 - Work activities centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work activities centers. 525.23 Section 525.23 Labor... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.23 Work activities centers. Nothing in these regulations shall be interpreted to prevent an employer from maintaining or establishing...

  15. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  16. Flow rates and reaction rates in the Galapagos Rise spreading center hydrothermal system as inferred from 228Ra/226Ra in vesicomyid clam shells

    PubMed Central

    Turekian, Karl K.; Cochran, J. Kirk

    1986-01-01

    The 228Ra/226Ra ratios in a previously dated vesicomyid clam shell were used to determine that seawater was in contact with mid-oceanic-ridge basalt glass for 22-45 years prior to arrival to the surface at 350°C at the Galapagos Rise Spreading Center. The minimum rate of reaction for the 45-year sojourn time, based on a water/rock ratio of 2.8 derived from 226Ra concentrations, is 8 g of basalt altered per kg of seawater per year. PMID:16593746

  17. Modeling and simulation of fire spreading through the activity tracking paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Muzy,; Nutaro, James J; Zeigler, Bernard P; Coquillard,

    2008-01-01

    Modeling and simulation is essential for understanding complex ecological systems. However, knowledge of the structure and behavior of these systems is limited, and models must be revised frequently as our understanding of a system improves. Moreover, the dynamic, spatial distribution of activity in very large systems necessitates mapping natural mechanisms as logically as possible onto computer structures. This paper describes theoretical and algorithmic tools for building component-based models and simulations of dynamic spatial phenomena. These methods focus attention on and exploit the irregular distribution of activity in ecological processes. We use the DEVS formalism as the basis for a component based approach to modeling spatially distributed systems. DEVS is a mathematical theory of discrete-event systems that is well suited for describing large systems that are described by small parts with irregular, short-range interactions. This event-based approach to modeling leads naturally to efficient simulations algorithms which focus on the active parts of a large model. Ecological modeling benefits from these efficient the simulation algorithms and the reusability of the model s basic components. Our event-based method is demonstrated with a physics-based model of fire spread.

  18. Effect of individual behavior on epidemic spreading in activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Frasca, Mattia; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    In this work we study the effect of behavioral changes of individuals on the propagation of epidemic diseases. Specifically, we consider a susceptible-infected-susceptible model over a network of contacts that evolves in a time scale that is comparable to the individual disease dynamics. The phenomenon is modeled in the context of activity-driven networks, in which contacts occur on the basis of activity potentials. To offer insight into behavioral strategies targeting both susceptible and infected individuals, we consider two separate behaviors that may emerge in respiratory syndromes and sexually transmitted infections. The first is related to a reduction in the activity of infected individuals due to quarantine or illness. The second is instead associated with a selfish self-protective behavior of susceptible individuals, who tend to reduce contact with the rest of the population on the basis of a risk perception. Numerical and theoretical results suggest that behavioral changes could have a beneficial effect on the disease spreading, by increasing the epidemic threshold and decreasing the steady-state fraction of infected individuals.

  19. Dynamic characteristics of an active coastal spreading area using ambient noise measurements—Anchor Bay, Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Farrugia, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Anchor Bay and surrounding regions are located on the northwest coast of the island of Malta, Central Mediterranean. The area is characterized by a coastal cliff environment having an outcropping layer of hard coralline limestone (UCL) resting on a thick (up to 50 m) layer of clays and marls (Blue Clay, BC). This configuration gives rise to coastal instability effects, in particular lateral spreading phenomena and rock falls. Previous and ongoing studies have identified both lateral spreading rates and vertical motions of several millimetres per year. The area is an interesting natural laboratory as coastal detachment processes in a number of different stages can be identified and are easily accessible. We investigate the site dynamic characteristics of this study area by recording ambient noise time-series at more than 30 points, over an area of 0.07 km2, using a portable three-component seismograph. The time-series are processed to give both horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio graphs (H/V) as well as frequency-dependent polarisation analysis. The H/V graphs illustrate and quantify aspects of site resonance effects due both to underlying geology as well as to mechanical resonance of partly or wholly detached blocks. The polarization diagrams indicate the degree of linearity and predominant directions of vibrational effects. H/V curves closer to the cliff edge show complex responses at higher frequencies, characteristic of the dynamic behaviour of individual detached blocks. Particle motion associated with the higher frequencies shows strongly directional polarization and a high degree of linearity at well-defined frequencies, indicative of normal-mode vibration. The stable plateau areas, on the other hand, show simple, single-peak H/V curves representative of the underlying stratification and no predominant polarization direction. These results, which will be compared with those from other experiments in the area, have important implications for the

  20. Focal hyperemia followed by spreading oligemia and impaired activation of rCBF in classic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, J.; Larsen, B.; Lauritzen, M.

    1981-04-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 254 areas of a hemisphere with the xenon 133 intraarterial injection method. Six cases of classic migraine were followed from the normal state into the prodromal phase, and in 3 cases further into the headache phase. One patient with common migraine was similarly followed during his only classic attack. The attacks were initiated by focal hyperemia in 3 patients. During prodromes all patients displayed occipitoparietal rCBF reduction (oligemia), but in only 1 case did the reduction approach critical values. Oligemia gradually spread anteriorly in the course of 15 to 45 minutes. In 4 patients a global oligemia was observed. In 4 patients severe headache was present concomitantly with oligemia and with no sign of hyperemia or nonhomogeneous brain perfusion. The normal rCBF increase during cortical activity (hand movement, speech, and similar activities) was impaired in 6 patients. The results indicate that the vasospastic model of the migraine attack is too simplistic.

  1. Activation-triggered subunit exchange between CaMKII holoenzymes facilitates the spread of kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Margaret; Lee, Il-Hyung; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Christensen, Sune M; Chao, Luke H; Schulman, Howard; Groves, Jay T; Kuriyan, John

    2014-01-01

    The activation of the dodecameric Ca2+/calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) holoenzyme is critical for memory formation. We now report that CaMKII has a remarkable property, which is that activation of the holoenzyme triggers the exchange of subunits between holoenzymes, including unactivated ones, enabling the calcium-independent phosphorylation of new subunits. We show, using a single-molecule TIRF microscopy technique, that the exchange process is triggered by the activation of CaMKII, and that exchange is modulated by phosphorylation of two residues in the calmodulin-binding segment, Thr 305 and Thr 306. Based on these results, and on the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations, we suggest that the phosphorylated regulatory segment of CaMKII interacts with the central hub of the holoenzyme and weakens its integrity, thereby promoting exchange. Our results have implications for an earlier idea that subunit exchange in CaMKII may have relevance for information storage resulting from brief coincident stimuli during neuronal signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01610.001 PMID:24473075

  2. Recruitment of marine invertebrates to hard substrates at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Berg, Carl J.; Turner, Ruth D.

    1988-10-01

    Recruitment panels were placed at and near hydrothermal vent communities at three sites on the Galapagos spreading center and one site on the East Pacific Rise at 21°N. Deployment periods ranged from 26 days (Clam Acres, 21°N) to 260-320 days (Rose Garden, Garden of Eden, Mussel Bed, GSC) to 1216 days (Clam Acres). Recruitment of gastropod post-larvae and juveniles was observed on arrays deployed at Clam Acres for 26 days. Regardless of length of deployment, populations of polychaetes, mollusks, and barnacles colonizing the panels were predominantly post-larval, juvenile, or sub-adult stages. We suggest that some combination of competition, migration, and predation maintains these populations in immature stages. Size distributions of individuals within a taxon on panels deployed for 1216 days are broad, suggesting intermittent or continuous recruitment in many of the vent-associated species rather than a single episodic recruitment event. Folliculinid and foraminiferan protozoans were the most abundant eucaryotic organisms colonizing long-term deployments at Clam Acres. On the Galapagos spreading center, level of recruitment differed among the vent sites, with Rose Garden > Garden of Eden ≫ Mussel Bed. Recruitment of vent-associated species was greater on panels placed within vent communities compared to panels placed adjacent to these communities. This observation is consistent with the maintenance of vent communities in discrete regions of hydrothermal flux.

  3. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  4. Calculation method using Clarkson integration for the physical dose at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajiri, Minoru; Maeda, Takamasa; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Kuroiwa, Toshitaka; Tanimoto, Katsuyuki; Shibayama, Koichi; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In broad-beam carbon-ion radiotherapy performed using the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba, the number of monitor units is determined by measuring the physical dose at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) for the treatment beam. The total measurement time increases as the number of treatment beams increases, which hinders the treatment of an increased number of patients. Hence, Kusano et al.[Jpn. J. Med. Phys. 23(Suppl. 2), 65-68 (2003)] proposed a method to calculate the physical dose at the center of the SOBP for a treatment beam. Based on a recent study, the authors here propose a more accurate calculation method.Methods: The authors measured the physical dose at the center of the SOBP while varying the circular field size and range-shifter thickness. The authors obtained the physical dose at the center of the SOBP for an irregularly shaped beam using Clarkson integration based on these measurements.Results: The difference between the calculated and measured physical doses at the center of the SOBP varied with a change in the central angle of the sector segment. The differences between the calculated and measured physical doses at the center of the SOBP were within {+-}1% for all irregularly shaped beams that were used to validate the calculation method.Conclusions: The accuracy of the proposed method depends on both the number of angular intervals used for Clarkson integration and the fineness of the basic data used for calculations: sampling numbers for the field size and thickness of the range shifter. If those parameters are properly chosen, the authors can obtain a calculated monitor unit number with high accuracy sufficient for clinical applications.

  5. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  6. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  7. An Ontology-Based Tourism Recommender System Based on Spreading Activation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahramian, Z.; Abbaspour, R. Ali

    2015-12-01

    A tourist has time and budget limitations; hence, he needs to select points of interest (POIs) optimally. Since the available information about POIs is overloading, it is difficult for a tourist to select the most appreciate ones considering preferences. In this paper, a new travel recommender system is proposed to overcome information overload problem. A recommender system (RS) evaluates the overwhelming number of POIs and provides personalized recommendations to users based on their preferences. A content-based recommendation system is proposed, which uses the information about the user's preferences and POIs and calculates a degree of similarity between them. It selects POIs, which have highest similarity with the user's preferences. The proposed content-based recommender system is enhanced using the ontological information about tourism domain to represent both the user profile and the recommendable POIs. The proposed ontology-based recommendation process is performed in three steps including: ontology-based content analyzer, ontology-based profile learner, and ontology-based filtering component. User's feedback adapts the user's preferences using Spreading Activation (SA) strategy. It shows the proposed recommender system is effective and improves the overall performance of the traditional content-based recommender systems.

  8. Faulting and volcanism in the axial valley of the slow-spreading center of the Mariana back arc basin from Wadatsumi side-scan sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Anne; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Asada, Miho; MontéSi, Laurent; Gente, Pascal

    2005-05-01

    We analyzed in detail the geology of the median valley floor of the Mariana Basin slow-spreading ridge using sea surface geophysical data and a high-resolution deep-tow side-scan sonar survey over one spreading segment. Analysis of surface magnetic data indicates highly asymmetric accretion, with the half-spreading rate on the western side of the basin being two to three times larger than on the eastern side. Surface magnetic and reflectivity data together suggest that asymmetric spreading is accomplished through eastward ridge jumps of ˜10 km of amplitude. Deep-tow backscatter data indicate along-axis variations of the volcanic processes with the emplacement of smooth and hummocky flows at the segment center and end, respectively. This variation likely relates to changes in the effusion rate due to the deepening or even disappearance of the magma chamber toward the segment end. Concerning tectonic processes, we find a power law distribution of the fractures, with an exponent of 1.74. This suggests that within the inner valley floor, fracture growth prevails over fracture nucleation and coalescence and that fractures accommodate less than 8% of the strain. According to our calculation based on a ratio of 0.02 to 0.03 between the vertical displacement and the length of faults, the amount of tectonic strain accommodated in the inner valley floor would consistently be ˜1.1-3.4%. Data also show two distinct sets of fractures. One trend is parallel to the rift direction at the segment center (˜N160°E) and perpendicular to the plate separation direction. Another set trends ˜17° oblique to this direction (˜N175°E) and is located over the eastern part of the valley, in the vicinity of a major bounding fault also trending ˜N175°E, that is, obliquely to the direction of plate motion. We modeled the stress field near a major fault that is oblique to the regional stress field associated with plate separation using a three-dimensional boundary element approach. We

  9. NASA Glenn Research Center Battery Activities Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon and GRC's involvement in their development. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EVA) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  10. Characterization of Inhibitory GABA-A Receptor Activation during Spreading Depolarization in Brain Slice

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2014-01-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a slowly propagating wave of near complete depolarizations of neurons and glia. Previous studies have reported large GABA releases during SD, but there is limited understanding of how GABA release and receptor activation are regulated and influence the propagating SD wavefront, as well as an excitatory phase immediately following the passage of SD. The present study characterized GABA-A type receptor (GABAAR) currents during SD generated by KCl microinjection in acute hippocampal slices from adult mice. Spontaneous GABAAR-mediated currents (sIPSCs) were initially enhanced, and were followed by a large outward current at the wavefront. sIPSC were then transiently supressed during the late SD phase, resulting in a significant reduction of the sIPSC/sEPSC ratio. The large outward current generated during SD was eliminated by the GABAAR antagonist gabazine, but the channel potentiator/agonist propofol failed to potentiate the current, likely because of a ceiling effect. Extracellular Cl− decreases recorded during SD were reduced by the antagonist but were not increased by the potentiator. Together with effects of GABAAR modulators on SD propagation rate, these results demonstrate a significant inhibitory role of the initial GABAAR activation and suggest that intracellular Cl− loading is insufficient to generate excitatory GABAAR responses during SD propagation. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for facilitating effects of GABAAR antagonists, and the lack of inhibitory effect of GABAAR potentiators on SD propagation. In addition, selective suppression of GABA transmission in the late SD period and the lack of effect of GABAA modulators on the duration of SD suggests that GABA modulation may not be effective approach to protect neurons during the vulnerable phase of SD. PMID:25338191

  11. Evidence of recent volcanic activity on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M H; Kurras, G J; Tolstoy, M; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Coakley, B J; Cochran, J R

    2001-02-15

    Seafloor spreading is accommodated by volcanic and tectonic processes along the global mid-ocean ridge system. As spreading rate decreases the influence of volcanism also decreases, and it is unknown whether significant volcanism occurs at all at ultraslow spreading rates (<1.5 cm yr(-1)). Here we present three-dimensional sonar maps of the Gakkel ridge, Earth's slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, located in the Arctic basin under the Arctic Ocean ice canopy. We acquired this data using hull-mounted sonars attached to a nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Hawkbill. Sidescan data for the ultraslow-spreading (approximately 1.0 cm yr(-1)) eastern Gakkel ridge depict two young volcanoes covering approximately 720 km2 of an otherwise heavily sedimented axial valley. The western volcano coincides with the average location of epicentres for more than 250 teleseismic events detected in 1999, suggesting that an axial eruption was imaged shortly after its occurrence. These findings demonstrate that eruptions along the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge are focused at discrete locations and appear to be more voluminous and occur more frequently than was previously thought.

  12. Evidence of recent volcanic activity on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M H; Kurras, G J; Tolstoy, M; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Coakley, B J; Cochran, J R

    2001-02-15

    Seafloor spreading is accommodated by volcanic and tectonic processes along the global mid-ocean ridge system. As spreading rate decreases the influence of volcanism also decreases, and it is unknown whether significant volcanism occurs at all at ultraslow spreading rates (<1.5 cm yr(-1)). Here we present three-dimensional sonar maps of the Gakkel ridge, Earth's slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, located in the Arctic basin under the Arctic Ocean ice canopy. We acquired this data using hull-mounted sonars attached to a nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Hawkbill. Sidescan data for the ultraslow-spreading (approximately 1.0 cm yr(-1)) eastern Gakkel ridge depict two young volcanoes covering approximately 720 km2 of an otherwise heavily sedimented axial valley. The western volcano coincides with the average location of epicentres for more than 250 teleseismic events detected in 1999, suggesting that an axial eruption was imaged shortly after its occurrence. These findings demonstrate that eruptions along the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge are focused at discrete locations and appear to be more voluminous and occur more frequently than was previously thought. PMID:11236991

  13. Five million years of compositionally diverse, episodic volcanism: Construction of Davidson Seamount atop an abandoned spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Duncan, R. A.; Huard, J. J.; Davis, A. S.; Castillo, P. R.; Lonsdale, P.; Devogelaere, A.

    2009-12-01

    Davidson Seamount, a volcano located about 80 km off the central California coast, has a volume of ˜320 km3 and consists of a series of parallel ridges serrated with steep cones. Davidson was sampled and its morphology observed during 27 ROV Tiburon dives. During those dives, 286 samples of lava, volcaniclastite, and erratics from the continental margin were collected, with additional samples from one ROV-collected push core and four gravity cores. We report glass compositions for 99 samples and 40Ar-39Ar incremental heating age data for 20 of the samples. The glass analyses are of hawaiite (62%), mugearite (13%), alkalic basalt (9%), and tephrite (8%), with minor transitional basalt (2%), benmoreite (2%), and trachyandesite (2%). The lithologies are irregularly distributed in space and time. The volcano erupted onto crust inferred to be 20 Ma from seafloor magnetic anomalies. Ages of the lavas range from 9.8 to 14.8 Ma. The oldest rocks are from the central ridge, and the youngest are from the flanks and southern end of the edifice. The compositions of the 18 reliably dated volcanic cones vary with age such that the oldest lavas are the most fractionated. The melts lost 65% to nearly 95% of their initial S because of bubble loss during vesiculation, and the shallowest samples have S contents similar to lava erupted subaerially in Hawaii. Despite this similarity in S contents, there is scant other evidence to suggest that Davidson was ever an island. The numerous small cones of disparate chemistry and the long eruptive period suggest episodic growth of the volcano over at least 5 Myr and perhaps as long as 10 Myr if it began to grow when the spreading ridge was abandoned.

  14. the P-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading center: The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed analysis of short period travel time, and waveform data reveals the upper mantle structure beneath an oceanic ridge to depths of 900 km. More than 1400 digital seismograms from earthquakes in Mexico and central America recorded at SCARLET yield 1753 travel times and 58 direct measurements of short period travel time as well as high quality, stable waveforms. The 29 events combine to form a continuous record section from 9 deg to 40 deg with an average station spacing of less than 5 km. First the travel times are inverted. Further constraints arise from the observed relative amplitudes of mantle phases, which are modeled by trial and error.

  15. Discovery and Distribution of Black Smokers on the Western Galapagos Spreading Center: Implications for Spatial and Temporal Controls on High Temperature Venting at Ridge/Hotspot Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P. G.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Though nearly one-fifth of the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lies on or near hotspots, it has been debated whether hotspots increase or decrease MOR hydrothermal flux, or affect vent biota. Despite hotspot enhancement of melt supply, high-temperature vent plumes are enigmatically sparse along two previously-surveyed ridge- hotspot intersections [Reykjanes Ridge (RR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR)]. This has been attributed to crustal thickening by excess volcanism. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 540 km-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot at lon. 94.5 -89.5 deg. W. Although MOR hydrothermal springs were first found along the eastern GSC crest in 1977 near lon. 86 deg. W, the GalAPAGoS smokers are the first active high-temperature vents to be found anywhere along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary. Active and/or recently-inactive smokers were located beneath plumes at 5 sites on the seafloor between lon. 91 deg. W and 94.5 deg. W (see Anderson et al., this session) during near-bottom, real-time fiber-optic Medea camera surveys. Smokers occur along eruptive seafloor fissures atop axial volcanic ridges near the middles of ridge segments, mainly in areas underlain by relatively shallow, continuous axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors. These findings (1) support magmatic, rather than tectonic, control of GSC smoker distribution; (2) demonstrate that thick crust at MOR-hotspot intersections does not prevent high-temperature hydrothermal vents from forming; and, (3) appear to be inconsistent with models suggesting that enhanced hydrothermal cooling causes abrupt deepening of the AMC and transition from non-rifted to rifted GSC morphology near lon. 92.7 deg. W. The widely-spaced smoker sites located on different GSC segments exhibit remarkably similar characteristics and seafloor settings. Most sites are mature or extinct, and are on lava

  16. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-01-01

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95oW and 85oW on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P2O5/K2O ratio implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns. The sequence of fractionated lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95oW. The mantle source regions for these two areas are interpreted to be depleted in incompatible (and volatile?) elements, although the source region beneath 95oW is less severely depleted in La and K. -Authors

  17. Animal-Centered Learning Activities in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Lust, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the contribution of animal-centered activities to students achieving learning outcomes in a veterinary therapeutics course. Design Qualitative methods were used to assess the outcome of using “hands-on” animal interactions as tools of engagement in the course. Reflective commentary on animal-centered activities was collected and analyzed. Assessment Animal-centered learning activities are effective tools for engaging students and facilitating their understanding and application of veterinary therapeutic knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Analysis of qualitative data revealed themes of professional caring and caring behaviors as a direct result of animal-centered activities. Elements of empathy, caring, compassion, and self-awareness were strong undercurrents in student's comments. Conclusions Animal-centered learning activities provide an innovative learning environment for the application of veterinary pharmacy knowledge, skills, and attitudes directly to animal patients. The use of animals in the course is a successful active-learning technique to engage pharmacy students and assist them in developing caring attitudes and behaviors beneficial to future health care providers. PMID:17149415

  18. Antifungal properties of gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde and application in active food packaging of bread and cheese spread foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Mari Pau; Lopez-Carballo, Gracia; Catala, Ramon; Gavara, Rafael; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2013-09-16

    Gliadin films incorporating 1.5, 3 and 5% cinnamaldehyde (g/100g protein) were tested against food-spoilage fungi Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger in vitro, and were employed in an active food packaging system for sliced bread and cheese spread. Gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde were highly effective against fungal growth. P. expansum and A. niger were completely inhibited after storage in vitro for 10 days in the presence of films incorporating 3% cinnamaldehyde. Indeed 1.5% cinnamaldehyde was sufficient in the case of P. expansum. The amount of cinnamaldehyde retained in films after storage for 45 days at 20 °C and 0% RH was also sufficient in most cases to prevent fungal growth in vitro. Active food packaging with gliadin films incorporating 5% cinnamaldehyde increased the shelf-life of both sliced bread and cheese spread. Mold growth was observed on sliced bread after 27 days of storage at 23 °C with active packaging, whereas in the control bread packaged without the active film fungal growth appeared around the fourth day. In the cheese spread, no fungi were observed after 26 days of storage at 4 °C when the product was packaged with the active film. However, growth of fungi was observed in control packaged cheese after 16 days of storage. This work demonstrates a noteworthy potential of these novel bioplastics incorporating natural antimicrobial compounds as innovative solutions to be used in active food packaging to extend shelf-life of food products. PMID:24029024

  19. Antifungal properties of gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde and application in active food packaging of bread and cheese spread foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Mari Pau; Lopez-Carballo, Gracia; Catala, Ramon; Gavara, Rafael; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2013-09-16

    Gliadin films incorporating 1.5, 3 and 5% cinnamaldehyde (g/100g protein) were tested against food-spoilage fungi Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger in vitro, and were employed in an active food packaging system for sliced bread and cheese spread. Gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde were highly effective against fungal growth. P. expansum and A. niger were completely inhibited after storage in vitro for 10 days in the presence of films incorporating 3% cinnamaldehyde. Indeed 1.5% cinnamaldehyde was sufficient in the case of P. expansum. The amount of cinnamaldehyde retained in films after storage for 45 days at 20 °C and 0% RH was also sufficient in most cases to prevent fungal growth in vitro. Active food packaging with gliadin films incorporating 5% cinnamaldehyde increased the shelf-life of both sliced bread and cheese spread. Mold growth was observed on sliced bread after 27 days of storage at 23 °C with active packaging, whereas in the control bread packaged without the active film fungal growth appeared around the fourth day. In the cheese spread, no fungi were observed after 26 days of storage at 4 °C when the product was packaged with the active film. However, growth of fungi was observed in control packaged cheese after 16 days of storage. This work demonstrates a noteworthy potential of these novel bioplastics incorporating natural antimicrobial compounds as innovative solutions to be used in active food packaging to extend shelf-life of food products.

  20. Learning to Characterize Submarine Lava Flow Morphology at Seamounts and Spreading Centers using High Definition Video and Photomosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundis, A. T.; Sautter, L. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Kerr-Riess, M.; Denny, A. R.; Elend, M.

    2010-12-01

    In August, 2010 the UW ENLIGHTEN ’10 expedition provided ~140 hours of seafloor HD video footage at Axial Seamount, the most magmatically robust submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During this expedition, direct imagery from an Insite Pacific HD camera mounted on the ROV Jason 2 was used to classify broad expanses of seafloor where high power (8 kw) and high bandwidth (10 Gb/s) fiber optic cable will be laid as part of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF funded Ocean Observatories Initiative. The cable will provide power and two-way, real-time communication to an array of >20 sensors deployed at the summit of the volcano and at active sites of hydrothermal venting to investigate how active processes within the volcano and at seafloor hot springs within the caldera are connected. In addition to HD imagery, over 10,000 overlapping photographs from a down-looking still camera were merged and co-registered to create high resolution photomosaics of two areas within Axial’s caldera. Thousands of additional images were taken to characterize the seafloor along proposed cable routes, allowing optimal routes to be planned well in advance of deployment. Lowest risk areas included those free of large collapse basins, steep flow fronts and fissures. Characterizing the modes of lava distribution across the seafloor is crucial to understanding the construction history of the upper oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges. In part, reconstruction of crustal development and eruptive histories can be inferred from surface flow morphologies, which provide insights into lava emplacement dynamics and effusion rates of past eruptions. An online resource is under development that will educate students about lava flow morphologies through the use of HD video and still photographs. The objective of the LavaFlow exercise is to map out a proposed cable route across the Axial Seamount caldera. Students are first trained in appropriate terminology and background content

  1. Reconstructing lava flow emplacement processes at the hot spot-affected Galápagos Spreading Center, 95°W and 92°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, Tim; White, Scott M.; Colman, Alice; Sinton, John M.

    2013-08-01

    Volcanic eruptions at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) control the permeability, internal structure, and architecture of oceanic crust, thus establishing the foundation for the evolution of the ocean basins. To better understand the emplacement of submarine lava flows at MORs, we have integrated submersible-based geologic mapping with remote sensing techniques to characterize the lava flow morphology within previously mapped lava flow fields produced during single eruptive episodes at the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC). Detailed attributes describing the surface geometry and texture of the lava flows have been extracted from high-resolution sonar data and combined with georeferenced visual observations from submersible dives and camera tows; based on signatures contained in these data, a fuzzy logic-based classification algorithm categorized lava flow morphology as pillows, lobates, or sheets. The resulting digital thematic maps offer an unprecedented view of GSC lava morphology, collectively covering 77 km2 of ridge axis terrain at a resolution of 2 m × 2 m. Error assessments with independent visual reference data indicate approximately 90% agreement, comparable to subaerial classification studies. The digital lava morphology maps enable quantitative, spatially comprehensive measurements of the abundance and distribution of lava morphologies over large areas of seafloor and within individual eruptive units. A comparison of lava flow fields mapped at lower- and higher-magma-supply settings (95° and 92°W, respectively) indicates that effusion rates increase along with magma supply and independent of spreading rate at the GSC, although a complete range of eruptive behavior exists at each setting.

  2. Community Information and Services Centers: Concepts for Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Cleve

    An experimental program based on a study by the Department of Housing and Urban Development was activated to deliver services to urban residents via automated communications technology. Designed to contribute to improvement in the quality of life, the program of a Community Information and Services Center (CISC) included: outreach programs, i.e.,…

  3. Insights on the Biology of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center from Studies on the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. R.; Sen, A.; Becker, E.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal of the Ridge 2000 program was to conduct comparable interdisciplinary studies at a few fundamentally different sites that would facilitate comparisons among sites and development of concepts with broad application across deep ocean ridge spreading centers. Although the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) was the least known of the three Integrated Study Sites, we were able to make amazingly fast progress on understanding this system because we could draw on technology and experience developed during the RIDGE program to plan and conduct the work, and now interpret our findings in the context of the rich literature and Ridge 2000 studies on East Pacific Rise (EPR) , Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), and Mid Atlantic Ridge communities. The ELSC communities not only house different species than those of the other regions, but unlike the often tubeworm dominated E. Pacific vents, they are structured by symbiont reliant species that are mobile; snails and mussels. Although there is some variation with lava type on the ELSC, the 4 species of large, symbiont-containing snails largely occupy the niches filled by tubeworms and mussels on the EPR, while the niche of the mussel in the W. Pacific vents is quite different from that of its EPR cousin. Although we have not observed any significant tectonic or magmatic events during our studies of the ELSC, 4 years of study considered in the context of what we have learned on the EPR and JdFR allow us to formulate and begin testing hypotheses about temporal change and succession in these very different and much less visited ecosystems. Furthermore, athough Paralvinella fijiensis are only found in limited areas on some chimneys and flanges, unlike the situation on the EPR and JdFR ,the ELSC chimney communities are largely composed of the same species as are found in diffuse flow on the lavas. The ELSC chimney communities are also remarkably stable, hosting some of the largest and apparently oldest individuals found on the

  4. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an Hα luminosity of L {sub Hα} = (4.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ∼0.''29 ± 0.''05 (corresponding to ∼14.3 ± 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  5. Langley Research Center contributions in advancing active control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active control technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. Some of the contributions of the Langley Research Center in advancing active control technology are described. Contributions are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  6. Ischemia triggered by spreading neuronal activation is induced by endothelin-1 and hemoglobin in the subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Gabor C; Einhäupl, Karl M; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Dreier, Jens P

    2003-11-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm has a major impact on the outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two important candidates to cause the arterial spasm are the red blood cell product oxyhemoglobin and the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, although oxyhemoglobin alone is not sufficient to induce cerebral ischemia and endothelin-1 leads to ischemia only at relatively high concentrations. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of oxyhemoglobin and endothelin-1 triggered spreading neuronal activation in rat cortex in vivo. In contrast with the expected transient increase of regional cerebral blood flow during spreading depression, however, cerebral blood flow decreased profoundly and was long-lasting, paralleled by delayed repolarization of the steady (direct current) potential. These changes are characteristic of cortical spreading ischemia. Replacing oxyhemoglobin for the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine mimicked these effects, implicating nitric oxide scavenging functions of oxyhemoglobin. Furthermore, the effect of endothelin-1 was related to a reduction of Na(+)-/K(+)-ATPase activity rather than solely to its vasoconstrictive properties. In conclusion, the threshold concentration of endothelin-1 that induces cerebral ischemia is profoundly reduced via a complex interaction between the neuronal/astroglial network and the cortical microcirculation if nitric oxide availability declines. The results may have implications for the understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage-related cortical lesions.

  7. Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory development activities. 2: Langley Research Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, T. G.; Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis activities at the Langley Research Center are resulting in efficient and accurate analytical methods for predicting both far- and near-field radiation characteristics of large offset multiple-beam multiple-aperture mesh reflector antennas. The utilization of aperture integration augmented with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction in analyzing the large reflector antenna system is emphasized.

  8. Activity in the Mission Control Center during Apollo 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two individuals are examining a seismic reading in the Mission Control Center's Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) Room during the Apollo 14 S-IVB impact on the moon. Dr. Maurice Ewing (left) is the Director of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory at Columbia University. David Lammlein, a Columbia graduate student, is on the right (17609); Partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the time the Apollo 14 S-IVB stage impacted on the lunar surface. The flight director's console in in the foregroune. Eugene F. Kranz, Chief of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Flight Control Division, is in the right foreground. Seated at the console is Glynn S. Lunney, Head of the Flight Directors Office, Flight Control Division. Facing the camera is Gerald D. Griffin, Flight Director of the Third (Gold) team (17610).

  9. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  10. Vehicle Engineering Development Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.; Champion, Robert H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    New initiatives in the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center include an emphasis on Vehicle Engineering to enhance the strong commitment to the Directorate's projects in the development of flight hardware and flight demonstrators for the advancement of space transportation technology. This emphasis can be seen in the activities of a newly formed organization in the Transportation Directorate, The Vehicle Subsystems Engineering Group. The functions and type of activities that this group works on are described. The current projects of this group are outlined including a brief description of the status and type of work that the group is performing. A summary section is included to describe future activities.

  11. From rifting to active spreading in the Lau Basin - Havre Trough backarc system (SW Pacific): Locking/unlocking induced by seamount chain subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruellan, E.; Delteil, J.; Wright, I.; Matsumoto, T.

    2003-05-01

    Associated with Pacific-Australia plate convergence, the Lau Basin - Havre Trough is an active back-arc basin that has been opened since ˜5.5 Ma by rifting and southward propagating oceanic spreading. Current back-arc opening rates decrease from 159 mm yr-1 in the northern Lau Basin to 15 mm y-1 in the southern Havre Trough. Major tectonic changes occur at the transition between Havre Trough rifting and full oceanic spreading of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC), where the oblique-to-trench, westward subducting Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) sweeps southwards along the Tonga trench. New swath bathymetry, seismic reflection data, and limited rock sampling in this area constrain a tectonic and kinematic back-arc model that incorporates the effects of LSC subduction. The ELSC, which extends southward to 24°55'S, forms a deep rift valley propagating southward through older, rifted arc basement. Present-day seismicity and fresh and fractured pillow lavas at 23°42'S are consistent with rift valley neovolcanism. Conversely, the northern Havre Trough has low seismicity and rifted volcanic basement ridges trending 25-45° oblique to the basin axis consistent with low levels of extensional tectonism and volcanism. This latter structural fabric is interpreted as an early stage of rifting that is now "locked" due to compression on the arc exerted by LSC subduction, while in the Lau Basin such effects have passed as the LSC swept along the Tonga Trench. It is proposed that the Lau-Havre back-arc opening is controlled by tectonic constraints exerted at the limits of the system by the LSC subduction, which determines the southward migration of the Tonga Arc pole of rotation and associated Lau Basin opening. A discrete three-stage back-arc opening evolution is proposed, comprising: (1) an initial phase of back-arc rifting along the whole length of the plate boundary, beginning at ˜6-5 Ma; (2) a subsequent phase, mostly present in the southern part of the back-arc domain

  12. Building the oceanic crust: Insights on volcanic emplacement processes at the hotspot-influenced Galápagos Spreading Center, 92°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, J. T.; White, S. M.; Colman, A.; Sinton, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) displays a range of axial morphology due to increased magma supply from the adjacent Galápagos mantle plume. Over 30 years of scientific exploration has also documented the associated variations in volcanic terrain, crustal thickness, and geochemistry of erupted basalts, but until recently the fine-scale ("lava flow scale") volcanic features of the GSC had not been investigated. Using the Alvin submersible and aided by near-bottom photographic surveys by TowCam and sub-meter-scale sonar surveys by AUV Sentry, we mapped and sampled 12 individual eruptive units covering ~16km2 of seafloor on the ridge axis of the GSC at 92°W. Variations in AUV Sentry bathymetry and DSL-120A backscatter enabled us to characterize the fine-scale surface morphology within each eruptive unit. Lava flow morphologies within each unit were identified using a neuro-fuzzy classifier which assigns pixels as pillows, lobates, sheets, or fissures by using attributes derived from high-resolution sonar bathymetry and backscatter (McClinton et al., submitted PE&RS). An accuracy assessment indicates approximately 90% agreement between the lava morphology map and an independent set of visual observations. The result of this classification effort is that we are able to quantitatively examine the spatial distribution of lava flow morphology as it relates to the emplacement of lava flows within each eruptive unit at a mid-ocean ridge. Preliminary analyses show that a large, segment-centered volcanic cone which straddles the axial summit graben (the "Empanada") is constructed mostly of pillow lavas, while volcanism in the rifted center of the cone consists of lobate and sheet flows. Conversely, along the rest of the segment, on-axis eruptions consist mainly of pillow lava with most sheet and lobate flows found outside of a small axial summit graben. At least some of these sheet flows are fed by lava channels, suggesting emplacement over distances up to 1km, while

  13. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  14. Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

  15. Correlated Geophysical, Geochemical and Volcanological Manifestations of Plume-Ridge Interaction Along the Galápagos Spreading Center, 90.5-98° W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, J. M.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Ito, G.; Behn, M.; Blacic, T.; Cushman, B.; Dixon, J.

    2001-12-01

    As the Galápagos plume is approached from the west along the Galápagos Spreading Center there are systematic increases in crustal thickness, and K/Ti and H2O content of recovered lavas. These increases correlate with progressive transitions from axial deep to axial high morphology along with decreases in axial depth, residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly (MBA), average swell depth, average lava Mg # (atomic MgO/(MgO+FeO)), and the frequency of isolated axial seamounts. Although K/Ti, H2O and Nb/Zr (likely indicators of plume source enrichment) show step-wise increases across the 95.5° W propagating offset, trends in crustal thickness, axial bathymetry, MBA, swell depth, and seamount frequency generally show either no effect or only local perturbations to regional trends. East of ~92.7° W, sharp increases in K/Ti, Nb/Zr, H2O, and Na8 (Na2O corrected for fractionation to 8 wt % MgO) coincide with the transition to axial high morphology, a rapid shoaling of axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors, and thinning of seismic layer 2A. Maximum values in K/Ti (>0.4), Nb/Zr (>0.10), H2O (>1.0 wt %), Na8 ( ~3.2) and crustal thickness (7.9 km), and minima in axial depth (<1700 m), Mg # (<40), and Ca8/Al8 (<0.7) all occur between 91.25° W and 92° W, whereas the minimum MBA (-25 mGal) and AMC depth ( ~0.5 sec 2-way travel time) are found near 92.25° W. These general correlations can be modeled by the combined effects of changes in source composition and melt generation processes on the thickness, composition and structure of the oceanic crust. Key elements of this model include: (1) compensation of the swell is partitioned between crustal thickening (2.3 km) between 98° W and 90.5° W [Ito et al., this meeting] and thermal and compositional buoyancy of the mantle [Canales et al., this meeting]; (2) increased melt production near the hotspot is associated with lower mean extents of melting from a larger region of an increasingly hydrous, and other incompatible

  16. Neural mechanism of activity spread in the cat motor cortex and its relation to the intrinsic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Capaday, Charles; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Ethier, Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Weber, Doug

    2011-05-15

    Motor cortical points are linked by intrinsic horizontal connections having a recurrent network topology. However, it is not known whether neural activity can propagate over the area covered by these intrinsic connections and whether there are spatial anisotropies of synaptic strength, as opposed to synaptic density. Moreover, the mechanisms by which activity spreads have yet to be determined. To address these issues, an 8 × 8 microelectrode array was inserted in the forelimb area of the cat motor cortex (MCx). The centre of the array had a laser etched hole ∼500 μm in diameter. A microiontophoretic pipette, with a tip diameter of 2-3 μm, containing bicuculline methiodide (BIC) was inserted in the hole and driven to a depth of 1200-1400 μm from the cortical surface. BIC was ejected for ∼2min from the tip of the micropipette with positive direct current ranging between 20 and 40 nA in different experiments. This produced spontaneous nearly periodic bursts (0.2-1.0 Hz) of multi-unit activity in a radius of about 400 μm from the tip of the micropipette. The bursts of neural activity spread at a velocity of 0.11-0.24 ms⁻¹ (mean=0.14 mm ms⁻¹, SD=0.05)with decreasing amplitude.The area activated was on average 7.22 mm² (SD=0.91 mm²), or ∼92% of the area covered by the recording array. The mode of propagation was determined to occur by progressive recruitment of cortical territory, driven by a central locus of activity of some 400 μm in radius. Thus, activity did not propagate as a wave. Transection of the connections between the thalamus and MCx did not significantly alter the propagation velocity or the size of the recruited area, demonstrating that the bursts spread along the routes of intrinsic cortical connectivity. These experiments demonstrate that neural activity initiated within a small motor cortical locus (≤ 400 μm in radius) can recruit a relatively large neighbourhood in which a variety of muscles acting at several forelimb joints are

  17. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  18. Actively Spreading Plate Boundaries and UNCLOS: the Difficulties of Applying Article 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A.; Carleton, C.; Parson, L.

    2005-12-01

    The process by which the delineation of a legal continental shelf according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) is made for an oceanic island territory beyond 200 nautical miles causes significant confusion for both researchers on the issue and coastal states' representatives trying to apply the provisions within Article 76. The interpretation of the statutory provisions set out in UNCLOS and the Technical and Scientific guidelines laid out by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) remain, for the most part, difficult to implement. This global summary of oceanic islands and their geological context with respect to the Law of the Sea Convention, and in particular regarding mid-ocean ridge systems, brings to light some of the problems responsible for this confusion and attempts to resolve the uncertainty associated with ridge issues with a practical and equitable delimitation proposal. Paragraph 6 of Article 76 requires a constraint/limit of 350M from the territorial sea baselines on submarine ridges, (one assumes, to ensure that no coastal state claims the entire mid-ocean ridge!). However the criteria set in paragraph 4a(i) or 4a(ii) of Article 76, which provide the means to extend a legal continental shelf beyond 200M based on the identification of a morphological foot of slope, cannot be applied to oceanic island territories because of difficulties in determining its consistent and practical location. Accordingly the advantages and disadvantages of several geophysical data types have been evaluated for their use under paragraph 4 (b) of Article 76 (definition of the foot of the slope on "evidence to the contrary"). Our proposed method of using the central, zero-age locus of the mid oceanic ridge, whether this may be the ridge line, bathymetric maxima or spreading centre, as a representation of the foot of slope (based on evidence to the contrary), results in a simple, fair and consistent way of developing an area

  19. Slab-derived water and the petrogenesis of distinct zones of oceanic crust along spreading centers in the Lau back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Deborah; Dunn, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Back-arc basin crust formed along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) exhibits dramatic and abrupt changes in magmatic processes and crustal formation with proximity to the nearby Tofua Arc. Systematic variations in seafloor morphology, crustal thickness, seismic properties, and lava composition reflect a decreasing 'subduction influence' with increasing distance from the arc. Results from seismic tomography indicate that the crust that forms near the arc is abnormally thick and compositionally stratified, with a thick low-velocity upper crust and an abnormally high-velocity lower crust. As the ridge moves away from the arc, there is a step-like transition in crustal properties towards crustal velocities and thicknesses more typical of oceanic crust produced at mid-ocean ridges. Likewise, lava compositions exhibit abrupt changes in slab-derived volatiles and trace element enrichments, with silicic, arc-like compositions at the Valu Fa Ridge and southern half of the ELSC, located near the arc, and relatively depleted basalts along the northern ELSC, which is located further from the arc. We attribute the observed changes in the physical and chemical makeup of the crust to excess mantle melting coupled with higher degrees of crustal differentiation near the arc due to higher mantle water contents. We propose a model for the formation of the arc-proximal layered crust whereby water-rich basaltic melts stall and differentiate in the lower crust. High-pressure crystallization concentrates water in the residual melts, decreasing their viscosity and density. Eventually the lighter, more felsic residual melts are extracted from the lower crust, leaving behind a dense, mafic cumulate layer, and go on to produce a silica-rich, porous volcanic layer. We present results of thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibria and develop a petrological model for the formation of this unusual "hydrous" form of oceanic crust.

  20. Mantle source variations beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and the nature of subduction components in the Lau basin-Tonga arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escrig, S.; BéZos, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    New high-density sampling of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center provides constraints on the processes that affect the mantle wedge beneath a back-arc environment, including the effect of the subduction input on basalt petrogenesis and the change in subduction input with distance from the Tonga arc. We obtained trace element and Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of 64 samples distributed between 20.2°S and 22.3°S with an average spacing of ˜3.6 km. The trace element and isotope variations do not vary simply with distance from the arc and reflect variations in the mantle wedge composition and the presence of multiple components in the subduction input. The mantle wedge composition varies form north to south, owing to the southward migration of Indian-like mantle, progressively replacing the initially Pacific-like mantle wedge. The mantle wedge compositions also require an enriched mid-ocean ridge basalt-like trace element enrichment that has little effect on isotope ratios, suggesting recent low-degree melt enrichment events. The composition of the subduction input added to the mantle wedge is geographically variable and mirrors the changes observed in the Tonga arc island lavas. The combination of the back-arc and arc data allows identification of several components contributing to the subduction input. These are a fluid derived from the altered oceanic crust with a possible sedimentary contribution, a pelagic sediment partial melt, and, in the southern Lau basin, a volcaniclastic sediment partial melt. While on a regional scale, there is a rough decrease in subduction influence with the distance from the arc, on smaller scales, the distribution of the subduction input reflects different mechanisms of the addition of the subduction input to a variable mantle wedge.

  1. Influence of Geologic Setting on the Morphology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry of Vent Deposits Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M. K.; Evans, G. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    Establishment of links between lithology, vent fluid chemistry, and vent deposit characteristics along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) was made possible using deep submergence vehicles and technology. ROV Jason was used to collect ultrahigh-resolution (submeter) bathymetric data sufficient to quantify characteristics of volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal features; differences within vent fields from north to south include a change from low-relief volcanic domes cut by faults and fissures to higher aspect ratio volcanic domes dominated by aa-type lava morphologies (Ferrini et al., G-cubed, 2008). Highest temperature fluids are associated with crosscutting faults at all but Mariner vent field where faults are not observed. The detailed maps were used to target areas within vent fields for observations and sampling. Vent deposit morphologies are similar at the northernmost vent fields (Kilo Moana, TowCam, Tahi Moana), with black smokers and diffusers present on branched edifices. Vent deposits at the more southerly ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner vent fields vary in morphology, despite similar substrate lithology. Examples include abundant flanges at ABE and Tui Malila and ~20m-tall spires and squat barite-rich edifices at Mariner. Geochemical analyses and petrographic observations document the influence of lithology, fluid temperature, pH, and extents of seawater mixing on deposit formation. Concentrations of As, which increase from north to south, reflect lithologic control. Sb, Pb, and Ba concentrations also reflect lithologic control, but are affected as well by low pH and/or extents of seawater mixing. The significant differences in Mariner deposits reflect formation from very high temperature, low pH (<3 vs >4) fluids that keep Zn in solution, combined with local subsurface mixing. Overall, results document the influence of the Tonga Subduction Zone on vent deposits through its affects on lithology and vent fluid composition.

  2. Intracellular Zn2+ accumulation enhances suppression of synaptic activity following spreading depolarization.

    PubMed

    Carter, Russell E; Seidel, Jessica L; Lindquist, Britta E; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a feed-forward wave that propagates slowly throughout brain tissue and recovery from SD involves substantial metabolic demand. Presynaptic Zn(2+) release and intracellular accumulation occurs with SD, and elevated intracellular Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+) ]i ) can impair cellular metabolism through multiple pathways. We tested here whether increased [Zn(2+) ]i could exacerbate the metabolic challenge of SD, induced by KCl, and delay recovery in acute murine hippocampal slices. [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD, by transient ZnCl2 application with the Zn(2+) ionophore pyrithione (Zn/Pyr), delayed recovery of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, prolonged DC shifts, and significantly increased extracellular adenosine accumulation. These effects could be due to metabolic inhibition, occurring downstream of pyruvate utilization. Prolonged [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation prior to SD was required for effects on fEPSP recovery and consistent with this, endogenous synaptic Zn(2+) release during SD propagation did not delay recovery from SD. The effects of exogenous [Zn(2+) ]i loading were also lost in slices preconditioned with repetitive SDs, implying a rapid adaptation. Together, these results suggest that [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD can provide significant additional challenge to brain tissue, and could contribute to deleterious effects of [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation in a range of brain injury models. PMID:23495967

  3. Caffeine enhances micturition through neuronal activation in micturition centers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sam; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwan, Lakkyong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jin, Jun-Jang; Chung, Jun-Young; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2014-12-01

    Caffeine may promote incontinence through its diuretic effect, particularly in individuals with underlying detrusor overactivity, in addition to increasing muscle contraction of the bladder smooth muscle. Caffeine may also affect bladder function via central micturition centers, including the medial preoptic area, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, and pontine micturition center. However, the biochemical mechanisms of caffeine in central micturition centers affecting bladder function remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of caffeine on the central micturition reflex were investigated by measuring the degree of neuronal activation, and by quantifying nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in rats. Following caffeine administration for 14 days, a urodynamic study was performed to assess the changes to bladder function. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining to identify the expression of c‑Fos and NGF in the central micturition areas was performed. Ingestion of caffeine increased bladder smooth muscle contraction pressure and time as determined by cystometry. Expression levels of c‑Fos and NGF in all central micturition areas were significantly increased following the administration of caffeine. The effects on contraction pressure and time were the most potent and expression levels of c‑Fos and NGF were greatest at the lowest dose of caffeine. These results suggest that caffeine facilitates bladder instability through enhancing neuronal activation in the central micturition areas.

  4. Ignition's glow: Ultra-fast spread of global cortical activity accompanying local "ignitions" in visual cortex during conscious visual perception.

    PubMed

    Noy, N; Bickel, S; Zion-Golumbic, E; Harel, M; Golan, T; Davidesco, I; Schevon, C A; McKhann, G M; Goodman, R R; Schroeder, C E; Mehta, A D; Malach, R

    2015-09-01

    Despite extensive research, the spatiotemporal span of neuronal activations associated with the emergence of a conscious percept is still debated. The debate can be formulated in the context of local vs. global models, emphasizing local activity in visual cortex vs. a global fronto-parietal "workspace" as the key mechanisms of conscious visual perception. These alternative models lead to differential predictions with regard to the precise magnitude, timing and anatomical spread of neuronal activity during conscious perception. Here we aimed to test a specific aspect of these predictions in which local and global models appear to differ - namely the extent to which fronto-parietal regions modulate their activity during task performance under similar perceptual states. So far the main experimental results relevant to this debate have been obtained from non-invasive methods and led to conflicting interpretations. Here we examined these alternative predictions through large-scale intracranial measurements (Electrocorticogram - ECoG) in 43 patients and 4445 recording sites. Both ERP and broadband high frequency (50-150 Hz - BHF) responses were examined through the entire cortex during a simple 1-back visual recognition memory task. Our results reveal short latency intense visual responses, localized first in early visual cortex followed (at ∼200 ms) by higher order visual areas, but failed to show significant delayed (300 ms) visual activations. By contrast, oddball image repeat events, linked to overt motor responses, were associated with a significant increase in a delayed (300 ms) peak of BHF power in fronto-parietal cortex. Comparing BHF responses with ERP revealed an additional peak in the ERP response - having a similar latency to the well-studied P3 scalp EEG response. Posterior and temporal regions demonstrated robust visual category selectivity. An unexpected observation was that high-order visual cortex responses were essentially concurrent (at ∼200 ms

  5. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  6. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  7. GHRC: NASAs Hazardous Weather Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2016-01-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC; ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov) is one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers responsible for providing access to NASA's Earth science data to users worldwide. Each of NASA's twelve DAACs focuses on a specific science discipline within Earth science, provides data stewardship services and supports its research community's needs. Established in 1991 as the Marshall Space Flight Center DAAC and renamed GHRC in 1997, the data center's original mission focused on the global hydrologic cycle. However, over the years, data holdings, tools and expertise of GHRC have gradually shifted. In 2014, a User Working Group (UWG) was established to review GHRC capabilities and provide recommendations to make GHRC more responsive to the research community's evolving needs. The UWG recommended an update to the GHRC mission, as well as a strategic plan to move in the new direction. After a careful and detailed analysis of GHRC's capabilities, research community needs and the existing data landscape, a new mission statement for GHRC has been crafted: to provide a comprehensive active archive of both data and knowledge augmentation services with a focus on hazardous weather, its governing dynamical and physical processes, and associated applications. Within this broad mandate, GHRC will focus on lightning, tropical cyclones and storm-induced hazards through integrated collections of satellite, airborne, and in-situ data sets. The new mission was adopted at the recent 2015 UWG meeting. GHRC will retain its current name until such time as it has built substantial data holdings aligned with the new mission.

  8. 75 FR 49946 - National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Response System. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC... Intelligence Center, Fifth Floor, 319 Washington Street, Johnstown, PA 15901. Written comments and...

  9. [Activities of Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The final report of NASA funded activities at Iowa State University (ISU) for the period between 1/96 and 1/99 includes two main areas of activity. The first is the development and delivery of an x-ray simulation package suitable for evaluating the impact of parameters affects the inspectability of an assembly of parts. The second area was the development of images processing tools to remove reconstruction artifacts in x-ray laminagraphy images. The x-ray simulation portion of this work was done by J. Gray and the x-ray laminagraphy work was done by J. Basart. The report is divided into two sections covering the two activities respectively. In addition to this work reported the funding also covered NASA's membership in the NSF University/Industrial Cooperative Research Center.

  10. Oxygen Activation at Mononuclear Nonheme Iron Centers: A Superoxo Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anusree; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Chakraborti, Mrinmoy; Paine, Tapan K.; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by iron enzymes is responsible for many metabolically important transformations in biology. Often a high-valent iron-oxo oxidant is proposed to form upon dioxygen activation at a mononuclear nonheme iron center, presumably via intervening iron-superoxo and iron-peroxo species. While iron(IV)-oxo intermediates have been trapped and characterized in enzymes and models, less is known of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species. Utilizing a synthetic model for the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent monoiron enzymes, [(TpiPr2)FeII(O2CC(O)CH3)], we have obtained indirect evidence for the formation of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species, which can undergo one-electron reduction, hydrogen-atom transfer, or conversion to an iron(IV)-oxo species, depending on the reaction conditions. These results demonstrate the various roles the iron(III)-superoxo species can play in the course of dioxygen activation at a nonheme iron center. PMID:20380464

  11. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  12. Antituberculosis activity of the molecular libraries screening center network library.

    PubMed

    Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Goldman, Robert C; Hobrath, Judith V; Kwong, Cecil D; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Reynolds, Robert C; Secrist, John A; Sosa, Melinda I; White, E Lucile; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-01

    There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein.

  13. [Research activities in Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Centers].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak

    2013-01-01

    Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Center was established in Institute of Tropical Disease (ITD), Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia in 2007 under the program of ''Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases'' supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and then it has been under the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) since 2010. Japanese researchers have been stationed at ITD, conducting joint researches on influenza, viral hepatitis, dengue and infectious diarrhea. Also, another Japanese researcher has been stationed at Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, carrying out joint researches on'' Identification of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) substances and development of HCV and dengue vaccines'' in collaboration with University of Indonesia and Airlangga University through the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) since 2009. In this article, we briefly introduce the background history of Kobe University Research Center in Indonesia, and discuss the research themes and outcomes of J-GRID and SATREPS activities.

  14. Editors and author resource centers actively used by attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, as in previous years, the Editors Resource Center located on the second floor of Moscone West was buzzing with activity: editors talking with other editors, collaborating with associate editors, speaking with authors, and meeting with students. In addition, several editors took part in "Meet the Editor" informal sessions, a new feature introduced for the 2011 meeting to strengthen the partnership between authors and editors. The map "Where are you from?" (see photo), outside the Editors Resource Center, drew the attention of many attendees who were eager to place their colored dots on the map. The Author Resource Center, located in the AGU Marketplace, became a hub for AGU veteran authors and potential authors alike. Staff were there to answer both editorial and technical questions, especially the most frequent one: What happens after my paper is accepted? The running slideshow that described all aspects of the AGU publications program sparked a myriad of questions, which AGU staff were happy to answer.

  15. Architecture and evolution of Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Rosen, Wayne; Sherman, Mark; Pease, Phil

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to enhance Earth Science research by improved access to remote sensor earth science data. Building and operating an archive, even one of a moderate size (a few Terabytes), is a challenging task. One of the critical components of this system is Unitree, the Hierarchical File Storage Management System. Unitree, selected two years ago as the best available solution, requires constant system administrative support. It is not always suitable as an archive and distribution data center, and has moderate performance. The Data Archive and Distribution System (DADS) software developed to monitor, manage, and automate the ingestion, archive, and distribution functions turned out to be more challenging than anticipated. Having the software and tools is not sufficient to succeed. Human interaction within the system must be fully understood to improve efficiency to improve efficiency and ensure that the right tools are developed. One of the lessons learned is that the operability, reliability, and performance aspects should be thoroughly addressed in the initial design. However, the GSFC DAAC has demonstrated that it is capable of distributing over 40 GB per day. A backup system to archive a second copy of all data ingested is under development. This backup system will be used not only for disaster recovery but will also replace the main archive when it is unavailable during maintenance or hardware replacement. The GSFC DAAC has put a strong emphasis on quality at all level of its organization. A Quality team has also been formed to identify quality issues and to propose improvements. The DAAC has conducted numerous tests to benchmark the performance of the system. These tests proved to be extremely useful in identifying bottlenecks and deficiencies in operational procedures.

  16. Vent Fluid Chemistry From Six Hydrothermal Fields Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center From 20°03'S to 22°13'S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, J.; Wheat, C. G.; Mottl, M. J.; Seewald, J.

    2005-12-01

    As part of a series of R2K and NSF funded explorations of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center, we participated in a cruise between April and May of 2005 aboard the R/V Melville. Eighty-one fluid samples were collected from six hydrothermal fields that span from 20°03'S to 22°13'S (from north to south: Kilo Moana, TowCam, Abe, Tui Malia, Mariner, and Vai Lili) using the ROV Jason 2. Fluids samples were collected using both isobaric gas-tight and major samplers from focused and diffuse vents to determine vent fluid composition and establish the hydrogeologic and geochemical processes occurring at depth. We report here on dissolved ion concentrations from vent fluids. The maximum vent temperature and magnesium concentration from individual orifices ranged from 11 to 363 ° C and from 51.7 to 0.65mmol/kg, respectively. The Mariner site had the lowest pH of 2.5 and the greatest H2S concentration of approximately 9mmol/kg. All samples had alkalinities less than seawater. Chlorinities were both depleted and enriched relative to seawater (around 538 mmol/kg), ranging from 530 to 650mmol/kg. Fe endmember concentration is about 12mmol/kg at Mariner and 3mmol/kg at Kilo Moana, but less than 0.3mmol/kg for the other sites. Fe/Mn molar ratios range from 4.7 at Kilo Moana to 0.1 at Vai Lili. Systematic along strike variations were observed in the endmember abundance of some aqueous species. For example, values for Si and Li are greater to the north whereas concentrations of K are greater to the south. Compilations of endmember compositions for individual orifices and fields are being compiled for all major, minor and certain trace ions in seawater. Trends will be incorporated with geological and biological data to elucidate hydrothermal processes along this geologically diverse transect. We are particularly interested in assessing the response of fluid chemistry to variations in the composition and structure of the crust resulting from the increase influence of subduction related

  17. Space weather activities at NOAA s Space Environment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunches, J.

    The NOAA Space Environment Center is the focal point for real-time space weather monitoring and prediction in the United States . The Space Weather Operations (SWO) division staffs a 24-hour/day operations center, through which both in-situ and remotely sensed data and imagery flow. These diverse data streams are analyzed continuously, and that information is applied to both predictions and specifications of various aspects of the space environment. These include the behavior of the geomagnetic field, the character of the ionosphere, and the strength of the near-earth radiation environment. Models are brought to bear in each of thes e areas, as SEC has an active research-to-operations transition effort. The Rapid Prototyping Center is the venue through which pertinent models and data must pass to be brought into the operational arena. The model outputs are then made available both internally and externally. SEC is a member of the International Space Environment Service (ISES), a partnership currently consisting of eleven nations. The mission of the ISES is to encourage and facilitate near-real-time international monitoring and prediction of the space environment by: the rapid exchange of space environment information; the standardization of the methodology for space environment observations and data reduction; the uniform publication of observations and statistics; and the application of standardized space environment products and services to assist users in reducing the impact of space weather on activities of human interest. An overview of the operational attributes of the SEC, and the function of the ISES, will be presented. Additional issues related to space weather customers, new data streams to be available in the near-term, and how these new data and imagery will be integrated int o operations will be discussed.

  18. The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golon, Danielle K.

    2016-10-03

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) operates as a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey and is 1 of 12 DAACs within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The LP DAAC ingests, archives, processes, and distributes NASA Earth science remote sensing data. These data are provided to the public at no charge. Data distributed by the LP DAAC provide information about Earth’s surface from daily to yearly intervals and at 15 to 5,600 meter spatial resolution. Data provided by the LP DAAC can be used to study changes in agriculture, vegetation, ecosystems, elevation, and much more. The LP DAAC provides several ways to access, process, and interact with these data. In addition, the LP DAAC is actively archiving new datasets to provide users with a variety of data to study the Earth.

  19. Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Nanotube activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization as well as applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A parametric study of the pulsed laser ablation process is recently completed to monitor the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Enhancement of production is achieved by rastering the graphite target and by increasing the target surface temperature with a cw laser. In-situ diagnostics during production included time resolved passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from the plume. The improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymer/nanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large Surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs. Comparison with existing technologies and possible future improvements in the SWCNT materials sill be presented.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2006-01-01

    Research activities on carbon nanotubes at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization and their applications for human space flight. In-situ diagnostics during nanotube production by laser oven process include collection of spatial and temporal data of passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from C2, C3 and Nickel atoms in the plume. Details of the results from the "parametric study" of the pulsed laser ablation process indicate the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymednanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs.

  1. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Possible link to blood–brain barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Maren K. L.; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S.; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I.; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood–brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood

  2. Along-strike variations in extension from the Woodlark spreading center to mainland Papua New Guinea: New constraints from offshore seismic reflection and well data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz, G. G.; Mann, P.; Horton, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    Guy Fitz, Paul Mann, and Brian Horton, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX The D’Entrecasteaux Islands (DEI) of eastern Papua New Guinea are composed of high-grade metamorphic domes located within continental crust at the tip of the westward propagating Woodlark spreading ridge. Estimates from Euler pole rotation calculations require ~220 km of extension over ~6 Ma to uplift the DEI domes, the youngest, most recently uplifted metamorphic core complexes on Earth. However, analysis of multi-channel seismic data collected by the RV Maurice Ewing in 1992 and industry seismic data collected in 1974 from offshore basins flanking the DEI domes provides a much lower estimate of 78 + 12 km of upper crust brittle extension in a north-south transect 120 km west of the Woodlark rift area. The WNW alignment of the DEI demarcates two areas of contrasting deformational and depositional histories. In the area of the Kiribisi and Trobriand basins north of the DEI, normal faults occupy a WNW-striking basin of likely forearc origin that rifted in the early Miocene and continued to rift sporadically until the early Pliocene when all normal faults were buried by ~650 m of undeformed Plio-Pleistocene sediments. In Goodenough Basin to the south, the Pleistocene section is thicker and deformed by more recently active, WNW-striking normal faults with seafloor scarps and high-angle dips. The asymmetry of the Goodenough Pleistocene clastic fill near the Owen-Stanley fault along the southern coastline of the bay indicates that most normal motion has now shifted to this fault forming the southern edge of the Goodenough Bay. These seismic data provide no evidence for the OSFZ to be a low-angle normal fault capable of accommodating additional extension. Measurements of upper crust brittle extension in the area are compared to basin stretching factors determined from subsidence analysis and crustal thinning derived from gravity inversion.

  3. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  4. Activity File of Learning Center and Classroom Multi-Cultural Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverside Unified School District, CA.

    The cards in this file are representative samples of the types of activities developed by teachers involved in a Title I funded learning center of multi-cultural classroom activities for elementary school students. The five cultures that are stuoied are those of blacks, Asian Americans, native Americans, Mexican Americans, and Anglos. A…

  5. Development of Secondary Archive System at Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Mark; Kodis, John; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Wacker, Chris; Woytek, Joanne; Lynnes, Chris

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been developed to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test EOS data and information system (EOSDIS) concepts. To ensure that no data is ever lost, each product received at GSFC DAAC is archived on two different media, VHS and digital linear tape (DLT). The first copy is made on VHS tape and is under the control of UniTree. The second and third copies are made to DLT and VHS media under a custom built software package named 'Archer'. While Archer provides only a subset of the functions available with commercial software like UniTree, it supports migration between near-line and off-line media and offers much greater performance and flexibility to satisfy the specific needs of a data center. Archer is specifically designed to maximize total system throughput, rather than focusing on the turn-around time for individual files. The commercial off the shelf software (COTS) hierarchical storage management (HSM) products evaluated were mainly concerned with transparent, interactive, file access to the end-user, rather than a batch-orientated, optimizable (based on known data file characteristics) data archive and retrieval system. This is critical to the distribution requirements of the GSFC DAAC where orders for 5000 or more files at a time are received. Archer has the ability to queue many thousands of file requests and to sort these requests into internal processing schedules that optimize overall throughput. Specifically, mount and dismount, tape load and unload cycles, and tape motion are minimized. This feature did not seem to be available in many COTS pacages. Archer also uses a generic tar tape format that allows tapes to be read by many different systems rather than the proprietary format found in most COTS packages. This paper discusses some of the specific requirements at GSFC DAAC, the

  6. The p-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading centre - The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Over 1400 seismograms of earthquakes in Mexico are analyzed and data sets for the travel time, apparent phase velocity, and relative amplitude information are utilized to produce a tightly constrained, detailed model for depths to 900 km beneath an active oceanic ridge region, the Gulf of California. The data are combined by first inverting the travel times, perturbing that model to fit the p-delta data, and then performing trial and error synthetic seismogram modelling to fit the short-period waveforms. The final model satisfies all three data sets. The ridge model is similar to existing upper mantle models for shield, tectonic-continental, and arc-trench regimes below 400 km, but differs significantly in the upper 350 km. Ridge model velocities are very low in this depth range; the model 'catches up' with the others with a very large velocity gradient from 225 to 390 km.

  7. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  8. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrara (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  9. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  10. Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Aasgaard, Live; Landmark, Bjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers. Methods The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results Four categories, ie, “appreciated activities”, “praised nurses and volunteers”, “being more active”, and “being included in a fellowship”, as well as the overall theme “participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being” emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants’ health and well-being. Conclusion In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers. PMID:25419121

  11. RLIP76 regulates Arf6-dependent cell spreading and migration by linking ARNO with activated R-Ras at recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Lee, Seunghyung; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay; Ginsberg, Mark H; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2015-11-27

    R-Ras small GTPase enhances cell spreading and motility via RalBP1/RLIP76, an R-Ras effector that links GTP-R-Ras to activation of Arf6 and Rac1 GTPases. Here, we report that RLIP76 performs these functions by binding cytohesin-2/ARNO, an Arf GTPase guanine exchange factor, and connecting it to R-Ras at recycling endosomes. RLIP76 formed a complex with R-Ras and ARNO by binding ARNO via its N-terminus (residues 1-180) and R-Ras via residues 180-192. This complex was present in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes and the presence of ARNO in recycling endosomes required RLIP76, and was not supported by RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192). Spreading and migration required RLIP76(1-180), and RLIP76(Δ1-180) blocked ARNO recruitment to recycling endosomes, and spreading. Arf6 activation with an ArfGAP inhibitor overcame the spreading defects in RLIP76-depleted cells or cells expressing RLIP76(Δ1-180). Similarly, RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192) suppressed Arf6 activation. Together these results demonstrate that RLIP76 acts as a scaffold at recycling endosomes by binding activated R-Ras, recruiting ARNO to activate Arf6, thereby contributing to cell spreading and migration.

  12. Ridge segmentation and the magnetic structure of the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge 26°S and 31°-35°S: Implications for magmatic processes at slow spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Charles M.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Grindlay, Nancy R.

    1996-04-01

    Along-axis profiles of three-dimensional magnetic inversions for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 31°-35°S show low magnetization near the middle of ridge segments and high magnetization at the segment tips for three adjacent spreading segments; thus there is an inverse relation between axial magnetization and axial topography. The ridge segment at 26°S on the MAR has the same inverse relationship between magnetization and topography. The common occurrence of this relationship suggests that it reflects a fundamental process of crustal accretion at the MAR. We analyze the rock magnetic properties from 42 locations within the four ridge segments in the South Atlantic to constrain the inherent trade-off between source intensity and source thickness in the magnetization model. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) intensities from the four ridge segments, averaged together, correlate with the magnetic inversion profiles. This finding implies that changes in the magnetization of the extrusives may account for much of the observed magnetic anomaly amplitude variation. A direct correlation of FeO content and magnetization suggests that magnetic anomaly amplitudes may be an indicator of FeTi-rich basalts at the slow spreading MAR, even though the iron content of the basalts from high magnetization areas is not as high as observed at Pacific spreading centers. Despite the different magma plumbing systematics of the Pacific spreading centers and the MAR, it appears that the segment-scale magma system of the MAR also results in segment-scale crustal magnetization variations. Further evidence that the axial magnetic variations result from source intensity variations is that older isochrons have higher intensities near the ridge-discontinuities, similar to the behavior on-axis. Between 0 and 5 Ma the decay in magnetization is ˜50% independent of location within a spreading segment.

  13. Activities of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1992 to March 1993. New experimental investigations were made on (1) nuclear spectroscopy was initiated by a new (gamma) ray spectrometer; (2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; (3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; (4) the behavior of self interstitial atoms and its migration mechanism in Mo metal; (5) the studies on electronic conduction of metal oxides and bronzes by NMR; (6) Moessbauer studies on Fe-Cr alloy and the RBS analysis of YBCO superconductor films; and (7) a new field was challenged on the micro cluster physics. Nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report.

  14. Coherent Lidar Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing and using coherent lidar systems for many years. The current projects at LaRC are the Global Wind Observing Sounder (GWOS) mission preparation, the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) compact, rugged Doppler wind lidar project, the Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project for lunar landing, and the Skywalker project to find and use thermals to extend UAV flight time. These five projects encompass coherent lidar technology development; characterization, validation, and calibration facilities; compact, rugged packaging; computer simulation; trade studies; data acquisition, processing, and display development; system demonstration; and space mission design. This paper will further discuss these activities at LaRC.

  15. Center-of-pressure movements during equine-assisted activities.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Hilary M; Kaiser, Leeann J; de Pue, Bonnie; Kaiser, Lana

    2011-01-01

    We compared anteroposterior and mediolateral range of motion and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) on the horse's back between riders without disabilities and riders with cerebral palsy. An electronic pressure mat was used to track COP movements beneath the saddle in 4 riders without disabilities and 4 riders with cerebral palsy. Comparisons between rider groups were made using the Mann-Whitney test (p < .05). The two rider groups differed significantly in anteroposterior range of COP motion, mediolateral range of COP motion, and mediolateral COP velocity. Anteroposterior COP velocity did not differ between groups. The results suggest that measurements of COP range of motion and velocity are potentially useful for monitoring changes in balance as an indicator of core stability during equine-assisted activities.

  16. Antituberculosis Activity of the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network Library

    PubMed Central

    MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; MADDOX, CLINTON; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; WHITE, E. LUCILE; ZHANG, WEI

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein. PMID:19783214

  17. Experimental constraints on the generation of FeTi basalts, andesites, and rhyodacites at the Galapagos Spreading Center, 85°W and 95°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juster, Thomas C.; Grove, Timothy L.; Perfit, Michael R.

    1989-07-01

    One-atmosphere experiments conducted on a synthetic glass similar to Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) FeTi basalt (POO.82N2), (Byerly et al., 1976) define liquid lines of descent at fO2 values between the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer and 2 log units more oxidizing than the nickle-nickle oxide (NNO) buffer. The experiments provide a framework for understanding the development of FeTi basalts by fractionation at near-ocean floor conditions. GSC lavas from near 85°W initially follow a compositional trend, distinguished by FeO° (= FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) enrichment and SiO2 depletion, which is nearly identical to the trend observed in experiments at QFM to which olivine seeds were added. This compositional trend can be produced by crystallization along an olivine → pigeonite reaction boundary in a shallow crystal-rich magma reservoir. In contrast, GSC lavas from 95°W do not mimic the 1-atm liquid line of descent, but appear to have fractionated at somewhat higher pressure. Basaltic liquids from 95°W underwent fractional crystallization at 1-2 kbar, did not experience FeO° enrichment along an olivine → low-Ca pyroxene reaction boundary, and developed FeO° enrichment concomitant with SiO2 enrichment. This compositional variation is consistent with a differentiation process in which crystals are continually removed from contact with liquid. Rhyodacites from 95°W cannot be related to the basalts and FeTi basalts recovered at 95°W by shallow-level crystal fractionation. Instead, rhyolite liquids were formed either by fractionation of similar parents at greater depth and higher PH2O, or formed by fractionation of different parents. Andesite formed by mixing between basaltic and rhyodacitic liquids. As a consequence, mixed andesites define a trend of decreasing P2O5 which has been previously interpreted to represent apatite saturation at approximately 0.22 wt% P2O5, significantly earlier than at 85°W (where P2O5 decreases at approximately 0.7 wt% P2O5). Our

  18. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  19. The SIRS Model of Epidemic Spreading in Virtual Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R.

    2008-09-01

    center">Dedicated to Professor Dietrich Stauffer on the occasion of his 65th birthday The phenomenon of epidemic spreading in a real social network is described and investigated numerically. On the basis of data concerning amount of time devoted daily to social interactions, the influence of human activity on spreading process is investigated in the frame of SIRS model. It was found that the activity of an individual is positively correlated with its connectivity and the relation has power law form. The influence of control measures on the spreading process is investigated as a function of initial conditions. The cost-effectiveness of mass immunizations campaigns and target vaccinations is compared. It was found that the form of activity distribution has significant influence on the spreading phenomena in the network.

  20. Using glacial morphology to constrain the impact of the Chile active spreading ridge subduction in Central Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrino, B.; Ritz, J. F.; Lagabrielle, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Central Patagonian Cordillera is a unique laboratory to study interaction between oceanic and continental lithospheres during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The subduction of the South Chile spreading Ridge, which separates the Nazca plate from the Antarctic plate, started ca. 15-14 Ma at the southern tip of Patagonia (55°S latitude). The northwards migration of the Chile Triple Junction induces the subduction of several segments especially around 46°S latitude. There, three segments subducted at ca. 6, 3 and 0.3 Ma, leading to the formation of a large asthenospheric slab-window beneath Central Patagonia. Contemporaneously, the Central Patagonia reliefs are undergoing major glacial events since at least 7 Ma. These events are evidenced to the east of the Central Patagonian morphotectonic front within perched relict surfaces. Inset in these perched glacial surfaces are found mid-Pleistocene glacial valleys, as the Lake General Carrera-Buenos Aires amphitheatre (LGCBA), which formed between 1.1 Ma and 16 ka. We used the relationships between the glacial valleys and the volcanism associated with the asthenospheric slab-window to better constraints the structural evolution of the Patagonian Cordillera related to the subduction of the Chili active spreading Ridge. The present work focused within two well-preserved perched flat surfaces named Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires and Meseta del Cerro Galera: (i) The meseta del Lago Buenos Aires defines a plateau made of interbedded units of tills and lavas dated between 12 Ma and 3 Ma. The top surface of the meseta, ˜2000 meters high is dated at 3 Ma, and is shaped by four NE-SW trending glacial lobes characterized with kettles, lineations and moraines. The glacial valleys are beheaded westwards and define perched valleys 200 to 400 meters higher than the western Cordillera. This suggests recent vertical movement along N160 extensive/transtensive corridor located between the morphotectonic

  1. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The rate of magma and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges is thought to decrease with decreasing spreading rate. At ultraslow spreading rates below 10-20 mm/y full rate, heat loss by conduction greatly reduces melt production with less melt produced at increasingly greater depths. Gakkel Ridge, the actively spreading mid-ocean ridge in the Arctic Ocean, opens at rates of 14 mm/y in the west decreasing to less than 6 mm/y at its eastern termination and demonstrates that magma production is not only a function of spreading rate. Whereas amagmatic spreading takes place at rates of about 12-10 mm/y, focussed melt production occurs at even lower spreading rates in long-lived discrete volcanic centres. One such centre is the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge where in 1999 a teleseismically recorded earthquake swarm consisting of more than 250 earthquakes over 9 months signalled the onset of an active spreading episode. The earthquake swarm is believed to be associated with volcanic activity although no concurrent lava effusion was found. We analysed the teleseismic earthquake swarm together with visual observation and microseismic data recorded at this site in 2001 and 2007 and noted the following characteristics which may be indicative for volcanic spreading events at the still poorly explored ultraslow spreading ridges: - unusual duration: The 1999 earthquake swarm lasted over 9 months rather than a few weeks as observed on faster spreading ridges. In addition, in 2001 seismoacoustic sounds which we interpret as gas discharge in Strombolian eruptions and a giant event plume maintained over more than one year indicate waxing and waning volcanic activity since 1999. - unusual strength: The earthquake swarm was detected at teleseismic distances of more than 1000 km and included 11 events with a magnitude >5. No other confirmed mid-ocean ridge eruption released a comparable seismic moment. Rather than focussing in a narrow area or showing pronounced

  2. Constraints on Galactic Center Activity: A Search for Enhanced Galactic Center Lithium and Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.; Turner, B. E.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1998-12-01

    The abundances of lithium and boron provide important information about big bang nucleosynthesis, Galactic chemical evolution, stellar evolution, and cosmic-ray spallation reactions. We conducted the first search for the ground-state hyperfine-structure transitions of Li I (2S1/2; F = 2-1 803 MHz) and B I (2P1/2; F = 2-1 732 MHz). We used the 43 m NRAO radio telescope to search for enhanced Galactic center (GC) Li and B expected from models of Galactic activity. We did not detect Li I or B I and obtained upper limits of N(Li I) < 1.9 × 1016 cm-2, (Li/H) < 3.9 × 10-8, N(B I) < 2.2 × 1018 cm-2, and (B/H) < 9.2 × 10-6 for the dense 20 km s-1 Sgr A molecular cloud where our largest sources of uncertainties are Li I/Li, B I/B, and N(H). Our observations imply (Li/H)GC < 22 (Li/H)disk, (Li/H)GC < 39 (Li/H)disk-spallation, (B/H)GC < 1.2 × 104 (B/H)disk, (B/H)GC < 1.5 × 104 (B/H)disk-spallation. For a simple model combining mass loss from AGB stars (only for Li), spallation reactions, and SN ν-nucleosynthesis, we estimate (Li/H)GC = 1.3 × 10-8 (13 times enhancement) and (B/H)GC = 7.4 × 10-9 (10 times enhancement). If Li is primarily produced via spallation reactions from a cosmic-ray proton flux φp(t) with the same energy and trapping as in the disk, then [\\smallint φp(t)dt]GC < 13[\\smallint φp(t)dt]disk. Comparing our results to AGN models, we conclude that the GC has not had an extended period of AGN activity containing a large cosmic-ray flux (LCR <= 1044 ergs s-1 for 108 yr), a large low-energy cosmic-ray flux (less than 100 times the disk flux), or a large γ-ray flux (Lγ < 1042 ergs s-1 for 109 yr). Furthermore, since any Galactic deuterium production will significantly enhance the abundances of Li and B, our results imply that there are no sources of D in the GC or Galaxy. Therefore, all the Galactic D originated from the infall of primordial matter with the current D/H reduced by astration and mixing.

  3. Solar activity linked variabilities in the Thermospheric meridional winds and their control on the occurrence of Equatorial Spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.; Jyoti, N.; Devasia, C.

    The thermospheric wind system, through interactions with the ionospheric layers control many of the electrodynamic processes of the equatorial ionosphere thermosphere system; the occurrence of equatorial Spread F (ESF) being a manifestation of one of these processes. One of the important aspects of a plausible linkage of Thermospheric meridional winds with the ESF has recently been identified as through the polarity of the winds just before the onset of ESF. The importance of winds of equatorward/poleward polarity would matter only in relation with the Fregion base height as to whether it is below or above a characteristic- critical height. It is found that there is a strong solar cycle modulation of the critical base height of the F-region by as much as +/-50km for the occurrence of ESF with the associated meridional winds also responding to the solar variabilities. The solar activity dependence of the meridional wind characteristics and the F-region critical height variations are discussed in detail in relation to their possible roles in the variations of ESF occurrence.

  4. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  5. Multilevel Methodology for Simulation of Spatio-Temporal Systems with Heterogeneous Activity; Application to Spread of Valley Fever Fungus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jammalamadaka, Rajanikanth

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a dissertation submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2008. Spatio-temporal systems with heterogeneity in their structure and behavior have two major problems associated with them. The first one is that such complex real world systems extend over very large spatial and temporal domains and consume so many computational resources to simulate that they are infeasible to study with current computational platforms. The second one is that the data available for understanding such systems is limited because they are spread over space and time making it hard to obtain micro and macro measurements. This also makes it difficult to get the data for validation of their constituent processes while simultaneously considering their global behavior. For example, the valley fever fungus considered in this dissertation is spread over a large spatial grid in the arid Southwest and typically needs to be simulated over several decades of time to obtain useful information. It is also hard to get the temperature and moisture data (which are two critical factors on which the survival of the valley fever fungus depends) at every grid point of the spatial domain over the region of study. In order to address the first problem, we develop a method based on the discrete event system specification which exploits the heterogeneity in the activity of the spatio-temporal system and which has been shown to be effective in solving relatively simple partial differential equation systems. The benefit of addressing the first problem is that it now makes it feasible to address the second problem. We address the second problem by making use of a multilevel methodology based on modeling and simulation and systems theory. This methodology helps us in the construction of models with different resolutions (base and

  6. Fuel Cell Activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cells have a long history in space applications and may have potential application in aeronautics as well. A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that directly transforms the chemical energy of a fuel and oxidant into electrical energy. Alkaline fuel cells have been the mainstay of the U.S. space program, providing power for the Apollo missions and the Space Shuttle. However, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer potential benefits over alkaline systems and are currently under development for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Furthermore, primary and regenerative systems utilizing PEM technology are also being considered for future space applications such as surface power and planetary aircraft. In addition to these applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the feasibility of the use of both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells for low- or zero-emission electric aircraft propulsion. These types of systems have potential applications for high altitude environmental aircraft, general aviation and commercial aircraft, and high attitude airships. NASA Glenn has a unique set of capabilities and expertise essential to the successful development of advanced fuel cell power systems for space and aeronautics applications. NASA Glenn's role in past fuel cell development programs as well as current activities to meet these new challenges will be presented

  7. [Requests for active euthanasia: which reality in an oncology center.].

    PubMed

    Chvetzoff, G; Perret, M; Thevenet, G; Arbiol, E; Gobet, S; Saltel, P

    2009-09-01

    Euthanasia is a controversial issue in today's society. In countries where euthanasia is legal, it is mainly associated with people with cancer. We retrospectively studied the frequency and basis of patients' requests for active euthanasia in the oncology setting.MethodsRecurrent requests for euthanasia made by the patients of Leon-Berard cancer center (Lyon, France) between 2001 and 2003 were recorded by questioning the physicians and nurse supervisors in charge or by collecting information from the minutes of multidisciplinary palliative care meetings. We also collected information on the general health status of the patients, their motives and their evolution over time, as well as responses from caregivers.ResultsWe identified 16 requests for euthanasia. These involved 8 men, 7 women and 1 child (median age, 56 years), corresponding to 1% of the total deaths recorded during the period. In 2 cases, the request had come from the family only. The most frequent motives were psychological distress (38%), desire for self-autonomy (31%) and pain (31%). Half of the patients, particularly those striving for autonomy, persisted with their request until death, whereas 2 of 3 requests motivated by physical or psychological distress were not maintained. Sedation was administered to 3 patients in response to recurrent requests.ConclusionRequests for euthanasia in cancer patients are rare but may occur. Sometimes suffering is not relieved by palliative care and the request is maintained. Dealing with these patients puts caregivers in a difficult situation.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  10. THE GALACTIC CENTER: NOT AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris

    2013-06-01

    We present 10 {mu}m-35 {mu}m Spitzer spectra of the interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), the central 210 pc Multiplication-Sign 60 pc of the Galactic center (GC). We present maps of the CMZ in ionic and H{sub 2} emission, covering a more extensive area than earlier spectroscopic surveys in this region. The radial velocities and intensities of ionic lines and H{sub 2} suggest that most of the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(0) emission comes from gas along the line-of-sight, as found by previous work. We compare diagnostic line ratios measured in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey to our data. Previous work shows that forbidden line ratios can distinguish star-forming galaxies from low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our GC line ratios agree with star-forming galaxies and not with LINERs or AGNs.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1993-03-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  12. Chemical characteristics of magma and related seafloor sulfide deposits on back-arc spreading center and off-ridge volcanoes in Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, T.; Kanamori, S.; Ishibashi, J.; Kentaro, K.; Sato, H.; Kato, S.; Toyoda, S.

    2012-12-01

    The back-arc basalt in Mariana Trough is characterized by fluid-dominated components (Stolper and Newman, 1994). They suggested that the H2O-enriched magma of the Mariana Trough is formed as melting mixture between MORB-type mantle source and H2O-rich component which is likely to be derived from the subducting slab. Four active and one inactive hydrothermal sites were found within a distance of 5 km in Southern Mariana Trough; that is, Snail site (12o57.19'N, 143o37.16'E, depth:2861m) and Yamanaka site (12o56.64'N, 143o36.80'E, depth: 2823m) on the spreading-axis, Archean site (12o56.35'N, 143o37.89'E, depth: 2986m), and Pika+Urashima sites (12o55.13'N, 143o38.92'E, depth: 2773m) on the off-axis seamount, respectively. We conducted nine BMS (Benthic Multi-coring System) drillings during the Hakurei-Maru No.2 cruise of TAIGA project (see below) in June 2010. Both basalt glasses and associated seafloor massive sulfide ores from these sites are cored and served for ICP-MS analyses. Multi-element plot of basalt glass indicates that both on-axis and off-axis basalts have similar pattern and are categorized as differentiated MORB and basaltic andesite which cannot be produced by fractionation of MORB, respectively. Sulfide ores at on-axis and off-axis sites show similar mineral assemblage of pyrite/marcasite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, barite, and limited occurrence of galena only at on-axis site. Fluid-mobile elements such as As, Ba, Pb and others in sulfide ores show systematic increase at off-axis sites which reflect the influence of subduction zone fluids towards the Mariana arc. The sulfur isotope composition of pyrite/marcasite from on-axis sites shows values (+6.4 - +7.9 permil) typically observed in arc magma-related hydrothermal deposits (Suzuki, unpubl. data). On the other hand, those observed at off-axis sites (Archean; +3.6 - +6.9 permil, Pika; +0.8 - +3.5 permil) are similar to the composition of sulfides on mid-ocean ridges where the influence of sulfur

  13. Spread Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    In the multiverse the scale of supersymmetry breaking, widetilde{m} = {F_X}/{M_{ * }} ∗, may scan and environmental constraints on the dark matter density may exclude a large range of m from the reheating temperature after inflation down to values that yield a lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) mass of order a TeV. After selection effects, for example from the cosmological constant, the distribution for widetilde{m} in the region that gives a TeV LSP may prefer larger values. A single environmental constraint from dark matter can then lead to multi-component dark matter, including both axions and the LSP, giving a TeV-scale LSP somewhat lighter than the corresponding value for single-component LSP dark matter. If supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the Standard Model sector at order X † X and higher, only squarks, sleptons and one Higgs doublet acquire masses of order widetilde{m} . The gravitino mass is lighter by a factor of M ∗ /M Pl and the gaugino masses are suppressed by a further loop factor. This Spread Supersymmetry spectrum has two versions, one with Higgsino masses arising from supergravity effects of order the gravitino mass giving a wino LSP, and another with the Higgsino masses generated radiatively from gaugino masses giving a Higgsino LSP. The environmental restriction on dark matter fixes the LSP mass to the TeV domain, so that the squark and slepton masses are order 103 TeV and 106 TeV in these two schemes. We study the spectrum, dark matter and collider signals of these two versions of Spread Supersymmetry. The Higgs boson is Standard Model-like and predicted to lie in the range 110-145 GeV; monochromatic photons in cosmic rays arise from dark matter annihilations in the halo; exotic short charged tracks occur at the LHC, at least for the wino LSP; and there are the eventual possibilities of direct detection of dark matter and detailed exploration of the TeV-scale states at a future linear collider. Gauge coupling unification is at

  14. 77 FR 70211 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Call Center Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Call Center Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VBA Call Center Satisfaction Survey. OMB Control Number: 2900-0744. Type of... VA call centers will provide VBA with three key benefits to: (1) Identify what is most important...

  15. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  16. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  17. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Agriculture Action Centers? 426.7 Section 426.7 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM General § 426.7 What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access...

  18. Activities and Products at IVS combination center at BKG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, S.; Lösler, M.

    2013-08-01

    The IVS combination center is primarily responsible to provide rapid EOP products based on observation campaigns twice a week and a long-term EOP series which is updated four times a year. Besides EOP products, methods and analysis of combined station coordinates and source positions are evolving and new products are developed in order to expand the range of combined VLBI products. Within the last year the combination center continuously worked on several improvements and refinements of the combination procedure: outlier test have been improved, the detection of unsuitable sessions in order to improve the stability of the results, the modeling of station coordinates of the reference frame generation and the data presentation on the combination centers website. Besides the routine combination of 24h VLBI sessions, several other projects have been developed, e.g. the preparation of the latest VLBI reference frame (VTRF) including the calculation of station height variations and baseline lengths generation derived by the combination of station coordinates. The combination center is furthermore intensely working on the combination of source coordinates and on providing user friendly online analysis tools on the combination centers website in order to meet the user requirements.

  19. Activities, accomplishments and research progress of the Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom

    1992-02-01

    This annual report contains a detailed description of the activities, accomplishments, and research progress of the MIT Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics established under the University Research Initiative Program by AFOSR. During this second phase of the program, the Center has made definite strides toward the goals prescribed in the renewal proposal. The Center now has a staff of twenty-five (25) faculty, research scientists, postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate students and visiting scientists. Members of the Center published forty-eight (48) scientific papers and five (5) books and proceedings, delivered forty (40) invited lectures and fifty-one (51) contributed papers. We have initiated a number of new research activities to complement our other ongoing research programs. Some of our research efforts have already been utilized by Dr. J. R. Jasperse's group at the Geophysics Directorate of the Phillips Laboratory in practical space technology applications relevant to the missions of the Air Force. In addition to the Phillips Laboratory, the Center has interacted with numerous research organizations and universities. The research publications are generally the direct product of such interactions.

  20. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  1. Sulphatides trigger polymorphonuclear granulocyte spreading on collagen-coated surfaces and inhibit subsequent activation of 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sud'ina, G F; Brock, T G; Pushkareva, M A; Galkina, S I; Turutin, D V; Peters-Golden, M; Ullrich, V

    2001-01-01

    Sulphatides are sulphate esters of galactocerebrosides that are present on the surfaces of many cell types and act as specific ligands to selectins. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sulphatides on polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) attachment, spreading and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism. Sulphatides, but not non-sulphated galactocerebrosides, dose-dependently enhanced attachment to collagen, as measured by the myeloperoxidase assay. Studies with blocking antibodies indicated that the increased attachment was mediated by CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) beta 2 integrin. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that sulphatides also greatly enhanced the degree of cell spreading. In PMNs treated in suspension, sulphatides had no effect on the ionophore A23187-stimulated release of arachidonic acid and the synthesis of 5-LO metabolites. In contrast, in PMNs attached to collagen, the enzymic conversion of arachidonic acid by 5-LO was inhibited by sulphatides. Inhibition of 5-LO metabolism by sulphatides was observed even in the presence of exogenous substrate, suggesting that sulphatides directly inhibited 5-LO action. Consistent with this, sulphatides interfered with ionophore-induced translocation of the 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. Substances competing with sulphatide binding to cells, like dextran sulphate, or a strong inhibitor of cell spreading, like the actin-polymerizing agent jasplakinolide, prevented the effects of sulphatides on PMN attachment and spreading and leukotriene synthesis. We conclude that shape changes occurring in response to sulphatides specifically impair PMN leukotriene synthesis by inhibiting translocation of 5-LO. PMID:11672437

  2. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Overall view of JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR) during Flight Day 1 of STS-26 integrated simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  3. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), astronauts John O. Creighton (right) and L. Blaine Hammond review their notes while serving as spacecraft communicators (CAPCOMs) for STS-26 simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  4. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), flight directors (FDs) Lee Briscoe (left) and Charles W. Shaw, seated at FD console, view front visual display monitors during STS-26 simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  5. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  6. Physical activity in the EPIC-Italy centers.

    PubMed

    Salvini, Simonetta; Saieva, Calogero; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Berrino, Franco; Pala, Valeria; Frasca, Graziella; Tumino, Rosario; Veglia, Fabrizio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Palli, Domenico

    2003-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition offers the opportunity to explore patterns of physical activity in a large series of healthy adults enrolled in the different local cohorts of the Italian section of the European EPIC project. Physical activity is considered one of the means by which chronic disease could be prevented. Subjects in the EPIC study completed a life-style questionnaire, with a section dedicated to the assessment of physical activity at work and during leisure time. Time spent in the various activities was transformed into an index of physical activity (physical activity level, PAL) and an activity index that includes intense activity (PAL; intense activity included). Quintiles of these indexes were computed in order to observe the distribution of subject characteristics according to levels of physical activity. In general, the population was characterized by low levels of physical activity at work, with more than 50% of the sample reporting sedentary occupations. During leisure time, only a small percentage of subjects compensated for the inactivity at work by engaging in energy-consuming activities. In particular, organized fitness activities were reported by a small percentage of people, whereas walking was the most common sort of physical activity. Specific types of activity seemed to characterize subjects in the different areas of the country, reflecting local traditions or specific living situations. Detailed information about physical activity habits, together with a description of other characteristics, could help in designing physical activity promotion programs in different Italian populations and age groups.

  7. Composition of plume-influenced mid-ocean ridge lavas and glasses from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Kingsley, Richard; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    The global mid-ocean ridge system is peppered with localities where mantle plumes impinge on oceanic spreading centers. Here, we present new, high resolution and high precision data for 40 trace elements in 573 samples of variably plume-influenced mid-ocean ridge basalts from the Mid-Atlantic ridge, the Easter Microplate and Salas y Gomez seamounts, the Galápagos spreading center, and the Gulf of Aden, in addition to previously unpublished major element and isotopic data for these regions. Included in the data set are the unconventional trace elements Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, W, and Tl, which are not commonly reported by most geochemical studies. We show variations in the ratios Mo/Ce, Cd/Dy, Sn/Sm, Sb/Ce, W/U, and Rb/Tl, which are expected not to fractionate significantly during melting or crystallization, as a function of proximity to plume-related features on these ridges. The Cd/Dy and Sn/Sm ratios show little variation with plume proximity, although higher Cd/Dy may signal increases in the role of garnet in the mantle source beneath some plumes. Globally, the Rb/Tl ratio closely approximates the La/SmN ratio, and thus provides a sensitive tracer of enriched mantle domains. The W/U ratio is not elevated at plume centers, but we find significant enrichments in W/U, and to a lesser extent the Mo/Ce and Sb/Ce ratios, at mid-ocean ridges proximal to plumes. Such enrichments may provide evidence of far-field entrainment of lower mantle material that has interacted with the core by deeply-rooted, upwelling mantle plumes.

  8. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  9. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang; Woitzik, Johannes; Scheel, Michael; Wiesenthal, Dirk; Martus, Peter; Winkler, Maren K.L.; Hartings, Jed A.; Fabricius, Martin; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We here report on such spreading convulsions in monopolar subdural recordings in 2 of 25 consecutive aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients in vivo and neocortical slices from 12 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in vitro. The in vitro results suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition protects from spreading convulsions. Moreover, we describe arterial pulse artefacts mimicking epileptic field potentials in three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage that ride on the slow potential peak. Twenty-one of the 25 subarachnoid haemorrhage patients (84%) had 656 spreading depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression

  10. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang; Woitzik, Johannes; Scheel, Michael; Wiesenthal, Dirk; Martus, Peter; Winkler, Maren K L; Hartings, Jed A; Fabricius, Martin; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We here report on such spreading convulsions in monopolar subdural recordings in 2 of 25 consecutive aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients in vivo and neocortical slices from 12 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in vitro. The in vitro results suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition protects from spreading convulsions. Moreover, we describe arterial pulse artefacts mimicking epileptic field potentials in three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage that ride on the slow potential peak. Twenty-one of the 25 subarachnoid haemorrhage patients (84%) had 656 spreading depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression

  11. Physical Activity in Child-Care Centers: Do Teachers Hold the Key to the Playground?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49…

  12. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  13. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.32 What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering...

  14. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  15. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.32 What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering...

  16. Aerospace Battery Activities at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has "pioneered" rechargeable secondary battery design, test, infusion and in-orbit battery management among NASA installations. Nickel cadmium batteries of various designs and sizes have been infused for LEO, GEO and Libration Point spacecraft. Nickel-Hydrogen batteries have currently been baselined for the majority of our missions. Li-Ion batteries from ABSL, JSB, SaFT and Lithion have been designed and tested for aerospace application.

  17. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  18. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), flight controller Granvil A. Pennington, leaning on console, listens to communications during the STS-26 integrated simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). MCC FCR visual displays are seen in background. Five veteran astronauts were in the FB-SMS rehearsing their roles for the scheduled June 1988 flight aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  19. Spread Across Liquids Continues to Fly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.

    2001-01-01

    The physics and behavior of a flame spreading across a flammable liquid is an active area of research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Spills of fuels and other liquids often result in considerable fire hazards, and much remains unknown about the details of how a flame, once ignited, moves across a pool. The depth of the liquid or size of the spill, the temperature, and wind, if any, can all complicate the combustion processes. In addition, with the advent of the International Space Station there may be fire hazards associated with cleaning, laboratory, or other fluids in space, and it is essential to understand the role that gravity plays in such situations. The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment is an experimental and computational effort dedicated to understanding the detailed mechanisms of flame spread across a flammable liquid initially below its flashpoint temperature. The experimental research is being carried out in-house by a team of researchers from Glenn, the National Center for Microgravity Combustion, and Zin Technologies, with computer modeling being provided via a grant with the University of California, Irvine. Glenn's Zero Gravity Facility is used to achieve short microgravity periods, and normal gravity testing is done in the Space Experiments Laboratory. To achieve longer periods of microgravity, the showcase SAL hardware flies aboard a sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, approximately once per year. In addition to extended microgravity, this carrier allows the use of detailed diagnostics that cannot be employed in a drop tower.

  20. The Internet Alert Project: spreading the word about high-risk sexual activities advertised on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Kachur, R E

    2004-11-01

    The Internet is an emerging venue for facilitating high-risk sexual behavior; in particular, use of the Internet to seek out sex partners has been shown to be associated with high-risk sexual behaviors, such as an increase in number of sexual partners and an increase in anal sex, which can increase the risk of contracting and transmitting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV. In an effort to assist health departments around the country, the Internet Alert Project was developed to provide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) project officers and field staff with information about Internet-advertised, high-risk sexual activities in areas that do not have access to sexually explicit material on the Internet. An evaluation was conducted to determine the utility of the Internet Alert Project, its effect on knowledge and awareness of recipients and on public health efforts. Results of the evaluation show the alerts are a useful and valuable tool. The alerts have helped to increase knowledge about sexually-related uses of the Internet and have also driven public health efforts in the field. The results also indicate the need for project areas to access information found on the Internet in order to keep up with the ever-changing behaviors of at-risk populations. PMID:15511729

  1. Learning by Doing: Engaging Students through Learner-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Karl L.; Csapo, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    With a shift of focus from teaching to learning in higher education, teachers often look for strategies to involve students actively in the learning process, especially since numerous studies have demonstrated that a student's active involvement in the learning process enhances learning. Active learning has resulted in positive learning outcomes.…

  2. A Paleomagnetic Study of Late Cretaceous Ophiolites in SE Turkey: implications for palaeolatitudes of S Neotethyan spreading centers and emplacement-related tectonic rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mualla, Cinku; Timur, Ustaömer; Osman, Parlak; Mumtaz, Hisarli

    2016-04-01

    Two E-W trending ophiolite belts crop out in SE Turkey, The southerly located ophiolites (Hatay, Koçali) were emplaced onto the Arabian Platform in Late Cretaceous whereas the northerly located ophiolites (Göksun, İspendere, Kömürhan, Guleman) were underthrust the S Tauride margin (i.e. Malatya-Keban Platform) in Late Cretaceous. Different tectonic models exist in the literature for the origin of these different ophiolite belts that we test here by a detailed palaomagnetic study: a) all the ophiolites in Turkey, including those in the study area were rooted from a single ocean basin to the N (i.e. the N Neotethyan Ocean Basin); b) all the ophiolites in SE Turkey were derived from the S Neotethyan Ocean Basin; c) the two ophiolite belts in SE Turkey are believed to have rooted from two different ocean basins; the Berit ocean to the north and the S Neotethys to the S. Our palaeomagnetic study from 72 different sites was focused on to the sheeted dyke complex, cumulate gabbros and extrusive sequences where available of each ophiolite from the N and S belts. We also sampled the unconformable cover units to distinguish emplacement related tectonic rotations from post-emplacement tectonic rotations. Here we report our first results obtained from the Göksun Ophiolite of the northern belt and the Hatay Ophiolite of the southern belt. Rock magnetic experiments showed evidence od magnetite/titanomagnetite as the main magnetic carriers at the majority of sites. Progressive thermal and alternating demagnetization revealed that the characteristic remanent component is removed between 500 and 580 ?C or 30-100 mT, respectively. Our new paleomagnetic results from the ophiolitic rocks emplaced in Arabian platform and the SE Anatolia show important implications to the spreading centre of the former ocean (s). Large counterclockwise rotations up to 100° are obtained from the sheeded dykes of the Hatay ophiolite in the Arabian plate with a paleolatitude of ˜16° , in contrast

  3. Recent Activities of Tsukuba Correlator/Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, K.; Kurihara, S.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has been a member of IVS and taken charge of a Network Station and an IVS Correlator since 1998. In addition, GSI became an IVS Operational Analysis Center in January 2010.The Tsukuba Correlator takes charge of correlation work for approximately 100 IVS-INT02 (INT2) sessions and 10 Japanese domestic sessions every year. In 2011, the number of INT2 sessions dramatically increased, because INT2 sessions were observed twice a day during the weekend from April 2011 to January 2012 due to the change in position of the Tsukuba 32-m antenna by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. The role of the Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center is to produce ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements, sessions with the goal of obtaining a dUT1 solution within 30 minutes after the end of the observation session. The data processing system at the Tsukuba Correlator and Analysis Center was dramatically improved to achieve rapid data processing. It enabled us to shorten the data processing time to one-sixth and to process the IVS VLBI data in near real-time. In 2011, we processed the ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements with the Onsala or Wettzell stations from INT2 sessions or IVS 24-hour sessions, such as R1, RD or T2 sessions. The most successful sessions for ultra-rapid dUT1 measurement was the CONT11 sessions which were a campaign of 15 days of continuous VLBI sessions. During these sessions, we succeeded in estimating continuous dUT1 solutions in near real-time for 15 days.

  4. Recent activities of the Priroda State Remote Sensing Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, J.L.; Bond, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    At present the Priroda State Remote Sensing Center is the largest entity in the USSR responsible for the receipt and processing of space imagery. Besides the aforementioned consulting and training functions, Priroda, upon user request: a) processes multispectral, band-specific, and other remote sensing imagery and supplies a broad range of primary and derivative information in the form of image copies [prints and transparencies] and digital products; and b) cooperates with other GUGK bodies in the compilation of thematic map series on diverse topics. -from Authors

  5. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  6. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above.

  7. Activities of the Structures Division, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Structures Division's 1990 Annual Report is to give a brief, but comprehensive, review of the technical accomplishments of the Division during the past calendar year. The report is organized topically to match the Center's Strategic Plan. Over the years, the Structures Division has developed the technology base necessary for improving the future of aeronautical and space propulsion systems. In the future, propulsion systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance. Achieving these goals is complex and challenging. Our approach has been to work cooperatively with both industry and universities to develop the technology necessary for state-of-the-art advancement in aeronautical and space propulsion systems. The Structures Division consists of four branches: Structural Mechanics, Fatigue and Fracture, Structural Dynamics, and Structural Integrity. This publication describes the work of the four branches by three topic areas of Research: (1) Basic Discipline; (2) Aeropropulsion; and (3) Space Propulsion. Each topic area is further divided into the following: (1) Materials; (2) Structural Mechanics; (3) Life Prediction; (4) Instruments, Controls, and Testing Techniques; and (5) Mechanisms. The publication covers 78 separate topics with a bibliography containing 159 citations. We hope you will find the publication interesting as well as useful.

  8. Recent Activities on the Embrace Space Weather Regional Warning Center: the New Space Weather Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Mendes, Odim; Batista, Inez S.; SantAnna, Nilson; Gatto, Rubens; Takahashi, Hisao; Costa, D. Joaquim; Banik Padua, Marcelo; Campos Velho, Haroldo

    2016-07-01

    On August 2007 the National Institute for Space Research started a task force to develop and operate a space weather program, which is known by the acronyms Embrace that stands for the Portuguese statement "Estudo e Monitoramento BRAasileiro de Clima Espacial" Program (Brazilian Space Weather Study and Monitoring program). The mission of the Embrace/INPE program is to monitor the Solar-Terrestrial environment, the magnetosphere, the upper atmosphere and the ground induced currents to prevent effects on technological and economic activities. The Embrace/INPE system monitors the physical parameters of the Sun-Earth environment, such as Active Regions (AR) in the Sun and solar radiation by using radio telescope, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) information by satellite and ground-based cosmic ray monitoring, geomagnetic activity by the magnetometer network, and ionospheric disturbance by ionospheric sounders and using data collected by four GPS receiver network, geomagnetic activity by a magnetometer network, and provides a forecasting for Total Electronic Content (TEC) - 24 hours ahead - using a version of the SUPIM model which assimilates the two latter data using nudging approach. Most of these physical parameters are daily published on the Brazilian space weather program web portal, related to the entire network sensors available. Regarding outreach, it has being published a daily bulletin in Portuguese and English with the status of the space weather environment on the Sun, the Interplanetary Medium and close to the Earth. Since December 2011, all these activities are carried out at the Embrace Headquarter, a building located at the INPE's main campus. Recently, a comprehensive data bank and an interface layer are under commissioning to allow an easy and direct access to all the space weather data collected by Embrace through the Embrace web Portal. The information being released encompasses data from: (a) the Embrace Digisonde Network (Embrace DigiNet) that monitors

  9. [History and activities of the Rescue Coordination Center].

    PubMed

    Hausman, A

    1983-01-01

    The founder and first director of the C.C.R. enumerates the principles that led to the conception and the achievement of the C.C.R. He reviews the principal rescue activities during these 25 years and mentions the development of supplementary activities on safety, ergonomics and respiratory protection during the last few years.

  10. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  11. Report on Advanced Life Support Activities at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Plant studies at Kennedy Space Center last year focused on selecting cultivars of lettuce, tomato, and pepper for further testing as crops for near-term space flight applications. Other testing continued with lettuce, onion, and radish plants grown at different combinations of light (PPF), temperature, and CO2 concentration. In addition, comparisons of mixed versus mono culture approaches for vegetable production were studied. Water processing testing focused on the development and testing of a rotating membrane bioreactor to increase oxygen diffusion levels for reducing total organic carbon levels and promoting nitrification. Other testing continued to study composting testing for food wastes (NRA grant) and the use of supplemental green light with red/blue LED lighting systems for plant production (NRC fellowship).

  12. Craving love? Enduring grief activates brain's reward center.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Wellisch, David K; Stanton, Annette L; Eisenberger, Naomi I; Irwin, Michael R; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2008-08-15

    Complicated Grief (CG) occurs when an individual experiences prolonged, unabated grief. The neural mechanisms distinguishing CG from Noncomplicated Grief (NCG) are unclear, but hypothesized mechanisms include both pain-related activity (related to the social pain of loss) and reward-related activity (related to attachment behavior). Bereaved women (11 CG, 12 NCG) participated in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging scan, during grief elicitation with idiographic stimuli. Analyses revealed that whereas both CG and NCG participants showed pain-related neural activity in response to reminders of the deceased, only those with CG showed reward-related activity in the nucleus accumbens (NA). This NA cluster was positively correlated with self-reported yearning, but not with time since death, participant age, or positive/negative affect. This study supports the hypothesis that attachment activates reward pathways. For those with CG, reminders of the deceased still activate neural reward activity, which may interfere with adapting to the loss in the present. PMID:18559294

  13. Recent and Future Stratospheric Balloon Activities at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemi, Stig

    Esrange Space Center located in northern Sweden has during 45 years been a leading launch site for both sounding rockets and stratospheric balloons. We have a unique combination of maintaining both stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets launch operations. Most balloon flights are normally handled inside Scandinavia but since 2005 PersonNamesemi-circular flights are performed with recovery in northern Canada. The Swedish Government and Swedish National Space Board are now finaliz-ing an agreement with Russia for peaceful uPersonNamese of space, which will permit circumpolar balloon flights. Within this agreement we will soon be able to of-fer the science community long duration balloon flights with durations for PersonNameseveral weeks. The balloon operations at Esrange Space Center are yearly expanding. Both NASA and CNES have long term plans for balloon flights from northern Sweden. We have also received a request from JAXA for future balloon missions. To handle balloon campaigns with large numbers of payloads or build up for two different campaigns a new big assembly hall will be ready for use at the beginning of 2011. January 24 we made an historical balloon flight in a very cold stratosphere with a Zodiac metricconverterProductID402?000 m3402ü ınbsp;000 m3402 000 m3 balloon carrying a 750kg gondola with the German Mipas-B/Telis instrument. The balloon reached 34kms alti-tude after a carefully piloted ascent in temperature levels down to -89 degrees Centigrade. The scientists received unique data during the 13 hours and 30 minutes long sailing at different altitudes during slow descent. The payload was recovered in very good condition 80 kms from the border between country-regionFinland and Russia.

  14. A journey into the active center of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes the reduction of N2 to NH3, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. This article describes our journey toward the definition of a complete molecular structure of the active site of nitrogenase, with an emphasis on the discovery of the interstitial carbide and the radical SAM-dependent insertion of this atom into the active FeMo cofactor site of nitrogenase.

  15. Active surveillance of the aquatic environment for potential prediction, prevention and spread of water borne disease: the cholera paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, A.; Colwell, R.

    2011-12-01

    Based on results of ecological and epidemiological studies, occurrence and spread of certain diseases are more fully understood. Cholera is a major waterborne disease, that is relatively easily treatable and clearly preventable, yet tens of thousands die each year worldwide. A dose dependent disease, the infectious dose can vary from 103-106, depending on health status of the victim. Historically, cholera has been shown to spread from person to person. Furthermore, the disease is caused predominantly via ingestion of contaminated water and most of the outbreaks that have been recorded worldwide originated in a coastal region. Using appropriate detection methods, Vibrio cholerae can be isolated from samples collected from ponds, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters globally. The populations of V. cholerae may vary in numbers during different seasons of the year. It is important to have a clear understanding of the distribution of the causative agent in the environment as such information can assist public health officials in taking action to prevent outbreaks of cholera. Thus an effective monitoring program is critical, particularly in light of climate change with temperature extremes more likely to be occurring. Based on a predictive model and results of ground truth data, temperature has been found to be a factor in the increase of V. cholerae in the environment. Correlation was observed with occurrence of cholera and both temperature and salinity. More recent research indicates additional factors need to be considered in predicting cholera epidemics, including the hydrology and disease dynamics.

  16. Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs…

  17. Report on the Activities of the Single Parent Resource Center, 1975-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Switchboard / Single Parent Resource Center, San Francisco, CA.

    This report provides a model for the provision of social services to single parents. The activities the center provides include drop-in support groups, workshops on single parent issues, a single parent magazine, individual counseling and community outreach. The report briefly specifies the goals of the center and the rationale behind its…

  18. Social Inequalities in Body Weight and Physical Activity: Exploring the Role of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Lindsay; Rock, Melanie J.; McElgunn, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Fitness centers are a viable option for physical activity, particularly in climates with significant weather variation. Due to variation in economic and social expressions of exclusivity, fitness centers may have some relation to social inequalities in physical inactivity and related health outcomes; thus, our objective was to explore this…

  19. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  20. Transmission research activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A joint research program, to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions, consists of analytical and experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing transmission weight and noise, while increasing life and reliability. Recent activities in the areas of transmission and related component research are highlighted. Current areas include specific technologies in support of military rotary wing aviation, gearing technology, transmission noise reduction studies, a recent interest in gearbox diagnostics, and advanced transmission system studies. Results of recent activities are presented along with near term research plans.

  1. Kidspiration[R] for Inquiry-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L., Jr.; Baggett, Paige V.; Salyer, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Computer technology can be integrated into science inquiry activities to increase student motivation and enhance and expand scientific thinking. Fifth-grade students used the visual thinking tools in the Kidspiration[R] software program to generate and represent a web of hypotheses around the question, "What affects the distance a marble rolls?"…

  2. Robotics-Centered Outreach Activities: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-del-Solar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, universities are making extensive efforts to attract prospective students to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Thus, outreach is becoming increasingly important, and activities with schoolchildren are being extensively carried out as part of this effort. In this context, robotics is a very attractive and…

  3. An Interdisciplinary, Computer-Centered Approach to Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misale, Judi M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a computer-assisted, interdisciplinary course in decision making developed to promote student participation and critical thinking. Students participate in 20 interactive exercises that utilize and illustrate psychological and economic concepts. Follow-up activities include receiving background information, group discussions, text…

  4. 77 FR 69604 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Educational Opportunity Centers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Educational Opportunity Centers Program (EOC... respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please note that written comments received in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection:...

  5. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY: Office of Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of Acquisition and Logistics (OAL), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA),...

  6. 77 FR 38398 - Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Office of Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION... notice announces that the Office of Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs,...

  7. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  8. UAS Related Activities at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is completing its refurbishment and initial flights of one the pre-production Global Hawk aircraft it received from the U.S. Air Force. NASA Dryden has an agreement with the Global Hawk s manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, to partner in the refurbishment and flight operations of the vehicles. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also partnered on the project and is assisting NASA with project management and pilot responsibilities for the aircraft. NASA and NOAA will be using the Global Hawks to conduct earth science research. The earth science community is increasing utilizing UAS of all sizes and capabilities to collect important data on a variety of issues including important global climate change issues. To pursue the data collection needs of the science community there is a growing demand for international collaboration with respect to operating UAS in global airspace. Operations of NASA s Ikhana aircraft continued this past year. The Ikhana is a modified Predator B UAS. A UAS dedicated to research at NASA Dryden is the X-48B blended wing body research aircraft. Flight tests with the 500- pound, remotely piloted test vehicle are now in a block 4 phase involving parameter identification and maneuvers to research the limits of the engine in stall situations. NASA s participation in the blended wing body research effort is focused on fundamental, advanced flight dynamics and structural design concepts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing project, part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program managed through NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Potential benefits of the aircraft include increased volume for carrying capacity, efficient aerodynamics for reduced fuel burn and possibly significant reductions in noise due to propulsion integration options. NASA Dryden continues to support the UAS industry by facilitating access to three specially designated test areas on Edwards Air Force Base for the

  9. Beyond active learning: a case study of teaching practices in an occupation-centered curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Although occupation-centered curricula are highly promoted, the teaching processes that convey such designs remain unclear. This case study elucidated occupation-centered teaching practices. Interview and observational data were collected over 8 weeks, and analysis involved coding transcriptions, data matrices, concept maps, journaling, and writing. Participants augmented active learning strategies with strategies that linked course topics to the subject of occupation. The use of linking strategies suggested that: (a) course content was treated as two-tiered; (b) neither content nor instructional processes were inherently occupation-centered; and (c) subject-centered education strengthens social learning theories. Although curricula may appear occupation-centered based on a curriculum description and course content, ultimately "linking opportunities" in the classroom constitute an essential feature that demarcates a program as occupation-centered.

  10. Activation of NF-kappaB by extracellular matrix is involved in spreading and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Eva B; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Rickenbach, Katharina; Parnaud, Géraldine; Ribaux, Pascale; Bosco, Domenico; Rouiller, Dominique G; Halban, Philippe A

    2005-08-26

    Laminin-5-rich extracellular matrix derived from 804G cells (804G-ECM) engages beta1 integrins to induce spreading, improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and increase survival of pancreatic beta cells. The present study examines whether 804G-ECM activates the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB and the involvement of NF-kappaB in those effects of 804G-ECM on pancreatic beta cells. 804G-ECM induces nuclear translocation and the DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. 804G-ECM-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB was weak as compared with that induced by interleukin-1beta. Transient 804G-ECM-induced DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB (peak at 2 h) and overexpression of NF-kappaB target genes IkappaB alpha and NF-kappaB1(p105) (peak at 4 h) were observed. When NF-kappaB was inhibited by an inhibitor of IkappaB alpha phosphorylation (Bay 11-7082) or by a recombinant adenovirus expressing the nonphosphorylatable form of IkappaB alpha, 804G-ECM-induced cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton organization were reduced. GSIS from cells on 804G-ECM was inhibited 5-fold, whereas cell survival was not affected. In summary, the results indicate that 804G-ECM induces a transient and moderate NF-kappaB activity. This study shows for the first time that ECM-induced NF-kappaB activity is necessary in maintaining GSIS, although it does not affect survival of pancreatic beta cells. The effects of ECM-induced NF-kappaB activity contrast with the deleterious effects of cytokine-induced NF-kappaB activity. It is proposed that transient and moderate NF-kappaB activity is essential for proper function of the pancreatic beta cell.

  11. ALOP-active learning in optics and photonics: a UNESCO's program spreading in Colombia through the National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Gómez, Catalina; Monroy-Ramírez, Freddy A.

    2014-07-01

    The National University of Colombia is committed to the spreading of the UNESCO's ALOP program throughout the country by programming a series of workshops (ALOP-NPH) to be held in each of its eight campuses. This huge effort is intended to contribute at a national scale to the training of high school teachers in new pedagogic methodologies. Furthermore, the ALOP Workshop has had large impact in the recently established Master's program on pedagogy of Sciences, a degree program addressed to middle and high school teachers, which has a current enrollment of more than 400 teachers from all over the country. In this paper we also describe the contributions of the team also ALOP-Colombia to the material and electronic devices used in optical transmission modules and data division multiplexing wavelength.

  12. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  13. City Kids and City Critters! Activities for Urban Explorers from the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Janet Wier; Huelbig, Carole

    This guide contains activities from the Houston Arboretum and Nature Center programs for children ages 8 to 12 years. The multisensory activities help students improve their observational skills and utilize activity sheets, journals, and hands-on projects to involve them. Children observe, draw, and photograph animals in their natural settings and…

  14. Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) Project Studied "Green House" Effects on Fire Spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Ronney, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) project, slated for flight aboard the International Space Station, reached a major milestone by holding its Science Concept Review this year. REEFS is led by principal investigator Paul Ronney from the University of Southern California in conjunction with a project team from the NASA Glenn Research Center. The study is focusing on flame spread over flat solid fuel beds to improve our understanding of more complex fires, such as those found in manned spacecraft and terrestrial buildings. The investigation has direct implications for fire safety, both for space and Earth applications, and extends previous work with emphasis on the atmospheres and flow environments likely to be present in fires that might occur in microgravity. These atmospheres will contain radiatively active gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion products, and likely gaseous fuels such as carbon monoxide (CO) from incomplete combustion of solid fuel, as well as flows induced by ventilation currents. During tests in the 2.2-Second Drop Tower and KC-135 aircraft at Glenn, the principal investigator introduced the use of foam fuels for flame spread experiments over thermally thick fuels to obtain large spread rates in comparison to those of dense fuels such as PMMA. This enables meaningful results to be obtained even in the 2.2 s available in drop tower experiments.

  15. Attitudinal Effects of a Student-Centered Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Allen, Deedee

    2005-06-01

    The importance of attitudes toward science has risen from widely accepted assumptions that achievement and attitude are positively interdependent and that affective variables are as important as cognitive variables in molding student learning. This report examines the effect on student attitudes toward learning chemistry in an active learning environment that has incorporated elements believed to positively influence student attitudes toward science including cooperative learning, hands-on activities, real-world applications, and engaging technology. These elements were considered for synergetic effects and not as individual contributors to the overall results. Two different sections of the same general chemistry course participated. The lecture setting was used as the control. Residualized gain scores were used to compare net changes in student attitudes. Data were analyzed for possible differences in gain for different academic majors. Anxiety in chemistry was monitored for the two class settings in three areas, learning in chemistry, chemistry evaluation, and chemical handling. Qualitative student feedback was also collected and is summarized in this report on the attitudinal aspects of instruction.

  16. Constraint based scheduling for the Goddard Space Flight Center distributed Active Archive Center's data archive and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nick, Jr.; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Beane, John

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational since October 1, 1993. Its mission is to support the Earth Observing System (EOS) by providing rapid access to EOS data and analysis products, and to test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) design concepts. One of the challenges is to ensure quick and easy retrieval of any data archived within the DAAC's Data Archive and Distributed System (DADS). Over the 15-year life of EOS project, an estimated several Petabytes (10(exp 15)) of data will be permanently stored. Accessing that amount of information is a formidable task that will require innovative approaches. As a precursor of the full EOS system, the GSFC DAAC with a few Terabits of storage, has implemented a prototype of a constraint-based task and resource scheduler to improve the performance of the DADS. This Honeywell Task and Resource Scheduler (HTRS), developed by Honeywell Technology Center in cooperation the Information Science and Technology Branch/935, the Code X Operations Technology Program, and the GSFC DAAC, makes better use of limited resources, prevents backlog of data, provides information about resources bottlenecks and performance characteristics. The prototype which is developed concurrently with the GSFC Version 0 (V0) DADS, models DADS activities such as ingestion and distribution with priority, precedence, resource requirements (disk and network bandwidth) and temporal constraints. HTRS supports schedule updates, insertions, and retrieval of task information via an Application Program Interface (API). The prototype has demonstrated with a few examples, the substantial advantages of using HTRS over scheduling algorithms such as a First In First Out (FIFO) queue. The kernel scheduling engine for HTRS, called Kronos, has been successfully applied to several other domains such as space shuttle mission scheduling, demand flow manufacturing, and avionics communications

  17. Centering perspectives on Black women, hair politics, and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Versey, H Shellae

    2014-05-01

    As researchers categorize issues facing Black women's health, obesity and physical exercise continue to be significant topics of debate. General interventions targeted toward Black women to address obesity and increase physical exercise have been largely ineffective. In this article, I situate the current public health discourse on obesity and related interventions within a sociocultural context of body appearance, with a specific focus on hair. Why do some African American women feel such strong ties to their hair that they will avoid exercise? What can be done to understand this phenomenon and address alternatives that may make both hair maintenance and regular exercise feasible? I map a theoretical argument for why hair matters for some women, and discuss how physical activity intervention strategies might be improved by considering such complexities.

  18. [Automation of immunohematologic testing activities at French blood transfusion centers].

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Girard, M

    1983-11-01

    In May 1982, a questionnaire was sent to all of the 170 French Blood Transfusion Services (BTS), on behalf of the French Society of Blood Transfusion. The purpose was to determine the types of automated equipment used for immunohematological controls, the way in which they are used and the result of automation and computerization in daily laboratory operations. We received 135 replies (80%). A generalized conclusion can be drawn from the collected information. 50% of the respondents are neither automated nor computerized. 30% are both automated and computerized. 10% are automated but not computerized and 8% are not automated but are computerized. In the field of automated serology there is an increased tendency to complete the ABO/Rh testing by Cc D Ee and Kell phenotyping. The use of computers allows the current test determination to be compared with previous donation data. However, no fully automated equipment, which can conduct antibody screening, exists, cost effectively, in small or average BTS. In France, there has been a significant increase in automation between 1970 and 1980 but only the most important BTS have carried out automation at the same time as computerization. The smaller BTS have usually become automated without becoming computerized. In 1978, Codabar was first used. This has been one of the principal advances of the last 10 years, allowing all the users of automation to start moving towards complete computerization. This advance was assisted by the use of prepackaged software. This questionnaire also determined that the current emphasis is now to computerize administrative and management activities before laboratory activities. This survey has been conducted during a turning point of the automation of French BTS. It shows that they are, on the whole, satisfied with their automation. As far as the safety and the efficiency of the service are concerned, it is only fair to consider that the main purposes of the automation have been achieved. But

  19. Coevolution between human's anticancer activities and functional foods from crop origin center in the world.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ya-Wen; Du, Juan; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Jia-Zhen; Yang, Tao; Yang, Shu-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Meng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death around the world. Anticancer activities from many functional food sources have been reported in years, but correlation between cancer prevalence and types of food with anticancer activities from crop origin center in the world as well as food source with human migration are unclear. Hunger from food shortage is the cause of early human evolution from Africa to Asia and later into Eurasia. The richest functional foods are found in crop origin centers, housing about 70% in the world populations. Crop origin centers have lower cancer incidence and mortality in the world, especially Central Asia, Middle East, Southwest China, India and Ethiopia. Asia and Africa with the richest anticancer crops is not only the most important evolution base of humans and origin center of anticancer functional crop, but also is the lowest mortality and incidence of cancers in the world. Cancer prevention of early human migrations was associated with functional foods from crop origin centers, especially Asia with four centers and one subcenter of crop origin, accounting for 58% of the world population. These results reveal that coevolution between human's anticancer activities associated with functional foods for crop origin centers, especially in Asia and Africa. PMID:25824728

  20. Curved Radio Jet in Center of Nearby Galaxy Complicates Picture of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New observations with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) indicate that the inner workings of active galaxies may be considerably more complex than astronomers have previously thought. Drs. Alan Roy and James Ulvestad of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, together with Drs. Edward Colbert and Andrew Wilson of the Space Telescope Science Institute and the University of Maryland, used the VLBA to image a light-year-sized radio jet in NGC 4151, a relatively nearby spiral galaxy. The jet seen by the radio telescopes is not aligned as the scientists expected, and this misalignment may require changes to theoretical models of active galactic nuclei. The astronomers presented their findings today to the American Astronomical Society meeting in Winston- Salem, North Carolina. The radio structure at the center of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151, located approximately 43 million light-years from Earth, was imaged with a resolution of better than 1 light-year. The radio images were made using the 25-meter (82-foot) telescopes of the VLBA, an array of 10 telescopes spread out over the full length and width of the United States, from the Virgin Islands to Hawaii. Seyfert galaxies are spiral galaxies that are nearby examples of galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGN), which are thought to be powered by black holes having masses millions of times greater than the Sun. They represent nearby cousins of the more distant and energetic quasars; their relative proximity to Earth permits images to be made with much finer spatial resolution than is possible for quasars. The radio images of NGC 4151 reveal a chain of knots several light years in length, separated by a few light months, which then appear to make a fairly sharp turn -- about 55 degrees -- to merge with a previously known straight radio jet about 800 light-years in length. This large-scale radio jet is nearly coincident with a complex of gas clouds imaged at optical wavelengths with

  1. Social inequalities in body weight and physical activity: exploring the role of fitness centers.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Lindsay; Rock, Melanie J; McElgunn, Jamie

    2012-03-01

    Fitness centers are a viable option for physical activity, particularly in climates with significant weather variation. Due to variation in economic and social expressions ofexclusivity, fitness centers may have some relation to social inequalities in physical inactivity and related health outcomes; thus, our objective was to explore this relation. Using publicly available data and guided by Bourdieu's theory of habitus, we classified fitness centers in Calgary, Canada, on three dimensions of exclusivity (economic, social, and appearance). We found that, although some highly exclusive centers exist, most demonstrated low exclusivity based on our dimensions. An overall contribution of centers to inequalities appears to be limited; however, caution is warranted in light of cutbacks to municipal budgets that can have an impact on publicly funded facilities.

  2. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the initial entry of hydrothermal seawater into deep levels of the oceanic crust, the effectiveness of hydrothermal circulation in cooling the crust, the geometry of hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the hydrothermal circulation and the magma chamber, the reaction of the oceanic crust with the seawater, and the identification of the hydrothermal fluid which alters a rock sample. Topics considered include the crack front, observation relevant to the crack front, the limitations of the crack front hypothesis, the observed pattern of hydrothermal alteration, the nature of the hydrothermal fluid, the physics of large scale convection, and convection through crack zones. Knowledge of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis is based on sampling of the hydrothermal fluid, indirect geophysical measurements of the oceanic crust, and studies of rocks which are believed to have undergone hydrothermal alteration at the ridge axis. Includes 2 drawings.

  3. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities in the USGS Ohio Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Shaffer, Kimberly H.

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, a quality-assurance plan has been written for use by the Ohio Water Science Center in conducting water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Ohio Water Science Center for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures documented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities are meant to complement the Ohio Water Science Center quality-assurance plans for water-quality monitors, the microbiology laboratory, and surface-water and ground-water activities.

  4. Primary centers and secondary concentrations of tectonic activity through time in the western hemisphere of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.C.; Dohm, J.M.; Golombek, M.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Franklin, B.J.; Tanaka, K.L.; Lias, J.; Peer, B.

    2001-01-01

    Five main stages of radial and concentric structures formed around Tharsis from the Noachian through the Amazonian as determined by geologic mapping of 24,452 structures within the stratigraphic framework of Mars and by testing their radial and concentric orientations. Tectonic activity peaked in the Noachian (stage 1) around the largest center, Claritas, an elongate center extending more than 20?? in latitude and defined by about half of the total grabens which are concentrated in the Syria Planum, Thaumasia, and Tempe Terra regions. During the Late Noachian and Early Hesperian (stage 2), extensional structures formed along the length of present-day Valles Marineris and in Thaumasia (with a secondary concentration near Warrego Vallis) radial to a region just to the south of the central margin of Valles Marineris. Early Hesperian (stage 3) radial grabens in Pavonis, Syria, Ulysses, and Tempe Terra and somewhat concentric wrinkle ridges in Lunae and Solis Plana and in Thaumasia, Sirenum, Memnonia, and Amazonis are centered northwest of Syria with secondary centers at Thaumasia, Tempe Terra, Ulysses Fossae, and western Valles Marineris. Late Hesperian/Early Amazonian (stage 4) structures around Alba Patera, the northeast trending alignment of Tharsis Montes, and Olympus Mons appears centered on Alba Patera. Stage 5 structures (Middle-Late Amazonian) represent the last pulse of Tharsis-related activity and are found around the large shield volcanoes and are centered near Pavonis Mons. Tectonic activity around Tharsis began in the Noachian and generally decreased through geologic time to the Amazonian. Statistically significant radial distributions of structures formed during each stage, centered at different locations within the higher elevations of Tharsis. Secondary centers of radial structures during many of the stages appear related to previously identified local magmatic centers that formed at different times and locations throughout Tharsis. Copyright 2001 by

  5. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W. |

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  6. Learner-Centered Activities from the DVD-Format "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Li-Yun

    This paper demonstrates how Taiwanese English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) college teachers and students collaborate and negotiate to design various learner-centered activities based on the Chinese film, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." These activities are intended to enhance students' listening and speaking abilities. The paper demonstrates eight…

  7. Active-Learning versus Teacher-Centered Instruction for Learning Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of "acids and bases". Sample: The sample of this study was…

  8. Activities. A Collection of Things to Do at the Environmental Learning Center, Isabella, Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Learning Center, Isabella, Minn.

    A collection of activities used successfully at the Environmental Learning Center in Isabella, Minnesota, are contained in this guide. Areas of study are perception and communication, mapping, weather, snow, soil, aquatics, trees, and animals. Within these areas is a number of related activities, each to be adapted to the appropriate grade level.…

  9. SPECIAL ACTIVITIES SUPPLEMENTAL TO AND RELATED TO THE ART PROGRAM AT DEEP RIVER OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary City Public School System, IN.

    A CURRICULUM GUIDE DEALING WITH VARIOUS SUBJECT AREAS WAS PREPARED FOR POSSIBLE STUDY ACTIVITIES THAT WOULD USE THE LEARNING RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT THE DEEP RIVER OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTER IN GARY, INDIANA. ACTIVITIES GUIDES ARE PRESENTED FOR (1) ART ACTITIVIES RELATED TO DESIGN, COLOR, LANDSCAPE REPRESENTATION, PAPER CONSTRUCTION, DRAWING, PRINT…

  10. A Work Sampling Study of Provider Activities in School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavis, Brian; Pearson, Rachel; Stewart, Gail; Keefe, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe provider activities in a convenience sample of School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs). The goal was to determine the relative proportion of time that clinic staff engaged in various patient care and non-patient care activities. Methods: All provider staff at 4 urban SBHCs participated in this…

  11. Excellence in Physics Education Award: SCALE-UP, Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) Project combines curricula and a specially-designed instructional space to enhance learning. SCALE-UP students practice communication and teamwork skills while performing activities that enhance their conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This can be done with small or large classes and has been implemented at more than 250 institutions. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. SCALE-UP classtime is spent primarily on ``tangibles'' and ``ponderables''--hands-on measurements/observations and interesting questions. There are also computer simulations (called ``visibles'') and hypothesis-driven labs. Students sit at tables designed to facilitate group interactions. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Impressive learning gains have been measured at institutions across the US and internationally. This talk describes today's students, how lecturing got started, what happens in a SCALE-UP classroom, and how the approach has spread. The SCALE-UP project has greatly benefitted from numerous Grants made by NSF and FIPSE to NCSU and other institutions.

  12. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Study of Lateral Spreading of Cortical Activity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex Induced by a Current Impulse

    PubMed Central

    Fehérvári, Tamás Dávid; Sawai, Hajime; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), lateral spreading of excitatory potentials is believed to be involved in spatial integrative functions, but the underlying cortical mechanism is not well understood. Visually-evoked population-level responses have been shown to propagate beyond the V1 initial activation site in mouse, similar to higher mammals. Visually-evoked responses are, however, affected by neuronal circuits prior to V1 (retina, LGN), making the separate analysis of V1 difficult. Intracortical stimulation eliminates these initial processing steps. We used in vivo RH1691 voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging and intracortical microstimulation in adult C57BL/6 mice to elucidate the spatiotemporal properties of population-level signal spreading in V1 cortical circuits. The evoked response was qualitatively similar to that measured in single-cell electrophysiological experiments in rodents: a fast transient fluorescence peak followed by a fast and a slow decrease or hyperpolarization, similar to EPSP and fast and slow IPSPs in single cells. The early cortical response expanded at speeds commensurate with long horizontal projections (at 5% of the peak maximum, 0.08–0.15 m/s) however, the bulk of the VSD signal propagated slowly (at half-peak maximum, 0.05–0.08 m/s) suggesting an important role of regenerative multisynaptic transmission through short horizontal connections in V1 spatial integrative functions. We also found a tendency for a widespread and fast cortical response suppression in V1, which was eliminated by GABAA-antagonists gabazine and bicuculline methiodide. Our results help understand the neuronal circuitry involved in lateral spreading in V1. PMID:26230520

  13. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2011-01-01

    We show that communication of single-photon quantum states in a multi-user environment is improved by using spread spectrum communication techniques. We describe a framework for spreading, transmitting, despreading, and detecting single-photon spectral states that mimics conventional spread spectrum techniques. We show in the cases of inadvertent detection, unintentional interference, and multi-user management, that quantum spread spectrum communications may minimize receiver errors by managing quantum channel access.

  14. The Spread of Aedes albopictus in Metropolitan France: Contribution of Environmental Drivers and Human Activities and Predictions for a Near Future

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Benjamin; Léger, Lucas; L’Ambert, Grégory; Lacour, Guillaume; Foussadier, Rémi; Besnard, Gilles; Barré-Cardi, Hélène; Simard, Frédéric; Fontenille, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of new territories by insect vector species that can transmit pathogens is one of the most important threats for human health. The spread of the mosquito Aedes albopictus in Europe is emblematic, because of its major role in the emergence and transmission of arboviruses such as dengue or chikungunya. Here, we modeled the spread of this mosquito species in France through a statistical framework taking advantage of a long-term surveillance dataset going back to the first observation of Ae. albopictus in the Metropolitan area. After validating the model, we show that human activities are especially important for mosquito dispersion while land use is a major factor for mosquito establishment. More importantly, we show that Ae. albopictus invasion is accelerating through time in this area, resulting in a geographic range extending further and further year after year. We also show that sporadic “jump” of Ae. albopictus in a new location far from the colonized area did not succeed in starting a new invasion front so far. Finally, we discuss on a potential adaptation to cooler climate and the risk of invasion into Northern latitudes. PMID:25962160

  15. [SCREENING OF WILD SPREAD AND CULTIVATED OF BUXUS SPECIES GROWING IN GEORGIA ON THE CONTENT OF ALKALOIDS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, N; Mchedlidze, Q; Novikova, J; Suladze, T; Vachnadze, V

    2016-07-01

    Georgian flora is represented by about 4150 plant species. Many important alkaloid-containing plant species and among of them are species Buxus L. of genus in Adjara. The aims of the research were: sequential screening of the plants for the consistence of alkaloids; Study of anatomical characteristics of Buxus colchica Pojark. and revealing of specific pharmacological activity of steroidal alkaloids. The objects of research were B. colchica, B. balearika and B. sempervirens, growing in Adjara (Georgia), collected in active phase of flowering of the plants. There were revealed 370 species of alkaloid containing plants. Sum of alkaloids and crude aqueous extract have spasmolitic and antihistaminic activity. Experimental anatomical research of diagnostic characteristics of the bines showed the existence of monocyclic transient system with fiber like tracheids, dorsoventral mesophyll of the leaves; the structure for the upper part of epidermis is linear and the lower part is curved, type of stomata is paracitic. PMID:27661282

  16. Study of spin centers in nanocrystalline titanium dioxide with a high degree of photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, E. A.; Gayvoronskiy, V. Ya.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2010-08-15

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to study the effects of illumination and changes in temperature on spin centers in nanocrystalline anatase powders synthesized by sol-gel methods with various complexing agents. A correlation between the concentration of oxygen radicals at the surface and the rate of photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds in the presence of TiO{sub 2} is observed. It is shown that the concentration of centers active in the electron spin resonance spectra can be used for monitoring the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}.

  17. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  18. DISCOVERY OF THE RECOMBINING PLASMA IN THE SOUTH OF THE GALACTIC CENTER: A RELIC OF THE PAST GALACTIC CENTER ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Nobukawa, M.; Uchida, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuru, T. G.; Koyama, K.; Murakami, H.; Uchiyama, H.

    2013-08-10

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter {sup G}C South{sup )} has an angular size of {approx}42' Multiplication-Sign 16' centered at (l, b) {approx} (0. Degree-Sign 0, - 1. Degree-Sign 4) and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at {approx}2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density Multiplication-Sign elapsed time) of 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} s cm{sup -3}. The absorption column density of GC South is consistent with that toward the GC region. Thus, GC South is likely to be located in the GC region ({approx}8 kpc distance). The size of the plasma, the mean density, and the thermal energy are estimated to be {approx}97 pc Multiplication-Sign 37 pc, 0.16 cm{sup -3}, and 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, respectively. We discuss possible origins of the recombination-dominant plasma as a relic of past activity in the GC region.

  19. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  20. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  1. A center open to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, L.; Vaquerizo, A.; García-Villadangos, M.

    2015-05-01

    The view to the public of a research center depends, of course, on the quality of its scientific activity but also, to a large extent, on the communication of results and spreading from the center itself. The Center for Astrobiology (CAB, CSIC-INTA) has maintained for some years a place among the leading Spanish scientific centers and the proof is his continued appearance in the media. In this communication we will give an overview of the activities of the Unit for Scientific Culture of CAB to achieve that goal.

  2. Integration of telencephalic Wnt and hedgehog signaling center activities by Foxg1.

    PubMed

    Danesin, Catherine; Peres, João N; Johansson, Marie; Snowden, Victoria; Cording, Amy; Papalopulu, Nancy; Houart, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    The forebrain is patterned along the dorsoventral (DV) axis by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). However, previous studies have suggested the presence of an Shh-independent mechanism. Our study identifies Wnt/beta-catenin-activated from the telencephalic roof-as an Shh-independent pathway that is essential for telencephalic pallial (dorsal) specification during neurulation. We demonstrate that the transcription factor Foxg1 coordinates the activity of two signaling centers: Foxg1 is a key downstream effector of the Shh pathway during induction of subpallial (ventral) identity, and it inhibits Wnt/beta-catenin signaling through direct transcriptional repression of Wnt ligands. This inhibition restricts the dorsal Wnt signaling center to the roof plate and consequently limits pallial identities. Concomitantly to these roles, Foxg1 controls the formation of the compartment boundary between telencephalon and basal diencephalon. Altogether, these findings identify a key direct target of Foxg1, and uncover a simple molecular mechanism by which Foxg1 integrates two opposing signaling centers.

  3. Endogenous mechanisms underlying the activation and sensitization of meningeal nociceptors: the role of immuno-vascular interactions and cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dan

    2012-06-01

    Migraine is considered one of the most prevalent neurological disorders but its underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Over the past two decades, it became widely accepted that activation of primary afferent nociceptive neurons that innervate the intracranial meninges serves as a key process that mediates the throbbing head pain of migraine. Knowledge about the endogenous factors that play a role in promoting this neural process during a migraine attack slowly begins to increase, and a better understanding remains one of the holy grails in migraine research. One endogenous process, which has been invoked as a major player in the genesis of migraine pain, is cortical spreading depression (CSD). Until recently, however, this notion was only supported by indirect evidence. Recently, electrophysiological data provided the first direct evidence that CSD is indeed a powerful endogenous process that can lead to persistent activation of meningeal nociceptors and the migraine pain pathway. CSD has been suggested to promote persistent sensitization and ensuing activation of meningeal nociceptors through a mechanism involving local neurogenic inflammation including the activation of mast cells and macrophages and subsequent release of inflammatory mediators. Local action of such nociceptive mediators can increase the responsiveness of meningeal nociceptors. Recent studies provided key experimental data implicating complex meningeal immuno-vascular interactions, in particular, the interplay between proinflammatory cytokines, the meningeal vasculature and immune cells, in enhancing the responses of meningeal nociceptors.

  4. The effects of hip external rotator exercises and toe-spread exercises on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking in subjects with pronated foot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toe-spread (TS) exercises and hip external rotator strengthening exercises for pronated feet on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy adults with no present or previous pain, no past history of surgery on the foot or the ankle, and no foot deformities. Ten subjects performed hip external rotator strengthening exercises and TS exercises and the remaining ten subjects performed only TS exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] Less change in navicular drop height occurred in the group that performed hip external rotator exercises than in the group that performed only TS exercises. The group that performed only TS exercises showed increased abductor hallucis muscle activity during both stair-climbing and -descending, and the group that performed hip external rotator exercises showed increased muscle activities of the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis during stair-climbing and increased muscle activity of only the abductor hallucis during stair-descending after exercise. [Conclusion] Stair-walking can be more effectively performed if the hip external rotator muscle is strengthened when TS exercises are performed for the pronated foot. PMID:27134364

  5. The potential role of an unregulated coastal anthropogenic activity in facilitating the spread of a non-indigenous biofoulant.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Eilir Hedd; Richardson, Christopher Alan

    2012-01-01

    Despite an exponential rise in anthropogenically-mediated transfers of non-indigenous species during the last 150 years, several coastal anthropogenic activities remain unregulated under current legislation frameworks. This study investigates the potential role of commercial periwinkle (Littorina littorea) harvesting as an unregulated facilitator of both small- and large-scale geographic range expansion of an invasive oyster epibiont (Ostrea chilensis) within the Menai Strait (North Wales, UK) and beyond. The frequency of oyster-fouled periwinkles was greatest in areas of high adult oyster abundance and restricted to large, market-sized periwinkles (>20 mm) inhabiting the low shore. Active efforts by commercial collectors to reject oyster-fouled periwinkles were found to be inadequate, with oysters of all sizes observed within collected hauls. Whilst the survival of fouled and unfouled periwinkles was comparable under post-collection refrigerated conditions, a significant decrease in both mobility and flesh content was associated with the presence of oyster epibionts. Survival of all but the smallest oyster epibionts under post-collection refrigerated conditions enhances the possibility of accidental non-indigenous oyster transfers. Better interventions during both initial visual inspection and post-griddling stages are recommended, as well as the development of techniques that kill off all non-indigenous epibionts, whilst leaving the freshness and marketability of the periwinkles uncompromised.

  6. The potential role of an unregulated coastal anthropogenic activity in facilitating the spread of a non-indigenous biofoulant.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Eilir Hedd; Richardson, Christopher Alan

    2012-01-01

    Despite an exponential rise in anthropogenically-mediated transfers of non-indigenous species during the last 150 years, several coastal anthropogenic activities remain unregulated under current legislation frameworks. This study investigates the potential role of commercial periwinkle (Littorina littorea) harvesting as an unregulated facilitator of both small- and large-scale geographic range expansion of an invasive oyster epibiont (Ostrea chilensis) within the Menai Strait (North Wales, UK) and beyond. The frequency of oyster-fouled periwinkles was greatest in areas of high adult oyster abundance and restricted to large, market-sized periwinkles (>20 mm) inhabiting the low shore. Active efforts by commercial collectors to reject oyster-fouled periwinkles were found to be inadequate, with oysters of all sizes observed within collected hauls. Whilst the survival of fouled and unfouled periwinkles was comparable under post-collection refrigerated conditions, a significant decrease in both mobility and flesh content was associated with the presence of oyster epibionts. Survival of all but the smallest oyster epibionts under post-collection refrigerated conditions enhances the possibility of accidental non-indigenous oyster transfers. Better interventions during both initial visual inspection and post-griddling stages are recommended, as well as the development of techniques that kill off all non-indigenous epibionts, whilst leaving the freshness and marketability of the periwinkles uncompromised. PMID:22794077

  7. Introductory Astronomy Student-Centered Active Learning at The George Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    The Physics Department at the George Washington University has been successfully using student-centered active learning (SCALE-UP) in physics classes since 2008. In Fall 2011, we began implementing introductory (non-majors) astronomy classes taught in the student-centered active learning mode. Class time is devoted to engaging in hands-on activities and laboratories, and tackling thought-provoking questions and problems. Students work together in small groups to gain a deeper understanding of the material. Multiple instructors circulate to answer questions and engage students in additional contemplation of the material. Research has shown that students who are engaged in this manner have an increased conceptual understanding and are better able to solve problems. This talk will describe our methods, our successes and the associated challenges of integrating active learning into courses entitled “Stars, Planets and Life” and “Introduction to the Cosmos.”

  8. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  9. Nature of methane activation over oxide centers. Annual report, September 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.; Agarwal, S.K.; Migone, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane was studied over alkali-promoted antimony oxide and lead-magnesia catalysts. Reaction studies were used in conjunction with bulk and surface characterization of the catalysts to attempt to characterize the active centers. It was found that both acidity and availability of strong oxidizing sites can influence the selectivities of the various products of the reaction.

  10. Students´ Perspectives on eLearning Activities in Person-Centered, Blended Learning Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselberger, David; Motsching, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Blended or hybrid learning has become a frequent practice in higher education. In this article our primary research interest was to find out how students perceived eLearning activities in blended learning courses based on the person-centered paradigm. Through analyzing the content of a series of semi-structured interviews we found out that…

  11. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  12. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  13. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  14. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  15. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE...

  16. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE...

  17. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE...

  18. Can Physical Education and Physical Activity Outcomes Be Developed Simultaneously Using a Game-Centered Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Andrew; Christensen, Erin; Eather, Narelle; Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John; Keay, Jeanne; Lubans, David

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a pilot intervention using a game-centered approach for improvement of physical activity (PA) and physical education (PE) outcomes simultaneously, and if this had an impact on enjoyment of PE. A group-randomized controlled trial with a 7-week wait-list control group was conducted…

  19. Individual Information-Centered Approach for Handling Physical Activity Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Minsoo; Rowe, David A.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Robinson, Terrance S.; Mahar, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate individual information (II)-centered methods for handling missing data, using data samples of 118 middle-aged adults and 91 older adults equipped with Yamax SW-200 pedometers and Actigraph accelerometers for 7 days. We used a semisimulation approach to create six data sets: three physical activity outcome…

  20. Fuel cycle centers revisited: Consolidation of fuel cycle activities in a few countries

    SciTech Connect

    Kratzer, M.B.

    1996-07-01

    Despite varied expressions, the general impression remains that the international fuel cycle center concept, whatever its merits, is visionary. It also is quite possibly unattainable in light of strong national pressures toward independence and self-sufficiency in all things nuclear. Is the fuel cycle center an idea that has come and gone? Is it an idea whose time has not yet come? Or is it, as this paper suggests, an idea that has already arrived on the scene, attracting little attention or even acknowledgement of its presence? The difficult in answering this questions arises, in part, from the fact that despite its long and obvious appeal, there has been very little systematic analysis of the concept itself. Such obvious questions as how many and where fuel cycle centers should be located; what characteristics should the hot country or countries possess; and what are the institutional forms or features that endow the concept with enhanced proliferation protection have rarely been seriously and systematically addressed. The title of this paper focuses on limiting the geographic spread of fuel cycle facilities, and some may suggest that doing so does not necessarily call for any type of international or multinational arrangements applicable to those that exist. It is a premise of this paper, however, that a restriction on the number of countries possessing sensitive fuel cycle facilities necessarily involves some degree of multinationalization. This is not only because in every instance a nonproliferation pledge and international or multinational safeguards, or both, will be applied to the facility, but also because a restriction on the number of countries possessing these facilities implies that those in existence will serve a multinational market. This feature in itself is an important form of international auspices. Thus, the two concepts--limitation and multinationalization--if not necessarily one and the same, are at least de facto corollaries.

  1. Allosteric mutants show that PrfA activation is dispensable for vacuole escape but required for efficient spread and Listeria survival in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deshayes, Caroline; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Cain, Robert J; Scortti, Mariela; de las Heras, Aitor; Pietras, Zbigniew; Luisi, Ben F; Núñez Miguel, Ricardo; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator PrfA controls key virulence determinants of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. PrfA-dependent gene expression is strongly induced within host cells. While the basis of this activation is unknown, the structural homology of PrfA with the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the finding of constitutively activated PrfA* mutants suggests it may involve ligand-induced allostery. Here, we report the identification of a solvent-accessible cavity within the PrfA N-terminal domain that may accommodate an activating ligand. The pocket occupies a similar position to the cAMP binding site in Crp but lacks the cyclic nucleotide-anchoring motif and has its entrance on the opposite side of the β-barrel. Site-directed mutations in this pocket impaired intracellular PrfA-dependent gene activation without causing extensive structural/functional alterations to PrfA. Two substitutions, L48F and Y63W, almost completely abolished intracellular virulence gene induction and thus displayed the expected phenotype for allosteric activation-deficient PrfA mutations. Neither PrfAallo substitution affected vacuole escape and initial intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes in epithelial cells and macrophages but caused defective cell-to-cell spread and strong attenuation in mice. Our data support the hypothesis that PrfA is allosterically activated during intracellular infection and identify the probable binding site for the effector ligand. They also indicate that PrfA allosteric activation is not required for early intracellular survival but is essential for full Listeria virulence and colonization of host tissues. PMID:22646689

  2. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  3. Paris Observatory Analysis Center (OPAR): Report on Activities, January - December 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Sebastien; Barache, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We report on activities of the Paris Observatory VLBI Analysis Center (OPAR) for calendar year 2012 concerning the development of operational tasks, the development of our Web site, and various other activities: monitoring of the Earth's free core nutation, measuring of the post-seismic displacements of some stations, and the analysis of the recent IVS R&D sessions, including observations of quasars close to the Sun.

  4. Subduction of the South Chile active spreading ridge: A 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Arnaud, N.; Guivel, C.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Scalabrino, B.; Espinoza, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4-3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  5. Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Report on Activities (UCLA/MIT), 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Carter

    2011-04-18

    The final 'phaseout' year of the CMPD ended July 2010; a no cost extension was requested until May 2011 in order to enable the MIT subcontract funds to be fully utilized. Research progress over this time included verification and validation activities for the BOUT and BOUT++ code, studies of spontaneous reconnection in the VTF facility at MIT, and studies of the interaction between Alfven waves and drift waves in LAPD. The CMPD also hosted the 6th plasma physics winter school in 2010 (jointly with the NSF frontier center the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, significant funding came from NSF for this most recent iteration of the Winter School).

  6. Introductory Astronomy Student-Centered Active Learning at the George Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, B. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Physics Department at the George Washington University has been successfully using student-centered active learning (SCALE-UP) in physics classes since 2008. Recently (since fall 2011), we have been developing and implementing introductory (non-majors) astronomy classes taught in the student-centered active learning mode. Class time is devoted to engaging in hands-on activities and laboratories and tackling questions and problems in a workbook. Students work in small groups, and multiple instructors circulate to answer questions and engage students in the material. Research has shown that students who are engaged in this manner have an increased conceptual understanding of the material. In developing our “Stars, Planets and Life” course into an interactive class, we encountered many challenges, but there have also been positive outcomes. Improvements to this class are ongoing, and in fall of 2013 we will begin full implementation of SCALE-UP in our “Introduction to the Cosmos” course.

  7. Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  8. Design of an experiment to study optically-active centers in diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ankit; Tiwari, Kunal; Sharma, Suresh

    2012-03-01

    The silicon-vacancy (SiV) and nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes in diamond nanoparticles (NPs) are optically active centers, which produce single photon events. These centers may be formed when a silicon atom from the silicon substrate often used in CVD growth or nitrogen from impurities in the feed gas ends up next to a vacancy in the diamond lattice. Because of their stability and high quantum efficiency, SiV and NV centers in diamond NPs are attractive for applications in quantum computing, optics, biotechnology, and medicine. We briefly review our recently published results on diamond NPs, describe the design of an experimental system for carrying out in-situ optical spectroscopy and time-correlation measurements, and show preliminary photoluminescence data.

  9. Earth Science Data Archive and Access at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), as an integral part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), is the official source of data for several important earth remote sensing missions. These include the Sea-viewing Wide-Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) launched in August 1997, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) launched in November 1997, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) scheduled for launch in mid 1999 as part of the EOS AM-1 instrumentation package. The data generated from these missions supports a host of users in the hydrological, land biosphere and oceanographic research and applications communities. The volume and nature of the data present unique challenges to an Earth science data archive and distribution system such as the DAAC. The DAAC system receives, archives and distributes a large number of standard data products on a daily basis, including data files that have been reprocessed with updated calibration data or improved analytical algorithms. A World Wide Web interface is provided allowing interactive data selection and automatic data subscriptions as distribution options. The DAAC also creates customized and value-added data products, which allow additional user flexibility and reduced data volume. Another significant part of our overall mission is to provide ancillary data support services and archive support for worldwide field campaigns designed to validate the results from the various satellite-derived measurements. In addition to direct data services, accompanying documentation, WWW links to related resources, support for EOSDIS data formats, and informed response to inquiries are routinely provided to users. The current GDAAC WWW search and order system is being restructured to provide users with a simplified, hierarchical access to data. Data Browsers have been developed for several data sets to aid users in ordering data. These Browsers allow users to specify

  10. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  11. Distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by myoglobin with a designed heme active center.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Du, Ke-Jie; Gao, Shu-Qin; He, Bo; Wen, Ge-Bo; Tan, Xiangshi; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse biological functions, of which myoglobin (Mb) is a representative protein. In this study, the O2 carrier Mb was shown to cleave double stranded DNA upon aerobic dithiothreitol-induced reduction, which is fine-tuned by an additional distal histidine, His29 or His43, engineered in the heme active center. Spectroscopic (UV-vis and EPR) and inhibition studies suggested that free radicals including singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are responsible for efficient DNA cleavage via an oxidative cleavage mechanism. On the other hand, L29E Mb, with a distinct heme active center involving three water molecules in the met form, was found to exhibit an excellent DNA cleavage activity that was not depending on O2. Inhibition and ligation studies demonstrated for the first time that L29E Mb cleaves double stranded DNA into both the nicked circular and linear forms via a hydrolytic cleavage mechanism, which resembles native endonucleases. This study provides valuable insights into the distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by heme proteins, and lays down a base for creating artificial DNA endonucleases by rational design of heme proteins. Moreover, this study suggests that the diverse functions of heme proteins can be fine-tuned by rational design of the heme active center with a hydrogen-bonding network.

  12. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.

  13. Flame spread across liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William

    1995-01-01

    Recent reviews of our understanding of flame spread across liquids show that there are many unresolved issues regarding the phenomenology and causal mechanisms affecting ignition susceptibility, flame spread characteristics, and flame spread rates. One area of discrepancy is the effect of buoyancy in both the uniform and pulsating spread regimes. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity (1g) and microgravity (micro g) experiments; and (2) numerical modeling at different gravitational levels. Of special interest to this work, as discussed at the previous workshop, is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread occurs in micro g. Microgravity offers a unique ability to modify and control the gas-phase flow pattern by utilizing a forced air flow over the pool surface.

  14. The spreading of disorder.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Kees; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Steg, Linda

    2008-12-12

    Imagine that the neighborhood you are living in is covered with graffiti, litter, and unreturned shopping carts. Would this reality cause you to litter more, trespass, or even steal? A thesis known as the broken windows theory suggests that signs of disorderly and petty criminal behavior trigger more disorderly and petty criminal behavior, thus causing the behavior to spread. This may cause neighborhoods to decay and the quality of life of its inhabitants to deteriorate. For a city government, this may be a vital policy issue. But does disorder really spread in neighborhoods? So far there has not been strong empirical support, and it is not clear what constitutes disorder and what may make it spread. We generated hypotheses about the spread of disorder and tested them in six field experiments. We found that, when people observe that others violated a certain social norm or legitimate rule, they are more likely to violate other norms or rules, which causes disorder to spread.

  15. Morphotectonic fabrics of major spreading centers, subduction zones and transform faults in the southern hemisphere -Beagle 2003 cruise by R/V Mirai the round trip in the southern hemisphere-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, W.; Fujioka, K.; Kimura, R.; Okumura, S.; Fujiwara, T.

    2004-12-01

    Precise bathymetric surveys of the world ocean has been made it possible to establish continental drift, sea-floor spearheading and plate tectonics. However the data have mostly been restricted from the oceans in the northern hemisphere. The precise submarine bathymetric data from the southern hemisphere are quite scarce because of the long distance from the major countries and of being always severe sea conditions with bad weather for the bathymetric swath mapping. Well-surveyed areas of the southern hemisphere are the Indian triple junction, SW and SE Indian Ridges, Southern East Pacific Rise from 13\\deg S to 20\\deg S and Scotia arc-trench-backarc system. We had not been known about the vast area of the southern hemisphere. We had a bathymetric survey around the southern hemisphere during the cruise of BEAGLE 2003. The project BEAGLE 2003 started from Brisbane, on 2003 Aug and ended at Fremantle, on Feb 2004 with a great success. In the South Pacific Ocean the line crosses on the 28\\deg S - 32.5\\deg S latitude from Brisbane to Valparaiso via Papeete and in the South Atlantic Ocean on the 30\\deg S latitude from Santos to Cape Town and in the Indian Ocean on the 20\\deg S latitude from Madagascar to Fremantle via Mauritius Island, respectively. We had a precise bathymetric survey by using the narrow multi beam system (SeaBeam 2112) that is installed in the JAMSTEC R/V Mirai. Bathymetric survey lines cross the Tonga-Kermadec Arc-Trench and backarc system, Louisville Ridge, East Pacific Rise spreading center, Peru-Chile Trench, southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Central Indian Ridge, Ninety East ridge and many other oceanic plateaus and seamounts. We had obtained a narrow band data on the morphologic features of the ridges, trenches, seamounts and oceanic plateaus and we compared the data with those from ETOPO2 that was distributed by Sandwell and Smith (1996). These data offer significant information on the plate tectonics and plume tectonics if we think about the

  16. In-situ resource utilization activities at the NASA Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes theoretical and experimental research activities at the NASA Space Engineering Research Center aimed at realizing significant cost savings in space missions through the use of locally available resources. The fundamental strategy involves idea generation, scientific screening, feasibility demonstrations, small-scale process plant design, extensive testing, scale-up to realistic production rates, associated controls, and 'packaging', while maintaining sufficient flexibility to respond to national needs in terms of specific applications. Aside from training, the principal activities at the Center include development of a quantitative figure-of-merit to quickly assess the overall mission impact of individual components that constantly change with advancing technologies, extensive tests on a single-cell test bed to produce oxygen from carbon dioxide, and the use of this spent stream to produce methane.

  17. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  18. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bloxham, Saul; Barter, Phil; Scragg, Slafka; Peers, Charles; Jane, Ben; Layden, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person's Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. PMID:27417616

  19. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bloxham, Saul; Barter, Phil; Scragg, Slafka; Peers, Charles; Jane, Ben; Layden, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years) completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in back strength (23%), aerobic fitness (23%), negative wellbeing (32%) and disability (16%). Person’s Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93). It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP. PMID:27417616

  20. Features of the electronic structure of the active center of an HbS molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D. Yu.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Features of the electronic structure of the nonprotein part of the mutant form of the human hemoglobin molecule, HbS, are studied along with the magnetic state of the iron ion that is the "nucleus" of the active center of the molecule. It is found that the mutant form of the HbS molecule differs from a normal hemoglobin molecule by the distortion of the local environment of the iron ion, which changes the energy level splitting by a crystal field. As a result of ab initio calculations, the magnetic transition in the iron atom from the high-spin state to the low-spin state upon the addition of molecular oxygen to hemoglobin molecule is reproduced. It is established for the first time that a change in the crystal and electronic structure of the active center as a result of a mutation can lead to a substantial change in the energy of the bond between the active center of the hemoglobin molecule and an oxygen molecule.

  1. Spreading depolarization in the brain of Drosophila is induced by inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase and mitigated by a decrease in activity of protein kinase G.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rodríguez, Esteban C; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-09-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is characterized by a massive redistribution of ions accompanied by an arrest in electrical activity that slowly propagates through neural tissue. It has been implicated in numerous human pathologies, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, and thus the elucidation of control mechanisms underlying the phenomenon could have many health benefits. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of SD in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model system, whereby cellular mechanisms can be dissected using molecular genetic approaches. Propagating waves of SD were reliably induced by disrupting the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o), either directly or by inhibition of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with ouabain. The disturbance was monitored by recording the characteristic surges in [K(+)]o using K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes or by monitoring brain activity by measuring direct current potential. With the use of wild-type flies, we show that young adults are more resistant to SD compared with older adults, evidenced by shorter bouts of SD activity and attenuated [K(+)]o disturbances. Furthermore, we show that the susceptibility to SD differs between wild-type flies and w1118 mutants, demonstrating that our ouabain model is influenced by genetic strain. Lastly, flies with low levels of protein kinase G (PKG) had increased latencies to onset of both ouabain-induced SD and anoxic depolarization compared with flies with higher levels. Our findings implicate the PKG pathway as a modulator of SD in the fly brain, and given the conserved nature of the signaling pathway, it could likely play a similar role during SD in the mammalian central nervous system. PMID:27358319

  2. How does spreading depression spread? Physiology and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zandt, Bas-jan; ten Haken, Bennie; van Putten, Michel J A M; Dahlem, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a wave phenomenon in gray matter tissue. Locally, it is characterized by massive redistribution of ions across cell membranes. As a consequence, there is sustained membrane depolarization and tissue polarization that depress any normal electrical activity. Despite these dramatic events, SD remains difficult to observe in humans noninvasively, which, for long, has slowed advances in this field. The growing appreciation of its clinical importance in migraine and stroke is therefore consistent with an increasing need for computational methods that tackle the complexity of the problem at multiple levels. In this review, we focus on mathematical tools to investigate the question of spread and its two complementary aspects: What are the physiological mechanisms and what is the spatial extent of SD in the cortex? This review discusses two types of models used to study these two questions, namely, Hodgkin-Huxley type and generic activator-inhibitor models, and the recent advances in techniques to link them.

  3. How does spreading depression spread? Physiology and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zandt, Bas-jan; ten Haken, Bennie; van Putten, Michel J A M; Dahlem, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a wave phenomenon in gray matter tissue. Locally, it is characterized by massive redistribution of ions across cell membranes. As a consequence, there is sustained membrane depolarization and tissue polarization that depress any normal electrical activity. Despite these dramatic events, SD remains difficult to observe in humans noninvasively, which, for long, has slowed advances in this field. The growing appreciation of its clinical importance in migraine and stroke is therefore consistent with an increasing need for computational methods that tackle the complexity of the problem at multiple levels. In this review, we focus on mathematical tools to investigate the question of spread and its two complementary aspects: What are the physiological mechanisms and what is the spatial extent of SD in the cortex? This review discusses two types of models used to study these two questions, namely, Hodgkin-Huxley type and generic activator-inhibitor models, and the recent advances in techniques to link them. PMID:25719306

  4. Flame Spread Across Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Sirignano, William A.; Schiller, David

    1997-01-01

    The principal goal of our recent research on flame spread across liquid pools is the detailed identification of the mechanisms that control the rate and nature of flame spread when the liquid pool is initially at an isothermal bulk temperature that is below the fuel's flash point temperature. In our project, we specialize the subject to highlight the roles of buoyancy-related processes regarding the mechanisms of flame spread, an area of research cited recently by Linan and Williams as one that needs further attention and which microgravity (micro-g) experiments could help to resolve. Toward resolving the effects of buoyancy on this flame spread problem, comparisons - between 1-g and micro-g experimental observations, and between model predictions and experimental data at each of these gravitational levels - are extensively utilized. The present experimental and computational foundation is presented to support identification of the mechanisms that control flame spread in the pulsating flame spread regime for which long-duration, micro-g flame spread experiments have been conducted aboard a sounding rocket.

  5. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  6. Cryogenic wind-tunnel model technology development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P., Jr.; Bradshaw, J. F.; Rush, H. F., Jr.; Wallace, J. W.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current cryogenic wind-tunnel model technology development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These research and development activities are being conducted in support of the design and fabrication of models for the new National Transonic Facility (NTF). The scope and current status of major research and development work is described and where available, data are presented from various investigations conducted to date. In addition, design and fabrication experience for existing developmental models to be tested in the NTF is discussed.

  7. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  8. Activities of the Japanese space weather forecast center at Communications Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Watari, Shinichi; Tomita, Fumihiko

    2002-12-01

    The International Space Environment Service (ISES) is an international organization for space weather forecasts and belongs to the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). There are eleven ISES forecast centers in the world, and Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) runs the Japanese one. We make forecasts on the space environment and deliver them over the phones and through the Internet. Our forecasts could be useful for human activities in space. Currently solar activity is near maximum phase of the solar cycle 23. We report the several large disturbances of space environment occurred in 2001, during which low-latitude auroras were observed several times in Japan. PMID:12793730

  9. Activities of the Japanese space weather forecast center at Communications Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Watari, Shinichi; Tomita, Fumihiko

    2002-12-01

    The International Space Environment Service (ISES) is an international organization for space weather forecasts and belongs to the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). There are eleven ISES forecast centers in the world, and Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) runs the Japanese one. We make forecasts on the space environment and deliver them over the phones and through the Internet. Our forecasts could be useful for human activities in space. Currently solar activity is near maximum phase of the solar cycle 23. We report the several large disturbances of space environment occurred in 2001, during which low-latitude auroras were observed several times in Japan.

  10. KDD Services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Mack, Robert; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) processes, stores and distributes earth science data from a variety of remote sensing satellites. End users of the data range from instrument scientists to global change and climate researchers to federal agencies and foreign governments. Many of these users apply data mining techniques to large volumes of data (up to 1 TB) received from the GES DAAC. However, rapid advances in processing power are enabling increases in data processing that are outpacing tape drive performance and network capacity. As a result, the proportion of data that can be distributed to users continues to decrease. As mitigation, we are migrating more data mining and mining preparation activities into the data center in order to reduce the data volume that needs to be distributed and to offer the users a more useful and manageable product. This migration of activities faces a number of technical and human-factor challenges. As data reduction and mining algorithms are normally quite specific to the user's research needs, the user's algorithm must be integrated virtually unchanged into the archive environment. Also, the archive itself is busy with everyday data archive and distribution activities and cannot be dedicated to, or even impacted by, the mining activities. Therefore, we schedule KDD 'campaigns' (similar to reprocessing campaigns), during which we schedule a wholesale retrieval of specific data products, offering users the opportunity to extract information from the data being retrieved during the campaign.

  11. Quality-assurance plan for groundwater activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozar, Mark D.; Kahle, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the standard procedures, policies, and field methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Washington Water Science Center staff for activities related to the collection, processing, analysis, storage, and publication of groundwater data. This groundwater quality-assurance plan changes through time to accommodate new methods and requirements developed by the Washington Water Science Center and the USGS Office of Groundwater. The plan is based largely on requirements and guidelines provided by the USGS Office of Groundwater, or the USGS Water Mission Area. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process. Because numerous policy memoranda have been issued by the Office of Groundwater since the previous groundwater quality assurance plan was written, this report is a substantial revision of the previous report, supplants it, and contains significant additional policies not covered in the previous report. This updated plan includes information related to the organization and responsibilities of USGS Washington Water Science Center staff, training, safety, project proposal development, project review procedures, data collection activities, data processing activities, report review procedures, and archiving of field data and interpretative information pertaining to groundwater flow models, borehole aquifer tests, and aquifer tests. Important updates from the previous groundwater quality assurance plan include: (1) procedures for documenting and archiving of groundwater flow models; (2) revisions to procedures and policies for the creation of sites in the Groundwater Site Inventory database; (3) adoption of new water-level forms to be used within the USGS Washington Water Science Center; (4) procedures for future creation of borehole geophysics, surface geophysics, and aquifer-test archives; and (5) use of the USGS Multi Optional Network Key Entry System software for entry of routine water-level data

  12. Working together may be better: activation of reward centers during a cooperative maze task.

    PubMed

    Krill, Austen L; Platek, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Humans use theory of mind when predicting the thoughts and feelings and actions of others. There is accumulating evidence that cooperation with a computerized game correlates with a unique pattern of brain activation. To investigate the neural correlates of cooperation in real-time we conducted an fMRI hyperscanning study. We hypothesized that real-time cooperation to complete a maze task, using a blind-driving paradigm, would activate substrates implicated in theory of mind. We also hypothesized that cooperation would activate neural reward centers more than when participants completed the maze themselves. Of interest and in support of our hypothesis we found left caudate and putamen activation when participants worked together to complete the maze. This suggests that cooperation during task completion is inherently rewarding. This finding represents one of the first discoveries of a proximate neural mechanism for group based interactions in real-time, which indirectly supports the social brain hypothesis.

  13. Reactive spreading in ceramic/metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2000-11-06

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated mechanistically. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the steps involved in spreading are outlined to permit comparison to the steps in the compound formation that typically accompanies reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. They can all be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. This analysis plus assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than commonly believed, and perhaps is the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the slow spreading rates plus the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  14. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  15. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kristen A; Kendeigh, Cassandra A; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Sherman, Susan N

    2012-02-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don't like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher. PMID:21804083

  16. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3–5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children’s physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don’t like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher. PMID:21804083

  17. Water-containing hydrogen-bonding network in the active center of channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shota; Kato, Hideaki E; Taniguchi, Reiya; Iwata, Tatsuya; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) functions as a light-gated ion channel in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Passive transport of cations by ChR is fundamentally different from the active transport by light-driven ion pumps such as archaerhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin. These microbial rhodopsins are important tools for optogenetics, where ChR is used to activate neurons by light, while the ion pumps are used for neural silencing. Ion-transport functions by these rhodopsins strongly depend on the specific hydrogen-bonding networks containing water near the retinal chromophore. In this work, we measured protein-bound water molecules in a chimeric ChR protein of ChR1 (helices A to E) and ChR2 (helices F and G) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy at 77 K. We found that the active center of ChR possesses more water molecules (9 water vibrations) than those of other microbial (2-6 water vibrations) and animal (6-8 water vibrations) rhodopsins. We conclude that the protonated retinal Schiff base interacts with the counterion (Glu162) directly, without the intervening water molecule found in proton-pumping microbial rhodopsins. The present FTIR results and the recent X-ray structure of ChR reveal a unique hydrogen-bonding network around the active center of this light-gated ion channel. PMID:24512107

  18. A 1.5 Ma record of plume-ridge interaction at the Western Galápagos Spreading Center (91°40‧-92°00‧W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Antje; Hauff, Folkmar; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; White, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Shallow (elevated) portions of mid-ocean ridges with enriched geochemical compositions near hotspots document the interaction of hot, geochemically-enriched plume mantle with shallow depleted upper mantle. Whereas the spatial variations in geochemical composition of ocean crust along the ridge axis in areas where plume-ridge interaction is taking place have been studied globally, only restricted information exists concerning temporal variations in geochemistry of ocean crust formed through plume-ridge interaction. Here we present a detailed geochemical study of 0-1.5 Ma ocean crust sampled from the Western Galápagos Spreading Center (WGSC) axis to 50 km north of the axis, an area that is presently experiencing a high influx of mantle material from the Galápagos hotspot. The tholeiitic to basaltic andesitic fresh glass and few bulk rock samples have incompatible element abundances and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions intermediate between depleted normal mid-ocean-ridge basalt (N-MORB) from >95.5°W along the WGSC and enriched lavas from the Galápagos Archipelago, displaying enriched (E-)MORB type compositions. Only limited and no systematic geochemical variations are observed with distance from the ridge axis for <1.0 Ma old WGSC crust, whereas 1.0-1.5 Ma old crust trends to more enriched isotopic compositions in 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb isotope ratios. On isotope correlation diagrams, the data set displays correlations between depleted MORB and two enriched components. Neither the geographically referenced geochemical domains of the Galápagos Archipelago nor the end members used for principal component analysis can successfully describe the observed mixing relations. Notably an off-axis volcanic cone at site DR63 has the appropriate composition to serve as the enriched component for the younger WGSC and could represent a portion of the northern part of the Galápagos plume not sampled south of the WGSC. Similar compositions to samples

  19. Influx of Different Galapagos Plume Components to the Galapagos Spreading Center: Evidence From Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf Isotope Variations in Axial Lavas Between 86W and 92.5W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauff, F.; Hanan, B.; Hoernle, K. A.; Kokfelt, T. F.; Christie, D.; Werner, R.

    2006-12-01

    We present new Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope data of basaltic glasses from the GSC between 86W and 92.5W. In this part of the ridge the main structural inventory includes an overlapping spreading center (OSC) at 87.3W, a transform fault (TF) at 91W and a series of seamount chains intersecting the GSC West of the 91W TF. The systematic transition from an axial-valley and rift morphology at axial depths of 2450 m.b.s.l. in the 86W area to an axial-high morphology at progressively shallower depths of 1500 m.b.s.l in the 90.5W area together with gradational changes in major and trace element chemistry of the axial lavas is believed to reflect increasing mantle temperature and compositional changes related to the Galapagos plume [1]. Previous work from 83W to 105W revealed a broad symmetric gradational pattern at around 91W and lead to the conclusion that this region is the main point of plume influx on the GSC [2]. Based on published isotope data Christie et al. (2005) inferred the probable existence of two enrichment peaks immediately East and West of the 91TF. Indeed, along axis variations of our new Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope data map two distinct peaks of enrichment at 92W and 90.5W, suggesting that mantle from the Galapagos hotspot enters the GSC melting zone on both sides of the 91W transform fault. Lavas from within the 91W TF are isotopically intermediate and show a distinct depletion in incompatible trace elements, which may reflect repeated melting at shallow depth of passively upwelling mantle in this unique extensional regime. At least three different components are required to generate the observed isotope correlations. When compared to the geographically distinct isotopic domains of the Galapagos islands; GSC lavas East of the 91W TF form tight correlations from the rim of the Central Galapagos domain through the Eastern Galapagos domain towards DMM. Most axial lavas and corresponding off axis seamounts West of the 91W TF have higher 87Sr/86Sr, 207Pb/204Pb, 208Pb/204Pb

  20. Characterization of in vitro antifungal activities of small and American cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos L. and V. macrocarpon Aiton) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) concentrates in sugar reduced fruit spreads.

    PubMed

    Ermis, Ertan; Hertel, Christian; Schneider, Christin; Carle, Reinhold; Stintzing, Florian; Schmidt, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    In this study, cranberry and lingonberry concentrates were added to commercial sugar-reduced fruit spreads (raspberry-Aloe vera, strawberry-guava, and strawberry-lime), and tested for their antifungal activities. Selected strains of the species Absidia glauca, Penicillium brevicompactum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, as well as xerophilic environmental isolates of the genera Penicillium and Eurotium were used for challenge testing. Initially, varying concentrations of synthetic antifungal agents, such as sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate were tested against these fungi on wort agar containing 31% fructose at different pH values. Subsequently, the experiments were conducted in fruit spreads containing different concentrations of cranberry and lingonberry concentrates. The results of this study demonstrate that these concentrates were able to inhibit growth of visible colonies of xerophilic and non-xerophilic fungi. Cranberry and lingonberry concentrates are interesting candidates for natural preservation against fungal growth in sugar reduced fruit spreads. PMID:25868124

  1. Characterization of in vitro antifungal activities of small and American cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos L. and V. macrocarpon Aiton) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) concentrates in sugar reduced fruit spreads.

    PubMed

    Ermis, Ertan; Hertel, Christian; Schneider, Christin; Carle, Reinhold; Stintzing, Florian; Schmidt, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    In this study, cranberry and lingonberry concentrates were added to commercial sugar-reduced fruit spreads (raspberry-Aloe vera, strawberry-guava, and strawberry-lime), and tested for their antifungal activities. Selected strains of the species Absidia glauca, Penicillium brevicompactum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, as well as xerophilic environmental isolates of the genera Penicillium and Eurotium were used for challenge testing. Initially, varying concentrations of synthetic antifungal agents, such as sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate were tested against these fungi on wort agar containing 31% fructose at different pH values. Subsequently, the experiments were conducted in fruit spreads containing different concentrations of cranberry and lingonberry concentrates. The results of this study demonstrate that these concentrates were able to inhibit growth of visible colonies of xerophilic and non-xerophilic fungi. Cranberry and lingonberry concentrates are interesting candidates for natural preservation against fungal growth in sugar reduced fruit spreads.

  2. Evaluation design of New York City's regulations on nutrition, physical activity, and screen time in early child care centers.

    PubMed

    Breck, Andrew; Goodman, Ken; Dunn, Lillian; Stephens, Robert L; Dawkins, Nicola; Dixon, Beth; Jernigan, Jan; Kakietek, Jakub; Lesesne, Catherine; Lessard, Laura; Nonas, Cathy; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Osuji, Thearis A; Bronson, Bernice; Xu, Ye; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the multi-method cross-sectional design used to evaluate New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's regulations of nutrition, physical activity, and screen time for children aged 3 years or older in licensed group child care centers. The Center Evaluation Component collected data from a stratified random sample of 176 licensed group child care centers in New York City. Compliance with the regulations was measured through a review of center records, a facility inventory, and interviews of center directors, lead teachers, and food service staff. The Classroom Evaluation Component included an observational and biometric study of a sample of approximately 1,400 children aged 3 or 4 years attending 110 child care centers and was designed to complement the center component at the classroom and child level. The study methodology detailed in this paper may aid researchers in designing policy evaluation studies that can inform other jurisdictions considering similar policies. PMID:25321635

  3. Activation and implementation of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.F. III

    1989-01-01

    The Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has been assigned the primary responsibility for responding to a major radiological emergency. The initial response to any radiological emergency, however, will probably be conducted under the DOE regional radiological assistance plan (RAP). If the dimensions of the crisis demand federal assistance, the following sequence of events may be anticipated: (1) DOE regional RAP response, (2) activation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assistance Center (FRMAC) requested, (3) aerial measuring systems and DOE/NV advance party respond, (4) FRMAC activated, (5) FRMAC responds to state(s) and cognizant federal agency (CFA), and (6) management of FRMAC transferred to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The paper discusses activation channels, authorization, notification, deployment, and interfaces.

  4. Daily activity and light exposure levels for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G; Jones, Geoffrey E; Glander, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of all biological rhythms, yet little is known about the role of the 24-hour luminous environment on nonhuman primate circadian patterns, making it difficult to understand the photic niche of the ancestral primate. Here we present the first data on proximate light-dark exposure and activity-rest patterns in free-ranging nonhuman primates. Four individuals each of five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center (Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta, Propithecus coquereli, Varecia rubra, and Varecia variegata variegata) were fitted with a Daysimeter-D pendant that contained light and accelerometer sensors. Our results reveal common as well as species-specific light exposure and behavior patterns. As expected, all five species were more active between sunrise and sunset. All five species demonstrated an anticipatory increase in their pre-sunrise activity that peaked at sunrise with all but V. rubra showing a reduction within an hour. All five species reduced activity during mid-day. Four of the five stayed active after sunset, but P. coquereli began reducing their activity about 2 hours before sunset. Other subtle differences in the recorded light exposure and activity patterns suggest species-specific photic niches and behaviors. The eventual application of the Daysimeter-D in the wild may help to better understand the adaptive evolution of ancestral primates.

  5. Clinical process analysis and activity-based costing at a heart center.

    PubMed

    Ridderstolpe, Lisa; Johansson, Andreas; Skau, Tommy; Rutberg, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans

    2002-08-01

    Cost studies, productivity, efficiency, and quality of care measures, the links between resources and patient outcomes, are fundamental issues for hospital management today. This paper describes the implementation of a model for process analysis and activity-based costing (ABC)/management at a Heart Center in Sweden as a tool for administrative cost information, strategic decision-making, quality improvement, and cost reduction. A commercial software package (QPR) containing two interrelated parts, "ProcessGuide and CostControl," was used. All processes at the Heart Center were mapped and graphically outlined. Processes and activities such as health care procedures, research, and education were identified together with their causal relationship to costs and products/services. The construction of the ABC model in CostControl was time-consuming. However, after the ABC/management system was created, it opened the way for new possibilities including process and activity analysis, simulation, and price calculations. Cost analysis showed large variations in the cost obtained for individual patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. We conclude that a process-based costing system is applicable and has the potential to be useful in hospital management. PMID:12118815

  6. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  7. Clinical process analysis and activity-based costing at a heart center.

    PubMed

    Ridderstolpe, Lisa; Johansson, Andreas; Skau, Tommy; Rutberg, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans

    2002-08-01

    Cost studies, productivity, efficiency, and quality of care measures, the links between resources and patient outcomes, are fundamental issues for hospital management today. This paper describes the implementation of a model for process analysis and activity-based costing (ABC)/management at a Heart Center in Sweden as a tool for administrative cost information, strategic decision-making, quality improvement, and cost reduction. A commercial software package (QPR) containing two interrelated parts, "ProcessGuide and CostControl," was used. All processes at the Heart Center were mapped and graphically outlined. Processes and activities such as health care procedures, research, and education were identified together with their causal relationship to costs and products/services. The construction of the ABC model in CostControl was time-consuming. However, after the ABC/management system was created, it opened the way for new possibilities including process and activity analysis, simulation, and price calculations. Cost analysis showed large variations in the cost obtained for individual patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. We conclude that a process-based costing system is applicable and has the potential to be useful in hospital management.

  8. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  9. JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) data availability, version 1-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and integrated water vapor. The JPL PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is the United States distribution site for Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  10. Contents of the JPL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive, version 2-91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A. (Editor); Lassanyi, Ruby A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) includes satellite data sets for the ocean sciences and global change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Parameters include sea surface height, surface wind vector, sea surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, and surface pigment concentration. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and will be the United States distribution site for the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  11. Wind tunnel productivity status and improvement activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Lawrence E.

    1996-01-01

    Over the last three years, a major effort has been underway to re-engineering the way wind tunnel testing is accomplished at the NASA Langley Research Center. This effort began with the reorganization of the LaRC and the consolidation of the management of the wind tunnels in the Aerodynamics Division under one operations branch. This paper provides an overview of the re-engineering activities and gives the status of the improvements in the wind tunnel productivity and customer satisfaction that have resulted from the new ways of working.

  12. Galactic Center gamma-ray ``excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Jovana; Dario Serpico, Pasquale; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 1052÷1053 erg roughly Script O(106) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ``steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  13. Activities in the Payload Operations Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Members of the Fluid Experiment System (FES) group monitor the progress of their experiment through video at the POCC. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administion, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  14. Activities in the Payload Operation Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between the astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  15. Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  16. Galactic Center gamma-ray ''excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    SciTech Connect

    Petrović, Jovana; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela E-mail: serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ∼ 10{sup 52}÷10{sup 53} erg roughly O(10{sup 6}) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ''steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  17. An Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation of Activities Connected with the Operation of Educational Information Service Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, C. Neil; and Others

    This one-year project produced several publications and an evaluative investigation, all having to do with the rapidly growing community of educational information centers. Over 1500 such centers were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their locations, sizes, activities, and holdings. A directory which lists and describes some four hundred…

  18. Narrowband spread spectrum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annecke, K. H.; Ottka, M.

    1984-10-01

    The available military radio frequency bands are covered very densely by the already existing conventional systems and therefore the application of bandwidth widening procedures as antijam measures will be allowed only with small spreading factors within these RF-bands. The problems arising from the random code selection for spread spectrum systems with small spreading factors are discussed. The calculations show the dependence between certain statistical properties of classes of codewords and the number of codewords available in these classes. The bit error probabilities in case of jamming by white Gaussian noise, narrowband and CW-jammers are calculated in comparison with the error probability of the class of codewords with ideal correlation properties.

  19. Mutational analysis of the active center of plant fructosyltransferases: Festuca 1-SST and barley 6-SFT.

    PubMed

    Altenbach, Denise; Nüesch, Eveline; Ritsema, Tita; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres

    2005-08-29

    The active center of the glycoside hydrolase family 32 contains the three characteristic motifs (N/S)DPNG, RDP, and EC. We replaced the N-terminal region including the (N/S)DPNG motif of barley 6-SFT (sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase) by the corresponding region of Festuca 1-SST (sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase). The chimeric enzyme, expressed in Pichia, retained the specificity of 6-SFT. Attempts to replace a larger piece at the N-terminus including also the RDP motif failed. A point mutation introduced in the RDP motif of 1-SST abolished enzymatic activity. Interestingly, point mutations of the EC-motif resulted in an enzyme which had lost the capability to form 1-kestose and glucose from sucrose but still accepted 1-kestose, producing fructose and sucrose as well as nystose.

  20. Activity of daptomycin against staphylococci collected from bloodstream infections in Spanish medical centers.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Betriu, Carmen; Culebras, Esther; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Gómez, María; López, Fátima

    2009-08-01

    We used the broth microdilution method to determine the MICs of daptomycin and 13 comparator agents against 319 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 201 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, and 183 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Isolates were consecutively collected from bloodstream infections in 39 Spanish medical centers during a 3-month period (March through May 2008). Among MRSA, 1 isolate with intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin and 6 isolates resistant to linezolid were found. Nonsusceptibility to teicoplanin was detected in 3.9% of CoNS. Daptomycin was highly active against the staphylococcal blood isolates tested-all were inhibited at the daptomycin susceptibility breakpoint of < or = 1 microg/mL. Daptomycin retained its activity against the isolates that were resistant to teicoplanin or linezolid, or that had reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. These data suggest that daptomycin could be useful for the treatment of bloodstream infections caused by staphylococci. PMID:19631100

  1. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis.

  2. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis. PMID:11442093

  3. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine is discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features are presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept is presented.

  4. Active learning and student-centered pedagogy improve student attitudes and performance in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Peter; Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years-1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change.

  5. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities. [National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  6. Active Learning and Student-centered Pedagogy Improve Student Attitudes and Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years—1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  7. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Mike; Purewal, Justin; Xu, Chunchuan; Yang, Jun; Blaser, Rachel; Sudik, Andrea; Siegel, Don; Ming, Yang; Liu, Dong'an; Chi, Hang; Gaab, Manuela; Arnold, Lena; Muller, Ulrich

    2015-06-30

    revealed cost gaps and opportunities that identified a storage system that was lower cost than a 700 bar compressed system. Finally, we led the HSECoE efforts devoted to characterizing and enhancing metal organic framework (MOF) storage materials. This report serves as a final documentation of the Ford-UM-BASF project contributions to the HSECoE during the 6-year timeframe of the Center. The activities of the HSECoE have impacted the broader goals of the DOE-EERE and USDRIVE, leading to improved understanding in the engineering of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. This knowledge is a prerequisite to the development of a commercially-viable hydrogen storage system.

  8. Home-Type Activities at the Day Care Center. (Tipos De Actividades Del Hogar En El Centro De Cuidado Diario.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaronson, May; Moberg, Patricia E.

    This paper argues that home activities comprise a valuable unplanned curriculum and that many of these activities can be transferred to the day care center. It is suggested that these activities foster a closer relationship between child and caregiver and bridge the gap between familiar home environment and novel day care setting. Home activities…

  9. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  10. Quality-assurance plan for ground-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drost, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Washington Water Science Center, for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of ground-water data. This plan serves as a guide to all Washington Water Science Center personnel involved in ground-water activities, and changes as the needs and requirements of the Washington Water Science Center and Discipline change. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process.

  11. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  12. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  13. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  14. Recent activities within the aeroservoelasticity branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  15. Recent activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  16. Sentinel-1 Data System at the Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Center (ASF DAAC) has a long history of supporting international collaborations between NASA and foreign flight agencies to promote access to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for US science research. Based on the agreement between the US and the EC, data from the Sentinel missions will be distributed by NASA through archives that mirror those established by ESA. The ASF DAAC is the designated archive and distributor for Sentinel-1 data. The data will be copied from the ESA archive to a rolling archive at the NASA Goddard center, and then pushed to a landing area at the ASF DAAC. The system at ASF DAAC will take the files as they arrive and put them through an ingest process. Ingest will populate the database with the information required to enable search and download of the data through Vertex, the ASF DAAC user interface. Metadata will be pushed to the NASA Common Metadata Repository, enabling data discovery through clients that utilize the repository. Visual metadata will be pushed to the NASA GIBS system for visualization through clients linked to that system. Data files will be archived in the DataDirect Networks (DDN) device that is the primary storage device for the ASF DAAC. A backup copy of the data will be placed in a second DDN device that serves as the disaster recovery solution for the ASF DAAC.

  17. Speckled-like Pattern in the Germinal Center (SLIP-GC), a Nuclear GTPase Expressed in Activation-induced Deaminase-expressing Lymphomas and Germinal Center B Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kathleen; Brar, Sukhdev; Ray, Madhumita; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Bolland, Silvia; Verkoczy, Laurent; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    We identified a novel GTPase, SLIP-GC, with expression limited to a few tissues, in particular germinal center B cells. It lacks homology to any known proteins, indicating that it may belong to a novel family of GTPases. SLIP-GC is expressed in germinal center B cells and in lymphomas derived from germinal center B cells such as large diffuse B cell lymphomas. In cell lines, SLIP-GC is expressed in lymphomas that express activation-induced deaminase (AID) and that likely undergo somatic hypermutation. SLIP-GC is a nuclear protein, and it localizes to replication factories. Reduction of SLIP-GC levels in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Raji and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines resulted in an increase in DNA breaks and apoptosis that was AID-dependent, as simultaneous reduction of AID abrogated the deleterious effects of SLIP-GC reduction. These results strongly suggest that SLIP-GC is a replication-related protein in germinal center B cells whose reduction is toxic to cells through an AID-dependent mechanism. PMID:19734146

  18. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  19. Implicit trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces activate brain centers involved in reward.

    PubMed

    Platek, Steven M; Krill, Austen L; Wilson, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Hamilton's (Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behavior I, II. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 7, 17-52) theory of inclusive fitness, self-facial resemblance is hypothesized as a mechanism for self-referent phenotypic matching by which humans can detect kin. To understand the mechanisms underlying pro-sociality toward self-resembling faces, we investigated the neural correlates of implicit trustworthiness ratings for self-resembling faces. Here we show that idiosyncratic trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces predict brain activation in the ventral inferior, middle and medial frontal gyri, substrates involved in reward processing. These findings demonstrate that neural reward centers are implicated in evaluating implicit pro-social behaviors toward self-resembling faces. These findings suggest that humans have evolved to use neurocomputational architecture dedicated to face processing and reward evaluation for the differentiation of kin, which drives implicit idiosyncratic affectively regulated social interactions.

  20. Global Change Data Center: Mission, Organization, Major Activities, and 2003 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Rapid, efficient access to Earth sciences data from satellites and ground validation stations is fundamental to the nation's efforts to understand the effects of global environmental changes and their implications for public policy. It becomes a bigger challenge in the future when data volumes increase from current levels to terabytes per day. Demands on data storage, data access, network throughput, processing power, and database and information management are increased by orders of magnitude, while budgets remain constant and even shrink.The Global Change Data Center's (GCDC) mission is to develop and operate data systems, generate science products, and provide archival and distribution services for Earth science data in support of the U.S. Global Change Program and NASA's Earth Sciences Enterprise. The ultimate product of the GCDC activities is access to data to support research, education, and public policy.

  1. Helmet-mounted display and associated research activities recently conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1994-06-01

    To enhance manned extravehicular activity (EVA) utilizing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)(i.e., a space suit and portable life support backpack), NASA has conducted research into implementing helmet mounted display (HMD) and related technology within its next generation of space suits. The NASA/Johnson Space Center has completed four feasibility development programs for the design and development of an EMU HMD, each resulting in the delivery of a binocular or biocular HMD breadboard unit utilizing conventional optical elements (i.e., glass lenses and beamsplitters) and/or holographic optics. Additional research into combining the use of voice recognition for astronaut 'hands- free' access to information via the HMD has also been conducted. Research conducted since 1983 will be summarized along with current shuttle EMU display enhancements. In addition, recommendations for the design of the next generation of displays for use within the EMU will be presented.

  2. Data catalog for JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digby, Susan

    1995-01-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archive at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory contains satellite data sets and ancillary in-situ data for the ocean sciences and global-change research to facilitate multidisciplinary use of satellite ocean data. Geophysical parameters available from the archive include sea-surface height, surface-wind vector, surface-wind speed, surface-wind stress vector, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric liquid water, integrated water vapor, phytoplankton pigment concentration, heat flux, and in-situ data. PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System and is the United States distribution site for TOPEX/POSEIDON data and metadata.

  3. WebQuests: creating engaging, student-centered, constructivist learning activities.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia K; Burchum, Jacqueline R; Likes, Wendy M; Jacob, Susan; Graff, J Carolyn; Driscoll, Carolyn; Britt, Teresa; Adymy, Cindy; Cowan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Students entering health professions educational programs today have grown up and grown older in an unparalleled age of computers and connectivity. Yet most of these students face challenges in applying their information technology and information literacy abilities because most of them have never received formal training, have only a limited understanding of the tools they use, and underuse those tools. WebQuests are a unique method for enhancing students' information technology and information literacy competencies. As inquiry-oriented, engaging, and student-centered activities, WebQuests promote high-level thinking and problem-solving skills. Although WebQuests are used extensively in primary and secondary educational institutions, they have received limited attention in higher education settings. The authors describe the history of WebQuests and, using examples from a series of WebQuests used in an undergraduate informatics for healthcare course, offer specific guidelines for developing relevant WebQuests for nursing education.

  4. Analysis of the access patterns at GSFC distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore; Bedet, Jean-Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been operational for more than two years. Its mission is to support existing and pre Earth Observing System (EOS) Earth science datasets, facilitate the scientific research, and test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) concepts. Over 550,000 files and documents have been archived, and more than six Terabytes have been distributed to the scientific community. Information about user request and file access patterns, and their impact on system loading, is needed to optimize current operations and to plan for future archives. To facilitate the management of daily activities, the GSFC DAAC has developed a data base system to track correspondence, requests, ingestion and distribution. In addition, several log files which record transactions on Unitree are maintained and periodically examined. This study identifies some of the users' requests and file access patterns at the GSFC DAAC during 1995. The analysis is limited to the subset of orders for which the data files are under the control of the Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) Unitree. The results show that most of the data volume ordered was for two data products. The volume was also mostly made up of level 3 and 4 data and most of the volume was distributed on 8 mm and 4 mm tapes. In addition, most of the volume ordered was for deliveries in North America although there was a significant world-wide use. There was a wide range of request sizes in terms of volume and number of files ordered. On an average 78.6 files were ordered per request. Using the data managed by Unitree, several caching algorithms have been evaluated for both hit rate and the overhead ('cost') associated with the movement of data from near-line devices to disks. The algorithm called LRU/2 bin was found to be the best for this workload, but the STbin algorithm also worked well.

  5. Information spreading on dynamic social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, information spreading on social networks has triggered an explosive attention in various disciplines. Most of previous works in this area mainly focus on discussing the effects of spreading probability or immunization strategy on static networks. However, in real systems, the peer-to-peer network structure changes constantly according to frequently social activities of users. In order to capture this dynamical property and study its impact on information spreading, in this paper, a link rewiring strategy based on the Fermi function is introduced. In the present model, the informed individuals tend to break old links and reconnect to their second-order friends with more uninformed neighbors. Simulation results on the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model with fixed recovery time T=1 indicate that the information would spread more faster and broader with the proposed rewiring strategy. Extensive analyses of the information cascade size distribution show that the spreading process of the initial steps plays a very important role, that is to say, the information will spread out if it is still survival at the beginning time. The proposed model may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of information spreading on dynamical social networks.

  6. Identification of a brain center whose activity discriminates a choice behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lau, Billy Y B; Mathur, Priya; Gould, Georgianna G; Guo, Su

    2011-02-01

    The ability to make choices and carry out appropriate actions is critical for individual survival and well-being. Choice behaviors, from hard-wired to experience-dependent, have been observed across the animal kingdom. Although differential engagement of sensory neuronal pathways is a known mechanism, neurobiological substrates in the brain that underlie choice making downstream of sensory perception are not well understood. Here, we report a behavioral paradigm in zebrafish in which a half-light/half-dark visual image evokes an innate choice behavior, light avoidance. Neuronal activity mapping using the immediate early gene c-fos reveals the engagement of distinct brain regions, including the medial zone of the dorsal telencephalic region (Dm) and the dorsal nucleus of the ventral telencephalic area (Vd), the teleost anatomical homologs of the mammalian amygdala and striatum, respectively. In animals that were subjected to the identical sensory stimulus but displayed little or no avoidance, strikingly, the Dm and Vd were not engaged, despite similar levels of activation in the brain nuclei involved in visual processing. Based on these findings and previous connectivity data, we propose a neural circuitry model in which the Dm serves as a brain center, the activity of which predicates this choice behavior in zebrafish.

  7. Evaluation of magnetic shear in off-disk center active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    The changes that projection effects produce in the evaluation of magnetic shear in off-disk center active regions by comparing angular shear calculated in image plane and heliographic coordinates are analyzed, and the procedure for properly evaluating magnetic shear by transforming the observed vector magnetic field into the heliographic system is described. This procedure is then used to evaluate magnetic shear along the magnetic neutral line in an active region that was observed on April 24, 1984 at a longitude offset of -45 deg. In particular, the number of 'critically sheared' pixels along an east-west directed segment of the neutral line in the leader sunspot group changes from 16 in the image plane magnetogram to 14 in the heliographic magnetogram. The critical shear as calculated in the image plane served as a good predictor for the location of flaring activity since the flare ribbons of the great flare of April 24 bracketed the inversion line where the critical shear was located. These results indicate that for this particular region, projection effects did not significantly affect the evaluation of critical shear.

  8. Spread spectrum image steganography.

    PubMed

    Marvel, L M; Boncelet, C R; Retter, C T

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method of digital steganography, entitled spread spectrum image steganography (SSIS). Steganography, which means "covered writing" in Greek, is the science of communicating in a hidden manner. Following a discussion of steganographic communication theory and review of existing techniques, the new method, SSIS, is introduced. This system hides and recovers a message of substantial length within digital imagery while maintaining the original image size and dynamic range. The hidden message can be recovered using appropriate keys without any knowledge of the original image. Image restoration, error-control coding, and techniques similar to spread spectrum are described, and the performance of the system is illustrated. A message embedded by this method can be in the form of text, imagery, or any other digital signal. Applications for such a data-hiding scheme include in-band captioning, covert communication, image tamperproofing, authentication, embedded control, and revision tracking.

  9. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜eαt with α proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  10. AVIRIS and TIMS data processing and distribution at the land processes distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, G. R.; Myers, J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Government has initiated the Global Change Research program, a systematic study of the Earth as a complete system. NASA's contribution of the Global Change Research Program is the Earth Observing System (EOS), a series of orbital sensor platforms and an associated data processing and distribution system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the archiving, production, and distribution system for data collected by the EOS space segment and uses a multilayer architecture for processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data. The first layer consists of the spacecraft ground stations and processing facilities that receive the raw data from the orbiting platforms and then separate the data by individual sensors. The second layer consists of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) that process, distribute, and archive the sensor data. The third layer consists of a user science processing network. The EOSDIS is being developed in a phased implementation. The initial phase, Version 0, is a prototype of the operational system. Version 0 activities are based upon existing systems and are designed to provide an EOSDIS-like capability for information management and distribution. An important science support task is the creation of simulated data sets for EOS instruments from precursor aircraft or satellite data. The Land Processes DAAC, at the EROS Data Center (EDC), is responsible for archiving and processing EOS precursor data from airborne instruments such as the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), the Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), and Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS, TIMS, and TMS are flown by the NASA-Ames Research Center ARC) on an ER-2. The ER-2 flies at 65000 feet and can carry up to three sensors simultaneously. Most jointly collected data sets are somewhat boresighted and roughly registered. The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial

  11. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and

  12. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases. PMID:26133935

  13. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael A.; Duffield, Wendell A.; Fournier, Robert O.; Giorgis, Leake W.; Janik, Cathy J.; Kahsai, Gabreab; Lowenstern, Jacob; Mariam, Kidane W.; Smith, James G.; Tesfai, Theoderos; ,

    1996-01-01

    Alid volcanic center, a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa, straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250 ??C. The history of volcanism and the high reservoir temperature indicated by the Alid fumarole gases suggest that a geothermal resource of electrical grade lies beneath the mountain. Though drilling is needed to determine subsurface conditions, the process of dome formation and the ongoing crustal spreading can create and maintain fracture permeability in the hydrothermal system that feeds the Alid fumaroles.

  14. Active-learning versus teacher-centered instruction for learning acids and bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar Sesen, Burcin; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-07-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of 'acids and bases'. Sample The sample of this study was 45 high-school students (average age 17 years) from two different classes, which were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) and control groups (n = 25), in a high school in Turkey. Design and methods A pre-test consisting of 25 items was applied to both experimental and control groups before the treatment in order to identify student prerequisite knowledge about their proficiency for learning 'acids and bases'. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the pre-test scores for groups and no significant difference was found between experimental (ME = 40.14) and control groups (MC = 41.92) in terms of mean scores (F 1,43 = 2.66, p > 0.05). The experimental group was taught using an active-learning curriculum developed by the authors and the control group was taught using traditional course content based on teacher-centered instruction. After the implementation, 'Acids and Bases Achievement Test' scores were collected for both groups. Results ANOVA results showed that students' 'Acids and Bases Achievement Test' post-test scores differed significantly in terms of groups (F 1,43 = 102.53; p < 0.05). Additionally, in this study 54 misconceptions, 14 of them not reported in the literature before, were observed in the following terms: 'acid and base theories'; 'metal and non-metal oxides'; 'acid and base strengths'; 'neutralization'; 'pH and pOH'; 'hydrolysis'; 'acid-base equilibrium'; 'buffers'; 'indicators'; and 'titration'. Based on the achievement test and individual interview results, it was found that high-school students in the experimental group had fewer misconceptions and understood the

  15. Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's Urban Research and Development Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Sugiyama, G.; Nasstrom, J.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation describes the tools and services provided by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for modeling the impacts of airborne hazardous materials. NARAC provides atmospheric plume modeling tools and services for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear airborne hazards. NARAC can simulate downwind effects from a variety of scenarios, including fires, industrial and transportation accidents, radiation dispersal device explosions, hazardous material spills, sprayers, nuclear power plant accidents, and nuclear detonations. NARAC collaborates on radiological dispersion source terms and effects models with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NARAC was designated the interim provider of capabilities for the Department of Homeland Security's Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center by the Homeland Security Council in April 2004. The NARAC suite of software tools include simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end-user's computers, and Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced modeling tools and expert analyses from the national center at LLNL. Initial automated, 3-D predictions of plume exposure limits and protective action guidelines for emergency responders and managers are available from the center in 5-10 minutes. These can be followed immediately by quality-assured, refined analyses by 24 x 7 on-duty or on-call NARAC staff. NARAC continues to refine calculations using updated on-scene information, including measurements, until all airborne releases have stopped and the hazardous threats are mapped and impacts assessed. Model predictions include the 3-D spatial and time-varying effects of weather, land use, and terrain, on scales from the local to regional to global. Real-time meteorological data and forecasts are provided by redundant communications links to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  16. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and

  17. Consequences of Rift Propagation for Spreading in Thick Oceanic Crust in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Iceland has long been considered a natural laboratory for processes related to seafloor spreading, including propagating rifts, migrating transforms and rotating microplates. The thick, hot, weak crust and subaerial processes of Iceland result in variations on the themes developed along more typical parts of the global MOR system. Compared to most other parts of the MOR, Icelandic rift zones and transform faults are wider and more complex. Rift zones are defined by overlapping arrays of volcanic/tectonic spreading segments as much as 50 km wide. The most active rift zones propagate N and S away from the Iceland hot spot causing migration of transform faults. A trail of crust deformed by bookshelf faulting forms in their wakes. Dead or dying transform strands are truncated along pseudofaults that define propagation rates close to the full spreading rate of ~20 mm/yr. Pseudofaults are blurred by spreading across wide rift zones and laterally extensive subaerial lava flows. Propagation, with decreasing spreading toward the propagator tips causes rotation of crustal blocks on both sides of the active rift zones. The blocks deform internally by the widespread reactivation of spreading-related faults and zones of weakness along dike margins. The sense of slip on these rift-parallel strike-slip faults is inconsistent with transform-fault deformation. These various deformation features as well as subaxial subsidence that accommodate the thickening of the volcanic upper crustal units are probably confined to the brittle, seismogenic, upper 10 km of the crust. At least beneath the active rift zones, the upper crust is probably decoupled from hot, mechanically weak middle and lower gabbroic crust resulting in a broad plate boundary zone between the diverging lithosphere plates. Similar processes may occur at other types of propagating spreading centers and magmatic rifts.

  18. Increasing Practitioners Knowledge of Participation Among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  19. Increasing Practitioners' Knowledge of Participation among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  20. PHABULOSA Controls the Quiescent Center-Independent Root Meristem Activities in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Zhou, Jing; Tarkowská, Danuše; Tarkowski, Petr; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Kim, Eun-Sol; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth depends on stem cell niches in meristems. In the root apical meristem, the quiescent center (QC) cells form a niche together with the surrounding stem cells. Stem cells produce daughter cells that are displaced into a transit-amplifying (TA) domain of the root meristem. TA cells divide several times to provide cells for growth. SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are key regulators of the stem cell niche. Cytokinin controls TA cell activities in a dose-dependent manner. Although the regulatory programs in each compartment of the root meristem have been identified, it is still unclear how they coordinate one another. Here, we investigate how PHABULOSA (PHB), under the posttranscriptional control of SHR and SCR, regulates TA cell activities. The root meristem and growth defects in shr or scr mutants were significantly recovered in the shr phb or scr phb double mutant, respectively. This rescue in root growth occurs in the absence of a QC. Conversely, when the modified PHB, which is highly resistant to microRNA, was expressed throughout the stele of the wild-type root meristem, root growth became very similar to that observed in the shr; however, the identity of the QC was unaffected. Interestingly, a moderate increase in PHB resulted in a root meristem phenotype similar to that observed following the application of high levels of cytokinin. Our protoplast assay and transgenic approach using ARR10 suggest that the depletion of TA cells by high PHB in the stele occurs via the repression of B-ARR activities. This regulatory mechanism seems to help to maintain the cytokinin homeostasis in the meristem. Taken together, our study suggests that PHB can dynamically regulate TA cell activities in a QC-independent manner, and that the SHR-PHB pathway enables a robust root growth system by coordinating the stem cell niche and TA domain. PMID:25730098

  1. Probing the active massive black hole candidate in the center of NGC 404 with VLBI

    SciTech Connect

    Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Kaaret, P.; Cseh, D.; Kharb, P.

    2014-08-10

    Recently, Nyland et al. argued that the radio emission observed in the center of the dwarf galaxy NGC 404 originates in a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus powered by a massive black hole (MBH, M ≲ 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉}). High-resolution radio detections of MBHs are rare. Here we present sensitive, contemporaneous Chandra X-ray, and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio observations with the European VLBI Network. The source is detected in the X-rays, and shows no long-term variability. If the hard X-ray source is powered by accretion, the apparent low accretion efficiency would be consistent with a black hole (BH) in the hard state. Hard state BHs are known to show radio emission compact on the milliarcsecond scales. However, the central region of NGC 404 is resolved out on 10 mas (0.15-1.5 pc) scales. Our VLBI non-detection of a compact, partially self-absorbed radio core in NGC 404 implies that either the BH mass is smaller than 3{sub −2}{sup +5}×10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}, or the source does not follow the fundamental plane of BH activity relation. An alternative explanation is that the central BH is not in the hard state. The radio emission observed on arcsecond (tens of parsecs) scales may originate in nuclear star formation or extended emission due to AGN activity, although the latter would not be typical considering the structural properties of low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxies with confirmed nuclear activity.

  2. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  3. Contributions to Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs by the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  4. NASA Langley Research Center's Contributions to International Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  5. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  6. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  7. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  8. A comparative analysis of the center of gravity and center of pressure trajectory path lengths in standing posture: an estimation of active stiffness.

    PubMed

    Caron, O; Gelat, T; Rougier, P; Blanchi, J P

    2000-08-01

    The center of foot pressure (CP) motions, representing the net neuromuscular control, was compared to the center of gravity (CG) motions, representing the net performance. The comparison focused on the trajectory path length parameter along the medio-lateral and antero-posterior axes because these two variables depend on amplitude versus frequency relationship. This relationship was used to evaluate the CG motions based on the CP motions. Seven subjects stood still on a force plate with eyes open and eyes closed. The results showed that the ratio of (CP-CG)/CP trajectory path length was personal for each subject. These results suggest different levels of passive (ligaments, elastic properties) and active (reflex activity) stiffness. For some subjects, this ratio was significantly lower for the eyes open condition than for the eyes closed condition, indicating a decrease of the active stiffness for the eyes open condition. Therefore, a CG-CP comparative analysis appeared helpful in understanding the control of balance and necessary to quantify the subjects' net performance. PMID:11757569

  9. The potential and realized spread of wildfires across Canada.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Parisien, Marc-André; Flannigan, Mike D; Parks, Sean A; Anderson, Kerry R; Little, John M; Taylor, Steve W

    2014-08-01

    Given that they can burn for weeks or months, wildfires in temperate and boreal forests may become immense (eg., 10(0) - 10(4) km(2) ). However, during the period within which a large fire is 'active', not all days experience weather that is conducive to fire spread; indeed most of the spread occurs on a small proportion (e.g., 1 - 15 days) of not necessarily consecutive days during the active period. This study examines and compares the Canada-wide patterns in fire-conducive weather ('potential' spread) and the spread that occurs on the ground ('realized' spread). Results show substantial variability in distributions of potential and realized spread days across Canada. Both potential and realized spread are higher in western than in eastern Canada; however, whereas potential spread generally decreases from south to north, there is no such pattern with realized spread. The realized-to-potential fire-spread ratio is considerably higher in northern Canada than in the south, indicating that proportionally more fire-conducive days translate into fire progression. An exploration of environmental correlates to spread show that there may be a few factors compensating for the lower potential spread in northern Canada: a greater proportion of coniferous (i.e., more flammable) vegetation, lesser human impacts (i.e., less fragmented landscapes), sufficient fire ignitions, and intense droughts. Because a linear relationship exists between the frequency distributions of potential spread days and realized spread days in a fire zone, it is possible to obtain one from the other using a simple conversion factor. Our methodology thus provides a means to estimate realized fire spread from weather-based data in regions where fire databases are poor, which may improve our ability to predict future fire activity.

  10. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  11. Isolation of human serum spreading factor.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Silnutzer, J

    1983-10-25

    Serum spreading factor (SF) was isolated from human serum by a four-step procedure employing affinity chromatography on glass beads, concanavalin A-Sepharose, DEAE-agarose, and heparin-agarose. The final product was purified approximately 260-fold from the starting material and was maximally active in assays of cell spreading-promoting activity at 300 ng/ml. The isolated human SF preparation consisted of two proteins of apparent molecular weights approximately 65,000 (SF65) and 75,000 (SF75). Both SF65 and SF75 have been shown previously to exhibit cell spreading-promoting activity and to bind monoclonal antibody to human serum SF. PMID:6630199

  12. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.; Limaye, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula's "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA's SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT's experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  13. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  14. The Spread of Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Deborah S.; Deshpande, Omkar; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2011-01-01

    The causes of socioeconomic inequality have been debated since the time of Plato. Many reasons for the development of stratification have been proposed, from the need for hierarchical control over large-scale irrigation systems to the accumulation of small differences in wealth over time via inheritance processes. However, none of these explains how unequal societies came to completely displace egalitarian cultural norms over time. Our study models demographic consequences associated with the unequal distribution of resources in stratified societies. Agent-based simulation results show that in constant environments, unequal access to resources can be demographically destabilizing, resulting in the outward migration and spread of such societies even when population size is relatively small. In variable environments, stratified societies spread more and are also better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes. The predictions of our simulation are provided modest support by a range of existing empirical studies. In short, the fact that stratified societies today vastly outnumber egalitarian societies may not be due to the transformation of egalitarian norms and structures, but may instead reflect the more rapid migration of stratified societies and consequent conquest or displacement of egalitarian societies over time. PMID:21957457

  15. Illusory spreading of watercolor

    PubMed Central

    Devinck, Frédéric; Hardy, Joseph L.; Delahunt, Peter B.; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a phenomenon of long-range color assimilation occurring when a dark chromatic contour delineating a figure is flanked on the inside by a brighter chromatic contour; the brighter color spreads into the entire enclosed area. Here, we determined the optimal chromatic parameters and the cone signals supporting the WCE. To that end, we quantified the effect of color assimilation using hue cancellation as a function of hue, colorimetric purity, and cone modulation of inducing contours. When the inner and outer contours had chromaticities that were in opposite directions in color space, a stronger WCE was obtained as compared with other color directions. Additionally, equal colorimetric purity between the outer and inner contours was necessary to obtain a large effect compared with conditions in which the contours differed in colorimetric purity. However, there was no further increase in the magnitude of the effect when the colorimetric purity increased beyond a value corresponding to an equal vector length between the inner and outer contours. Finally, L–M-cone-modulated WCE was perceptually stronger than S-cone-modulated WCE for our conditions. This last result demonstrates that both L–M-cone and S-cone pathways are important for watercolor spreading. Our data suggest that the WCE depends critically upon the particular spatiochromatic arrangement in the display, with the relative chromatic contrast between the inducing contours being particularly important. PMID:16881793

  16. Toward Optimized Surface δ-Profiles of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers Activated by Helium Irradiation in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Momenzadeh, S Ali; Antonov, Denis; Scharpf, Jochen; Osterkamp, Christian; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Denisenko, Andrej; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-04-13

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has been shown recently as an excellent sensor for external spins. Nevertheless, their optimum engineering in the near-surface region still requires quantitative knowledge in regard to their activation by vacancy capture during thermal annealing. To this aim, we report on the depth profiles of near-surface helium-induced NV centers (and related helium defects) by step-etching with nanometer resolution. This provides insights into the efficiency of vacancy diffusion and recombination paths concurrent to the formation of NV centers. It was found that the range of efficient formation of NV centers is limited only to approximately 10 to 15 nm (radius) around the initial ion track of irradiating helium atoms. Using this information we demonstrate the fabrication of nanometric-thin (δ) profiles of NV centers for sensing external spins at the diamond surface based on a three-step approach, which comprises (i) nitrogen-doped epitaxial CVD diamond overgrowth, (ii) activation of NV centers by low-energy helium irradiation and thermal annealing, and (iii) controlled layer thinning by low-damage plasma etching. Spin coherence times (Hahn echo) ranging up to 50 μs are demonstrated at depths of less than 5 nm in material with 1.1% of (13)C (depth estimated by spin relaxation (T1) measurements). At the end, the limits of the helium irradiation technique at high ion fluences are also experimentally investigated.

  17. Global Change Data Center: Mission, Organization, Major Activities, and 2001 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rapid efficient access to Earth sciences data is fundamental to the Nation's efforts to understand the effects of global environmental changes and their implications for public policy. It becomes a bigger challenge in the future when data volumes increase further and missions with constellations of satellites start to appear. Demands on data storage, data access, network throughput, processing power, and database and information management are increased by orders of magnitude, while budgets remain constant and even shrink. The Global Change Data Center's (GCDC) mission is to provide systems, data products, and information management services to maximize the availability and utility of NASA's Earth science data. The specific objectives are (1) support Earth science missions be developing and operating systems to generate, archive, and distribute data products and information; (2) develop innovative information systems for processing, archiving, accessing, visualizing, and communicating Earth science data; and (3) develop value-added products and services to promote broader utilization of NASA Earth Sciences Enterprise (ESE) data and information. The ultimate product of GCDC activities is access to data and information to support research, education, and public policy.

  18. Environmental Data from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and models useful in environmental research. Data have been collected on the ground, by aircraft, by satellite, and from computer models. The extent of data and model products ranges from site specific to global, and durations range from days to years. Data products and models are free, but users must typically register. Major field campaigns with available data include: • The Boreal Ecosystem - Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) • The First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) Project) • The Large-Scale Biosphere - Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) • The North American Carbon Program (NACP) • Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project • The SAFARI 2000 (S2K) Project in Africa • Superior National Forest(SNF)Project Validation projects with available data include: • BigFoot • The Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP) • The EOS Land Validation Project • FLUXNET • MODIS • The Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) The ORNL DAAC also provides access to data for many regional and global projects and to a model archive. (Specialized Interface)(Registration Required)

  19. Research activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1993-01-01

    The main research activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT) are described. The research objective of CMOTT is to improve and/or develop turbulence and transition models for propulsion systems. The flows of interest in propulsion systems can be both compressible and incompressible, three dimensional, bounded by complex wall geometries, chemically reacting, and involve 'bypass' transition. The most relevant turbulence and transition models for the above flows are one- and two-equation eddy viscosity models, Reynolds stress algebraic- and transport-equation models, pdf models, and multiple-scale models. All these models are classified as one-point closure schemes since only one-point (in time and space) turbulent correlations, such as second moments (Reynolds stresses and turbulent heat fluxes) and third moments, are involved. In computational fluid dynamics, all turbulent quantities are one-point correlations. Therefore, the study of one-point turbulent closure schemes is the focus of our turbulence research. However, other research, such as the renormalization group theory, the direct interaction approximation method, and numerical simulations are also pursued to support the development of turbulence modeling.

  20. Bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD) for the efficient production of an interfacially active peptide.

    PubMed

    Morreale, Giacomo; Lee, Eun Gyo; Jones, Daniel B; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2004-09-30

    The efficient expression and purification of an interfacially active peptide (mLac21) was achieved by using bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD), wherein key bioprocess considerations are addressed during the initial molecular biology work. The 21 amino acid mLac21 peptide sequence is derived from the lac repressor protein and is shown to have high affinity for the oil-water interface, causing a substantial reduction in interfacial tension following adsorption. The DNA coding for the peptide sequence was cloned into a modified pET-31(b) vector to permit the expression of mLac21 as a fusion to ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Rational iterative molecular design, taking into account the need for a scaleable bioprocess flowsheet, led to a simple and efficient bioprocess yielding mLac21 at 86% purity following ion exchange chromatography (and >98% following chromatographic polishing). This case study demonstrates that it is possible to produce acceptably pure peptide for potential commodity applications using common scaleable bioprocess unit operations. Moreover, it is shown that BMD is a powerful strategy that can be deployed to reduce bioseparation complexity.

  1. LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

    1995-01-01

    Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

  2. Electrically active centers formed in silicon during the high-temperature diffusion of boron and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Poloskin, D. S.; Shek, E. I.

    2013-02-15

    The parameters of electrically active centers formed during the high-temperature diffusion of boron and aluminum into silicon in various media are studied by the Hall method and capacitance spectroscopy. It is found that the variation in the resistivity of the n base of the structures with p-n junctions fabricated in the study is controlled by the formation of three donor levels Q1, E4, and Q3 with the energies E{sub c} - 0.31, E{sub c} - 0.27, and E{sub c} - 0.16 eV. Diffusion in a chlorine-containing atmosphere introduces only a single level E4, but its concentration is 2.5 times lower, compared with diffusion in air. The values of the ionization energy of the Q3 level, measured under equilibrium (Hall effect) and nonequilibrium (capacitance spectroscopy) conditions, almost coincide. The deepest level E1 with an energy of E{sub c} - 0.54 eV, formed upon diffusion in both media, has no effect on the resistivity in the n base of the structures.

  3. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Lewis Research Center's free-piston Stirling engine research is presented, including efforts to improve and advance its design for use in specific space power applications. These efforts are a part of the SP-100 program being conducted to support the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA. Such efforts include: (1) the testing and improvement of 25 kWe Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE); (2) the preliminary design of 25 kWe single-cylinder Experimental stirling Space Engine (ESSE); and, (3) a study to determine the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator to 150 kWe. Other NASA Lewis free-piston Stirling engine activities will be described, directed toward the advancement of general free-piston Stirling engine technology and its application in specific terrestrial applications. One such effort, supported by DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DRNL), is the development of a free-piston Stirling engine which produces hydraulic power. Finally, a terrestrial solar application involving a conceptual design of a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) capable of delivering power to an electric utility grid will be discussed. The latter work is supported by DOE/Sandia National Laboratory (SNLA).

  4. Spread and SpreadRecorder An Architecture for Data Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ted

    2006-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been measuring the microgravity environment of the space shuttle, the International Space Station, MIR, sounding rockets, drop towers, and aircraft since 1991. The Principle Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at NASA GRC has been collecting, analyzing, reducing, and disseminating over 3 terabytes of collected SAMS and other microgravity sensor data to scientists so they can understand the disturbances that affect their microgravity science experiments. The years of experience with space flight data generation, telemetry, operations, analysis, and distribution give the SAMS/ PIMS team a unique perspective on space data systems. In 2005, the SAMS/PIMS team was asked to look into generalizing their data system and combining it with the nascent medical instrumentation data systems being proposed for ISS and beyond, specifically the Medical Computer Interface Adapter (MCIA) project. The SpreadRecorder software is a prototype system developed by SAMS/PIMS to explore ways of meeting the needs of both the medical and microgravity measurement communities. It is hoped that the system is general enough to be used for many other purposes.

  5. The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    How do you keep a classroom of 100 undergraduates actively learning? Can students practice communication and teamwork skills in a large class? How do you boost the performance of underrepresented groups? The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project has addressed these concerns. Because of their inclusion in a leading introductory physics textbook, project materials are used by more than 1/3 of all science, math, and engineering majors nationwide. The room design and pedagogy have been adopted at more than 100 leading institutions across the country. Physics, chemistry, math, astronomy, biology, engineering, earth sciences, and even literature classes are currently being taught this way. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. We promote active learning in a redesigned classroom for 100 students or more. (Of course, smaller classes can also benefit.) Class time is spent primarily on "tangibles" and "ponderables"--hands-on activities, simulations, and interesting questions. Nine students sit in three teams at round tables. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Hundreds of hours of classroom video and audio recordings, transcripts of numerous interviews and focus groups, data from conceptual learning assessments (using widely-recognized instruments in a pretest/posttest protocol), and collected portfolios of student work are part of our rigorous assessment effort. Our findings (based on data from over 16,000 students collected over five years as well as replications at adopting sites) can be summarized as the following: 1) Female failure rate is 1/5 of previous levels, even though more is demanded of students. 2) Minority failure rate is 1/4 that seen in traditionally taught courses. 3) At-risk students are more

  6. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  7. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  8. 76 FR 17149 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for North American Reporting Center for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... published a Federal Register notice (75 FR 80525) announcing that we would submit this ICR to OMB for... Reporting Center for Amphibian Malformations (NARCAM) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior... currently approved paperwork requirements for the USGS North American Reporting Center for...

  9. 34 CFR 426.7 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Agriculture Action Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Centers? The Secretary supports model Agriculture Action Centers that provide improved access to... rural economic downturns; (2) Who are dislocated from farming; and (3) Who are dislocated from agriculturally related businesses and industries that are adversely affected by farm and rural economic...

  10. Innovation spread: lessons from HIV.

    PubMed

    Talbert-Slagle, Kristina; Berg, David; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2013-09-01

    Efficient spreading of evidence-based innovations among complex health systems remains an elusive goal despite extensive study in the social sciences. Biology provides a model of successful spread in viruses, which have evolved to spread with maximum efficiency using minimal resources. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) spread and identify five steps that are also common to a recent example of spread in complex health systems: reduction in door-to-balloon times for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We then describe a new model we have developed, called AIDED, which is based on mixed-methods research but informed by the conceptual framework of HIV spread among cells. The AIDED model contains five components: Assess, Innovate, Develop, Engage and Devolve, and can describe any one of the following: the spread of HIV among cells, the spread of practices to reduce door-to-balloon time for patients with STEMI and the spread of certain family health innovations in low- and middle-income countries. We suggest that by looking to the biological sciences for a model of spread that has been honed by evolution, we may have identified fundamental steps that are necessary and sufficient for efficient, low-cost spread of health innovations among complex health systems.

  11. A network model for Ebola spreading.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Pedalino, Biagio; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    The availability of accurate models for the spreading of infectious diseases has opened a new era in management and containment of epidemics. Models are extensively used to plan for and execute vaccination campaigns, to evaluate the risk of international spreadings and the feasibility of travel bans, and to inform prophylaxis campaigns. Even when no specific therapeutical protocol is available, as for the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), models of epidemic spreading can provide useful insight to steer interventions in the field and to forecast the trend of the epidemic. Here, we propose a novel mathematical model to describe EVD spreading based on activity driven networks (ADNs). Our approach overcomes the simplifying assumption of homogeneous mixing, which is central to most of the mathematically tractable models of EVD spreading. In our ADN-based model, each individual is not bound to contact every other, and its network of contacts varies in time as a function of an activity potential. Our model contemplates the possibility of non-ideal and time-varying intervention policies, which are critical to accurately describe EVD spreading in afflicted countries. The model is calibrated from field data of the 2014 April-to-December spreading in Liberia. We use the model as a predictive tool, to emulate the dynamics of EVD in Liberia and offer a one-year projection, until December 2015. Our predictions agree with the current vision expressed by professionals in the field, who consider EVD in Liberia at its final stage. The model is also used to perform a what-if analysis to assess the efficacy of timely intervention policies. In particular, we show that an earlier application of the same intervention policy would have greatly reduced the number of EVD cases, the duration of the outbreak, and the infrastructures needed for the implementation of the intervention.

  12. Satellite and earth science data management activities at the U.S. geological survey's EROS data center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carneggie, David M.; Metz, Gary G.; Draeger, William C.; Thompson, Ralph J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, the national archive for Landsat data, has 20 years of experience in acquiring, archiving, processing, and distributing Landsat and earth science data. The Center is expanding its satellite and earth science data management activities to support the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Program. The Center's current and future data management activities focus on land data and include: satellite and earth science data set acquisition, development and archiving; data set preservation, maintenance and conversion to more durable and accessible archive medium; development of an advanced Land Data Information System; development of enhanced data packaging and distribution mechanisms; and data processing, reprocessing, and product generation systems.

  13. Quality-Assurance Plan for Water-Quality Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Montana Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambing, John H.

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with guidelines set forth by the Office of Water Quality in the Water Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a quality-assurance plan has been created for use by the USGS Montana Water Science Center in conducting water-quality activities. This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the USGS Montana Water Science Center for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of water-quality data. The policies and procedures presented in this quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities complement the quality-assurance plans for surface-water and ground-water activities and suspended-sediment analysis.

  14. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  15. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the child’s activities at the day care center over the 48-h monitoring period. The diary was divided into three time periods over the 48-h monitoring interval. The Food Survey collected information on the frequency and types of fruits, veget...

  16. "Sticky Ions": A Student-Centered Activity Using Magnetic Models to Explore the Dissolving of Ionic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sheila; Herrington, Deborah G.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding what happens at the particulate level when ionic compounds dissolve in water is difficult for many students, yet this understanding is critical in explaining many macroscopic observations. This article describes a student-centered activity designed to help strengthen students' conceptual understanding of this process at the…

  17. Swift/XRT detects renewed activity of the Galactic center transient XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-09-01

    Daily X-ray monitoring observations of the Galactic center with Swift (Degenaar et al. 2015, JHEAp 7, 137) reveal activity at a position consistent with the location of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XMM J174457-2850.3.

  18. Wonderful Rooms Where Children Can Bloom! Over 500 Innovative Ideas and Activities for Your Child-Centered Classroom. K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jean R.

    This book for primary grade teachers provides over 500 ideas and suggestions for designing the environment and developing learning activities in a child-centered classroom. Part 1 of the book focuses on the larger school environment, with suggestions for making the whole school inviting for parents and children. Part 2 provides ideas for making…

  19. Efficacy of a Web-Based, Center-Based or Combined Physical Activity Intervention among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Alexandre; Cloes, Marc

    2015-01-01

    With more social support and environment-centered interventions being recommended in web-based interventions, this study examined the efficacy of three intervention conditions aimed at promoting physical activity (PA) in older adults. The efficacy analyses included the self-reported PA level, stage of change for PA and awareness about PA among…

  20. Department of Energy Support for Operations of the WMO/GAW Quality Control/Science Activity Center for the Americas

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B. B.

    2003-11-13

    As a formal activity of the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch, to provide, through agency collaboration, a center of excellence in the United States that would impose quality assurance techniques on data collected by national air and precipitation quality networks operating in the Americas (north, south, and central).