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Sample records for active spreading ridge

  1. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E,37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon

  2. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  3. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge axes is ubiquitous, associated with mass, chemical, and heat exchanges between the deep lithosphere and the overlying envelopes, and sustaining chemiosynthetic ecosystems at the seafloor. Compared with hydrothermal fields at fast-spreading ridges, those at slow spreading ones show a large variability as their location and nature is controlled or influenced by several parameters that are inter-related: a) tectonic setting, ranging from 'volcanic systems' (along the rift valley floor, volcanic ridges, seamounts), to 'tectonic' ones (rift-bounding faults, oceanic detachment faults); b) the nature of the host rock, owing to compositional heterogeneity of slow-spreading lithosphere (basalt, gabbro, peridotite); c) the type of heat source (magmatic bodies at depth, hot lithosphere, serpentinization reactions); d) and the associated temperature of outflow fluids (high- vs.- low temperature venting and their relative proportion). A systematic review of the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal fields along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity is concentrated either at oceanic detachment faults, or along volcanic segments with evidence of robust magma supply to the axis. A detailed study of the magmatically robust Lucky Strike segment suggests that all present and past hydrothermal activity is found at the center of the segment. The association of these fields to central volcanos, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the remaining of the ridge segment, suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity in these volcanic systems is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build these volcanic edifices. In this setting, hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust exploit permeable fault zones to circulate. While

  4. Evidence of recent volcanic activity on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M H; Kurras, G J; Tolstoy, M; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Coakley, B J; Cochran, J R

    2001-02-15

    Seafloor spreading is accommodated by volcanic and tectonic processes along the global mid-ocean ridge system. As spreading rate decreases the influence of volcanism also decreases, and it is unknown whether significant volcanism occurs at all at ultraslow spreading rates (<1.5 cm yr(-1)). Here we present three-dimensional sonar maps of the Gakkel ridge, Earth's slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, located in the Arctic basin under the Arctic Ocean ice canopy. We acquired this data using hull-mounted sonars attached to a nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Hawkbill. Sidescan data for the ultraslow-spreading (approximately 1.0 cm yr(-1)) eastern Gakkel ridge depict two young volcanoes covering approximately 720 km2 of an otherwise heavily sedimented axial valley. The western volcano coincides with the average location of epicentres for more than 250 teleseismic events detected in 1999, suggesting that an axial eruption was imaged shortly after its occurrence. These findings demonstrate that eruptions along the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge are focused at discrete locations and appear to be more voluminous and occur more frequently than was previously thought.

  5. Evidence of recent volcanic activity on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M H; Kurras, G J; Tolstoy, M; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Coakley, B J; Cochran, J R

    2001-02-15

    Seafloor spreading is accommodated by volcanic and tectonic processes along the global mid-ocean ridge system. As spreading rate decreases the influence of volcanism also decreases, and it is unknown whether significant volcanism occurs at all at ultraslow spreading rates (<1.5 cm yr(-1)). Here we present three-dimensional sonar maps of the Gakkel ridge, Earth's slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, located in the Arctic basin under the Arctic Ocean ice canopy. We acquired this data using hull-mounted sonars attached to a nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Hawkbill. Sidescan data for the ultraslow-spreading (approximately 1.0 cm yr(-1)) eastern Gakkel ridge depict two young volcanoes covering approximately 720 km2 of an otherwise heavily sedimented axial valley. The western volcano coincides with the average location of epicentres for more than 250 teleseismic events detected in 1999, suggesting that an axial eruption was imaged shortly after its occurrence. These findings demonstrate that eruptions along the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge are focused at discrete locations and appear to be more voluminous and occur more frequently than was previously thought. PMID:11236991

  6. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville fracture zone. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in 1 yr by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  7. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate-dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville FZ. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in one year by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  8. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The rate of magma and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges is thought to decrease with decreasing spreading rate. At ultraslow spreading rates below 10-20 mm/y full rate, heat loss by conduction greatly reduces melt production with less melt produced at increasingly greater depths. Gakkel Ridge, the actively spreading mid-ocean ridge in the Arctic Ocean, opens at rates of 14 mm/y in the west decreasing to less than 6 mm/y at its eastern termination and demonstrates that magma production is not only a function of spreading rate. Whereas amagmatic spreading takes place at rates of about 12-10 mm/y, focussed melt production occurs at even lower spreading rates in long-lived discrete volcanic centres. One such centre is the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge where in 1999 a teleseismically recorded earthquake swarm consisting of more than 250 earthquakes over 9 months signalled the onset of an active spreading episode. The earthquake swarm is believed to be associated with volcanic activity although no concurrent lava effusion was found. We analysed the teleseismic earthquake swarm together with visual observation and microseismic data recorded at this site in 2001 and 2007 and noted the following characteristics which may be indicative for volcanic spreading events at the still poorly explored ultraslow spreading ridges: - unusual duration: The 1999 earthquake swarm lasted over 9 months rather than a few weeks as observed on faster spreading ridges. In addition, in 2001 seismoacoustic sounds which we interpret as gas discharge in Strombolian eruptions and a giant event plume maintained over more than one year indicate waxing and waning volcanic activity since 1999. - unusual strength: The earthquake swarm was detected at teleseismic distances of more than 1000 km and included 11 events with a magnitude >5. No other confirmed mid-ocean ridge eruption released a comparable seismic moment. Rather than focussing in a narrow area or showing pronounced

  9. Structural processes at slow-spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Mutter, J C; Karson, J A

    1992-07-31

    Slow-spreading (<35 millimeters per year) mid-ocean ridges are dominated by segmented, asymmetric, rifted depressions like continental rifts. Fast-spreading ridges display symmetric, elevated volcanic edifices that vary in shape and size along axis. Deep earthquakes, major normal faults, and exposures of lower crustal rocks are common only along slow-spreading ridges. These contrasting features suggest that mechanical deformation is far more important in crustal formation at slow-spreading ridges than at fast-spreading ridges. New seismic images suggest that the nature and scale of segmentation of slow-spreading ridges is integral to the deformational process and not to magmatic processes that may control segmentation on fast-spreading ridges.

  10. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  11. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  12. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the

  13. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  14. Using glacial morphology to constrain the impact of the Chile active spreading ridge subduction in Central Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrino, B.; Ritz, J. F.; Lagabrielle, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Central Patagonian Cordillera is a unique laboratory to study interaction between oceanic and continental lithospheres during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The subduction of the South Chile spreading Ridge, which separates the Nazca plate from the Antarctic plate, started ca. 15-14 Ma at the southern tip of Patagonia (55°S latitude). The northwards migration of the Chile Triple Junction induces the subduction of several segments especially around 46°S latitude. There, three segments subducted at ca. 6, 3 and 0.3 Ma, leading to the formation of a large asthenospheric slab-window beneath Central Patagonia. Contemporaneously, the Central Patagonia reliefs are undergoing major glacial events since at least 7 Ma. These events are evidenced to the east of the Central Patagonian morphotectonic front within perched relict surfaces. Inset in these perched glacial surfaces are found mid-Pleistocene glacial valleys, as the Lake General Carrera-Buenos Aires amphitheatre (LGCBA), which formed between 1.1 Ma and 16 ka. We used the relationships between the glacial valleys and the volcanism associated with the asthenospheric slab-window to better constraints the structural evolution of the Patagonian Cordillera related to the subduction of the Chili active spreading Ridge. The present work focused within two well-preserved perched flat surfaces named Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires and Meseta del Cerro Galera: (i) The meseta del Lago Buenos Aires defines a plateau made of interbedded units of tills and lavas dated between 12 Ma and 3 Ma. The top surface of the meseta, ˜2000 meters high is dated at 3 Ma, and is shaped by four NE-SW trending glacial lobes characterized with kettles, lineations and moraines. The glacial valleys are beheaded westwards and define perched valleys 200 to 400 meters higher than the western Cordillera. This suggests recent vertical movement along N160 extensive/transtensive corridor located between the morphotectonic

  15. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  16. Chemical signatures from hydrothermal venting on slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Henrietta N.

    At least 24 sites of active venting have been confirmed on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges, with dozens more indicated on the basis of hydrothermal plume distributions and/or dredge recovery of massive sulfides. Fluid chemistry data have been published for 13 sites: 8 on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 3 on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and 2 on the Central Indian Ridge. Three of these 13 sites (Rainbow, Logatchev, and Lost City) are known to be hosted in ultramafic terrain, and their fluid chemistries reflect the influence of serpentinization reactions, including elevated hydrogen and methane, and low silica concentrations. This brief review presents the published fluid chemistry for all 13 sites, including time series where available, and demonstrates the diversity of chemical compositions engendered by the myriad settings (near and off axis, young volcanic to ultramafic terrain, and depths up to 4100 m) of hydrothermal systems on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges.

  17. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change.

  18. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change. PMID:14647373

  19. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  20. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  1. Ridge transform fault spreading pattern in freezing wax.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, D W; Brune, J N

    1972-10-20

    A laboratory experiment shows that ridge-ridge transform faults, inactive fracture zones, and other features characteristic of spreading oceanic ridges can be produced in a variety of paraffins. Although the resultant pattern depends upon the temperature of the wax and the ratio of spreading rate to surface cooling, the characteristic orthogonal ridge transform fault system is a preferred mode of separation. Symmetric spreading occurs under conditions of no tensile strength across the ridge, and the stability of transform faults is a consequence of their lack of shear strength. The experiment also shows that properties characteristic of oceanic ridges occur under conditions of passive convection where upwelling of material at the ridge crest is a result only of hydrostatic forces in the fluid; that is, the plate separation is caused not by large convective forces beneath the ridge but rather by tensile forces in the plate. PMID:17735477

  2. Subduction of the South Chile active spreading ridge: A 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Arnaud, N.; Guivel, C.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Scalabrino, B.; Espinoza, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4-3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  3. An analysis of ridge axis gravity roughness and spreading rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher; Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Fast and slow spreading ridges have radically different morphologic and gravimetric characteristics. In this study, altimeter measurements from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission are used to investigate spreading rate dependence of the ridge axis gravity field. Gravity roughness provides an estimate of the amplitude of the gravity anomaly and is robust to small errors in the location of the ridge axis. Gravity roughness as a weighted root mean square of the vertical deflection at 438 ridge crossings on the mid-ocean ridge system is computed. Ridge axis gravity anomalies show a decrease in amplitude with increasing spreading rate up to an intermediate rate of about 60-80 mm/yr and almost no change at higher rates; overall the roughness decreases by a factor of 10 between the lowest and highest rates. In addition to the amplitude decrease, the range of roughness values observed at a given spreading rate shows a similar order of magnitude decrease with transition between 60 and 80 mm/yr. The transition of ridge axis gravity is most apparent at three relatively unexplored locations on the Southeast Indian Ridge and the Pacific-Antarctic Rise; on these intermediate rate ridges the transition occurs abruptly across transform faults.

  4. Carlsberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Comparison of slow spreading centre analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Bramley J.; Rona, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    Eighty per cent of all mid-ocean spreading centres are slow. Using a mixture of global bathymetry data and ship-board multibeam echosounder data, we explore the morphology of global mid-ocean ridges and compare two slow spreading analogues: the Carlsberg Ridge in the north-west Indian Ocean between 57°E and 60°E, and the Kane to Atlantis super-segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 21°N and 31°N. At a global scale, mid-ocean spreading centres show an inverse correlation between segment length and spreading rate with segmentation frequency. Within this context, both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge are similar: spreading at 22 and 26 mm/yr full rates respectively, being devoid of major transform faults, and being segmented by dextral, non-transform, second-order discontinuities. For these and other slow spreading ridges, we show that segmentation frequency varies inversely with flank height and ridge axis depth. Segments on both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge range in aspect ratio (ridge flank height/axis width), depth and symmetry. Segments with high aspect ratios and deeper axial floors often have asymmetric rift flanks and are associated with indicators of lower degrees of melt flux. Segments with low aspect ratios have shallower axial floors, symmetric rift flanks, and evidence of robust melt supply. The relationship between segmentation, spreading rate, ridge depth and morphology, at both a global and local scale, is evidence that rates of melting of the underlying mantle and melt delivery to the crust play a significant role in determining the structure and morphology of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  5. Controls on melting at spreading ridges from correlated abyssal peridotite - mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelous, Marcel; Weinzierl, Christoph G.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-09-01

    Variations in the volume and major element composition of basalt erupted along the global mid-ocean ridge system have been attributed to differences in mantle potential temperature, mantle composition, or plate spreading rate and lithosphere thickness. Abyssal peridotites, the residues of mantle melting beneath mid-ocean ridges, provide additional information on the melting process, which could be used to test these hypotheses. We compiled a global database of abyssal peridotite compositions averaged over the same ridge segments defined by Gale et al. (2013). In addition, we calculated the distance of each ridge segment to the nearest hotspots. We show that Cr# in spinel in abyssal peridotites is negatively correlated with Na90 in basalts from the same ridge segments on a global scale. Ridge segments that erupt basalts apparently produced by larger degrees of mantle melting are thus underlain by peridotites from which large amounts of melt have been extracted. We find that near-ridge hotspots have a more widespread influence on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) composition and ridge depth than previously thought. However, when these hotspot-influenced ridge segments are excluded, the remaining segments show clear relationships between MORB composition, peridotite composition, and ridge depth with spreading rate. Very slow-spreading ridges (<20 mm/yr) are deeper, erupt basalts with higher Na90, Al90, K90/Ti90, and lower Fe90, Ca90/Al90, and expose peridotites with lower Cr# than intermediate and fast-spreading ridges. We show that away from hotspots, the spreading-rate dependence of the maximum degree of mantle melting inferred from Cr# in peridotites (FM) and the bulk degree of melting inferred from Na90 in basalts (FB) from the same ridge segments is unlikely to be due to variations in mantle composition. Nor can the effects of dynamic mantle upwelling or incomplete melt extraction at low spreading rates satisfactorily explain the observed compositions of abyssal

  6. Neogene magmatism northeast of the Aegir and Kolbeinsey ridges, NE Atlantic: Spreading ridge-mantle plume interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, AsbjøRn Johan; Faleide, Jan Inge; Mjelde, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    According to mantle plume theory the Earth's interior cools partly by localized large vertical mass transport, causing extensive decompression melting. The Iceland melt anomaly is regarded as a typical example of a mantle plume. However, there are centers of Miocene to recent magmatism in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea not easily explained by the plume theory. Here we present new data to document diffuse late Miocene magmatic underplating of older oceanic crust located mostly north of the Aegir Ridge, an extinct seafloor spreading axis in the Norway Basin. There is also a region with similar magmatism northeast of the presently spreading Kolbeinsey Ridge north of Iceland. Intraplate magmatism in these locations is not easily explained by local plume models, edge-driven convection, or by asthenosphere flow-lithosphere thickness interaction. On the basis of correlation between the magmatism and the active or extinct spreading ridges, we propose the mid-ocean ridge basalt-capture model, in which this magmatism can be understood through plume-spreading ridge interaction: The asthenosphere flow out from Iceland captures deeper, low-degree partially molten asthenospheric regions from underneath the spreading ridges and carry these across the terminating fracture zones, to subsequently underplate oceanic crust or to intrude and build seamounts. This model is similar to lithospheric cracking models for intraplate magmatism in requiring that low-degree partial melt can be retained in the asthenosphere over time but differ in that the magma is extracted by internal magma movement processes and not by external tectonic forces.

  7. Diversity of Hydrothermal Systems on Slow Spreading Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.; Devey, Colin W.; Dyment, Jérôme; Murton, Bramley J.

    Diversity of Hydrothermal Systems on Slow Spreading Ocean Ridges presents a multidisciplinary overview of the remarkable emerging diversity of hydrothermal systems on slow spreading ocean ridges in the Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic oceans. When hydrothermal systems were first found on the East Pacific Rise and other Pacific Ocean ridges beginning in the late 1970s, the community consensus held that the magma delivery rate of intermediate to fast spreading was necessary to support black smoker-type high-temperature systems and associated chemosynthetic ecosystems and polymetallic sulfide deposits. Contrary to that consensus, hydrothermal systems not only occur on slow spreading ocean ridges but, as reported in this volume, are generally larger, exhibit different chemosynthetic ecosystems, produce larger mineral deposits, and occur in a much greater diversity of geologic settings than those systems in the Pacific. The full diversity of hydrothermal systems on slow spreading ocean ridges, reflected in the contributions to this volume, is only now emerging and opens an exciting new frontier for ocean ridge exploration, including • Processes of heat and chemical transfer from the Earth's mantle and crust via slow spreading ocean ridges to the oceans • The major role of detachment faulting linking crust and mantle in hydrothermal circulation • Chemical reaction products of mantle involvement including serpentinization, natural hydrogen, abiotic methane, and hydrocarbon synthesis • Generation of large polymetallic sulfide deposits hosted in ocean crust and mantle • Chemosynthetic vent communities hosted in the diverse settings The readership for this volume will include schools, universities, government laboratories, and scientific societies in developed and developing nations, including over 150 nations that have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

  8. Periodic Magmatic Events on Slow-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges: Evidence from the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the Earth's solid surface is produced by volcanic eruptions at mid-ocean ridges. Slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge eruptions are thought to be characterized by cyclic or periodic volcanism separated by periods of tectonic extension. Here we present high-resolution acoustic sidescan data from the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, a shallow slow-spreading ridge where high glacial and steady post-glacial sedimentation rates allow relative flow ages to be determined using backscatter amplitude as a proxy for sediment thickness and hence age. We identify a suite of young lava flows within the axial valley, suggesting that a significant length of the segment was magmatically active at the same time. This suite of flows represents the largest magmatic event in the last 7 kyr but still do not constitute enough volume to maintain the thickness of seismic layer 2A, suggesting that larger volume, periodic magmatic events are required to maintain crustal thickness.

  9. Discovery of abundant hydrothermal venting on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, H N; Michael, P J; Baker, E T; Connelly, D P; Snow, J E; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Mühe, R; German, C R; Graham, D W

    2003-01-16

    Submarine hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges is an important contributor to ridge thermal structure, and the global distribution of such vents has implications for heat and mass fluxes from the Earth's crust and mantle and for the biogeography of vent-endemic organisms. Previous studies have predicted that the incidence of hydrothermal venting would be extremely low on ultraslow-spreading ridges (ridges with full spreading rates <2 cm x yr(-1)-which make up 25 per cent of the global ridge length), and that such vent systems would be hosted in ultramafic in addition to volcanic rocks. Here we present evidence for active hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel ridge, which is the slowest spreading (0.6-1.3 cm x yr(-1)) and least explored mid-ocean ridge. On the basis of water column profiles of light scattering, temperature and manganese concentration along 1,100 km of the rift valley, we identify hydrothermal plumes dispersing from at least nine to twelve discrete vent sites. Our discovery of such abundant venting, and its apparent localization near volcanic centres, requires a reassessment of the geologic conditions that control hydrothermal circulation on ultraslow-spreading ridges.

  10. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in obliquely spreading ultra-slow ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Evgeniy; Kokhan, Andrey; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    This paper is dedicated to obliquely spreading ultra-slow ridges of North Atlantic and Arctic. The study covers four ridges: Reikjanes, Kolbeynsey, Mohns and Knipovich They are rather young (spreading initiated 58-60 Myr ago) and angles between their trends and spreading direction are from 33 to 85°. All the ridges have peculiarities in structure patterns, kinematics, and morphology and develop in specific geodynamical environments. Kolbeynsey and Reikjanes ridges are developing under influence of Iceland hotspot. Knipovich ridge is developing in ancient slip zone along the heavily sedimented Spitzbergen margin. Spreading at Mohns ridge occurs in conditions of thick lithosphere and extremely narrow heating zone. In order to study geodynamical features of structure-forming on these ridges we apply experimental modeling The model material used in modeling is a colloidal system composed of mineral oils, solid hydrocarbon and surface-active substances. It has elastic-viscous-plastic properties, under temperature and strain rate, it is capable of failure like a brittle body. Reikjanes (ridge obliquity 60-65°) and Kolbeynsey (80-85°) ridges show changes of morphology with increasing distance from Iceland mantle plume. In proximity with Iceland they are characterized by axial rise with long s-shaped axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) offset by small discontinuities. Far from Iceland the AVRs are short and offset by large non-transform offsets which are situated in axial valley. In conditions of all these features are explained by influence of mantle flow from the Iceland mantle plum initiating the increasing of mantle temperature. It results in decreasing of lithospheric brittle layer with approaching to Iceland. In experimental sets reproducing conditions of proximate to Iceland part of the ridge were reproduced in sets with the widest weak zone and the smallest crustal thickness and vice versa. In sets reproducing conditions of proximate to Iceland received long and non

  11. The detectability of melt channels beneath slow- and fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, S.; Nowacki, A.; Katz, R. F.; Wookey, J.

    2012-12-01

    At mid-ocean ridges, the oceanic crust is created by the intrusion and extrusion of melt, drawn upwards from below the ridge axis in high-porosity channels which form by reactive flow. These channels have drastically different seismic properties to the surrounding mantle material, which has the potential to explain widespread observations of seismic anisotropy in surface and body waves travelling through mid-ocean ridges and the oceanic lithosphere. In order to investigate these processes, we use a 2D numerical model of coupled magma/mantle dynamics. The model is based on conservation statements for mass, momentum, energy and composition in a two-phase system with two components in local thermodynamic equilibrium. One component is more fusible than the other, and a network of magma-rich channels are nucleated when heterogeneities rich in fusible material are introduced into the system. Whilst most channels focus melt towards the axis, pockets of high porosity (analogous to melt) are also rifted away from the ridge axis. We model ridges with full spreading rates between 40 and 160 mm/a, reflecting most ridge systems currently active. Shear wave splitting measurements at mid-ocean ridges reveal a pattern of increasing splitting with distance from the ridge axis, and greater splitting beneath fast-spreading ridges. Surface wave studies show that horizontally-polarised waves (SH) travel faster than those polarised vertically (SV) in the region of 50-100 km beneath the ocean floor. Neither of these observations can be wholly explained by the alignment of mineral phases due to mantle flow beneath ridges. We convert the thermodynamic ridge model to elasticity using effective medium theories, taking porosity as a proxy for melt, and using melt flow lines to predict the orientation of the elasticity. Seismic forward modelling then predicts the amount and orientation of shear wave splitting and surface wave anisotropy, which can be compared to observations. Early results

  12. Magmatic and amagmatic seafloor generation at the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Michael, P J; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Snow, J E; Goldstein, S L; Graham, D W; Lehnert, K; Kurras, G; Jokat, W; Mühe, R; Edmonds, H N

    2003-06-26

    A high-resolution mapping and sampling study of the Gakkel ridge was accomplished during an international ice-breaker expedition to the high Arctic and North Pole in summer 2001. For this slowest-spreading endmember of the global mid-ocean-ridge system, predictions were that magmatism should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases along the ridge, and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, it was found that magmatic variations are irregular, and that hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometre-long central amagmatic zone, where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the ridge axis, lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west, and large, widely spaced volcanic centres in the east. These observations demonstrate that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth or mantle chemistry (or both) must vary significantly along-axis. Highly punctuated volcanism in the absence of ridge offsets suggests that first-order ridge segmentation is controlled by mantle processes of melting and melt segregation. The strong focusing of magmatic activity coupled with faulting may account for the unexpectedly high levels of hydrothermal activity observed.

  13. Magmatic and amagmatic seafloor generation at the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Michael, P J; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Snow, J E; Goldstein, S L; Graham, D W; Lehnert, K; Kurras, G; Jokat, W; Mühe, R; Edmonds, H N

    2003-06-26

    A high-resolution mapping and sampling study of the Gakkel ridge was accomplished during an international ice-breaker expedition to the high Arctic and North Pole in summer 2001. For this slowest-spreading endmember of the global mid-ocean-ridge system, predictions were that magmatism should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases along the ridge, and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, it was found that magmatic variations are irregular, and that hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometre-long central amagmatic zone, where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the ridge axis, lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west, and large, widely spaced volcanic centres in the east. These observations demonstrate that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth or mantle chemistry (or both) must vary significantly along-axis. Highly punctuated volcanism in the absence of ridge offsets suggests that first-order ridge segmentation is controlled by mantle processes of melting and melt segregation. The strong focusing of magmatic activity coupled with faulting may account for the unexpectedly high levels of hydrothermal activity observed. PMID:12827193

  14. Segmentation in Oman Ophiolite and Fast Spreading Ridges Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. J.; Boudier, F. I.

    2004-12-01

    New, fine scale mapping in the large NW-SE ridge segment formerly identified in the Oman ophiolite (Nicolas and Boudier, 1995) has revealed that this structure is composed of smaller nestled segments, each being centered on the small mantle diapirs already mapped. The contacts with adjacent lithosphere and the tips of these segments have been mapped in detail. Their nature and structure depend on the difference in age between the two lithospheres. When the difference in age is in the range of 1 Myr, strike slip shear zones, 1-2 km wide, are developed in the mantle of the new segment. When this difference drops to ~0.5 Myr, the shear zones are small and diffuse but, in the mantle wedge at the tip of the segment which penetrates the older lithosphere, spectacular deformations are observed. The mantle and lower crust of the older lithosphere near the Moho are shoveled vertically and kilometer-sized folds develop in the gabbro unit. In contrast, the lid is not affected, suggesting that, at present day fast spreading ridges, similar major tectonic structures, seen in Oman thanks to deep sections, may also be present. Contacts and tips of new segments are invaded by mafic dikes and sills issued from the segment magmatic activity and trapped against these colder boundaries. An important contribution to this magmatism results from massive seawater penetration down to the Moho, possibly favored by the segment tectonic activity. Inside crystallizing magma chamber, the hydrous reaction (Koepke et al.,2004) generates orthopyroxene gabbros which are interlayered with the olivine gabbros. Outside the magma chamber, it generates, by hydrous anatexis, copious melts which mix and react with the indigenous segment melts and crystallize as pargasitic clinopyroxene gabbros and plagiogranites. It is suggested that their magmatic signature should be looked for in present day ridges. Nicolas, A. and Boudier, F., 1995, J.G.R., 100, 6179-6197. Koepke, J., Feig, S.T., Snow, J., Freise, M

  15. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-01

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges.

  16. New data about small-magnitude earthquakes of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexey N.; Vaganova, Natalya V.; Ivanova, Ekaterina V.; Konechnaya, Yana V.; Fedorenko, Irina V.; Mikhaylova, Yana A.

    2016-01-01

    At the present time there is available detailed bathymetry, gravimetric, magnetometer, petrological, and seismic (mb > 4) data for the Gakkel Ridge. However, so far not enough information has been obtained on the distribution of small-magnitude earthquakes (or microearthquakes) within the ridge area due to the absence of a suitable observation system. With the ZFI seismic station (80.8° N, 47.7° E), operating since 2011 at the Frantz Josef Land Archipelago, we can now register small-magnitude earthquakes down to 1.5 ML within the Gakkel Ridge area. This article elaborates on the results and analysis of the ZFI station seismic monitoring obtained for the period from December 2011 to January 2015. In order to improve the accuracy of the earthquakes epicenter locations, velocity models and regional seismic phase travel-times for spreading ridges in areas within the Euro-Arctic Region have been calculated. The Gakkel Ridge is seismically active, regardless of having the lowest spreading velocity among global mid-ocean ridges. Quiet periods alternate with periods of higher seismic activity. Earthquakes epicenters are unevenly spread across the area. Most of the epicenters are assigned to the Sparsely Magmatic Zone, more specifically, to the area between 1.5° E and 19.0° E. We hypothesize that assignment of most earthquakes to the SMZ segment can be explained by the amagmatic character of the spreading of this segment. The structuring of this part of the ridge is characterized by the prevalence of tectonic processes, not magmatic or metamorphic ones.

  17. Subduction of the South-Chile active spreading ridge: a 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Arnaud, Nicolas; Guivel, Christèle; Lagabrielle, Yves; Scalabrino, Bruno; Espinoza, Felipe

    2010-05-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4- 3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  18. Upper plate responses to active spreading ridge/transform subduction: The tectonics, basin evolution, and seismicity of the Taita area, Chile Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.; Prior, D. ); Styles, P.; Murdie, R. ); Agar, S.; Turner, P. )

    1993-02-01

    Integrated field geophysical, structural and stratigraphic studies are attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and consequences of the Late Miocene-present day subduction of the Chile Ridge triple junction system. Preliminary data indicate a shallow plane of seismicity at about 15 km to 20 km depth below the Taitao peninsula. The depths correspond to the predicted depth range of subducted upper ocean crust. The calculated Bouguer anomaly map cannot be explained by the upper plate geology, suggesting that gravity is influenced by heterogeneities in the subducting oceanic plate. Seismic data imply that a subducted transform system underlying the inner Taitao Peninsula is still an active structure. A series of Middle-Late Tertiary sedimentary basins lie inboard of the triple junction. Within the Cosmelli basin, abrupt marine to continental facies transitions give clear evidence of base level changes. The amount of basinward shift of facies across sequence boundaries gets progressively greater up stratigraphy, indicating progressively greater base level changes. The lower part of the basin fill is folded and then thrusted eastward as a series of imbricates, while the overlying, greater thickness of fluvial sediments are only gently tilted westwards. We provisionally interpret this geometry to indicate that the early basin fill was deforming due to contractional tectonics while the later basin fill was being deposited. This complex basin history may reflect initiation and development of triple junction subduction.

  19. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in ultra-slow spreading Arctic and Polar Atlantic ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Grokholsky, A. L.; Kokhan, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    The system of regional spreading ridges includes Reikjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich and Gakkel ridges. They are rather young (spreading initiated 58-60 Myr ago) and ultra-slow (spreading velocity < 20 mm/year). But all of them have peculiarities in structure patterns, kinematics, and morphology. In order to study geodynamical features of structure-forming on these ridges we apply experimental modeling. This study covers three of the ridges mentioned above: Reikjanes, Knipovich and Gakkel. The specified experimental complex and model material were used in modeling sets. The model material used in modeling is a colloidal system composed of mineral oils, solid hydrocarbon and surface-active substances. It has elastic-viscous-plastic properties, under temperature and strain rate, it is capable of failure like a brittle body. All experiments were held according to similarity conditions. Reikjanes ridge is situated south-west of Iceland. It shows changes of morphology from north to south. The northern part of it is characterized by axial rise, the southern part - by axial valley. The main feature of axial morphology is presence of s-shaped axial volcanic ridges (AVRs). The angle between ridge trend and plate divergence trend is nearly 60°. All these features are explained by influence of mantle flow from the Iceland mantle plum initiating the increasing of mantle temperature. It results in decreasing of litospheric brittle layer with approaching to Iceland. The experimental setting was following. The weak zone was emplaced obliquely, crustal thickness and width of weak zone varied in sets. Conditions of northern part of the ridge were reproduced in sets with the widest weak zone and the smallest crustal thickness and vice versa. In sets reproducing conditions of northern province we received long and non-discontinued AVRs, on the other hand we received short and displaced AVRs in south-like conditions. Knipovich ridge stretches along Spitsbergen continental margin

  20. Explosive volcanism on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Robert A; Willis, Claire; Humphris, Susan; Shank, Timothy M; Singh, Hanumant; Edmonds, Henrietta N; Kunz, Clayton; Hedman, Ulf; Helmke, Elisabeth; Jakuba, Michael; Liljebladh, Bengt; Linder, Julia; Murphy, Christopher; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Sato, Taichi; Schlindwein, Vera; Stranne, Christian; Tausenfreund, Maria; Upchurch, Lucia; Winsor, Peter; Jakobsson, Martin; Soule, Adam

    2008-06-26

    Roughly 60% of the Earth's outer surface is composed of oceanic crust formed by volcanic processes at mid-ocean ridges. Although only a small fraction of this vast volcanic terrain has been visually surveyed or sampled, the available evidence suggests that explosive eruptions are rare on mid-ocean ridges, particularly at depths below the critical point for seawater (3,000 m). A pyroclastic deposit has never been observed on the sea floor below 3,000 m, presumably because the volatile content of mid-ocean-ridge basalts is generally too low to produce the gas fractions required for fragmenting a magma at such high hydrostatic pressure. We employed new deep submergence technologies during an International Polar Year expedition to the Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Basin at 85 degrees E, to acquire photographic and video images of 'zero-age' volcanic terrain on this remote, ice-covered ridge. Here we present images revealing that the axial valley at 4,000 m water depth is blanketed with unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, including bubble wall fragments (limu o Pele), covering a large (>10 km(2)) area. At least 13.5 wt% CO(2) is necessary to fragment magma at these depths, which is about tenfold the highest values previously measured in a mid-ocean-ridge basalt. These observations raise important questions about the accumulation and discharge of magmatic volatiles at ultraslow spreading rates on the Gakkel ridge and demonstrate that large-scale pyroclastic activity is possible along even the deepest portions of the global mid-ocean ridge volcanic system.

  1. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  2. Hydrological response to a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Davis, Earl; Becker, Keir; Dziak, Robert; Cassidy, John; Wang, Kelin; Lilley, Marvin

    2004-07-15

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are known to respond to seismic and magmatic activity along mid-ocean ridges, often resulting in locally positive changes in hydrothermal discharge rate, temperature and microbial activity, and shifts in composition occurring at the time of earthquake swarms and axial crustal dike injections. Corresponding regional effects have also been observed. Here we present observations of a hydrological response to seafloor spreading activity, which resulted in a negative formation-fluid pressure transient during and after an earthquake swarm in the sediment-sealed igneous crust of the Middle Valley rift of the northernmost Juan de Fuca ridge. The observations were made with a borehole seal and hydrologic observatory originally established in 1991 to study the steady-state pressure and temperature conditions in this hydrothermally active area. The magnitude of the co-seismic response is consistent with the elastic strain that would be expected from the associated earthquakes, but the prolonged negative pressure transient after the swarm is surprising and suggests net co-seismic dilatation of the upper, permeable igneous crust. The rift valley was visited four weeks after the onset of the seismic activity, but no signature of increased hydrothermal activity was detected in the water column. It appears that water, not magma, filled the void left by this spreading episode.

  3. Hydrological response to a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Davis, Earl; Becker, Keir; Dziak, Robert; Cassidy, John; Wang, Kelin; Lilley, Marvin

    2004-07-15

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are known to respond to seismic and magmatic activity along mid-ocean ridges, often resulting in locally positive changes in hydrothermal discharge rate, temperature and microbial activity, and shifts in composition occurring at the time of earthquake swarms and axial crustal dike injections. Corresponding regional effects have also been observed. Here we present observations of a hydrological response to seafloor spreading activity, which resulted in a negative formation-fluid pressure transient during and after an earthquake swarm in the sediment-sealed igneous crust of the Middle Valley rift of the northernmost Juan de Fuca ridge. The observations were made with a borehole seal and hydrologic observatory originally established in 1991 to study the steady-state pressure and temperature conditions in this hydrothermally active area. The magnitude of the co-seismic response is consistent with the elastic strain that would be expected from the associated earthquakes, but the prolonged negative pressure transient after the swarm is surprising and suggests net co-seismic dilatation of the upper, permeable igneous crust. The rift valley was visited four weeks after the onset of the seismic activity, but no signature of increased hydrothermal activity was detected in the water column. It appears that water, not magma, filled the void left by this spreading episode. PMID:15254534

  4. The SHEBA Ridge : a Particular Spreading Center or an End-member of the Slow Spreading Processes ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENTE, P.; LEROY, S.; BLAIS, A.; d'ACREMONT, E.; PATRIAT, P.; FLEURY, J.; MAIA, M.; PERROT, J.; FOURNIER, M.

    2001-12-01

    We analyze multibeam bathymetry, acoustic imagery, magnetic and gravity data collected during the Encens-Sheba cruise of the NO Marion Dufresne. The survey covered the axis and the flanks up to the continental margins of the Sheba Ridge between 52oE and 54o30'E, at the oriental extremity of the Aden gulf. The full spreading rate in this young oceanic basin is about 2 cmy since the continental rifting. Three second-order segments, one presenting an anomalously shallow axis, characterize this part of the Sheba ridge. The new bathymetry data reveal a particular fabric on the flanks and at the axis for the long (120 km) and shallow spreading center. The flanks, like the ridge axis, are marked by large, more or less circular, volcanic domes. They are built by a few large volcanoes (5-10 km diameter) and by several smaller (1-2 km diameter) edifices. Many of these volcanoes present a well-developed caldera. These volcanic constructions are well developed in the southern part of the axis. Close to the axis, the higher reliefs culminate at a depth of 1000 m. Tectonic scarps limit a deep axial valley at the extremities of this long segment. The deformation, diffuse at the ends, becomes more focused toward the center of this segment and is arranged in an hourglass pattern. A negative mantle Bouguer anomaly elongated in the spreading direction marks this segment. The differences in MBA (~70 mgals) and in depth (more than 2 km) between the center and the ends of this segment are the largest, highest of the slow spreading ridges. Acoustic imagery, axial magnetic and mantle Bouguer anomalies generally permit to precise the location of the spreading axis. In this segment, if the axial area is clearly defined, the neovolcanic zone is more difficult to localize. This suggests a diffuse volcanism at the center of the segment at the origin of the numerous small volcanoes. The other segments of the Sheba ridge present a more typical slow spreading axial valley. The discontinuities

  5. Dependence of ridge-axis morphology on magma supply and spreading rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps Morgan, Jason; Ghen, Y. John

    1993-08-01

    WHY do some mid-ocean-ridge axes have as their topographic expression a median valley 1-2 km deep and 15-30 km wide, whereas others have an axial high 100-200 m high and 1-2 km wide? In general, median valleys exist at the axes of ridges spreading at half-rates less than ~ 20-25 mm yr-1, whereas axial highs are found at faster-spreading ridges1,2. A recent crustal genesis model3, incorporating hydrothermal cooling and crustal accretion by means of a magma lens, agrees well with observations of the spreading-rate dependence of axial morphology1,2, the depth of the axial magma chamber3,4 and the thickness of the ridge-axis lithosphere5,6. But there are several notable exceptions to the correlation between spreading rate and axial morphology, such as the Reykjanes Ridge, which spreads at l0mm yr-1 but has an axial high. Here we show that by extending the model of ref. 3 to include variations in crustal thickness, we can explain the observed dependence of axial morphology on crustal thickness and spreading rate. Our results suggest that the ultimate control on axial morphology is the thermal structure at the ridge axis, which is a function of both spreading rate and magma supply.

  6. Hydrothermal activity at the Arctic mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Nygård, Tor Eivind; Lilley, Marvin D.; Kelley, Deborah S.

    Over the last 10 years, hydrothermal activity has been shown to be abundant at the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridges (AMOR). Approximately 20 active and extinct vent sites have been located either at the seafloor, as seawater anomalies, or by dredge sampling hydrothermal deposits. Decreasing spreading rates and decreasing influence of the Icelandic hot spot toward the north along the AMOR result in a north-south change from a shallow and magmatically robust to a deep and magmatically starved ridge system. This contrast gives rise to large variability in the ridge geology and in the nature of the associated hydrothermal systems. The known vent sites at the southern part of the ridge system are either low-temperature or white smoker fields. At the deep, northern parts of the ridge system, a large black smoker field has been located, and seawater anomalies and sulfide deposits suggest that black smoker-type venting is common. Several of these fields may be peridotite-hosted. The hydrothermal activity at parts of the AMOR exceeds by a factor of 2 to 3 what would be expected by extrapolating from observations on faster spreading ridges. Higher fracture/fault area relative to the magma volume extracted seems a likely explanation for this. Many of the vent fields at the AMOR are associated with axial volcanic ridges. Strong focusing of magma toward these ridges, deep rifting of the ridges, and subsequent formation of long-lived detachment faults that are rooted below the ridges may be the major geodynamic mechanisms causing the unexpectedly high hydrothermal activity.

  7. Magma Systems Formation and Crustal Accretion in Intermediate-rate Spreading Ridges of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Galushkin, Y. I.; Sveshnikov, A. A.; Grokholsky, A.

    2008-12-01

    Fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) are known to be characterized by well-developed axial rises with axial magma chambers (AMC) in the crust, whereas slow spreading centers with deep rift valleys are devoid of AMC. An AMC disappears when spreading rate is about 4-5 cm/year. Approximately the same spreading rate is marked by axial morphology transition from axial rises to rift valleys. This transition was thoroughly analyzed for South-East Indian intermediate spreading ridge. Typical patterns of bathymetric profiles across the rift axis with transitional morphology were revealed. Dimensions and relative position of profile constituents change regularly with morphology turning from axial rises to rift valleys. A non-steady thermal model of spreading with periodic axial intrusions allows an explanation of location, size and shape of the crust and mantle magma chambers. This model also permits us to analyze changes in parameters including spreading rate, temperature and composition of the mantle and crust rocks. In the axial zones of intermediate spreading ridges with higher mantle temperature (e.g., under the influence of mantle plumes or hot spots), the modeling confirms an occurrence of the zones with higher melt concentration (magma chambers) at two levels: at depth ~2 km and more in the crust and just below the Moho boundary in the mantle. In the axial zones of intermediate spreading ridges with lower mantle temperature, a quasi steady-state magma chamber in the crust does not exist, but here, formation of the short-living magma chambers in the crust is possible. Difference in location depth, shape and sizes of magma chambers in spreading ridges result in considerable differences in rheologic behavior and accretion mechanisms of the crust and therefore in relief and deep structure of the crust. The steady-state crust magma chambers in the fast spreading ridges or in the intermediate spreading ridges with higher mantle temperature secure a differentiation of

  8. The influence of isotropic and anisotropic crustal permeability on hydrothermal flow at fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Rüpke, Lars; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    We use 3-D numerical models of hydrothermal fluid flow to assess the magnitude and spatial distribution of hydrothermal mass and energy fluxes within the upper and lower oceanic crust. A better understanding of the hydrothermal flow pattern (e.g. predominantly on-axis above the axial melt lens vs. predominantly off-axis and ridge-perpendicular over the entire crustal thickness) is essential for quantifying the volume of oceanic crust exposed to high-temperature fluid flow and the associated leaching and redistribution of economically interesting metals. The initial setup of all 3-D models is based on our previous 2-D studies (Theissen-Krah et al., 2011), in which we have coupled numerical models for crustal accretion and hydrothermal fluid flow. One result of these 2-D calculations is a crustal permeability field that leads to a thermal structure in the crust that matches seismic tomography data at the East Pacific Rise. Our reference 3-D model for hydrothermal flow at fast-spreading ridges predicts the existence of a hybrid hydrothermal system (Hasenclever et al., 2014) with two interacting flow components that are controlled by different physical mechanisms. Shallow on-axis flow structures develop owing to the thermodynamic properties of water, whereas deeper off-axis flow is strongly shaped by crustal permeability, particularly the brittle-ductile transition. About ˜60% of the discharging fluid mass is replenished on-axis by warm (up to 300oC) recharge flow surrounding the hot thermal plumes. The remaining ˜40%, however, occurs as colder and broader recharge up to several kilometres away from the ridge axis that feeds hot (500-700oC) deep off-axis flow in the lower crust towards the ridge. Both flow components merge above the melt lens to feed ridge-centred vent sites. In a suite of 3-D model calculations we vary the isotropic crustal permeability to quantify its influence on on-axis vs. off-axis hydrothermal fluxes as well as on along-axis hydrothermal

  9. Venus trough-and-ridge tessera - Analog to earth oceanic crust formed at spreading centers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The similarity between the morphologies of Venus trough-and-ridge tessera and the earth's ocean floor is discussed. The hypothesis that tessera texture might be related to a crustal fabric produced at spreading centers is examined. It is suggested that the proccesses that produce the ocean floor fabric on earth are good candidates for the origin and production of the trough-and-ridge tessera. To support this hypothesis, the characteristics of the trough-and-ridge terrain in Laima Tessera are described and compared to the seafloor at spreading centers.

  10. Venus trough-and-ridge tessera - Analog to earth oceanic crust formed at spreading centers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.

    1990-05-01

    The similarity between the morphologies of Venus trough-and-ridge tessera and the earth's ocean floor is discussed. The hypothesis that tessera texture might be related to a crustal fabric produced at spreading centers is examined. It is suggested that the proccesses that produce the ocean floor fabric on earth are good candidates for the origin and production of the trough-and-ridge tessera. To support this hypothesis, the characteristics of the trough-and-ridge terrain in Laima Tessera are described and compared to the seafloor at spreading centers.

  11. Mechanics of gravitational spreading of steep-sided ridges («sackung»)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Varnes, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Large-scale gravitational spreading of steep-sided ridges characterized by linear fissures, trenches, and uphill-facing scarps high on the sides and tops of ridges are known worldwide. Such spreading, termed sackung, is commonly attributed to pervasive plastic deformation of a rock mass, and is here analyzed as such. Beginning with a previously developed exact elastic solution for gravity-induced stresses in a symmetric ridge, stresses calculated from the exact solution are used in the Coulomb failure criterion to determine the extent of ridge failure under self-weight. Finally, when the regions of failure are established, a plastic flow solution is applied to predict the location of and sense of movement on upward-facing scarps near ridge crests and other features common in sackung. ?? 1987 International Assocaition of Engineering Geology.

  12. Formation of volcanic edifices in response to changes in magma budget at intermediate spreading rate ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J.; White, S. M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices along mid-ocean ridges have a well known correlation with spreading rate. Along slow spreading centers, volcanic edifices are normally distributed about the segment center. Volcanic edifices along fast spreading centers have the opposing trend, i.e. edifices form primarily at the ends of segments. However, in ridges affected by plumes and at back arc basins, the spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices differ from that observed at normal ridges of the same spreading rate. This suggests that magma supply rate may control the spatial and abundance distribution of volcanic edifices. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies along the Galapagos Spreading Centers (GSC), Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the Valu Fa (VF) and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (ELSC) put tight constraints on crustal thickness, making it possible investigate the effect of magma budget and axial morphology on the formation of volcanic edifices. Volcanic edifices are described according to their volume, shape (their height to basal radius ratio) and their location relative to the end or center of a segment (abundance distribution). For the GSC, the shape and distribution of volcanic edifices correlate with changes in crustal thickness and axial morphology, consistent with a magma supply control on their formation in this region. This relationship is not apparent along the SEIR or JdFR, where edifices show little variation with changes in axial morphology at relatively constant spreading rates. Results for VF and ELSC are what we expect for changes in spreading rate, not axial morphology. Our study suggests that the formation of volcanic edifices at intermediate spreading rate ridges are influenced by magma budget but only when it is above a certain threshold.

  13. Off- and Along-Axis Slow Spreading Ridge Segment Characters: Insights From 3d Thermal Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, S.; Tisseau, C.; Dyment, J.

    2001-12-01

    Many observations along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge segments suggest a correlation between surface characters (length, axial morphology) and the thermal state of the segment. Thibaud et al. (1998) classify segments according to their thermal state: "colder" segments shorter than 30 km show a weak magmatic activity, and "hotter" segments as long as 90 km show a robust magmatic activity. The existence of such a correlation suggests that the thermal structure of a slow spreading ridge segment explains most of the surface observations. Here we test the physical coherence of such an integrated thermal model and evaluate it quantitatively. The different kinds of segment would constitute different phases in a segment evolution, the segment evolving progressively from a "colder" to a "hotter" so to a "colder" state. Here we test the consistency of such an evolution scheme. To test these hypotheses we have developed a 3D numerical model for the thermal structure and evolution of a slow spreading ridge segment. The thermal structure is controlled by the geometry and the dimensions of a permanently hot zone, imposed beneath the segment center, where is simulated the adiabatic ascent of magmatic material. To compare the model with the observations several geophysic quantities which depend on the thermal state are simulated: crustal thickness variations along axis, gravity anomalies (reflecting density variations) and earthquake maximum depth (corresponding to the 750° C isotherm depth). The thermal structure of a particular segment is constrained by comparing the simulated quantities to the real ones. Considering realistic magnetization parameters, the magnetic anomalies generated from the same thermal structure and evolution reproduce the observed magnetic anomaly amplitude variations along the segment. The thermal structures accounting for observations are determined for each kind of segment (from "colder" to "hotter"). The evolution of the thermal structure from the "colder" to

  14. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bézos, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 °C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing number of

  15. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bezos, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 degrees C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing

  16. Gravitational spreading of steep-sided ridges ("sackung") in Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.; Savage, W.Z.

    1976-01-01

    Large-scale gravitational spreading and movement along fractures of steep-sided ridges in the mountainous areas of the western United States are characterized by linear fissures, trenches, and uphill-facing scarps on tops and sides of ridges. Spreading appears to take place by movement along disconnected planes and/or by slow plastic deformation of a rock mass. In some places, valleyward squeezing out of weak shales overlain by rigid rocks causes extensional fracturing and outward movement of the rigid layers, as illustrated by extension of two laccoliths overlying Mancos Shale, one at Dolores Peak and another at Crested Butte in western Colorado. Gravitational forces acting on a ridge of more homogeneous material causes tensional spreading of the ridge parallel to its long axis, for example in fractured granitic rock north of Mt. Massive in central Colorado, where a survey course has been established to monitor the movement. Recognition and understanding of these large-scale gravitational features and the mechanism that causes them are pertinent to site selection and design of engineering structures in high mountains. If fractures extend to considerable depth and if movement is continuing, engineering structures in valleys or tunnels through the spreading ridges could be damaged. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  17. Hybrid on-axis plus ridge-perpendicular circulation reconciles hydrothermal flow observations at fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, J.; Theissen-Krah, S.; Rupke, L.; Morgan, J.; Iyer, K. H.; Petersen, S.; Devey, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present crustal-scale 3D numerical calculations of hydrothermal fluid flow at fast spreading ridges. The model domain covers 5 km along-axis, 20 km across-axis and extends down to Moho depth. We observe that a complex hydrothermal system develops that extends over the entire crustal thickness and forms a series of on-axis vent fields with an average along-ridge spacing of 500-1000m. This hydrothermal system comprises two distinct flow components: (1) An on-axis circulation above the melt lens with recharging flow surrounding the hot up-flow zones. (2) A ridge-perpendicular circulation with recharge areas located kilometers away from the ridge. Here fluids penetrate the crust down to Moho depth and travel at temperatures of 400-600°C towards the ridge where they merge with the on-axis circulation in a reaction zone above the axial melt lens. Fluids released at the seafloor are a mixture of both components, with an average ratio between proximately- and distally-sourced fluids of about 2:1. This hybrid hydrothermal system reconciles previously incompatible observations that support either on-axis or ridge-perpendicular circulation patterns. The potential co-existence of two interacting hydrothermal circulations at fast spreading ridges is of importance for the interpretation of chemical signatures at hydrothermal vents and the quantification of the mass and energy exchange between ocean and solid earth: (1) A vertically and laterally extended ridge-perpendicular circulation will expose a much larger volume of oceanic crust to high-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Especially the lower crust would also be exposed to significant hydrothermal fluid flow and thus geochemical mining. (2) Fluids that migrate ridge-perpendicular and undergo phase separation at depth are likely to separate gravitationally from the denser and highly saline brine phase. Only the vapor-like phase may migrate up-slope towards the top of the melt lens, where these fluids would provide a

  18. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joshua J; John, Barbara E; Cheadle, Michael J; Miranda, Elena A; Grimes, Craig B; Wooden, Joseph L; Dick, Henry J B

    2005-10-28

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas approximately 25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of approximately 5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank.

  19. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joshua J; John, Barbara E; Cheadle, Michael J; Miranda, Elena A; Grimes, Craig B; Wooden, Joseph L; Dick, Henry J B

    2005-10-28

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas approximately 25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of approximately 5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank. PMID:16254183

  20. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, J.J.; John, Barbara E.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Miranda, E.A.; Grimes, Craig B.; Wooden, J.L.; Dick, H.J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas ???25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of ???5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank.

  1. No spreading across the southern Juan de Fuca ridge axial cleft during 1994-1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwell, C.D.; Hildebrand, J.A.; Spiess, Fred N.; Morton, J.L.; Normark, W.R.; Reiss, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40' N and 130??20' W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (~1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5??7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40 minutes N and 130??20 minutes W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (approx. 1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5 ?? 7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.

  2. Gakkel Ridge at 85°E/85°N: Seismicity and Structure of an Ultraslow Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korger, Edith; Schlindwein, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridges are divergent plate boundaries, which spread apart with less than 20 mm/yr. Their appearance is very rugged, with steep rift flanks, numerous normal faults and discontinuous volcanic activity at discrete volcanic centres - drastically different from ridges which spread faster. Due to the inaccessible area where these ridges are found, much less is know about lithospheric structure than at faster spreading ridges. Gakkel Ridge spans between Greenland and Siberia, crossing through the Arctic Ocean. There, a perennial ice cover inhibits seismic surveys. At 85°E/85°N where the spreading rate is only about 10.2 mm/yr, a volcanic spreading centre is located. It was spectacularly active in 1999, spawning over 250 teleseismically registered earthquakes with body wave magnitudes up to 5.2 and lasting 9 months. At this site, volcanic cones and fresh lava were captured by seafloor imagery in 2007. Making use of the ice cover, three arrays of four seismometers each were deployed in 2007 on ice floes, drifting 16 days over the area and recording more than 300 local events. Due to the drift of the ice floes, the location of the arrays changed with time, resulting in sufficient ray coverage suitable for a local earthquake tomography. We present here the results of this tomography, the first ever done at an ultraslow spreading centre. We compiled a 1D local velocity model from confidently located hypocentres. While incorporating the varying 3D bathymetry and the water layer, we used 124 microearthquakes which had been recorded by at least two arrays for generating a local 3D earthquake tomographic model. At spreading rates below 20 mm/yr it has been proposed that conductive heat loss should increase, leading to a thinner crust. Yet, our results infer a deep Moho at about 7 km beneath seafloor and hypocentres as deep as 16 km (bsf.) which implies an exceptionally thick crust and cold lithosphere. Theoretical thermal models for the axial lithospheric

  3. The Afar region as an analogue of mature oceanic ridges: a model for slow spreading centres?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, Sarah; Pik, Raphaël; Burnard, Peter; France, Lyderic; Whaler, Kathryn

    2014-05-01

    The Afar depression (Ethiopia) is organised along magmatic rift segments which morphologically resemble oceanic ridges. The segmentation in individual magmatic rift segments results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed in mature oceanic ridges. Therefore the Afar region represents an ideal natural and subaerial analogue laboratory to study the evolution of rift/ridge morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences.We focussed on the Dabbahu rift segment which experienced in 2005 a well-documented rifting event. This tectono-volcanic crisis provided invaluable information via the direct observation of a sequence of dyke intrusions. However, over timescales of 1 to 100 kyrs - a key period over which the main morphology of a rift/ridge segment is acquired - chronological constraints are very scarce. In order to address the lack of data on these timescales, a multidisciplinary study of the Dabbahu rift has combined surface exposure dating (3He and 36Cl) of lavas and fault scarp with major & trace element compositions and field/remote sensing mapping. Over three field campaigns, we investigated the Northern and central parts of the rift, from its western shoulders to the axial valley, allowing the long-term interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes to be deciphered (Medynski et al., 2013; Medynski et al. 2014a,b submitted). Based on this subaerial example of an active magmatic rift segment, we propose a model for the acquisition of slow spreading oceanic ridge morphology, where topography building is tightly tied to magma budget and location. Over a period of ~100 ka, magmatic accretion is maintained by successive intrusions of dikes that spread from the various magma chambers distributed along the rift, and which also provoke a local topographic response. The main topographic development is not continuous, but rather is linked to the degree of differentiation of these reservoirs. Our data show that magma chambers

  4. The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition -AMORE 2001- Seafloor Spreading at the Top of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. J.; Thiede, J.; Dick, H. J.; Goldstein, S. L.; Graham, D.; Jokat, W.; Langmuir, C. H.; Muhe, R.; Snow, J. E.

    2001-12-01

    with a central volcano. Transform faults are absent along both sections suggesting that they are not required for punctuated magmatism. Seismic refraction and reflection profiles were run across the basins on either side of Gakkel Ridge and show that crustal thickness varies with time. Along-axis seismic refraction profiles show anomalously fast velocities present at shallow levels in the crust. Heat flow measurements were performed in the axial valley and off-axis and revealed a highly variable pattern. We detected an unexpected amount of hydrothermal activity using MAPRs (Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders). About 30% of lowerings detected coupled anomalies in both light scattering and temperature, demonstrating that hydrothermal activity is abundant here and is therefore not correlated with spreading rate in a global context. Unweathered hydrothermal sulfides were dredged near the western end of the ridge, in an area with a MAPR anomaly. A camera tow also detected evidence for active venting. The name ``Aurora'' is proposed for this newly discovered vent field.

  5. Spreading behaviour of the Pacific-Farallon ridge system between 83 and 28 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    At 83 Ma, the roughly N-S oriented Pacific-Farallon ridge extended more than 10,000 km from 51° N to 43° S. Despite substantial shortening of the ridge system since ~55 Ma, this ridge and its remnants (e.g., the East Pacific Rise/EPR) have produced as much as 45% of all the reconstructable oceanic lithosphere created in the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic. Accurately reconstructing the past spreading history of the Pacific-Farallon ridge is therefore of paramount importance for determining possible variations in global spreading rates over geological time, which are the basis of suggested interactions between mantle dynamics, surface tectonics, sea-level rise and climate in the past 100 Myr. However, attempts to accurately determine Pacific-Farallon spreading face the twin challenges of extensive subduction of Farallon crust - which precludes reconstruction by fitting conjugate magnetic anomaly and fracture zone traces - and the well-established asymmetric spreading behaviour of the EPR and its ancestor ridges for at least the past 51 Myr. We present improved rotation poles for the Pacific-Farallon spreading system between geomagnetic chrons 34y (83 Ma) and 10y (28.28 Ma), complete with uncertainties that allow easier combination into global plate circuits. These poles are derived by combining magnetic anomaly and fracture zone data from both the northern and southern Pacific plate, maximising the data distribution along the original ridge length to average out local variations in spreading behaviour. We have calculated best fit 'half'-stage poles for Pacific-Farallon spreading between nine Pacific plate magnetic anomalies (34y, 33y, 29o, 24.3o, 20o, 18.2o, 17.1y, 13y and 10y). For poles younger than chron 24.3o, full stage poles have been calculated by using anomaly picks from yet-to-be subducted Farallon/Nazca crust in the south Pacific to determine spreading asymmetry. Characterisation of the variation in spreading asymmetry in the past 50 Ma also allows bounds

  6. Geoid height versus age for symmetric spreading ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, D.; Schubert, G.

    1980-01-01

    Geoid height-age relations have been extracted from Geos 3 altimeter data for large areas in the North Atlantic, South Atlantic, southeast Indian, and southeast Pacific oceans. Except for the southeast Pacific area, geoid height decreases approximately linearly with the age of the ocean floor for ages less than about 80 m.y. in agreement with the prediction of an isostatically compensated thermal boundary layer model (Haxby and Turcotte, 1978). The geoid-age data for 0 to 80 m.y. are consistent with constant slopes of -0.094 + or - -0.131 + or - 0.041, and -0.149 + or - 0.028 m/m.y. for the South Atlantic, southeast Indian, and North Atlantic regions, respectively. For ages greater than 80 m.y. the geoid-age relation for the North Atlantic is nearly flat, indicating a reduction in the rate of boundary layer thickening with age. The uncertainties in the geoid slope-age estimates are positively correlated with spreading velocity.

  7. The formation of post-spreading volcanic ridges in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghui; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; He, Enyuan; Tan, Pingchuan; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Xuelin

    2016-04-01

    In the South China Sea (SCS), the post-spreading magmatism (˜8-13 Ma) largely masks the previous spreading fabric. The resulting post-spreading seamounts are more numerous in the northern part than in the southern part of the East sub-basin. In the eastern part of the East sub-basin, the post-spreading volcanic ridge (PSVR) is approximately N055° oriented and follows the extinct spreading ridge (ESR). In the western part of the East sub-basin, the PSVR, called the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, is E-W oriented and hides the ESR. Based on swath bathymetric and magnetic data, the ESR in the eastern part of the East basin is also N055° oriented and thus is oblique the E-W Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain (Sibuet et al., 2016). We conducted a seismic refraction survey covering both the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain and the adjacent ESR, providing new constraints for understanding the relationship between the PSVR and the ESR. The detailed velocity structure shows that the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain was emplaced through a typical oceanic crust. The thicknesses of Zhenbei (14 km) and Huangyan seamounts (8 km) are larger than the ones of the normal oceanic crust. The correlation between crustal thicknesses and mean lower-crustal seismic velocities suggest that an asymmetric generation of seamounts in the East sub-basin where active upwelling mantle (Holbrook et al., 2001), the presence of a fertile mantle component (Korenaga et al., 2002), or buoyancy-driven decompression melting may happened (Castillo et al., 2010). Below the seamounts, the thickened lower crust is probably due to secondary magmatic intrusions and the large thickness of upper crust is possibly due to volcanic extrusions. The crustal thicknesses as well as the mean lower-crustal velocities of the Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts are different, suggesting an independent origin for magmatic feeding. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 91428204

  8. Continental margin volcanism at sites of spreading ridge subduction: Examples from southern Alaska and western California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Ronald B.; Stewart, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    compositions, with ɛ Nd( t) and 87Sr/ 86Sr( t) ranging from + 6.3 to - 3.2 and 0.70390 to 0.71131, respectively, among the western California samples and from + 10.1 to + 7.3 and 0.70299 to 0.70413, respectively, in the southern Alaska Caribou Creek samples. Compared to the basalts, the intermediate to acidic samples of each group also show enrichment in the light rare earth and large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Ba, Rb, Th, K). These data indicate that assimilation of crustal rocks was important in the evolution of each volcanic suite, although in the case of the Caribou Creek volcanic field, the crustal rocks are of oceanic island arc affinity and did not impart a strong geochemical enrichment to the magmas. The depleted Nd and Sr isotope and trace element compositions, coupled with the relatively high Ti content and low Ba/Ta and Th/Yb ratios among the basalts, indicates that the basalt magmas of each group formed by a low-degree of partial melting from a depleted mantle source without a strong flux of fluid-mobile large ion lithophile elements as would occur above an actively dewatering subducted slab. This petrogenesis is consistent with a slab window model in which parental magmas were derived by decompression melting of suboceanic (sub-slab) mantle that upwelled into the opening that formed beneath each continental margin following spreading ridge subduction.

  9. Spreading History of a Segment of the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.; Clayton, R. W.

    2001-12-01

    The Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone in the South Atlantic Ocean separates crust that records the entire Cenozoic history of South America-Africa spreading (on the north) from crust on the south that experienced a more complicated plate motion history including major ridge jumps, an additional plate (Malvinas), and plate reorganizations in early Cenozoic time. The Nathaniel B. Palmer cruise 01-02 in April 2001 measured gravity, magnetics, and swath bathymetry on a transit from Cape Town to Punta Arenas, including a survey line in Cenozoic crust on the north side of, and parallel to, the Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone. The objectives were to test previous models of Cenozoic plate motions for this region, and to examine the structure of the Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone by collection of limited single-channel seismic data. From 5° W to 3° W longitude, several seismic lines with accompanying SeaBeam data across the northern flank of the fracture zone reveal it to be a wide zone characterized by multiple parallel southward-facing fault scarps whose strike is 70-80° E of N. From chron 12 time to chron 6 time, the spreading history for this segment of the ridge was relatively simple, with slightly asymmetric spreading rates (more crust accreted to South America than to Africa), as has been previously noted for this part of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Between chron 5c and chron 2a, the magnetic anomalies are complex and disrupted, suggesting possible small-scale ridge jumps and continued asymmetric spreading. The modern ridge axis is 40 km east of the topographic high ("ridge crest"). The zones of disrupted magnetic anomalies may be due to the effects of pseudofault traces in the same spreading corridor, visible in satellite gravity data in younger seafloor north of the transit. We recorded late Cretaceous and younger magnetic anomalies (chrons 34y to 18) on the Africa plate to improve the distribution of known magnetic anomaly locations in this part of the South

  10. Sediment distribution on the mid-ocean ridges with respect to spreading of the sea floor.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J; Ewing, M

    1967-06-23

    An abrupt change in sediment thickness between the crests and flanks of the mid-ocean ridges can be interpreted as a major discontinuity in the rates either of spreading of the sea floor or of accumulation of sediment. The preferable interpretation of the data is that the process of spreadig of the sea floor is intermittent and that the present cycle of spreading commenced around 10 million years ago. following a long period Of quiescence during which most of the observed sediments were deposited.

  11. Seismic structure of an amagmatic section of the ultra-slow spreading South West Indian Ridge: the 2014 Sismosmooth cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Cannat, M.; Momoh, E. I.; Singh, S. C.; Watremez, L.; Sauter, D.; Autin, J.; Louden, K. E.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Daniel, R.; Jourdain, A.; Huot, G.; Sergent, L.; Wang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Exhumation of mantle derived rocks at the seafloor is common at slow spreading ridges, and is observed or inferred in the distal parts of many divergent continental margins (Ocean Continent transition-OCT). It is therefore a fundamental plate tectonic process. It involves large normal fault displacements, and has consequences in terms of magmatic and hydrothermal processes, two parameters that (with divergence rates) control the thermal evolution of the plate boundary. Mantle exhumation may also favor specific deep seafloor ecosystems (hydrogen and methane produced during serpentinization may be used as a fuel for microbial activity). Key questions at both slow-spreading ridges and OCTs are: how do exhumation faults work? how deep does serpentinization extend? and what is the proportion between serpentinized mantle and intrusive magmatic rocks within the seismic crust?In order to address these questions, and to characterise the nature of oceanic crust formed in an amagmatic section of an ultra-slow spreading ridge, we acquired 3D seismic reflection and refraction data across the South West Indian Ridge at 64.3°E in October 2014 aboard R/V Marion-Dufresne. The study area is a corridor of nearly amagmatic spreading, where previous sampling indicates that continuous tectonic exhumation of mantle-derived peridotites occurred over the past 8-10myrs (Sauter et al., Nature Geosc. 2013). We used a 4.5 km long streamer and 38 ocean bottom seismometers in 56 deployment. Our cruise was designed to characterize velocity-depth profiles and Vp/Vs ratio in variably serpentinized ultramafic basement, their lateral variability, and the differences between axial and off-axis areas, as well as the seismic reflectivity structure in exhumed ultramafic domains. We also aimed to image the active detachment fault responsible for on-going mantle rocks exhumation at the ridge. In this poster presentation, we provide details on the experimental setting, and an overview of the results of

  12. Hydrothermal activity on near-arc sections of back-arc ridges: Results from the Mariana Trough and Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Massoth, Gary J.; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Embley, Robert W.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Arculus, Richard J.

    2005-09-01

    The spatial density of hydrothermal venting is strongly correlated with spreading rate on mid-ocean ridges (with the interesting exception of hot spot-affected ridges), evidently because spreading rate is a reliable proxy for the magma budget. This correlation remains untested on spreading ridges in back-arc basins, where the magma budget may be complicated by subduction-induced variations of the melt supply. To address this uncertainty, we conducted hydrothermal plume surveys along slow-spreading (40-60 mm/yr) and arc-proximal (10-60 km distant) sections of the southern Mariana Trough and the Valu Fa Ridge (Lau Basin). On both sections we found multiple plumes overlying ˜15-20% of the total length of each section, a coverage comparable to mid-ocean ridges spreading at similar rates. These conditions contrast with earlier reported results from the two nearest-arc segments of a faster spreading (60-70 mm/yr) back-arc ridge, the East Scotia Ridge, which approaches no closer than 100 km to its arc. There, hydrothermal venting is relatively scarce (˜5% plume coverage) and the ridge characteristics are distinctly slow-spreading: small central volcanic highs bookended by deep median valleys, and axial melt lenses restricted to the volcanic highs. Two factors may contribute to an unexpectedly low hydrothermal budget on these East Scotia Ridge segments: they may lie too far from the adjacent arc to benefit from near-arc sources of melt supply, and subduction-aided migration of mantle from the Bouvet hot spot may reduce hydrothermal circulation by local crustal warming and thickening, analogous to the Reykjanes Ridge. Thus the pattern among these three ridge sections appears to mirror the larger global pattern defined by mid-ocean ridges: a well-defined trend of spreading rate versus hydrothermal activity on most ridge sections, plus a subset of ridge sections where unusual melt delivery conditions diminish the expected hydrothermal activity.

  13. SWEAP: Southwest Indian Ridge Earthquakes and Plumes: First Results from a Comparative Seismicity Study of Magmatic and Amagmatic Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Scholz, J. R.; Schmid, F.

    2014-12-01

    Cruise ANT-29/8 (SWEAP) of RV Polarstern in November 2013 headed for the Oblique Supersegment of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the "Furious Fifties" to recover 10 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) after recording earthquake activity for a period of one year. The OBS recovery was flanked by a multidisciplinary science program that searched in difficult sea conditions for signs of hydrothermal venting, examined deep-sea fauna and determined the thermal regime of this rift section. The seismic activity that accompanies crustal generation at ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges is hardly known. We present here preliminary results from the first-ever long-term deployment of OBS networks at two locations of the SWIR. We instrumented the segment 8 volcano near 65°E with 8 OBS and the amagmatically spreading Oblique Supersegment with 10 OBS, two of which returned no data. The networks had dimensions of 60 km x 40 km and a comparable station spacing of about 15 km. A first data analysis suggests that the seismic activity of the magmatic segment is about 4 times as high as that of the magmatically starved Oblique Supersegment. Interestingly, the segment 8 volcano itself displays a prominent seismic gap with a complete absence even of small earthquakes while the adjacent rift valley hosts earthquakes down to 15 km depth indicating a cold lithosphere. This spatial earthquake distribution may reflect an up-doming lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary that has been postulated to guide melts towards the widely spaced volcanoes of ultraslow spreading ridges.

  14. Spreading behaviour of the Pacific-Farallon ridge system since 83 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Christopher J.; Rowley, David B.

    2014-06-01

    We present improved rotations, complete with uncertainties, for the Pacific-Farallon Ridge (PFR) between geomagnetic chrons 34y (83 Ma) and 10y (28.28 Ma). Despite substantial shortening since ˜55 Ma, this ridge system and its remnants (e.g. the East Pacific Rise) have produced as much as 45 per cent of all oceanic lithosphere created since the Late Cretaceous, but reconstructions face the twin challenges of extensive subduction of Farallon crust-which precludes reconstruction by fitting conjugate magnetic anomaly and fracture zone (FZ) traces-and asymmetric spreading behaviour for at least the past 51 Myr. We have calculated best-fit `half'-angle stage rotations between nine geomagnetic chron boundaries (34y, 33y, 29o, 24.3o, 20o, 18.2o, 17.1y, 13y and 10y) using combined anomaly and FZ data from both the northern and southern Pacific Plate. For rotations younger than chron 24.3o, estimates for spreading asymmetry, derived using anomaly picks from yet-to-be subducted Farallon/Nazca crust in the south Pacific, allow full stage rotations to be calculated. Between 50 and 83 Ma, where no direct constraints on spreading asymmetry are possible, a `best-fit' full stage rotation was calculated based on the net Nazca:Pacific spreading asymmetry (Pacific spreading fraction fPAC = 0.44) over the past 50 Myr, with conservative lower and upper bounds, based on variability in the degree of spreading asymmetry over periods of <15 Myr, assuming fPACs of 0.5 and 0.36, respectively. Synthetic flowlines generated from our new stage rotation produce a better match to Pacific FZ trends than previously published rotations. With the exception of the chron 18o-20o rotation, the six stage poles for rotations between chrons 33y and 13y (74-33 Ma) all cluster tightly at 60-75°E, 60-68°N, consistent with the relatively constant trend of the major Pacific FZs. This stability spans at least one episode of Farallon Plate fragmentation caused by subduction of PFR segments beneath the Americas

  15. Seafloor Geodetic Evidence of Episodic Spreading 25 km East of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Spiess, F. N.; Hildebrand, J. A.; Dragert, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate, with no exposed landmass, encompassed by the larger Pacific and North America plates. Over geologic time, the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates continuously diverge along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). GPS combined with acoustic ranging (GPS-A) provides a method to observe present-day seafloor positions with centimeter resolution. From 1994-1999, using an acoustic ranging system that straddled the JdFR Cleft Segment, we observed no spreading across a 700-m wide zone spanning the central cleft. However, seaward of the northern Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ), a GPS-A array was observed to move continuously between 1994 to 1996 at about the average geologic rate. These contrasting results suggest that a transition zone must exist between episodic spreading occurring at the JdFR and the continuous motion nearer the CSZ. In this zone the motion would be expected to lag behind that of the bulk of the JdF plate while the ridge crest is locked and then, subsequent to a spreading event at the ridge crest, the velocity in the transition zone would be greater than the plate average to compensate for the loss. To investigate the transition zone, we established a GPS-Acoustic reference site 25 km off-axis from the Cleft array on the east flank of the JdFR. Preliminary results from analyses of the GPS-A data collected in 2000 and 2002, while still characterized by large errors, show that this site may be lagging behind the bulk of the JdF plate. Analysis of additional data, and a scheduled 2003 return to the area, should refine these results. At this time they clearly suggest that the flank region is currently in the portion of the cycle preceding a spreading event. The work was supported by NSF-OCE-9907247.

  16. Spreading Rate versus Magma Supply in the Region of Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 16.5° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmiotto, C.; Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Cann, J. R.; Dick, H. J.; Parnell-Turner, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The region of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 16.5° N is a slow spreading center characterized by several detachment faults and oceanic core complexes. This area is ideal to study the relationship between the formation and the evolution of detachment faults, the role of magma supply during detachment faulting, and its effect on the magnetization of the crust at a slow-spreading center. In May-June 2013, during cruise KN210-05 on RV Knorr, we acquired multibeam bathymetry and sea surface magnetic anomaly data to understand the spreading history of a section of the MAR near 16.5° N. Multibeam data acquired using a SeaBeam 3012 system show that the ridge axis can be divided into a northern segment, characterized by a 4500-m deep axial valley, and a southern segment, which is characterized by a robust and continuous axial volcanic ridge which reaches to 3200 m water depth. Both segments are bordered to the west by active detachment faults. Magnetic data were acquired with a Marine Magnetics SeaSPY system, and inverted for crustal magnetization. The inversion assumes a constant thickness source layer of 0.5 km whose upper bound is bathymetry. Isochrons were identified from the magnetization map. We found that spreading rate is symmetric, and have calculated a total spreading rate in this area of ~24 km/Ma for the last 4 Ma. The central anomaly (Brunhes, 0-0.78 Ma) in the southern segment, however, has only half the predicted width of ~ 20 km and is located exclusively east of the axis. No Brunhes normal magnetization is recorded in the rift valley floor west of the axis, which is the hanging wall of the detachment. This observation confirms predictions from ';asymmetric' spreading at oceanic core complexes where slip along long-lived detachment faults take up extension on one (western) side and magmatic accretion occurs exclusively to the other (eastern) of the axis; the hanging wall, bounded by detachment fault and axis, should be as old as the core complex and its

  17. Intraplate compressional deformation in West-Congo and the Congo basin: related to ridge-puch from the South Atlantic spreading ridge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien; Everaerts, Michel; Kongota Isasi, Elvis; Ganza Bamulezi, Gloire

    2016-04-01

    After the break-up and separation of South America from Africa and the initiation of the South-Atlantic mid-oceanic ridge in the Albian, at about 120 Ma, ridge-push forces started to build-up in the oceanic lithosphere and were transmitted to the adjacent continental plates. This is particularly well expressed in the passive margin and continental interior of Central Africa. According to the relations of Wiens and Stein (1985) between ridge-push forces and basal drag in function of the lithospheric age of oceanic plates, the deviatoric stress reaches a compressional maximum between 50 and 100, Ma after the initiation of the spreading ridge, so broadly corresponding to the Paleocene in this case (~70-20 Ma). Earthquake focal mechanism data show that the West-Congo margin and a large part of the Congo basin are still currently under compressional stresses with an horizontal compression parallel to the direction of the active transform fracture zones. We studied the fracture network along the Congo River in Kinshasa and Brazzaville which affect Cambrian sandstones and probably also the late Cretaceous-Paleocene sediments. Their brittle tectonic evolution is compatible with the buildup of ridge-push forces related to the South-Atlantic opening. Further inland, low-angle reverse faults are found affecting Jurassic to Middle Cretaceous cores from the Samba borehole in the Congo basin and strike-slip movements are recorded as a second brittle phase in the Permian cores of the Dekese well, at the southern margin of the Congo basin. An analysis of the topography and river network of the Congo basin show the development of low-amplitude (50-100 m) long wavelengths (100-300 km) undulations that can be interpreted as lithospheric buckling in response to the compressional intraplate stress field generated by the Mid-Atlantic ridge-push. Wiens, D.A., Stein, S., 1985. Implications of oceanic intraplate seismicity for plate stresses, driving forces and theology. Tectonophysics

  18. The Patuki intrusive suite: closed-system fractionation beneath a slow-spreading ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivell, W. J.; Waterhouse, J. B.

    A wide range of mafic and ultramafic rock types, together with cogenetic silicic plagiogranites, form a structurally coherent intrusive sequence within the Patuki Volcanics at south D'Urville Island, New Zealand. In addition, gabbroic rocks comprise abundant tectonic inclusions in highly-sheared, concordant serpentinite bands which intrude the Patuki suite. Chemical evidence suggests many of the gabbros, including those in which recrystallization has obliterated original textures, represent magmatic cumulates and indicates extensive closed-system fractionation analogous to that known to occur beneath slow-spreading mid-oceanic ridges. Dyke intrusion occurred throughout the generation of the suite. An early stage of spreading is suggested by the anomalously low thickness of the sequence, the non-sheeted nature of the dyke suite and chemical characteristics of the lavas which comprise the extrusive component of the ophiolite.

  19. Insights on the Nature of the Geophysical Crust at a Melt-starved Slow-spreading Mid-oceanic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momoh, E. I.; Cannat, M.; Leroy, S. D.; Watremez, L.; Singh, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Of the 7200 km long very slow-spreading (14 mm/yr) Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR), which forms the plate boundary between Africa and the Antarctic, the easternmost portion represents an endmember of the global mid-ocean ridge system in terms of low melt supply. It is characterized by 30 to 70 km-wide corridors of nearly amagmatic spreading, separating domains of focused volcanic activity. Our study concerns one of these amagmatic corridors. Volcanic features that typically characterize other ridge systems are scarce and the seafloor is mostly made of exhumed mantle-derived sepentinized periodotites. Long-offset detachment faults are proposed to be responsible for exhumation, and provide the context for serpentinization. In this poster presentation, we use seismic constraints to discuss the kilometer-scale characteristics of the geophysical crust formed at the melt-poor divgergent plate boundaries. To supply these constraints, we use seismic data acquired during the recent Sismosmooth cruise (2014; E64o20' to E65o). We show seismic reflection results from three 2D coincident across-axis lines, and two 2D axis-parallel lines processed in a self-similar manner and merged to improve the information content. From these, we show evidence for the expression of the active detachment fault responsible for mantle exhumation. This fault can be followed to ~ 7.7 km at depth. To give an insight to the nature of the subsurface, we examine tomography results from wide-angle seismic refraction data, which suggests a thin geophysical crust. This is similar to models of geophysical crust proposed from gravity studies in the study area.

  20. Geochemical Characterization of Hydrothermal Plume Fluids From Peridotite- and Basalt- Dominated Regions of the Ultra-Slow Spreading Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upchurch, L.; Edmonds, H. N.; Resing, J.; Nakamura, K.; Buck, N.; Liljebladh, B.; Stranne, C.; Tupper, G.; Winsor, P.

    2007-12-01

    Geochemical characterization of hydrothermal plumes initially located during the 2001 AMORE cruise to the Gakkel Ridge was undertaken as part of the 2007 Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE). One peridotite- and one basalt-dominated area were targeted for this exploration to constrain the range of venting environments found on the Gakkel Ridge, the ultra-slow spreading endmember of the global mid-ocean ridge. CTD hydrocasts at the 7 E peridotite-hosted site relocated the plumes found initially on the AMORE cruise. The target plume was located between 2800 and 2950 meters and exhibited a localized signal in temperature and light scattering. While shipboard analysis of dissolved gases was unavailable at the 7 E site, samples were preserved for manganese and helium measurements. No Eh signal was found at the 7 E site. The 85 E basalt-hosted site has experienced recent volcanic activity and was more extensively studied relative to the 7 E site during the AGAVE cruise. CTD casts detected numerous temperature, light scattering, and Eh plumes at 85 E indicative of multiple hydrothermal sources. Three of the plumes sampled exhibited methane concentrations ranging from 20 nM to greater than 250 nM and hydrogen concentrations ranging from 10nM to 100nM. In situ Eh measurements recorded negative excursions of at least 25 mV in each plume. Associated manganese and particle chemistry samples collected at both sites will be analyzed in time for this meeting.

  1. Rapid hydrothermal cooling above the axial melt lens at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Koepke, Juergen; Kirchner, Clemens; Götze, Niko; Behrens, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Axial melt lenses sandwiched between the lower oceanic crust and the sheeted dike sequences at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are assumed to be the major magma source of oceanic crust accretion. According to the widely discussed “gabbro glacier” model, the formation of the lower oceanic crust requires efficient cooling of the axial melt lens, leading to partial crystallization and crystal-melt mush subsiding down to lower crust. These processes are believed to be controlled by periodical magma replenishment and hydrothermal circulation above the melt lens. Here we quantify the cooling rate above melt lens using chemical zoning of plagioclase from hornfelsic recrystallized sheeted dikes drilled from the East Pacific at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D. We estimate the cooling rate using a forward modelling approach based on CaAl-NaSi interdiffusion in plagioclase. The results show that cooling from the peak thermal overprint at 1000–1050°C to 600°C are yielded within about 10–30 years as a result of hydrothermal circulation above melt lens during magma starvation. The estimated rapid hydrothermal cooling explains how the effective heat extraction from melt lens is achieved at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. PMID:25209311

  2. Rapid hydrothermal cooling above the axial melt lens at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Koepke, Juergen; Kirchner, Clemens; Götze, Niko; Behrens, Harald

    2014-09-11

    Axial melt lenses sandwiched between the lower oceanic crust and the sheeted dike sequences at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are assumed to be the major magma source of oceanic crust accretion. According to the widely discussed "gabbro glacier" model, the formation of the lower oceanic crust requires efficient cooling of the axial melt lens, leading to partial crystallization and crystal-melt mush subsiding down to lower crust. These processes are believed to be controlled by periodical magma replenishment and hydrothermal circulation above the melt lens. Here we quantify the cooling rate above melt lens using chemical zoning of plagioclase from hornfelsic recrystallized sheeted dikes drilled from the East Pacific at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D. We estimate the cooling rate using a forward modelling approach based on CaAl-NaSi interdiffusion in plagioclase. The results show that cooling from the peak thermal overprint at 1000-1050°C to 600°C are yielded within about 10-30 years as a result of hydrothermal circulation above melt lens during magma starvation. The estimated rapid hydrothermal cooling explains how the effective heat extraction from melt lens is achieved at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  3. Rapid hydrothermal cooling above the axial melt lens at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Koepke, Juergen; Kirchner, Clemens; Götze, Niko; Behrens, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Axial melt lenses sandwiched between the lower oceanic crust and the sheeted dike sequences at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are assumed to be the major magma source of oceanic crust accretion. According to the widely discussed "gabbro glacier" model, the formation of the lower oceanic crust requires efficient cooling of the axial melt lens, leading to partial crystallization and crystal-melt mush subsiding down to lower crust. These processes are believed to be controlled by periodical magma replenishment and hydrothermal circulation above the melt lens. Here we quantify the cooling rate above melt lens using chemical zoning of plagioclase from hornfelsic recrystallized sheeted dikes drilled from the East Pacific at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D. We estimate the cooling rate using a forward modelling approach based on CaAl-NaSi interdiffusion in plagioclase. The results show that cooling from the peak thermal overprint at 1000-1050°C to 600°C are yielded within about 10-30 years as a result of hydrothermal circulation above melt lens during magma starvation. The estimated rapid hydrothermal cooling explains how the effective heat extraction from melt lens is achieved at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. PMID:25209311

  4. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon Flag oceanic core complex at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (49°39'E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Li, Jiabiao; Sauter, Daniel; Ruan, Aiguo; Chen, John; Cannat, Mathilde; Singh, Satish; Zhang, Jiazheng; Wu, Zhenli; Niu, Xiongwei

    2013-10-01

    The Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is an ultraslow spreading end-member of mid-ocean ridge system. We use air gun shooting data recorded by ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and multibeam bathymetry to obtain a detailed three-dimensional (3-D) P wave tomographic model centered at 49°39'E near the active hydrothermal "Dragon Flag" vent. Results are presented in the form of a 3-D seismic traveltime inversion over the center and both ends of a ridge segment. We show that the crustal thickness, defined as the depth to the 7 km/s isovelocity contour, decreases systematically from the center (˜7.0-8.0 km) toward the segment ends (˜3.0-4.0 km). This variation is dominantly controlled by thickness changes in the lower crustal layer. We interpret this variation as due to focusing of the magmatic activity at the segment center. The across-axis velocity model documents a strong asymmetrical structure involving oceanic detachment faulting. A locally corrugated oceanic core complex (Dragon Flag OCC) on the southern ridge flank is characterized by high shallow crustal velocities and a strong vertical velocity gradient. We infer that this OCC may be predominantly made of gabbros. We suggest that detachment faulting is a prominent process of slow spreading oceanic crust accretion even in magmatically robust ridge sections. Hydrothermal activity at the Dragon Flag vents is located next to the detachment fault termination. We infer that the detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection.

  5. Serpentinization Rates at Slow-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges: From Sample Scale to Plate-Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Rouméjon, S.

    2015-12-01

    About 25% of the crust formed at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges includes a component of tectonically exhumed and partially serpentinized mantle-derived peridotites. Exhumation occurs along large offset normal faults (detachment faults). In this presentation we outline a conceptual and testable model for serpentinization at slow-spreading ridges, based on petrological observations of samples of variably serpentinized peridotites from the Mid Atlantic and Southwest Indian ridges, on tectonic and geophysical data and on current interpretations of plate-boundary processes at slow spreading ridges. Serpentinization at mid-ocean ridges is a heterogeneous and multistage process occurring along fractures, in the footwall of axial detachments. The initial and most pervasive stage of serpentinization results in the typical serpentine mesh texture. We propose that it occurs when hydrothermal fluids reach extensively microfractured fresh peridotite. Subsequent stages of serpentinization appear to involve higher fluid-rock ratio along larger fractures and veins that are spaced by at least a few decimeters. Experimental data indicate that each stage of serpentinization identified in a given sample may have occurred at very high rates relative to the rates of tectonic exhumation. However, serpentinization (initial and later stages) may be a protracted process at the km-scale, associated with complex fracturation of the detachment's footwall due to combined tectonic and reaction-induced stresses. We outline possible consequences of this conceptual model in terms of crustal structure, hydrogen production and of the relations between serpentinization and black smoker-type hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges.

  6. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-01

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  7. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-01

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. PMID:11343114

  8. Seismic anisotropy indicates ridge-parallel asthenospheric flow beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, William; Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.; Blackman, Donna K.

    2015-02-01

    Seismic anisotropy beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) is investigated using both Rayleigh waves and shear waves, using data from the 2009-2010 ELSC ocean bottom seismograph experiment. Phase velocities of Rayleigh waves determined by ambient noise cross correlation are inverted for azimuthally anisotropic phase velocity maps. Splitting of S waves from five intermediate and deep focus earthquakes was determined by waveform analysis. Taken together, Rayleigh wave and S wave data indicate that significant (~2%) anisotropy extends to at least 300 km depth. Both data sets indicate a fast direction aligned within a few degrees of the N10°E striking ELSC and somewhat oblique to the N25°E strike of the neighboring volcanic arc. We therefore describe the fast direction as spreading perpendicular, not convergence perpendicular and interpret it as due to ridge-parallel flow of the asthenosphere. However, the region arcward (east) of the ELSC has the stronger anisotropy, suggesting that the strongest flow gradients may occur in the region between the spreading center and the arc, in contrast to being centered beneath the ELSC. Fluids released from the underlying plate may produce anisotropic hydrous materials, but more importantly lower the viscosity, thus enhancing along-strike flow. Both could contribute to an along-strike fast direction signature. Seafloor spreading diminishes south of the seismic array, ceasing altogether south of latitude 25°S (500 km south of the array center), a region dominated by much slower tectonic extension, suggesting that asthenosphere is inflowing from the north to accommodate the increase in asthenospheric volume associated with the seafloor spreading.

  9. Effects of Fertile Mantle Compositional Variation and Spreading Rate Variation on the Working of Global Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; O'Hara, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle temperature variation, plate spreading rate variation and mantle compositional variation have been considered to be the three fundamental variables that govern the working of global ocean ridges [1]. An analysis demonstrates that mantle compositional variation exerts the primary control on ocean ridge processes; it determines (1) variation in both composition and mode of mantle mineralogy, (2) variation of mantle density, (3) variation of ridge axial depth, (4) source-inherited MORB compositional variation, (4) density-controlled variation in the amplitude of mantle upwelling, (5) apparent variation in the extent of melting, and (6) the correlated variation of MORB chemistry with ridge axial depth [2]. The above interpretations are reinforced by the updated MORB database [3]. The new database also confirms spreading rate control on the extent of melting as shown previously [4]. Mantle temperature variation could play a part, but its overstated role [3,5] results from a basic error (1) in treating ridge axial depth variation as evidence of mantle temperature variation by ignoring the intrinsic control of mantle composition, (2) in treating "mantle plume" influenced ridges (e.g., Iceland) as normal ridges of plate spreading origin, and (3) in treating low Vs at greater depths (> 300 km vs. < 200 km beneath ridges) beneath these "mantle plume" influenced ridges as evidence for hot ridge mantle. In order to understand the working of global ocean ridges, we must avoid plume-influenced ridges (e.g., in the vicinity of Iceland) and remove/average out data from such ridges. As a result, the correlations (e.g., between ridge axial depth, mantle low Vs anomaly, and some geochemical parameters) required for the interpretation of mantle temperature control all disappear. There is thus no evidence for large mantle temperature variation away from ridges influenced by "mantle plumes". References: [1] Niu et al., 2001, Earth Planet Sci. Lett., 186, 383-399; [2] Niu & O

  10. Spreading-rate dependence of melt extraction at mid-ocean ridges from mantle seismic refraction data.

    PubMed

    Lizarralde, Daniel; Gaherty, James B; Collins, John A; Hirth, Greg; Kim, Sangmyung D

    2004-12-01

    A variety of observations indicate that mid-ocean ridges produce less crust at spreading rates below 20 mm yr(-1) (refs 1-3), reflecting changes in fundamental ridge processes with decreasing spreading rate. The nature of these changes, however, remains uncertain, with end-member explanations being decreasing shallow melting or incomplete melt extraction, each due to the influence of a thicker thermal lid. Here we present results of a seismic refraction experiment designed to study mid-ocean ridge processes by imaging residual mantle structure. Our results reveal an abrupt lateral change in bulk mantle seismic properties associated with a change from slow to ultraslow palaeo-spreading rate. Changes in mantle velocity gradient, basement topography and crustal thickness all correlate with this spreading-rate change. These observations can be explained by variations in melt extraction at the ridge, with a gabbroic phase preferentially retained in the mantle at slower spreading rates. The estimated volume of retained melt balances the approximately 1.5-km difference in crustal thickness, suggesting that changes in spreading rate affect melt-extraction processes rather than total melting. PMID:15592410

  11. Spreading-rate dependence of melt extraction at mid-ocean ridges from mantle seismic refraction data.

    PubMed

    Lizarralde, Daniel; Gaherty, James B; Collins, John A; Hirth, Greg; Kim, Sangmyung D

    2004-12-01

    A variety of observations indicate that mid-ocean ridges produce less crust at spreading rates below 20 mm yr(-1) (refs 1-3), reflecting changes in fundamental ridge processes with decreasing spreading rate. The nature of these changes, however, remains uncertain, with end-member explanations being decreasing shallow melting or incomplete melt extraction, each due to the influence of a thicker thermal lid. Here we present results of a seismic refraction experiment designed to study mid-ocean ridge processes by imaging residual mantle structure. Our results reveal an abrupt lateral change in bulk mantle seismic properties associated with a change from slow to ultraslow palaeo-spreading rate. Changes in mantle velocity gradient, basement topography and crustal thickness all correlate with this spreading-rate change. These observations can be explained by variations in melt extraction at the ridge, with a gabbroic phase preferentially retained in the mantle at slower spreading rates. The estimated volume of retained melt balances the approximately 1.5-km difference in crustal thickness, suggesting that changes in spreading rate affect melt-extraction processes rather than total melting.

  12. How the growth and freeboard of continents may relate to geometric and kinematic parameters of mid-ocean spreading ridges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    If the volume of continents has been growing since 4 Ga then the area of the ocean basins must have been shrinking. Therefore, by inferring a constant continental freeboard, in addition to constant continental crustal thicknesses and seawater volume, it is possible to calculate the necessary combinations of increased ridge lengths and spreading rates required to displace the seawater in the larger oceans of the past in order to maintain the constant freeboard. A reasonable choice from the various possibilities is that at 4 Ga ago, the ridge length and spreading rates were ca. 2.5 times greater than the averages of these parameters during the past 200 Ma. By 2.5 Ga ago the ridge length and spreading rate decreased to about 1.8 times the recent average and by 1 Ga ago these features became reduced to approximately 1.4 times recent averages. ?? 1989.

  13. Lower crustal differentiation processes beneath a back-arc spreading ridge (Marsili seamount, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trua, Teresa; Marani, Michael; Barca, Donatella

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the texture and chemical zoning of phenocrysts of six basic lavas (five basalts and one basaltic andesite) from the Marsili volcano, the superinflated spreading ridge of the Marsili back-arc basin (Southern Tyrrhenian). The samples, dredged from different portions of the volcano, were selected in order to represent the two distinct mafic magmas that sourced its plumbing system. Four of the basalts and the basaltic andesite have an Island Arc Basalt (IAB) affinity, dominant amongst the erupted Marsili lavas; the fifth basalt is an Ocean Island Basalt (OIB)-like lava erupted during the late stage of volcano activity. Olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase are the prevalent phenocrysts, except for two basalts that lack clinopyroxene. In addition, small amphibole crystals are found in the basaltic andesite sample. Olivine is more forsteritic (Fo91-75) in the basalts than in the basaltic andesite (Fo78-74) and in all samples a proportion of crystals shows Fo compositions in near equilibrium with the respective whole-rock composition. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts from IAB basalts have higher Mg number (Mg# = 89-83) than those from the OIB lava (Mg# = 81-84), implying that clinopyroxene joined the liquidus shortly after olivine during the early stage of IAB magma fractionation whereas the OIB magma saturated in clinopyroxene after a more extensive olivine crystallization. In both IAB and OIB-like lavas, the clinopyroxene phenocrysts record crystallization at Moho depth. A common feature of these clinopyroxenes is the intra-crystal trace element variability, indicative of melt mixing during crystal growth. The mixing process involved chemically variable mantle melts derived from incremental fractional melting of the Marsili mantle source. An-rich plagioclases joined liquidus after the earlier fractionation assemblage of olivine-clinopyroxene. The An-rich crystals display distinct features, such as a range of textures and the concurrent increase of Sr and Ba

  14. Exploring the plutonic crust at a fast-spreading ridge:new drilling at Hess Deep

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam; Guerin, Gilles; Abe, Natsue; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J.; Adriao, Alden de Brito; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J.; Friedman, Sarah A.; Godard, Marguerite M.; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J.; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M.; John, Barbara E.; Koepke, Juergen H.; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E.; McCaig, Andrew M.; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2013-02-28

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hess Deep Expedition 345 was designed to sample lower crustal primitive gabbroic rocks that formed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) in order to test models of magmatic accretion and the intensity of hydrothermal cooling at depth. The Hess Deep Rift was selected to exploit tectonic exposures of young EPR plutonic crust, building upon results from ODP Leg 147 as well as more recent submersible, remotely operated vehicle, and near-bottom surveys. The primary goal was to acquire the observations required to test end-member crustal accretion models that were in large part based on relationships from ophiolites, in combination with mid-ocean ridge geophysical studies. This goal was achieved with the recovery of primitive layered olivine gabbros and troctolites with many unexpected mineralogical and textural relationships, such as the abundance of orthopyroxene and the preservation of delicate skeletal olivine textures.

  15. Effusive and explosive volcanism on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, 85°E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontbriand, Claire W.; Soule, S. Adam; Sohn, Robert A.; Humphris, Susan E.; Kunz, Clayton; Singh, Hanumant; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Jakobsson, Martin; Shank, Timothy

    2012-10-01

    We use high-definition seafloor digital imagery and multibeam bathymetric data acquired during the 2007 Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-1full rate). Our seafloor imagery reveals that the axial valley is covered by numerous, small-volume (order ˜1000 m3) lava flows displaying a range of ages and morphologies as well as unconsolidated volcaniclastic deposits with thicknesses up to 10 cm. The valley floor contains two prominent volcanic lineaments made up of axis-parallel ridges and small, cratered volcanic cones. The lava flows appear to have erupted from a number of distinct source vents within the ˜12-15 km-wide axial valley. Only a few of these flows are fresh enough to have potentially erupted during the 1999 seismic swarm at this site, and these are associated with the Oden and Loke volcanic cones. We model the widespread volcaniclastic deposits we observed on the seafloor as having been generated by the explosive discharge of CO2 that accumulated in (possibly deep) crustal melt reservoirs. The energy released during explosive discharge, combined with the buoyant rise of hot fluid, lofted fragmented clasts of rapidly cooling magma into the water column, and they subsequently settled onto the seafloor as fall deposits surrounding the source vent.

  16. Crustal accretion at fast spreading ridges and implications for hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen-Krah, S.; Rupke, L.; Hasenclever, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic crust is continuously created at mid-ocean ridges, but the location of lower crust crystallization continues to be debated since the proposal of the gabbro glacier and many sills end-member models. Geophysical and geochemical studies find evidence for either of the models. The crust is cooled by a combination of heat diffusion and advection, and hydrothermal circulation is thought to play a key role in distinguishing between both models. We use our numerical model for joint modeling of crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation1 to test different accretion and hydrothermal cooling scenarios. The results match the seismic and structural observations from the East Pacific Rise2 and the Oman Ophiolite3, with a shallow melt lens at the correct location overlaying a narrow volume of partially molten rocks. Our results show that no more than 25-50% of the lower crust crystallizes in situ and that deep circulation is likely to occur at fast and intermediate spreading ridges. The occurrence of deep hydrothermal cooling however does not rule out that a major portion of the lower crust is formed in the shallow melt lens; our simulations rather suggest that it is necessary independent of where in the lower crust crystallization takes place. 1 Theissen-Krah, S., Iyer, K., Rupke, L. H. & Morgan, J. P. Coupled mechanical and hydrothermal modeling of crustal accretion at intermediate to fast spreading ridges. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 311, 275-286, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2011.09.018 (2011). 2 Dunn, R. A., Toomey, D. R. & Solomon, S. C. Three-dimensional seismic structure and physical properties of the crust and shallow mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise at 9 degrees 30'N. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth 105, 23537-23555 (2000). 3 Nicolas, A. & Boudier, F. Structural contribution from the Oman ophiolite to processes of crustal accretion at the East Pacific Rise. Terra Nova 27, 77-96, doi:10.1111/ter.12137 (2015).

  17. Mantle control of a dynamically evolving spreading center: Mid-Atlantic Ridge 31-34 deg S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Peter J.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Blackman, Donna K.; Fox, Paul J.; Hanan, Barry B.; Harding, Alistair J.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Orcutt, John A.; Tolstoy, Maya

    1994-02-01

    A segment of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 33 deg S changes dramatically as its center is approached. Towards the center of the segment, the axis shoals from 3900 to 2400 m and a deep median valley nearly disappears. There is a prominent bullseye gravity low centered over the shallow summit, indicating thicker crust or lower density mantle or both. Incompatible element and radiogenic isotope ratios in MORB increase, creating a 'spike high' centered on the summit of the segment. The basalts' enrichment is confined to this robust ridge sement alone and is geochemically unlike the nearby hotspots at Tristan da Cunha, Gough and Discovery Islands. The average extent of mantle melting for the entire segment, as determined from mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) major element chemistry, is slightly greater than for adjacent segments. The segment has lengthened to 100 km by ridge propagation at both ends during the past 3.5 m.y., and is presently the longest and shallowest segment in the region. Although the ridge crest anomalies of this ridge segment strongly resemble those caused by the interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle hotspots, the geochemical and geophysical evidence suggests that they may instead be related to interaction of the ridge with a passively embedded chemical heterogeneity in the mantle.

  18. Hydrothermal Exploration of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center: Isolated Evolution on Earth’s Deepest Mid-Ocean Ridge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Huber, J. A.; Seewald, J.; van Dover, C.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D.; Connelly, D.; Honig, D. L.; Jakuba, M.; Kinsey, J. C.; McDermott, J.; Nakamura, K.; Sands, C.; Smith, J.; Sylva, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first systematic exploration for and characterization of hydrothermal vents and vent ecosystems on the short (~110 km), deep (> 5000 m), ultra-slow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) Mid-Cayman Rise in the Caribbean Sea. This work was carried out aboard the RV Cape Hatteras in October-November 2009 as part of the ChEss Project of the Census of Marine Life, funded through NASA’s ASTEP program and represents the first scientific field program funded to use WHOI’s new hybrid deep submergence vehicle, Nereus, first in AUV mode then in ROV mode. Prior to this work, evidence for hydrothermal venting had been found on every active spreading center investigated, including the comparably ultra-slow spreading ridges in the SW Indian Ocean and in the Arctic (Mohns, Knipovich & Gakkel Ridges). The organisms colonizing vents are renowned for their endemicity, their adaptations to the extreme chemical and physical conditions encountered and for differences in species level from one ocean basin to another. Consequently, the identification of any organisms colonizing vents of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center offers a critical opportunity to build upon our understanding of the dispersion of vent species and the potential role of the rise of the Isthmus of Panama (dating from ~5 Ma) as a vicariant event leading to the evolutionary divergence of Atlantic and Pacific vent faunas. Further, the MCSC is so deep that any vents present may occur at depths greater than all previously known vent systems, extending the known limits to life on our planet in terms of pressure, temperature, and vent-fluid chemistry. Finally, hydrothermal circulation through ultramafic rocks can generate abiotic synthesis of organic matter: an analog for the prebiotic basis for the origin of life on early Earth and Mars. In future years of this 4-year study, therefore, we will also aim to assess the relative importance of abiotic organic synthesis versus recycling of bio-organic material and/or chemical

  19. 238U and 230Th Excesses in Kolbeinsey Ridge Basalts: Implications for Melt Generation and Transport Beneath a Slow Spreading Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, K. W.; Mattielli, N.; Elliott, T.; Mertz, D.; Kelemen, P.; Devey, C.; Speigelman, M.; Murrell, M.

    2003-12-01

    Here we report measurements of U-Th disequilibria, Nd, and Sr isotopes and major- and trace-element compositions for 8 samples, from two suites of basalts from the slow-spreading Kolbeinsey Ridge (approx. 1 cm/yr. half-spreading rate; 67\\deg05' - 70 ° 26'N), north of Iceland. These basalts show both significant 238U excesses [(230Th /238U)<1] and 230Th excesses [(230Th /238U) > 1], with (230Th /238U) ranging from 0.95 to 1.24. While the samples (230Th/232Th) activities are essentially constant (1.25 to 1.29), there is a large range in (238U /232Th) activities (1.00 to 1.32); therefore these data lie on a horizontal array on a (230Th/232Th)- (238U /232Th) isochron plot. 226Ra has not been measured for these samples; however, the fact that they form a horizontal array, which can be interpreted as a zero-age slope, provides strong evidence in support of the young age of these samples. Another independent geological constraint on these samples' young ages comes from the observation that the cruise dredges recovered basaltic glass, rather than glacial wash-out, suggesting their ages are <10ka. Normalized trace element abundances indicate that all samples are highly depleted [e.g. (La/Yb)n < 0.4]. The samples with 238U excesses have the lowest Th concentrations, which is compatible with either shallow mantle melting or shallow mantle melt-rock reaction. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of these samples are not correlated with (230Th /238U) and fall into two groups relative to their proximity to Iceland: samples south of the Spar fracture Zone generally are isotopically enriched, while samples north of the Spar fracture zone are isotopically depleted, reflecting a change in mantle source composition north and south of the fracture zone . The lack of a correlation between the Nd and Sr isotopic compositions and (230Th /238U) suggests that the variability in U/Th and (230Th /238U) in the Kolbeinsey samples is best explained by melting processes and not the mixing of melts

  20. Microbial community diversity in seafloor basalt from the Arctic spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Lysnes, Kristine; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav; Øvreås, Lise; Torsvik, Terje; Pedersen, Rolf B

    2004-11-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting recent (< or =1 million years old; Ma) seafloor basalts from the Arctic spreading ridges were analyzed using traditional enrichment culturing methods in combination with culture-independent molecular phylogenetic techniques. Fragments of 16S rDNA were amplified from the basalt samples by polymerase chain reaction, and fingerprints of the bacterial and archaeal communities were generated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. This analysis indicates a substantial degree of complexity in the samples studied, showing 20-40 dominating bands per profile for the bacterial assemblages. For the archaeal assemblages, a much lower number of bands (6-12) were detected. The phylogenetic affiliations of the predominant electrophoretic bands were inferred by performing a comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Sequences obtained from basalts affiliated with eight main phylogenetic groups of Bacteria, but were limited to only one group of the Archaea. The most frequently retrieved bacterial sequences affiliated with the gamma-proteobacteria, alpha-proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. The archaeal sequences were restricted to the marine Group 1: Crenarchaeota. Our results indicate that the basalt harbors a distinctive microbial community, as the majority of the sequences differed from those retrieved from the surrounding seawater as well as from sequences previously reported from seawater and deep-sea sediments. Most of the sequences did not match precisely any sequences in the database, indicating that the indigenous Arctic ridge basalt microbial community is yet uncharacterized. Results from enrichment cultures showed that autolithotrophic methanogens and iron reducing bacteria were present in the seafloor basalts. We suggest that microbial catalyzed cycling of iron may be important in low-temperature alteration of ocean crust basalt. The phylogenetic and physiological diversity of the seafloor basalt

  1. Microbial community diversity in seafloor basalt from the Arctic spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Lysnes, Kristine; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav; Øvreås, Lise; Torsvik, Terje; Pedersen, Rolf B

    2004-11-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting recent (< or =1 million years old; Ma) seafloor basalts from the Arctic spreading ridges were analyzed using traditional enrichment culturing methods in combination with culture-independent molecular phylogenetic techniques. Fragments of 16S rDNA were amplified from the basalt samples by polymerase chain reaction, and fingerprints of the bacterial and archaeal communities were generated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. This analysis indicates a substantial degree of complexity in the samples studied, showing 20-40 dominating bands per profile for the bacterial assemblages. For the archaeal assemblages, a much lower number of bands (6-12) were detected. The phylogenetic affiliations of the predominant electrophoretic bands were inferred by performing a comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Sequences obtained from basalts affiliated with eight main phylogenetic groups of Bacteria, but were limited to only one group of the Archaea. The most frequently retrieved bacterial sequences affiliated with the gamma-proteobacteria, alpha-proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. The archaeal sequences were restricted to the marine Group 1: Crenarchaeota. Our results indicate that the basalt harbors a distinctive microbial community, as the majority of the sequences differed from those retrieved from the surrounding seawater as well as from sequences previously reported from seawater and deep-sea sediments. Most of the sequences did not match precisely any sequences in the database, indicating that the indigenous Arctic ridge basalt microbial community is yet uncharacterized. Results from enrichment cultures showed that autolithotrophic methanogens and iron reducing bacteria were present in the seafloor basalts. We suggest that microbial catalyzed cycling of iron may be important in low-temperature alteration of ocean crust basalt. The phylogenetic and physiological diversity of the seafloor basalt

  2. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure ( P- T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  3. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-05-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure (P-T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  4. Subalkaline andesite from Valu Fa Ridge, a back-arc spreading center in southern Lau Basin: petrogenesis, comparative chemistry, and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Jenner, G.A.; Frey, F.A.; Gill, J.B.; Davis, A.S.; Volpe, A.M.; Hawkins, J.W.; Morris, J.D.; Cawood, Peter A.; Morton, J.L.; Scholl, D. W.; Rautenschlein, M.; White, W.M.; Williams, Ross W.; Stevenson, A.J.; White, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Tholeiitic andesite was dredged from two sites on Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), a back-arc spreading center in Lau Basin. Valu Fa Ridge, at least 200 km long, is located 40-50 km west of the active Tofua Volcanic Arc (TVA) axis and lies about 150 km above the subducted oceanic plate. One or more magma chambers, traced discontinuously for about 100 km along the ridge axis, lie 3-4 km beneath the ridge. The mostly aphyric and glassy lavas had high volatile contents, as shown by the abundance and large sizes of vesicles. An extensive fractionation history is inferred from the high SiO2 contents and FeO* MgO ratios. Chemical data show that the VFR lavas have both volcanic arc and back-arc basin affinities. The volcanic arc characteristics are: (1) relatively high abundances of most alkali and alkaline earth elements; (2) low abundances of high field strength elements Nb and Ta; (3) high U/Th ratios; (4) similar radiogenic isotope ratios in VFR and TVA lavas, in particular the enrichment of 87Sr 86Sr relative to 206Pb 204Pb; (5) high 238U 230Th, 230Th 232Th, and 226Ra 230Th activity ratios; and (6) high ratios of Rb/Cs, Ba/Nb, and Ba/La. Other chemical characteristics suggest that the VFR lavas are related to MORB-type back-arc basin lavas. For example, VFR lavas have (1) lower 87Sr 86Sr ratios and higher 143Nd 144Nd ratios than most lavas from the TVA, except samples from Ata Island, and are similar to many Lau Basin lavas; (2) lower Sr/REE, Rb/Zr, and Ba/Zr ratios than in arc lavas; and (3) higher Ti, Fe, and V, and higher Ti/V ratios than arc lavas generally and TVA lavas specifically. Most characteristics of VFR lavas can be explained by mixing depleted mantle with either small amounts of sediment and fluids from the subducting slab and/or an older fragment of volcanic arc lithosphere. The eruption of subalkaline andesite with some arc affinities along a back-arc spreading ridge is not unique. Collision of the Louisville and Tonga ridges probably activated back-arc extension

  5. Composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralogy of associated chimney material on the East Scotia Ridge back-arc spreading centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Rachael H.; Green, Darryl R. H.; Stock, Michael J.; Alker, Belinda J.; Banerjee, Neil R.; Cole, Catherine; German, Christopher R.; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Powell, Alexandra M.; Connelly, Douglas P.

    2014-08-01

    The East Scotia Ridge is an active back-arc spreading centre located to the west of the South Sandwich island arc in the Southern Ocean. Initial exploration of the ridge by deep-tow surveys provided the first evidence for hydrothermal activity in a back-arc setting outside of the western Pacific, and we returned in 2010 with a remotely operated vehicle to precisely locate and sample hydrothermal sites along ridge segments E2 and E9. Here we report the chemical and isotopic composition of high- and low-temperature vent fluids, and the mineralogy of associated high-temperature chimney material, for two sites at E2 (Dog’s Head and Sepia), and four sites at E9 (Black & White, Ivory Tower, Pagoda and Launch Pad). The chemistry of the fluids is highly variable between the ridge segments. Fluid temperatures were ∼350 °C at all vent sites except Black & White, which was significantly hotter (383 °C). End-member chloride concentrations in E2 fluids (532-536 mM) were close to background seawater (540 mM), whereas Cl in E9 fluids was much lower (98-220 mM) indicating that these fluids are affected by phase separation. Concentrations of the alkali elements (Na, Li, K and Cs) and the alkaline earth elements (Ca, Sr and Ba) co-vary with Cl, due to charge balance constraints. Similarly, concentrations of Mn and Zn are highest in the high Cl fluids but, by contrast, Fe/Cl ratios are higher in E9 fluids (3.8-8.1 × 10-3) than they are in E2 fluids (1.5-2.4 × 10-3) and fluids with lowest Cl have highest Cu. Although both ridge segments are magmatically inflated, there is no compelling evidence for input of magmatic gases to the vent fluids. Fluid δD values range from 0.2‰ to 1.5‰, pH values (3.02-3.42) are not especially low, and F concentrations (34.6-54.4 μM) are lower than bottom seawater (62.8 μM). The uppermost sections of conjugate chimney material from E2, and from Ivory Tower and Pagoda at E9, typically exhibit inner zones of massive chalcopyrite enclosed

  6. Spreading-rate dependent mid-ocean ridge processes expressed in Western Atlantic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangmyung David

    The Far-Offset Active-Source Imaging of Mantle (FAIM) experiment was conducted along an 800-km-long transect in the Western Atlantic to study the evolution of 108-157 m.y. lithosphere. The main transect (Line 1) crosses a transition from slow (13-14 mm/yr in half rate) to ultra-slow (˜8 mm/yr) paleo spreading rates, and thus represents an ideal setting to study spreading-rate dependent processes as expressed in lithospheric structure. This thesis presents results of four analyses efforts along this transect. We present a crustal model based on seismic refraction and wide-angle traveltime modeling, we extend the crustal model to an upper lithosphere density model using gravity constraints, we constrain Poisson's ratio in oceanic Layer 3 using converted shear-wave phases, and we consider regional lithospheric structure by analysis of geoid/topography ratios. The crustal model indicates that a transition in crustal thickness accompanies the spreading-rate change, with the crust produced at slow rates being 1.0-1.5 km thinner. The gravity modeling shows that a density model can be constructed that simultaneously satisfies observed gravity, seismic constraints on crustal thickness, and our expectation of isostasy if ˜1.3 km of low-density material is distributed into the upper 30-60 km of the mantle. This amount of material (˜1.3 km) roughly equals the difference in thickness between slow and ultra-slow spreading crust, suggesting that the thinner crust formed during very slow spreading arises due to melt retention in the mantle rather than decreased mantle melting. Modeling of mode-converted S-wave phases reveals a uniform Poisson's ratio (˜0.27) in the lower crust. Along with the observation of sharp crust/mantle boundary, this result suggests that crust along the FAIM transect is primarily melt-derived igneous crust. Geoid versus topography relationships along Line 1 and nearby parallel tracks show abrupt changes that may originate from lateral changes in mantle

  7. Fluid composition of the sediment-influenced Loki's Castle vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, Tamara; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Hamelin, Cédric; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Okland, Ingeborg E.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent field Loki's Castle is located in the Mohns-Knipovich bend (73°N) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) close to the Bear Island sediment fan. The hydrothermal field is venting up to 320° C hot black smoker fluids near the summit of an axial volcanic ridge. Even though the active chimneys have grown on a basaltic ridge, geochemical fluid data show a strong sedimentary influence into the hydrothermal circulation at Loki's Castle. Compelling evidence for a sediment input is given by high alkalinity, high concentrations of NH4+, H2, CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons as well as low Mn and Fe contents. The low δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 and the thermogenic isotopic pattern of the C2+ hydrocarbons in the high-temperature vent fluids clearly point to thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and illustrate diminution of the natural carbon sequestration in sediments by hydrothermal circulation. Thus, carbon-release to the hydrosphere in Arctic regions is especially relevant in areas where the active Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system is in contact with the organic matter rich detrital sediment fans.

  8. Two Vent Fields Discovered at the Ultraslow Spreading Arctic Ridge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.; Hellevang, B.; Schultz, A.; Taylor, P.; Knudsen, H. P.; Steinsbu, B. O.

    2005-12-01

    Two high-temperature vent fields were discovered at the Mohns Ridge during an expedition with the Norwegian research vessel "G.O. Sars" in July 2005. Both vent fields are located within the southernmost segment of the Mohns Ridge approximately 50 km north of the West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone. Water depths along this segment range from 3800 meters close to the fracture zone to ~500 meters at the segment centre where the vent fields are located. The largest field - named "Gallionella Garden" - is situated within a rift graben where high- and low-temperature venting occurs along ridge-parallel normal faults and fissures. Presently we have documented high- and low-temperature venting along more then 2 km of the fault and fissure system in the area. The high-temperature venting takes place at around 550 mbsl at the base of a 100 meter high fault wall and was traced ~500 meters along strike. The field consists of at least 10 major vent sites, each composed of multiple chimneys that are up to 5-10 meters tall. There are also large areas of diffuse flow. The temperature of the vent fluids was measured to be above 260°C at a chimney orifice. This is at the boiling point of seawater at these water depths, and gas bubbling was observed at several of the vent sites. A sample of the top of a chimney consists of anhydrite, barite, sphalerite and pyrite. Outside the high-temperature vent area mounds of ferric iron are abundant. Such deposits have presently been traced along ~2 km of the faults and fissure system in the area. The deposits are predominantly made up of branching and twisted stalks comparable to those formed by the iron oxidizing bacteria Gallionella ferruginea showing that the precipitation is mediated by microbial activity. The temperatures below the upper crust of a mound were measured to be one degree above the ambient water temperature. The Fe-oxyhydroxides show Nd-isotope compositions similar to the basaltic crust and Sr-isotope compositions close to that of

  9. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected. PMID:16871215

  10. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected.

  11. Tectonics and mechanism of a spreading ridge subduction at the Chile Triple Junction based on new marine geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Doi, A.; Kise, S.; Abe, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Chile Triple Junction (CTJ), an RTT-type triple junction located at 46°30'S off Taitao Peninsula, the western coast of Chile, is to be remarked in that the Chile Ridge, one of the typical mid-oceanic ridges that generate oceanic plates, is subducting underneath the South American continental plate. It is well known that earthquakes occur frequently off the Chilean coast. But earthquakes never occur on and around the CTJ and the fracture zones nearby (Tilmann et al., 2008). A thick crust is usually developed below an ordinary oceanic ridge. In this case the ridge never subducts due to the thick crust supported by the buoyancy of the mantle materials, even though the ridge reaches a trench. Or the subduction of the ridge may be delayed as compared with the case of the neighbouring sea floor. The purpose of this study is to solve the problem of the mechanism of a smooth subduction of the spreading ridge at the trench and the regional tectonics around the CTJ, mainly based on the marine geophysical data collected by the recent MR08-06 cruise by R/V MIRAI (Abe et al., AGU Fall 2009) and other cruise data from National Geophysical Data Center. Isostatic equilibrium in addition to the profiles of topography and gravity across the trench were examined on both sides of the CTJ. One of the principal results of this study is that ridge axis is associated with an axial deep covered with thick sediment unlike the case of typical ridge crests. The profiles of both topography and free air anomaly at Segment-I on Chile Ridge (just before subduction at Chile Trench) show quite different patterns from those at ordinary subduction zones. In addition, the topography of the seaward side is flat with poor relief and the abrupt landside slope is attached to the trench axis. To the south of the CTJ, the area of relatively negative free air anomaly reaches from the seaward side toward the fore-arc. This is due to the weight of the thick sediment accumulation apparently supplied from

  12. Comparison of Oceanic and Continental Ultramafic Hosted Hydrothermal Sulfide Deposits under Slow-spreading Mid-ocean Ridge Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honglin; Li, Jianghai; Zhang, Huatian

    2013-04-01

    Recently, slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges have attracted lots of researchers, especially in the MAR (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and the Indian Ocean Ridge. People have found many hydrothermal vents or hydrothermal sulfide deposits around MAR, such as TAG, Rainbow and Lost City. The slow-spreading ridges are characterized by variations in magmatic, tectonic, and alteration processes along ridge segments. Because of the difficulties of the seafloor exploration, we need an example on the continent for compare with the hydrothermal sulfide deposits on mid-ocean ridge. So we found De'erni Cu (Co) ore deposit on the north of Tibet. De'erni Cu (Co) ore deposit is a typical VHMS developing in the north of Tibet, China. The ore body is hosted by the ultramafic rocks of the A'nyemagen ophiolite suite, which is the symbol of the residual crust of Paleo-Tethys Ocean. Through the detailed geological analysis to De'erni Cu (Co) ore deposit, lots of reminded geological records of submarine hydrothermal system, including: 1) thin-layer exhalative rock covering on the ore body; 2) the colloform structure, raspberry-like structure and breccia structure reserved in the porous-type ores; 3) the main mineral composition; 4) the calcite and felsic cement in the synchronization with the pyrite clast; 4) the ore zonality similar to the TAG hydrothermal sulfide deposit. According to the TiO2 content in the MORB basalts, the approximate half-spreading rate is 1.1-2.5cm/a, of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean represented by the De'erni ophiolite. Comparing to the mineralization processes of present mid-ocean hydrothermal sulfide deposits, we insist that De'erni Cu (Co) deposit has experienced three stages: submarine exhalation stage, cooling deposition and subduction emplacement. And the OCC (Oceanic Core Complex) may be the host setting of the submarine hydrothermal exhalation stage. Compared to other similar sulfide deposits on the continent in the world, De'erni Cu (Co) sulfide deposit has a younger age

  13. Geophysical Investigation of the Slow-spreading Carlsberg Ridge in the Northwest Indian Ocean: Structure and Thermo-mechanical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangumalla, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Carlsberg Ridge (CR) is a slow-spreading ridge (22-32 mm/yr) in the northwest Indian Ocean that extends from Owen transform near 10°N to the Central Indian Ridge near equator, and defines the boundary between India and Africa plates. We present here the results of a detailed modeling (2-D / 3-D) study of bathymetry and the potential field data (gravity, geoid and magnetic), and the spectral based (admittance/ coherence) analysis to understand the structure, isostasy, rheology and segmentation of the ridge. The study revealed that the CR shows distinctly different geophysical characteristics such as wide and deep axial valley (1.5-3 km) with prominently high residual geoid (degree 10) and mantle Bouguer anomalies in the northwest, and narrow and shallow axial valley type morphology with prominent lows in the southeast. This variation is attributed to less mamgmatic phase with dominant tectonic extension in the northwest, and dominance of magmatic accretion phase in the southeast. It is also noticed that the ridge has only one first order segment along its entire length defined by a well developed transform fault and fracture zone. However, along and across axis residual geoid (degree 10, 30 and 50) and mantle Bouguer anomalies of the CR revealed several 2nd order discontinuities. Inversion of residual mantle Bouguer anomalies reveled along and across axis variation in crustal thickness having 7-10 km close to the spreading centers, 2-5km at the segment ends, and 4-6 km over the flanks of the spreading segments.The Geoid-Topography Ratio (GTR) values computed over the ridge vary between 0.26-0.46 m/km and suggest increase in the apparent compensation depthfrom ~5.5km in north to 9.5 km in the south. On the other hand, the effective elastic thickness (Te) values decrease from 16 km in the north to 5 km in the south. The joint modeling of geophysical data, and the geoid-age relations gave rise to maximum thickness of thermal lithosphere ~85 km in the CR region.

  14. Hotspot activity and plume pulses recorded by geometry of spreading axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Meir; Agnon, Amotz

    2001-06-01

    Anomalous plan view geometry (planform) of spreading axes is shown to be a faithful indicator of hotspot influence, possibly capable of detecting pulses of hotspot discharge. A planform anomaly (PA) occurs when the orientation of second-order ridge segments is prominently oblique to the spreading direction. PA is found in the vicinity of hotspots at shallow ridges (<1.5 km), suggesting hotspot influence. In places the PA and shallow bathymetry are accompanied by geochemical anomalies, corroborating hotspot influence. This linkage is best expressed in the western Gulf of Aden, where the extent of the PA from the Afar hotspot coincides with the extent of La/Sm and Sr isotopic anomalies. Using fracture mechanics we predict PA to reflect overpressurized melt that dominates the stresses in the crust, consistent with hotspot regime. Accordingly, the temporal variations of the planform previously inferred from magnetic anomalies around the Kolbeinsey Ridge (KR), north of Iceland, record episodes of interaction with the hotspot and major pulses of the plume. This suggestion is corroborated by temporal correlation of episodes showing PA north of Iceland with plume pulses previously inferred by the V-shaped ridges around the Reykjanes Ridge (RR), south of Iceland. In contrast to the RR, the temporal correlation suggests simultaneous incidence of the plume pulses at Iceland and KR, hundreds of kilometers to the north. A deep northward branch of the Iceland plume active during pulse-periods may explain these observations.

  15. Tectonics and geology of spreading ridge subduction at the Chile Triple Junction: a synthesis of results from Leg 141 of the Ocean Drilling Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrmann, J.H.; Lewis, S.D.; Cande, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    An active oceanic spreading ridge is being subducted beneath the South American continent at the Chile Triple Junction. This process has played a major part in the evolution of most of the continental margins that border the Pacific Ocean basin. A combination of high resolution swath bathymetric maps, seismic reflection profiles and drillhole and core data from five sites drilled during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 141 provide important data that define the tectonic, structural and stratigraphic effects of this modern example of spreading ridge subduction. A change from subduction accretion to subduction erosion occurs along-strike of the South American forearc. This change is prominently expressed by normal faulting, forearc subsidence, oversteepening of topographic slopes and intensive sedimentary mass wasting, overprinted on older signatures of sediment accretion, overthrusting and uplift processes in the forearc. Data from drill sites north of the triple junction (Sites 859-861) show that after an important phase of forearc building in the early to late Pliocene, subduction accretion had ceased in the late Pliocene. Since that time sediment on the downgoing oceanic Nazca plate has been subducted. Site 863 was drilled into the forearc in the immediate vicinity of the triple junction above the subducted spreading ridge axis. Here, thick and intensely folded and faulted trench slope sediments of Pleistocene age are currently involved in the frontal deformation of the forearc. Early faults with thrust and reverse kinematics are overprinted by later normal faults. The Chile Triple Junction is also the site of apparent ophiolite emplacement into the South American forearc. Drilling at Site 862 on the Taitao Ridge revealed an offshore volcanic sequence of Plio-Pleistocene age associated with the Taitao Fracture Zone, adjacent to exposures of the Pliocene-aged Taitao ophiolite onshore. Despite the large-scale loss of material from the forearc at the triple junction

  16. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U–Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3-4.6+4.8 ka; 1δ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U–Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U-230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10–20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850–900 °C and pressures > 70–150 MPa are calculated from H2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10-2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series (238U–230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  17. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2011-02-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U-Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3 - 4.6 + 4.8 ka; 1σ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U-Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U- 230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10-20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850-900 °C and pressures > 70-150 MPa are calculated from H 2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10 - 2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series ( 238U- 230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  18. Active Gas Venting Through Hydrate-Bearing Sediments on the Vestnesa Ridge, Offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenz, S.; Vadakkepuliyambatta, S.; Polyanov, S.; Mienert, J.

    2010-12-01

    Gas hydrate systems offshore western Svalbard are far more extensive (~4000km^2) than previously assumed and include the whole Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. The crest of the Vestnesa Ridge at water depth between 1200-1300 m is pierced with fluid-flow features. Seafloor pockmarks vary in size up to 1 km in diameter. Pockmarks are generally larger at the onset of the Vestnesa Ridge than at its western termination. A recent cruise with R/V Jan Mayen discovered methane flares in the water column above the pockmark field at the onset of the Vestnesa Ridge. Over a period of one week at least 4 pockmarks were continuously active and methane flares in the water column reached a height of approximately 800 m. The extent of the active gas venting is much stronger than discovered earlier and it is still unclear what has triggered the increase in gas expulsion from seafloor sediments. Any connection to hundreds of active gas vents further to the east at the shelf edge in water depth of 250-400 m remains speculative at this point but cannot be ruled out. High -resolution 3D seismic data acquired in 2007 and 2010 also show significant dissimilarities of the sub-seafloor expression of these fluid leakage systems. At the western end of the Vestnesa Ridge, sub-seafloor fluid flow features resemble well-described pipe structures. However, the seismic expression of the active fluid flow features is much broader, much more chaotic, dome-shaped and is not very similar to a typical chimney structure. The Vestnesa Ridge gas-hydrate and free- gas system occurs within few km of a mid-oceanic ridge and transform fault, which makes this gas hydrate system unique on Earth. The close proximity to the spreading centre and its hydrothermal circulation system affects the dynamics of the gas-hydrate and free-gas system. The high heat flow

  19. Discovery and Distribution of Black Smokers on the Western Galapagos Spreading Center: Implications for Spatial and Temporal Controls on High Temperature Venting at Ridge/Hotspot Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P. G.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Though nearly one-fifth of the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lies on or near hotspots, it has been debated whether hotspots increase or decrease MOR hydrothermal flux, or affect vent biota. Despite hotspot enhancement of melt supply, high-temperature vent plumes are enigmatically sparse along two previously-surveyed ridge- hotspot intersections [Reykjanes Ridge (RR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR)]. This has been attributed to crustal thickening by excess volcanism. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 540 km-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot at lon. 94.5 -89.5 deg. W. Although MOR hydrothermal springs were first found along the eastern GSC crest in 1977 near lon. 86 deg. W, the GalAPAGoS smokers are the first active high-temperature vents to be found anywhere along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary. Active and/or recently-inactive smokers were located beneath plumes at 5 sites on the seafloor between lon. 91 deg. W and 94.5 deg. W (see Anderson et al., this session) during near-bottom, real-time fiber-optic Medea camera surveys. Smokers occur along eruptive seafloor fissures atop axial volcanic ridges near the middles of ridge segments, mainly in areas underlain by relatively shallow, continuous axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors. These findings (1) support magmatic, rather than tectonic, control of GSC smoker distribution; (2) demonstrate that thick crust at MOR-hotspot intersections does not prevent high-temperature hydrothermal vents from forming; and, (3) appear to be inconsistent with models suggesting that enhanced hydrothermal cooling causes abrupt deepening of the AMC and transition from non-rifted to rifted GSC morphology near lon. 92.7 deg. W. The widely-spaced smoker sites located on different GSC segments exhibit remarkably similar characteristics and seafloor settings. Most sites are mature or extinct, and are on lava

  20. Topographic Expression of the Gulf of Aden Spreading System and its Tectonics: Hotspots-Ridge Interaction in Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Tamaki, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Okino, K.; Curewitz, D.; Huchon, P.; Khanbari, K. M.

    2001-12-01

    Gulf of Aden is a young ocean basin formed by the rifting of Arabia away from Somalia (NE Africa). The Arabian plate moves away from Africa in a NE direction, at a rate of about 2 cm/yr. The rifting started from Early Miocene. After the, the Gulf of Aden spreding system is propagating westward into the Arabia-Africa continent (Manighetti et al., 1997). It reached the Afar hotspot area about 10 Ma (Manighetti et al., 1998). The spreading system continues to interact with the hotspot up to the present. Tamsett and Searle (1988) exposed that strike of segmentations of the spreading center in Gulf of Aden is NW-SE, although the trend of the spreading system is ENE. Their survey showed the general topographic features of the spreading system, but more detailed survey is necessary to reveal the tectonics of the Gulf of Aden, especially hotspot-ridge interaction. The bathymetric survey by the SEA BEAM 2120 multi-narrow beam echo sounders aboard the R/V Hakuho-maru was carried out along the spreading system of the Gulf of Aden between 45\\deg30'E and 50° 20'E from December 2000 to January 2001. The interval of the track lines is 4-6 km. The trend of the track lines is N70\\degE. Geomagnetic and gravity fields were measured during the bathymetric. The topographic expression of the spreading centers east of N46° 20'E is an axial rift valley offset by transform faults similar to that observed at slow spreading centers. The trend of the axial rift valley is N65\\degW. The offset of the spreading centers increases in length to the east as Tamsett and Searle (1988) indicated. The axial rift valley west of N46° 20'E, which has an east-west direction, is not offset by any prominent transform faults. N65\\deg$W trending en-echelon basins are situated in the rift valley similar to that of the western Gulf of Aden spreading system (Dauteuil, et al. 2001).

  1. Faulting pattern along slow-spreading ridge segments: a consequence of along-axis variation in lithospheric rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaud, Rémy; Dauteuil, Olivier; Gente, Pascal

    1999-11-01

    We present here results from an analogue model designed to test the relative influence of along-axis variations of the crustal thickness and of the thermal structure of the lithosphere on the geometry and on the faulting pattern of the axial rift of a slow-spreading ridge. Rheologically calculated layered models are employed, using quartz sand and silicone putty as analogues of the brittle and ductile components of the lithosphere, respectively. Two parameters have been analysed in detail: (1) the thickness of the brittle layer, and (2) the viscosity of the ductile layer. This study shows that the thickening of the brittle layer and the increase of the viscosity of the ductile layer bring about a widening of the axial valley associated with an increase of the number of faults. A decrease of the depth of the axial valley and of the vertical throw of the faults is observed with an increase of the viscosity of the ductile layer and a decrease of the thickness of the brittle layer. These results are consistent with observations along Mid-Atlantic Ridge segments. For segment ends, the fault pattern obtained in the models is similar to that described on both sides of the axis for segments bordered by a zero-offset discontinuity, and on outside corners for segments bordered by a lateral offset discontinuity. Our results suggest that the viscosity of the ductile layer plays a more important role in the fault pattern than the thickness of the brittle layer. The influence of segment length, offset length and temporal variation in thermal input could explain the more or less important along-axis variation in the deformation pattern observed along segments of slow-spreading ridges.

  2. Gabbroic xenoliths from the northern Gorda Ridge: implications for magma chamber processes under slow spreading centers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, A.S.; Clague, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Abundant gabbroic xenoliths in porphyritic pillow basalt were dredged from the northern Gorda Ridge. The host lava is a moderately fractionated, normal mid-ocean ridge basalt with a heterogeneous glass rind (Mg numbers 56-60). Other lavas in the vicinity range from near primary (Mg number 69) to fractionated (Mg number 56). On the basis of textures and mineral compositions, the xenoliths are divided into five types. The xenoliths are not cognate to the host lava, but they are genetically related. Chemistry of mineral phases in conjunction with textural features suggests that the xenoliths formed in different parts of a convecting magma chamber that underwent a period of closed system fractionation. The chamber was filled with a large proportion of crystalline mush when new, more primitive, and less dense magma was injected and mixed incompletely with the contents in the chamber, forming the hybrid host lava. -from Authors

  3. Spatial and temporal distribution of the seismicity along two mid-oceanic ridges with contrasted spreading rates in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Perrot, J.; Royer, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The seismicity of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest (14 mm/y) and intermediate spreading Southeast (60 mm/y) Indian ridges was monitored from February 2012 to March 2013 by the OHASISBIO array of 7 autonomous hydrophones. A total of 1471 events were located with 4 instruments or more, inside the array, with a median location uncertainty < 5 km and a completeness magnitude of mb = 3. Both ridges display similar average rates of seismicity, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. Accretion modes do differ, however, by the along-axis distribution of the seismic events. Along the ultra-slow Southwest Indian Ridge, events are sparse but regularly spaced and scattered up to 50 km off-axis. Along the fast Southeast Indian Ridge, events are irregularly distributed, focusing in narrow regions near the ridge axis at segment ends and along transform faults, whereas ridge-segment centers generally appear as seismic gaps (at the level of completeness of the array). Only two clusters, 6 months apart, are identified in a segment-center at 29°S. From the temporal distribution of the clustered events and comparisons with observations in similar mid-oceanic ridge setting, both clusters seem to have a volcanic origin and to be related to a dike emplacement or a possible eruption on the seafloor. Their onset time and migration rate are comparable to volcanic swarms recorded along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Overall, the rate of seismicity along the two Indian spreading ridges correlates with the large-scale variations in the bathymetry and shear-wave velocity anomaly in the upper mantle, suggesting that the distribution of the low-magnitude seismicity is mainly controlled by along-axis variations in the lithosphere rheology and temperature.

  4. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Richardson, S M

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  5. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Richardson, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  6. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates - The Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Richardson, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Eocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates.

  7. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and spreading rates: the Eocene carbon dioxide greenhouse revisted.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Richardson, S M

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion has been made that enhanced rates of hydrothermal activity during the Eocene could have caused a global warming by adding calcium to the ocean and pumping CO2 into the atmosphere (Owen and Rea, 1984). This phenomenon was purported to be consistent with the predictions of the CO2 geochemical cycle model of Berner, Lasaga and Garrels (1983) (henceforth BLAG). In fact, however, the BLAG model predicts only a weak connection between hydrothermal activity and atmospheric CO2 levels. By contrast, it predicts a strong correlation between seafloor spreading rates and pCO2, since the release rate of CO2 from carbonate metamorphism is assumed to be proportional to the mean spreading rate. The Ecocene warming can be conveniently explained if the BLAG model is extended by assuming that the rate of carbonate metamorphism is also proportional to the total length of the midocean ridges from which the spreading originates. PMID:11539654

  8. Age-Related Changes in Spreading Activation during Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Rachel; Walker, Joanne; Gross, Julien; Hayne, Harlene

    2014-01-01

    The concept of spreading activation describes how retrieval of one memory cues retrieval of other memories that are associated with it. This study explored spreading activation in 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old infants. Infants (n = 144) learned two tasks within the same experimental session; one task, deferred imitation (DI), is typically remembered…

  9. Modes and implications of mantle and lower-crust denudation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Timothy John

    Slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (<5 cm/yr) have intermittent magma supply, and accommodate spreading by a combination of magmatism and tectonic extension (Smith and Cann, 1993, Cannat, 1993). Extension at mid-ocean ridges is most commonly manifested by slip on high angle (˜60°) normal faults that dip into, and define the rift valley walls (Smith and Cann, 1993). Less commonly, extension occurs by long periods of slip along low-angle normal faults that penetrate to structurally deep levels of oceanic lithosphere and denude gabbro and/or pendotite to the seafloor in domal massifs termed "oceanic core complexes" (Dick et al., 1981; Dick et al., 1991; Tucholke et al., 1998; Mutter and Karson, 1992; Cann et al., 1997; MacLeod et al., 2002). This dissertation addresses processes and implications of tectonic extension at two oceanic core complexes. Atlantis Massif (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is formed dominantly of serpentinized peridotite with lesser gabbro, and Atlantis Bank (57°E, Southwest Indian Ridge) is dominated by gabbro. Localization of brittle strain at Atlantis Massif occurred by reaction-softening processes associated with metasomatic alteration of peridotite and serpentmite to amphibole-, chlorite- and talc-bearing assemblages. Ductile strain at Atlantis Massif and Atlantis Bank is localized into intervals of highly-fractionated, oxide-rich gabbro. Two-oxide geothermometry of gabbro indicates that it was not penetratively deformed below ˜500°C. Denuded peridotite at Atlantis Massif is host to hydrothermal circulation driven in part by exothermic serpentinization reactions. Serpentinization decreases the seismic velocity of peridotite and leads to acquisition of a magnetic signature. Venting of highly-alkaline, methane- and hydrogen-rich serpentinization-derived fluids leads to lithification of seafloor carbonate ooze by precipitation of carbonate cement in a zone of mixing with "normal" seawater. This process may be the primary depositional mechanism of

  10. The axial melt lens as a processor of evolved melts at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loocke, M. P.; Lissenberg, J. C. J.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The axial melt lens is a steady-state, generally magma-rich body located at the dyke-gabbro transition at mid-crustal levels beneath intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges. It is widely believed to be the reservoir from which mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupts. Using a remotely-operated vehicle, cruise JC21 to the Hess Deep Rift recovered the first comprehensive sample suite of the uppermost plutonics from a fast-spreading ridge. We present the results of a detailed microanalytical investigation of 23 samples (8 dolerites, 14 gabbronorites, and 1 gabbro) recovered by ROV dive 78 from a section traversing the transition from the uppermost gabbros into the sheeted dykes. With the exception of a single olivine-bearing sample (78R-6), dive 78 is dominated by evolved, varitextured (both in hand sample and thin section) oxide gabbronorites. Full thin section quantitative element maps were acquired on serial thin sections from each sample using the analytical scanning electron microscope in the at Cardiff University. The resulting maps were post-processed in MatlabTM to determine the full distribution of plagioclase compositions across entire thin sections (typically 500,000 analyses per sample); an approach we term 'quantitative assessment of compositional distribution' (QACD). By so doing we are able to conduct the first fully rigorous assessment of gabbro compositions, and, by extension, melt compositions present at this level beneath the ridge axis. Critically, we only found 2 grains of high-An plagioclase (An>80) in all of the samples (N = 51). These occur as cores within a sample dominated by lower-An plagioclase. Instead, the vast majority (75%) of plagioclase within the samples have compositions of An65 or lower; compositions too evolved to be in equilibrium with MORB. The most primitive sample, 78R-6, is an olivine-bearing gabbronorite with Fo67 olivine, and plagioclase ranging from An52-77 (median An = 65). These data are difficult to reconcile with models in

  11. Ocean-continent-transition and oceanic ridge structural evolution (eastern Gulf of Aden): Implications for rift to seafloor spreading processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S. D.; Beslier, M.; Autin, J.; Watremez, L.; Maia, M. A.; Gente, P.

    2009-12-01

    The rifting between Arabia and Somalia, which started around 35 Ma ago, is followed by oceanic accretion from at least 17.6 Ma leading to the present Gulf of Aden. The transition between the thinned continental and the oceanic crusts is characterized, in space and time, by an ocean-continent transition (OCT). Here, we use bathymetry, gravity, seismic reflection and magnetism from the Encens-Sheba and Encens cruises in order to constrain the structure and segmentation of the conjugate OCT as well as the oceanic ridge between two main fracture zones (Alula-Fartak and Socotra-Hadbeen). The segmentation of the initial oceanic spreading centers seem directly related to the margin structure. Then, magmatic processes and kinematics change strongly influenced the evolution of the segmentation. The OCT and the oceanic domain can be divided into two distinct areas in the study area. The Eastern area is characterized by an extremely thin OCT and oceanic crusts (< 4km), a ~30 km wide and tectonized OCT with isolated continental blocks and short axial segments. In the western area, thicker OCT and oceanic crusts (>5km), a ~15 km wide OCT with a volcanic ridge, and a 6 km thick underplated mafic body in the northern margin suggest a high melt supply. The magmatic supply observed in the western domain is probably due to an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge, at 75 km east of the major Alula-Fartak transform fault. This suggests that the OCT and the axial ridge morphology of this domain are perturbed by post-rift volcanism, which is due to a combination of the spreading rate, a thermal anomaly, and the cold edge effect of the Alula-Fartak transform fault. The presence of the inherited Mesozoic basins (Jezar-Qamar-Gardafui basin) located on this western domain can also explain, the difference in both the structure and the nature of the OCT between the two domains. The nature of the OCT could be either (or both) exhumed lower crust or

  12. Ridge segmentation and the magnetic structure of the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge 26°S and 31°-35°S: Implications for magmatic processes at slow spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Charles M.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Grindlay, Nancy R.

    1996-04-01

    Along-axis profiles of three-dimensional magnetic inversions for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 31°-35°S show low magnetization near the middle of ridge segments and high magnetization at the segment tips for three adjacent spreading segments; thus there is an inverse relation between axial magnetization and axial topography. The ridge segment at 26°S on the MAR has the same inverse relationship between magnetization and topography. The common occurrence of this relationship suggests that it reflects a fundamental process of crustal accretion at the MAR. We analyze the rock magnetic properties from 42 locations within the four ridge segments in the South Atlantic to constrain the inherent trade-off between source intensity and source thickness in the magnetization model. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) intensities from the four ridge segments, averaged together, correlate with the magnetic inversion profiles. This finding implies that changes in the magnetization of the extrusives may account for much of the observed magnetic anomaly amplitude variation. A direct correlation of FeO content and magnetization suggests that magnetic anomaly amplitudes may be an indicator of FeTi-rich basalts at the slow spreading MAR, even though the iron content of the basalts from high magnetization areas is not as high as observed at Pacific spreading centers. Despite the different magma plumbing systematics of the Pacific spreading centers and the MAR, it appears that the segment-scale magma system of the MAR also results in segment-scale crustal magnetization variations. Further evidence that the axial magnetic variations result from source intensity variations is that older isochrons have higher intensities near the ridge-discontinuities, similar to the behavior on-axis. Between 0 and 5 Ma the decay in magnetization is ˜50% independent of location within a spreading segment.

  13. Galapagos Plume Ridge Interaction Part 1: Morphologic Variations Along the Eastern Galapagos Spreading Center. Results From the SO158 MEGAPRINT Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauff, F.; Christie, D. C.; Wintersteller, P.; Werner, R.; Hanan, B. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2001-12-01

    During the MEGAPRINT expedition (R/V Sonne Cruise SO158), we mapped and sampled the eastern Galapagos spreading center (GSC) between 85\\deg and 92.5\\deg W using the newly installed SIMRAD EM120 multibeam echosounder. The new maps reveal a wide range of axial morphologies, ranging through several axial valley types, some with pronounced graben structures, to both narrow and broad axial highs. The GSC shoals from 2700 meters at 86\\deg W to as little as 1500 meters in the 89\\deg - 90\\deg W area, where it lies closest to the Galapagos platform. The eastern GSC encompasses the known range of morphologies for intermediate spreading ridges with frequent transitions presumably reflecting local variations in melt supply and eruption frequency. Periods in which spreading exceeds extrusive construction are characterized by axial valleys and, in one case by a rifted axial volcano at 87\\deg W. The 91\\deg W transform fault is marked by a 3500m deep pull-apart basin containing two small recently active volcanic cones. The western GSC between 90\\deg and 92.5\\deg W is characterized by two broad axial highs separated by axial lows (see also Sinton et al. 2000). The axial highs are connected with southeastward trending chains of seamounts and small ridges, sub-parallel to the larger Wolf Darwin lineament (WDL), commonly thought to reflect today's primary plume ridge connection. The junction of the WDL and the GSC is, however, an axial low suggesting that the maximum geochemical influence of the plume (e.g., Verma and Schilling 1982), may not correlate with the WDL. Seamounts in the region between the WDL and the 91\\deg W transform are shallow and several display morphologic terraces. Dredge samples from several include rounded cobbles and nearshore sediment (beach deposits) suggesting that these seamounts may represent submerged ocean islands. It is yet not clear whether these are on-axis volcanoes or if they may have formed on older crust anologous to some of the seamounts

  14. Magma system along fast-spreading centers controlled by ridge segmentation: Evidence from the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Sumio; Adachi, Yoshiko

    2013-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are segmented at various scales with a hierarchy, from the biggest 1st- order to the smallest 4th-order segments. These segment structures control magmatic processes beneath the mid-ocean ridges such as mantle upwelling, partial melting of the upper mantle, and magma delivery system to form the oceanic crust (Macdonald, 1998). However, systematic studies on the segment control for magmatic processes are rare at modern mid-ocean ridges due to the difficulty of obtaining in-situ samples from different crustal-lithospheric depths. Sampling at ocean floors is generally exclusively limited only to the surface (i.e. the seafloor). Furthermore, the samples obtained from the surface of the ocean floor may likely represent the products of off-axis magmatism (Kusano et al., 2012). Therefore, studies of ocean ridge segmentation in ophiolites provide important constraints for the magmatic processes beneath seafloor spreading centers, because the precise 3-D architecture of the upper mantle and the crust (all the way to the uppermost extrusive layer) and their lateral variations could be observed and investigated in ophiolites. We have studied the northern Oman ophiolite where a complete succession from the upper mantle peridotites to the uppermost extrusive rocks is well exposed. Miyashita et al. (2003), Adachi and Miyashita (2003) and Umino et al. (2003) proposed a segment structure in the northern Oman ophiolite; the Wadi Fizh area is regarded as a northward propagating tip of a mid-ocean ridge based on geological evidence (Adachi and Miyashita. 2003). On the other hand, the Wadi Thuqbah area, about 25 km south of Wadi Fizh, is regarded as a segment center based on the thickest Moho transition zone, well developed EW-trending lineations in the MTZ and layered gabbro, and the comparatively primitive compositions of the layered gabbros. Furthermore, the southern margin of the Hilti block (Salahi block), about 40 km south of Wadi Thuqbah, is inferred to be the

  15. Improvement of spread-out Bragg peak flatness for a carbon-ion beam by the use of a ridge filter with a ripple filter.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yousuke; Takada, Yoshihisa; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Nihei, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yojiro; Nagafuchi, Kosuke; Kawai, Ryuichi; Tanabe, Masaki; Mizutani, Shohei; Himukai, Takeshi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2012-03-21

    We have developed a novel design method of ridge filters for carbon-ion therapy using a broad-beam delivery system to improve the flatness of a biologically effective dose in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). So far, the flatness of the SOBP is limited to about ±5% for carbon beams since the weight control of component Bragg curves composing the SOBP is difficult. This difficulty arises from using a large number of ridge-bar steps (e.g. about 100 for a SOBP width of 60 mm) required to form the SOBP for the pristine Bragg curve with an extremely sharp distal falloff. Instead of using a single ridge filter, we introduce a ripple filter to broaden the Bragg peak so that the number of ridge-bar steps can be reduced to about 30 for SOBP with of 60 mm for the ridge filter designed for the broadened Bragg peak. Thus we can manufacture the ridge filter more accurately and then attain a better flatness of the SOBP due to well-controlled weights of the component Bragg curves. We placed the ripple filter on the same frame of the ridge filter and arranged the direction of the ripple-filter-bar array perpendicular to that of the ridge-filter-bar array. We applied this method to a 290 MeV u(-1) carbon-ion beam in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba and verified the effectiveness by measurements.

  16. Hawaiian Hotspot - Spreading Ridge Interaction in the Late Cretaceous: A Fair and Balanced Look at the Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.

    2004-12-01

    As is so often the case in years divisible by 4, reality turns out to be quite different from reputation. The Hawaiian hotspot, often righteously promoted as the hotspot that the rest should strive to emulate, was not as stable nor as free from interactions with plate boundaries as some supporters suggest. Mounting geochemical and geophysical evidence shows that in its youth the hotspot not only inhaled, but probably snorted and did shots as well. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize what we know about the Late Cretaceous interaction between a spreading ridge and the Hawaiian hotspot from recent work on the Emperor Seamount chain. At the time of this writing, facts are a commodity to be fabricated, deleted, spun, denied, and denied-that-you-denied; but by the time of this presentation, we (hopefully) will be looking toward the future: can the Hawaiian hotspot's checkered past be treated as a bonus rather than a burden? Plate reconstructions of the Late Cretaceous northwest Pacific place a seafloor spreading center very close to, or even directly on top of, the Hawaiian hotspot. The geochemical effects of this hotspot-ridge interaction are now well documented by work on Ocean Drilling Program samples from Detroit Seamount, the next-to-oldest remaining Emperor Seamount. Basalts recovered from ODP Site 883 partway up the east side of Detroit Seamount have trace element and isotopic characteristics more akin to MORB than to Hawaiian Islands basalts. Basalts from ODP Site 884 at the eastern foot of the seamount are highly depleted tholeiites unlike anything else found so far in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain (Keller et al. 2000, Nature). Their trace element and radiogenic isotope values are essentially indistinguishable from MORB values (Keller et al. 2000), although triple-spike Pb isotope data are distinct from modern EPR MORB data (Regelous et al. 2003, J. Pet.). These characteristics were the result of the hotspot melting a greater proportion of a depleted

  17. Moytirra: Discovery of the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, A. J.; Murton, B.; Copley, J.; Lim, A.; Carlsson, J.; Collins, P.; Dorschel, B.; Green, D.; Judge, M.; Nye, V.; Benzie, J.; Antoniacomi, A.; Coughlan, M.; Morris, K.

    2013-10-01

    Geological, biological, morphological, and hydrochemical data are presented for the newly discovered Moytirra vent field at 45oN. This is the only high temperature hydrothermal vent known between the Azores and Iceland, in the North Atlantic and is located on a slow to ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridge uniquely situated on the 300 m high fault scarp of the eastern axial wall, 3.5 km from the axial volcanic ridge crest. Furthermore, the Moytirra vent field is, unusually for tectonically controlled hydrothermal vents systems, basalt hosted and perched midway up on the median valley wall and presumably heated by an off-axis magma chamber. The Moytirra vent field consists of an alignment of four sites of venting, three actively emitting "black smoke," producing a complex of chimneys and beehive diffusers. The largest chimney is 18 m tall and vigorously venting. The vent fauna described here are the only ones documented for the North Atlantic (Azores to Reykjanes Ridge) and significantly expands our knowledge of North Atlantic biodiversity. The surfaces of the vent chimneys are occupied by aggregations of gastropods (Peltospira sp.) and populations of alvinocaridid shrimp (Mirocaris sp. with Rimicaris sp. also present). Other fauna present include bythograeid crabs (Segonzacia sp.) and zoarcid fish (Pachycara sp.), but bathymodiolin mussels and actinostolid anemones were not observed in the vent field. The discovery of the Moytirra vent field therefore expands the known latitudinal distributions of several vent-endemic genera in the north Atlantic, and reveals faunal affinities with vents south of the Azores rather than north of Iceland.

  18. Diversity of microbial communities of Loki's Castle black smoker field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.; Früh-Green, G.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present an organic geochemical study of Loki’s Castle, a black smoker field recently discovered at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea at around 73.2°N. Located at the Mohn-Knipovich Ridge, which is one of the slowest spreading ridge segments on Earth, Loki’s Castle is the most northerly major hydrothermal vent field known to date. The vent field is composed of five actively venting (320°C) black-smoker chimneys that tower on top of a large mound of hydrothermal sulfide deposits. Loki’s Castle is a basalt-hosted hydrothermal system, but high methane and ammonium contents in the vent fluids strongly indicate a sedimentary component below the volcanic ridge. In 2009, another site of low-temperature hydrothermal venting hosting numerous barite chimneys was discovered in the vicinity of the black smokers, which probably results from subsurface mixing of diffuse hydrothermal fluid with seawater. In our study, variations in microbial communities associated with the formation of actively venting, sulfide and sulfate chimneys in this essentially unexplored ultraslow spreading ridge system are assessed based on biomarker lipid and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses. Lipid extracts from an active, high-temperature sulfide chimney yielded abundant archaeal di- and tetraether lipids as well as irregular isoprenoidal hydrocarbons (PMIs) that are associated with archaeal methanogens and methanotrophs. Predominant archaeal biomarker lipids include archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol as well as glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing 0-4 cyclopentyl moieties. In addition, GDGTs with an additional covalent bond between the isoprenoid hydrocarbon chains, so-called H-shaped GDGTs, containing 0-4 cyclopentyl rings were also found to be abundant components and are indicative of hyperthermophilic methanogens. Biomarkers characteristic of eukaryotes (sterols) and bacteria (fatty acids and hopanoids) were less prevalent in

  19. Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria Found at Slow-Spreading Ridge: a Case Study of Capelinhos Hydrothermal Vent (Lucky Strike, MAR 37°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, P. A.; Rommevaux, C.; Lesongeur, F.; Emerson, D.; Leleu, T.; Chavagnac, V.

    2015-12-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria becomes increasingly described in different geological settings from volcanically active seamounts, coastal waters, to diffuse hydrothermal vents near seafloor spreading centers [Emerson et al., 2010]. They have been mostly identified and described in Pacific Ocean, and have been only recently found in hydrothermal systems associated to slow spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) [Scott et al., 2015]. During the MoMARSAT'13 cruise at Lucky Strike hydrothermal field (MAR), a new hydrothermal site was discovered at about 1.5 km eastward from the lava lake and from the main hydrothermal vents. This active venting site, named Capelinhos, is therefore the most distant from the volcano, features many chimneys, both focused and diffuses. The hydrothermal end-member fluids from Capelinhos are different from those of the other sites of Lucky Strike, showing the highest content of iron (Fe/Mn≈3.96) and the lowest chlorinity (270 mmol/l) [Leleu et al., 2015]. Most of the chimneys exhibit rust-color surfaces and bacterial mats near diffuse flows. During the MoMARSAT'15 cruise, an active chimney, a small inactive one, and rust-color bacterial mat near diffuse flow were sampled at Capelinhos. Observations by SEM of the hydrothermal samples revealed the presence of iron oxides in an assemblage of tubular "sheaths", assembled "stalks", helical "stalks" and amorphous aggregates. These features are similar to those described from the Loihi iron-mats deposits and argue for the occurrence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Cultures under micro-aerobic and neutral pH conditions allowed us to isolate strains from the small inactive chimney. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of the isolates and environmental samples will soon be performed, which should confirm the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria and reveal the organization of bacterial communities in this original and newly discovered hydrothermal site of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Emerson

  20. Distribution of mega fauna on sulfide edifices on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Arunima; Becker, Erin L.; Podowski, Elizabeth L.; Wickes, Leslie N.; Ma, Shufen; Mullaugh, Katherine M.; Hourdez, Stéphane; Luther, George W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrothermal vent sulfide edifices contain some of the most extreme thermal and chemical conditions in which animals are able to live. As a result, sulfide edifices in the East Pacific Rise, Juan de Fuca Ridge, and Mid Atlantic Ridge vent systems often contain distinct faunal assemblages. In this study, we used high-resolution imagery and in-situ physico-chemical measurements within the context of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to examine community structure and niche differentiation of dominant fauna on sulfide edifices in the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our results show that ELSC and VFR sulfide edifices host two distinct types of communities. One type, that covers the majority of sulfide edifice faces, is overall very similar to nearby lava communities and biomass is dominated by the same chemoautotrophic symbiont-containing molluscs that dominate lava communities, namely the provannid gastropods Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei and the mytilid bivalve Bathymodiolus brevior. The spatial distribution of the dominant molluscs is often a variation of the pattern of concentric rings observed on lavas, with Alviniconcha spp. at the tops of edifices where exposure to vent flow is the highest, and I. nautilei and B. brevior below. Our physico-chemical measurements indicate that because of rapid dispersion of vent fluid, habitable area for symbiont-containing fauna is quite limited on sulfide edifices, and the realized niches of the mollusc groups are narrower on sulfide edifices than on lavas. We suggest that competition plays an important role in determining the realized distributions of the mollusc groups on edifices. The other habitat, present in small patches of presumably hot, new anhydrite, is avoided by the dominant symbiont-containing molluscs and inhabited by crabs, shrimp and polynoids that are likely more heat tolerant. The ratio of sulfide concentration to temperature anomaly of

  1. Multiple stages of carbonation and brecciation in a peridotite from the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Der Handt, A.; Menzel, M.; Oencue, A.; Danilewsky, A. N.; Hellebrand, E.; Kluegel, A.; Snow, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate breccias and carbonate veins have been described from fossil and modern day ocean floor peridotites. Their fabric can vary from fractured serpentinite to clast-supported in-situ breccia to matrix-supported breccia. It has been shown that hydrothermal flow is partly responsible for carbonation of seafloor lithologies as well as fluids from serpentinization reactions and low-temperature precipitation from seawater. Therefore, the study of carbonated peridotites can provide important information on fluid flow and fluid-rock interaction at the sea floor and give implications for the global carbon cycle as well as carbon sequestration. We carried out a detailed petrographic, geochemical and microstructural study of a peridotite breccia that contains texturally and compositionally complex carbonate veins. The sample was dredged in the Sparsely Magmatic Zone of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge where a magmatic cover is missing and only mantle rocks are exposed for more than 100 km in the axial valley. The sample, a harzburgitic mylonite, is brecciated in places with angular to sub-angular clasts cemented by carbonates. Narrow (0.1- 5 mm) carbonate veins crosscut the sample and make-up around 20% of the sample. A prominent up to 12 mm wide carbonate vein records the interplay of brecciation and carbonate-forming reactions. Mg-calcite (9 mol% Mg) and aragonite occur in the proportion 30:70 in the central vein while thin crosscutting veins consist dominantly of Mg-calcite. Multiple generations of carbonates can be discerned in the central vein, alternating between Mg-calcite and aragonite. The earliest carbonate generation consists of fibrous overgrowths on serpentine veins suggesting an early link between carbonation and serpentinization reactions. Furthermore, bend aragonite needles indicate syntectonic growth. The next generation consists of spherulitic aragonites that are in places brecciated and cemented by a Mg-calcite matrix. Notably, the following

  2. Spreading Sea Floors and Fractured Ridges. Crustal Evaluation Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  3. [In Situ Analysis of Element Geochemistry in Submarine Basalt in Hydrothermal Areas from Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Xiao-ming; Xu, Li; Liang, Ye-heng; Wu, Zhong-wei; Fu, Yu; Huang, Yi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we analyze element geochemistry of submarine basalt in situ, which is sampled in hydrothermal areas from ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge, including the fresh basalt rocks (B19-9, B15-13) and altered basalt (B5-2). And we can confirm that altered mineral in B5-2 is celadonite by microscope and Raman Spectrum. Furthermore, amygdaloidal celadonites are analyzed by electron microprobe (EPMA) and EDS-line scanning. The results show that K-contents decrease and Na-contents increase from the core to the edge in these altered minerals, indicating the transition from celadonite to saponite. Celadonite is an altered minerals, forming in low temperature (< 50 degrees C) and oxidizing condition, while saponite form in low water/rock and more reducing condition. As a result, the transition from celadonite to saponite suggests environment change from oxidizing to reducing condition. Using the result of EPMA as internal standard, we can analyze rare earth elements (REE) in altered mineral in situ. Most of result show positive Eu anomaly (Δ(Eu)), indicating hydrothermal fluid transform from oxidizing to reducing, and reducing fluid rework on the early altered minerals. Comparison with REE in matrix feldspar both in altered and unaltered zoning, we find that reducing fluid can leach REE from the matrix feldspar, leading to lower total REE concentrations and positive Eu anomaly. So leaching process play an important role in hydrothermal system.

  4. [In Situ Analysis of Element Geochemistry in Submarine Basalt in Hydrothermal Areas from Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Xiao-ming; Xu, Li; Liang, Ye-heng; Wu, Zhong-wei; Fu, Yu; Huang, Yi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we analyze element geochemistry of submarine basalt in situ, which is sampled in hydrothermal areas from ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge, including the fresh basalt rocks (B19-9, B15-13) and altered basalt (B5-2). And we can confirm that altered mineral in B5-2 is celadonite by microscope and Raman Spectrum. Furthermore, amygdaloidal celadonites are analyzed by electron microprobe (EPMA) and EDS-line scanning. The results show that K-contents decrease and Na-contents increase from the core to the edge in these altered minerals, indicating the transition from celadonite to saponite. Celadonite is an altered minerals, forming in low temperature (< 50 degrees C) and oxidizing condition, while saponite form in low water/rock and more reducing condition. As a result, the transition from celadonite to saponite suggests environment change from oxidizing to reducing condition. Using the result of EPMA as internal standard, we can analyze rare earth elements (REE) in altered mineral in situ. Most of result show positive Eu anomaly (Δ(Eu)), indicating hydrothermal fluid transform from oxidizing to reducing, and reducing fluid rework on the early altered minerals. Comparison with REE in matrix feldspar both in altered and unaltered zoning, we find that reducing fluid can leach REE from the matrix feldspar, leading to lower total REE concentrations and positive Eu anomaly. So leaching process play an important role in hydrothermal system. PMID:26117900

  5. Deep pyroclastic deposits and evidence for explosive volcanism on the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge at 85E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontbriand, C. W.; Soule, S. A.; Sohn, R. A.; Humphris, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Seafloor surveys conducted during the 2007 Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) expedition provide evidence for widespread explosive volcanism within the axial valley of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge at 85°E. We have used high-definition video and high-resolution bathymetry to map out the extent of the deposits as well as lava flows. The video imagery reveals that unconsolidated pyroclastic material lightly blankets the axial valley at 85°E with thicknesses up to ~10cm over an area 10km2. The bathymetric data show that the axial valley contains ubiquitous cratered volcanoes, that we interpret as potential source vents for the clastic material. We collected detailed visual imagery from one of these volcanoes, and found that the crater center as well as the proximal portions of the rim and outer flanks are covered with talus, suggesting the possibility that Vulcanian explosions played a role in crater formation and pyroclast deposition. We collected samples of the pyroclasts from two locations within the axial valley. The pyroclasts are dominated by low vesicularity angular fragments, with a small weight fraction (~ 12%) of bubble-wall fragments (limu o Pele). Many bubble-wall fragments have fluidal morphologies and stretched vesicles. The morphology of the clasts help constrain multiple models of fragmentation that may have occurred. The distribution of clasts suggests explosive discharge from multiple source vents within the axial valley over a prolonged period of time (i.e, not a single eruption in 1999). In order to explain the generation of pyroclastic material in water depths of ~3800 m (well below the critical pressure for steam generation), we present a model wherein volatiles exsolve from ascending magmas and are sequestered and stored in a lithospheric reservoir before being explosively discharged during a volcanic eruption. The long inter-eruption interval (100s to 1000s of years) and strong spatial heterogeneity of melt delivery associated with ultra

  6. Quantitative and phylogenetic study of the Deep Sea Archaeal Group in sediments of the Arctic mid-ocean spreading ridge

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Steffen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Pedersen, Rolf B.; Baumberger, Tamara; Schleper, Christa

    2013-01-01

    In marine sediments archaea often constitute a considerable part of the microbial community, of which the Deep Sea Archaeal Group (DSAG) is one of the most predominant. Despite their high abundance no members from this archaeal group have so far been characterized and thus their metabolism is unknown. Here we show that the relative abundance of DSAG marker genes can be correlated with geochemical parameters, allowing prediction of both the potential electron donors and acceptors of these organisms. We estimated the abundance of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea, Bacteria, and DSAG in 52 sediment horizons from two cores collected at the slow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge, using qPCR. The results indicate that members of the DSAG make up the entire archaeal population in certain horizons and constitute up to ~50% of the total microbial community. The quantitative data were correlated to 30 different geophysical and geochemical parameters obtained from the same sediment horizons. We observed a significant correlation between the relative abundance of DSAG 16S rRNA genes and the content of organic carbon (p < 0.0001). Further, significant co-variation with iron oxide, and dissolved iron and manganese (all p < 0.0000), indicated a direct or indirect link to iron and manganese cycling. Neither of these parameters correlated with the relative abundance of archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nor did any other major electron donor or acceptor measured. Phylogenetic analysis of DSAG 16S rRNA gene sequences reveals three monophyletic lineages with no apparent habitat-specific distribution. In this study we support the hypothesis that members of the DSAG are tightly linked to the content of organic carbon and directly or indirectly involved in the cycling of iron and/or manganese compounds. Further, we provide a molecular tool to assess their abundance in environmental samples and enrichment cultures. PMID:24109477

  7. Composition of plume-influenced mid-ocean ridge lavas and glasses from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Kingsley, Richard; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    The global mid-ocean ridge system is peppered with localities where mantle plumes impinge on oceanic spreading centers. Here, we present new, high resolution and high precision data for 40 trace elements in 573 samples of variably plume-influenced mid-ocean ridge basalts from the Mid-Atlantic ridge, the Easter Microplate and Salas y Gomez seamounts, the Galápagos spreading center, and the Gulf of Aden, in addition to previously unpublished major element and isotopic data for these regions. Included in the data set are the unconventional trace elements Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, W, and Tl, which are not commonly reported by most geochemical studies. We show variations in the ratios Mo/Ce, Cd/Dy, Sn/Sm, Sb/Ce, W/U, and Rb/Tl, which are expected not to fractionate significantly during melting or crystallization, as a function of proximity to plume-related features on these ridges. The Cd/Dy and Sn/Sm ratios show little variation with plume proximity, although higher Cd/Dy may signal increases in the role of garnet in the mantle source beneath some plumes. Globally, the Rb/Tl ratio closely approximates the La/SmN ratio, and thus provides a sensitive tracer of enriched mantle domains. The W/U ratio is not elevated at plume centers, but we find significant enrichments in W/U, and to a lesser extent the Mo/Ce and Sb/Ce ratios, at mid-ocean ridges proximal to plumes. Such enrichments may provide evidence of far-field entrainment of lower mantle material that has interacted with the core by deeply-rooted, upwelling mantle plumes.

  8. Crustal structure across the post-spreading magmatic ridge of the East Sub-basin in the South China Sea: Tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Enyuan; Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jiazheng

    2016-05-01

    The 140-km wide last phase of opening of the South China Sea (SCS) corresponds to a N145° direction of spreading with rift features identified on swath bathymetric data trending N055° (Sibuet et al., 2016). These N055° seafloor spreading features of the East Sub-basin are cut across by a post-spreading volcanic ridge oriented approximately E-W in its western part (Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain). The knowledge of the deep crustal structure beneath this volcanic ridge is essential to elucidate not only the formation and tectonic evolution of the SCS, but also the mechanism of emplacement of the post-spreading magmatism. We use air-gun shots recorded by ocean bottom seismometers to image the deep crustal structure along the N-S oriented G8G0 seismic profile, which is perpendicular to the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain but located in between the Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts, where topographic changes are minimum. The velocity structure presents obvious lateral variations. The crust north and south of the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain is ca. 4-6 km in thickness and velocities are largely comparable with those of normal oceanic crust of Atlantic type. To the south, the Jixiang seamount with a 7.2-km thick crust, seems to be a tiny post-spreading volcanic seamount intruded along the former extinct spreading ridge axis. In the central part, a 1.5-km thick low velocity zone (3.3-3.7 km/s) in the uppermost crust is explained by the presence of extrusive rocks intercalated with thin sedimentary layers as those drilled at IODP Site U1431. Both the Jixiang seamount and the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain started to form by the intrusion of decompressive melt resulting from the N-S post-spreading phase of extension and intruded through the already formed oceanic crust. The Jixiang seamount probably formed before the emplacement of the E-W post-spreading seamounts chain.

  9. U-Series Disequilibria From the East Pacific Rise (9N, 10N and 11N): evidence for off-axis magmatism along fast spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, C.; Turner, S.; Niu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Lavas erupted along Mid-Ocean Ridges provide important information on melt formation and movement beneath the oceanic lithosphere. Despite the fact that the majority of lavas are erupted along the spreading axis itself, it has been proposed that a small quantity of lavas are erupted off-axis at distances >5 km [1]. The East Pacific Rise has a fast (5.5 cm/yr) half spreading rate and so the age of lavas sampled off-axis are well constrained assuming an on-axis origin. Zou et al. [2] tested this assumption by comparing U-series disequilibria in lavas sampled away from the ridge with that observed at the present day axis. They found larger U-Th disequilibria than predicted by decay of the ridge signal in a number of lavas and interpreted this to indicate that these lavas were erupted off-axis. These are important results and so we have analysed U-Th disequilibria in lavas from three traverses along the East Pacific Rise (9°3 N, 10°4N and 11°5N) extending to a maximum distance of 31 km East and West from the ridge axis (corresponding to an age ≤550 ka), including reanalysing the critical samples analysed by Zou et al. [2]. Our analyses of four samples analysed by Zou et al. [2] confirm greater U-Th disequilibria than predicted by decay of the axis signal. However, we could not reproduce the U-excesses in two lavas. Relative to a calculated decay curve assuming an initial (230Th/238U) of 1.23 at the ridge, all of our analyses from 9°3N have greater Th excesses (2-6%) than predicted. Similarly, the lavas from the traverse at 10°4N have (230Th/238U) ratios up to 1.067 (6% Th excess) some 13 km from the ridge axis which is comparable to ratios of 1.042 (4% Th excess) 23 km distant from the ridge at 9°3N. Thus, lavas in a zone 13-30 km off- axis to both sides of the axis have greater Th excess than predicted by decay from the ridge. In contrast, we have found U excesses in lavas from the traverse at 11°5N. 226Ra data will be presented for those samples with

  10. A reduced crustal magnetization zone near the first observed active hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lin, Jian; Chen, Yongshun J.; Tao, Chunhui; German, Christopher R.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2010-09-01

    Inversion of near-bottom magnetic data reveals a well-defined low crustal magnetization zone (LMZ) near a local topographic high (37°47‧S, 49°39‧E) on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The magnetic data were collected by the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE on board R/V DaYangYiHao in February-March 2007. The first active hydrothermal vent field observed on the SWIR is located in Area A within and adjacent to the LMZ at the local topographic high, implying that this LMZ may be the result of hydrothermal alteration of magnetic minerals. The maximum reduction in crustal magnetization is 3 A/M. The spatial extent of the LMZ is estimated to be at least 6.7 × 104 m2, which is larger than that of the LMZs at the TAG vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), as well as the Relict Field, Bastille, Dante-Grotto, and New Field vent-sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF). The calculated magnetic moment, i.e., the product of the spatial extent and amplitude of crustal magnetization reduction is at least -3 × 107 Am2 for the LMZ on the SWIR, while that for the TAG field on the MAR is -8 × 107 Am2 and that for the four individual vent fields on the JdF range from -5 × 107 to -3 × 107 Am2. Together these results indicate that crustal demagnetization is a common feature of basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent fields at mid-ocean ridges of all spreading rates. Furthermore, the crustal demagnetization of the Area A on the ultraslow-spreading SWIR is comparable in strength to that of the TAG area on the slow-spreading MAR.

  11. A History of Classified Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Quist, A.S.

    2001-01-30

    The facilities that became Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were created in 1943 during the United States' super-secret World War II project to construct an atomic bomb (the Manhattan Project). During World War II and for several years thereafter, essentially all ORNL activities were classified. Now, in 2000, essentially all ORNL activities are unclassified. The major purpose of this report is to provide a brief history of ORNL's major classified activities from 1943 until the present (September 2000). This report is expected to be useful to the ORNL Classification Officer and to ORNL's Authorized Derivative Classifiers and Authorized Derivative Declassifiers in their classification review of ORNL documents, especially those documents that date from the 1940s and 1950s.

  12. Active and relict sea-floor hydrothermal mineralization at the TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A. . Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Labs.); Hannington, M.D. ); Raman, C.V. ); Thompson, G.; Tivey, M.K.; Humphris, S.E. ); Lalou, C. . Lab. CNRS-CEA); Petersen, S. Aachen Univ. of Technology )

    1993-12-01

    The TAG hydrothermal field is a site of major active and inactive volcanic-hosted hydrothermal mineralization in the rift valley of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26[degree]N. The axial high is the principal locus of present magmatic intrusions. The TAG field contains three main areas of present and past hydrothermal activity: (1) an actively venting high-temperature sulfide mound; (2) two former high-temperature vent areas; (3) a zone of low-temperature venting and precipitation of Fe and Mn oxide deposits. The volcanic centers occur at the intersections between ridge axis-parallel normal faults and projected axis-transverse transfer faults. The intersections of these active fault systems may act as conduits both for magmatic intrusions from sources beneath the axial high that build the volcanic centers and for hydrothermal upwelling that taps the heat sources. Radiometric dating of sulfide samples and manganese crusts in the hydrothermal zones and dating of sediments intercalated with pillow lava flows in the volcanic center adjacent to the active sulfide mound indicate multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity throughout the field driven by heat supplied by episodic intrusions over a period of at least 140 [times] 10[sup 3] yr. The sulfide deposits are built by juxtaposition and superposition during relatively long residence times near episodic axial heat sources counterbalanced by mass wasting in the tectonically active rift valley of the slow-spreading oceanic ridge. Hydrothermal reworking of a relict hydrothermal zone by high-temperature hydrothermal episodes has recrystallized sulfides and concentrated the first visible primary gold reported in a deposit at an oceanic ridge.

  13. The temporal and spatial distribution of magmatism during lower crustal accretion at an ultraslow-spreading ridge: High-precision U-Pb zircon dating of ODP Holes 735B and 1105A, Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Matthew; Cheadle, Michael J.; John, Barbara E.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Hole 735B at Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge sampled 1508 m of plutonic oceanic crust, hosted in the footwall of an oceanic detachment fault. We present new high-precision isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon dates from samples spanning the length of Hole 735B, and from the shallower adjacent Hole 1105A (158 m). The new dates provide the most complete and precise record of both the spatial and temporal distribution of magmatism during accretion of the lower oceanic crust to date. Whole rock and mineral geochemistry from Hole 735B define three main igneous series. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates suggest each igneous series intruded beneath the preceding series. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates range from 12.175 to 11.986 Ma in Series 1; 11.974 to 11.926 Ma in Series 2; and 11.936 to 11.902 Ma in Series 3 (±0.015 to 0.069 Ma). Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates from Hole 1105A range from 11.9745 to 11.9573 Ma (±0.0082 to 0.0086 Ma). The Hole 1105A dates are coeval with Series 2 in Hole 735B, consistent with previous correlations of Fe-Ti oxide-rich layers between the two holes, suggesting individual magmatic series formed sheet-like bodies that were ≥250 m thick and extended ≥1.1 km parallel to the ridge axis (E-W) and ≥0.48 km in the spreading direction (N-S). The data suggest a total duration of magmatism in Hole 735B of ≥ 0.214 ± 0.032 Ma, corresponding to accretion over a horizontal distance of ≥ 2.6 ± 0.4 km. The crust at Atlantis Bank was formed during active detachment faulting, and the successive underplating of each magmatic unit may have been favored in this environment. The combined U-Pb dates, and reported Ti-in-zircon temperatures, are consistent with magmatic cooling rates of 103-104 °C/Ma over the temperature interval of 900-700 °C.

  14. The temporal and spatial distribution of magmatism during lower crustal accretion at an ultraslow-spreading ridge: High-precision U-Pb zircon dating of ODP Holes 735B and 1105A, Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Matthew; Cheadle, Michael J.; John, Barbara E.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Hole 735B at Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge sampled 1508 m of plutonic oceanic crust, hosted in the footwall of an oceanic detachment fault. We present new high-precision isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon dates from samples spanning the length of Hole 735B, and from the shallower adjacent Hole 1105A (158 m). The new dates provide the most complete and precise record of both the spatial and temporal distribution of magmatism during accretion of the lower oceanic crust to date. Whole rock and mineral geochemistry from Hole 735B define three main igneous series. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates suggest each igneous series intruded beneath the preceding series. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates range from 12.175 to 11.986 Ma in Series 1; 11.974 to 11.926 Ma in Series 2; and 11.936 to 11.902 Ma in Series 3 (±0.015 to 0.069 Ma). Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates from Hole 1105A range from 11.9745 to 11.9573 Ma (±0.0082 to 0.0086 Ma). The Hole 1105A dates are coeval with Series 2 in Hole 735B, consistent with previous correlations of Fe-Ti oxide-rich layers between the two holes, suggesting individual magmatic series formed sheet-like bodies that were ≥250 m thick and extended ≥1.1 km parallel to the ridge axis (E-W) and ≥0.48 km in the spreading direction (N-S). The data suggest a total duration of magmatism in Hole 735B of ≥ 0.214 ± 0.032 Ma, corresponding to accretion over a horizontal distance of ≥ 2.6 ± 0.4 km. The crust at Atlantis Bank was formed during active detachment faulting, and the successive underplating of each magmatic unit may have been favored in this environment. The combined U-Pb dates, and reported Ti-in-zircon temperatures, are consistent with magmatic cooling rates of 103-104 °C/Ma over the temperature interval of 900-700 °C.

  15. A study of epidemic spreading on activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yijiang; Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic spreading was explored on activity-driven networks (ADNs), accounting for the study of dynamics both on and of the ADN. By employing the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model, two aspects were considered: (1) the infection rate of susceptible agent (depending on the number of its infected neighbors) evolves due to the temporal structure of ADN, rather than being a constant number; (2) the susceptible and infected agents generate unequal links while being activated, namely, the susceptible agent gets few contacts with others in order to protect itself. Results show that, in both cases, the larger epidemic threshold and smaller outbreak size were obtained.

  16. Insights on the Biology of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center from Studies on the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. R.; Sen, A.; Becker, E.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal of the Ridge 2000 program was to conduct comparable interdisciplinary studies at a few fundamentally different sites that would facilitate comparisons among sites and development of concepts with broad application across deep ocean ridge spreading centers. Although the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) was the least known of the three Integrated Study Sites, we were able to make amazingly fast progress on understanding this system because we could draw on technology and experience developed during the RIDGE program to plan and conduct the work, and now interpret our findings in the context of the rich literature and Ridge 2000 studies on East Pacific Rise (EPR) , Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), and Mid Atlantic Ridge communities. The ELSC communities not only house different species than those of the other regions, but unlike the often tubeworm dominated E. Pacific vents, they are structured by symbiont reliant species that are mobile; snails and mussels. Although there is some variation with lava type on the ELSC, the 4 species of large, symbiont-containing snails largely occupy the niches filled by tubeworms and mussels on the EPR, while the niche of the mussel in the W. Pacific vents is quite different from that of its EPR cousin. Although we have not observed any significant tectonic or magmatic events during our studies of the ELSC, 4 years of study considered in the context of what we have learned on the EPR and JdFR allow us to formulate and begin testing hypotheses about temporal change and succession in these very different and much less visited ecosystems. Furthermore, athough Paralvinella fijiensis are only found in limited areas on some chimneys and flanges, unlike the situation on the EPR and JdFR ,the ELSC chimney communities are largely composed of the same species as are found in diffuse flow on the lavas. The ELSC chimney communities are also remarkably stable, hosting some of the largest and apparently oldest individuals found on the

  17. Continental rifting and metamorphic core complex formation ahead of the Woodlark spreading ridge, D'Entrecasteaux Islands, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Baldwin, S. L.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Monteleone, B.

    2007-02-01

    We evaluate the role of a metamorphic core complex (MCC) on Normanby Island in the Woodlark rift. Located <30 km from an active mid-ocean ridge (MOR), a >1 km thickness of blueschist-derived mylonites formed in a midcrustal shear zone during the Pliocene at ˜400-500°C. This top-to-the-north zone appears to have reactivated the gently dipping base of the Papuan ophiolite (Papuan Ultramafic Body, PUB), and its continued activity appears to control the north dipping asymmetry of active half grabens to the north of the MCC and rapid subsidence of the Woodlark Rise. Mylonites in the MCC's lower plate have been exhumed along a detachment as a result of >50 km of slip at rates of >12 mm/yr. The inactive, back-tilted detachment preserves fault surface megamullions and mylonitic lineations parallel to the Plio-Pleistocene plate motion. A second SE vergent detachment has been established on the opposite flank of this rolling-hinge style MCC, probably since <0.5 Ma. Centimeters per year slip rates on these two faults can account for most of the Pleistocene plate motion in this eastern sector of the Woodlark rift, and confirm the important role of MCCs in exhuming very young HP rocks in this rift. Paleopiezometry of mylonites using recrystallized quartz grain size indicates flow stresses of ˜30 MPa before the rocks were overprinted by extension fractures. These results imply high pore fluid pressures (λ > 0.8) at depth, and provide a sufficient mechanism for activating low-angle normal faults in the rift. MCC inception was not localized to the tip of the Woodlark MOR. Instead, extreme crustal thinning near the MCC preconditioned later continental breakup. The lower crust appears to be weak, thickening beneath unloaded footwalls to uplift MCCs above sea level, and flowing laterally to even out regional crustal thickness contrasts on a 1-6 m.y. timescale. Deep-seated transforms separate rheologically distinct domains in which extension has been localized along the weak PUB

  18. Imaging of Lower-crustal Magma Chambers at an Ultraslow Spreading Ridge Segment using Elastic Waveform Inversion of a Sparse OBS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, H.; Singh, S. C.; Chen, Y. J.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    The existence of axial magma chambers (AMC) is indicative of the magmatic crustal accretion at Mid-Ocean Ridges. They have been extensively imaged with seismic reflection data (e.g. multichannel seismic data), showing that the depth of the top reflector increases from 1 km to ~3 km below the seafloor, when the spreading rate decreases from fast to slow spreading. Under the ultraslow spreading environment, we have previously reported the discovery of a large lower-crustal low-velocity zone at the Southwest Indian Ridge at 50°28'E from 3-D travel time tomography of refraction data registered by an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array. These results suggest the presence of partial melt within the lower crust (>4 km bsf). Here we further improve the resolution of the AMC image by employing a 2-D time-domain elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) method. The FWI gives a higher resolution than travel time tomography as it utilizes amplitude information and does not require the high-frequency approximation used in travel time tomography. The non-linearity of the FWI is overcome by using the tomographic results as a starting model. We have selected a 70-km long profile running across the ridge axis around the segment center, where 340 shots spaced at ~220 m were recorded on 3 OBSs. The small number of OBS poses serious challenge for the success of the full waveform inversionFWI. In order to examine the resolvability of this sparse OBS dataset, we first performed FWI over a sparse synthetic data set. We find that the FWI of these this sparse dataset is capable of retrieving an isolated lower-crustal AMC anomaly beneath the ridge axis, although the resulting velocity anomaly is smeared out, particularly along the lateral direction. For the real-data inversion, the starting model was built from the 3-D travel time tomography. The inverted results clearly show the sharp boundary of the top of the low velocity zone, suggesting that the low velocity zone indeed corresponds to

  19. Epidemic spreading and immunization in node-activity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Chen, Shufang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading in node-activity networks, where an individual participates in social networks with a certain rate h. There are two cases for h: the state-independent case and the state-dependent case. We investigate the epidemic threshold as a function of h compared to the static network. Our results suggest the epidemic threshold cannot be exactly predicted by using the analysis approach in the static network. In addition, we further propose a local information-based immunization protocol on node-activity networks. Simulation analysis shows that the immunization can not only eliminate the infectious disease, but also change the epidemic threshold via increasing the immunization parameter.

  20. Loki's Castle: A sediment-influenced hydrothermal vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, T.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Moeller, K.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical composition as well as the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures of hydrothermal fluids from the Loki’s Castle vent field, located at the Mohns-Knipovich bend in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea (73°N), are substantially different from sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Geochemical studies of the hydrothermal vent fluids and the adjacent rift valley sediments provide insights into the influence of sediments on the hydrothermal fluid composition and provide constraints on acting redox conditions. Additionally, they reflect the degree of fluid-rock-sediment interaction at this arctic hydrothermal vent field. Here we present an overview of the geochemical characteristics of the hydrothermal and sedimentary components at Loki’s Castle, obtained during expeditions in 2008, 2009 and 2010, with emphasis on the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures. We compare these data with other sediment-influenced and sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. The hydrothermal vent fluids are characterized by a pH of ˜ 5.5 and by elevated concentrations of methane, hydrogen and ammonia, which reflect a sedimentary contribution. δ13CDIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) are depleted relative to mantle carbon values, consistent with an organic carbon input. The δ18OH2O values of the vents fluids are enriched compared to background bottom seawater, whereas the δD values are not. 87Sr/86Sr ratios are more radiogenic than those characteristic of un-sedimented mid-ocean ridge vent fluids. S-isotope data reflect mixing of a MORB source with sulphide derived from reduced seawater sulphate. To document the background sediment input of the ridge system, short gravity cores and up to 18 m long piston cores were recovered from various localities in the rift valley. The pore-fluid isotope chemistries of the sediments show vertical gradients that primarily reflect diagenesis and degradation of organic matter. The vertical gradient is locally enhanced

  1. Inhibition of Colony-spreading Activity of Staphylococcus aureus by Secretion of δ-Hemolysin*

    PubMed Central

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed “colony spreading.” Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin. PMID:22411996

  2. Geophysical Investigation of Continental Margin Development, and Early Spreading History of the South Atlantic South of the Walvis Ridge/Rio Grande Rise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, D.; Hall, S.; Bird, D.

    2006-12-01

    Crustal models of the transition from continental (>30 km) to normal oceanic crust between 22°S and 32°S on the African side and from 28°S and 43°S on the S. American side have been constructed from extensive gravity and magnetic anomaly data together with more limited seismic reflection and refraction data. Offshore gravity highs related to major crustal thinning can be followed along each margin. A smaller, more seaward gravity high observed on the African side coincides with previously mapped magnetic anomaly M4 and appears to delineate the landward limit of normal oceanic crust. The transition zone width is relatively uniform ~320±30 km on the African margin but increases southward from ~300 km to >400 km on the S. American side. The zone of magmatic underplating beneath the thinned crust has a uniform width of ~200 km on the African side but is somewhat narrower (~130 km) and also decreases southwards on the S. American side. Seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies C31 to C34, and M0 to M4 have been identified on both sides. Distinctive C34 anomalies can be clearly correlated except where masked by large amplitude (~1000 nT) anomalies produced by seafloor topography of the Walvis Ridge. C34 spreading rates are slightly asymmetrical with 42 mm/yr on the S. American side compared with 38 mm/yr on the African side. M0 to M4 anomalies are more difficult to identify and reliably correlate over each margin. M0-M4 spreading appears to be asymmetric with more rapid spreading on the S. American side. The C34-M0 distance is noticeably larger on the S. American side suggesting that asymmetrical spreading may continue into the Cretaceous Quiet Zone. A more probable explanation for the asymmetry is that one or more ridge jumps occurred between 84 and 120 Ma. Residualized free air satellite gravity data have been used to delineate fracture zones (FZs) associated with the early opening. More than 10 flow lines determined from these FZs intersect the mapped C34, M0 and M4

  3. Differential lexical and semantic spreading activation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul S; Drago, Valeria; Yung, Raegan C; Pearson, Jaclyn; Stringer, Kristi; Giovannetti, Tania; Libon, David; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to be associated with disruption in semantic networks. Previous studies examining changes in spreading activation in AD have used a lexical decision task paradigm. We have used a paradigm based on average word frequencies obtained from the words generated on the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) and the Animal Naming (AN) test. The COWAT and AN tests were administered to a group of 25 patients with AD and 20 control participants. We predicted that the patients with AD would have higher average word frequencies on the COWAT and AN tests than the control participants. The results indicated that the AD group generated words with a higher average word frequency on the AN test but a lower average word frequency on the COWAT. The reasons for the discrepancy in average word frequencies on the AN test and COWAT are discussed.

  4. Lava Morphology Classification of a Fast-Spreading Ridge Using Deep-Towed Sonar Data: East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; White, S.

    2005-05-01

    Classification of lava morphology on a regional scale contributes to the understanding of the distribution and extent of lava flows at a mid-ocean ridge. Seafloor classification is essential to understand the regional undersea environment at midocean ridges. In this study, the development of a classification scheme is found to identify and extract textural patterns of different lava morphologies along the East Pacific Rise using DSL-120 side-scan and ARGO camera imagery. Application of an accurate image classification technique to side-scan sonar allows us to expand upon the locally available visual ground reference data to make the first comprehensive regional maps of small-scale lava morphology present at a mid-ocean ridge. The submarine lava morphologies focused upon in this study; sheet flows, lobate flows, and pillow flows; have unique textures. Several algorithms were applied to the sonar backscatter intensity images to produce multiple textural image layers useful in distinguishing the different lava morphologies. The intensity and spatially enhanced images were then combined and applied to a hybrid classification technique. The hybrid classification involves two integrated classifiers, a rule-based expert system classifier and a machine learning classifier. The complementary capabilities of the two integrated classifiers provided a higher accuracy of regional seafloor classification compared to using either classifier alone. Once trained, the hybrid classifier can then be applied to classify neighboring images with relative ease. This classification technique has been used to map the lava morphology distribution and infer spatial variability of lava effusion rates along two segments of the East Pacific Rise, 17 deg S and 9 deg N. Future use of this technique may also be useful for attaining temporal information. Repeated documentation of morphology classification in this dynamic environment can be compared to detect regional seafloor change.

  5. Data Sharing Report for the Quantification of Removable Activity in Various Surveillance and Maintenance Facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OR-EM) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Specifically, DOE OR-EM requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting potential removable radiological contamination that may be transferrable to future personal protective equipment (PPE) and contamination control materials—collectively referred to as PPE throughout the remainder of this report—used in certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Project facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Routine surveys in Bldgs. 3001, 3005, 3010, 3028, 3029, 3038, 3042, 3517, 4507, and 7500 continuously generate PPE. The waste is comprised of Tyvek coveralls, gloves, booties, Herculite, and other materials used to prevent worker exposure or the spread of contamination during routine maintenance and monitoring activities. This report describes the effort to collect and quantify removable activity that may be used by the ORNL S&M Project team to develop radiation instrumentation “screening criteria.” Material potentially containing removable activity was collected on smears, including both masselin large-area wipes (LAWs) and standard paper smears, and analyzed for site-related constituents (SRCs) in an analytical laboratory. The screening criteria, if approved, may be used to expedite waste disposition of relatively clean PPE. The ultimate objectives of this effort were to: 1) determine whether screening criteria can be developed for these facilities, and 2) provide process knowledge information for future site planners. The screening criteria, if calculated, must be formally approved by Federal Facility Agreement parties prior to use for

  6. Experimental quantification of P-T conditions of mantle refertilisation at shallow depth under spreading ridges and formation of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.

    2014-05-01

    We studied the first-order melting process of differentiation in the Earth, and the major process of rejuvenation of the upper mantle after melting related to plate spreading (Chalot-Prat et al, 2010; 2013). We conducted experiments at High Pressure (0.75 and 0.5 GPa) and High Temperature (1260-1100°C) to obtain magma compositions in equilibrium with the mineral assemblages of a plagioclase + spinel lherzolite. These PT conditions prevail at 17-30km below axial oceanic spreading ridges. We used a "trial and error" approach in a system involving nine elements (Cr-Na-Fe-Ca-Mg-Al-Si-Ti-Ni). This approaches as closely as possible a natural mantle composition, Cr being a key element in the system. Our objectives were : • to determine experimentally the compositions of melts in equilibrium with plagioclase + spinel lherzolite, with emphasis on the role of plagioclase composition in controlling melt compositions; • to test the hypothesis that MORB are produced at shallow depth (17-30kms) • to quantify liquid- and mantle residue compositional paths at decreasing T and low P to understand magma differentiation by "percolation-reaction" at shallow depth in the mantle; • to compare experimental mantle mineral compositions to those of re-fertilised oceanic mantle lithosphere outcropping at the axis of oceanic spreading ridges, enabling quantification of the pressure (i.e. depth) and temperature of the re-fertilisation process that leads to formation of plagioclase and indicates the minimum thickness of the lithosphere at ridge axes. In the normative basalt tetrahedron, liquids plot on two parallel cotectic lines from silica-oversaturated (basaltic andesite at 0.75 GPa or andesite at 0.5 GPa) at the calcic end to silica-undersaturated compositions (trachyte) at the sodic end. The lower the pressure, the greater the silica oversaturation. Besides the plagioclase solid solution has a dominant role in determining the solidus temperature of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites

  7. Hydrothermal Activity and Volcanism on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Scientific Party, M.

    2005-12-01

    In April 2005 four recently discovered different hydrothermal fields on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Equator were studied and sampled using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during cruise METEOR 64/1. Three of these hydrothermally active fields (called Turtle Pits, Red Lion, and Wideawake) occur at about 3000 m water depth in the centre of a MAR segment at 4° 48'S which appears to be volcanically very active. The youngest lava flow partly covers the low-temperature, diffuse flow Wideawake mussel field and is thus probably only a few years old. The high-temperature Turtle Pits hydrothermal field with four active vent structures lies some 300 m west of the diffuse vent field and is characterized by boiling fluids with temperatures close to 400° C. The mineral assemblage recovered from inactive hydrothermal mounds includes massive magnetite+hematite+sulfate and differs from that of the presently active vents and indicates more oxidizing conditions during the earlier activity. The vent fluids at Turtle Pits contain relatively high contents of hydrogen which may have formed during iron oxidation processes when basaltic magmas crystallized. The high fluid temperatures, the change to more reducing conditions, and the relatively high hydrogen contents in the fluids are most likely due to the ascent of magmas from the mantle that fed the very recent eruption. The high-temperature Red Lion hydrothermal field lies some 2 km north of the Turtle Pits field and consists of at least four active black smokers surrounded by several inactive sulfide mounds. The composition of the Red Lion fluids differs significantly from the Turtle Pits fluids, possibly owing largely to a difference in the temperature of the two systems. The fourth hydrothermally active field on the southern MAR, the Liliput field, was discovered near 9° 33'S in a water depth of 1500 m and consists of several low-temperature vents. A shallow hydrothermal plume in the water column

  8. Protracted construction of gabbroic crust at a slow spreading ridge: Constraints from 206Pb/238U zircon ages from Atlantis Massif and IODP Hole U1309D (30°N, MAR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, Craig B.; John, Barbara E.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon ages of 24 samples from oceanic crust recovered in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hole U1309D and from the surface of Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) (30°N) document a protracted history of accretion in the footwall to an oceanic detachment fault. Ages for 18 samples of evolved Fe-Ti oxide gabbro and felsic dikes collected 40–1415 m below seafloor in U1309D yield a weighted mean of 1.20 ± 0.03 Ma (mean square of weighted deviates = 7.1). However, the ages range from 1.08 ± 0.07 Ma and 1.28 ± 0.05 Ma indicating crustal construction occurred over a minimum of 100–200 ka. The zircon ages, along with petrologic observations, indicate at least 2 major periods of intrusive activity with age peaks separated by 70 ka. The oldest ages are observed below 600 mbsf, an observation inconsistent with models requiring constant depth melt intrusion beneath a detachment fault. The data are most consistent with a “multiple sill” model whereby sills intrude at random depths below the ridge axis over a length scale greater than 1.4 km. Zircon ages from broadly spaced samples collected along the southern ridge of Atlantis Massif yield a detachment fault slip rate of 28.7 ± 6.7 mm/a and imply significant asymmetric plate spreading (up to 100% on the North American plate) for at least 200 ka during core complex formation.

  9. Oceanic core complex and newly-formed basalts in axial part of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (5-7oN): Implications for formation and evolution of slow-spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Sharkov, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Data on petrography, mineralogy and U-Pb and Sr isotope studies of rocks exposed in the axial valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 5oN to 7oN are discussed. Samples were collected in 10th cruise of R/V "Academik Ioffe" (2001-2002) and 22nd cruise of R/V "Professor Logachev" (2003). Dredged rocks are serpentinized mantle peridotites, gabbros, including ferrogabbros and trondhjemites as well as fresh basalts with chilled glassy crusts. Plutonic rocks are strongly altered and tectonized. The association of rocks is identical to that defined as oceanic core complexes (OCC), described by Tucholke et al. (1998), Escartin et al. (2003), Ildefonse et al. (2007), MacLeod et al. (2009). Two complexes of altered gabbros: (1) primitive magnesian gabbros, derived from MORB, and (2) hornblende-bearing ferrogabbros defined as siliceous Fe-Ti-oxide series were found. The latter are saturated and supersaturated with silica under relatively high water content. Such features are usually typical of subduction-related magmas, but they have high contents of Ti, Fe, Nb, Ta and P, which characterize plume-related magmas. SHRIMP-studies of the magmatic zircon grains with oscillatory zoning, extracted from the gabbros, showed that their U-Pb age range from 0.7 to 2.3 Ma. Newly-formed fresh basaltic flows covered protrusions in the rift valleys and fill in dips in axial valleys where they overlap both altered gabbros and serpentinites. Fresh basalts are close in composition to oceanic platobasalts. These basalts are considered to be derived due to crystallizing differentiation in shallow transitional magmatic chambers (intrusions). This assumes the present-day magmatic activity beneath the spreading zone in this area. Several centimeters-scale Sr-isotopic heterogeneity in basalts was discovered. It is considered as a result of incomplete dissolution in basaltic magmas of gabbro fragments, captured during rapid ascent of the melt through the lower crust. This is evidence that a magmatic

  10. Chemical characteristics of magma and related seafloor sulfide deposits on back-arc spreading center and off-ridge volcanoes in Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, T.; Kanamori, S.; Ishibashi, J.; Kentaro, K.; Sato, H.; Kato, S.; Toyoda, S.

    2012-12-01

    The back-arc basalt in Mariana Trough is characterized by fluid-dominated components (Stolper and Newman, 1994). They suggested that the H2O-enriched magma of the Mariana Trough is formed as melting mixture between MORB-type mantle source and H2O-rich component which is likely to be derived from the subducting slab. Four active and one inactive hydrothermal sites were found within a distance of 5 km in Southern Mariana Trough; that is, Snail site (12o57.19'N, 143o37.16'E, depth:2861m) and Yamanaka site (12o56.64'N, 143o36.80'E, depth: 2823m) on the spreading-axis, Archean site (12o56.35'N, 143o37.89'E, depth: 2986m), and Pika+Urashima sites (12o55.13'N, 143o38.92'E, depth: 2773m) on the off-axis seamount, respectively. We conducted nine BMS (Benthic Multi-coring System) drillings during the Hakurei-Maru No.2 cruise of TAIGA project (see below) in June 2010. Both basalt glasses and associated seafloor massive sulfide ores from these sites are cored and served for ICP-MS analyses. Multi-element plot of basalt glass indicates that both on-axis and off-axis basalts have similar pattern and are categorized as differentiated MORB and basaltic andesite which cannot be produced by fractionation of MORB, respectively. Sulfide ores at on-axis and off-axis sites show similar mineral assemblage of pyrite/marcasite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, barite, and limited occurrence of galena only at on-axis site. Fluid-mobile elements such as As, Ba, Pb and others in sulfide ores show systematic increase at off-axis sites which reflect the influence of subduction zone fluids towards the Mariana arc. The sulfur isotope composition of pyrite/marcasite from on-axis sites shows values (+6.4 - +7.9 permil) typically observed in arc magma-related hydrothermal deposits (Suzuki, unpubl. data). On the other hand, those observed at off-axis sites (Archean; +3.6 - +6.9 permil, Pika; +0.8 - +3.5 permil) are similar to the composition of sulfides on mid-ocean ridges where the influence of sulfur

  11. Actively Spreading Plate Boundaries and UNCLOS: the Difficulties of Applying Article 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A.; Carleton, C.; Parson, L.

    2005-12-01

    The process by which the delineation of a legal continental shelf according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) is made for an oceanic island territory beyond 200 nautical miles causes significant confusion for both researchers on the issue and coastal states' representatives trying to apply the provisions within Article 76. The interpretation of the statutory provisions set out in UNCLOS and the Technical and Scientific guidelines laid out by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) remain, for the most part, difficult to implement. This global summary of oceanic islands and their geological context with respect to the Law of the Sea Convention, and in particular regarding mid-ocean ridge systems, brings to light some of the problems responsible for this confusion and attempts to resolve the uncertainty associated with ridge issues with a practical and equitable delimitation proposal. Paragraph 6 of Article 76 requires a constraint/limit of 350M from the territorial sea baselines on submarine ridges, (one assumes, to ensure that no coastal state claims the entire mid-ocean ridge!). However the criteria set in paragraph 4a(i) or 4a(ii) of Article 76, which provide the means to extend a legal continental shelf beyond 200M based on the identification of a morphological foot of slope, cannot be applied to oceanic island territories because of difficulties in determining its consistent and practical location. Accordingly the advantages and disadvantages of several geophysical data types have been evaluated for their use under paragraph 4 (b) of Article 76 (definition of the foot of the slope on "evidence to the contrary"). Our proposed method of using the central, zero-age locus of the mid oceanic ridge, whether this may be the ridge line, bathymetric maxima or spreading centre, as a representation of the foot of slope (based on evidence to the contrary), results in a simple, fair and consistent way of developing an area

  12. Hydrothermal plumes over spreading ridges and related deposits in the northeast Pacific Ocean: The East Pacific Rise near 11 degrees north and 21 degrees north, Explorer Ridge and J. Tuzo Wilson Seamounts

    SciTech Connect

    McConachy, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrothermal plumes emanating from hot springs over spreading ridges in the north east Pacific Ocean have been mapped and sampled using the submersible ALVIN and equipment deployed from surface ships. The geologic setting and polymetallic sulfides of the vent field producing the hydrothermal plume at 11{degree}N have also been examined. At 11{degree}N, two distinct metalliferous components are delivered to the intermediate to far-field from high temperature black smoker discharge as a result of the physical and chemical processes that occur in the lower 32 m of the plume. About 60 volume % of this material is estimated to settle within a 6-km-radius of the vent field, based on the results of SEM-IPS grain-size analyses and their application to a published particle settling model. The second component delivered to the far-field consists of the remaining 40 volume % of fine-grained sulfides and non-sulfides, 10% of dissolved Fe which will eventually precipitate as oxyhydroxides, and {>=} 80% of the hydrothermally injected Mn, Si, and probably Ba. At 21{degree} N by contrast, only 20 volume % of the smoke particles is conservatively estimated to settle within a 8-km-radius of the NGS vent due to their finer grain size and a higher terminal height of the buoyant hydrothermal plume.

  13. The Masked Semantic Priming Effect Is Task Dependent: Reconsidering the Automatic Spreading Activation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Bianca; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Semantic priming effects are popularly explained in terms of an automatic spreading activation process, according to which the activation of a node in a semantic network spreads automatically to interconnected nodes, preactivating a semantically related word. It is expected from this account that semantic priming effects should be routinely…

  14. Masked Priming Effects in Aphasia: Evidence of Altered Automatic Spreading Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silkes, JoAnn P.; Rogers, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has suggested that impairments of automatic spreading activation may underlie some aphasic language deficits. The current study further investigated the status of automatic spreading activation in individuals with aphasia as compared with typical adults. Method: Participants were 21 individuals with aphasia (12 fluent, 9…

  15. Samail Ophiolite plutonic suite: Field relations, phase variation, cryptic variation and layering, and a model of a spreading ridge magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Hopson, C. A.

    1981-04-01

    Geologic mapping of an intact plutonic sequence within the Samail ophiolite in the Ibra area, southeastern Oman Mountains, reveals stratigraphic, structural, and petrologic details of oceanic layer 3. Four measured stratigraphic sections, each spaced about 5 km apart across the southern flank of Jabal Dimh, define a time-transgressive progression within the ophiolite and reveal geometric and petrologic features of a spreading-ridge magma chamber. The sections show the following vertical sequence: (1) dunite (chr-ol cumulates ± harzburgite xenoliths) 0-200 m thick, grading up from a transition zone with harzburgite tectonite, (2) interlayered wehrlite-melagabbro-gabbro (cpx-ol and ol-cpx-pl cumulates) 0-100 m thick, (3) layered gabbro (chiefly ol-cpx-pl cumulates but including recurrent intervals of cumulus wehrlite and melagabbro) 2.6-5.5 km thick, (4) planar laminated nonlayered gabbro (chiefly ol-cpx-pl cumulates) 100-400 m thick, (5) hypidiomorphic (ol)-hb-cpx gabbro (high-level gabbro) 200-800 m thick, (6) small, discontinous diorite to plagiogranite bodies at or near the top of the gabbro. Cumulus textures (adcumulus > mesocumulus), planar lamination, and cumulus layering (phase, ratio, and grain size layers at mm to 10-m scale, commonly graded) within this sequence show that crystals accumulated from the base of the magma chamber upward to within a few hundred meters of the top; downward solidification from the roof was minor. Cyclicity within the cumulus sequence is represented by the recurrence of olivine-rich intervals (melagabbo and wehrlite) up to high stratigraphic levels and by hundreds of phase-graded layers (ol-rich at the bases to pl-rich at the tops), individually up to 5 m thick. Limited cryptic variation relative to closed-system layered intrusions and the limited range in solid-solution components of olivine (Fo69-90), plagioclase (An62-95) and clinopyroxene (En40-54, Fs4-16, Wo37-49) from the cumulus suite require replenishment of the magma

  16. Correlated Geophysical, Geochemical and Volcanological Manifestations of Plume-Ridge Interaction Along the Galápagos Spreading Center, 90.5-98° W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, J. M.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Ito, G.; Behn, M.; Blacic, T.; Cushman, B.; Dixon, J.

    2001-12-01

    element-enriched mantle [Cushman et al., this meeting]; and (3) higher magma supply results in stabilization of axial magma chambers at increasingly shallow crustal depths [Blacic et al., this meeting] and the dominance of fissure-fed rather than point-source volcanism. The hotspot-related effect of increased magma supply on axial morphology, AMC depth and volcanic style along this intermediate-spreading ridge is similar to that between slow and faster spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  17. Annual report on surveillance and maintenance activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1995, the sites and facilities from both the Remedial Action (RA) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) programs were combined to form the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) Program. Surveillance and Maintenance activities were conducted throughout FY 1996 at the RA facilities. Overall, the RA S and M Program consists of approximately 650 acres that include 14 waste area groupings with approximately 200 sites. These sites include 46 major facilities, several leak and contaminated soil sites, 38 inactive tanks, approximately 50 environmental study areas and approximately 2,973 wells and boreholes. Site inspections were conducted at established frequencies on appropriate sites in the RA S and M Program in accordance with the established S and M FY 1996 Incentive Task Order (ITO).

  18. Implications of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project for improving understanding of hydrothermal processes at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elders, Wilfred A.; Friðleifsson, Guðmundur Ómar

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) is investigating producing geothermal energy from magma-hydrothermal systems at supercritical conditions. This requires drilling to depths of 4 to 5 km where temperatures should be in the range of 450-600°C or higher. Modeling studies suggest producing superheated steam from supercritical temperatures >450°C could increase power output tenfold relative to steam produced from a 300°C reservoir. The first IDDP well was drilled at Krafla within a volcanic caldera in the active rift zone of NE Iceland. At the end of June 2009, drilling was terminated at only 2100 m depth when a >900°C rhyolitic magma flowed into the drill hole. The well was completed with a casing cemented a few meters above the magma. Depending on the result of a planned flow test, there is the possibility of creating the world's hottest "Engineered Geothermal System" by injecting water in a nearby well to produce superheated steam from the magma. An advantage of such a strategy would be that the acidic gases likely to be given off by the magma could be neutralized by injecting suitably treated water. Two new wells, ˜4 km deep, are planned to be drilled during 2010-2012 at the Hengill and the Reykjanes geothermal fields in SW Iceland to explore for supercritical zones. The Reykjanes geothermal system produces hydrothermally modified seawater. This presents an ideal situation to study a high-temperature magma-hydrothermal system at depth analogous to those responsible for the black smokers at submarine divergent plate margins.

  19. Impact of Non-Poissonian Activity Patterns on Spreading Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Alexei; Rácz, Balázs; Lukács, András; Barabási, Albert-László

    2007-04-01

    Halting a computer or biological virus outbreak requires a detailed understanding of the timing of the interactions between susceptible and infected individuals. While current spreading models assume that users interact uniformly in time, following a Poisson process, a series of recent measurements indicates that the intercontact time distribution is heavy tailed, corresponding to a temporally inhomogeneous bursty contact process. Here we show that the non-Poisson nature of the contact dynamics results in prevalence decay times significantly larger than predicted by the standard Poisson process based models. Our predictions are in agreement with the detailed time resolved prevalence data of computer viruses, which, according to virus bulletins, show a decay time close to a year, in contrast with the 1 day decay predicted by the standard Poisson process based models.

  20. 4D Time-Lapse Seismic Analysis of Active Gas Seepage Systems on the Vestnesa Ridge, Offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunz, S.; Hurter, S.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Mienert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Active gas venting occurs on the Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. The crest of the Vestnesa Ridge at water depth between 1200-1300 m is pierced with fluid-flow features. Seafloor pockmarks vary in size up to 1 km in diameter with significant morphological features consisting of small ridges, diapiric structures and small pits. Detailed hydro-acoustic surveying shows that gas mostly emanates from the small-scale pits, where also hydrates have been recovered by sediment sampling. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data acquired in 2012 show vertical focused fluid flow features beneath the seafloor pockmarks. These co-called chimneys extend down to the free-gas zone underneath a bottom-simulating reflection (BSR). Here, they link up with small fault systems that might provide pathways to the deeper subsurface. The chimney features show a high variability in their acoustic characteristics with alternating blanked or masked zones and high-amplitude anomalies scattered through the whole vertical extent of the chimneys. The amplitude anomalies indicate high-impedance contrasts due to the likely presence of gas or a high-velocity material like gas hydrates or carbonates. In most cases, the high-amplitude anomalies line up along specific vertical pathways that connect nicely with the small-scale pits at the surface where gas bubbles seep from the seafloor. We re-acquired the 3D seismic survey in 2013 for time-lapse seismic studies in order to better understand the origin of the amplitude anomalies and in order to track potentially migrating gas fronts up along the chimney structure. The time-lapse seismic analysis indicates several areas, where gas migration may have led to changes in acoustic properties of the subsurface. These areas are located along chimney structures and the BSR. This work provides a basis for better

  1. Influence of Geologic Setting on the Morphology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry of Vent Deposits Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M. K.; Evans, G. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    Establishment of links between lithology, vent fluid chemistry, and vent deposit characteristics along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) was made possible using deep submergence vehicles and technology. ROV Jason was used to collect ultrahigh-resolution (submeter) bathymetric data sufficient to quantify characteristics of volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal features; differences within vent fields from north to south include a change from low-relief volcanic domes cut by faults and fissures to higher aspect ratio volcanic domes dominated by aa-type lava morphologies (Ferrini et al., G-cubed, 2008). Highest temperature fluids are associated with crosscutting faults at all but Mariner vent field where faults are not observed. The detailed maps were used to target areas within vent fields for observations and sampling. Vent deposit morphologies are similar at the northernmost vent fields (Kilo Moana, TowCam, Tahi Moana), with black smokers and diffusers present on branched edifices. Vent deposits at the more southerly ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner vent fields vary in morphology, despite similar substrate lithology. Examples include abundant flanges at ABE and Tui Malila and ~20m-tall spires and squat barite-rich edifices at Mariner. Geochemical analyses and petrographic observations document the influence of lithology, fluid temperature, pH, and extents of seawater mixing on deposit formation. Concentrations of As, which increase from north to south, reflect lithologic control. Sb, Pb, and Ba concentrations also reflect lithologic control, but are affected as well by low pH and/or extents of seawater mixing. The significant differences in Mariner deposits reflect formation from very high temperature, low pH (<3 vs >4) fluids that keep Zn in solution, combined with local subsurface mixing. Overall, results document the influence of the Tonga Subduction Zone on vent deposits through its affects on lithology and vent fluid composition.

  2. Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 13-14N: Evidence of Unstable Seafloor Spreading Processes From Deep-Towed Magnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R.; Mallows, C.; Cipcigan, F.; Party, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    During cruise JC007 in March-April 2007 we recorded total magnetic field anomalies over two active and one defunct oceanic core complex (OCC) and the intervening seafloor. Measurements were made by towed magnetometer at the sea surface, and by the TOBI deep-towed vehicle approximately 400 m above seafloor, along 13 E-W lines about 60 km long and spaced 3 to 6 km apart. Sea-surface data show a fairly coherent central anomaly on most lines, though on some it is significantly displaced from the spreading axis as indicated by bathymetry and side-scan sonar data. Modelling in terms of a standard, simple (but probably unrealistic), continuous reversal sequence requires total spreading rates ranging from about 15 to 40 km/Myr with offsets of the axis up to 20 km and highly asymmetric spreading. The deep-towed data were corrected for the heading-dependent magnetic effects of the TOBI vehicle before inversion to crustal magnetisation using the 2D Parker & Huestis (1974) procedure. These results were checked by comparing with inversions of the sea-surface field, which shows similar features at reduced resolution. The deep-towed inversion results show a rather incoherent magnetisation pattern. The central magnetisation high is nowhere more than 13 km wide, only 70% of the expected width of the Brunhes here, and several profiles yield apparently negative magnetisation over areas we expect to be of Brunhes age based on sonar and bathymetry data. This may due to a combination of destruction of magnetisation by faulting (Hussenoeder at al., 1996), departure from the 2D geometry assumed for the inversions, and departure (via tectonic rotation) from the assumed constant magnetisation direction. We are now carrying out fully 3D inversions and forward modelling guided by the structural evidence provided by sidescan and bathymetry. These results will be presented and discussed in relation to the seafloor spreading history and structure of the region.

  3. The p-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading centre - The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Over 1400 seismograms of earthquakes in Mexico are analyzed and data sets for the travel time, apparent phase velocity, and relative amplitude information are utilized to produce a tightly constrained, detailed model for depths to 900 km beneath an active oceanic ridge region, the Gulf of California. The data are combined by first inverting the travel times, perturbing that model to fit the p-delta data, and then performing trial and error synthetic seismogram modelling to fit the short-period waveforms. The final model satisfies all three data sets. The ridge model is similar to existing upper mantle models for shield, tectonic-continental, and arc-trench regimes below 400 km, but differs significantly in the upper 350 km. Ridge model velocities are very low in this depth range; the model 'catches up' with the others with a very large velocity gradient from 225 to 390 km.

  4. SAN-RL: combining spreading activation networks and reinforcement learning to learn configurable behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J.; Gaines, D. M.; Wilkes, M.; Kusumalnukool, K.; Thongchai, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2001-01-01

    This approach provides the agent with a causal structure, the spreading activation network, relating goals to the actions that can achieve those goals. This enables the agent to select actions relative to the goal priorities.

  5. A Dual-Porosity, In Situ Crystallisation Model For Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Chambers Based Upon Direct Observation From Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Lissenberg, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a revised magma chamber model for fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges based upon a synthesis of new data from a complete section of lower crust from the East Pacific Rise, reconstructed from samples collected from the Hess Deep rift valley during cruise JC21. Our investigation includes detailed sampling across critical transitions in the upper part of the plutonic section, including the inferred axial melt lens (AML) within the dyke-gabbro transition. We find that an overall petrological progression, from troctolite and primitive gabbro at the base up into evolved (oxide) gabbro and gabbronorite at the top of the lower crustal section, is mirrored by a progressive upward chemical fractionation as recorded in bulk rock and mineral compositions. Crystallographic preferred orientations measured using EBSD show that the downward increase in deformation of mush required in crystal subsidence models is not observed. Together these observations are consistent only with a model in which crystallisation of upward migrating evolving melts occurs in situ in the lower crust. Over-enrichment in incompatible trace element concentrations and ratios above that possible by fractional crystallisation is ubiquitous. This implies redistribution of incompatible trace elements in the lower crust by low porosity, near-pervasive reactive porous flow of interstitial melt moving continuously upward through the mush pile. Mass balance calculations reveal a significant proportion of this trace element enriched melt is trapped at mid-crustal levels. Mineral compositions in the upper third to half of the plutonic section are too evolved to represent the crystal residues of MORB. Erupted MORB therefore must be fed from melts sourced in the deeper part of the crystal mush pile, and which must ascend rapidly without significant modification in the upper plutonics or AML. From physical models of mush processes we posit that primitive melts are transported through transient, high porosity

  6. Evaluation of the Variation in Cooling Rate with Depth in the Lower Oceanic Crust at Fast-Spreading Ridges Using a Newly Developed Mg in Plagioclase Geospeedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faak, K.; Chakraborty, S.; Coogan, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The crystallization and cooling of new oceanic crust is regenerating two thirds of the Earth's surface continuously but the processes that occur during the cooling and crystallization of the magma are still poorly understood. Two end-member models have been proposed for lower crustal accretion at intermediate- to fast-spreading ridges (the "gabbro glacier" and "sheeted sill" models). These require different depth distributions of hydrothermal circulation and are likely to result in different variations of cooling rates with depth. Mapping cooling rates of samples of the lower oceanic crust as a function of depth can, therefore, allow us to distinguish between the models and constrain the thermal evolution during the generation of oceanic crust. We have developed a new geospeedometer, based on the exchange of Mg between plagioclase and clinopyroxene, to address this problem. New experiments demonstrate that the partitioning of Mg between clinopyroxene and plagioclase is strongly temperature dependent, changing by a factor of 4 between 1200°C and 900°C, such that during cooling Mg diffuses out of plagioclase into adjacent clinopyroxene grains. A finite difference diffusion model of Mg redistribution during cooling is applied to natural samples from the north wall of the Hess Deep Rift at the East Pacific Rise. 90 concentration profiles (rim - rim) from 45 crystals in 14 samples (from a depth range 0-520m below the sheeted dikes) were measured using an electron microprobe. For obtaining reliable cooling rates, Mg concentration profiles were measured along two crystallographic directions in a grain, and profiles from several crystals in one thin section are modeled. Cooling rate determinations are considered reliable only when results from all of these calculations are consistent. Fresh plagioclase crystals in coarse grained gabbros (mean grain size ~ 1mm) were chosen for the measurement of Mg contents. The shapes of these measured concentration profiles are very

  7. How the heterogeneous infection rate effect on the epidemic spreading in activity-driven network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Chen, Chao; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we research the impact of the heterogeneous infection rate on the epidemic spread in the activity-driven networks. By using the mean field approximation, the epidemic threshold is theoretically obtained. Several immunization strategies that could curb the epidemic spread are presented. Based on the theoretical analysis and simulation results, we obtain that the epidemic would be prevented effectively if the infection rate strongly correlates with the individual activity. However, if infection rate has a little correlation with the individual activity, most of the individuals may be infected. In addition, the epidemic can be suppressed soon if the individuals with high activity are immunized preferentially.

  8. ARCO moves to spark U. S. activity, spread risk

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1992-07-13

    This paper reports that one US major oil company has taken the offensive to combat tightness of drilling capital in the US and the overseas flight of interest in elephant hunting. ARCO Oil and Gas Co., with substantial acreage and seismic data covering most of the US Lower 48 states, s communicating with a broad audience to try to make activity happen on its properties. ARCO is looking to bring others in on its prospects, hawk seismic data, and take deals from others. On some acreage that internal funds are not available to evaluate, ARCO was offering 100% farmounts.

  9. Hybrid spreading mechanisms and T cell activation shape the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M; Jolly, Clare

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments' influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  10. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF POPULATION 7: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, DRY ACTIVE WASTE, AND MISCELLANEOUS DEBRIS, SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpenau, Evan M

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  11. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  12. Measurement of ridge-spreading movements (Sackungen) at Bald Eagle Mountain, Lake County, Colorado, II : continuation of the 1975-1989 measurements using a Global Positioning System in 1997 and 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, David J.; Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Savage, W.Z.; Savage, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of ridge-spreading movements at Bald Eagle Mountain in north-central Colorado were reported in USGS Open-File Report 90-543 for the years 1975-1989. Measurements were renewed in 1997 and 1999 using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Movements are generally away from a ridge-top graben and appear to be concentrated along 3 or 4 trenches with uphill facing scarps that are parallel with slope contours. A point just below the lowest trench has moved the most? a total of 8.3 cm horizontally and slightly downward from 1977 to 1999 relative to an assumed stable point on the periphery of the graben. Movements from 1997 to 1999 are less than 1 cm or within the error of measurement.

  13. SAPIENS: Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures. Technical Report No. 296.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortony, Andrew; Radin, Dean I.

    The product of researchers' efforts to develop a computer processor which distinguishes between relevant and irrelevant information in the database, Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures (SAPIENS) exhibits (1) context sensitivity, (2) efficiency, (3) decreasing activation over time, (4) summation of…

  14. Human factors activities in teleoperator development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Herndon, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing advanced teleoperator systems for maintenance of future nuclear reprocessing facilities. Remote maintenance systems developed by the CFRP emphasize man-in-the-loop teleoperation. Consequently, human factors issues which affect teleoperator performance must be addressed. This papers surveys research and development activities carried out by the human factors group within the Remote Control Engineering Task of the CFRP.

  15. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory LLLW active tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.G.; Maresca, J.W. Jr. )

    1993-03-01

    This document provides a detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for leak testing many of the tanks that comprise the active portion of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and two other agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

  16. Effect of geomagnetic activity on equatorial radio VHF scintillations and spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, R.G.; Mullen, J.P.; MacKenzie, E.

    1981-05-01

    The paper discusses the occurrence of scintillations of ATS 3 (137 MHz) beacons recorded at Huancayo on geomagnetically quiet and disturbed days during the years 1969--1976 and compared the results with the corresponding occurrence of range and frequency spread F at Huancayo. During the equinoctial months and the December solstical months the geomgnetic activity reduces the equatorial scintillations during premidnight hours but increases their occurrence during the postmidnight hours. These features are very similar to the effect of geomagnetic activity on the occurrence of the range type of equatorial spread F rather than on the occurrence of frequency spread, which decreases for any hour of the night during geomagnetic active periods. During the June solsticial months, the occurrence of both scintillations and spread F is very much reduced; however, both the phenomena are more frequent on disturbed than on quiet days for any of the hours of the night. These effects are consistently the same for any of the years within the solar cycle. It is suggested that the equatorial radio scintillations at 137 MHz during the nighttime are produced primarily by the occurrence of the range type of spread F. The geomagnetic effects are due to the modifications of the equatorial electric field by the geomagnetic disturbance and thereby affect the development of F region irregularities causing scintillations.

  17. Epidemic spreading with activity-driven awareness diffusion on multiplex network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Yifang; Huo, Guanying; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing interest in exploring the interplay between epidemic spreading with human response, since it is natural for people to take various measures when they become aware of epidemics. As a proper way to describe the multiple connections among people in reality, multiplex network, a set of nodes interacting through multiple sets of edges, has attracted much attention. In this paper, to explore the coupled dynamical processes, a multiplex network with two layers is built. Specifically, the information spreading layer is a time varying network generated by the activity driven model, while the contagion layer is a static network. We extend the microscopic Markov chain approach to derive the epidemic threshold of the model. Compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, the method shows high accuracy for the prediction of the epidemic threshold. Besides, taking different spreading models of awareness into consideration, we explored the interplay between epidemic spreading with awareness spreading. The results show that the awareness spreading can not only enhance the epidemic threshold but also reduce the prevalence of epidemics. When the spreading of awareness is defined as susceptible-infected-susceptible model, there exists a critical value where the dynamical process on the awareness layer can control the onset of epidemics; while if it is a threshold model, the epidemic threshold emerges an abrupt transition with the local awareness ratio α approximating 0.5. Moreover, we also find that temporal changes in the topology hinder the spread of awareness which directly affect the epidemic threshold, especially when the awareness layer is threshold model. Given that the threshold model is a widely used model for social contagion, this is an important and meaningful result. Our results could also lead to interesting future research about the different time-scales of structural changes in multiplex networks. PMID:27131489

  18. Epidemic spreading with activity-driven awareness diffusion on multiplex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Quantong; Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Yifang; Huo, Guanying; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing interest in exploring the interplay between epidemic spreading with human response, since it is natural for people to take various measures when they become aware of epidemics. As a proper way to describe the multiple connections among people in reality, multiplex network, a set of nodes interacting through multiple sets of edges, has attracted much attention. In this paper, to explore the coupled dynamical processes, a multiplex network with two layers is built. Specifically, the information spreading layer is a time varying network generated by the activity driven model, while the contagion layer is a static network. We extend the microscopic Markov chain approach to derive the epidemic threshold of the model. Compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, the method shows high accuracy for the prediction of the epidemic threshold. Besides, taking different spreading models of awareness into consideration, we explored the interplay between epidemic spreading with awareness spreading. The results show that the awareness spreading can not only enhance the epidemic threshold but also reduce the prevalence of epidemics. When the spreading of awareness is defined as susceptible-infected-susceptible model, there exists a critical value where the dynamical process on the awareness layer can control the onset of epidemics; while if it is a threshold model, the epidemic threshold emerges an abrupt transition with the local awareness ratio α approximating 0.5. Moreover, we also find that temporal changes in the topology hinder the spread of awareness which directly affect the epidemic threshold, especially when the awareness layer is threshold model. Given that the threshold model is a widely used model for social contagion, this is an important and meaningful result. Our results could also lead to interesting future research about the different time-scales of structural changes in multiplex networks.

  19. 78 FR 69447 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Existing Collection, Comments Requested: Friction Ridge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Requested: Friction Ridge Cards: Arrest and Institution; Applicant; Personal Identification; FBI Standard... form/collection: Friction Ridge Cards: Arrest and Institution; Applicant; Personal Identification;...

  20. Large scale organization of rat sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large activation spreads

    PubMed Central

    Frostig, Ron D.; Xiong, Ying; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Kvašňák, Eugen; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Parcellation according to function (e.g., visual, somatosensory, auditory, motor) is considered a fundamental property of sensorimotor cortical organization, traditionally defined from cytoarchitectonics and mapping studies relying on peak evoked neuronal activity. In the adult rat, stimulation of single whiskers evokes peak activity at topographically appropriate locations within somatosensory cortex and provides an example of cortical functional specificity. Here, we show that single whisker stimulation also evokes symmetrical areas of supra- and sub-threshold neuronal activation that spread extensively away from peak activity, effectively ignoring cortical borders by spilling deeply into multiple cortical territories of different modalities (auditory, visual and motor), where they were blocked by localized neuronal activity blocker injections and thus ruled out as possibly due to ‘volume conductance’. These symmetrical activity spreads were supported by underlying border-crossing, long-range horizontal connections as confirmed with transection experiments and injections of anterograde neuronal tracer experiments. We found such large evoked activation spreads and their underlying connections irrespective of whisker identity, cortical layer, or axis of recorded responses, thereby revealing a large scale nonspecific organization of sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large symmetrical activation spreads. Because the large activation spreads and their underlying horizontal connections ignore anatomical borders between cortical modalities, sensorimotor cortex could therefore be viewed as a continuous entity rather than a collection of discrete, delineated unimodal regions – an organization that could co-exist with established specificity of cortical organization and that could serve as a substrate for associative learning, direct multimodal integration and recovery of function following injury. PMID:19052219

  1. Mantle plume capture, anchoring and outflow during ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Richards, M. A.; Geist, D.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical and geophysical studies have shown that >40% of the world's mantle plumes are currently interacting with the global ridge system and such interactions may continue for up to 180 Myr[1]. At sites of plume-ridge interaction up to 1400 km of the spreading centre is influenced by dispersed plume material but there are few constraints on how and where the ridge-ward transfer of deep-sourced material occurs, and also how it is sustained over long time intervals. Galápagos is an archetypal example of an off-axis plume and sheds important light on these mechanisms. The Galápagos plume stem is located ~200 km south of the spreading axis and its head influences 1000 km of the ridge. Nevertheless, the site of enriched basalts, greatest crustal thickness and elevated topography on the ridge, together with active volcanism in the archipelago, correlate with a narrow zone (~150 km) of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle that connects the plume stem and ridge at depths of ~100 km[2]. The enriched ridge basalts contain a greater amount of partially-dehydrated, recycled oceanic crust than basalts elsewhere on the spreading axis, or indeed basalts erupted in the region between the plume stem and ridge. The presence of these relatively volatile-rich ridge basalts requires flow of plume material below the peridotite solidus (i.e.>80 km). We propose a 2-stage model for the development and sustainment of a confined zone of deep ridge-ward plume flow. This involves initial on-axis capture and establishment of a sub-ridge channel of plume flow. Subsequent anchoring of the plume stem to a contact point on the ridge during axis migration results in confined ridge-ward flow of plume material via a deep network of melt channels embedded in the normal spreading and advection of the plume head[2]. Importantly, sub-ridge flow is maintained. The physical parameters and styles of mantle flow we have defined for Galápagos are less-well known at other sites of plume-ridge

  2. Reactive spreading in ceramic/metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2000-11-06

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated mechanistically. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the steps involved in spreading are outlined to permit comparison to the steps in the compound formation that typically accompanies reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. They can all be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. This analysis plus assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than commonly believed, and perhaps is the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the slow spreading rates plus the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  3. Evidence of explosive seafloor volcanic activity from the Walvis Ridge, South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.

    2005-07-01

    Hydrophones moored in the North Atlantic Ocean recorded a sequence of explosive, volcano-acoustic signals originated at the Walvis Ridge in the South Atlantic Ocean. 365 explosive signals were detected from the Walvis Ridge beginning 24 November 2001 continuing through March 2002. The largest swarm began on 19 December at 2329 GMT, and lasted 1.25 hrs producing 32 locatable events. Swarm locations are centered on the northern flank of an unnamed seamount (-32.96°S -5.22°W), northwest of Wüst Seamount. These signals are interpreted as volcanogenic explosions due to similarities with acoustic signals recorded from a confirmed submarine eruption in the Caribbean in 2001 (Kick'em Jenny volcano). The observations presented suggest recent magmatic activity along the Walvis Ridge may be unrelated to the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume. Furthermore, these events lend support for an extensional fracture-zone model resulting in the recurrence of volcanic activity along older segments of large-scale sea floor lineaments.

  4. Relatedness Proportion Effects in Semantic Categorization: Reconsidering the Automatic Spreading Activation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Bianca; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Semantic priming effects at a short prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony are commonly explained in terms of an automatic spreading activation process. According to this view, the proportion of related trials should have no impact on the size of the semantic priming effect. Using a semantic categorization task ("Is this a living…

  5. The Roles of Spreading Activation and Retrieval Mode in Producing False Recognition in the DRM Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Michelle L.; Watson, Jason M.; Balota, David A.; Roediger, Henry L., III

    2007-01-01

    The nature of persisting spreading activation from list presentation in eliciting false recognition in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm was examined in two experiments. We compared the time course of semantic priming in the lexical decision task (LDT) and false alarms in speeded recognition under identical study and test conditions. The…

  6. Spreading Activation in an Attractor Network with Latching Dynamics: Automatic Semantic Priming Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Localist models of spreading activation (SA) and models assuming distributed representations offer very different takes on semantic priming, a widely investigated paradigm in word recognition and semantic memory research. In this study, we implemented SA in an attractor neural network model with distributed representations and created a unified…

  7. Extinct mid-ocean ridges and insights on the influence of hotspots at divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Sarah; Dietmar Müller, R.; Williams, Simon; Matthews, Kara

    2016-04-01

    We review all global examples of confirmed or suspected extinct mid-ocean ridges that are preserved in present-day ocean basins. Data on their spreading rate prior to extinction, time of cessation, length of activity, bathymetric and gravity signature are analysed. This analysis identifies some differences between subgroups of extinct ridges, including microplate spreading ridges, back-arc basin ridges and large-scale mid-ocean ridges. Crustal structure of extinct ridges is evaluated using gravity inversion to seek to resolve a long-standing debate on whether the final stages of spreading leads to development of thinned or thickened crust. Most of the ridges we assess have thinner crust at their axes than their flanks, yet a small number are found to have a single segment that is overprinted by an anomalous feature such as a seamount or volcanic ridge. A more complex cessation mechanism is necessary in these cases. The location of spreading centres at their time of cessation relative to hotspots was also evaluated using a global plate reconstruction. This review provides strong evidence for the long-term interaction of spreading centres with hotspots and plate boundaries have been frequently modified within the radius of a hotspot zone of influence.

  8. Determination of Wetting Behavior, Spread Activation Energy, and Quench Severity of Bioquenchants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, K. Narayan; Fernandes, Peter

    2007-08-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the suitability of vegetable oils such as sunflower, coconut, groundnut, castor, cashewnut shell (CNS), and palm oils as quench media (bioquenchants) for industrial heat treatment by assessing their wetting behavior and severity of quenching. The relaxation of contact angle was sharp during the initial stages, and it became gradual as the system approached equilibrium. The equilibrium contact angle decreased with increase in the temperature of the substrate and decrease in the viscosity of the quench medium. A comparison of the relaxation of the contact angle at various temperatures indicated the significant difference in spreading of oils having varying viscosity. The spread activation energy was determined using the Arrhenius type of equation. Oils with higher viscosity resulted in lower cooling rates. The quench severity of various oil media was determined by estimating heat-transfer coefficients using the lumped capacitance method. Activation energy for spreading determined using the wetting behavior of oils at various temperatures was in good agreement with the severity of quenching assessed by cooling curve analysis. A high quench severity is associated with oils having low spread activation energy.

  9. Effects of heterogeneity on active spreading strategies to remediate contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Piscopo, A. N.; Neupauer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) to remediate contaminated aquifers is constrained by the amount of contact between the groundwater contaminant and the injected oxidant. Contaminant degradation during ISCO can be enhanced using innovative active spreading strategies, which involve injecting and extracting water at wells in the vicinity of the plume to generate flow fields that spread the contaminant and oxidant plumes in a manner that increases their contact. Because aquifer heterogeneity affects the transport of the contaminant and oxidant during injection and extraction, aquifer heterogeneity also affects the amount of contact and the degree of contaminant degradation achieved using active spreading strategies during ISCO. Consequently, we can improve the effectiveness of active spreading strategies by generating sequences of injection and extraction that take the aquifer heterogeneity into account. In this study, we optimize sequences of injections and extractions to maximize contaminant degradation in aquifers with zonal and spatially-correlated heterogeneity for three contaminant-oxidant pairings with different reaction kinetics. Analysis of the transport and degradation corresponding to the optimal sequences of injection and extraction demonstrates that the underlying aquifer and contaminant properties are reflected by the optimal sequences.

  10. Black smokers on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    Evidence for a variety of active hydrothermal venting phenomena, including black smokers, was discovered at a site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by a research team of government and university scientists. The work was accomplished on a cruise of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Researcher during July 1985 as part of the NOAA Vents Program. The site of the venting phenomena is the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) Hydrothermal Field on the east wall of the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°N. The TAG Hydrothermal Field was the first hydrothermal field to be found on an oceanic ridge; it was discovered 12 years ago in 1973. However, until the present cruise, only low-temperature hydrothermal activity had been documented, and the existence of higher-temperature hydrothermal activity along slow spreading oceanic ridges (half rate 2 cm/yr), such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, was in question.

  11. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  12. Mid-ocean ridge basalt generation along the slow-spreading, South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (5-11°S): Inferences from 238U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Simon; Kokfelt, Thomas; Hauff, Folkmar; Haase, Karsten; Lundstrom, Craig; Hoernle, Kaj; Yeo, Isobel; Devey, Colin

    2015-11-01

    U-series disequilibria have provided important constraints on the physical processes of partial melting that produce basaltic magma beneath mid-ocean ridges. Here we present the first 238U-230Th-226Ra isotope data for a suite of 83 basalts sampled between 5°S and 11°S along the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This section of the ridge can be divided into 5 segments (A0-A4) and the depths to the ridge axis span much of the global range, varying from 1429 to 4514 m. Previous work has also demonstrated that strong trace element and radiogenic isotope heterogeneity existed in the source regions of these basalts. Accordingly, this area provides an ideal location in which to investigate the effects of both inferred melt column length and recycled materials. 226Ra-230Th disequilibria indicate that the majority of the basalts are less than a few millennia old such that their 230Th values do not require any age correction. The U-Th isotope data span a significant range from secular equilibrium up to 32% 230Th excess, also similar to the global range, and vary from segment to segment. However, the (230Th/238U) ratios are not negatively correlated with axial depth and the samples with the largest 230Th excesses come from the deepest ridge segment (A1). Two sub-parallel and positively sloped arrays (for segments A0-2 and A3 and A4) between (230Th/238U) and Th/U ratios can be modelled in various ways as mixing between melts from peridotite and recycled mafic lithologies. Despite abundant evidence for source heterogeneity, there is no simple correlation between (230Th/238U) and radiogenic isotope ratios suggesting that at least some of the trace element and radiogenic isotope variability may have been imparted to the source regions >350 kyr prior to partial melting to produce the basalts. In our preferred model, the two (230Th/238U) versus Th/U arrays can be explained by mixing of melts from one or more recycled mafic lithologies with melts derived from chemically heterogeneous

  13. Petroleum associated with polymetallic sulfide in sediment from Gorda Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Hostettler, F.D.; Morton, J.L.; King, J.D.; Claypool, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    A sediment sample, impregnated with asphaltic petroleum and polymetallic sulfide, was dredged from the southern end of Gorda Ridge (the Escanaba Trough) off northern California, within the offshore Exclusive Economic Zone of the United States. The molecular distributions of hydrocarbons in this petroleum show that it was probably derived from terrestrial organic matter in turbidite sediment filling the Escanaba Trough. Hydrothermal activity at the Gorda Ridge spreading center provided the heat for petroleum formation and was the source of fluids for sulfide mineralization.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Crusz, Shanika A; Diggle, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term 'comets', which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet 'tail'; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  15. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Eric J. G.; Crusz, Shanika A.; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term ‘comets’, which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet ‘tail’; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  16. Accelerating late Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia Island Group (Solomon island arc) in response to subduction of the recently active Woodlark spreading center and Coleman seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, Frederick W.; Lagoe, Martin B.; Quarles, Andrew; Burr, G.

    1998-10-01

    The New Georgia Island Group of the Solomon Islands is one of four places where an active or recently active spreading ridge has subducted beneath an island arc. We have used coral reef terraces, paleobathymetry of Neogene sedimentary rocks, and existing marine geophysical data to constrain patterns of regional Quaternary deformation related to subduction of the recently active Woodlark spreading center and its overlying Coleman seamount. These combined data indicate the following vertical tectonic history for the central part of the New Georgia Island Group: (1) subsidence of the forearc region (Tetepare and Rendova Islands) to water depths of ˜1500 m and deposition of marine turbidites until after 270 ka; (2) late Quaternary uplift of the forearc to sea level and erosion of an unconformity; (3) subsidence of the forearc to ˜500 m BSL and deposition of bathyal sediments; and (4) uplift of the forearc above sea level with Holocene uplift rates up to at least 7.5 mm/yr on Tetepare and 5 mm/yr on Rendova. In the northeastern part of the New Georgia Island Group, our combined data indicate a slightly different tectonic history characterized by lower-amplitude vertical motions and a more recent change from subsidence to uplift. Barrier reefs formed around New Georgia and Vangunu Islands as they subsided >300 m. By 50-100 ka, subsidence was replaced by uplift that accelerated to Holocene rates of ˜1 mm/yr on the volcanic arc compared with rates up to ˜7.5 mm/yr in the forearc area of Tetepare and Rendova. Uplift mechanisms, such as thermal effects due to subduction of spreading ridges, tectonic erosion, or underplating of deeply subducted bathymetric features, are not likely to function on the 270-ka period that these uplift events have occurred in the New Georgia Island Group. A more likely uplift mechanism for the post-270-ka accelerating uplift of the forearc and volcanic arc of the New Georgia Island Group is progressive impingement of the Coleman seamount or

  17. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  18. Retrograde spread of 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas in patients with active ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Campieri, M.; Lanfranchi, G.A.; Brignola, C.; Bazzocchi, G.; Gionchetti, P.; Minguzzi, M.R.; Cappello, I.P.; Corbelli, C.; Boschi, S.

    1986-02-01

    In an attempt to know the exact retrograde spread of high-dosage 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas, we have studied eight patients with active left-sided colitis, by adding a small amount of barium sulfate to the enemas and by checking the spread radiologically after 15 minutes, 1 hour, and 6 hours. Four grams of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas and 4 gm in 200-ml enemas were used. The same experiment was repeated in a subsequent attack, with enemas labeled with technetium-99m and checked by scintiscans in five of these patients. We always have observed a volume-dependent spread of enemas but, interestingly, in the patients studied with technetium-99m there was always a wider spread than that which was detected with barium enemas. In all five patients, 100-ml enemas reached the splenic flexure. In two patients with total colitis, a progression of 100-ml technetium-99m enemas was performed in the transverse colon, but the maximum opacity remained in the left side. We can conclude that 4 gm of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas can be suitable for treating patients with left-sided colitis, and will represent a valid addition for patients with more extensive colitis.

  19. Crevasse-squeeze ridge corridors: Diagnostic features of late-stage palaeo-ice stream activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David J. A.; Storrar, Robert D.; Rea, Brice R.

    2016-04-01

    A 200-km-long and 10-km-wide linear assemblage of till-filled geometrical ridges on the bed of the Maskwa palaeo-ice stream of the late Wisconsinan southwest Laurentide Ice Sheet are interpreted as crevasse-squeeze ridges (CSR) developed during internal flow unit reorganization, immediately prior to ice stream shutdown. Ridge orientations are predominantly orientated WNW-ESE, with a subordinate WSW-ENE alignment, both indicative of ice fracture development transverse to former ice stream flow, as indicated by NNE-SSW aligned MSGL. Subglacial till injection into basal and/or full depth, mode I and II crevasses occurred at the approximate centreline of the ice stream, in response to extension and fracturing. Landform preservation indicates that this took place during the final stages of ice streaming, immediately prior to ice stream shutdown. This linear zone of ice fracturing therefore likely represents the narrowing of the fast-flowing trunk, similar to the plug flow identified in some surging valley glaciers. Lateral drag between the final active flow unit and the slower moving ice on either side is likely recorded by the up-ice bending of the CSR limbs. The resulting CSR corridor, here related to an individual ice stream flow unit, constitutes a previously unreported style of crevasse infilling and contrasts with two existing CSR patterns: (1) wide arcuate zones of CSRs related to widespread fracturing within glacier surge lobes; and (2) narrow concentric arcs of CSRs and recessional push moraines related to submarginal till deformation at active temperate glacier lobes.

  20. Spreading of the ocean floor: new evidence.

    PubMed

    Vine, F J

    1966-12-16

    It is suggested that the entire history of the ocean basins, in terms of oceanfloor spreading,is contained frozen in the oceanic crust. Variations in the intensity and polarity of Earth's magnetic field are considered to be recorded in the remanent magnetism of the igneous rocks as they solidified and cooled through the Curie temperature at the crest of an oceanic ridge, and subsequently spread away from it at a steady rate. The hypothesis is supported by the extreme linearity and continuity of oceanic magnetic anomalies and their symmetry about the axes of ridges. If the proposed reversal time scale for the last 4 million years is combined with the model, computed anomaly profiles show remarkably good agreement with those observed, and one can deduce rates of spreading for all active parts of the midoceanic ridge system for which magnetic profilesor surveys are available. The rates obtained are in exact agreement with those needed to account for continental drift. An exceptionally high rate of spreading (approximately 4.5 cm/year) in the South Pacific enables one to deduce by extrapolation considerable details of the reversal time scale back to 11.5 million years ago. Again, this scale can be applied to other parts of the ridge system. Thus one isled to the suggestion that the crest of the East Pacific Rise in the northeast Pacific has been overridden and modified by the westward drift of North America, with the production of the anomalous width and unique features of the American cordillera in the western United States. The oceanicmagnetic anomalies also indicate that there was a change in derection of crustal spreading in this region during Pliocene time from eastwest to southeast-northwest. A profile from the crest to the boundary of the East Pacific Rise, and the difference between axial-zone and flank anomalies over ridges, suggest increase in the frequency of reversal of Earth's magnetic field, together, possibly, with decrease in its intensity

  1. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  2. Spreading topsoil encourages ecological restoration on embankments: soil fertility, microbial activity and vegetation cover.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M; Costa-Tenorio, Marga; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  3. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  4. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  5. Low-latitude equinoctial spread-F occurrence at different longitude sectors under low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, M.; Zuccheretti, E.; Abadi, P.; de Abreu, A. J.; de Jesus, R.; Fagundes, P. R.; Supnithi, P.; Rungraengwajiake, S.; Nagatsuma, T.; Tsugawa, T.; Cabrera, M. A.; Ezquer, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of a comparative study of spread-F signatures over five low-latitude sites: Chiangmai (CGM; 18.8° N, 98.9° E, mag. Lat. 8.8° N), Thailand; Tanjungsari (TNJ; 6.9° S, 107.6° E, mag. Lat. 16.9° S), Indonesia; Palmas (PAL; 10.2° S, 311.8° E, mag. Lat. 0.9° S) and São José Dos Campos (SJC; 23.2° S, 314.1° E, mag. Lat. 14.0° S), Brazil; and Tucumán (TUC; 26.9° S, 294.6° E, mag. Lat. 16.8° S), Argentina. The investigation was based on simultaneous ionograms recorded by an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) at CGM, an IPS-71 (digital ionosonde from KEL aerospace) at TNJ, a CADI (Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde) at PAL and SJC, and an AIS-INGV (Advanced Ionospheric Sounder - Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) at TUC, during the equinoctial periods March-April (R12 = 2.0 and R12 = 2.2) and September-October (R12 = 6.1 and R12 = 7.0) 2009, for very low solar activity. Spread-F signatures were categorized into two types: the range spread-F (RSF) and the frequency spread-F (FSF). The study confirms that the dynamics and the physical processes responsible for these phenomena are actually complicated. In fact, the features that arise from the investigation are different, depending on both the longitude sector and on the hemisphere. For instance, TUC, under the southern crest of the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), shows a predominance of RSF signatures, while both SJC, under the southern crest of EIA but in a different longitude sector, and CGM, under the northern crest of EIA, show a predominance of FSF signatures. Moreover, the spread-F occurrence over the longitude sector that includes CGM and TNJ is significantly lower than the spread-F occurrence over the longitude sector of PAL, SJC, and TUC.

  6. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activation suppresses alpha2beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through inhibition of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Chau-Zen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Upregulation and overexpression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) have been implied in the regulation of kidney development and progression of cancers. Our previous studies with Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells showed that overexpression of DDR1 inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative DDR1 promoted cell spreading on collagen-coated dish. Cell spreading is an important characteristic for cell differentiation and survival. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of DDR1 in cell spreading. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of DDR1 consisting of Cdc42 that regulates the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeleton and cell spreading in MDCK cells. Cell spreading involves the organization of cytoskeleton that is mainly regulated by Rho-family GTPases. We assessed the activity of Rho-family GTPases and transfected MDCK cells with constitutively active or dominant negative GTPases, and quantified the extent of cell spreading. These results showed that DDR1 decreased the filamentous actin ratio and Rac1/Cdc42 activities, but had no effects on RhoA activity. Neither constitutively active nor dominant negative Rac1 altered DDR1-inhibited cell spreading. Constitutively active Cdc42 could rescue the DDR1-inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative Cdc42 inhibited cell spreading, indicating that DDR1-inhibited cell spreading is Cdc42 dependent. With the use of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin blocking antibody, we showed that collagen-induced Cdc42 activation was mediated by alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. Moreover, ectopic FAK expression enhanced the Cdc42 activity. Reducing FAK activity by dominant negative FAK (FRNK) markedly abolished the Cdc42 activity. These findings show that DDR1a/b activation inhibits cell spreading through suppressing alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-mediated Cdc42 activation. PMID:18780290

  7. Accelerating efforts to prevent childhood obesity: spreading, scaling, and sustaining healthy eating and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debbie I; Gertel-Rosenberg, Allison; Snyder, Kim

    2014-12-01

    During the past decade, progress has been made in addressing childhood obesity through policy and practice changes that encourage increased physical activity and access to healthy food. With the implementation of these strategies, an understanding of what works to prevent childhood obesity is beginning to emerge. The task now is to consider how best to spread, scale, and sustain promising childhood obesity prevention strategies. In this article we examine a project led by Nemours, a children's health system, to address childhood obesity. We describe Nemours's conceptual approach to spreading, scaling, and sustaining a childhood obesity prevention intervention. We review a component of a Nemours initiative in Delaware that focused on early care and education settings and its expansion to other states through the National Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative to prevent childhood obesity. We also discuss lessons learned. Focusing on the spreading, scaling, and sustaining of promising strategies has the potential to increase the reach and impact of efforts in obesity prevention and help ensure their impact on population health.

  8. Hydrothermal Exploration of Mid-Ocean Ridges: Where Might the Largest Sulfide Deposits Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Petersen, S.; Hannington, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We review the distribution of modern-day seafloor hydrothermal activity along the global mid-ocean ridge crest (MOR) and the mineral deposits being formed at those sites. To date, one form of hydrothermal activity - "black smoker" venting - has been prospected for along >30% of the global mid ocean ridge crest and some important trends have emerged. Submarine venting can occur along all mid-ocean ridges, of all spreading rates, in all ocean basins. While the abundance of currently active venting (from water column signals), scales linearly with seafloor spreading rate (a proxy for magmatic heat-flux) there is an "excess" of high temperature venting along slow and ultra-slow spreading ridges when compared to early predictions. Consistent with this, no more than half of the sites responsible for "black smoker" plume signals along the slow spreading Mid Atlantic Ridge are associated with magmatic systems with the other half hosted under tectonic control. The latter appear both to be longer-lived than, and to give rise to much larger sulfide deposits than, their magmatic counterparts - presumably as a result of sustained fluid flow. Where these tectonic-hosted systems also involve water-rock interaction with ultramafic sources, seafloor massive sulfide deposits exhibit highly concentrated Cu and Au in surface samples (>10wt.% average Cu content and >3ppm average Au). Intriguingly, first detailed examinations of hydrothermally active sites along ultraslow-spreading ridges seems to indicate that they may depart beyond the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge pattern. Hydrothermal plume distributions may follow the same (~50:50) distribution of "black smoker" plume signals between magmatic and tectonics settings, but the first three "black smoker" sites tracked to source have all revealed large polymetallic sulfide deposits - in both magmatic as well as tectonic settings. Could ultra-slow ridges represent the richest mineral resource potential along the global MOR?

  9. Activities of Z-ajoene against tumour and viral spreading in vitro.

    PubMed

    Terrasson, Jerome; Xu, Bo; Li, Min; Allart, Sophie; Davignon, Jean-Luc; Zhang, Li-he; Wang, Kui; Davrinche, Christian

    2007-06-01

    Z-ajoene is a garlic-derived compound with known anti-tumour properties. This report argues in favour of pro-apoptotic and cell cycle blockage activities of Z-ajoene on various cell lines involving activation of the p53-family gene products, p53, p63 and p73, at indicated doses. According to its known anti-proteasome activity, Z-ajoene induced a downregulation of MHC-class I expression at the surface of treated cells but did not impair their recognition by CD8+ T cells. We further demonstrated a new activity of Z-ajoene against human cytomegalovirus spreading in vitro that was mediated by an increased number of apoptotic cells after infection. Altogether our data point at the ubiquitous efficiency of Z-ajoene as a new compound to fight against cancers of various origins including those that put up viruses.

  10. The Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.; Fox, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Described are concepts involved with the formation and actions of the Mid-Ocean Ridge. Sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, discontinuities, off-axis structures, overlaps and deviation, and aquatic life are discussed. (CW)

  11. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  12. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Amy N; Neupauer, Roseanna M; Kasprzyk, Joseph R

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  13. Broadening the Spectrum of Actin-Based Protrusive Activity Mediated by Arp2/3 Complex-Facilitated Polymerization: Motility of Cytoplasmic Ridges and Tubular Projections

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Gianakas, Anastasia D.; Henson, Lauren H.; Lakin, Christina L.; Voss, Meagen K.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Morris, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Arp2/3 complex-facilitated actin polymerization plays an essential role in a variety of cellular functions including motility, adherence, endocytosis and trafficking. In the present study we employ the sea urchin coelomocyte experimental model system to test the hypotheses that Arp2/3 complex-nucleated actin assembly mediates the motility of two unusual cellular protrusions; the cytoplasmic ridges present during coelomocyte spreading, and inducible, tubular-shaped, and neurite-like projections. Our investigations couple pharmacological manipulation employing inhibitors of actin polymerization and the Arp2/3 complex with a wide array of imaging methods including digitally enhanced phase contrast, DIC and polarization light microscopy of live cells; conventional, confocal and super-resolution light microscopy of fluorescently labeled cells; and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that Arp2/3 complex-facilitated actin polymerization underlies the motility of coelomocyte cytoplasmic ridges and tubular projections, that these processes are related to each other, and that they have been preliminarily identified in other cell types. The results also highlight the broad spectrum of actin-based protrusive activities dependent on the Arp2/3 complex and provide additional insights into the pervasive nature of this ubiquitous actin nucleator. Furthermore we provide the first evidence of a possible mechanistic difference between the impacts of the small molecule drugs BDM and CK666 on the Arp2/3 complex. PMID:25111797

  14. PGE fractionation in seafloor hydrothermal systems: examples from mafic- and ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašava, Jan; Vymazalová, Anna; Petersen, Sven

    2007-04-01

    The distribution of platinum group elements (PGEs) in massive sulfides and hematite-magnetite±pyrite assemblages from the recently discovered basalt-hosted Turtle Pits hydrothermal field and in massive sulfides from the ultramafic-hosted Logatchev vent field both on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was studied and compared to that from selected ancient volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) deposits. Cu-rich samples from black smoker chimneys of both vent fields are enriched in Pd and Rh (Pd up to 227 ppb and Rh up to 149 ppb) when compared to hematite-magnetite-rich samples from Turtle Pits (Pd up to 10 ppb, Rh up to 1.9 ppb). A significant positive correlation was established between Cu and Rh in sulfide samples from Turtle Pits. PGE chondrite-normalized patterns (with a positive Rh anomaly and Pd and Au enrichment), Pd/Pt and Pd/Au ratios close to global MORB, and high values of Pd/Ir and Pt/Ir ratios indicate mafic source rock and seawater involvement in the hydrothermal system at Turtle Pits. Similarly shaped PGE chondrite-normalized patterns and high values of Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in Cu-rich sulfides at Logatchev likely reflect a similar mechanism of PGE enrichment but with involvement of ultramafic source rocks.

  15. Late Neogene changes in North America and Antarctica absolute plate motions inferred from the Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges spreading histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaffaldano, G.; DeMets, C.

    2016-08-01

    Reconstructions of absolute plate motions underpin our understanding of the plate torque balance, but are challenging due to difficulties in inferring well-dated rates and directions of plate movements from hot spot tracks. Useful information about plate dynamics can be inferred from rapid absolute plate motion changes, as these are linked only to the torque(s) that changed. Here we infer late Neogene changes in the absolute motions of North America and possibly Antarctica from changes in the easier-to-determine relative plate motions recorded along the Arctic, northern Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges. We show that Eurasia/North America and Nubia/North America motions changed by the same amount between 8 and 5 Ma, as may have Nubia/Antarctica and Somalia/Antarctica plate motions. By considering additional, independent constraints on Somalia/India plate motion, we argue that a scenario in which North America and Antarctica absolute motions changed is the simplest one that explains the observed changes in relative motions. We speculate that these changes are linked to the late Neogene dynamics of the Pacific plate.

  16. No slab-derived CO2 in Mariana Trough back-arc basalts: Implications for carbon subduction and for temporary storage of CO2 beneath slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Colin G.; Hilton, David R.; Hammerschmidt, Konrad

    2010-11-01

    The Southern Mariana Trough is particularly well suited to study mass balance in subduction zones because the flux of material recycled from the subducted slab has been shown to diminish to negligible levels in the southernmost part of the area. We present new He and Ar concentration and isotopic data for 16 back-arc basaltic glasses and combine these with previously published CO2 and H2O concentration and δ13C data to explore the recycling of carbon and light noble gases in the Mariana back arc. Degassing has affected all samples and is particularly extensive in more water-rich samples, i.e., those containing the largest recycled component. The degassing history features three stages: (1) deep degassing which commenced when the melt reached saturation of CO2 and noble gases in the mantle, (2) preeruptive degassing during storage in the crust-mantle transition zone which involved addition of extraneous CO2 to the vapor phase, and (3) eruption. CO2 released during stage 1 was, at least partially, incorporated into wall rock and subsequently remobilized during stage 2 degassing of later magma batches. Reconstructed parental values for 3He/4He, δ13C, CO2/3He, and CO2/40Ar* are indistinguishable from those of mid-ocean ridge basalt. This implies that there is negligible recycling of subducted carbon, helium, or argon into the source of Mariana Trough basalt.

  17. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  18. A 1.5 Ma record of plume-ridge interaction at the Western Galápagos Spreading Center (91°40‧-92°00‧W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Antje; Hauff, Folkmar; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; White, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Shallow (elevated) portions of mid-ocean ridges with enriched geochemical compositions near hotspots document the interaction of hot, geochemically-enriched plume mantle with shallow depleted upper mantle. Whereas the spatial variations in geochemical composition of ocean crust along the ridge axis in areas where plume-ridge interaction is taking place have been studied globally, only restricted information exists concerning temporal variations in geochemistry of ocean crust formed through plume-ridge interaction. Here we present a detailed geochemical study of 0-1.5 Ma ocean crust sampled from the Western Galápagos Spreading Center (WGSC) axis to 50 km north of the axis, an area that is presently experiencing a high influx of mantle material from the Galápagos hotspot. The tholeiitic to basaltic andesitic fresh glass and few bulk rock samples have incompatible element abundances and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions intermediate between depleted normal mid-ocean-ridge basalt (N-MORB) from >95.5°W along the WGSC and enriched lavas from the Galápagos Archipelago, displaying enriched (E-)MORB type compositions. Only limited and no systematic geochemical variations are observed with distance from the ridge axis for <1.0 Ma old WGSC crust, whereas 1.0-1.5 Ma old crust trends to more enriched isotopic compositions in 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb isotope ratios. On isotope correlation diagrams, the data set displays correlations between depleted MORB and two enriched components. Neither the geographically referenced geochemical domains of the Galápagos Archipelago nor the end members used for principal component analysis can successfully describe the observed mixing relations. Notably an off-axis volcanic cone at site DR63 has the appropriate composition to serve as the enriched component for the younger WGSC and could represent a portion of the northern part of the Galápagos plume not sampled south of the WGSC. Similar compositions to samples

  19. Dynamic Assessment of Fibroblast Mechanical Activity during Rac-induced Cell Spreading in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Ma, Lisha; Kim, Areum; Ly, Linda; Vishwanath, Mridula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the morphological and sub-cellular mechanical effects of Rac activation on fibroblasts within 3-D collagen matrices. Corneal fibroblasts were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 1 to 2 days in serum-free media. Time-lapse imaging was then performed using Nomarski DIC. After an acclimation period, perfusion was switched to media containing PDGF. In some experiments, Y-27632 or blebbistatin were used to inhibit Rho-kinase (ROCK) or myosin II, respectively. PDGF activated Rac and induced cell spreading, which resulted in an increase in cell length, cell area, and the number of pseudopodial processes. Tractional forces were generated by extending pseudopodia, as indicated by centripetal displacement and realignment of collagen fibrils. Interestingly, the pattern of pseudopodial extension and local collagen fibril realignment was highly dependent upon the initial orientation of fibrils at the leading edge. Following ROCK or myosin II inhibition, significant ECM relaxation was observed, but small displacements of collagen fibrils continued to be detected at the tips of pseudopodia. Taken together, the data suggests that during Rac-induced cell spreading within 3-D matrices, there is a shift in the distribution of forces from the center to the periphery of corneal fibroblasts. ROCK mediates the generation of large myosin II-based tractional forces during cell spreading within 3-D collagen matrices, however residual forces can be generated at the tips of extending pseudopodia that are both ROCK and myosin II-independent. PMID:18452153

  20. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Jorgensen, Steffen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific. PMID:21119639

  1. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Lilley, Marvin D; Barriga, Fernando J A S; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Jorgensen, Steffen L

    2010-11-23

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific.

  2. Miocene ridge impingement and the spawning of secondary ridges off Oregon, Washington and British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Edward; Dixon, John M.

    1980-11-01

    The East Pacific Rise is the only extant portion of the South Pacific Spreading Center, which began to impinge on the North American plate margin ~30 Ma ago. The North Pacific Spreading Center, offset ~1500 km to the west on the Mendocino transform fault, remained active until ~9 Ma ago when it, too, impinged on the trench off the Oregon—Washington margin. The zones of mantle upwelling associated with the spreading centers have since migrated inland to their present sites beneath the Cascade and Garibaldi volcanic chains and the Rio Grande Rift, maintaining the ~1500 km offset that they have had since the Early Tertiary. Impingement of the North Pacific Spreading Center on the trench at anomaly 5 time juxtaposed the Pacific and American plates and the continuing relative motion between these plates across the north—south boundary has been accommodated by secondary spreading at the Gorda—Juan de Fuca—Explorer ridge system. These obliquely spreading ridges, fed by lateral mantle flow originating at the zone of mantle upwelling beneath the Cascade belt, are migrating away from the North American coast at half the Pacific—America velocity, and no subduction is occurring along the continental margin, the Juan de Fuca sea floor being an integral part of the American plate. This scenario is consistent with the fact that the sea floor along the continental margin has the same age as that which bears the last north—south anomaly on the Pacific plate (anomaly 5) preceding initiation of spreading at the Juan de Fuca and Explorer ridges (a fortuitous coincidence in models involving continued subduction of the Juan de Fuca sea floor). This model implies that the rate of motion between the Pacific and American plates is 8 cm/a. The Blanco fracture zone formed as a transform fault at the south end of the Juan de Fuca ridge and was initially collinear with the North American margin south of Cape Mendocino. The North Pacific Spreading Center impinged on this portion of

  3. The Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration Telemedicine Project: Program Activities and Participant Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottke, T. E.; Little Finger, L.; Trapp, M. A.; Panser, L. A.; Novotny, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the response of participants to the Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project. DESIGN: We describe a 3-month demonstration project of medical education and clinical consultations conducted by means of satellite transmission. Postparticipation questionnaires and a postproject survey were used to assess the success of the activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients and employees at the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in southwestern South Dakota and employees at Mayo Clinic Rochester participated in a telemedicine project, after which they completed exit surveys and a postproject questionnaire to ascertain the acceptability of this mode of health care. RESULTS: Almost all Pine Ridge and Mayo Clinic participants viewed the project as beneficial. The educational sessions received favorable evaluations, and almost two-thirds of the patients who completed evaluations thought the consultation had contributed to their medical care. More than 90% of the respondents from Pine Ridge and more than 85% of the respondents from Mayo Clinic Rochester said that they would recommend participation in this project to others. More than 90% of respondents from Pine Ridge and 80% of Mayo respondents agreed with the statement that the project should continue. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that a program of clinical consultation services, professional education, and patient education available by telemedicine might be viewed as beneficial.

  4. Spreading of Viscous Liquids at High Temperature: Silicate Glasseson Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Moya, Jose S.; Tomsia,Antoni P.

    2004-12-15

    The spreading of Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, spreading can take place under reactive or non-reactive conditions. As the nucleation of the reaction product under reactive conditions is slow in comparison to the spreading kinetics, in both cases the glass front moves on the metal surface with similar spreading velocities. Spreading can be described using a molecular dynamics model where the main contribution to the wetting activation energy comes from the viscous interactions in the liquid. Enhanced interfacial diffusions in low-oxygen activities (reactive cases) form triple-line ridges that can pin the wetting front and cause a stick-slip motion.

  5. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) mid ocean ridges. This type of mid ocean ridge has distinct geo-morphologies that are influenced by the slow rate of plate divergence and by mantle potential temperature, which control the processes (peridotite diapirism and intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  6. Inward spread of activation in frog muscle fibres investigated by means of high-speed microcinematography

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, H.

    1974-01-01

    1. Single fast muscle fibres of the frog were locally activated by applying current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fibre surface, and the resulting local contractions were recorded with a high-speed ciné-camera at 1000-3000 frames/sec. 2. In some but not all of the fibres examined, a moderate membrane depolarization of 20-30 mV initiated a phasic type of local contraction, which showed a definite threshold and relaxed spontaneously while the depolarization still continued. 3. The phasic contraction was sometimes followed by a smaller steady contraction, which lasted as long as the depolarization went on and was regarded to be indentical with the graded type of local contraction. 4. With pipettes of 20-40 μm diameter, the phasic contraction was first initiated at the depolarized fibre surface, and spread to some extent inwards with a velocity of 0·7-2 cm/sec at 18-26° C. The velocity of inward spread of contraction had a Q10 of about 2·3. 5. With larger pipettes of more than 50-60 μm diameter, the phasic response was first initiated at the inner part definitely distant from the fibre surface, and the extent of contraction was greater at this part than at the superficial part during the course of the response. Furthermore, with depolarizations of nearly the threshold value, the steady contraction following the phasic one was seen only at the inner part, suggesting the reversal of the gradient of depolarization along the T tubules. 6. The phasic contraction spread inwards or transversely with a considerable decrement. The response spreading across the whole diameter of the fibre could be observed only in some cases. 7. The phasic response was not always sensitive to tetrodotoxin or to the removal of external sodium ions. 8. These results not only give information about the nature of the regenerative mechanism within the T system, but also suggest that the organization of the T tubule network is such that the electrotonic depolarization

  7. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P.; Cronin, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6–35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  8. Hurricane activity and the large-scale pattern of spread of an invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6-35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species.

  9. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent.

  10. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent. PMID:27656691

  11. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased. PMID:27003366

  12. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  13. Topographic Analysis of Europa's Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, C. E.; Kattenhorn, S. A.; Schenk, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    lower limit of 0.05 that corresponds to the widest ridge examined (4.05 km). Conversely, the upper limit of this ratio is 0.13, corresponding to the highest ridge examined (362 m). This raises the possibility that tall ridges modify their morphology through time through some form of gravitational collapse, thus decreasing the height, increasing the width, and decreasing the ridge slopes. The low slopes and overall low average height to total width ratios suggest predominantly time-dependent viscoplastic gravitational collapse. Variability between ridges may be related to the mechanisms driving ridge development (whether dilational, contractional, or shear heating), which are likely to influence the rate of ridge construction as well as the temperature (and hence rheology) of the icy material involved. We also observe a distinct upper limit of 0.58 for the ratio of average ridge height to PTP width, suggesting that once an active ridge exceeds a certain height, the ridge peaks begin to geomorphically migrate apart in order to maintain a limiting slope of the inner and outer flanks through gravitational collapse (whether it be granular flow or viscoplastic). Lower ratios of average ridge height to PTP width may indicate underdeveloped ridge heights but may also be a sign of dilation across a ridge, causing a tectonic increase in PTP width. Finally, variability in ratios of average height to total width along individual ridges indicates that some ridge pairs may have evolved differently along their lengths, an effect partially related to changes in ridge orientation along the observable length and associated variability in ridge kinematics.

  14. Parafoveal versus foveal N400s dissociate spreading activation from contextual fit.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Franziska; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Using concurrent electroencephalogram and eye movement measures to track natural reading, this study shows that N400 effects reflecting predictability are dissociable from those owing to spreading activation. In comparing predicted sentence endings with related and unrelated unpredicted endings in antonym constructions ('the opposite of black is white/yellow/nice'), fixation-related potentials at the critical word revealed a predictability-based N400 effect (unpredicted vs. predicted words). By contrast, event-related potentials time locked to the last fixation before the critical word showed an N400 only for the nonrelated unpredicted condition (nice). This effect is attributed to a parafoveal mismatch between the critical word and preactivated lexical features (i.e. features of the predicted word and its associates). In addition to providing the first demonstration of a parafoveally induced N400 effect, our results support the view that the N400 is best viewed as a component family.

  15. The timescales of magma evolution at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Regelous, Marcel; Beier, Christoph; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.; Nebel, Oliver; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust is continuously created at mid-ocean ridges by decompression melting of the upper mantle as it upwells due to plate separation. Decades of research on active spreading ridges have led to a growing understanding of the complex magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes linked to the formation of new oceanic igneous crust. However, less is known about the timescales of magmatic processes at mid-ocean ridges, including melting in and melt extraction from the mantle, fractional crystallisation, crustal assimilation and/or magma mixing. In this paper, we review the timescales of magmatic processes by integrating radiometric dating, chemical and petrological observations of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and geophysical models. These different lines of evidence suggest that melt extraction and migration, and crystallisation and mixing processes occur over timescales of 1 to 10,000 a. High-resolution geochemical stratigraphic profiles of the oceanic crust using drill-core samples further show that at fast-spreading ridges, adjacent flow units may differ in age by only a few 100 a. We use existing chemical data and new major- and trace-element analyses of fresh MORB glasses from drill-cores in ancient Atlantic and Pacific crust, together with model stratigraphic ages to investigate how lava chemistry changes over 10 to 100 ka periods, the timescale of crustal accretion at spreading ridges which is recorded in the basalt stratigraphy in drilled sections through the oceanic crust. We show that drilled MORBs have compositions that are similar to those of young MORB glasses dredged from active spreading ridges (lavas that will eventually be preserved in the lowermost part of the extrusive section covered by younger flows), showing that the dredged samples are indeed representative of the bulk oceanic crust. Model stratigraphic ages calculated for individual flows in boreholes, together with the geochemical stratigraphy of the drilled sections, show that at

  16. Composition and dissolution of black smoker particulates from active vents on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feely, Richard A.; Lewison, Maureen; Massoth, Gary J.; Robert-Baldo, Gillian; Lavelle, J. William; Byrne, Robert H.; Von Damm, Karen L.; Curl, Herbert C., Jr.

    1987-10-01

    During two Atlantis II/Alvin cruises to the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 1984 active high temperature (140°-284°C) vents were sampled for black smoker particulates using the Grassle Pump. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction and petrographic procedures. In addition, elemental compositions and particle morphologies were determined by X ray energy spectrometry and scanning electron microscope/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particulates from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge vent sites were highly enriched in S, Si, Fe, Zn, and Cu and were primarily composed of sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, barite, chalcopyrite, cubanite, hydrous iron oxides, and elemental sulfur. Two additional unidentified phases which were prevalent in the samples included an Fe-Si phase and a Ca-Si phase. The grain sizes of the individual particle phases ranged from < 2 μm for the sphalerite and Fe oxide particles to > 100 μm for the Fe-Si particles. Grain size and current meter data were used in a deposition model of individual phase dispersal. For many of the larger sulfide and sulfate particles, the model predicts dispersal to occur over length scales of only several hundreds of meters. The high-temperature black smokers from the more northerly Endeavour Segment vents were highly enriched in Fe, S, Ca, Cu, and Zn and were primarily composed of anhydrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, barite, sulfur, pyrite, and other less abundant metal sulfide minerals. The grain sizes of the individual particles ranged from < 10 μm to slightly larger than 500 μm. The composition and size distributions of the mineral phases are highly suggestive of high-temperature mixing between vent fluids and seawater. A series of field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the rates of dissolution of several sulfate and sulfide minerals. The dissolution rates ranged over more than 3 orders of magnitude, from 3.2 × 10-8 cm s-1 for anhydrite to 1.2

  17. Magnetic Measurements of Bacterial Activity in Mid Oceanic Ridge Basalt Samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, J.; Horen, H.; Brunet, F.; Janots, D.; Pozzi, J.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic properties of the young oceanic crust gives insights on the 3D structure at ridges axis and on variations of the Earth's magnetic field. Accurate interpretations depend on our understanding of the magnetic stability of titanomagnetite crystals carrying the magnetic signal. The mean remanent intensity of young ocean basalts shows significant variations with age and it has been suggested that rapid chemical alteration of titanomagnetite could be responsible. Ubiquitous presence of bacteria in deep marine environment and their ability to interact with iron oxides suggest a possible important impact of these life forms on the stability of titanomagnetites. In vivo experiments have been conducted on more than 15 fresh lava macro samples with a batch of selected sulfate reducing bacteria of the desulfovibrio genus, relevant to the deep biosphere. Remanent magnetization of samples was measured at regular time interval, in addition to more complete magnetic and chemical characterization at beginning and end of experiments. After a few months results show a significant contribution of bacterial activity on magnetic properties of samples, in particular a well defined drop in remanence. Our results suggest a strong impact of bacteria on the alteration rate of iron oxides carrying the magnetic signal within the oceanic crust.

  18. What does hotspot-ridge interaction tell us about mantle plumes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, B. J.

    2005-05-01

    depth, increase in segment length, and multi-component geochemical mixing that varies with distance along the plate boundary. Both the Icelandic and Réunion 'plume'-ridge couplets provide compelling evidence for advection and lateral flow of 'plume' mantle away from a central source and subsequent mingling with depleted, sub-ridge mantle characteristic of MORB genesis. As such, these studies support the current paradigm for mantle 'plumes' as phenomena associated with actively upwelling material that has resided deep within the mantle and whose influence upon spreading ridges is profound.

  19. Chemosynthetic microbial activity at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemosynthetic production of microbial biomass, determined by 14CO2 fixation and enzymatic (RuBisCo) activity, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 23° and 26°N vent sites was found in various niches: warm water emissions, loosely rock-attached flocculent material, dense morphologically diverse bacterial mats covering the surfaces of polymetal sulfide deposits, and filamentous microbes on the carapaces of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata). The bacterial mats on polymetal sulfide surfaces contained unicellular and filamentous bacteria which appeared to use as their chemolithotrophic electron or energy source either dissolved reduced minerals from vent emissions, mainly sulfur compounds, or solid metal sulfide deposits, mainly pyrite. Moderately thermophilic Chemosynthetic activity was observed in carbon dioxide fixation experiments and in enrichments, but no thermophilic aerobic sulfur oxidizers could be isolated. Both obligate and facultative chemoautotrophs growing at mesophilic temperatures were isolated from all chemosynthetically active surface scrapings. The obligate autotrophs could oxidize sterilized MAR natural sulfide deposits as well as technical pyrite at near neutral pH, in addition to dissolved reduced sulfur compounds. While the grazing by shrimp on the surface mats of MAR metal sulfide deposits was observed and deemed important, the animals' primary occurrence in dense swarms near vent emissions suggests that they were feeding at these sites, where conditions for Chemosynthetic growth of their filamentous microbial epiflora were optimal. The data show that the transformation of geothermal energy at the massive polymetal sulfide deposits of the MAR is based on the lithoautotrophic oxidation of soluble sulfides and pyrites into microbial biomass.

  20. Melt generation beneath Arctic Ridges: Implications from U decay series disequilibria in the Mohns, Knipovich, and Gakkel Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, L. J.; Sims, K. W. W.; Prytulak, J.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Elliott, T.; Blusztajn, J.; Fretzdorff, S.; Reagan, M.; Haase, K.; Humphris, S.; Schilling, J.-G.

    2014-02-01

    We present new 238U-230Th-226Ra-210Pb, 235U-231Pa, and Nd, Sr, Hf, and Pb isotope data for the slow- to ultraslow-spreading Mohns, Knipovich, and Gakkel Ridges. Combined with previous work, our data from the Arctic Ridges cover the full range of axial depths from the deep northernmost Gakkel Ridge shallowing upwards to the Knipovich, Mohns, and Kolbeinsey Ridges north of Iceland. Age-constrained samples from the Mohns and Knipovich Ridges have (230Th/238U) activity ratios ranging from 1.165 to 1.30 and 1.101 to 1.225, respectively. The high 230Th excesses of Kolbeinsey, Mohns, and Knipovich mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are erupted from ridges producing relatively thin (Mohns, Knipovich) to thick (Kolbeinsey) oceanic crust with evidence for sources ranging from mostly peridotite (Kolbeinsey) to eclogite-rich mantle (Mohns, Knipovich). Age-constrained lavas from 85°E on the Gakkel Ridge, on the other hand, overlie little to no crust and range from small (˜5%) 230Th excesses to small 238U excesses (˜5%). The strong negative correlation between (230Th/238U) values vs. axial ridge depth among Arctic ridge basalts is controlled not only by solidus depth influence on 238U-230Th disequilibria, but also by variations in mantle source lithology and depth to the base of the lithosphere, which is expected to vary at ultra-slow spreading ridges. Small 231Pa excesses (65% excess) in age-constrained basalts support the presence of eclogite in the mantle source for this region. Conversely, the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge basalts are homogeneous, with Sr, Nd, and Hf radiogenic isotopic signatures indicative of a long time-averaged depleted mantle source. The Gakkel samples have minimum (226Ra/230Th) ratios ranging from 3.07 to 3.65 ± 3%, which lie along and extend the global negative correlation between 226Ra and 230Th excesses observed in MORB. The new 230Th-226Ra data support a model for global MORB production in which deep melts record interaction with shallower

  1. Modeling and simulation of fire spreading through the activity tracking paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Muzy,; Nutaro, James J; Zeigler, Bernard P; Coquillard,

    2008-01-01

    Modeling and simulation is essential for understanding complex ecological systems. However, knowledge of the structure and behavior of these systems is limited, and models must be revised frequently as our understanding of a system improves. Moreover, the dynamic, spatial distribution of activity in very large systems necessitates mapping natural mechanisms as logically as possible onto computer structures. This paper describes theoretical and algorithmic tools for building component-based models and simulations of dynamic spatial phenomena. These methods focus attention on and exploit the irregular distribution of activity in ecological processes. We use the DEVS formalism as the basis for a component based approach to modeling spatially distributed systems. DEVS is a mathematical theory of discrete-event systems that is well suited for describing large systems that are described by small parts with irregular, short-range interactions. This event-based approach to modeling leads naturally to efficient simulations algorithms which focus on the active parts of a large model. Ecological modeling benefits from these efficient the simulation algorithms and the reusability of the model s basic components. Our event-based method is demonstrated with a physics-based model of fire spread.

  2. Effect of individual behavior on epidemic spreading in activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Frasca, Mattia; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    In this work we study the effect of behavioral changes of individuals on the propagation of epidemic diseases. Specifically, we consider a susceptible-infected-susceptible model over a network of contacts that evolves in a time scale that is comparable to the individual disease dynamics. The phenomenon is modeled in the context of activity-driven networks, in which contacts occur on the basis of activity potentials. To offer insight into behavioral strategies targeting both susceptible and infected individuals, we consider two separate behaviors that may emerge in respiratory syndromes and sexually transmitted infections. The first is related to a reduction in the activity of infected individuals due to quarantine or illness. The second is instead associated with a selfish self-protective behavior of susceptible individuals, who tend to reduce contact with the rest of the population on the basis of a risk perception. Numerical and theoretical results suggest that behavioral changes could have a beneficial effect on the disease spreading, by increasing the epidemic threshold and decreasing the steady-state fraction of infected individuals.

  3. Annual report of decommissioning and remedial action S&M activities for the Environmental Management Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Program performs a variety of activities to ensure that sites and facilities within its responsibility remain in a safe condition and in compliance with applicable regulations. All S&M Program activities during fiscal year (FY) 1997 were accomplished safely, with no health and safety incidents, no lost work days, and no environmental noncompliances. In addition, all activities were performed within schedule thresholds and under budget. Many remedial action (RA) sites and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities are inspected and maintained by the S&M Program. RA sites encompass approximately 650 acres and 33 D&D facilities, including 4 inactive reactors. During FY 1997, routine, preventative, and emergency maintenance activities were performed as needed at these sites and facilities. Stabilization activities were also performed to reduce risks and reduce future S&M costs. Major activities at the RA sites during FY 1997 included maintaining proper liquid levels in surface impoundments and inactive -liquid low-level waste storage tanks as well as installing a new cover at the tumulus pads in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, planting trees in the First Creek Riparian Corridor, and performing over 900 well inspections. Postremediation monitoring was conducted at the 3001 Canal, Core Hole 8, the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery caps, and WAG 5 Seeps C and D; groundwater monitoring was performed in WAGs 4, 5, and 6 and at the 3001 Canal Well. At ORNL D&D facilities, significant accomplishments included contaminated lead brick removal, asbestos abatement, contaminated equipment and debris removal, and radiologically contaminated area painting.

  4. Dynamic characteristics of an active coastal spreading area using ambient noise measurements—Anchor Bay, Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Farrugia, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Anchor Bay and surrounding regions are located on the northwest coast of the island of Malta, Central Mediterranean. The area is characterized by a coastal cliff environment having an outcropping layer of hard coralline limestone (UCL) resting on a thick (up to 50 m) layer of clays and marls (Blue Clay, BC). This configuration gives rise to coastal instability effects, in particular lateral spreading phenomena and rock falls. Previous and ongoing studies have identified both lateral spreading rates and vertical motions of several millimetres per year. The area is an interesting natural laboratory as coastal detachment processes in a number of different stages can be identified and are easily accessible. We investigate the site dynamic characteristics of this study area by recording ambient noise time-series at more than 30 points, over an area of 0.07 km2, using a portable three-component seismograph. The time-series are processed to give both horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio graphs (H/V) as well as frequency-dependent polarisation analysis. The H/V graphs illustrate and quantify aspects of site resonance effects due both to underlying geology as well as to mechanical resonance of partly or wholly detached blocks. The polarization diagrams indicate the degree of linearity and predominant directions of vibrational effects. H/V curves closer to the cliff edge show complex responses at higher frequencies, characteristic of the dynamic behaviour of individual detached blocks. Particle motion associated with the higher frequencies shows strongly directional polarization and a high degree of linearity at well-defined frequencies, indicative of normal-mode vibration. The stable plateau areas, on the other hand, show simple, single-peak H/V curves representative of the underlying stratification and no predominant polarization direction. These results, which will be compared with those from other experiments in the area, have important implications for the

  5. From rifting to active spreading in the Lau Basin - Havre Trough backarc system (SW Pacific): Locking/unlocking induced by seamount chain subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruellan, E.; Delteil, J.; Wright, I.; Matsumoto, T.

    2003-05-01

    Associated with Pacific-Australia plate convergence, the Lau Basin - Havre Trough is an active back-arc basin that has been opened since ˜5.5 Ma by rifting and southward propagating oceanic spreading. Current back-arc opening rates decrease from 159 mm yr-1 in the northern Lau Basin to 15 mm y-1 in the southern Havre Trough. Major tectonic changes occur at the transition between Havre Trough rifting and full oceanic spreading of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC), where the oblique-to-trench, westward subducting Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) sweeps southwards along the Tonga trench. New swath bathymetry, seismic reflection data, and limited rock sampling in this area constrain a tectonic and kinematic back-arc model that incorporates the effects of LSC subduction. The ELSC, which extends southward to 24°55'S, forms a deep rift valley propagating southward through older, rifted arc basement. Present-day seismicity and fresh and fractured pillow lavas at 23°42'S are consistent with rift valley neovolcanism. Conversely, the northern Havre Trough has low seismicity and rifted volcanic basement ridges trending 25-45° oblique to the basin axis consistent with low levels of extensional tectonism and volcanism. This latter structural fabric is interpreted as an early stage of rifting that is now "locked" due to compression on the arc exerted by LSC subduction, while in the Lau Basin such effects have passed as the LSC swept along the Tonga Trench. It is proposed that the Lau-Havre back-arc opening is controlled by tectonic constraints exerted at the limits of the system by the LSC subduction, which determines the southward migration of the Tonga Arc pole of rotation and associated Lau Basin opening. A discrete three-stage back-arc opening evolution is proposed, comprising: (1) an initial phase of back-arc rifting along the whole length of the plate boundary, beginning at ˜6-5 Ma; (2) a subsequent phase, mostly present in the southern part of the back-arc domain

  6. Surveillance and maintenance report on decontamination and decommissioning and remedial action activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.L.; Sollenberger, M.L.; Sparkman, D.E.; Reynolds, R.M.; Wayland, G.S.

    1996-12-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) and Remedial Action (RA) programs are part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Division and are funded by the Office of Environmental Management (EM-40). Building 9201-4 (known as Alpha-4), three sites located within Building 9201-3 (the Oil Storage Tank, the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Fuel Handling Facility, and the Coolant Salt Technology Facility), and Building 9419-1 (the Decontamination Facility) are currently the facilities at the Y-12 Plant included in the D&D program. The RA program provides surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and program management of ER sites at the Y-12 Plant, including selected sites listed in Appendix C of the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA), sites listed in the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment (HSWA) permit Solid Waste Management Unit (SWM-U) list, and sites currently closed or undergoing post-closure activities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) or the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report communicates the status of the program plans and specific S&M activities for the D&D and RA programs.

  7. Focal hyperemia followed by spreading oligemia and impaired activation of rCBF in classic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, J.; Larsen, B.; Lauritzen, M.

    1981-04-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 254 areas of a hemisphere with the xenon 133 intraarterial injection method. Six cases of classic migraine were followed from the normal state into the prodromal phase, and in 3 cases further into the headache phase. One patient with common migraine was similarly followed during his only classic attack. The attacks were initiated by focal hyperemia in 3 patients. During prodromes all patients displayed occipitoparietal rCBF reduction (oligemia), but in only 1 case did the reduction approach critical values. Oligemia gradually spread anteriorly in the course of 15 to 45 minutes. In 4 patients a global oligemia was observed. In 4 patients severe headache was present concomitantly with oligemia and with no sign of hyperemia or nonhomogeneous brain perfusion. The normal rCBF increase during cortical activity (hand movement, speech, and similar activities) was impaired in 6 patients. The results indicate that the vasospastic model of the migraine attack is too simplistic.

  8. Activation-triggered subunit exchange between CaMKII holoenzymes facilitates the spread of kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Margaret; Lee, Il-Hyung; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Christensen, Sune M; Chao, Luke H; Schulman, Howard; Groves, Jay T; Kuriyan, John

    2014-01-01

    The activation of the dodecameric Ca2+/calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) holoenzyme is critical for memory formation. We now report that CaMKII has a remarkable property, which is that activation of the holoenzyme triggers the exchange of subunits between holoenzymes, including unactivated ones, enabling the calcium-independent phosphorylation of new subunits. We show, using a single-molecule TIRF microscopy technique, that the exchange process is triggered by the activation of CaMKII, and that exchange is modulated by phosphorylation of two residues in the calmodulin-binding segment, Thr 305 and Thr 306. Based on these results, and on the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations, we suggest that the phosphorylated regulatory segment of CaMKII interacts with the central hub of the holoenzyme and weakens its integrity, thereby promoting exchange. Our results have implications for an earlier idea that subunit exchange in CaMKII may have relevance for information storage resulting from brief coincident stimuli during neuronal signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01610.001 PMID:24473075

  9. Evidence of active ground deformation on the mid-ocean ridge: Axial seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, April-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.G. )

    1990-08-10

    Since September 1987 a precision bottom pressure recorder (BPR) has been deployed within the summit caldera of Axial seamount. The instrument is capable of measuring pressure of 1 mbar resolution and recording these measurements at 64 samples per hour for up to 15 months. Any significant change in the pressure record should indicate a change of depth associated with vertical ground movement, commonly indicative of active inflation or deflation of underlying magma bodies. Results from the first 9 months of the BPR deployment revealed a significant change in pressure, which is interpreted to represent a 15-cm subsidence of the caldera floor during two 2- to 3-week periods in April-June 1988. Also during these periods, an anomalous decline in temperature at the site was recorded that is correlated with an apparent increase in current velocity at the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES) vent field, suggesting vigorous advection of cold water into the caldera. Concurrent oceanographic data from Geosat and from current meter arrays do not indicate any large-scale oceanographic phenomena capable of generating these simultaneous events. One mechanism to explain simultaneous ground subsidence and temperature decline at the caldera center and increased bottom current at the caldera margin is the generation of a buoyant parcel of heated water in response to the intrusion or the eruption of magma associated with volcanic deflation. Similar volcanic events also may have generated large midwater plumes that have been described previously along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  10. Hydrothermal venting along Earth's fastest spreading center: East Pacific Rise, 27.5°-32.3°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Hey, R. N.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Feely, R. A.; Gharib, J. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Sansone, F. J.; Kleinrock, M.; Martinez, F.; Naar, D. F.; Rodrigo, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D.; Pardee, D.

    2002-07-01

    During March/April 1998 we conducted detailed mapping and sampling of hydrothermal plumes along six segments of Earth's fasting spreading mid-ocean ridge, 27.5°-32.3°S on the East Pacific Rise. We compared the distribution and chemistry of hydrothermal plumes to geological indicators of long-term (spreading rate) and moderate-term (ridge inflation) variations in magmatic budget. In this large-offset, propagating rift setting, these geological indices span virtually the entire range found along fast spreading ridges worldwide. Hydrothermal plumes overlaid ~60% of the length of superfast (>130 km/Myr) spreading axis surveyed and defined at least 14 separate vent fields. We observed no plumes over the slower spreading propagating segments. Finer-scale variations in the magmatic budget also correlated with hydrothermal activity, as the location of the five most intense plumes corresponded to subsegment peaks in ridge inflation. Along the entire ridge crest, the more inflated a ridge location the more likely it was to be overlain by a hydrothermal plume. Plume chemistry mostly reflected discharge from mature vent fields apparently unperturbed by magmatic activity within the last few years. Plume samples with high volatile/metal ratios, generally indicating recent seafloor volcanism, were scarce. Along-axis trends in both volatile (3He; CH4; ΔpH, a proxy for CO2; and particulate S) and nonvolatile (Fe, Mn) species showed a first-order agreement with the trend of ridge inflation. Nevertheless, a broad correspondence between the concentration of volatile species in plumes and geological proxies of magma supply identifies a pervasive magmatic imprint on this superfast spreading group of ridge segments.

  11. Crustal architecture and deep structure of the Ninetyeast Ridge hotspot trail from active-source ocean bottom seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Flueh, E. R.; Reichert, C.; Bialas, J.; Kläschen, D.; Kopp, C.

    2001-02-01

    Ridge and was subsequently pulled apart along a transform fault boundary. Therefore, underplating eastwards of the fracture zone separating the edifice from the Wharton Basin suggests that prolonged crustal growth by subcrustal plutonism occurred over millions of years after the major shield-building stage. This fact, however, requires mantle flow along the fossil hotspot trail. The occurrence of PnP and PN arrivals is probably associated with a layered and anisotropic upper mantle due to the preferential alignment of olivine crystals and may have formed by rising plume material which spread away under the base of the lithosphere.

  12. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  13. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  14. An Ontology-Based Tourism Recommender System Based on Spreading Activation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahramian, Z.; Abbaspour, R. Ali

    2015-12-01

    A tourist has time and budget limitations; hence, he needs to select points of interest (POIs) optimally. Since the available information about POIs is overloading, it is difficult for a tourist to select the most appreciate ones considering preferences. In this paper, a new travel recommender system is proposed to overcome information overload problem. A recommender system (RS) evaluates the overwhelming number of POIs and provides personalized recommendations to users based on their preferences. A content-based recommendation system is proposed, which uses the information about the user's preferences and POIs and calculates a degree of similarity between them. It selects POIs, which have highest similarity with the user's preferences. The proposed content-based recommender system is enhanced using the ontological information about tourism domain to represent both the user profile and the recommendable POIs. The proposed ontology-based recommendation process is performed in three steps including: ontology-based content analyzer, ontology-based profile learner, and ontology-based filtering component. User's feedback adapts the user's preferences using Spreading Activation (SA) strategy. It shows the proposed recommender system is effective and improves the overall performance of the traditional content-based recommender systems.

  15. Geophysical Investigation of Australian-Antarctic Ridge Using High-Resolution Gravity and Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lin, J.; Park, S. H.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) has been remained uncharted until 2011 because of its remoteness and harsh weather conditions. From 2011, the multidisciplinary ridge program initiated by the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) surveyed the little-explored eastern ends of the AAR to characterize the tectonics, geochemistry, and hydrothermal activity of this intermediate spreading system. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of a 300-km-long supersegment of the AAR to quantify the spatial variations in ridge morphology and axial and off-axis volcanisms as constrained by high-resolution shipboard bathymetry and gravity. The ridge axis morphology alternates between rift valleys and axial highs within relatively short ridge segments. To obtain a geological proxy for regional variations in magma supply, we calculated residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies (RMBA), gravity-derived crustal thickness, and residual topography for neighboring seven sub-segments. The results of the analyses revealed that the southern flank of the AAR is associated with shallower seafloor, more negative RMBA, thicker crust, and/or less dense mantle in comparison to the conjugate northern flank. Furthermore, this north-south asymmetry becomes more prominent toward the KR1 supersegment of the AAR. The axial topography of the KR1 supersegment exhibits a sharp transition from axial highs at the western end to rift valleys at the eastern end, with regions of axial highs being associated with more robust magma supply as indicated by more negative RMBA. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of the AAR supersegment with that of other ridges of intermediate spreading rates, including the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Southeast Indian Ridge west of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, to investigate the influence of ridge-hotspot interaction on ridge magma supply and tectonics.

  16. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  17. Petroleum associated with polymetallic sulfide in sediment from gorda ridge.

    PubMed

    Kvenvolden, K A; Rapp, J B; Hostettler, F D; Morton, J L; King, J D; Claypool, G E

    1986-12-01

    A sediment sample, impregnated with asphaltic petroleum and polymetallic sulfide, was dredged from the southern end of Gorda Ridge (the Escanaba Trough) off northern California, within the offshore Exclusive Economic Zone of the United States. The molecular distributions of hydrocarbons in this petroleum show that it was probably derived from terrestrial organic matter in turbidite sediment filling the Escanaba Trough. Hydrothermal activity at the Gorda Ridge spreading center provided the heat for petroleum formation and was the source of fluids for sulfide mineralization. PMID:17778005

  18. [Impact of market place activity on the spread of STI/AIDS in Sikasso, Mali].

    PubMed

    Maiga, Y; Cissoko, Y; Toloba, Y; Samake, A; Kampo, B; Bougoudogo, F

    2010-02-01

    Since the beginning of the global HIV pandemic, more than 47 million people have been infected and more than 14 millions of people have died with 95% living in developing countries. Mali is located in West Africa that has been relatively less affected. However Mali is a country with a migratory culture. This study was conducted in primary health care centers located on the main road to neighboring countries with higher HIV prevalence. Attention was focused on healthcare services provided around market places in the main cities where diverse populations converge on a weekly basis. Attendance measured at five health centers on market day was compared with attendance on the other days of the week. In addition the level of sexually transmitted infections (STI) diagnosed on market days was determined to compare prevalence in the resident versus non-resident population in function of market activity. Attendance at all the centers was significantly higher on market days. This increase was due mainly to the non-resident population (60.2% vs. 46.5%; p=0.005). Findings also showed that the proportion of STI diagnosed was higher in the non-resident than resident population, but the difference was not statistically significant (15.6% vs. 11.3%; p=0.320). These results indicate that migration has an impact on the spread of STI. This is probably the same for HIV since these pathologies are known to be linked. Control strategies to fight against STI/AIDS could be improved by taking into account market place activity that is common in all localities of Mali and Africa.

  19. Characterization of Inhibitory GABA-A Receptor Activation during Spreading Depolarization in Brain Slice

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2014-01-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a slowly propagating wave of near complete depolarizations of neurons and glia. Previous studies have reported large GABA releases during SD, but there is limited understanding of how GABA release and receptor activation are regulated and influence the propagating SD wavefront, as well as an excitatory phase immediately following the passage of SD. The present study characterized GABA-A type receptor (GABAAR) currents during SD generated by KCl microinjection in acute hippocampal slices from adult mice. Spontaneous GABAAR-mediated currents (sIPSCs) were initially enhanced, and were followed by a large outward current at the wavefront. sIPSC were then transiently supressed during the late SD phase, resulting in a significant reduction of the sIPSC/sEPSC ratio. The large outward current generated during SD was eliminated by the GABAAR antagonist gabazine, but the channel potentiator/agonist propofol failed to potentiate the current, likely because of a ceiling effect. Extracellular Cl− decreases recorded during SD were reduced by the antagonist but were not increased by the potentiator. Together with effects of GABAAR modulators on SD propagation rate, these results demonstrate a significant inhibitory role of the initial GABAAR activation and suggest that intracellular Cl− loading is insufficient to generate excitatory GABAAR responses during SD propagation. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for facilitating effects of GABAAR antagonists, and the lack of inhibitory effect of GABAAR potentiators on SD propagation. In addition, selective suppression of GABA transmission in the late SD period and the lack of effect of GABAA modulators on the duration of SD suggests that GABA modulation may not be effective approach to protect neurons during the vulnerable phase of SD. PMID:25338191

  20. Revisiting the Ridge-Push Force Using the Lithospheric Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Coblentz, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The geoid anomaly and driving force associated with the cooling oceanic lithosphere ("ridge push") are both proportional to dipole moment of the density-depth distribution, and allow a reevaluation of the ridge push force using the geoid. The challenge with this approach is to isolate the "lithospheric geoid" from the full geoid signal. Our approach is to use a band-pass spherical harmonic filter on the full geoid (e.g., EGM2008-WGS84, complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 2159) between orders 6 and 80. However, even this "lithospheric geoid" is noisy, and thus we average over 100 profiles evenly spaced along the global ridge system to obtain an average geoid step associated with the mid-ocean ridges. Because the positive ridge geoid signal is largest near the ridge (and to capture fast-spreading ridges), we evaluate symmetrical profiles extending ±45 m.y. about the ridge. We find an average ridge geoid anomaly of 4.5m, which is equivalent to a 10m anomaly for 100 m.y. old oceanic lithosphere. This geoid step corresponds to a ridge push force of ~2.4 x1012N/m for old oceanic lithosphere of 100 m.y., very similar to earlier estimates of ~2.5 x1012N/m based on simple half-space models. This simple half-space model also predicts constant geoid slopes of about 0.15 m/m.y. for cooling oceanic lithosphere. Our observed geoid slopes are consistent with this value for ages up to 40-50 m.y., but drop off to lower values at greater ages. We model this using a plate cooling model (with a thickness of the order of 125km) to fit the observation that the geoid anomaly and ridge driving force only increase slowly for ages greater than 40 m.y. (in contrast to the half-space model where the linear dependence on age holds for all ages). This reduction of the geoid slope results in a 20% decrease in the predicted ridge push force. This decrease is due to the combined effects of treating the oceanic lithosphere as a cooling plate (vs. a half-space), and the loss of geoidal

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Configuration and Data Management Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Schlicher, Bob G

    2006-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involvement in the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) research with both government agencies and private companies dates back to 1989. The discussion here will focus on the US Army's current need for an automated WIM system to weigh and determine the center-of-balance for military wheeled vehicles and cargo and the expanded uses of WIM data. ORNL is addressing configuration and data management issues as they relate to deployments for both military and humanitarian activities. The transition from the previous WIM Gen I to the current Gen II system illustrates a configuration and data management solution that ensures data integration, integrity, coherence and cost effectiveness. Currently, Army units use portable and fixed scales, tape measures, and calculators to determine vehicle axle, total weights and center of balance for vehicles prior to being transshipped via railcar, ship, or airlifted. Manually weighing and measuring all vehicles subject to these transshipment operations is time-consuming, labor-intensive, hazardous and is prone to human errors (e.g., misreading scales and tape measures, calculating centers of balance and wheel, axle, and vehicle weights, recording data, and transferring data from manually prepared work sheets into an electronic data base and aggravated by adverse weather conditions). Additionally, in the context of the military, the timeliness, safety, success, and effectiveness of airborne heavy-drop operations can be significantly improved by the use of an automated system to weigh and determine center of balance of vehicles while they are in motion. The lack of a standardized airlift-weighing system for joint service use also creates redundant weighing requirements at the cost of scarce resources and time. This case study can be judiciously expanded into commercial operations related to safety and enforcement. The WIM program will provide a means for the Army to automatically identify/weigh and monitor

  2. A sea-floor spreading event captured by seismometers.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, M; Cowen, J P; Baker, E T; Fornari, D J; Rubin, K H; Shank, T M; Waldhauser, F; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Forsyth, D W; Holmes, R C; Love, B; Perfit, M R; Weekly, R T; Soule, S A; Glazer, B

    2006-12-22

    Two-thirds of Earth's surface is formed at mid-ocean ridges, yet sea-floor spreading events are poorly understood because they occur far beneath the ocean surface. At 9 degrees 50'N on the East Pacific Rise, ocean-bottom seismometers recently recorded the microearthquake character of a mid-ocean ridge eruption, including precursory activity. A gradual ramp-up in activity rates since seismic monitoring began at this site in October 2003 suggests that eruptions may be forecast in the fast-spreading environment. The pattern culminates in an intense but brief (approximately 6-hour) inferred diking event on 22 January 2006, followed by rapid tapering to markedly decreased levels of seismicity.

  3. PROPAGATION AND LINKAGE OF OCEANIC RIDGE SEGMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, David D.; Aydin, Atilla

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of spreading ridges and the development of structures that link ridge segments using an analogy between ridges and cracks in elastic plates. The ridge-propagation force and a path factor that controls propagation direction were calculated for echelon ridge segments propagating toward each other. The ridge-propagation force increases as ridge ends approach but then declines sharply as the ends pass, so ridge segments may overlap somewhat. The sign of the path factor changes as ridge ends approach and pass, so the overlapping ridge ends may diverge and then converge following a hook-shaped path. The magnitudes of shear stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of maximum shear planes between adjacent ridge segments were calculated to study transform faulting. For different loading conditions simulating ridge push, plate pull, and ridge suction, a zone of intense mechanical interaction between adjacent ridge ends in which stresses are concentrated was identified. The magnitudes of mean stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of principal stress planes were also calculated.

  4. Antifungal properties of gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde and application in active food packaging of bread and cheese spread foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Mari Pau; Lopez-Carballo, Gracia; Catala, Ramon; Gavara, Rafael; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2013-09-16

    Gliadin films incorporating 1.5, 3 and 5% cinnamaldehyde (g/100g protein) were tested against food-spoilage fungi Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger in vitro, and were employed in an active food packaging system for sliced bread and cheese spread. Gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde were highly effective against fungal growth. P. expansum and A. niger were completely inhibited after storage in vitro for 10 days in the presence of films incorporating 3% cinnamaldehyde. Indeed 1.5% cinnamaldehyde was sufficient in the case of P. expansum. The amount of cinnamaldehyde retained in films after storage for 45 days at 20 °C and 0% RH was also sufficient in most cases to prevent fungal growth in vitro. Active food packaging with gliadin films incorporating 5% cinnamaldehyde increased the shelf-life of both sliced bread and cheese spread. Mold growth was observed on sliced bread after 27 days of storage at 23 °C with active packaging, whereas in the control bread packaged without the active film fungal growth appeared around the fourth day. In the cheese spread, no fungi were observed after 26 days of storage at 4 °C when the product was packaged with the active film. However, growth of fungi was observed in control packaged cheese after 16 days of storage. This work demonstrates a noteworthy potential of these novel bioplastics incorporating natural antimicrobial compounds as innovative solutions to be used in active food packaging to extend shelf-life of food products. PMID:24029024

  5. Antifungal properties of gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde and application in active food packaging of bread and cheese spread foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Mari Pau; Lopez-Carballo, Gracia; Catala, Ramon; Gavara, Rafael; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2013-09-16

    Gliadin films incorporating 1.5, 3 and 5% cinnamaldehyde (g/100g protein) were tested against food-spoilage fungi Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger in vitro, and were employed in an active food packaging system for sliced bread and cheese spread. Gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde were highly effective against fungal growth. P. expansum and A. niger were completely inhibited after storage in vitro for 10 days in the presence of films incorporating 3% cinnamaldehyde. Indeed 1.5% cinnamaldehyde was sufficient in the case of P. expansum. The amount of cinnamaldehyde retained in films after storage for 45 days at 20 °C and 0% RH was also sufficient in most cases to prevent fungal growth in vitro. Active food packaging with gliadin films incorporating 5% cinnamaldehyde increased the shelf-life of both sliced bread and cheese spread. Mold growth was observed on sliced bread after 27 days of storage at 23 °C with active packaging, whereas in the control bread packaged without the active film fungal growth appeared around the fourth day. In the cheese spread, no fungi were observed after 26 days of storage at 4 °C when the product was packaged with the active film. However, growth of fungi was observed in control packaged cheese after 16 days of storage. This work demonstrates a noteworthy potential of these novel bioplastics incorporating natural antimicrobial compounds as innovative solutions to be used in active food packaging to extend shelf-life of food products.

  6. Heat Flow on the South West Indian Ridge at 14°E and the Consequences for Microbiological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, N. E.; Molari, M.; Boetius, A.

    2014-12-01

    During RV POLARSTERN cruise PS81 to the South West Indian Ridge (SWIR) at 52°S, 14°E an integrated study was carried out in more than 4000 m water depth employing seismology, geology, microbiology, deep-sea ecology, heat flow and others. Heat flow is supposed to be an indicator for the varying depth of the magma chamber beneath the ridge axis. Bottom observations from previous work on the SWIR are scarce and visual information about geostructures, habitat landscapes, benthic faunal communities and their distribution in this area have so far been missing. Vigorous fluid flow in the form of black smokers or shimmering water could not be detected but enhanced heat flow due to upward pore water migration occurred. This leads to values of very high heat flow (up to 850 mW/m2) and advection rates up to 25 cm/a Darcy velocity. Enhanced biomass and a greater variation of megafauna along those sites of high heat flow could be inferred from reconnaissance observations with a camera sledge. A closer investigation of microbial activity in the material of gravity corers revealed favorable living conditions for microorganisms. We find the inorganic carbon fixation rates, here applied like a proxy of microbial metabolic activity, were significantly higher (up to 7 times higher) in surficial sediments in proximity of the station PS 81/640 compared to other stations along the ridge. Conversely the extracellular enzymatic activities did not show any significant difference in the potential organic matter degradation between the stations investigated. These results suggest an increase of chemosynthetic activities at St PS 81/649, possibly related to increase of availability of reduced compounds (i.e. sulphide, reduced metals) in presence of pore water flow.

  7. Annual Report on Environmental Monitoring Activities for FY 1995 (Baseline Year) at Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report describes baseline contaminant release conditions for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sampling approach and data analysis methods used to establish baseline conditions were presented in ``Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (EMP).`` As outlined in the EMP, the purpose of the baseline monitoring year at WAG 6 was to determine the annual contaminant releases from the site during fiscal year 1995 (FY95) against which any potential changes in releases over time could be compared. The baseline year data set provides a comprehensive understanding of release conditions from all major waste units in the WAG through each major contaminant transport pathway. Due to a mandate to reduce all monitoring work, WAG 6 monitoring was scaled back and reporting efforts on the baseline year results are being minimized. This report presents the quantified baseline year contaminant flux conditions for the site and briefly summarizes other findings. All baseline data cited in this report will reside in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information system (OREIS) database, and will be available for use in future years as the need arises to identify potential release changes.

  8. the P-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading center: The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed analysis of short period travel time, and waveform data reveals the upper mantle structure beneath an oceanic ridge to depths of 900 km. More than 1400 digital seismograms from earthquakes in Mexico and central America recorded at SCARLET yield 1753 travel times and 58 direct measurements of short period travel time as well as high quality, stable waveforms. The 29 events combine to form a continuous record section from 9 deg to 40 deg with an average station spacing of less than 5 km. First the travel times are inverted. Further constraints arise from the observed relative amplitudes of mantle phases, which are modeled by trial and error.

  9. Hot spot-ridge crest convergence in the northeast Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Karsten, J.L.; Delaney, J.R. )

    1989-01-10

    Evolution of the Juan de Fuca Ridge during the past 7 m.y. has been reconstructed taking into account both the propagating rift history and migration of the spreading center in the 'absolute' (fixed hot spot) reference frame. Northwestward migration of the spreading center (at a rate of 30 km/m.y.) has resulted in progressive encroachment of the ridge axis on the Cobb Hot Spot and westward jumping of the central third of the ridge axis more recently than 0.5 Ma. Seamounts in the Cobb-Eickelberg chain are predicted to display systematic variations in morphology and petrology, and a reduction in the age contrast between the edifice and underlying crust, as a result of the ridge axis approach. Relative seamount volumes also indicate that magmatic output of the hot spot varied during this interval, with a reduction in activity between 2.5 and 4.5 Ma, compared with relatively more robust activity before and after this period. Spatial relationships determined in this reconstruction allow hypotheses relating hot spot activity and rift propagation to be evaluated. In most cases, rift propagation has been directed away from the hot spot during the time period considered. Individual propagators show some reduction in propagation rate as separation between the propagating rift tip and hot spot increases, but cross comparison of multiple propagators does not uniformly display the same relationship. No obvious correlation exists between propagation rate and increasing proximity of the hot spot to the ridge axis or increasing hot spot output. Taken together, these observations do not offer compelling support for the concept of hot spot driven rift propagation. However, short-term reversals in propagation direction at the Cobb Offset coincide with activity of the Heckle melting anomaly, suggesting that local propagation effects may be related to excess magma supply at the ridge axis.

  10. Plate boundary processes as alternatives to mantle plume effects on the Reykjanes Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, F.; Hey, R. N.; Eason, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The North Atlantic basin displays clear regional anomalies in depth and other features centered near Iceland. A current paradigm holds that these anomalies are due to a mantle plume and that the Reykjanes Ridge, located over this plume, is a sensitive recorder of its activity in the crust it accretes. Thus, many seafloor spreading features of the Reykjanes Ridge including axial reconfigurations from orthogonal to oblique spreading, elimination of segment offsets and transform faults, and formation of V-shaped ridges and troughs flanking the axis have been attributed to mantle plume thermal effects radiating outward from beneath Iceland. Based on new geophysical data from a R/V Marcus G Langseth cruise to the southern Reykjanes Ridge we propose an alternate hypothesis: that plate boundary processes superimposed on the larger regional anomalies can account for these seafloor spreading features. A key plate boundary process is sub-axial buoyant mantle upwelling because it can increase melt production and crustal thickness relative to passive mantle advection without changes in mantle temperature. We hypothesize that on a long and linear slow spreading ridge underlain by a regional gradient in mantle temperature and water content, buoyant mantle upwelling can propagate along axis and create many of the seafloor spreading effects currently attributed to radiating mantle plume thermal pulses. However, propagating buoyant mantle upwelling is fundamentally a wave-like phenomenon wherein only the form of upwelling propagates along axis, not actual mantle material. This has profoundly different implications for the formation of crustal structures than in mantle plume models, which require actual rapid radial mantle flow. This property of the sub-axial propagating buoyant mantle upwelling model, if correct, invalidates interpretation of prominent Reykjanes Ridge seafloor spreading features as indicators of regional mantle plume flow and requires reevaluation of geodynamic

  11. Geophysical explanation for the disparity in spreading rates between the Northern and Southern hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Dennis

    2007-03-01

    An interesting characteristic of the Earth, often noticed by schoolchildren, is that it seems out of balance: Oceans dominate the Southern Hemisphere, while continental crust seems to be crowded into the Northern Hemisphere. The cause of this inequity involves the greater number of mid-ocean spreading ridges and significantly faster spreading rates in the Southern Hemisphere, but no explanation has ever been suggested for this hemispheric disparity in spreading ridges and rates. An examination of east-west spreading rates and plate motion indicates that the imbalance is due to simple spherical geometry. In the Southern Hemisphere, the system of spreading ridges encircling Antarctica is pushing all of the neighboring plates northward, away from Antarctica. As these plates approach the equator, they begin to occupy larger latitudinal circumferences. This large-scale northward motion of latitudinal bands of crust to lower latitudes requires significant emplacement of new crustal material to fill up the larger circumferences, resulting in extremely high sum total east-west spreading rates along those latitudes. Contrariwise, in the Northern Hemisphere the general northward motion of plates away from the equator and toward smaller circumferences has led to a steep drop in spreading rates and the number of active spreading ridges. Sum total east-west spreading rates along latitudes are correlated with the rate of latitudinal circumferential extension to a significant degree (r = 0.68). The geophysical result of this correlation has been the asymmetric globe that we see today, mostly young and oceanic in the south, mostly old and continental in the north.

  12. Active neutron interrogation for verification of storage of weapons components at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Mattingly, J.K.; Mullens, J.A.; Hughes, S.S.

    1998-02-23

    A nuclear weapons identification system (NWIS), under development since 1984 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and presently in use there, uses active neutron interrogation with low-intensity {sup 252}Cf sources in ionization chambers to provide a timed source of fission neutrons from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. To date, measurements have been performed on {approximately}15 different weapons systems in a variety of configurations both in and out of containers. Those systems included pits and fully assembled systems ready for deployment at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, and weapons components at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These measurements have shown that NWIS can identify nuclear weapons and/or components; nuclear weapons/components can be distinguished from mockups where fissile material has been replaced by nonfissile material; omissions of small amounts (4%) of fissile material can be detected; changes in internal configurations can be determined; trainer parts can be identified as was demonstrated by verification of 512 containers with B33 components at the Y-12 Plant (as many as 32 in one 8-hour shift); and nonfissile components can be identified. The current NWIS activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant include: (1) further development of the system for more portability and lower power consumption, (2) collection of reference signatures for all weapons components in containers, and (3) confirmation of a particular weapons component in storage and confirmation of receipts. This paper describes the recent measurements with NWIS for a particular weapons component in storage that have resolved an Inspector General (IG`s) audit finding with regard to performance of confirmation of inventory.

  13. SeaVOICE: Sea-going Experiments to Test Potential Linkages among Sea Level Change, Ocean Ridge Volcanism, and Hydrothermal Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Huybers, P. J.; McManus, J. F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Winckler, G.; Boulahanis, B.; Costa, K.; Ferguson, D.; Katz, R. F.; Li, Y.; Middleton, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in sea level influence the pressure of the solid Earth over entire ocean basins. While the absolute changes in sea level caused by glacial cycles are small relative to ocean depths, the temporal variations in sea level can lead to pressure changes of similar order to mantle upwelling rates, with the potential to significantly perturb short term rates of melt production at ocean ridges (Huybers and Langmuir, EPSL, 2009). Such changes could then lead to fluctuations in crustal thickness, magma composition and hydrothermal activity. To investigate possible relationships between glacial cycles and ocean ridge processes, we carried out an 18 day cruise of mapping and sediment coring to the Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. High resolution bathymetry was obtained on the west side of the ridge axis to beyond 1Ma to test whether abyssal hill fabric shows periodicities consistent with glacial cycles. Nine successful piston cores up to 7.6m in length provide a sedimentary record back to more than 600kyr to test for spatial and temporal variations in hydrothermal activity. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy on these cores is systematic and provides good age constraints. Short cores near the ridge axis provide a record of the current trace of hydrothermal activity in youngest sediments. Several of the cores impacted basement and recovered a basement sample. Above basement, basaltic glass shards were recovered in the bottom meter of sediment, raising the possibility of temporal records of basalt chemical compositions using the age constraints the sediments provide. The glass samples provide a unique and new perspective on ridge volcanism, since previous off-axis samples were restricted to dredging old fault scarps. Cores can be taken anywhere, raising the potential for global time series studies of ridge volcanism. The coupled bathymetry, sediment geochemistry and magmatic glass compositions hold the promise of a definitive advance in our understanding of the

  14. Are Axial Volcanic Ridges where all the (volcanic) action is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are generally recognised as the main loci for lithospheric generation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, various recent studies have suggested that axial volcanism is not confined to them. Here I present evidence from three studies for significant amounts of off-AVR volcanism at three slow-spreading ridges. 1) Near-bottom side-scan sonar (TOBI) images of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13°N show a complex pattern of closely-spaced, active oceanic core complexes (OCCs) where plate separation is largely a-volcanic, separated by short segments of vigorous volcanic spreading. In one such volcanic segment, the brightest sea floor and therefore inferred youngest volcanism occurs not on the topographic axis (an apparently 'old' AVR) but at the edge of a broad axial valley. 2) A similar TOBI survey of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre reveals AVRs in the north and south flanking an OCC (Mt. Dent) and a non-volcanic ridge interpreted as tectonically extruded peridotite ('smooth' sea floor). In both AVR segments there are clear, young lava flows that have erupted from perched sources part way up the median valley walls and have partly flowed down into the valley. 3) The third case is from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N, where we conducted a detailed geophysical and geological study of an AVR and surrounding median valley floor. The AVR is largely surrounded by flat sea floor composed mainly of lobate and sheet flows, whereas the AVR comprises predominantly pillow lavas. Although we have no firm dates, various indicators suggest most lavas on the AVR are around 10ka old or somewhat less. The apparently youngest (brightest acoustic returns, thinnest sediment cover) of the flat-lying lava flows appears to have a similar age from its degree of sediment cover. Contact relations between these lavas and the AVR flanks show no evidence of a clear age difference between the two, and we think both types of eruption may have occurred roughly

  15. Data base management activities for the Remedial Action Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, L.A.; Voorhees, L.D.; Gentry, M.J.; Faulkner, M.A.; Shaakir-Ali, J.A.; Newman, K.A.; McCord, R.A.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-07-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in 1985 in response to state and federal regulations requiring comprehensive control over facility discharges and cleanup of contaminated sites. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed for RAP to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated facilities and sites. The current status of DIMS and its role in supporting RAP during 1989 are described. The DIMS consists of three components: (1) the Numeric Data Base, (2) the Bibliographic Data Base, and (3) the Records Control Data Base. This report addresses all three data bases, but focuses on the contents of the Numeric Data Base. Significant progress was made last year with the geographic information system (GIS) and ARC/INFO, which can be interfaced with SAS/GRAPH to provide combined mapping and statistical graphic products. Several thematic layers of GIS data for the Oak Ridge Reservation are now available. 18 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Gondwana subduction-modified mantle domain prevents magmatic seafloor generation in the Central Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, T.; Nakamura, K.; Senda, R.; Suzuki, K.; Kumagai, H.; Sato, H.; Sato, T.; Shibuya, T.; Minoguchi, K.; Okino, K.

    2013-12-01

    The creation of oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges is essential to understanding the genesis of oceanic plate and the evolution of the Earth. Detailed bathymetric measurements coupled with dense sample recovery at mid-ocean ridge revealed a wide range of variations in the ridge and seafloor morphologies, which cannot be simply explained by a spreading rate, but also by ridge geometry, mantle compositions and thermal structure (Dick et al., 2003 Nature; Cannat et al. 2006 Geology). It is now widely accepted that very limited magmatic activity with tectonic stretching generates oceanic core complex and/or smooth seafloor surface in the slow to ultraslow-spreading ridges, where serpentinized peridotite and gabbros are expected to be exposed associated with detachment faults (Cann et al., 1997 Nature; Cannat et al., 2006), although magmatism might be an essential role for the formation of oceanic core complexes (Buck et al., 2005 Nature; Tucholke et al 2008 JGR). A rising question is why magmatic activity is sometimes prevented during the oceanic plate formation. Ancient melting domain, that are too refractory to melt even in adiabatically upwelling to the shallow upper mantle, might cause the amagmatic spreading ridges (Harvey et al., 2006 EPSL, Liu et al.,2008 Nature). Its origin and effect on seafloor generations are, however, not well understood yet. We report an oceanic hill as an example of an ancient subduction-modified mantle domain, probably formed at continental margin of the Gondwanaland~Pangea supercontinent, existing beneath the Central Indian Ridge. This domain is the most likely to have prevented magmatic seafloor generation, resulting in creation of very deep oceanic valley and serpentine diaper (now the studied oceanic hill) at the present Central Indian ridge.

  17. Multiple seafloor spreading modes in the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    arises from the southern end of the southern AVR, whence it flows south, around a small inlier of older, more sedimented seafloor, and again cascades down a fault scarp into the Swan Island Fracture Zone to the south. Mount Dent has a surprisingly subdued sidescan character, with very low backscatter suggestive of significant sediment cover, and little evidence of spreading parallel striations as seen on other active OCCs, although subsequent Autosub bathymetry surveys did image fine-scale corrugations, especially near the OCC toe. Some NE- and NW- trending faults occur in the western part of the massif, indicating post-emplacement deformation, while some NS trending normal faults from the adjacent median valley extend into and across it. Similar characteristics seen on OCCs on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 13 - 14°N were taken as indicative of inactive detachment faulting. However, where such inactive faults occurred, plate separation was taken up by renewed and vigorous on-axis volcanism, but no such features are seen opposite Mt. Dent. The most probable explanation at present seems to be that Mt. Dent contains a detachment fault that is still actively accommodating the majority of plate separation, but that unusually heavy sedimentation masks the expected high reflectivity and fine-scale striations.

  18. Ischemia triggered by spreading neuronal activation is induced by endothelin-1 and hemoglobin in the subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Gabor C; Einhäupl, Karl M; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Dreier, Jens P

    2003-11-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm has a major impact on the outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two important candidates to cause the arterial spasm are the red blood cell product oxyhemoglobin and the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, although oxyhemoglobin alone is not sufficient to induce cerebral ischemia and endothelin-1 leads to ischemia only at relatively high concentrations. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of oxyhemoglobin and endothelin-1 triggered spreading neuronal activation in rat cortex in vivo. In contrast with the expected transient increase of regional cerebral blood flow during spreading depression, however, cerebral blood flow decreased profoundly and was long-lasting, paralleled by delayed repolarization of the steady (direct current) potential. These changes are characteristic of cortical spreading ischemia. Replacing oxyhemoglobin for the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine mimicked these effects, implicating nitric oxide scavenging functions of oxyhemoglobin. Furthermore, the effect of endothelin-1 was related to a reduction of Na(+)-/K(+)-ATPase activity rather than solely to its vasoconstrictive properties. In conclusion, the threshold concentration of endothelin-1 that induces cerebral ischemia is profoundly reduced via a complex interaction between the neuronal/astroglial network and the cortical microcirculation if nitric oxide availability declines. The results may have implications for the understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage-related cortical lesions.

  19. COMSOL-Related Activities within the Research Reactors Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D

    2015-01-01

    Our group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) started using COMSOL shortly after version 3.0 was released in the Spring of 2004. Over 11 years later and several new releases of the code, the application usage has grown along with the number of licenses we are responsible for. This paper focuses not on details of results and modeling methods, but instead, takes a look at our past and present applications, and evaluates where we are headed with COMSOL in the future. In doing so, we reveal some lessons learned along our pathway, provide some insight on how best to use COMSOL in a group setting, and perhaps help both users and developers to improve how the code is utilized.

  20. Follow-on Research Activities for the Rensselaer Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (RIDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaCombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The RIDGE effort continues the aegis of the earlier, NASA-sponsored, Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) series of experiments through the continued analysis of microgravity data acquired during these earlier space flights. The preliminary observations presented here demonstrate that there are significant differences between SCN and the more anisotropic PVA dendrites. The side branch structure becomes amplified only further behind the tip, and the interface shape is generally wider (i.e. more hyperbolic than parabolic) in PVA than in SCN. These characteristics are seen to affect the process of heat transport. Additionally, the dendrites grown during the fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) exhibit time-dependent growth characteristics and may not always have reached steady-state growth during the experiment.

  1. Alkalic Basalt in Ridge Axis of 53˚E Amagmatic Segment Center, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, J.; Liu, Y.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is key tracer of composition and process in the mantle. It is interesting to notice that some alkalic basalts occur in amagmatic spreading center of ultraslow spreading ridges, for examples, 9-16˚E of the Southwest Indian ridge (Standish et al., 2008) and Lena Trough of Arctic Ocean (Snow et al., 2011). The latter is interpreted as the result of the pre-existence of continental transform fault or the especially cold thermal structure of ancient continental lithosphere. 53˚E segment, east of the Gallieni transform fault, was discovered as an amagmatic segment (Zhou and Dick, 2013). On both sides of the ridge axis, peridotites with a little gabbro are exposed in an area more than 3200 km2. Basalts exist in the southern portion of 53˚E segment, indicating the transformation from magmatic to amagmatic spreading about 9.4 million years ago. In April of 2014, Leg 4 of the RV Dayang Yihao cruise 30, basaltic glasses was dredged at one location (3500 m water depth) in the ridge axis of 53˚E segment center. It is shown by electric probe analysis that the samples have extremely high sodium content (4.0-4.49 wt% Na­2O ), relative higher potassium content (0.27-0.32 wt% K2O) and silica (50.67-51.87 wt% SiO2), and lower MgO content (5.9-6.4 wt% MgO). Mg-number is 0.55-0.59. It is distinctly different from the N-MORB (2.42-2.68 wt% Na2O, 0.03-0.06 wt% K2O, 48.6-49.6 wt% Si2O, 8.8-9.0 wt% MgO, Mg-numbers 0.63) distributed in the 560-km-long supersegment, west of the Gallieni transform fault, where the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field was discovered at 49.6˚E in 2007. The reasons for the alkalic basalt in the ridge axis of 53˚E amagmatic segment center, either by low melting degree of garnet stability field, by melting from an ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle, or by sodium-metasomatism or even other mantle processes or their combination in the deep mantle, are under further studies.

  2. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  3. The structure of mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Toomey, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research results on the structure of midocean ridges are reviewed. The new view of ridge-axis crustal structure obtained from high-resolution seismology is reviewed, emphasizing the variation of that structure with spreading rate and along-axis at a given spreading rate. Recent results on upper mantle structure beneath ridges are examined, including variations with seafloor age, indications from anisotropy for directions of mantle flow, and long-wavelength along-axis variations in structure and their implications for lateral heterogeneity in mantle temperature and composition.

  4. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  5. Characterization of Active Hydrothermal Fluid Discharge and Recharge Zones in the Endeavour Axial Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, M.; Hutnak, M.; Hearn, C.; Tivey, M.; Bjorklund, T.; Johnson, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    Sites where warm hydrothermal fluid vents at mid-ocean spreading centers are important for understanding a wide range of critical oceanic processes, but discharge zones represent a very limited portion of crustal fluid circulation pathways. Mapping the distribution of both fluid recharge and discharge sites within the axial valley provides wider insight into the larger scale features of hydrothermal circulation. Our 2011 survey consisted of 180 conductive heat flow stations within the Endeavour axial valley in roughly a 400 m by 1000 m grid, extending across the entire axial valley from the outer flank of the western boundary ridge to the eastern wall. Data acquisition used thermal blankets which measured conductive heat flow without requiring substantial sediment cover. A surprising result from this survey was zones of high heat flow extending across-strike, from the summit of the west valley wall across the entire axial valley floor. This trend was correlated with anomalously low seafloor magnetization from a near-bottom survey with the ROV JASON. Unexpectedly, over half of the axial valley floor was anomalously low at <50 mW m-2, while a small portion of the sites within the 'warm zone' had heat flow values >1 W m-2. The areas of extremely low heat flow values are interpreted as being directly influenced by recharge zones. Based on MCS estimates of partial melt depth below the axial valley and the assumption of no fluid advection, the purely conductive heat flow for this region should be on the order of 1 W m-2.The observation that conductive heat flux is suppressed over large portions of the axial valley floor suggests that heat transfer within the crustal sub-surface fluid reservoir is widespread, and impacts a large portion of our survey area. The largely bi-modal distribution of high and low conductive heat flow, coupled with geophysical and video observations, suggest current Endeavour axial valley crustal fluid circulation models need to be re-evaluated.

  6. Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey; Cruse, Anna; Saccocia, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, experienced intense seismic activity in June 1999. Hydrothermal vent fluids were collected from sulfide structures in September 1999 and July 2000 and analyzed for the abundance of H2, H2S, CH4, CO2, NH3, Mg and Cl to document temporal and spatial changes following the earthquakes. Dissolved concentrations of CO2, H2, and H2S increased dramatically in the September 1999 samples relative to pre-earthquake abundances, and subsequently decreased during the following year. In contrast, dissolved NH3 and CH4 concentrations in 1999 and 2000 were similar to or less than pre-earthquake values. Aqueous Cl abundances showed large decreases immediately following the earthquakes followed by increases to near pre-earthquake values. The abundances of volatile species at the Main Endeavour Field were characterized by strong inverse correlations with chlorinity. Phase separation can account for 20-50% enrichments of CO2, CH4, and NH3 in low-chlorinity fluids, while temperature- and pressure-dependent fluid-mineral equilibria at near-critical conditions are responsible for order of magnitude greater enrichments in dissolved H2S and H2. The systematic variation of dissolved gas concentrations with chlorinity likely reflects mixing of a low-chlorinity volatile-enriched vapor generated by supercritical phase separation with a cooler gas-poor hydrothermal fluid of seawater chlorinity. Decreased abundances of sediment-derived NH3 and CH4 in 1999 indicate an earthquake-induced change in subsurface hydrology. Elevated CO2 abundances in vent fluids collected in September 1999 provide evidence that supports a magmatic origin for the earthquakes. Temperature-salinity relationships are consistent with intrusion of a shallow dike and suggest that the earthquakes were associated with movement of magma beneath the ridge crest. These data demonstrate the large and rapid response of chemical fluxes at mid-ocean ridges to magmatic activity and

  7. Summary of environmental characterization activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Solid Waste Storage Area Six, FY 1986 through 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Solomon, D.K.; Dreier, R.B.; Lee, S.Y.; Kelmers, A.D.; Lietzke, D.A. ); Craig, P.M. )

    1987-09-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP), has supported characterization activities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA 6) to acquire information necessary for identification and planning of remedial actions that may be warranted, and to facilitate eventual closure of the site. In FY 1986 investigations began in the areas of site hydrology, geochemistry, soils, geology, and geohydrologic model application. This report summarizes work carried out in each of these areas during FY's 1986 and 1987 and serves as a status report pulling together the large volume of data that has resulted. Characterization efforts are by no means completed; however, a sufficient data base has been generated to begin data interpretation and analysis of site contaminants.

  8. Summary of environmental characterization activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Solid Waste Storage Area Six, FY 1986 through 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Solomon, D.K.; Dreier, R.B.; Lee, S.Y.; Kelmers, A.D.; Lietzke, D.A.; Craig, P.M.

    1987-09-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP), has supported characterization activities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA 6) to acquire information necessary for identification and planning of remedial actions that may be warranted, and to facilitate eventual closure of the site. In FY 1986 investigations began in the areas of site hydrology, geochemistry, soils, geology, and geohydrologic model application. This report summarizes work carried out in each of these areas during FY`s 1986 and 1987 and serves as a status report pulling together the large volume of data that has resulted. Characterization efforts are by no means completed; however, a sufficient data base has been generated to begin data interpretation and analysis of site contaminants.

  9. Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER.

  10. Neural mechanism of activity spread in the cat motor cortex and its relation to the intrinsic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Capaday, Charles; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Ethier, Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Weber, Doug

    2011-05-15

    Motor cortical points are linked by intrinsic horizontal connections having a recurrent network topology. However, it is not known whether neural activity can propagate over the area covered by these intrinsic connections and whether there are spatial anisotropies of synaptic strength, as opposed to synaptic density. Moreover, the mechanisms by which activity spreads have yet to be determined. To address these issues, an 8 × 8 microelectrode array was inserted in the forelimb area of the cat motor cortex (MCx). The centre of the array had a laser etched hole ∼500 μm in diameter. A microiontophoretic pipette, with a tip diameter of 2-3 μm, containing bicuculline methiodide (BIC) was inserted in the hole and driven to a depth of 1200-1400 μm from the cortical surface. BIC was ejected for ∼2min from the tip of the micropipette with positive direct current ranging between 20 and 40 nA in different experiments. This produced spontaneous nearly periodic bursts (0.2-1.0 Hz) of multi-unit activity in a radius of about 400 μm from the tip of the micropipette. The bursts of neural activity spread at a velocity of 0.11-0.24 ms⁻¹ (mean=0.14 mm ms⁻¹, SD=0.05)with decreasing amplitude.The area activated was on average 7.22 mm² (SD=0.91 mm²), or ∼92% of the area covered by the recording array. The mode of propagation was determined to occur by progressive recruitment of cortical territory, driven by a central locus of activity of some 400 μm in radius. Thus, activity did not propagate as a wave. Transection of the connections between the thalamus and MCx did not significantly alter the propagation velocity or the size of the recruited area, demonstrating that the bursts spread along the routes of intrinsic cortical connectivity. These experiments demonstrate that neural activity initiated within a small motor cortical locus (≤ 400 μm in radius) can recruit a relatively large neighbourhood in which a variety of muscles acting at several forelimb joints are

  11. Metopic ridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant is made up of bony plates. The gaps between the plates allow for growth of the skull. The places where these plates connect are called sutures or suture lines. They do not fully close until the 2nd or 3rd year of life. A metopic ridge occurs when the ...

  12. Intracellular Zn2+ accumulation enhances suppression of synaptic activity following spreading depolarization.

    PubMed

    Carter, Russell E; Seidel, Jessica L; Lindquist, Britta E; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a feed-forward wave that propagates slowly throughout brain tissue and recovery from SD involves substantial metabolic demand. Presynaptic Zn(2+) release and intracellular accumulation occurs with SD, and elevated intracellular Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+) ]i ) can impair cellular metabolism through multiple pathways. We tested here whether increased [Zn(2+) ]i could exacerbate the metabolic challenge of SD, induced by KCl, and delay recovery in acute murine hippocampal slices. [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD, by transient ZnCl2 application with the Zn(2+) ionophore pyrithione (Zn/Pyr), delayed recovery of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, prolonged DC shifts, and significantly increased extracellular adenosine accumulation. These effects could be due to metabolic inhibition, occurring downstream of pyruvate utilization. Prolonged [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation prior to SD was required for effects on fEPSP recovery and consistent with this, endogenous synaptic Zn(2+) release during SD propagation did not delay recovery from SD. The effects of exogenous [Zn(2+) ]i loading were also lost in slices preconditioned with repetitive SDs, implying a rapid adaptation. Together, these results suggest that [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD can provide significant additional challenge to brain tissue, and could contribute to deleterious effects of [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation in a range of brain injury models. PMID:23495967

  13. Tank waste treatment R and D activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Lee, D.D.; Beahm, E.C.; Collins, J.L.; Davidson, D.J.; Egan, B.Z.; Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as the pilot plant for the Hanford production facility during the 1940s. As a result, the waste contained in the ORNL storage tanks has similarities to waste found at other sites, but is typically 10 to 100 times less radioactive. It is estimated that nearly 4.9 million liters of legacy of waste is stored on the site of ORNL. Of this volume about one-fifth is transuranic sludges. The remainder of the waste volume is classified as low-level waste. The waste contains approximately 130,000 Ci, composed primarily of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and small amounts of other fission products. The wastes were originally acidic in nature but were neutralized using Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH, or CaO to allow their storage in tanks constructed of carbon steel or concrete (Gunite). In addition to the legacy waste, about 57,000 L of concentrated waste is generated annually, which contains about 13,000 Ci, consisting primarily of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and small amounts of other fission products. As part of the US department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental Management Tanks Focus Area and Efficient Separations and Processing programs, a number of tasks are under way at ORNL to address the wastes currently stored in tanks across the DOE complex. This paper summarizes the efforts in three of these tasks: (1) the treatment of the tank supernatant to remove Cs, Tc, and Sr; (2) the leaching or washing of the sludges to reduce the volume of waste to be vitrified; and (3) the immobilization of the sludges.

  14. Age, Episodicity and Migration of Hydrothermal Activity within the Axial Valley, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Kelley, D. S.; Clague, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Tivey, M. K.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits record the history of high-temperature venting along the Endeavour Segment. Active venting is currently located within five discreet vent fields, with minor diffuse venting occurring between the fields. However, inactive and/or extinct sulfide structures are found throughout the entire axial valley of the ridge segment, suggesting that hydrothermal activity has been more vigorous in the past or focused venting has migrated with time. Here, we present age constraints from U-series dating of 44 sulfide samples collected by manned submersible from between the Mothra Field in the south to Sasquatch in the north. Samples are dated using 226Ra/Ba ratios from hydrothermal barite that precipitates along with the sulfide minerals. Most samples have been collected from within or near the active vent fields. Fifteen samples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) show a spectrum of ages from present to 2,430 years old, indicating that this field has been continuously active for at least ~2,400 years. MEF appears to be oldest currently active field. This minimum value for the age of hydrothermal activity also provides a minimum age of the axial valley itself. Ages from thirteen samples from the High-Rise Field indicate continuous venting for at least the past ~1,250 years. These age data are used in conjunction with age constraints of the volcanic flows to develop an integrated volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment. The total volume of hydrothermal sulfide within the axial valley, determined from high-resolution bathymetry, is used in conjunction with the age constraints of the sulfide material to determine the mass accumulation rates of sulfide along the Endeavour Segment. These data can be used to calibrate the efficiency of sulfide deposition from the hydrothermal vents, and provide a time-integrated history of heat, fluid and chemical fluxes at the ridge-segment scale. The comparison of time-integrated rates with

  15. Basalts dredged from the Amirante ridge, western Indian ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, R.L.; Engel, C.G.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1968-01-01

    Oceanic tholeiitic basalts were dredged from 2500 to 3000 m depth on each flank of the Amirante Ridge, 1200 km southeast of Somalia in the western Indian Ocean, by R.V. Argo in 1964. One sample, probably shed from a flow or dike in basement beneath the coralline cap, gave a wholerock KAr age of 82??16??106 years. The age is similar to those reported by others for agglomerate from Providence Reef, nearer Madagascar, and for gabbro from Chain Ridge, the southwest member of Owen Fracture Zone, nearer the Somali coast. The Amirante Cretaceous-Early Tertiary occurrence lies between the "continental" 650 ?? 106 years granites of Seychelles Archipelago and the large Precambrian "continental" block of Madagascar. Trends of major structures and distribution of the related topographic and magnetic-anomaly lineations in 7-8 ?? 106 km2of the surrounding Indian Ocean suggest that in addition to spreading of the seafloor from the seismically-active Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge-Carlsberg Ridge complex there has been, since mid-Mesozoic time, distributed left-lateral shear along 52??-54??E that has moved Madagascar at least 700 km south relative to Seychelles Bank. Measurements by other indicate the absolute movement of Madagascar has been southward as well. The emplacement of oceanic tholeiitic basalts at shallow depth, the development of volcanic topography between the sedimented Somali and Mascarene basins, and the existence of the faulted Amirante Trench and Ridge are consequences of the displacement. ?? 1968.

  16. Ignition's glow: Ultra-fast spread of global cortical activity accompanying local "ignitions" in visual cortex during conscious visual perception.

    PubMed

    Noy, N; Bickel, S; Zion-Golumbic, E; Harel, M; Golan, T; Davidesco, I; Schevon, C A; McKhann, G M; Goodman, R R; Schroeder, C E; Mehta, A D; Malach, R

    2015-09-01

    Despite extensive research, the spatiotemporal span of neuronal activations associated with the emergence of a conscious percept is still debated. The debate can be formulated in the context of local vs. global models, emphasizing local activity in visual cortex vs. a global fronto-parietal "workspace" as the key mechanisms of conscious visual perception. These alternative models lead to differential predictions with regard to the precise magnitude, timing and anatomical spread of neuronal activity during conscious perception. Here we aimed to test a specific aspect of these predictions in which local and global models appear to differ - namely the extent to which fronto-parietal regions modulate their activity during task performance under similar perceptual states. So far the main experimental results relevant to this debate have been obtained from non-invasive methods and led to conflicting interpretations. Here we examined these alternative predictions through large-scale intracranial measurements (Electrocorticogram - ECoG) in 43 patients and 4445 recording sites. Both ERP and broadband high frequency (50-150 Hz - BHF) responses were examined through the entire cortex during a simple 1-back visual recognition memory task. Our results reveal short latency intense visual responses, localized first in early visual cortex followed (at ∼200 ms) by higher order visual areas, but failed to show significant delayed (300 ms) visual activations. By contrast, oddball image repeat events, linked to overt motor responses, were associated with a significant increase in a delayed (300 ms) peak of BHF power in fronto-parietal cortex. Comparing BHF responses with ERP revealed an additional peak in the ERP response - having a similar latency to the well-studied P3 scalp EEG response. Posterior and temporal regions demonstrated robust visual category selectivity. An unexpected observation was that high-order visual cortex responses were essentially concurrent (at ∼200 ms

  17. Numerical modelling of Non Transform Discontinuity geometries: Implications for ridge structure, volcano-tectonic fabric development and hydrothermal activity at segment ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, S.; Bull, J.; Parson, L.; Tuckwell, G.

    2005-12-01

    Non Transform Discontinuities (NTDs) are a fundamental component of ocean ridge structure and geometry partitioning spreading centres into spatially and temporally independent segments. We use finite difference numerical models to understand the stress distributions associated with a range of NTD geometries. We also apply the models to rotations of volcano-tectonic fabrics observed within NTDs along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) from high resolution sidescan and bathymetry data. The CIR is an intermediate spreading ridge and within our study area between 18S and 21S, eight NTDs are identified, three of which are used for this study. The modelling results show a dominant component of along-axis offset for the stress field rotations. Model correlation and co-location with the CIR NTDs highlights important differences between the interpreted segment tips and the tips predicted by the mechanical models. We propose that segments interpreted from morphological and volcano-tectonic observations may overlook fundamental components of segment structure. The results indicate that morphologically defined segments are composed of an effective segment behaving at the scale of this study as cracks opening under a tensile stress in an elastic medium and a damage zone behaving inelastically between the effective segment tip and the NTD. The damage zone is broadly analogous to the process zone described in fracture mechanics. The damage zone if well developed is associated with crustal softening through significant tectonism in a region of high magnitude stresses ahead of the segment tip. One significant property of the damage zone is an increase in the permeability of the crust. We therefore propose that the damage zone coupled with a suitable heat supply from serpentinisation or along-axis transport of heat may be a favourable site for the development of hydrothermal systems

  18. A seismic anisotropy study of the Dragon Flag hydrothermal field (49°39'E ) on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhao, M.; Tong, V. C. H.; Qiu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Dragon Flag hydrothermal field located at 49°39'E on the Southwest Indian Ridge contains the active hydrothermal vents firstly discovered on the ultraslow spreading ridge (Tao et al, 2012). Anisotropic study in this area will provide important information tectonic activities. 65634 traveltime residuals from the three-dimensional isotropic inversion (Zhao et al., 2013), were divided into three groups, which correspond to quasi ocean crustal Layer 2 (qL2), quasi ocean crustal Layer 3 (qL3) and quasi uppermost mantle (qUM), respectively. Traveltime residuals at different depths show that there are obvious cosine relationships between traveltime residuals and azimuth of qL2, qL3 and qUM, indicating anisotropy existed in both crust and mantle beneath Dragon Flag hydrothermal field. The best fitted cosine curves indicate that the fast directions (negative traveltime residuals) corresponding to the general trend of ridge axis of N104°E. According to these results, we propose that there may be prevalent cracks penetrating into lower crust or even uppermost mantle. We argue that the hydrothermal convection of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field not only occurs perpendicular to ridge axis, but also occurs parallel to ridge axis. We reveal for the first time anisotropic characteristics of the ultraslow spreading ridge, which has profound scientific significance for the future research on global ocean lithospheric anisotropy. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 41176053, 91428204). Keywords: ultraslow spreading ridge, Southwest Indian Ridge, Dragon Flag hydrothermal field, P wave traveltime residuals, anisotropy References: Tao C H, Lin J, Guo S, et al. First active hydrothermal vents on an ultraslow-spreading center: Southwest Indian Ridge. Geology, 2012, 40(1): 47~50. Zhao M H, Qiu X L, Li J B, et al. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon Flag oceanic core complex at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (49°39

  19. Microearthquakes at the active Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal mound, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°08'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontbriand, C.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    A small 200 m aperture network of five ocean bottom seismometers around the periphery the active TAG hydrothermal mound on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (26°08’N) detected microearthquake events that may be associated with the subsurface hydraulics of the massive hydrothermal deposit. Seismic data were sampled at 100 Hz for a period of eight months spanning June, 2003 to February, 2004, during which time 24,191 locatable events were detected. Microearthquake hypocenters are concentrated within a 300 m radius of the sulfide mound in the top 250 m of crust, and exhibit a conical shape with the deepest events beneath the mound center. Event rates are steady at 180 events per day at the beginning of the study period and decline slightly to 116 events per day after whale calls elevate background noise levels about 2/3 of the way through the deployment. The mean local magnitude of events is -1.2 with a range of -2.9≦ML≦0.3. We suggest that events may be largely due to hydraulic fracturing of clogged flow conduits in the mineral deposit, which provides the possibility of using the microearthquake data to constrain subsurface flow parameters and the permeability structure of the active TAG deposit. Figure: A bathymetric map of the TAG area depicts a small aperture network of 5 ocean bottom seismometers (white triangles) around the periphery of the active TAG hydrothermal mound. High resolution bathymetry is from Roman and Singh, 2005.

  20. Mid-ocean ridge jumps associated with hotspot magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; Ito, Garrett; Behn, Mark D.

    2008-02-01

    Hotspot-ridge interaction produces a wide range of phenomena including excess crustal thickness, geochemical anomalies, off-axis volcanic ridges and ridge relocations or jumps. Ridges are recorded to have jumped toward many hotspots including, Iceland, Discovery, Galápagos, Kerguelen and Tristan de Cuhna. The causes of ridge jumps likely involve a number of interacting processes related to hotspots. One such process is reheating of the lithosphere as magma penetrates it to feed near-axis volcanism. We study this effect by using the hybrid, finite-element code, FLAC, to simulate two-dimensional (2-D, cross-section) viscous mantle flow, elasto-plastic deformation of the lithosphere and heat transport in a ridge setting near an off-axis hotspot. Heating due to magma transport through the lithosphere is implemented within a hotspot region of fixed width. To determine the conditions necessary to initiate a ridge jump, we vary four parameters: hotspot magmatic heating rate, spreading rate, seafloor age at the location of the hotspot and ridge migration rate. Our results indicate that the hotspot magmatic heating rate required to initiate a ridge jump increases non-linearly with increasing spreading rate and seafloor age. Models predict that magmatic heating, itself, is most likely to cause jumps at slow spreading rates such as at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge on Iceland. In contrast, despite the higher magma flux at the Galápagos hotspot, magmatic heating alone is probably insufficient to induce a ridge jump at the present-day due to the intermediate ridge spreading rate of the Galápagos Spreading Center. The time required to achieve a ridge jump, for fixed or migrating ridges, is found to be on the order of 10 5-10 6 years. Simulations that incorporate ridge migration predict that after a ridge jump occurs the hotspot and ridge migrate together for time periods that increase with magma flux. Model results also suggest a mechanism for ridge reorganizations not related to

  1. Magnetic Anomalies over the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pitman, W C; Heirtzler, J R

    1966-12-01

    Four magnetic profiles across the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge reveal magnetic anomalies that show trends parallel with the ridge axis and symmetry about the ridge axis. The distribution of bodies that could cause these anomalies supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the generation of patterns of magnetic anomalies associated with the midocean ridge system. The geometry of the bodies accords with the known reversals of the geomagnetic field during the last 3.4 million years, indicating a spreading rate of the ocean floor of 4.5 centimeters per year. If one assume that the spreading rate within 500 kilometers of the ridge axis has been constant, reversals of the geomagnetic field during the last 10.0 million years can be determined. This new, detailed history of field reversals accords with observed anomalies over Reykjanes Ridge in the North Atlantic if a spreading rate of 1 centimeter per year is assumed there.

  2. Discovery of a magma chamber and faults beneath a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish C; Crawford, Wayne C; Carton, Hélène; Seher, Tim; Combier, Violaine; Cannat, Mathilde; Pablo Canales, Juan; Düsünür, Doga; Escartin, Javier; Miranda, J Miguel

    2006-08-31

    Crust at slow-spreading ridges is formed by a combination of magmatic and tectonic processes, with magmatic accretion possibly involving short-lived crustal magma chambers. The reflections of seismic waves from crustal magma chambers have been observed beneath intermediate and fast-spreading centres, but it has been difficult to image such magma chambers beneath slow-spreading centres, owing to rough seafloor topography and associated seafloor scattering. In the absence of any images of magma chambers or of subsurface near-axis faults, it has been difficult to characterize the interplay of magmatic and tectonic processes in crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges. Here we report the presence of a crustal magma chamber beneath the slow-spreading Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The reflection from the top of the magma chamber, centred beneath the Lucky Strike volcano and hydrothermal field, is approximately 3 km beneath the sea floor, 3-4 km wide and extends up to 7 km along-axis. We suggest that this magma chamber provides the heat for the active hydrothermal vent field above it. We also observe axial valley bounding faults that seem to penetrate down to the magma chamber depth as well as a set of inward-dipping faults cutting through the volcanic edifice, suggesting continuous interactions between tectonic and magmatic processes.

  3. Discovery of a magma chamber and faults beneath a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish C; Crawford, Wayne C; Carton, Hélène; Seher, Tim; Combier, Violaine; Cannat, Mathilde; Pablo Canales, Juan; Düsünür, Doga; Escartin, Javier; Miranda, J Miguel

    2006-08-31

    Crust at slow-spreading ridges is formed by a combination of magmatic and tectonic processes, with magmatic accretion possibly involving short-lived crustal magma chambers. The reflections of seismic waves from crustal magma chambers have been observed beneath intermediate and fast-spreading centres, but it has been difficult to image such magma chambers beneath slow-spreading centres, owing to rough seafloor topography and associated seafloor scattering. In the absence of any images of magma chambers or of subsurface near-axis faults, it has been difficult to characterize the interplay of magmatic and tectonic processes in crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges. Here we report the presence of a crustal magma chamber beneath the slow-spreading Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The reflection from the top of the magma chamber, centred beneath the Lucky Strike volcano and hydrothermal field, is approximately 3 km beneath the sea floor, 3-4 km wide and extends up to 7 km along-axis. We suggest that this magma chamber provides the heat for the active hydrothermal vent field above it. We also observe axial valley bounding faults that seem to penetrate down to the magma chamber depth as well as a set of inward-dipping faults cutting through the volcanic edifice, suggesting continuous interactions between tectonic and magmatic processes. PMID:16943836

  4. Crustal manifestations of a hot transient pulse at 60°N beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, R. E.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.; Henstock, T. J.; Murton, B. J.; Jones, S. M.

    2013-02-01

    Since its inception at 62 Ma, mantle convective upwelling beneath Iceland has had a significant influence on Cenozoic vertical motions, magmatism and paleoceanography in the North Atlantic Ocean. Crucially, intersection of the Reykjanes Ridge with the Icelandic Plume provides us with a useful window into the transient activity of this plume. Here, the spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler of plume activity, which is recorded as a series of time-transgressive V-shaped ridges and troughs. We present the results of a detailed study of the spreading ridge close to 60°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge of thickened oceanic crust is forming today. A combination of multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles, acquired along and across the ridge axis, is used to map the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. Along the ridge axis, the density of volcanic seamounts varies markedly, increasing by a factor of two between 59°N and 62°N. Within this zone, seismic imaging shows that there is enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed. These observations are accompanied by a decrease in mean fault length from ∼12 km to ∼6 km. A 1960-2009 catalog of relocated teleseismic earthquake hypocenters indicates that there is a pronounced gap in seismicity between 59°N and 62°N where the cumulative moment release is two orders of magnitude smaller than that along adjacent ridge segments. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased melt generation and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for this suite of observations. The predicted decrease in the thickness of the brittle seismogenic layer is consistent with geochemical modeling of dredged basaltic samples, which require hotter asthenospheric material beneath the spreading axis. Thus, along-axis variation in melt supply caused by passage of a pulse of hot material modulates crustal accretion processes and rheological properties.

  5. FY 1994 annual summary report of the surveillance and maintenance activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) Program was initiated to manage former waste management and environmental research sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals. The S and M Program is responsible for managing designated sites/facilities from the end of their operating lives until final disposition or site stabilization. To effectively manage and perform the various S and M Program responsibilities, five summary-level work breakdown structure (WBS) elements have been established: S and M Preliminary Investigations, Special Projects, Routine S and M, Inactive Groundwater Wells, and Project Management. Routine S and M activities were conducted as scheduled throughout fiscal years (FY) 1994 at applicable inactive waste management (WM) and other contaminated areas. Overall, the ER S and M Program maintains 47 facilities, performs vegetation maintenance on approximately 230 acres, maintains 54 inactive tanks, and provides overall site management on over 700 acres. In addition to the routine S and M activities, detailed site inspections were conducted at established frequencies on appropriate sites in the ER S and M Program. This document provides a summary of the FY 1994 ORNL ER S and M Program accomplishments.

  6. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  7. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Possible link to blood–brain barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Maren K. L.; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S.; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I.; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood–brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood

  8. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb Apical Ectodermal Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H.; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A.; Pierro, Louis J.; Upholt, William B.; Dealy, Caroline N.

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the Zone of Polarizing Activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or AER, but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb AP, PD and DV patterning. PMID:21465622

  9. Hydrothermal circulation at the Cleft-Vance overlapping spreading center: Results of a magnetometric resistivity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, R.L.; Webb, S.C.; Jegen, M.; Sananikone, K.

    1998-01-01

    We report on a magnetometric resistivity sounding carried out in the overlapping spreading center between the Cleft and Vance segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The data collected reveal a strong three dimensionality in the crustal electrical resistivity structure on wavelengths of a few kilometers. Areas of reduced crustal electrical resistivities, with values approaching that of seawater, are seen beneath the neovolcanic zones of both active spreading centers. We interpret these reduced resistivities as evidence of active hydrothermal circulation within the uppermost 1 km of hot, young oceanic crust.

  10. Surveillance and maintenance activities of waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1991-12-01

    Surveillance and maintenance (S M) of 75 sites were conductd by the Remedial Action Section for the Environmental Restoration Program for surplus facilities and sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals. S M activities on these sites were conducted from the end of their operating life until final facility disposal or site stabilization. The objectives of the Waste Area Grouping S M Program are met by maintaining a program of routine S M as well as by implementing interim corrective maintenance when deemed necessary as a result of site surveillance. This report briefly presents this program's activities and includes tables indicating tank levels and dry well data for FY 1991.

  11. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part C, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 5: A summary of information concerning historical locations and activities of populations potentially affected by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    DaMassa, C.L.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    A significant number of information sources have been identified that are relevant to historical locations and activities of populations potentially affected by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information that has been reviewed as part of this Task 5 investigation has shown that numerous residences and farms have historically been present near the ORR boundary and that a variety of land uses and recreational activities have been practiced. Based on this information alone, it would appear that many routes of off-site exposure could have been plausible. Most of the available published information addresses demographic and land use data on a regional or county-wide basis over fairly broad time periods. The information sources that are most readily available do not support direct evaluation of potential exposure pathways at specific geographic locations near the Oak Ridge facilities at specific points in time. A number of information sources have been identified that can provide demography and land use information more specific to locations and time periods that are identified to be of interest. Examples of data sources in this category include individual USGS topographic maps, aerial photographs, lowest-level census tract data, and interviews with long-time local residents. However, specific release events and periods of interest should be identified prior to attempts to collect more specific demographic or land use information for actual dose reconstruction.

  12. Seismicity at interactions of spreading centers and transform faults

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlett, H.

    1981-05-10

    Ocean-bottom seismographs were used in a microearthquake monitoring experiment at the eastern junction of the Oceanographer transform with the mid-Atlantic ridge at 35 /sup 0/N. Microearthquake activity at the junction occurred over a broad area (>7 km). These microearthquakes 'cut across' the corner between the transform and median valley and are associated with fault scarps that form the inner walls on the west and north sides of the median and transform valleys. At intersections of other major fracture zones (>100-km offset) and slow to moderate spreading centers microearthquake activity is also diffuse and cuts across the corner between the spreading center and transform fault. The narrow zone of decoupling (approx.1 km) observed between spreading center and transform boundaries by detailed geological studies at the Tamayo/East Pacific Rise and Vema/mid-Atlantic Ridge interactions suggest that the diffuse seismicity (20 to 30 km in width) does not reflect a diffuse plate boundary at the transition from rift to transform valley. Instead, the faulting probably reflects internal deformation of the corner by secondary faults off of the plate boundary.

  13. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  14. Regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province, eastern Tennessee: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    A data collection form was developed for use in compiling information in the inventory. Information sources included files on subsidence, state and county highway departments, county agents and executives, soil conservation service representative, etc. Data obtained included location, date of occurrence, number of subsidence features at the reported site, size, topographic setting, geologic setting, and probable causative factors. The regional inventory obtained information on over 300 historic subsidence events at more than 200 sites in East Tennessee. Areas having the greatest areal density of active subsidence include Hamblen, Jefferson, and Loudon Counties. Reported subsidence events occurred between 1945 and 1986. The Knox Group dolomites account for about two-thirds of all reported sinkholes in the inventory. Most of the karst activity occurs in valleys or flat areas. In cases where causative factors could be established, the combination of surface water drainage alteration or impoundment combined with soil disturbance associated with construction activity were most often precursors to subsidence. 54 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. RLIP76 regulates Arf6-dependent cell spreading and migration by linking ARNO with activated R-Ras at recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Lee, Seunghyung; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay; Ginsberg, Mark H; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2015-11-27

    R-Ras small GTPase enhances cell spreading and motility via RalBP1/RLIP76, an R-Ras effector that links GTP-R-Ras to activation of Arf6 and Rac1 GTPases. Here, we report that RLIP76 performs these functions by binding cytohesin-2/ARNO, an Arf GTPase guanine exchange factor, and connecting it to R-Ras at recycling endosomes. RLIP76 formed a complex with R-Ras and ARNO by binding ARNO via its N-terminus (residues 1-180) and R-Ras via residues 180-192. This complex was present in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes and the presence of ARNO in recycling endosomes required RLIP76, and was not supported by RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192). Spreading and migration required RLIP76(1-180), and RLIP76(Δ1-180) blocked ARNO recruitment to recycling endosomes, and spreading. Arf6 activation with an ArfGAP inhibitor overcame the spreading defects in RLIP76-depleted cells or cells expressing RLIP76(Δ1-180). Similarly, RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192) suppressed Arf6 activation. Together these results demonstrate that RLIP76 acts as a scaffold at recycling endosomes by binding activated R-Ras, recruiting ARNO to activate Arf6, thereby contributing to cell spreading and migration.

  16. Central role of detachment faults in accretion of slow-spreading oceanic lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Escartín, J; Smith, D K; Cann, J; Schouten, H; Langmuir, C H; Escrig, S

    2008-10-01

    The formation of oceanic detachment faults is well established from inactive, corrugated fault planes exposed on sea floor formed along ridges spreading at less than 80 km Myr(-1) (refs 1-4). These faults can accommodate extension for up to 1-3 Myr (ref. 5), and are associated with one of the two contrasting modes of accretion operating along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The first mode is asymmetrical accretion involving an active detachment fault along one ridge flank. The second mode is the well-known symmetrical accretion, dominated by magmatic processes with subsidiary high-angle faulting and the formation of abyssal hills on both flanks. Here we present an examination of approximately 2,500 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 12.5 and 35 degrees N, which reveals asymmetrical accretion along almost half of the ridge. Hydrothermal activity identified so far in the study region is closely associated with asymmetrical accretion, which also shows high levels of near-continuous hydroacoustically and teleseismically recorded seismicity. Increased seismicity is probably generated along detachment faults that accommodate a sizeable proportion of the total plate separation. In contrast, symmetrical segments have lower levels of seismicity, which occurs primarily at segment ends. Basalts erupted along asymmetrical segments have compositions that are consistent with crystallization at higher pressures than basalts from symmetrical segments, and with lower extents of partial melting of the mantle. Both seismic evidence and geochemical evidence indicate that the axial lithosphere is thicker and colder at asymmetrical sections of the ridge, either because associated hydrothermal circulation efficiently penetrates to greater depths or because the rising mantle is cooler. We suggest that much of the variability in sea-floor morphology, seismicity and basalt chemistry found along slow-spreading ridges can be thus attributed to the frequent involvement of detachment faults

  17. High resolution bathymetric and sonar images of a ridge southeast of Terceira Island (Azores plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, N.; Miranda, J. M.; Luis, J.; Silva, I.; Goslin, J.; Ligi, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Terceira rift is a oblique ultra-slow spreading system where a transtensive regime results from differential movement between Eurasian and African plates. So far no classical ridge segmentation pattern has here been observed. The predominant morphological features are fault controlled rhombic shaped basins and volcanism related morphologies like circular seamounts and volcanic ridges. We present SIMRAD EM300 (bathymetry + backscatter) images acquired over one of these ridges located SE of Terceira Island, during the SIRENA cruise (PI J. Goslin), which complements previous TOBI mosaics performed over the same area during the AZZORRE99 cruise (PI M. Ligi). The ridge presents a NW-SE orientation, it is seismically active (a seismic crisis was documented in 1997) and corresponds to the southern branch of a V shape bathymetric feature enclosing the Terceira Island and which tip is located west of the Island near the 1998 Serreta ridge eruption site. NE of the ridge, the core of the V, corresponds to the North Hirondelle basin. All this area corresponds mainly to Brunhes magnetic epoch. The new bathymetry maps reveal a partition between tectonic processes, centred in the ridge, and volcanism present at the bottom of the North Hirondelle basin. The ridge high backscatter surface is cut by a set of sub-parallel anastomosed normal faults striking between N130º and N150º. Some faults present horse-tail terminations. Fault splays sometimes link to neighbour faults defining extensional duplexes and fault wedge basins and highs of rhombic shape. The faulting geometry suggests that a left-lateral strike slip component should be present. The top of the ridge consists on an arched demi-.horst, and it is probably a volcanic structure remnant (caldera system?), existing prior to onset of the tectonic stage in the ridge. Both ridge flanks display gullies and mass wasting fans at the base of the slope. The ridge vicinities are almost exclusively composed of a grayish homogeneous

  18. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Ridge Subduction Beneath the Americas: Synthesis and New Research on Anomalous Tectonism and Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorkelson, D. J.; Madsen, J. K.; Breitsprecher, K.; Groome, W. G.; Sluggett, C.

    2006-12-01

    The west coast of the Americas has been repeatedly affected by ridge-trench interactions from Mesozoic to Recent time. Beneath North America, subduction of the Kula-Farallon, Kula-Resurrection and Farallon- Resurrection spreading ridges resulted in anomalous and time-transgressive forearc to backarc magmatism and related tectonism from the Late Cretaceous to the Eocene. Following consumption and redistribution of the Kula and Resurrection plates, the Neogene Farallon-Pacific ridge system intersected the North American trench in two locations - western Canada and northwestern Mexico / southwestern United States - causing pronounced magmatic and tectonic effects that continue to the present. Beneath Central America, divergent subduction of the Nazca and Cocos plates led to development of a slab window, with a present location beneath Panama and a probable pre-Pliocene position beneath Columbia or Ecuador. Patagonia has been the site of localized ridge subduction from the Eocene to the Recent, with the Phoenix-Farallon ridge subducting from the Eocene to the early Miocene, and the Nazca-Antarctic ridge from the Miocene to the present. Antarctica experienced diverging Antarctic-Phoenix plate subduction from the Eocene to the Pliocene. In all cases, normal arc magmatism was interrupted or eliminated by anomalous igneous activity ranging in signature from adakitic to intraplate. Our current research involves geochemical, tectonic, and thermal modeling of slab window environments. A new geochemical analysis on the effects of Miocene to Recent subduction of the northern segment of the Farallon (Juan de Fuca)-Pacific ridge is underway. A symmetrical arc-intraplate-arc geochemical pattern is evident in a transect from the northern Cascade Arc, through the volcanic fields of British Columbia, Yukon and eastern Alaska, and into the Aleutian Arc. This pattern can be explained by Neogene displacement of the arc-metasomatized mantle wedge caused by upwelling oceanic

  20. How many vent fields? New estimates of vent field populations on ocean ridges from precise mapping of hydrothermal discharge locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Resing, Joseph A.; Haymon, Rachel M.; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lavelle, J. William; Martinez, Fernando; Ferrini, Vicki; Walker, Sharon L.; Nakamura, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Decades of exploration for venting sites along spreading ridge crests have produced global datasets that yield estimated mean site spacings of ∼ 12- 220 km. This conclusion demands that sites where hydrothermal fluid leaks from the seafloor are improbably rare along the 66 000 km global ridge system, despite the high bulk permeability of ridge crest axes. However, to date, exploration methods have neither reliably detected plumes from isolated low-temperature, particle-poor, diffuse sources, nor differentiated individual, closely spaced (clustered within a few kilometers) sites of any kind. Here we describe a much lower mean discharge spacing of 3-20 km, revealed by towing real-time oxidation-reduction-potential and optical sensors continuously along four fast- and intermediate-rate (>55 mm/yr) spreading ridge sections totaling 1470 km length. This closer spacing reflects both discovery of isolated sites discharging particle-poor plumes (25% of all sites) and improved discrimination (at a spatial resolution of ∼1 km) among clustered discrete and diffuse sources. Consequently, the number of active vent sites on fast- and intermediate-rate spreading ridges may be at least a factor of 3-6 higher than now presumed. This increase provides new quantitative constraints for models of seafloor processes such as dispersal of fauna among seafloor and crustal chemosynthetic habitats, biogeochemical impacts of diffuse venting, and spatial patterns of hydrothermal discharge.

  1. How many vent fields? New estimates of vent field populations on ocean ridges from precise mapping of hydrothermal discharge locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Resing, Joseph A.; Haymon, Rachel M.; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lavelle, J. William; Martinez, Fernando; Ferrini, Vicki; Walker, Sharon L.; Nakamura, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Decades of exploration for venting sites along spreading ridge crests have produced global datasets that yield estimated mean site spacings of ∼ 12- 220 km. This conclusion demands that sites where hydrothermal fluid leaks from the seafloor are improbably rare along the 66 000 km global ridge system, despite the high bulk permeability of ridge crest axes. However, to date, exploration methods have neither reliably detected plumes from isolated low-temperature, particle-poor, diffuse sources, nor differentiated individual, closely spaced (clustered within a few kilometers) sites of any kind. Here we describe a much lower mean discharge spacing of 3-20 km, revealed by towing real-time oxidation-reduction-potential and optical sensors continuously along four fast- and intermediate-rate (>55 mm/yr) spreading ridge sections totaling 1470 km length. This closer spacing reflects both discovery of isolated sites discharging particle-poor plumes (25% of all sites) and improved discrimination (at a spatial resolution of ∼1 km) among clustered discrete and diffuse sources. Consequently, the number of active vent sites on fast- and intermediate-rate spreading ridges may be at least a factor of 3-6 higher than now presumed. This increase provides new quantitative constraints for models of seafloor processes such as dispersal of fauna among seafloor and crustal chemosynthetic habitats, biogeochemical impacts of diffuse venting, and spatial patterns of hydrothermal discharge.

  2. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments is perpendicular to nearby transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. To estimate non-orthogonality, we compare ridge-segment strikes with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMets et al., 2010]. The advantages of this approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs where seafloor spreading is the fastest on the planet. If a plume lies near the ridge segment, we assume it contributes to magma overpressure along the ridge segment [Abelson & Agnon, 1997]. We further assume that the contribution to magma overpressure is proportional to the buoyancy flux of the plume [Sleep, 1990] and inversely proportional to the distance between the mid-ocean ridge segment and a given plume. We find that the non-orthogonal angle tends to decrease with increasing spreading rate and with increasing distance between ridge segment and plume.

  3. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory LLLW active tanks. Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.G.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    This document provides a detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for leak testing many of the tanks that comprise the active portion of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and two other agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

  4. The influence of ridge migration on the magmatic segmentation of mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Carbotte, S M; Small, C; Donnelly, K

    2004-06-17

    The Earth's mid-ocean ridges display systematic changes in depth and shape, which subdivide the ridges into discrete spreading segments bounded by transform faults and smaller non-transform offsets of the axis. These morphological changes have been attributed to spatial variations in the supply of magma from the mantle, although the origin of the variations is poorly understood. Here we show that magmatic segmentation of ridges with fast and intermediate spreading rates is directly related to the migration velocity of the spreading axis over the mantle. For over 9,500 km of mid-ocean ridge examined, leading ridge segments in the 'hotspot' reference frame coincide with the shallow magmatically robust segments across 86 per cent of all transform faults and 73 per cent of all second-order discontinuities. We attribute this relationship to asymmetric mantle upwelling and melt production due to ridge migration, with focusing of melt towards ridge segments across discontinuities. The model is consistent with variations in crustal structure across discontinuities of the East Pacific Rise, and may explain variations in depth of melting and the distribution of enriched lavas.

  5. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Field activities and well summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Four hydrofracture sites at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were used for development, demonstration, and disposal from 1959 to 1984. More than 10 million gal of waste grout mix was disposed of via hydrofracture. Various types of wells were installed to monitor the hydrofracture operations. The primary goal of this remedial investigation was to gather information about the wells in order to recommend the type and best method of final disposition for the wells. Evaluations were performed to determine the integrity of well castings, confirm construction details for each well, evaluate the extent of contamination, assist in planning for future activities, and determine the suitability of the wells for future temporary site monitoring.

  6. Learning experiences at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) of DOE has organized an Environmental Restoration Program to handle environmental cleanup activitis for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) following General Watkins' reorganization at DOE Headquarters. Based on the major facilities and locations of contamination sites, the Environmental Restoration Program is divided into five subprograms: Oak Ridge, National Laboatory (ORNL) sites, y-12 Plant sites, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) sites, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) sites and off-site areas. The Office of Risk Analysis at ORNL was established under the auspices of the Environmental Restoration Program to implement Superfun legislation in the five subprograms of DOE-ORO. Risk assessment must examine protetial human health and ecological impacts from contaminant sources that range from highly radioactive materials to toxic chemicals and mixed wastes. The remedial alternatives we are evaluating need to reach acceptable levels of risk effectively while also being cost-efficient. The purpose of this paper is to highlight areas of particular interest and concern at Oak Ridge and to discuss, where possible, solutions implemented by the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoation Program.

  7. Criticality emergency planning at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.H.; Cain, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to protect personnel and control the spread of contamination in the event of a radiation accident at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is outlined. Procedures and personnel are presented. (ACK)

  8. Active normal fault network of the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea) imaged by multibeam bathymetry and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Claudio; Marchese, Fabio; Savini, Alessandra; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian margin - Mediterranean Sea) is formed by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a NNW-SSE penetrative normal fault system and is part of the present foreland system of both the Apennine to the west and the Hellenic arc to the east. The geometry, age, architecture and kinematics of the fault network were investigated integrating data of heterogeneous sources, provided by previous studies: regional scale 2D seismics and three wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, very high resolution seismic (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multi-beam echosounder bathymetry and results from sedimentological and geo-chronological analysis of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Multibeam bathymetric data allowed in particular assessing the 3D continuity of structures imaged in 2D seismics, thanks to the occurrence of continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides), revealing the vertical extent and finite displacement associated to fault scarps. A penetrative network of relatively small faults, always showing a high dip angle, composes the NNW-SSE normal fault system, resulting in frequent relay zones, which are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. In addition, numerous fault scarps appear to be roughly coeval with quaternary submarine mass-wasting deposits colonised by Cold-Water Corals (CWC). Coral colonies, yielding ages between 11 and 14 kA, develop immediately on top of late Pleistocene mass-wasting deposits. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and landslides, indicating that, at least in places, these features may be coeval. We suppose that fault activity lasted at least as far as the Holocene-Pleistocene boundary and that the NNW-SSW normal fault network in the Apulian Plateau can be

  9. Solar activity linked variabilities in the Thermospheric meridional winds and their control on the occurrence of Equatorial Spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.; Jyoti, N.; Devasia, C.

    The thermospheric wind system, through interactions with the ionospheric layers control many of the electrodynamic processes of the equatorial ionosphere thermosphere system; the occurrence of equatorial Spread F (ESF) being a manifestation of one of these processes. One of the important aspects of a plausible linkage of Thermospheric meridional winds with the ESF has recently been identified as through the polarity of the winds just before the onset of ESF. The importance of winds of equatorward/poleward polarity would matter only in relation with the Fregion base height as to whether it is below or above a characteristic- critical height. It is found that there is a strong solar cycle modulation of the critical base height of the F-region by as much as +/-50km for the occurrence of ESF with the associated meridional winds also responding to the solar variabilities. The solar activity dependence of the meridional wind characteristics and the F-region critical height variations are discussed in detail in relation to their possible roles in the variations of ESF occurrence.

  10. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  11. Multilevel Methodology for Simulation of Spatio-Temporal Systems with Heterogeneous Activity; Application to Spread of Valley Fever Fungus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jammalamadaka, Rajanikanth

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a dissertation submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2008. Spatio-temporal systems with heterogeneity in their structure and behavior have two major problems associated with them. The first one is that such complex real world systems extend over very large spatial and temporal domains and consume so many computational resources to simulate that they are infeasible to study with current computational platforms. The second one is that the data available for understanding such systems is limited because they are spread over space and time making it hard to obtain micro and macro measurements. This also makes it difficult to get the data for validation of their constituent processes while simultaneously considering their global behavior. For example, the valley fever fungus considered in this dissertation is spread over a large spatial grid in the arid Southwest and typically needs to be simulated over several decades of time to obtain useful information. It is also hard to get the temperature and moisture data (which are two critical factors on which the survival of the valley fever fungus depends) at every grid point of the spatial domain over the region of study. In order to address the first problem, we develop a method based on the discrete event system specification which exploits the heterogeneity in the activity of the spatio-temporal system and which has been shown to be effective in solving relatively simple partial differential equation systems. The benefit of addressing the first problem is that it now makes it feasible to address the second problem. We address the second problem by making use of a multilevel methodology based on modeling and simulation and systems theory. This methodology helps us in the construction of models with different resolutions (base and

  12. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading, which is one of a handful of fundamental global tectonic processes. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments are perpendicular to transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with the non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. For our analysis, instead of comparing the strike of mid-ocean ridges with the strike of nearby transform faults, the azimuth of which can be uncertain, we compare with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMet, Gordon, and Argus 2010]. The advantages of our approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. Moreover, the strike may vary considerably within a single ridge segment bounded by transform faults. This is especially evident near overlapping spreading centers along with the strike varies rapidly with distance along a ridge segment. We use various bathymetric data sets to make our estimates including ETOPO1 [Amante and Eakins, 2009] and GeoMapApp [Ryan et al., 2009]. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, it appears that some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate significantly from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs

  13. Mantle anisotropy beneath the Earth's mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Andy; Kendall, J.-Michael; Wookey, James

    2012-02-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy at oceanic spreading centres offer insights into mid-ocean ridge processes and the formation of new plates. Here, remote observations of seismic anisotropy beneath mid-ocean ridges are made using measurements of source-side shear wave splitting. Over 100 high-quality measurements are made using earthquakes that occur near mid-ocean ridges and transform faults, but are observed at teleseismic distances. In general, for off-axis ridge events, the polarisation of fast shear waves, ϕ″, is approximately parallel to the spreading direction. Nearer the ridge (<~50 km), ϕ″ becomes more scattered and is often ridge-parallel. Delay times, δt, tend to increase from < 1 s near the ridge axis to ˜ 3 s further away. Slow-spreading regions (Gakkel and Southwest Indian Ridges) show smaller amounts of splitting than faster spreading centres. At transform zones, the pattern is more complex. Coverage beneath the East Pacific Rise is especially good, and we observe a systematic increase in delay times in S wave splitting measurements compared to previous SKS splitting observations made at ocean-bottom seismometers. One compatible explanation is the presence of horizontally-aligned, connected layers of melt at depth; this is also compatible with other observations of the 'LAB' discontinuity and surface-wave derived measurements of radial anisotropy.

  14. Melt Flux Around Iceland: The Kolbeinsey Ridge Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdóttir, B.; Hooft, E. E.

    2007-12-01

    Seafloor spreading within the Iceland region has been complex since the opening of the North Atlantic in late Paleocene-early Eocene. Whereas symmetric magnetic anomalies can be traced parallel to the Reykjanes Ridge and Mohns Ridge back to chrons 23-24, anomalies within the Iceland Plateau and Aegir Ridge in the Norwegian Sea, as well as along the Greenland-Iceland-Faeroe Ridge reflect plate-boundary irregularities associated with multiple-branched crustal accretion zones, rift jumps and plate boundary segmentation (volcanic systems). We observe large variations in crustal structure along two refraction/reflection/gravity profiles, a 700 km EW-profile straddling 66.5°N between the Aegir and Kolbeinsey Ridges and a 225 km NS-profile along the southern Kolbeinsey Ridge. These profiles enable us to quantify how melt flux at the N-Atlantic spreading center has been influenced by the Iceland hotspot from the initiation of spreading to present time. The westernmost 300 km of the EW profile lies across the Iceland shelf, considered to have formed by rifting at the Kolbeinsey Ridge whereas the easternmost 400 km lie across the Iceland Plateau and Norway Basin, a region formed by rifting at the Aegir Ridge and possibly containing slivers of older crust rifted off the east Greenland margin along with the Jan Mayen Ridge. Crustal thickness varies from 4-5 km across the Aegir Ridge, 12 km just east of the Iceland shelf, and 24-28 km beneath the outer shelf, to 12-13 km near the southern tip of the Kolbeinsey Ridge and 9-10 km further north along the ridge axis. Pronounced undulations in lower crustal structure across the Iceland Plateau are most likely associated with extinct spreading centers indicating that branched crustal accretion zones existed west of the Aegir Ridge prior to the westward ridge jump forming the KR at 26 Ma. Crustal thickness at the Kolbeinsey and Reykjanes Ridges support the asymmetry in plume-ridge interaction north and south of Iceland that has been

  15. Spread Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    In the multiverse the scale of supersymmetry breaking, widetilde{m} = {F_X}/{M_{ * }} ∗, may scan and environmental constraints on the dark matter density may exclude a large range of m from the reheating temperature after inflation down to values that yield a lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) mass of order a TeV. After selection effects, for example from the cosmological constant, the distribution for widetilde{m} in the region that gives a TeV LSP may prefer larger values. A single environmental constraint from dark matter can then lead to multi-component dark matter, including both axions and the LSP, giving a TeV-scale LSP somewhat lighter than the corresponding value for single-component LSP dark matter. If supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the Standard Model sector at order X † X and higher, only squarks, sleptons and one Higgs doublet acquire masses of order widetilde{m} . The gravitino mass is lighter by a factor of M ∗ /M Pl and the gaugino masses are suppressed by a further loop factor. This Spread Supersymmetry spectrum has two versions, one with Higgsino masses arising from supergravity effects of order the gravitino mass giving a wino LSP, and another with the Higgsino masses generated radiatively from gaugino masses giving a Higgsino LSP. The environmental restriction on dark matter fixes the LSP mass to the TeV domain, so that the squark and slepton masses are order 103 TeV and 106 TeV in these two schemes. We study the spectrum, dark matter and collider signals of these two versions of Spread Supersymmetry. The Higgs boson is Standard Model-like and predicted to lie in the range 110-145 GeV; monochromatic photons in cosmic rays arise from dark matter annihilations in the halo; exotic short charged tracks occur at the LHC, at least for the wino LSP; and there are the eventual possibilities of direct detection of dark matter and detailed exploration of the TeV-scale states at a future linear collider. Gauge coupling unification is at

  16. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  17. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  18. The "pressures" of being a ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeman, K.; Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger project aimed at understanding the magma plumbing systems and magmatic processes responsible for crust formation at divergent plate margins, we have begun a study of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), an intermediate spreading ridge off the west coast of South America and connected to the East Pacific Rise. This ridge is of interest because it passes close to the Galapagos Islands, allowing the effects of a mantle plume on sub-ridge processes and magma plumbing systems to be examined. In addition, the effects of ridge-ridge intersection, ridge propagation, and ridge offsets by transform faults on magma evolution can be examined. Published compositional data for glasses collected along the ridge were used to calculate pressures of partial crystallization and to examine variations in magma chemistry along the ridge. To aid interpretation of the results, the ridge was divided into 12 segments based on sample distribution and the occurrence of ridge offsets. Calculated pressures for most segments range from 100 and 300 MPa, and indicate depths of partial crystallization of ~3-9 km. This suggests that accretion occurs mostly near the base of the crust. However, the range of pressures for some segments is relatively large with maximum calculated values of 500-750 MPa. For example, near the major transform fault at ~85OW, the calculated maximum pressure is 741 MPa and the average pressure is ~ 300 MPa. We consider it unlikely that the calculated high pressures represent the true pressure of partial crystallization, and suggest that the compositions of some magmas result from processes other than simple crystallization. Correlations between Pressure and MgO, between Na2O and MgO, P2O5 and K2O, and between Na8 and longitude suggest that the processes operating beneath this ridge are complex. Near the transform fault for example, MgO vs Pressure shows a negative correlation with an R2 value of 0.546. Such trends are inconsistent with magma evolution

  19. How Leaky Are Seafloor Spreading Center Axes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Haymon, R. M.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.; Ferrini, V.

    2013-12-01

    Some 500 active vent sites, both focused and diffuse, have now been located along spreading centers by either visual confirmation or instrumental detection of the discharging plume. Discovery of the large majority of these sites was made easier by high-volume discharge of particle-laden plumes. These observations led to estimates (as can be derived from the InterRidge Vents Database) of site frequency from ~0.5-5/100 km, generally increasing with spreading rate. Over the last decade, however, the increasing use of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP (mV)) (aka Eh) sensors capable of detecting minute concentrations of reduced hydrothermal chemicals (e.g., Fe+2, sulfides, Mn+2, H2, and others) suggests that these frequency estimates may be far too conservative. This hypothesis is consistent with earlier results from a few large-scale, high-resolution camera tows on some EPR segments. ORP data provide two important advantages for site identification not available with other commonly used continuously recording sensors: (1) detection of low-temperature, particle-scarce plumes, and (2) detection of reduced chemical species with very short residence times, thus increasing the location specificity of the discharge source. Here, we present high-resolution distributions of ORP anomalies observed in past plume surveys along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (19.5°-22.5°S) in 2004 and 2008, the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.6°-86°W) in 2005/6 and 2011, as well as new data (2011) from the East Pacific Rise (9°-10°N). Except for the 2011 GSC data (a standard CTD tow-yo), all data were collected during continuous horizontal tows of ORP sensors at various depths <~120 m above the seafloor. We used two approaches to verify that ORP anomalies were authentic hydrothermal signals and not (especially in the case of small anomalies) produced by some other transient chemical anomaly. First, on the 2008 ELSC and 2011 EPR tows we compared temperature (ΔT) and ORP (ΔORP) data from

  20. Migration of mid-ocean-ridge volcanic segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Dick, H.J.B.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The propagation of small-offset volcanic spreading-centre segments along mid-ocean ridge crests may reflect absolute motion of the plate boundary relative to the underlying mesospheric frame. Such a relationship could be caused by a purely vertical flow of the mantle under spreading centres and would have value in constraining past plate motions from non-transform trends generated during along-ridge propagation and in linking the major-element variability of oceanic crust and upper mantle to the bulk composition and temperatures of mantle ascending under mid-ocean ridges. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. The Mid-Ocean Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, K.C. ); Fox, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The Mid-Ocean Ridge girdles the earth like the seam of a baseball. For more than 75,000 kilometers, this submerged range of razorback mountains--many higher than the greatest peaks on land--marks the restless boundary between continental plates. An analysis of this huge structure reveals a fascinating picture of how it is created by magma welling up as the plates pull apart. The paper discusses sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, types of discontinuities, off-axis structures, small overlaps and DEVALs (slight DEViations in Axial Linearity), and aquatic life.

  2. Sulphatides trigger polymorphonuclear granulocyte spreading on collagen-coated surfaces and inhibit subsequent activation of 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sud'ina, G F; Brock, T G; Pushkareva, M A; Galkina, S I; Turutin, D V; Peters-Golden, M; Ullrich, V

    2001-01-01

    Sulphatides are sulphate esters of galactocerebrosides that are present on the surfaces of many cell types and act as specific ligands to selectins. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sulphatides on polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) attachment, spreading and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism. Sulphatides, but not non-sulphated galactocerebrosides, dose-dependently enhanced attachment to collagen, as measured by the myeloperoxidase assay. Studies with blocking antibodies indicated that the increased attachment was mediated by CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) beta 2 integrin. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that sulphatides also greatly enhanced the degree of cell spreading. In PMNs treated in suspension, sulphatides had no effect on the ionophore A23187-stimulated release of arachidonic acid and the synthesis of 5-LO metabolites. In contrast, in PMNs attached to collagen, the enzymic conversion of arachidonic acid by 5-LO was inhibited by sulphatides. Inhibition of 5-LO metabolism by sulphatides was observed even in the presence of exogenous substrate, suggesting that sulphatides directly inhibited 5-LO action. Consistent with this, sulphatides interfered with ionophore-induced translocation of the 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. Substances competing with sulphatide binding to cells, like dextran sulphate, or a strong inhibitor of cell spreading, like the actin-polymerizing agent jasplakinolide, prevented the effects of sulphatides on PMN attachment and spreading and leukotriene synthesis. We conclude that shape changes occurring in response to sulphatides specifically impair PMN leukotriene synthesis by inhibiting translocation of 5-LO. PMID:11672437

  3. What`s an ARAR?: Regulatory requirements for CERCLA remedial activities at D&D sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Etnier, E.L.

    1994-09-01

    Many government-owned facilities that supported early nuclear energy research and defense programs have no current use and have been retired. Some of these facilities have residual radioactive or chemical contamination that require remediation. The Department of Energy (DOE) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program is responsible for managing these surplus facilities. Remedial activities for contaminated environs and inactive land-based units (e.g., landfills, surface impoundments) at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are conducted under the direction of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  4. A magmatic robust segment propagating at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 21.5° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannowski, A.; Grevemeyer, I.; Morgan, J. P.; Ranero, C. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 21.5° N shows the typical features of a propagating ridge segment in both bathymetric and satellite altimetry derived gravity data. However, the segment correlates with a gap in seismic activity. This active ridge system in a median valley environment started its propagation roughly five million years ago, after a transform fault boundary became unstable. At the southern segment end, a linear slightly asymmetric V-shaped wake has been formed by a propagation rate of approx. 16 mm/y with an average half-spreading rate of approx. 13 mm/y and hence a fast propagator for a slow spreading ridge. Three seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profiles surveyed the crustal structure along and across the ridge crest and yielded the crustal structure at the segment centre as a function of melt supply. Results suggest that crust is with ~8 km thickest at the domed segment centre, decreasing towards segment ends. However, crust at the northern and southern segment boundaries is 4 km and 5.5 km, respectively. Thus, crust is thicker in the direction of ridge propagation, suggesting that melt is preferential transferred towards the southern ridge tip. While seismic layer 2 remains constant along axis layer 3 shows profound changes in thickness, governing variations in total crustal thickness. This features supports mantle upwelling in the segment centre, i.e., low viscosity basalts are distributed easily laterally, while high viscosity gabbroic crust tends to crystallise at the locus of rising melts. The entire segment correlates with gaps in seismic activity, suggesting that the lithosphere of the propagating ridge segment is thin. Increased seismicity in the transform zone connecting the propagating ridge tip with the doomed segment in the south and to the north indicates thicker lithosphere at segment boundaries. A strong anisotropy of the crust of up to 10% has been observed in the segment centre. While the upper crust shows spreading parallel

  5. The Morphology, Structure and Origin of Seamounts on the South-West Indian Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, L. A.; Watts, A. B.; JC066 shipboard scientific party

    2012-04-01

    The South-West Indian Ridge (SWIR) between longitude 46 and 57° East is an ultra-slow spreading (~16 mm/a) mid-ocean ridge system with a highly oblique (>50°) spreading direction and a large number of closely spaced transform faults. Previous swath bathymetry surveys onboard R/V Dr. Fridtjof Nansen in 2009 show that the ridge crest is characterised by a number of irregularly shaped seamounts which rise about 2500 m above the mean depth of the surrounding seafloor. However, the origin of these seamounts and whether they reflect passive cracking of the lithosphere or deep mantle processes is not clear. In November/December, 2011 we re-surveyed 5 of these seamounts onboard RRS James Cook using an EM120 swath bathymetry system, a Lacoste-Romberg air-sea gravimeter and a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). Preliminary results show that the seamounts are highly fractured, with fault trends parallel and orthogonal to the spreading direction. There is evidence of both growth and collapse structures, including head scars, chutes and debris flows. We present here a preliminary analysis of the morphology, gravity field and rock sample data and its implications for tectonics, mass wasting and eruptive processes at young seamounts that have formed in an active extensional setting.

  6. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang; Woitzik, Johannes; Scheel, Michael; Wiesenthal, Dirk; Martus, Peter; Winkler, Maren K.L.; Hartings, Jed A.; Fabricius, Martin; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We here report on such spreading convulsions in monopolar subdural recordings in 2 of 25 consecutive aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients in vivo and neocortical slices from 12 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in vitro. The in vitro results suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition protects from spreading convulsions. Moreover, we describe arterial pulse artefacts mimicking epileptic field potentials in three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage that ride on the slow potential peak. Twenty-one of the 25 subarachnoid haemorrhage patients (84%) had 656 spreading depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression

  7. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang; Woitzik, Johannes; Scheel, Michael; Wiesenthal, Dirk; Martus, Peter; Winkler, Maren K L; Hartings, Jed A; Fabricius, Martin; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We here report on such spreading convulsions in monopolar subdural recordings in 2 of 25 consecutive aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients in vivo and neocortical slices from 12 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in vitro. The in vitro results suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition protects from spreading convulsions. Moreover, we describe arterial pulse artefacts mimicking epileptic field potentials in three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage that ride on the slow potential peak. Twenty-one of the 25 subarachnoid haemorrhage patients (84%) had 656 spreading depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression

  8. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste active tanks

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a plan and schedule for leak testing a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It is a concise version of a more general leak testing plan that was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This plan includes a schedule for the initial reporting of the leak test results from the various tanks that will be tested. The FFA distinguishes four categories of tank and pipeline systems: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA specifically requires leak testing of the Category C systems; there are 14 such tanks addressed in this plan, plus one tank (W-12) that has been temporarily returned to service based on EPA and TDEC concurrence. A schedule for testing these tanks is also included. The plan and schedule also addresses an additional 15 Category B tanks have been demonstrated to meet secondary containment requirements. While these 15 tanks are addressed in this plan for the sake of completeness, they have been removed from the leak testing program based on the design demonstrations that show secondary containment. It is noted that the general plan included 42 tanks. Since that report was issued, 26 of those tanks have passed secondary containment design demonstrations and subsequently have been removed from this leak testing plan. In addition, one tank (LA-104) has been removed from service. Accordingly, this document addresses 15 of the LLLW tanks in the system; plans for testing the pipelines will be described in a separate document.

  9. Magmatic and tectonic extension at the Chile Ridge: Evidence for mantle controls on ridge segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Samuel M.; Ito, Garrett; Behn, Mark D.; Martinez, Fernando; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Escartín, Javier

    2016-06-01

    We use data from an extensive multibeam bathymetry survey of the Chile Ridge to study tectonomagmatic processes at the ridge axis. Specifically, we investigate how abyssal hills evolve from axial faults, how variations in magmatic extension influence morphology and faulting along the spreading axis, and how these variations correlate with ridge segmentation. The bathymetry data are used to estimate the fraction of plate separation accommodated by normal faulting, and the remaining fraction of extension, M, is attributed primarily to magmatic accretion. Results show that M ranges from 0.85 to 0.96, systematically increasing from first-order and second-order ridge segment offsets toward segment centers as the depth of ridge axis shoals relative to the flanking highs of the axial valley. Fault spacing, however, does not correlate with ridge geometry, morphology, or M along the Chile Ridge, which suggests the observed increase in tectonic strain toward segment ends is achieved through increased slip on approximately equally spaced faults. Variations in M along the segments follow variations in petrologic indicators of mantle melt fraction, both showing a preferred length scale of 50 ± 20 km that persists even along much longer ridge segments. In comparison, mean M and axial relief fail to show significant correlations with distance offsetting the segments. These two findings suggest a form of magmatic segmentation that is partially decoupled from the geometry of the plate boundary. We hypothesize this magmatic segmentation arises from cells of buoyantly upwelling mantle that influence tectonic segmentation from the mantle, up.

  10. Microbial diversity in subseafloor fluids from Explorer Ridge, Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S.; Huber, J. A.; Embley, R.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Gorda, Juan de Fuca and Explorer Ridges are first order spreading centers located in the northeast Pacific. While the Gorda and Juan de Fuca Ridges have been extensively sampled for chemical and microbiological analyses, what little is known about the Explorer Ridge is from preliminary observations made in the mid-1980's. A cruise in 2002 revisited the area and discovered vigorous hydrothermal activity at Magic Mountain, a site located outside the primary rift valley. Explorer Ridge is an important site to compare with other well-described vent sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our research has focused on describing the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of bacteria and archaea in low temperature hydrothermal fluids in an effort to identify subseafloor indicator organisms and to use the physiological characteristics of these organisms to help constrain subseafloor habitat characteristics. We have previously established that there are microbial taxa that are unique to subseafloor habitats associated with diffuse flow fluids at Axial Seamount and at Endeavour both located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These included cultured anaerobic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic heterotrophs, methanogens and sulfur metabolizers. Moreover, results from molecular phylogeny analyses using the 16S rRNA sequences identified a phylogenetically diverse group of bacteria belonging to the epsilon-proteobacteria. While anaerobic hyperthermophiles were cultured from some diffuse-flow vent sites at Explorer, they were less abundant than at Axial Volcano and Endeavour, and curiously, no methanogens were cultured or detected in 16S rRNA clonal libraries. Like Axial, a diverse group of epsilon-proteobacterial clones were found with many similar to those identified from Axial Seamount and other hydrothermal vent sites, although there appears to be some unique species. The overall bacterial diversity at Explorer appears different than at Axial, possibly linked to temperature or chemical

  11. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  12. Rifting to spreading in the southern Lau Basin: Variations within the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Okino, K.; Kodera, T.

    2010-11-01

    The Lau Basin and Havre Trough are back-arc basins related to Pacific-Australian plate convergence. Seafloor spreading occurs in the Lau Basin whereas the Havre Trough is in a rifting stage. At present, the spreading propagator's tip lies at the southern end of the Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) at 22°40'S. Studying this propagation process provides an opportunity to characterize the evolution of rifting to the initiation of seafloor spreading which is fundamental to back-arc basin development. New geophysical data of the southern Lau Basin reveals that as spreading propagates south, it evolves in a discrete style south of 22°40'S. The propagation axis lies along the eastern margin of the basin, where the well defined, linear VFR loses its identifying morphology. Topography in this eastern zone is characterized by grabens separated by short narrow ridges. High backscatter intensity indicates tectonic and magmatic activity in this eastern area. Mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA) increase southwards from the VFR to form an elevated MBA area extending west from the currently active area. This indicates eastward migration of active rifting, during which the arc crust was extremely thinned. High magnetization is observed in a left-stepping pattern south of the VFR. We interpret this pattern as discrete segments that characterize the initiation of the spreading stage. There is no evidence of a single, continuous spreading axis like that which characterizes the central and northern Lau Basin. The magnetization highs are discrete and are observed in areas where deformation and magmatism are focused. They are offset relative to the VFR, though they generally follow the same north-south trend as the VFR.

  13. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  14. Imaging the seismic structure beneath oceanic spreading centers using ocean bottom geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang

    This dissertation focuses on imaging the crustal and upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath oceanic spreading centers. The goals are to provide a better understanding of the crustal magmatic system and the relationship between mantle melting processes, crustal architecture and ridge characteristics. To address these questions I have analyzed ocean bottom geophysical data collected from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center using a combination of ambient noise tomography and seafloor compliance analysis. To characterize the crustal melt distribution at fast spreading ridges, I analyze seafloor compliance - the deformation under long period ocean wave forcing - measured during multiple expeditions between 1994 and 2007 at the East Pacific Rise 9º - 10ºN segment. A 3D numerical modeling technique is developed and used to estimate the effects of low shear velocity zones on compliance measurements. The forward modeling suggests strong variations of lower crustal shear velocity along the ridge axis, with zones of possible high melt fractions beneath certain segments. Analysis of repeated compliance measurements at 9º48'N indicates a decrease of crustal melt fraction following the 2005 - 2006 eruption. This temporal variability provides direct evidence for short-term variations of the magmatic system at a fast spreading ridge. To understand the relationship between mantle melting processes and crustal properties, I apply ambient noise tomography of ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) data to image the upper mantle seismic structure beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The seismic images reveal an asymmetric upper mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the ELSC, representing a zone of partial melt. As the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc, the LVZ becomes increasingly offset and separated from the sub-arc low velocity zone. The separation of the ridge and arc low velocity zones is spatially coincident

  15. Structure and topography of the Siqueiros transform fault system: Evidence for the development of intra-transform spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, Daniel J.; Gallo, David G.; Edwards, Margo H.; Madsen, John A.; Perfit, Michael R.; Shor, Alexander N.

    1989-12-01

    The Siqueiros transform fault system, which offsets the East Pacific Rise between 8°20'N 8°30'N, has been mapped with the Sea MARC II sonar system and is found to consist of four intra-transform spreading centers and five strike-slip faults. The bathymetric and side-looking sonar data define the total width of the transform domain to be ≈20km. The transform domain includes prominent topographic features that are related to either seafloor spreading processes at the short spreading centers or shearing along the bounding faults. The spreading axes and the seafloor on the flanks of each small spreading center comprise morphological and structural features which suggest that the two western spreading centers are older than the eastern spreading centers. Structural data for the Clipperton, Orozco and Siqueiros transforms, indicate that the relative plate motion geometry of the Pacific-Cocos plate boundary has been stable for the past ≈1.5 Ma. Because the seafloor spreading fabric on the flanks of the western spreading centers is ≈500 000 years old and parallels the present EPR abyssal hill trend (350°) we conclude that a small change in plate motion was not the cause for intra-transform spreading center development in Siqueiros. We suggest that the impetus for the development of intra-transform spreading centers along the Siqueiros transform system was provided by the interaction of small melt anomalies in the mantle (SMAM) with deepseated, throughgoing lithospheric fractures within the shear zone. Initially, eruption sites may have been preferentially located along strike-slip faults and/or along cross-faults that eventually developed into pull-apart basins. Spreading centers C and D in the eastern portion of Siqueiros are in this initial pull-apart stage. Continued intrusion and volcanism along a short ridge within a pull-apart basin may lead to the formation of a stable, small intra-transform spreading center that creates a narrow swath of ridge

  16. Tectonics at the Southeast Indian Ridge 79 to 99 E. Results from the GEISEIR cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briais, A.; Hemond, C.; Maia, M. A.; Hanan, B. B.; Graham, D. W.; Geiseir Scientific Team; Geiseir2 Scientific Team

    2011-12-01

    During the GEISEIR (Géochimie Isotopique de la SEIR) and GEISEIR2 cruises on N/O Marion Dufresne in 2009 and 2010, we collected geophysical data, high-density wax-core or dredge basalt samples, and water column profiles along the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 79E and 99E. This section of the intermediate-spreading SEIR is located between the St Paul-Amsterdam hotspot plateau and the Australia-Antarctic Discordance. We completed the multibeam bathymetry mapping of the axis and transform faults of the 79-88E and the 96-99E sections, and mapped the axial zone and discontinuities of the 88-96E section up to 800 kyr. These ridge sections were sampled at 20 km, 5 km and 10 km spacing, respectively. This presentation focusses on the results of a structural and geophysical analysis of the axial domain and the off-axis area up to 800 kyr. We merged the bathymetry data collected during the GEISEIR and GEISEIR2 cruises with those of the previous (Westward 9 and 10 and Boomerang 6) cruises. We also compiled the shipborne gravity data and estimated mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA). The ridge displays large variations in axial depth and morphology, from a rifted axial high to an axial valley, at the scale of ridge segments. Ridge offsets vary in morphology from overlapping-spreading centers, to propagating rifts, to transform faults. Shalllow segments have pronounced axial MBA lows, probably resulting from a thicker ocean crust, and the presence of hotter mantle beneath the ridge axis. Water-column profiling at each wax-core sampling site reveals numerous moderate to strong signals of hydrothermal activity. The distribution of the hydrothermal vent signals does not always coincide with the magmatic robustness of the ridge axis, suggesting that tectonic activity also controls the vent setting. The recent evolution of the ridge discontinuities is marked by southeastward propagators at 92E and 95E, and by the eastward migration of the 96E transform fault. These areas

  17. Structural development of the Jan Mayen microcontinent (JMMC): An update of its role during the rift transition from the Ægir Ridge to the Kolbeinsey Ridge, and effects on the formation of the Greenland-Iceland-Faroe ridge complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blischke, Anett; Gaina, Carmen; Hopper, John R.; Peron-Pinvidic, Gwenn; Brandsdóttir, Bryndis; Guarnieri, Pierpaolo; Erlendsson, Ögmundur

    2016-04-01

    This study presents results of an ongoing PhD research project and proposes a revision of the Jan Mayen microcontinent's Cenozoic evolution with a special emphasis on the structural relationship to the Greenland-Iceland Faroe ridge complex. Recently acquired and publicly available geophysical and borehole data collected offshore Iceland since the early 1970s, facilitate a thorough review of Tertiary rift systems and their association with the Jan Mayen microcontinent, updating recent kinematic modelling that details the timing of the North Atlantic opening along the Jan Mayen transfer systems, and the Iceland-Faroe-Greenland transfer system bordering the Greenland-Iceland Faroe ridge complex, which covers a large area of thick crust that stretches across the North Atlantic Ocean between the central East Greenland and the North-West European margins. The established regional reflection seismic dataset interpretations and plate tectonic reconstructions indicate that the microcontinent may represent the southern extension of the East Greenland Jameson Land basin, suggesting a similar structural trend as the Faroe-Shetland basin. The Cenozoic structural evolution of the Jan Mayen microcontinent and surrounding oceanic crust includes six main phases that correlate to several major unconformities and related structures. Important events include the pre-break-up unconformity, the break-up to drift phase, a drifting phase and establishment of the Ægir Ridge seafloor spreading during the early Eocene, oblique seafloor spreading direction east of JMMC during mid-Eocene caused the formation of transform systems and uplift along the southern flank Jan Mayen microcontinent forming the Iceland Plateau Rift (Brandsdóttir et al. 2015), accompanied by igneous activity along the northeastern margin of the Blosseville Kyst (Larsen et al. 2014), ridge relocation via a southeast to northwest en-echelon ridge system transition from the southern extent of the microcontinent during the

  18. Seafloor Spreading in the Lau-Havre Backarc Basins: From Fast to Ultra Slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, F.; Dunn, R. A.; Sleeper, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Seafloor spreading in the Lau Basin occurs along the well-organized Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridges (VFR) opening at 97-39 mm/yr. The ELSC/VFR produce two distinct crustal types sub-parallel to the ridge as a function of their separation from the arc volcanic front. Arc-proximal spreading forms a shallow, thick crust with arc-like lavas that abruptly changes to a deeper, thinner crust with backarc basin basalt (BABB)-like lavas as the ridges separate from the arc volcanic front. Southward in the Havre Trough opening rates decrease to 15 mm/yr and a well-organized spreading axis is largely absent. Instead, active volcanism appears to be distributed across a broad zone located asymmetrically near the arc side of the basin. Further, crustal accretion appears to have two distinct styles forming a shallower terrain floored by arc-like lavas and deeper rifted basins floored by more BABB-like lavas [Wysoczanski et al., 2010, G-cubed]. Although these crustal terrains broadly resemble those flanking the ELSC/VFR, in the Havre Trough they are organized into bands that trend across the basin with the shallower arc-like terrains typically trailing from Kermadec arc front volcanoes. We hypothesize that the variation in style of crustal accretion along the Lau-Havre backarc system is controlled by the southward decreasing rate of plate extension superimposed on a compositionally variable mantle wedge. Distinct hydrous and less-hydrous mantle domains have been proposed for the mantle wedge [Martinez & Taylor, 2002; Dunn & Martinez, 2011; Nature]. Within the hydrous domain (< about 50 km from the arc volcanic front) further compositional 'fingers' trailing basinward from arc front volcanoes have been interpreted in the Lau Basin based on ridge axis morphology and chemistry [Sleeper & Martinez, submitted]. In the Lau Basin, intermediate to fast spreading rates impose a 2D plate-driven advective regime in the mantle wedge constraining volcanic accretion to the

  19. Agulhas Ridge, South Atlantic: the peculiar structure of a transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.

    2003-04-01

    Transform faults constitute conservative plate boundaries, where adjacent plates are in tangential contact. Transform faults in the ocean are marked by fracture zones, which are long, linear, bathymetric depressions. One of the largest transform offsets on Earth can be found in the South Atlantic. The 1200 km long Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone (AFFZ), form by this, developed during the Early Cretaceous break-up of West Gondwana. Between approx. 41°S, 16°E and 43°S, 9°E the Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone is characterised by a pronounced topographic anomaly, the Agulhas Ridge. The Agulhas Ridge rises more than 2 km above the surrounding seafloor. The only equivalent to this kind of topographic high, as part of the AFFZ, is found in form of marginal ridges along the continental parts of the fracture zone, namely the Falkland Escarpment at the South American continent and the Diaz Ridge adjacent to South Africa. But the Agulhas Ridge differs from both the Falkland Escarpment and the Diaz Ridge in the facts (1) that it was not formed during the early rift-drift phase, and (2) that it separates oceanic crust of different age and not continental from oceanic crust. A set of high-resolution seismic reflection data (total length 2000 km) and a seismic refraction line across the Agulhas Ridge give new information on the crustal and basement structure of this tectonic feature. We have observed that within the Cape Basin, to the North, the basement and sedimentary layers are in parts strongly deformed. We observe basement highs, which point towards intrusions. Both the basement and the sedimentary sequence show strong faulting. This points towards a combined tectono-magmatic activity, which led to the formation of basement ridges parallel to the Agulhas Ridge. Since at least the pre-Oligocene parts and, locally, the whole sedimentary column are affected we infer that the renewed activity began in the Middle Oligocene and may have lasted into the Quaternary. As an origin

  20. Active surveillance of the aquatic environment for potential prediction, prevention and spread of water borne disease: the cholera paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, A.; Colwell, R.

    2011-12-01

    Based on results of ecological and epidemiological studies, occurrence and spread of certain diseases are more fully understood. Cholera is a major waterborne disease, that is relatively easily treatable and clearly preventable, yet tens of thousands die each year worldwide. A dose dependent disease, the infectious dose can vary from 103-106, depending on health status of the victim. Historically, cholera has been shown to spread from person to person. Furthermore, the disease is caused predominantly via ingestion of contaminated water and most of the outbreaks that have been recorded worldwide originated in a coastal region. Using appropriate detection methods, Vibrio cholerae can be isolated from samples collected from ponds, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters globally. The populations of V. cholerae may vary in numbers during different seasons of the year. It is important to have a clear understanding of the distribution of the causative agent in the environment as such information can assist public health officials in taking action to prevent outbreaks of cholera. Thus an effective monitoring program is critical, particularly in light of climate change with temperature extremes more likely to be occurring. Based on a predictive model and results of ground truth data, temperature has been found to be a factor in the increase of V. cholerae in the environment. Correlation was observed with occurrence of cholera and both temperature and salinity. More recent research indicates additional factors need to be considered in predicting cholera epidemics, including the hydrology and disease dynamics.

  1. Geophysical evidence for reduced melt production on the Arctic ultraslow Gakkel mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Jokat, W; Ritzmann, O; Schmidt-Aursch, M C; Drachev, S; Gauger, S; Snow, J

    2003-06-26

    Most models of melt generation beneath mid-ocean ridges predict significant reduction of melt production at ultraslow spreading rates (full spreading rates &<20 mm x yr(-1)) and consequently they predict thinned oceanic crust. The 1,800-km-long Arctic Gakkel mid-ocean ridge is an ideal location to test such models, as it is by far the slowest portion of the global mid-ocean-ridge spreading system, with a full spreading rate ranging from 6 to 13 mm x yr(-1) (refs 4, 5). Furthermore, in contrast to some other ridge systems, the spreading direction on the Gakkel ridge is not oblique and the rift valley is not offset by major transform faults. Here we present seismic evidence for the presence of exceptionally thin crust along the Gakkel ridge rift valley with crustal thicknesses varying between 1.9 and 3.3 km (compared to the more usual value of 7 km found on medium- to fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges). Almost 8,300 km of closely spaced aeromagnetic profiles across the rift valley show the presence of discrete volcanic centres along the ridge, which we interpret as evidence for strongly focused, three-dimensional magma supply. The traces of these eruptive centres can be followed to crustal ages of approximately 25 Myr off-axis, implying that these magma production and transport systems have been stable over this timescale. PMID:12827194

  2. Geophysical evidence for reduced melt production on the Arctic ultraslow Gakkel mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Jokat, W; Ritzmann, O; Schmidt-Aursch, M C; Drachev, S; Gauger, S; Snow, J

    2003-06-26

    Most models of melt generation beneath mid-ocean ridges predict significant reduction of melt production at ultraslow spreading rates (full spreading rates &<20 mm x yr(-1)) and consequently they predict thinned oceanic crust. The 1,800-km-long Arctic Gakkel mid-ocean ridge is an ideal location to test such models, as it is by far the slowest portion of the global mid-ocean-ridge spreading system, with a full spreading rate ranging from 6 to 13 mm x yr(-1) (refs 4, 5). Furthermore, in contrast to some other ridge systems, the spreading direction on the Gakkel ridge is not oblique and the rift valley is not offset by major transform faults. Here we present seismic evidence for the presence of exceptionally thin crust along the Gakkel ridge rift valley with crustal thicknesses varying between 1.9 and 3.3 km (compared to the more usual value of 7 km found on medium- to fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges). Almost 8,300 km of closely spaced aeromagnetic profiles across the rift valley show the presence of discrete volcanic centres along the ridge, which we interpret as evidence for strongly focused, three-dimensional magma supply. The traces of these eruptive centres can be followed to crustal ages of approximately 25 Myr off-axis, implying that these magma production and transport systems have been stable over this timescale.

  3. Unraveling the unusual morphology of the Cretaceous Dirck Hartog extinct mid-ocean ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, S. J.; Whittaker, J. M.; Halpin, J.; Williams, S.; Milan, L. A.; Daczko, N. R.; Wyman, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP), offshore southwest Australia formed during Mesozoic East Gondwana breakup and Kerguelen plume activity. This study combines petrographic and geochemical data from the first samples ever to be dredged from the flanks of the Dirck Hartog Ridge (DHR), a prominent linear bathymetric feature in the central PAP, with new bathymetric profiles across the PAP to better constrain the formation of the early Indian Ocean floor. The DHR exhibits high relief and distinctive asymmetry that is unusual compared to most active or extinct spreading centres and likely results from compression and deformation of the recently extinct DHR during changes in relative motion of the Indian plate (110 - 100 Ma). Exhumation of gabbros in the southern DHR and an increase in seafloor roughness towards the centre of the PAP, likely result from a half spreading rate decrease from 35 mm/yr (based on magnetic reversals) to 24 mm/yr at ~114 Ma. The results support a slowdown of spreading prior to full cessation at ~102 Ma. The composition of basaltic samples varies along the DHR: from sub-alkaline dolerites with incompatible element concentrations most similar to depleted-to-normal mid-ocean ridge basalts in the south, to alkali basalts similar to ocean island basalts in the north. Therefore, magma sources and degrees of partial melting varied in space and time, a result supporting the interpretation that the DHR is an extinct spreading ridge rather than a pseudofault. The enriched alkali basalt signatures may be attributed to melting of a heterogeneous mantle or to the influence of the Kerguelen plume over distances greater than 1000 km. The results demonstrate the significance of regional tectonic plate motions on the formation and deformation of young ocean crust, and provide insight into the unique DHR morphology.

  4. Caught in the Act: A Hot Mantle Pulse beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, R. E.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.; Henstock, T.; Murton, B. J.; Jones, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The intersection of the Icelandic plume with the Reykjanes Ridge provides us with a useful window into aspects of mantle convective processes. This spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler, recording transient plume activity as a series of V-shaped ridges and troughs within the oceanic basin. The geometry of these ridges and troughs shows how plume flux varies with time, and how the shape and size of the plume head has evolved. Here, we present the results of a detailed study of the morphology of the Reykjanes Ridge between 57° and 63°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge forms thickened crust. This study is a synthesis of newly acquired and legacy data. A combination of high-resolution and multibeam bathymetric and 2D seismic reflection surveys acquired at the ridge axis reveals the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. The density of seamounts varies significantly along the ridge, increasing by a factor of two between 59° and 62°N. Within this zone, mean fault length decreases from ~11 to 6 km and the cumulative moment release of earthquakes decreases by about two orders of magnitude. Recently acquired seismic profiles show enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed and a change in the character of Layer 2A. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased crustal thickness and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for the range of observations within this ~200 km long portion of ridge. The increase in temperature required to effectively shut off brittle deformation is consistent with geochemical modeling of major, trace and rare earth elemental compositions which require horizontal advection of hotter asthenospheric material beneath the ridge axis. The existence of a ~200 km long transient mantle pulse within a ~100-200 km thick low velocity channel, horizontally advecting away from the Icelandic plume at a velocity of ~40 cm/yr, has important implications for the relationship between mantle convection, crustal

  5. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about fixed nitrogen (N) transformation and elimination at diffuse hydrothermal vents where anoxic fluids are mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e., temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always < 5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to ~150 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlations were found between fixed N loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence times, we estimated

  6. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about nitrogen (N) transformations in general, and the elimination of N in particular, at diffuse vents where anoxic hydrothermal fluids have mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N-loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilative nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e. temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N-loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always <5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to 152 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlation existed between fixed N-loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in-situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N-loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence

  7. Activation of NF-kappaB by extracellular matrix is involved in spreading and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Eva B; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Rickenbach, Katharina; Parnaud, Géraldine; Ribaux, Pascale; Bosco, Domenico; Rouiller, Dominique G; Halban, Philippe A

    2005-08-26

    Laminin-5-rich extracellular matrix derived from 804G cells (804G-ECM) engages beta1 integrins to induce spreading, improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and increase survival of pancreatic beta cells. The present study examines whether 804G-ECM activates the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB and the involvement of NF-kappaB in those effects of 804G-ECM on pancreatic beta cells. 804G-ECM induces nuclear translocation and the DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. 804G-ECM-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB was weak as compared with that induced by interleukin-1beta. Transient 804G-ECM-induced DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB (peak at 2 h) and overexpression of NF-kappaB target genes IkappaB alpha and NF-kappaB1(p105) (peak at 4 h) were observed. When NF-kappaB was inhibited by an inhibitor of IkappaB alpha phosphorylation (Bay 11-7082) or by a recombinant adenovirus expressing the nonphosphorylatable form of IkappaB alpha, 804G-ECM-induced cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton organization were reduced. GSIS from cells on 804G-ECM was inhibited 5-fold, whereas cell survival was not affected. In summary, the results indicate that 804G-ECM induces a transient and moderate NF-kappaB activity. This study shows for the first time that ECM-induced NF-kappaB activity is necessary in maintaining GSIS, although it does not affect survival of pancreatic beta cells. The effects of ECM-induced NF-kappaB activity contrast with the deleterious effects of cytokine-induced NF-kappaB activity. It is proposed that transient and moderate NF-kappaB activity is essential for proper function of the pancreatic beta cell.

  8. ALOP-active learning in optics and photonics: a UNESCO's program spreading in Colombia through the National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Gómez, Catalina; Monroy-Ramírez, Freddy A.

    2014-07-01

    The National University of Colombia is committed to the spreading of the UNESCO's ALOP program throughout the country by programming a series of workshops (ALOP-NPH) to be held in each of its eight campuses. This huge effort is intended to contribute at a national scale to the training of high school teachers in new pedagogic methodologies. Furthermore, the ALOP Workshop has had large impact in the recently established Master's program on pedagogy of Sciences, a degree program addressed to middle and high school teachers, which has a current enrollment of more than 400 teachers from all over the country. In this paper we also describe the contributions of the team also ALOP-Colombia to the material and electronic devices used in optical transmission modules and data division multiplexing wavelength.

  9. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  10. Spatial patterns of zooplankton and nekton in a hydrothermally active axial valley on Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skebo, Kristina; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Garcia Berdeal, Irene; Johnson, H. Paul

    2006-06-01

    Zooplankton and nekton at 2000 m depth in the axial valley of Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, show marked variability in abundances in a plane at 20 m above bottom. A remotely operated vehicle flew a gridded rectangle 3.2×0.5 km that included two large high-temperature and two small low-temperature vent fields. Numbers of zooplankton, jellyfish, shrimp and fish were recorded with a video camera, and the abundance patterns were examined with the program SADIE ©. Each organism group displayed a distinctive distribution pattern. Abundance gaps over the high-temperature fields were significant and, for the more abundant copepods, were related to the locations of individual smokers. Pelagic shrimp and macrourid fish abundances were correlated and concentrated around the northern high temperature field. Distinct aggregations of zooplankton and nekton were correlated with the fluid indicators from both the low temperature diffuse effluent and the focused high temperature vents. Patterns were likely established by organism choice that forms aggregations and gaps, and by physical processes that entrain passive particles near vigorous smoker plumes. While enhanced plankton and nekton numbers were not observed over the vent fields, overall abundances in the axial valley may be sustained by production transported from the vent fields on the seafloor.

  11. Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Enviromental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER.

  12. Caught in the Act: Crustal Manifestations of a Hot Transient Pulse Beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 60°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, Ross; White, Nicky; Henstock, Tim; Murton, Bramley; Jones, Stephen; Maclennan, John

    2013-04-01

    Since its inception, mantle convective upwelling beneath Iceland has had a significant influence on the history of vertical motion, magmatism and paleoceanography in the North Atlantic Ocean. Crucially, intersection of the Reykjanes Ridge with the Icelandic plume provides us with an important window into the transient activity of the plume. The spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler of plume activity, which is recorded as a series of time-transgressive V-shaped ridges and troughs. Here, we present the results of a detailed study along the spreading ridge close to 60°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge of thickened oceanic crust, is forming today. A combination of multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles, acquired along and across the ridge axis, is used to map the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. Along the ridge axis, the density of volcanic seamounts varies markedly, increasing by a factor of two between 59° and 62°N. Within this area, seismic imaging shows that there is enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed. These observations are accompanied by a decrease in mean fault length from ~12 km to ~6 km. A 1960-2009 catalog of relocated teleseismic earthquake hypocenters shows that there is a pronounced gap in seismicity between 59° and 62°N where the cumulative moment release is two orders of magnitude smaller than that along adjacent ridge segments. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased melt generation and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for this suite of observations. Our results suggest that the thickness of the brittle seismogenic layer is smaller where the youngest V-shaped ridge intersects the ridge axis. This decrease is consistent with geochemical modeling of dredged basaltic samples, which require horizontal flow of hotter asthenospheric material within a channel beneath the spreading axis. Thus, along-axis variation in melt supply arising from the passage of a pulse

  13. Spreading rate dependence of gravity anomalies along oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J

    2007-07-12

    Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative anomalies correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity anomalies observed. This finding in turn suggests that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults. PMID:17625563

  14. Spreading rate dependence of gravity anomalies along oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J

    2007-07-12

    Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative anomalies correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity anomalies observed. This finding in turn suggests that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults.

  15. Sulphide mineralization and wall-rock alteration in ophiolites and modern oceanic spreading centres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Massive and stockwork Fe-Cu-Zn (Cyprus type) sulphide deposits in the upper parts of ophiolite complexes represent hydrothermal mineralization at ancient accretionary plate boundaries. These deposits are probable metallogenic analogues of the polymetallic sulphide deposits recently discovered along modern oceanic spreading centres. Genetic models for these deposits suggest that mineralization results from large-scale circulation of sea-water through basaltic basement along the tectonically active axis of spreading, a zone of high heat flow. The high geothermal gradient above 1 to 2 km deep magma chambers emplaced below the ridge axis drives the convective circulation cell. Cold oxidizing sea-water penetrating the crust on the ridge flanks becomes heated and evolves into a highly reduced somewhat acidic hydrothermal solvent during interaction with basaltic wall-rock. Depending on the temperature and water/rock ratio, this fluid is capable of leaching and transporting iron, manganese, and base metals; dissolved sea-water sulphate is reduced to sulphide. At the ridge axis, the buoyant hydrothermal fluid rises through permeable wall-rocks, and fluid flow may be focussed along deep-seated fractures related to extensional tectonic processes. Metal sulphides are precipitated along channelways as the ascending fluid undergoes adiabatic expansion and then further cooling during mixing with ambient sub-sea-floor water. Vigorous fluid flow results in venting of reduced fluid at the sea-floor/sea-water interface and deposition of massive sulphide. A comparison of sulphide mineralization and wall-rock alteration in ancient and modern spreading centre environments supports this genetic concept. Massive sulphide deposits in ophiolites generally occur in clusters of closely spaced (< 1-5 km) deposits. Individual deposits are a composite of syngenetic massive sulphide and underlying epigenetic stockwork-vein mineralization. The massive sulphide occurs as concordant tabular

  16. First hydrothermal discoveries on the Australian-Antarctic Ridge: Discharge sites, plume chemistry, and vent organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Doshik; Baker, Edward T.; Siek Rhee, Tae; Won, Yong-Jin; Resing, Joseph A.; Lupton, John E.; Lee, Won-Kyung; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    The Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) is one of the largest unexplored regions of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Here, we report a multiyear effort to locate and characterize hydrothermal activity on two first-order segments of the AAR: KR1 and KR2. To locate vent sites on each segment, we used profiles collected by Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders on rock corers during R/V Araon cruises in March and December of 2011. Optical and oxidation-reduction-potential anomalies indicate multiple active sites on both segments. Seven profiles on KR2 found 3 sites, each separated by ˜25 km. Forty profiles on KR1 identified 17 sites, some within a few kilometer of each other. The spatial density of hydrothermal activity along KR1 and KR2 (plume incidence of 0.34) is consistent with the global trend for a spreading rate of ˜70 mm/yr. The densest area of hydrothermal activity, named "Mujin," occurred along the 20 km-long inflated section near the segment center of KR1. Continuous plume surveys conducted in January-February of 2013 on R/V Araon found CH4/3He (1 - 15 × 106) and CH4/Mn (0.01-0.5) ratios in the plume samples, consistent with a basaltic-hosted system and typical of ridges with intermediate spreading rates. Additionally, some of the plume samples exhibited slightly higher ratios of H2/3He and Fe/Mn than others, suggesting that those plumes are supported by a younger hydrothermal system that may have experienced a recent eruption. The Mujin-field was populated by Kiwa crabs and seven-armed Paulasterias starfish previously recorded on the East Scotia Ridge, raising the possibility of circum-Antarctic biogeographic connections of vent fauna.

  17. Petrological and geochemical variations along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 46°S and 32°S: Influence of the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Thompson, Geoffrey; Schilling, Jean-Guy; Kingsley, Richard H.

    1985-06-01

    Basalts from a section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge close to the active volcanic island of Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic have been analysed to investigate the influence of the mantle plume on the geochemistry of basalts being erupted at the spreading center. Although petrographically the rocks show only limited variation, two basaltic types were determined to be erupting in this region based on their major, trace and REE compositions. One group shows depletion in the incompatible and LRE elements, and can be characterised as N-type mid-ocean ridge basalts. The second group shows "enriched" geochemical characteristics and is similar to T-type MORBs. Mixing hyperbolae for the incompatible element and REE ratios suggest that extensive mixing of an end-member, characteristic of a plume region with an end-member of normal depleted MORB, canaccount for the occurrence of the T-type MORBs in this region.Based on the nature and development of the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume over the past 100 Ma, a composite model of evolution is suggested,in which a ridge-centered hotspot progressed to a near ridge hotspot, and finally to a totally intraplate situation. The fact that Tristan da Cunha is highly alkalic now, but that an irregular geochemical anomalyis also present on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at this latitude would suggest an intermediate stage between the near-ridge and totally intraplate situation. This model leads to the conclusion that, as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge migrated away from the Tristan hotspot, a preferential sublithospheric flow towards the Ridge was established. This discontinuous feature can explain the geochemical variations seen along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by providing a mechanism for mixing of a depleted N-type MORB component with an enriched component originating through processes active at the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume.

  18. Modes of faulting at mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Buck, W Roger; Lavier, Luc L; Poliakov, Alexei N B

    2005-04-01

    Abyssal-hill-bounding faults that pervade the oceanic crust are the most common tectonic feature on the surface of the Earth. The recognition that these faults form at plate spreading centres came with the plate tectonic revolution. Recent observations reveal a large range of fault sizes and orientations; numerical models of plate separation, dyke intrusion and faulting require at least two distinct mechanisms of fault formation at ridges to explain these observations. Plate unbending with distance from the top of an axial high reproduces the observed dip directions and offsets of faults formed at fast-spreading centres. Conversely, plate stretching, with differing amounts of constant-rate magmatic dyke intrusion, can explain the great variety of fault offset seen at slow-spreading ridges. Very-large-offset normal faults only form when about half the plate separation at a ridge is accommodated by dyke intrusion.

  19. The morphostructure of the South Atlantic Ridge in the Tristan da Cunha hot spot area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Investigation of the rift zone and flanks of the South Atlantic midoceanic ridge in the Tristan da Cunha hot spot area revealed that their morphostructure is atypical of slow spreading ridges. Feeding the spreading center with magmatic material, the hot spot changes the morphology of the axial zone and transform faults. It itself forms a relief ensemble that differs from the rift one as well. The continuous migration of the spreading center in the westerly direction stimulates the formation of a spacious volcanic highland, which is responsible for the regional asymmetry of ridge flanks in its extended segments (hundreds kilometers long).

  20. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Honig, D. L.; Huber, J. A.; Jakuba, M.; Kinsey, J. C.; Kurz, M. D.; Leroy, S.; McDermott, J.; Mercier de Lepinay, B. F.; Nakamura, K.; Seewald, J.; Smith, J.; Sylva, S.; van Dover, C. L.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global Mid Ocean Ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world’s ultra-slow spreading ridges which were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting, but may host systems particularly relevant to pre-biotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report first evidence for diverse and very deep hydrothermal vents along the ~110 km long, ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise collected using a combination of CTD-rosette operations and dives of the Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle (HROV) Nereus in 2009 followed by shore based work-up of samples for geochemical and microbiological analyses. Our data indicate that the Mid-Cayman Rise hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultra-mafic systems and, at ~5000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent-types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the Mid-Cayman Rise unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for: an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions; varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms; and unparalleled faunal biodiversity - all in close proximity.

  1. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise

    PubMed Central

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Honig, D. L.; Huber, J. A.; Jakuba, M. V.; Kinsey, J. C.; Kurz, M. D.; Leroy, S.; McDermott, J. M.; de Lépinay, B. Mercier; Nakamura, K.; Seewald, J. S.; Smith, J. L.; Sylva, S. P.; Van Dover, C. L.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global mid-ocean ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world’s ultraslow spreading ridges that were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting but may host systems particularly relevant to prebiotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report evidence for previously unknown, diverse, and very deep hydrothermal vents along the ∼110 km long, ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Our data indicate that the MCR hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultramafic systems and, at ∼5,000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the MCR unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions, varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms, and unparalleled faunal biodiversity—all in close proximity. PMID:20660317

  2. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise.

    PubMed

    German, C R; Bowen, A; Coleman, M L; Honig, D L; Huber, J A; Jakuba, M V; Kinsey, J C; Kurz, M D; Leroy, S; McDermott, J M; de Lépinay, B Mercier; Nakamura, K; Seewald, J S; Smith, J L; Sylva, S P; Van Dover, C L; Whitcomb, L L; Yoerger, D R

    2010-08-10

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global mid-ocean ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world's ultraslow spreading ridges that were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting but may host systems particularly relevant to prebiotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report evidence for previously unknown, diverse, and very deep hydrothermal vents along the approximately 110 km long, ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Our data indicate that the MCR hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultramafic systems and, at approximately 5,000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the MCR unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions, varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms, and unparalleled faunal biodiversity--all in close proximity.

  3. Discovery of new hydrothermal activity and chemosynthetic fauna on the Central Indian Ridge at 18°-20° S.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Junichi; Takai, Ken; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Noguchi, Takuro; Nemoto, Suguru; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Matsuzaki, Takuya; Shibuya, Takazo; Okamura, Kei; Mochizuki, Masashi; Orihashi, Yuji; Ura, Tamaki; Asada, Akira; Marie, Daniel; Koonjul, Meera; Singh, Manvendra; Beedessee, Girish; Bhikajee, Mitrasen; Tamaki, Kensaku

    2012-01-01

    Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents are believed to represent a novel biogeographic province, and are host to many novel genera and families of animals, potentially indigenous to Indian Ocean hydrothermal systems. In particular, since its discovery in 2001, much attention has been paid to a so-called 'scaly-foot' gastropod because of its unique iron-sulfide-coated dermal sclerites and the chemosynthetic symbioses in its various tissues. Despite increasing interest in the faunal assemblages at Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents, only two hydrothermal vent fields have been investigated in the Indian Ocean. Here we report two newly discovered hydrothermal vent fields, the Dodo and Solitaire fields, which are located in the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) segments 16 and 15, respectively. Chemosynthetic faunal communities at the Dodo field are emaciated in size and composition. In contrast, at the Solitaire field, we observed faunal communities that potentially contained almost all genera found at CIR hydrothermal environments to date, and even identified previously unreported taxa. Moreover, a new morphotype of 'scaly-foot' gastropod has been found at the Solitaire field. The newly discovered 'scaly-foot' gastropod has similar morphological and anatomical features to the previously reported type that inhabits the Kairei field, and both types of 'scaly-foot' gastropods genetically belong to the same species according to analyses of their COI gene and nuclear SSU rRNA gene sequences. However, the new morphotype completely lacks an iron-sulfide coating on the sclerites, which had been believed to be a novel feature restricted to 'scaly-foot' gastropods. Our new findings at the two newly discovered hydrothermal vent sites provide important insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of vent-endemic ecosystems in the Indian Ocean. PMID:22431990

  4. Tectonic evolution of Gorda Ridge inferred from sidescan sonar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masson, D.G.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Gorda Ridge is the southern segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge complex, in the north-east Pacific. Along-strike spreading-rate variation on Gorda Ridge and deformation of Gorda Plate are evidence for compression between the Pacific and Gorda Plates. GLORIA sidescan sonographs allow the spreading fabric associated with Gorda Ridge to be mapped in detail. Between 5 and 2 Ma, a pair of propagating rifts re-orientated the northern segment of Gorda Ridge by about 10?? clockwise, accommodating a clockwise shift in Pacific-Juan de Fuca plate motion that occurred around 5 Ma. Deformation of Gorda Plate, associated with southward decreasing spreading rates along southern Gorda Ridge, is accommodated by a combination of clockwise rotation of Gorda Plate crust, coupled with left-lateral motion on the original normal faults of the ocean crust. Segments of Gorda Plate which have rotated by different amounts are separated by narrow deformation zones across which sharp changes in ocean fabric trend are seen. Although minor lateral movement may occur on these NW to WNW structures, no major right-lateral movement, as predicted by previous models, is observed. ?? 1988 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  5. Transverse dune trailing ridges and vegetation succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; ‘Marisa' Martinez, M. L.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the evolution of, and vegetation succession on, a previously undescribed landform: transverse dune trailing ridges at El Farallón transgressive dunefield in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Three-dimensional clinometer/compass and tape topographic surveys were conducted in conjunction with 1 m 2 contiguous percent cover and presence/absence vegetation survey transects at eight locations across two adjacent trailing ridges. At the study site, and elsewhere, the transverse dune trailing ridges are formed by vegetation colonization of the lateral margins of active transverse, barchanoidal transverse, and aklé or network dunes. For simplicity, all trailing ridges formed from these dune types are referred to as transverse dune trailing ridges. Because there are several transverse dunes in the dunefield, multiple trailing ridges can be formed at one time. Two adjacent trailing ridges were examined. The shortest length ridge was 70 m long, and evolving from a 2.5 m-high transverse dune, while the longer ridge was 140 m long, and evolving from an 8 m-high dune. Trailing ridge length is a proxy measure of ridge age, since the longer the ridge, the greater the length of time since initial formation. With increasing age or distance upwind, species diversity increased, as well as species horizontal extent and percent cover. In turn, the degree of bare sand decreased. Overall, the data indicate a successional trend in the vegetation presence and cover with increasing age upwind. Those species most tolerant to burial ( Croton and Palafoxia) begin the process of trailing ridge formation. Ipomoea and Canavalia are less tolerant to burial and also are typically the next colonizing species. Trachypogon does not tolerate sand burial or deposition very well and only appears after significant stabilization has taken place. The ridges display a moderately defined successional sequence in plant colonization and percentage cover with time (and upwind distance). They are

  6. Seawater Circulation and Thermal Sink at OCEAN Ridges - FIELD Evidence in Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Cathles, L. M.; Buck, W. R.; Celerier, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally, the lowermost gabbros in the Oman ophiolite are black and totally fresh, except for minute traces of impregnation by seawater fluids at very high temperature (~1000°C). These black gabbros sharply contrast with normal, whitish gabbros altered down to Low-T~500-350°C. These hydrous alterations are ascribed to an unconventional model of seawater circulation and cooling of the permanent magma chambers of fast spreading ocean ridges. In this model, gabbros issued from the magma chamber cross a ~100 m thick thermal boundary layer (TBL) before reaching a narrow, Low-T high permeability channel where the heated return seawater is flowing towards black smokers and the local gabbros are altered. Uprising mantle diapirs in Oman diverge at ~5 km on each side of the palaeo-ridge axis and feed an overlying magma chamber that closes at this distance from axis. Preservation of black gabbros along the Moho implies that the loop of seawater alteration locally does not reach Moho beyond this ~5km distance (otherwise black gabbros would be altered in whitish gabbros). This defines an internal "thermal sink" within ~5 km to the ridge axis. There, the sink is efficiently cooled by the active hydrothermal convection that is ridge transverse. This has been documented near the Galapagos ridge by marine geophysical data, within the same distance. Beyond this critical distance, the cooling system becomes dominantly conductive and ridge-parallel. The TBL and attached return flow channels must be rising into the overcooled, accreted crust. Beyond the thermal sink, the 500°C isotherm rebounds into the crust. It is only after ~ 1My of crustal drift that this isotherm penetrates into the uppermost mantle in a sustained fashion, developing serpentinites at the expense of peridotites.

  7. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  8. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Study of Lateral Spreading of Cortical Activity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex Induced by a Current Impulse

    PubMed Central

    Fehérvári, Tamás Dávid; Sawai, Hajime; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), lateral spreading of excitatory potentials is believed to be involved in spatial integrative functions, but the underlying cortical mechanism is not well understood. Visually-evoked population-level responses have been shown to propagate beyond the V1 initial activation site in mouse, similar to higher mammals. Visually-evoked responses are, however, affected by neuronal circuits prior to V1 (retina, LGN), making the separate analysis of V1 difficult. Intracortical stimulation eliminates these initial processing steps. We used in vivo RH1691 voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging and intracortical microstimulation in adult C57BL/6 mice to elucidate the spatiotemporal properties of population-level signal spreading in V1 cortical circuits. The evoked response was qualitatively similar to that measured in single-cell electrophysiological experiments in rodents: a fast transient fluorescence peak followed by a fast and a slow decrease or hyperpolarization, similar to EPSP and fast and slow IPSPs in single cells. The early cortical response expanded at speeds commensurate with long horizontal projections (at 5% of the peak maximum, 0.08–0.15 m/s) however, the bulk of the VSD signal propagated slowly (at half-peak maximum, 0.05–0.08 m/s) suggesting an important role of regenerative multisynaptic transmission through short horizontal connections in V1 spatial integrative functions. We also found a tendency for a widespread and fast cortical response suppression in V1, which was eliminated by GABAA-antagonists gabazine and bicuculline methiodide. Our results help understand the neuronal circuitry involved in lateral spreading in V1. PMID:26230520

  9. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Aleutian convergent-margin basins - ridge crest to trench floor

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, D.W.; Ryan, H.F.; Geist, E.L.; Vallier, T.L.; Stevenson, A.J.; Childs, J.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The Aleutian Ridge lies along nearly 2000 km of the north Pacific's obliquely converging plate boundary with North America. Since middle Eocene time, convergent-margin basins have repeatedly formed here, typically as summit basins along the ridge crest, and as forearc basins on the landward trench slope. Summit and forearc basins formed as a consequence of plate-boundary coupling and the application of compressional and right-lateral shear stresses to the arc massif. Basins typically evolved along shear zones in response to transtensional processes, and as trailing-edge grabens behind rotating blocks of arc massif. In the late Cenozoic, high rates of trench sedimentation led to the growth of an accretionary complex that underthrust forearc basement. Wedging and improved plate coupling elevated and laterally shifted blocks of outer forearc rocks, creating much of the structural framework of the regionally extensive Aleutian Terrace forearc basin. Changes in plate-boundary conditions that affected the ridge's volcanic activity and regional elevation importantly influenced basinal sedimentation. Changes of greatest significance were a major shift in convergence direction and rate about 42 Ma (reduced volcanism), ridge underthrusting by increasingly younger ocean crust in Oligocene and Miocene time (arc elevation), and the combination of more orthogonal underthrusting and the subduction of a dead spreading center 5-10 Ma (arc subsidence).

  10. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Aleutian convergent-margin basins - Ridge crest to trench floor

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, D.W.; Ryan, H.F.; Geist, E.L.; Vallier, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Aleutian Ridge lies along nearly 2,000 km of the north Pacific's obliquely converging plate boundary with North America. Since middle Eocene time, convergent-margin basins have repeatedly formed here, typically as summit basins along the ridge crest, and as forecarc basins on the landward trench slope. Thick (1-4 km) sequences of terrigenous, hemipelagic, and biogenic debris have accumulated in these depressions, which are mostly intra-arc structures floored by arc-basement rocks. Summit and forearc basins formed as a consequence of plate-boundary coupling and the application of compressional and right-lateral shear stresses to the arc massif. Basins typically evolved along shear zones in response to transtensional processes, and as trailing-edge grabens behind rotating blocks of arc massif. In the late Cenozoic, high rates of trench sedimentation led to the growth of an accretionary complex that underthrust forearc basement. Wedging and improved plate coupling elevated and laterally shifted blocks of outer forearc rocks, creating much of the structural framework of the regionally extensive Aleutian Terrace forearc basin. Changes in plate-boundary conditions that affected the ridge's volcanic activity and regional elevation importantly influenced basinal sedimentation. Changes of greatest significant were a major shift in convergence direction and rate about 42 Ma (reduced volcanism), ridge underthrusting by increasingly younger ocean crust in Oligocena and Miocene time (arc elevation), and the combination of more orthogonal underthrusting and the subduction of a dead spreading center 5-120 Ma (arc subsidence).

  11. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2011-01-01

    We show that communication of single-photon quantum states in a multi-user environment is improved by using spread spectrum communication techniques. We describe a framework for spreading, transmitting, despreading, and detecting single-photon spectral states that mimics conventional spread spectrum techniques. We show in the cases of inadvertent detection, unintentional interference, and multi-user management, that quantum spread spectrum communications may minimize receiver errors by managing quantum channel access.

  12. Drill core-based facies reconstruction of a deep-marine felsic volcano hosting an active hydrothermal system (Pual Ridge, Papau New Guinea, ODP Leg 193)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulick, H.; Vanko, D. A.; Yeats, C. J.

    2004-02-01

    Pual Ridge is a deep-marine, felsic volcanic edifice in the eastern Manus back-arc basin (Papua New Guinea) with an estimated volume of ˜6 to 9 km 3. It is 1-1.5 km wide, 20 km long and rises 500-600 m above the surrounding ocean floor. The active PACMANUS hydrothermal field on the crest of Pual Ridge at 1640-1690 m below sea level was the target of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 193. Variably altered dacite lavas have been recovered from the subsurface of a low-T discharge site (Snowcap) and a high-T black smoker site (Roman Ruins) reaching a maximum depth of 380 m below seafloor (mbsf). Volcanic facies interpretation of these cores is difficult due to incomplete recovery and widespread pseudoclastic textures generated by fracturing and multi-phase, incomplete fluid-dacite interaction. However, distinction of genuine volcaniclastic facies and facies with alteration-related clastic appearance is important in order to define paleo-seafloor positions within the volcanic stratigraphy, that may be prospective for massive sulfide mineralization. This has been accomplished using remnant primary characteristics indicative of transportation such as polymictic composition, grading or textural evidence for differential movement of individual clasts. Three phases of volcanic activity can be distinguished and a proximal facies association dominated by coherent facies of dacite lavas exists below Snowcap. At Roman Ruins, a medial facies association consists of lava flows with about equal proportions of coherent and volcaniclastic facies. Endogenous growth was an important process during lava flow emplacement and groundmass textures such as perlite, flow banding and spherulites indicate that cooling rates were variable, locally allowing for high-temperature devitrification. A tube pumice breccia unit is interpreted as the resedimented facies of a quench fragmented, highly vesicular dacite lava carapace. Sulfide accumulations in the subsurface are restricted to Roman Ruins

  13. Marine Geophysical Investigations of Vestmannaeyjar and the Reykjanes Ridge, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, R. N.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Driscoll, N.; Detrick, R.

    2003-12-01

    In July-August 2003 we conducted brief surveys of the Vestmannaeyjar area, south of Iceland, to try to determine whether or not the recent volcanic eruptions here result from nascent plate boundary processes. We used the SIO SUBSCAN chirp seismic system to collect seismic profiles and sidescan sonar swaths from the R/V Bjarni Saemundsson, and the EM300 system on the R/V Arni Fridriksson to acquire swath bathymetry and backscatter data. Vestmannaeyjar, including the recently active eruptive centers of Surtsey and Heimaey, may be forming at the tip of the reorganizing North America - Eurasia plate boundary system, where the seafloor spreading on Iceland appears to be shifting from the Western Volcanic Zone to the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ). A linear chain of small islands and seafloor eruptions is consistent with Vestmannaeyjar being the southern extension of the EVZ. The seafloor volcanic pattern shows large spatial variability, with only a few indications of tectonic rift structures seen in either the seafloor or subsurface data. If this is the tip of a propagating rift, the rifting has not yet focussed the volcanic eruptions into a single coherent eruptive segment. Alternatively, these eruptions could result from plume flank volcanism, or some other process. In contrast to Vestmannaeyjar, a brief EM300 survey of the first Reykjanes Ridge segment offshore of the Reykjanes Peninsula shows that seafloor spreading here has been active long enough that the volcanism has coalesced into a focussed volcanic system. Few rift structures are visible here either, perhaps because shallow explosive eruptions tend to bury them. The approximately 20 degree change in azimuth between the en echelon volcanic system trends on the Reykjanes Peninsula and those observed on the Reykjanes Ridge occurs within this first offshore segment.

  14. The Spread of Aedes albopictus in Metropolitan France: Contribution of Environmental Drivers and Human Activities and Predictions for a Near Future

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Benjamin; Léger, Lucas; L’Ambert, Grégory; Lacour, Guillaume; Foussadier, Rémi; Besnard, Gilles; Barré-Cardi, Hélène; Simard, Frédéric; Fontenille, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of new territories by insect vector species that can transmit pathogens is one of the most important threats for human health. The spread of the mosquito Aedes albopictus in Europe is emblematic, because of its major role in the emergence and transmission of arboviruses such as dengue or chikungunya. Here, we modeled the spread of this mosquito species in France through a statistical framework taking advantage of a long-term surveillance dataset going back to the first observation of Ae. albopictus in the Metropolitan area. After validating the model, we show that human activities are especially important for mosquito dispersion while land use is a major factor for mosquito establishment. More importantly, we show that Ae. albopictus invasion is accelerating through time in this area, resulting in a geographic range extending further and further year after year. We also show that sporadic “jump” of Ae. albopictus in a new location far from the colonized area did not succeed in starting a new invasion front so far. Finally, we discuss on a potential adaptation to cooler climate and the risk of invasion into Northern latitudes. PMID:25962160

  15. The mean composition of ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Allison; Dalton, Colleen A.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Su, Yongjun; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-03-01

    mean composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is determined using a global data set of major elements, trace elements, and isotopes compiled from new and previously published data. A global catalog of 771 ridge segments, including their mean depth, length, and spreading rate enables calculation of average compositions for each segment. Segment averages allow weighting by segment length and spreading rate and reduce the bias introduced by uneven sampling. A bootstrapping statistical technique provides rigorous error estimates. Based on the characteristics of the data, we suggest a revised nomenclature for MORB. "ALL MORB" is the total composition of the crust apart from back-arc basins, N-MORB the most likely basalt composition encountered along the ridge >500 km from hot spots, and D-MORB the depleted end-member. ALL MORB and N-MORB are substantially more enriched than early estimates of normal ridge basalts. The mean composition of back-arc spreading centers requires higher extents of melting and greater concentrations of fluid-mobile elements, reflecting the influence of water on back-arc petrogenesis. The average data permit a re-evaluation of several problems of global geochemistry. The K/U ratio reported here (12,340 ± 840) is in accord with previous estimates, much lower than the estimate of Arevalo et al. (2009). The low Sm/Nd and 143Nd/144Nd ratio of ALL MORB and N-MORB provide constraints on the hypothesis that Earth has a non-chondritic primitive mantle. Either Earth is chondritic in Sm/Nd and the hypothesis is incorrect or MORB preferentially sample an enriched reservoir, requiring a large depleted reservoir in the deep mantle.

  16. Geology of a dying backarc spreading segment: results of high-density samplings of Godzilla Megamullion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Snow, J. E.; Michibayashi, K.; Dick, H. J.; Harigane, Y.; Tani, K.; Yamashita, H.; Ishizuka, O.; Loocke, M. P.; Ishii, T.; Okino, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Godzilla Megamullion is the largest known oceanic core complex (OCC), and is located in an extinct backarc basin in the Philippine Sea: the Parece Vela Basin (PVB). Earlier, based on poorly constrained magnetic data, we believed the basin was active from 26 to 12 Ma at an intermediate-spreading rate of 8.8-7.0 cm/year full-rate (Okino et al. 1998; Ohara et al. 2001, 2003). The tectono-magmatic characteristics of Godzilla Megamullion were thus thought unusual and paradoxical. Although a higher magmatic budget is expected for a fast- to intermediate-spreading ridge, the PVB shows features indicating a smaller magmatic budget, including oceanic core complexes and abundant peridotites and gabbros (Ohara et al., 2001; 2003). Many peridotites in the PVB are much less depleted than those exposed at comparable spreading rates on other mid-ocean ridge systems (Ohara et al. 2001, 2003; Ohara 2006). Zircon U-Pb dating of gabbroic and leucocratic rocks from Godzilla Megamullion now reveals that exhumation of the 125 km long detachment surface lasted for ~4 m.y., with continuous magmatic accretion at the spreading axis (Tani et al., 2011). The estimated denudation rate of the OCC was ~2.5 cm/y; significantly slower than the previous estimate based on magnetic data. The latest magmatism occurred at ~7.9 Ma or later, significantly younger than a previous estimate of 12 Ma. The new age data indicate that the terminal phase of PVB spreading was not at intermediate spreading rates, with a significant decline and asymmetry accompanying formation of Godzilla Megamullion in a "dying" backarc spreading segment. The recent field survey also supports a slow- to ultraslow-spreading environment for Godzilla Megamulllion, including increased melt stagnation in the shallow mantle, and decreasing degree of partial melting of the peridotites towards the termination of Godzilla Megamullion. We will be conducting a cruise (YK11-08) during October 2011 focused on the tectono-magmatic process

  17. [SCREENING OF WILD SPREAD AND CULTIVATED OF BUXUS SPECIES GROWING IN GEORGIA ON THE CONTENT OF ALKALOIDS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, N; Mchedlidze, Q; Novikova, J; Suladze, T; Vachnadze, V

    2016-07-01

    Georgian flora is represented by about 4150 plant species. Many important alkaloid-containing plant species and among of them are species Buxus L. of genus in Adjara. The aims of the research were: sequential screening of the plants for the consistence of alkaloids; Study of anatomical characteristics of Buxus colchica Pojark. and revealing of specific pharmacological activity of steroidal alkaloids. The objects of research were B. colchica, B. balearika and B. sempervirens, growing in Adjara (Georgia), collected in active phase of flowering of the plants. There were revealed 370 species of alkaloid containing plants. Sum of alkaloids and crude aqueous extract have spasmolitic and antihistaminic activity. Experimental anatomical research of diagnostic characteristics of the bines showed the existence of monocyclic transient system with fiber like tracheids, dorsoventral mesophyll of the leaves; the structure for the upper part of epidermis is linear and the lower part is curved, type of stomata is paracitic. PMID:27661282

  18. Segment-scale volcanic episodicity: Evidence from the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. A.; Devey, C. W.,; LeBas, T. P.; Augustin, N.; Steinführer, A.

    2016-04-01

    The upper oceanic crust is produced by magmatism at mid-ocean ridges, a process thought to be characterized by cyclic bouts of intense magmatic activity, separated by periods when faulting accommodates most or even all of the plate motion. It is not known whether there is a distinct periodicity to such magmatic-tectonic cycles. Here we present high-resolution sidescan sonar data from the neovolcanic zone of the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, a shallow slow-spreading ridge where high glacial and steady post-glacial sedimentation rates allow relative flow ages to be determined with a resolution of around 2 kyr using backscatter amplitude as a proxy for sediment thickness and hence age. We identify 18 lava flow fields covering 40% of the area surveyed. A group of 7 flow fields showing the highest (and similar) backscatter intensity are scattered along 75 km of axial valley surveyed, suggesting that at least this length of the segment was magmatically active within a 1.2 kyr time window. Based on conservative age estimates for all datable flows and estimated eruption volumes, the post-glacial volcanic activity imaged is insufficient to maintain crustal thickness, implying that episode(s) of enhanced activity must have preceded the volcanism we image.

  19. Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.C.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field measurements and sample collection conducted by the

  20. Oxygen Fugacity of Abyssal Peridotites Along the Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M.; Birner, S.; Cottrell, E.

    2015-12-01

    The oxygen budget of the Earth's mantle is important in understanding how our planet evolves chemically over time. The Gakkel Ridge is the world's slowest spreading ridge [1], and exposes peridotites along its axis that record the activity of oxygen in the upper mantle. Our samples comprise relatively fertile lherzolites and harzburgites (Cr#=0.13-0.17, 3.1-8.3% modal cpx [2]) as well as refractory harzburgites (Cr#=0.43-0.55, 0.2-1.0% modal cpx [2]). Using spinel peridotite oxygen barometry [3], we calculated the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a suite of 10 peridotites from the Gakkel Ridge in order to investigate how melt processes affect the oxygen budget of the Earth's interior. We show that the low-Cr# lherzolites and harzburgites range from -0.1 to +0.6 log units relative to the QFM buffer, consistent with the global abyssal peridotite array, whereas high-Cr# refractory harzburgites have low fO2 values, ranging from -0.7 to -2.7 log units below QFM, with the most refractory samples falling significantly lower than the global array. Because D'Errico et al. (submitted) interprets the refractory samples as recording ancient melt extraction, the low fO2 recorded by these samples may originate in the geologic past, perhaps even in a different tectonic setting. While LREE enrichment in the refractory harzburgites [2] provides evidence for refertilization by an infiltrating melt that could have recently imprinted reducing conditions, we see no corresponding increase in TiO2 content in the spinels, which weakens this hypothesis. Further research on additional refractory harzburgites is needed to constrain whether the reduced nature of these samples is telling us something about the effect of extreme melt extraction on fO2 at ridges, or whether these samples record a unique history that obscures processes operating at ridges today. [1] Coakley and Cochran, EPSL (1998), [2] D'Errico et al., submitted, [3] Bryndzia and Wood, American Journal of Science (1990)

  1. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  2. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  3. Model of Methane Hydrate Formation in Mid-ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrievsky, A. N.; Balanyuk, I. E.; Sorokhtin, O. G.; Matveenkov, V. V.; Dongaryan, L. Sh.

    2003-04-01

    MODEL OF METHANE HYDRATE FORMATION IN MID-OCEAN RIDGES A.N. Dmitrievsky, I.E. Balanyuk, O.G.Sorokhtin, V.V. Matveenkov, and L.Sh. Dongaryan P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia, balanyuk@sio.rssi.ru One among the most perspective direction in studying the ocean floor is the research of hydrothermal fields within the most active zones — rift valleys, where the processes of spreading of the ocean floor, uplift of the deep matter to the surface of the ocean floor, and creation of the new oceanic crust occur. Volcanic activity in these zones is accompanied with the formation of the hydrothermal system executing separation, transfer, and precipitation of a series of chemical elements. It is known that ore deposits with high concentration of iron, manganese, copper, nickel, cobalt are formed as a result of hydrothermal activity. It is much less known that hydrothermal activity in these zones has important but not so evident result — the formation of hydrocarbons in the form of methane hydrates. We propose the hypothesis of formation of methane hydrate deposits over the shallow slopes of the mid-oceanic ridges as an outcome of the action of two factors: the thermal convection of water in fractured-porous rocks of the crust and the reaction of serpentinization of the crust. The intensive exhalation of hydrocarbons takes place in the process of serpentinization. The conditions of water convection in the porous media are favorable for the formation and accumulation of methane hydrates in the near-surface layers of the oceanic crust. The carbonic-acid gas dissolved in the seawater is involved into the process of methane hydrate formation. It was established that the most favorable conditions for this mechanism are over the slopes of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. All types of water areas where gas hydrates occur can be conditionally subdivided into following geodynamic zones: the abyssal basins of the inner and marginal seas, the

  4. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific.

  6. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific. PMID:17792827

  7. Results from a 14-month hydroacoustic monitoring of the three mid-oceanic ridges in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, J.-Y.; Dziak, R. P.; Delatre, M.; Chateau, R.; Brachet, C.; Haxel, J. H.; Matsumoto, H.; Goslin, J.; Brandon, V.; Bohnenstielh, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    From October 2006 to January 2008, an hydroacoustic experiment in the Indian Ocean was carried out by the CNRS/University of Brest and NOAA/Oregon State University to monitor the low-level seismic activity associated with the three contrasting spreading ridges and deforming zones in the Indian Ocean. Three autonomous hydrophones were moored in the SOFAR channel by R/V Marion Dufresne for 14 months in the Madagascar Basin, and northeast and southwest of Amsterdam Island, complementing the two permanent hydroacoustic stations of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) located near Diego Garcia Island and off Cape Leeuwin. The three instruments successfully collected 14 month of continuous acoustic records. Combined with the records from the permanent stations, the array detected 1780 acoustic events consisting mostly of earthquake generated T-waves, but also of iceberg tremors from Wilkes Land, Antarctica. Within the triangle defined by the temporary array, the three ridges exhibit contrasting seismicity patterns. Along the Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR), the 272 acoustic events (vs 24 events in the NEIC catalog) occur predominantly along the transform faults ; only one ridge segment (76˚E) displays a continuous activity for 10 months. Along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), seismicity is distributed along fracture zones and ridge segments (269 events vs 45 NEIC events), with two clusters of events near the triple junction (24-25S) and south of Marie-Celeste FZ (18.5S). Along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), the 222 events (vs 31 NEIC events) are distributed along the ridge segments with a larger number of events west of Melville FZ and a cluster at 58E. The immediate vicinity of the Rodrigues triple junction shows periods of quiescence and of intense activity. Some large earthquakes (Mb>5) near the triple junction (SEIR and CIR) seem to be preceded by several acoustic events that may be precursors. Finally, off-ridge seismicity is mostly

  8. Endogenous mechanisms underlying the activation and sensitization of meningeal nociceptors: the role of immuno-vascular interactions and cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dan

    2012-06-01

    Migraine is considered one of the most prevalent neurological disorders but its underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Over the past two decades, it became widely accepted that activation of primary afferent nociceptive neurons that innervate the intracranial meninges serves as a key process that mediates the throbbing head pain of migraine. Knowledge about the endogenous factors that play a role in promoting this neural process during a migraine attack slowly begins to increase, and a better understanding remains one of the holy grails in migraine research. One endogenous process, which has been invoked as a major player in the genesis of migraine pain, is cortical spreading depression (CSD). Until recently, however, this notion was only supported by indirect evidence. Recently, electrophysiological data provided the first direct evidence that CSD is indeed a powerful endogenous process that can lead to persistent activation of meningeal nociceptors and the migraine pain pathway. CSD has been suggested to promote persistent sensitization and ensuing activation of meningeal nociceptors through a mechanism involving local neurogenic inflammation including the activation of mast cells and macrophages and subsequent release of inflammatory mediators. Local action of such nociceptive mediators can increase the responsiveness of meningeal nociceptors. Recent studies provided key experimental data implicating complex meningeal immuno-vascular interactions, in particular, the interplay between proinflammatory cytokines, the meningeal vasculature and immune cells, in enhancing the responses of meningeal nociceptors.

  9. The effects of hip external rotator exercises and toe-spread exercises on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking in subjects with pronated foot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toe-spread (TS) exercises and hip external rotator strengthening exercises for pronated feet on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy adults with no present or previous pain, no past history of surgery on the foot or the ankle, and no foot deformities. Ten subjects performed hip external rotator strengthening exercises and TS exercises and the remaining ten subjects performed only TS exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] Less change in navicular drop height occurred in the group that performed hip external rotator exercises than in the group that performed only TS exercises. The group that performed only TS exercises showed increased abductor hallucis muscle activity during both stair-climbing and -descending, and the group that performed hip external rotator exercises showed increased muscle activities of the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis during stair-climbing and increased muscle activity of only the abductor hallucis during stair-descending after exercise. [Conclusion] Stair-walking can be more effectively performed if the hip external rotator muscle is strengthened when TS exercises are performed for the pronated foot. PMID:27134364

  10. The potential role of an unregulated coastal anthropogenic activity in facilitating the spread of a non-indigenous biofoulant.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Eilir Hedd; Richardson, Christopher Alan

    2012-01-01

    Despite an exponential rise in anthropogenically-mediated transfers of non-indigenous species during the last 150 years, several coastal anthropogenic activities remain unregulated under current legislation frameworks. This study investigates the potential role of commercial periwinkle (Littorina littorea) harvesting as an unregulated facilitator of both small- and large-scale geographic range expansion of an invasive oyster epibiont (Ostrea chilensis) within the Menai Strait (North Wales, UK) and beyond. The frequency of oyster-fouled periwinkles was greatest in areas of high adult oyster abundance and restricted to large, market-sized periwinkles (>20 mm) inhabiting the low shore. Active efforts by commercial collectors to reject oyster-fouled periwinkles were found to be inadequate, with oysters of all sizes observed within collected hauls. Whilst the survival of fouled and unfouled periwinkles was comparable under post-collection refrigerated conditions, a significant decrease in both mobility and flesh content was associated with the presence of oyster epibionts. Survival of all but the smallest oyster epibionts under post-collection refrigerated conditions enhances the possibility of accidental non-indigenous oyster transfers. Better interventions during both initial visual inspection and post-griddling stages are recommended, as well as the development of techniques that kill off all non-indigenous epibionts, whilst leaving the freshness and marketability of the periwinkles uncompromised.

  11. The potential role of an unregulated coastal anthropogenic activity in facilitating the spread</