Science.gov

Sample records for active steroid hormones

  1. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  2. Persistent Organochlorine Pollutants with Endocrine Activity and Blood Steroid Hormone Levels in Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Emeville, Elise; Giton, Frank; Giusti, Arnaud; Oliva, Alejandro; Fiet, Jean; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Blanchet, Pascal; Multigner, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies relating long-term exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) with endocrine activities (endocrine disrupting chemicals) on circulating levels of steroid hormones have been limited to a small number of hormones and reported conflicting results. Objective We examined the relationship between serum concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, androstenediol, testosterone, free and bioavailable testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrone, estrone sulphate, estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone as a function of level of exposure to three POPs known to interfere with hormone-regulated processes in different way: dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 153, and chlordecone. Methods We collected fasting, morning serum samples from 277 healthy, non obese, middle-aged men from the French West Indies. Steroid hormones were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, except for dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, which was determined by immunological assay, as were the concentrations of sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone. Associations were assessed by multiple linear regression analysis, controlling for confounding factors, in a backward elimination procedure, in multiple bootstrap samples. Results DDE exposure was negatively associated to dihydrotestosterone level and positively associated to luteinizing hormone level. PCB 153 was positively associated to androstenedione and estrone levels. No association was found for chlordecone. Conclusions These results suggested that the endocrine response pattern, estimated by determining blood levels of steroid hormones, varies depending on the POPs studied, possibly reflecting differences in the modes of action generally attributed to these compounds. It remains to be investigated whether this response pattern

  3. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-07

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system.

  4. Fate of steroid hormones and endocrine activities in swine manure disposal and treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Combalbert, Sarah; Bellet, Virginie; Dabert, Patrick; Bernet, Nicolas; Balaguer, Patrick; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina

    2012-03-01

    Manure may contain high concern endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) such as steroid hormones, naturally produced by pigs, which are present at μgL(-1) levels. Manure may also contain other EDCs such as nonylphenols (NP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins. Thus, once manure is applied to the land as soil fertilizer these compounds may reach aquifers and consequently living organisms, inducing abnormal endocrine responses. In France, manure is generally stored in anaerobic tanks prior spreading on land; when nitrogen removal is requested, manure is treated by aerobic processes before spreading. However, little is known about the fate of hormones and multiple endocrine-disrupting activities in such manure disposal and treatment systems. Here, we determined the fate of hormones and diverse endocrine activities during manure storage and treatment by combining chemical analysis and in vitro quantification of estrogen (ER), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), androgen (AR), pregnane-X (PXR) and peroxysome proliferator-activated γ (PPARγ) receptor-mediated activities. Our results show that manure contains large quantities of hormones and activates ER and AhR, two of the nuclear receptors studied. Most of these endocrine activities were found in the solid fraction of manure and appeared to be induced mainly by hormones and other unidentified pollutants. Hormones, ER and AhR activities found in manure were poorly removed during manure storage but were efficiently removed by aerobic treatment of manure.

  5. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  6. Steroid hormones and BDNF.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, N; Russo, M; Santoro, A N; Litta, P; Cela, V; Genazzani, A R

    2013-06-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin abundantly expressed in several areas of the central nervous system (CNS) and is known to induce a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy, to enhance specific learning and memory processes. BDNF is one of the key molecules modulating brain plasticity and it affects cognitive deficit associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies have shown an altered BDNF production and secretion in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases but also in mood disorders like depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. Plasma BDNF is also a biomarker of impaired memory and general cognitive function in aging women. Gonadal steroids are involved in the regulation of several CNS processes, specifically mood, affective and cognitive functions during fertile life and reproductive aging. These observations lead many scientists to investigate a putative co-regulation between BDNF and gonadal and/or adrenal steroids and their relationship with gender difference in the incidence of mental diseases. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge on the correlation between BDNF expression/function and both gonadal (progesterone, estrogens, and testosterone) and adrenal hormones (mainly cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)) with relevance in clinical application.

  7. FLASH interacts with p160 coactivator subtypes and differentially suppresses transcriptional activity of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P

    2004-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor- and Fas-associated FLASH interacts with one of the p160 nuclear receptor coactivators, glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) 1, at its nuclear receptor-binding (NRB) domain, and that inhibits the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by interfering with association of GR and GRIP1. Here, we further examined the specificity of FLASH suppressive effect and the physical/functional interactions between this protein and two other p160 family subtypes. The suppressive effect of FLASH on GR transactivation was observed in several cell lines and on the chromatin-integrated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. FLASH strongly interacted with the NRB domain of the thyroid hormone receptor activator molecule (TRAM) 1, a member of the steroid hormone receptor coactivator (SRC) 3/nuclear receptor coactivator (N-CoA) 3 subtypes, as well as with SRC2/N-CoA2 p160 coactivator GRIP1, while its interaction with SRC1a, one of the SRC1/N-CoA1 proteins, was faint in yeast two-hybrid assays. Accordingly, FLASH strongly suppressed TRAM1- and GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR-stimulated transactivation of the MMTV promoter in HCT116 cells, while it did not affect SRC1a-induced potentiation of transcription. Furthermore, FLASH suppressed androgen- and progesterone receptor-induced transcriptional activity, but did not influence estrogen receptor-induced transactivation, possibly due to their preferential use of p160 coactivators in HCT116 and HeLa cells. Thus, FLASH differentially suppresses steroid hormone receptor-induced transcriptional activity by interfering with their association with SRC2/N-CoA2 and SRC3/N-CoA3 but not with SRC1/N-CoA1.

  8. Steroid plant hormones: effects outside plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Zhabinskii, Vladimir N; Khripach, Natalia B; Khripach, Vladimir A

    2015-05-01

    Brassinosteroids (BS) are the first group of steroid-hormonal compounds isolated from and acting in plants. Among numerous physiological effects of BS growth stimulation and adaptogenic activities are especially remarkable. In this review, we provide evidence that BS possess similar types of activity also beyond plant kingdom at concentrations comparable with those for plants. This finding allows looking at steroids from a new point of view: how common are the mechanisms of steroid bioregulation in different types of organisms from protozoa to higher animals.

  9. Comparative aspects of steroid hormone metabolism and ovarian activity in felids, measured noninvasively in feces.

    PubMed

    Brown, J L; Wasser, S K; Wildt, D E; Graham, L H

    1994-10-01

    Noninvasive fecal assays were used to study steroid metabolism and ovarian activity in several felid species. Using the domestic cat (Felis catus) as model, the excretory products of injected [14C]estradiol (E2) and [14C]progesterone (P4) were determined. Within 2 days, 97.0 +/- 0.6% and 96.7 +/- 0.5% of recovered E2 and P4 radioactivity, respectively, was found in feces. E2 was excreted as unconjugated estradiol and estrone (40%) and as a non-enzyme-hydrolyzable conjugate (60%). P4 was excreted primarily as non-enzyme-hydrolyzable, conjugated metabolites (78%) and as unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. A simple method for extracting fecal steroid metabolites optimized extraction efficiencies of the E2 and P4 excretion products (90.1 +/- 0.8% and 87.2 +/- 1.4%, respectively). Analysis of HPLC fractions of extracted fecal samples from the radiolabel-injected domestic cats revealed that E2 immunoreactivity coincided primarily with the unconjugated metabolized [14C]E2 peak, whereas progestogen immunoreactivity coincided with a single conjugated epimer and multiple unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. After HPLC separation, similar immunoreactive E2 and P4 metabolite profiles were observed in the leopard cat (F. bengalensis), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), and snow leopard (Panthera uncia). Longitudinal analyses demonstrated that changes in fecal E2 and P4 metabolite concentrations reflected natural or artificially induced ovarian activity. For example, severalfold increases in E2 excretion were associated with overt estrus or exogenous gonadotropin treatment, and elevated fecal P4 metabolite concentrations occurred during pregnant and nonpregnant (pseudopregnant) luteal phases. Although overall concentrations were similar, the duration of elevated fecal P4 metabolites during pseudopregnancy was approximately half that observed during pregnancy. In summary, steroid metabolism mechanisms appear to be conserved among these physically

  10. Alligators, contaminants and steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Guillette, Louis J; Edwards, Thea M; Moore, Brandon C

    2007-01-01

    Steroids are essential for successful reproduction in all vertebrate species. Over the last several decades, extensive research has indicated that exposure to various environmental pollutants can disrupt steroidogenesis and steroid signaling. Although steroidogenesis is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, it is also modified by various paracrine and autocrine factors. Furthermore, the classical two-cell model of steroidogenesis in the developing ovarian follicle, involving the granulosa and theca cells in mammals, may not be universal. Instead, birds and probably reptiles use the two thecal compartments (theca interna and theca externa) as sites of steroid production. We have documented that embryonic or juvenile exposure to a complex mixture of contaminants from agricultural and storm water runoff leads to altered steroid hormone profiles in American alligators. Our observations suggest that alterations in plasma steroid hormone concentrations are due in part to altered gene expression, modified hepatic biotransformation and altered gonadal steroidogenesis. Future studies must examine the interplay between endocrine and paracrine regulation in the development and expression of gonadal steroidogenesis in individuals exposed to endocrine disrupting contaminants at various life stages if we are to fully understand potential detrimental outcomes.

  11. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor-Controlled Steroid Hormone Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinhan; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential in normal physiology whereas disruptions in hormonal homeostasis represent an important etiological factor for many human diseases. Steroid hormones exert most of their functions through the binding and activation of nuclear hormone receptors (NRs or NHRs), a superfamily of DNA-binding and often ligand-dependent transcription factors. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that NRs can also regulate the biosynthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones. This review will focus on the recent progress in our understanding of the regulatory role of NRs in hormonal homeostasis and the implications of this regulation in physiology and diseases. PMID:19762543

  12. Estrone Sulfate Transport and Steroid Sulfatase Activity in Colorectal Cancer: Implications for Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, Lorna C.; Gondal, Ali; Tang, Vivien; Hussain, Maryam T.; Arvaniti, Anastasia; Hewitt, Anne-Marie; Foster, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) affects the incidence and potential progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). As HRT primarily consists of estrone sulfate (E1S), understanding whether this conjugated estrogen is transported and metabolized in CRC will define its potential effect in this malignancy. Here, we show that a panel of CRC cell lines (Colo205, Caco2, HCT116, HT-29) have steroid sulfatase (STS) activity, and thus can hydrolyze E1S. STS activity is significantly higher in CRC cell lysate, suggesting the importance of E1S transport in intracellular STS substrate availability. As E1S transport is regulated by the expression pattern of certain solute carrier organic anion transporter polypeptides, we show that in CRC OATP4A1 is the most abundantly expressed transporter. All four CRC cell lines rapidly transported E1S into cells, with this effect significantly inhibited by the competitive OATP inhibitor BSP. Transient knockdown of OATP4A1 significantly disrupted E1S uptake. Examination of estrogen receptor status showed ERα was present in Colo205 and Caco2 cells. None of the cells expressed ERβ. Intriguingly, HCT116 and HT29 cells strongly expressed the G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), and that stimulation of this receptor with estradiol (E2) and G1, a GPER agonist, significantly (p < 0.01) increased STS activity. Furthermore, tamoxifen and fulvestrant, known GPER agonist, also increased CRC STS activity, with this effect inhibited by the GPER antagonist G15. These results suggest that CRC can take up and hydrolyze E1S, and that subsequent GPER stimulation increases STS activity in a potentially novel positive feedback loop. As elevated STS expression is associated with poor prognosis in CRC, these results suggest HRT, tamoxifen and fulvestrant may negatively impact CRC patient outcomes. PMID:28326039

  13. Overlapping nongenomic and genomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Stephen R.; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The genomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids depend upon primary interactions of the hormones with their specific nuclear receptor proteins. Formation of nuclear co-activator or co-repressor complexes involving the liganded receptors subsequently result in transcriptional events—either activation or suppression—at genes that are specific targets of thyroid hormone or steroids. Nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids are in contrast initiated at binding sites on the plasma membrane or in cytoplasm or organelles and do not primarily require formation of intranuclear receptor protein-hormone complexes. Importantly, hormonal actions that begin nongenomically outside the nucleus often culminate in changes in nuclear transcriptional events that are regulated by both traditional intranuclear receptors as well as other nuclear transcription factors. In the case of thyroid hormone, the extranuclear receptor can be the classical “nuclear” thyroid receptor (TR), a TR isoform, or integrin αvβ3. In the case of steroid hormones, the membrane receptor is usually, but not always, the classical “nuclear” steroid receptor. This concept defines the paradigm of overlapping nongenomic and genomic hormone mechanisms of action. Here we review some examples of how extranuclear signaling by thyroid hormone and by estrogens and androgens modulates intranuclear hormone signaling to regulate a number of vital biological processes both in normal physiology and in cancer progression. We also point out that nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone may mimic effects of estrogen in certain tumors. PMID:26303085

  14. Steroid Hormones in NF1 Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    neurofibroma and MPNST Schwann cells. We found less than 2-fold difference in these transcripts in tumor versus normal Schwann cells (in those that changed...neurofibromin-negative) to steroid hormones, focusing on estrogen and progesterone. The hypothesis is that human neurofibroma (and MPNST , malignant...to determine steroid hormone receptor expression in human normal, NF1 neurofibroma, and NF1 MPNST Schwann cells, pre- and post-hormone treatment by

  15. Steroid hormones as biomarkers of endocrine disruption in wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Guillette, L.J. Jr.; Rooney, A.A.; Crain, D.A.; Orlando, E.F.

    1999-07-01

    Xenobiotic compounds introduced into the environment by human activity have been shown to adversely affect the endocrine system of wildlife. Various species exhibit abnormalities of (1) plasma sex steroid hormones, (2) altered steroid synthesis form the gonad in vitro and (3) altered steroidogenic enzyme function. These endpoints are sensitive and relatively easy to measure quantitatively with reliability and precision. These observations have led to the conclusion that sex steroid hormones could be markers of exposure to, and altered function from, endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs). However, there are serious limitations in the use of steroid hormones as generalized markers of EDC exposure. Steroid hormones exhibit seasonal, ontogenetic, gender and species-specific variation. Moreover, the regulation of sex steroid plasma concentrations is a relatively complex phenomenon capable of short-term (minutes-hours) alteration due to environmental inputs, such as acute stress--an activational response. Alterations in steroids synthesis and degradation also can be a response to altered embryonic development due to EDC exposure--an organizational response. If steroid hormones are to be used as biomarkers, then closely controlled, well designed sampling has to be performed. Additionally, an appreciation of the variation possible in endocrine responses among the species to be studied must be obtained.

  16. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  17. Steroid Hormones in NF1 Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    NFl is characterized by benign Schwann cell tumors called neurofibromas; complex forms can become malignant ( MPNST ). Little is known about...neurofibroma (and/or MPNST ) Schwann cells have increased growth or decreased apoptosis related to steroid hormones. Specific Aim 1 is examining steroid...hormone receptor expression in human normal, NFl neurofibroma and MPNST Schwann cells. Real-time PCR shows very low levels of these receptor

  18. [Urinary excretion of steroid hormone and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in normal young adult women].

    PubMed

    Takeyasu, M; Kato, T

    1999-01-01

    The urinary steroid hormone metabolites and the ratio of pregnenetriol (delta 5P3) to pregnanetriol (P3) as indicators of 3 beta HSD activity in the urine of healthy young female were measured by means of capillary gas chromatography. All of the subjects have finished the normal pubertal development, and their adrenal steroid hormone secretion had reached to the stable state. We analyzed the diurnal variation, fluctuation during menstrual cycle and seasonal variation of delta 5P3/P3. We found that the hormone excretion in the urine of the morning during the follicular phase of menstrual cycle was relatively stable, and that the ratio of delta 5P3/P3 correlated highly with that in the total daily urine. In the seasonal variation, the urinary delta 5P3/P3 ratio in the subjects of high urinary DHEA group was relatively high, and that of the low DHEA group was low. Although the difference of delta 5P3/P3 ratio of the both groups was small, but statistically significant. Individual difference in the delta 5P3/P3 ratio was relatively small in comparison with that of the urinary DHEA excretion. About 5% of the all subjects showed marked high value of delta 5P3/P3 ratio. About 80% of the high urinary excretion group showed higher value than the average delta 5P3/P3 ratio. These findings suggest that the normal young female subjects were divided into several groups with regard to the urinary DHEA excretion pattern and delta 5P3/P3 ratio in the urine. Both of them may be a specific individual marker.

  19. Steroid Hormones and Uterine Vascular Adaptation to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Katherine; Zhang, Lubo

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological state that involves a significant decrease in uterine vascular tone and an increase in uterine blood flow, which is mediated in part by steroid hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and cortisol. Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of these hormones in the regulation of uterine artery contractility through signaling pathways specific to the endothelium and the vascular smooth muscle. Alterations in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and activity, nitric oxide production, and expression of enzymes involved in PGI2 production contribute to the uterine artery endothelium-specific responses. Steroid hormones also have an effect on calcium-activated potassium channel activity, PKC signaling pathway and myogenic tone, and alterations in pharmacomechanical coupling in the uterine artery smooth muscle. This review addresses current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which steroid hormones including estrogen, progesterone, and cortisol modulate uterine artery contractility to alter uterine blood flow during pregnancy with an emphasis on the pregnant ewe model. PMID:18497342

  20. Steroid Hormones in NF1 Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    hypothesis is that human neurofibroma (and/or MPNST ) Schwann cells have increased hormone response compared to normal Schwann cells, leading to tumor...growth. Specific Aim 1 will determine steroid hormone receptor expression in human normal, NFl neurofibroma and MPNST Schwann cells. Real-time PCR has...and rat Schwann cells, as well as an MPNST line so far (which showed no proliferative response) Specific Aim 3 involves in vivo hormone response of

  1. Mice lacking Mrp1 have reduced testicular steroid hormone levels and alterations in steroid biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    SIVILS, JEFFREY C.; GONZALEZ, IVEN; BAIN, LISA J.

    2010-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a member of the ABC active transporter family that can transport several steroid hormone conjugates, including 17β-estradiol glucuronide, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and estrone 3-sulfate. The present study investigated the role that MRP1 plays in maintaining proper hormone levels in the serum and testes. Serum and testicular steroid hormone levels were examined in both wild-type mice and Mrp1 null mice. Serum testosterone levels were reduced 5-fold in mice lacking Mrp1, while testicular androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were significantly reduced by 1.7- to 4.5-fold in Mrp1 knockout mice. Investigating the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in steroid hormones in Mrp1-/- mice revealed no differences in the expression or activity of enzymes that inactivate steroids, the sulfotransferases or glucuronosyltransferases. However, steroid biosynthetic enzyme levels in the testes were altered. Cyp17 protein levels were increased by 1.6-fold, while Cyp17 activity using progesterone as a substrate was also increased by 1.4-2.0-fold in mice lacking Mrp1. Additionally, the ratio of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase to 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and steroidogenic factor 1 to 3βhydroxysteroid dehydrogenase were significantly increased in the testes of Mrp1-/- mice. These results indicate that Mrp1-/- mice have lowered steroid hormones levels, and suggests that upregulation of steroid biosynthetic enzymes may be an attempt to maintain proper steroid hormone homeostasis. PMID:20178799

  2. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or ‘free’ fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the ‘primary gatekeepers of steroid action’. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  3. Steroid Hormones in NF1 Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    This work is testing the hypothesis that human NF1 neurofibroma (and/or MPNST ) Schwann cells have increased growth or decreased apoptosis in response...to estrogen and progesterone. Specific Aim 1 measured steroid hormone receptor expression in human normal, NF1 neurofibroma and MPNST Schwann cells...responses of the neurofibroma/ MPNST Schwann cell cultures to hormones or antagonists, but no global patterns, indicating tumors behave individually as

  4. Steroid hormone sulphation in lead workers.

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P; Romeo, L; Peroni, E; Ferioli, A; Ferrari, S; Pasini, F; Aprili, F

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of steroid hormones has been investigated in 10 workers exposed to lead and in 10 non-exposed subjects to determine whether lead interferes with the first or second phase reactions of steroid hormone biotransformation, or both. In the exposed workers blood lead concentrations (PbB) ranged from 45 to 69 micrograms/100 ml; in the controls PbB was less than 25 micrograms/100 ml. No statistical differences were found for the total amount of the urinary hormone metabolites, but a drop of about 50% was observed for the sulphated portion. It is suggested that lead interferes with the mechanisms of sulphoconjugation through an effect on the cytosol enzymes sulphotransferase and sulphokinase. PMID:2930732

  5. Effect of antibodies against distinctive rat liver estrogen-binding protein on hormone-binding activity of this protein and steroid hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.N.; Shchelkunova, T.A.; Smirnova, O.V.; Rozen, V.B.

    1986-12-10

    The effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies (AB) against a distinctive estrogen-binding protein (DEBP) of rat liver, isolated using an immunosorbent, on the interaction of (/sup 3/H)estradiol with the DEBP and estrogen receptors of the uterus and other tissues, as well as of (/sup 3/H)dihydrotestosterone with prostate androgen receptors, (/sup 3/H)progesterone with uterine progesterone receptors, and (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone with rat thymus glucocorticoid receptors was investigated. It was found that preincubation of the cytosol of the tissues under investigation with the antibodies decreases the capacity of the DEBP of the estrogen and androgen receptors to bind the corresponding ligand. The hormone-binding activity of progesterone and the glucocorticoid receptors does not change in the presence of AB. The binding activity of DEBP in the presence of AB decreases as a result of a decrease in the concentration of binding sites of the protein, while that of the estrogen and androgen receptors drops as a result of a decrease in affinity for the ligand, due to a drop in the association rate constant. A cross effect of AB on the activity of uterine estrogen receptors of the rabbit, guinea pig, and mouse was found. It was concluded that there is a definite similarity in the structure of DEBP and sex steroid receptors.

  6. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... steroids (say: STARE-oydz), they often mean illegal anabolic steroids. Anabolic steroids are artificially produced hormones that are the same ... these is testosterone (say: tes-TOSS-tuh-rone). Anabolic steroids can be taken in the form of pills, ...

  7. Stem cells with neurogenic potential and steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Iván

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent stem cells with differentiation potential to neural phenotypes have been described and characterized in the last decades. Embryonic stem cells, as well as neural stem cells from developing and adult nervous system, can differentiate into different types of neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. Although the initially identified actions of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone are related to sexual reproductive functions, recent evidence shows that these steroid hormones modulate development, physiology and survival of nerve cells. Furthermore, neurosteroids can be synthesized in the developing and adult nervous system. A description of the molecular modulatory actions of sex steroid hormones on the Central Nervous System is presented. The main focus of this review is to summarize the described effects of steroid hormones (progesterone, allopregnanolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, estradiol and androgens) on cell parameters relevant to stem cells, both in vitro and in vivo. The overall conclusion is that steroid hormones influence stem cell behavior by several mechanisms, namely regulation of gene expression by binding to their cognate receptors, activation of intracellular pathways involving kinases or intracellular calcium signaling, and modulation of receptors for neurotransmitters; in some instances, these hormones can substitute or modulate the action of growth factors, and also directly influence self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation or cell death of neurogenic stem cells.

  8. Conserved steroid hormone homology converges on nuclear factor κB to modulate inflammation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Payne, Asha S; Freishtat, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a complex, multifactorial disease comprising multiple different subtypes, rather than a single disease entity, yet it has a consistent clinical phenotype: recurring episodes of chest tightness, wheezing, and difficulty breathing (Pediatr Pulmonol Suppl. 1997;15:9-12). Despite the complex pathogenesis of asthma, steroid hormones (eg, glucocorticoids) are ubiquitous in the short-term and long-term management of all types of asthma. Overall, steroid hormones are a class of widely relevant, biologically active compounds originating from cholesterol and altered in a stepwise fashion, but maintain a basic 17-carbon, 4-ring structure. Steroids are lipophilic molecules that diffuse readily through cell membranes to directly and/or indirectly affect gene transcription. In addition, they use rapid, nongenomic actions to affect cellular products. Steroid hormones comprise several groups (including glucocorticoids, sex steroid hormones, and secosteroids) with critical divergent biological and physiological functions relevant to health and disease. However, the conserved homology of steroid hormone molecules, receptors, and signaling pathways suggests that each of these is part of a dynamic system of hormone interaction, likely involving an overlap of downstream signaling mechanisms. Therefore, we will review the similarities and differences of these 3 groups of steroid hormones (ie, glucocorticoids, sex steroid hormones, and secosteroids), identifying nuclear factor κB as a common inflammatory mediator. Despite our understanding of the impact of individual steroids (eg, glucocorticoids, sex steroids and secosteroids) on asthma, research has yet to explain the interplay of the dynamic system in which these hormones function. To do so, there needs to be a better understanding of the interplay of classic, nonclassic, and nongenomic steroid hormone functions. However, clues from the conserved homology steroid hormone structure and function and signaling pathways offer

  9. Steroidal hormones and other endocrine active compounds in shallow groundwater in nonagricultural areas of Minnesota—Study design, methods, and data, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Melinda L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, completed a study on the occurrence of steroidal hormones and other endocrine active compounds in shallow groundwater in nonagricultural areas of Minnesota during 2009–10. This report describes the study design and methods, and presents the data collected on steroidal hormones and other related compounds. Environmental and quality-control samples were collected from 40 wells as part of this study. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for 16 steroidal hormones and 4 other related compounds, of which all but 2 compounds are endocrine active compounds. Most of the water samples did not contain detectable concentrations of any of the 20 compounds analyzed. Water samples from three wells had detectable concentrations of one or more compounds. Bisphenol A was detected in samples from three wells, and trans-diethylstilbestrol was detected in one of the samples in which bisphenol A also was detected.

  10. Brain and gonadal aromatase activity and steroid hormone levels in female and polymorphic males of the peacock blenny Salaria pavo.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, David; Teles, Magda; Alpedrinha, João; Oliveira, Rui F

    2008-11-01

    In the peacock blenny Salaria pavo large males with well-developed secondary sexual characters establish nests and attract females while small "sneaker" males mimic female sexual displays in order to approach the nests of larger males and parasitically fertilize eggs. These alternative reproductive tactics are sequential, as sneakers irreversibly switch into nesting males. This transition involves major morphologic and behavioral changes and is likely to be mediated by hormones. This study focuses on the role of aromatase, an enzyme that catalyses the conversion of androgens into estrogens, in the regulation of male sexual polymorphism in S. pavo. For this, sex steroid plasma levels and aromatase activity (AA) in gonads, whole brain and brain macroareas were determined in sneakers, transitional males (i.e. sneakers undergoing the transition into nesting males), nesting males and females collected in the field. AA was much higher in ovarian tissue than in testicular tissue and accordingly circulating estradiol levels were highest in females. This supports the view that elevated AA and estradiol levels are associated with the development of a functional ovary. Transitional males are in a non-reproductive phase and had underdeveloped testes when compared with sneakers and nesting males. Testicular AA was approximately 10 times higher in transitional males when compared with sneakers and nesting males, suggesting high AA has a suppressive effect on testicular development. Nesting males had significantly higher plasma levels of both testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone when compared with the other male morphs and previous studies demonstrated that these androgens suppress female-like displays in sneakers. In the brain, AA was highest in macroareas presumably containing hypothalamic nuclei traditionally associated with the regulation of reproductive behaviors. Overall, females presented the highest levels of brain AA. In male morphs AA increased from sneakers, to

  11. Gestational hypoxia increases reactive oxygen species and inhibits steroid hormone-mediated upregulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel function in uterine arteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ronghui; Huang, Xiaohui; Hu, Xiang-Qun; Xiao, DaLiao; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-08-01

    Gestational hypoxia inhibits steroid hormone-induced upregulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa) channel activities in uterine arteries. We tested the hypothesis that increased reactive oxygen species play an important role in hypoxia-mediated inhibition of KCa channel activities. Uterine arteries were isolated from nonpregnant (nonpregnant uterine artery) and near-term (≈142-145 day) pregnant (pregnant uterine artery) sheep maintained at either sea level or high altitude (3820 m, Pao2: 60 mm Hg) for 110 days. In pregnant uterine arteries, hypoxia significantly decreased large conductance channel opener NS1619- and small conductance channel opener NS309-induced relaxations, which were partially restored by reactive oxygen species inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC). NAC significantly increased large conductance KCa but not small conductance KCa current densities in uterine arterial smooth muscle cells in pregnant animals acclimatized to high altitude. The NAC-sensitive component of small conductance KCa-induced relaxations was diminished in endothelium-denuded arteries. In nonpregnant uterine arteries, NS1619- and NS309-induced relaxations were diminished compared with those in pregnant uterine arteries. Treatment of nonpregnant uterine arteries with 17β-estradiol and progesterone for 48 hours increased small conductance KCa type 3 protein abundance and NS1619- and NS309-induced relaxations, which were inhibited by hypoxia. This hypoxia-mediated inhibition was reversed by NAC. Consistently, steroid hormone treatment had no significant effects on large conductance KCa current density in nonpregnant uterine arteries of hypoxic animals in the absence of NAC but significantly increased it in the presence of NAC. These results suggest an important role of hypoxia-mediated reactive oxygen species in negatively regulating steroid hormone-mediated upregulation of KCa channel activity and adaptation of uterine vascular reactivity in pregnancy, which may contribute to the

  12. Subsets of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are activated during a steroid-induced luteinizing hormone surge and mating in mice: a combined retrograde tracing double immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Rajendren, G

    2001-11-09

    The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in reproduction and is synthesized by GnRH-producing cell bodies in the basal forebrain. Experiments were designed to investigate whether GnRH cells projecting outside the blood brain barrier or those projecting within the brain are activated during the steroid-induced LH surge or mating in female mice. Retrograde uptake of intraperitoneally administered fluorogold (FG) by GnRH cells and double immunostaining for GnRH and Fos was employed for this purpose. The number of GnRH cells with FG uptake was comparable among the surged, mated and control mice. However, the number of Fos-positive GnRH cells was significantly higher in the steroid-induced LH surge group than in the mated mice. The number of Fos+FG-positive GnRH cells was higher and the number of FG-only GnRH cells was lower in mice with a steroid-induced LH surge as compared with the mated mice. This suggests the existence of a subgroup of GnRH cells projecting outside the blood-brain barrier activated during the steroid-induced LH surge but not during mating. The activation of similar proportions of GnRH cells without FG uptake in both the mated and the surge group indicate that nonneuroendocrine GnRH cells are not silent but can be activated by both mating and steroid hormones. Thus, functional subgroups may exist within the GnRH system with considerable overlap in the input to these cells.

  13. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression. PMID:26770009

  14. Steroid binding sites in liver membranes: interplay between glucocorticoids, sex steroids, and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, L; Flores-Morales, A; Chirino-Godoy, R; Díaz-Chico, J C; Díaz-Chico, B N

    2008-04-01

    Steroid hormones activate target cells through specific receptors that discriminate among ligands based upon recognition of distinct structural features. For most known steroids, membrane and nuclear receptors co-exist in many target cells. However, while the structure of the nuclear receptors and their function as transcriptional activators of specific target genes is generally well understood, the identity of the membrane receptors remains elusive. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we are beginning to characterize receptors for glucocorticoids and anabolic-androgenic steroids in male rat liver membranes. Male rat liver endoplasmic reticulum contains two steroid binding sites which are functionally related and associated with a 90-134 kDa oligomeric protein: (1) the low-affinity glucocorticoid binding site (LAGS), composed at least in part of two peptides (37 and 53 kDa) that bind glucocorticoids and (2) the stanozolol binding protein (STBP), composed at least in part of three peptides (22, 31, and 55 kDa) that bind the synthetic androgen stanozolol. These steroid binding proteins have many properties different from those of classical nuclear receptors, with the salient differences being a failure to recognize "classical" ligands for nuclear receptors together with marked differences in biochemical properties and physiological regulation. The mechanism of interaction of glucocorticoids with the LAGS can be clearly distinguished from that with STBP. Moreover, STBP shows an extremely narrow pharmacological profile, being selective for ST and its analog, danazol, among more than 100 steroids and non-steroidal compounds that were assayed, including those that are able to displace glucocorticoids from the LAGS. The level of LAGS activity undergoes dramatic variations following changes from the physiological serum levels of thyroid hormones, glucocorticoids, GH, vitamin A, and E2. However, neither thyroid hormones nor GH have a critical role on STBP

  15. Influence of sex steroid hormones on the adolescent brain and behavior: An update.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Pilar; Del Río, Juan Pablo; Carrera, BÁrbara; ArÁnguiz, Florencia C; Rioseco, Hernán; Cortés, Manuel E

    2016-08-01

    This review explains the main effects exerted by sex steroids and other hormones on the adolescent brain. During the transition from puberty to adolescence, these hormones participate in the organizational phenomena that structurally shape some brain circuits. In adulthood, this will propitiate some specific behavior as responses to the hormones now activating those neural circuits. Adolescence is, then, a critical "organizational window" for the brain to develop adequately, since steroid hormones perform important functions at this stage. For this reason, the adolescent years are very important for future behaviors in human beings. Changes that occur or fail to occur during adolescence will determine behaviors for the rest of one's lifetime. Consequently, understanding the link between adolescent behavior and brain development as influenced by sex steroids and other hormones and compounds is very important in order to interpret various psycho-affective pathologies. Lay Summary : The effect of steroid hormones on the development of the adolescent brain, and therefore, on adolescent behavior, is noticeable. This review presents their main activational and organizational effects. During the transition from puberty to adolescence, organizational phenomena triggered by steroids structurally affect the remodeling of brain circuits. Later in adulthood, these changes will be reflected in behavioral responses to such hormones. Adolescence can then be seen as a fundamental "organizational window" during which sex steroids and other hormones and compounds play relevant roles. The understanding of the relationship between adolescent behavior and the way hormones influence brain development help understand some psychological disorders.

  16. Rooibos flavonoids inhibit the activity of key adrenal steroidogenic enzymes, modulating steroid hormone levels in H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Schloms, Lindie; Swart, Amanda C

    2014-03-24

    Major rooibos flavonoids--dihydrochalcones, aspalathin and nothofagin, flavones--orientin and vitexin, and a flavonol, rutin, were investigated to determine their influence on the activity of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD2) and cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1), P450 21-hydroxylase (CYP21A2) and P450 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1). All the flavonoids inhibited 3βHSD2 and CYP17A1 significantly, while the inhibition of downstream enzymes, CYP21A2 and CYP11B1, was both substrate and flavonoid specific. The dihydrochalcones inhibited the activity of CYP21A2, but not that of CYP11B1. Although rutin, orientin and vitexin inhibited deoxycortisol conversion by CYP11B1 significantly, inhibition of deoxycorticosterone was <20%. These three flavonoids were unable to inhibit CYP21A2, with negligible inhibition of deoxycortisol biosynthesis only. Rooibos inhibited substrate conversion by CYP17A1 and CYP21A2, while the inhibition of other enzyme activities was <20%. In H295R cells, rutin had the greatest inhibitory effect on steroid production upon forskolin stimulation, reducing total steroid output 2.3-fold, while no effect was detected under basal conditions. Nothofagin and vitexin had a greater inhibitory effect on overall steroid production compared to aspalathin and orientin, respectively. The latter compounds contain two hydroxyl groups on the B ring, while nothofagin and vitexin contain a single hydroxyl group. In addition, all of the flavonoids are glycosylated, albeit at different positions--dihydrochalcones at C3' and flavones at C8 on ring A, while rutin, a larger molecule, has a rutinosyl moiety at C3 on ring C. Structural differences regarding the number and position of hydroxyl and glucose moieties as well as structural flexibility could indicate different mechanisms by which these flavonoids influence the activity of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes.

  17. Detection of multiple hormonal activities in wastewater effluents and surface water, using a panel of steroid receptor CALUX bioassays.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, Sander C; Heringa, Minne B; Man, Hai-Yen; Sonneveld, Edwin; Puijker, Leo M; Brouwer, Abraham; Van der Burg, Bart

    2008-08-01

    It is generally known that there are compounds present in the aquatic environment that can disturb endocrine processes, for example via interaction with the endogenous hormone receptors. Most research so far has focused on compounds that bind to the estrogen and/or androgen receptor, but ligands for other hormone receptors might also be present. In this study, a newly completed panel of human cell derived CALUX reporter gene bioassays was utilized to test water extracts for estrogen (ER), as well as androgen (AR), progesterone (PR), and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor mediated transactivation activity. Effluents from industry, hospital, and municipal sewage treatment plants, as well as tap water and different sources of surface water were tested. The CALUX reporter gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity to known agonists, enabling discrimination between different receptor based endocrine responses present in the aquatic environment. Our results clearly showed the presence of agonistic activity on the ER, as well as on the AR, PR, and GR in the raw and wastewater and surface water extracts. However, no hormone receptor-mediated transactivation was detected in the drinking water or in the blank water. The levels of estrogenic activity were 0.2-0.5 ng E2-equiv/L for surface water and 0.4-1.0 ng E2-equiv/L for municipal effluents, which was consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, the other hormonal activities were found to be present in similar or much higher levels. Most notably, glucocorticoid-like activity was detected in all samples, at surprisingly high levels ranging from 0.39-1.3 ng Dex-equiv/L in surface water and 11-243 ng Dex-equiv/L in effluents. When regarding the fact that dexamethasone in the GR CALUX bioassay is a factor 12 more potent than the natural hormone cortisol, results expressed as cortisol equivalents would range up to 2900 ng cortisol equiv/L. Further studies are needed to establish the identity of the active compounds and to

  18. Organized for sex – steroid hormones and the developing hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kathryn M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2017-01-01

    Steroid hormones of gonadal origin act on the neonatal brain, particularly the hypothalamus, to produce sex differences that underlie copulatory behavior. Neuroanatomical sex differences include regional volume, cell number, connectivity, morphology, physiology, neurotransmitter phenotype and molecular signaling, all of which are determined by the action of steroid hormones, particularly by estradiol in males, and are established by diverse downstream effects. Sex differences in distinct hypothalamic regions can be organized by the same steroid hormone, but the direction of a sex difference is often specific to one region or cell type, illustrating the wide range of effects that steroid hormones have on the developing brain. Substantial progress has been made in elucidating the downstream mechanisms through which gonadal hormones sexually differentiate the brain, but gaps remain in establishing the precise relationship between changes in neuronal morphology and behavior. A complete understanding of sexual differentiation will require integrating the diverse mechanisms across multiple brain regions into a functional network that regulates behavioral output. PMID:21143664

  19. Fifty years ago: the quest for steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Guy G

    2013-08-15

    In 1963 Peter Karlson put forward the revolutionary "hormone-gene" hypothesis, which would change drastically the way in which steroid hormones were thought to act at the time. From a historical perspective, this review relates the acceptance of this initially controversial idea, the discovery of the steroid receptors and the key experiments that have led to the current understanding of the mechanism of steroid hormone action. It shows how, over 50years, the field has widened beyond all expectation and has contributed to major advances not only in endocrinology, but also in molecular biology, pharmacology and therapeutics.

  20. Inhibin-non-steroidal regulation of follicle stimulating hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, H.G.; Findlay, J.K. ); de Kretser, D.M. ); Igarashi, M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of inhibin non-steroidal regulation of follicle stimulating hormone secretion. Topics covered include: FSH regulation, Molecular biology, Radioimmunoassay, Physiology - Testocular inhibin, Physiology - ovarian inhibin, and local actions.

  1. Lack of sensorial innervation in the newborn female rats affects the activity of hypothalamic monoaminergic system and steroid hormone secretion during puberty.

    PubMed

    Quiróz, Ubaldo; Morales-Ledesma, Leticia; Morán, Carolina; Trujillo, Angélica; Domínguez, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that sensory innervation plays a role regulating ovarian functions, including fertility.Since sensory denervation by means of capsaicin in newborn female rats results in a lower response togonadotropins, the present study analyzed the effects that sensory denervation by means of capsaicin in neonatal rats has on the concentration of monoamines in the anterior(AH) and medium (MH) hypothalamus, and on steroid hormone levels in serum. Groups of newborn female rats were injected subcutaneously with capsaicin and killed at 10, 20, and 30 days of age and on the first vaginal estrous.The concentrations of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin(5-HT), and their metabolites in the AH and MH were measured using HPLC, and the levels of estradiol (E),progesterone (P), testosterone (T), FSH, and luteinizing hormone using radioimmunoanalysis. The results show thatat 20 days of age, capsaicin-treated rats have lowernoradrenergic and serotonergic activities in the AH, and that the dopaminergic activity was lower in the MH. These results suggest that the sensorial system connections within the monoaminergic systems of the AH and MH are different.Capsaicin-treated animals had lower T, E, and P levels than in the control group, suggesting that the lower activity in the AH monoaminergic system and lower hormonesecretion could be explained by the blockade of information mediated by the sensory innervation (probably substance P), mainly between the ovary and the AH.

  2. Asymmetry within and around the human planum temporale is sexually dimorphic and influenced by genes involved in steroid hormone receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Zwiers, Marcel P; Wittfeld, Katharina; Teumer, Alexander; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; van Bokhoven, Hans; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Grabe, Hans J; Francks, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The genetic determinants of cerebral asymmetries are unknown. Sex differences in asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT), that overlaps Wernicke's classical language area, have been inconsistently reported. Meta-analysis of previous studies has suggested that publication bias established this sex difference in the literature. Using probabilistic definitions of cortical regions we screened over the cerebral cortex for sexual dimorphisms of asymmetry in 2337 healthy subjects, and found the PT to show the strongest sex-linked asymmetry of all regions, which was supported by two further datasets, and also by analysis with the FreeSurfer package that performs automated parcellation of cerebral cortical regions. We performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis of PT asymmetry in a pooled sample of 3095 subjects, followed by a candidate-driven approach which measured a significant enrichment of association in genes of the 'steroid hormone receptor activity' and 'steroid metabolic process' pathways. Variants in the genes and pathways identified may affect the role of the PT in language cognition.

  3. The Interaction between Steroid Hormones and Lipid Monolayers on Water

    PubMed Central

    Gershfeld, N. L.; Muramatsu, M.

    1971-01-01

    The interaction of progesterone, testosterone, androsterone, and etiocholanolone with insoluble lipid films (cholesterol and saturated hydrocarbons containing either alcohol, ester, acetamide, phosphate, amine, or carboxyl groups) was studied. In addition to surface pressure and surface potential measurements of the surface films, radioactive tracers were used to measure the concentration of adsorbed steroid in the lipid films. In general, steroids form mixed films with the insoluble lipid films. Compression of the insoluble lipid films to their most condensed state leads to complete ejection of adsorbed steroid from the surface in all cases except with the amine, for which a small amount of steroid is still retained in the surface. Interactions between the steroids and insoluble lipids are primarily due to van der Waals or dispersion forces; there were no significant contributions from dipole-dipole interactions (except possibly with the amine). Specific interactions between cholesterol and the soluble steroids were not observed. Evidence suggests that low steroid concentrations influence structure of lipid films by altering the hydration layer in the surface film. In contrast to a specific site of action, it is proposed that steroid hormones initiate structural changes in a variety of biological sites; this model of steroid action is consistent with the ubiquity of many steroid hormones. PMID:5120392

  4. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum.

  5. Music increase altruism through regulating the secretion of steroid hormones and peptides.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2014-12-01

    Music is well known for its effect on human behavior especially of their bonding and empathy towards others. Music provokes one's emotion and activates mirror neurons and reward system. It also regulates social hormones such as steroid hormones or peptides, and increases empathy, pro-sociality and altruism. As a result, it improves one's reproductive success.

  6. Sex steroid hormone metabolism takes place in human ocular cells.

    PubMed

    Coca-Prados, Miguel; Ghosh, Sikha; Wang, Yugang; Escribano, Julio; Herrala, Annakaisa; Vihko, Pirkko

    2003-08-01

    Steroids are potentially important mediators in the pathophysiology of ocular diseases. In this study, we report on the gene expression in the human eye of a group of enzymes, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs), involved in the biosynthesis and inactivation of sex steroid hormones. In the eye, the ciliary epithelium, a neuroendocrine secretory epithelium, co-expresses the highest levels of 17HSD2 and 5 mRNAs, and in lesser level 17HSD7 mRNA. The regulation of gene expression of these enzymes was investigated in vitro in cell lines, ODM-C4 and chronic open glaucoma (GCE), used as cell models of the human ciliary epithelium. The estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (10(-7) M) and androgen agonist, R1881 (10(-8) M) elicited in ODM-C4 and GCE cells over a 24 h time course a robust up-regulation of 17HSD7 mRNA expression. 17HSD2 was up-regulated by estradiol in ODM-C4 cells, but not in GCE cells. Under steady-state conditions, ODM-C4 cells exhibited a predominant 17HSD2 oxidative enzymatic activity. In contrast, 17HSD2 activity was low or absent in GCE cells. Our collective data suggest that cultured human ciliary epithelial cells are able to metabolize estrogen, androgen and progesterone, and that 17HSD2 and 7 in these cells are sex steroid hormone-responsive genes and 17HSD7 is responsible to keep on intra/paracrine estrogenic milieu.

  7. The Endocannabinoid System and Sex Steroid Hormone-Dependent Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Anthony H.; Marczylo, Timothy H.; Willets, Jonathon M.; Konje, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    The “endocannabinoid system (ECS)” comprises the endocannabinoids, the enzymes that regulate their synthesis and degradation, the prototypical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), some noncannabinoid receptors, and an, as yet, uncharacterised transport system. Recent evidence suggests that both cannabinoid receptors are present in sex steroid hormone-dependent cancer tissues and potentially play an important role in those malignancies. Sex steroid hormones regulate the endocannabinoid system and the endocannabinoids prevent tumour development through putative protective mechanisms that prevent cell growth and migration, suggesting an important role for endocannabinoids in the regulation of sex hormone-dependent tumours and metastasis. Here, the role of the endocannabinoid system in sex steroid hormone-dependent cancers is described and the potential for novel therapies assessed. PMID:24369462

  8. Steroid hormones, stress and the adolescent brain: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, G R; Spencer, K A

    2013-09-26

    Steroid hormones, including those produced by the gonads and the adrenal glands, are known to influence brain development during sensitive periods of life. Until recently, most brain organisation was assumed to take place during early stages of development, with relatively little neurogenesis or brain re-organisation during later stages. However, an increasing body of research has shown that the developing brain is also sensitive to steroid hormone exposure during adolescence (broadly defined as the period from nutritional independence to sexual maturity). In this review, we examine how steroid hormones that are produced by the gonads and adrenal glands vary across the lifespan in a range of mammalian and bird species, and we summarise the evidence that steroid hormone exposure influences behavioural and brain development during early stages of life and during adolescence in these two taxonomic groups. Taking a cross-species, comparative perspective reveals that the effects of early exposure to steroid hormones depend upon the stage of development at birth or hatching, as measured along the altricial-precocial dimension. We then review the evidence that exposure to stress during adolescence impacts upon the developing neuroendocrine systems, the brain and behaviour. Current research suggests that the effects of adolescent stress vary depending upon the sex of the individual and type of stressor, and the effects of stress could involve several neural systems, including the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. Experience of stressors during adolescence could also influence brain development via the close interactions between the stress hormone and gonadal hormone axes. While sensitivity of the brain to steroid hormones during early life and adolescence potentially leaves the developing organism vulnerable to external adversities, developmental plasticity also provides an opportunity for the developing organism to respond to current circumstances and for behavioural

  9. Albumin, steroid hormones and the origin of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Baker, M E

    2002-10-01

    Albumin, the major serum protein, binds a wide variety of lipophilic compounds including steroids, other lipophilic hormones and various phytochemicals and xenobiotics that bind to receptors for steroids and other lipophilic hormones. Despite albumin's low affinity (K(d) approximately 10(-4) M to 10(-6) M) for these lipophilic compounds, the high concentration of albumin in serum makes this protein a major carrier of steroids and lipophilic hormones and a regulator of their access to receptors. Albumin also functions as a sink for xenobiotics, diminishing the binding of xenobiotics to hormone receptors and other cellular proteins. This protects animals from endocrine disruption by xenobiotics. We propose that these properties of albumin were important in protochordates and primitive vertebrates, such as jawless fish, about 600 to 530 million years ago, just before and during the Cambrian period. It is at that time that the ancestral receptors of adrenal and sex steroids - androgens, estrogens, glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, and progestins - arose in multicellular animals. Albumin regulated access of steroids to their receptors, as well as protecting animals from endocrine disruptors, such as phytochemicals, fungal chemicals and phenolics, and other chemicals formed at hydrothermal vents by geochemical processes. Thus, animals in which albumin expression was high had a selective advantage in regulating the steroid response and avoiding endocrine disruption by xenobiotics.

  10. Synthesis and chemical reactions of the steroidal hormone 17α-methyltestosterone.

    PubMed

    El-Desoky, El-Sayed Ibrahim; Reyad, Mahmoud; Afsah, Elsayed Mohammed; Dawidar, Abdel-Aziz Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Structural modifications of natural products with complex structures like steroids require great synthetic effort. A review of literature is presented on the chemistry of the steroidal hormone 17α-methyltestosterone that is approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States as an androgen for estrogen-androgen hormone replacement therapy treatment. The analog also offers special possibilities for the prevention/treatment of hormone-sensitive cancers. The testosterone skeleton has important functionalities in the molecule that can act as a carbonyl component, an active methylene compound, α,β-unsaturated enone and tertiary hydroxyl group in various chemical reactions to access stereoisomeric steroidal compounds with potent activity. In addition, microbiological methods of synthesis and transformation of this hormone are presented.

  11. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor α, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  12. Role of Sex Steroid Hormones in Bacterial-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Elizabeth; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones play important physiological roles in reproductive and nonreproductive tissues, including immune cells. These hormones exert their functions by binding to either specific intracellular receptors that act as ligand-dependent transcription factors or membrane receptors that stimulate several signal transduction pathways. The elevated susceptibility of males to bacterial infections can be related to the usually lower immune responses presented in males as compared to females. This dimorphic sex difference is mainly due to the differential modulation of the immune system by sex steroid hormones through the control of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines expression, as well as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expression and antibody production. Besides, sex hormones can also affect the metabolism, growth, or virulence of pathogenic bacteria. In turn, pathogenic, microbiota, and environmental bacteria are able to metabolize and degrade steroid hormones and their related compounds. All these data suggest that sex steroid hormones play a key role in the modulation of bacterial-host interactions. PMID:23509808

  13. Sex steroids and growth hormone interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Guerra, Borja; Díaz, Mario; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    GH and sex hormones are critical regulators of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism, and sexual dimorphism. Deficiencies in GH- or sex hormone-dependent signaling and the influence of sex hormones on GH biology may have a dramatic impact on liver physiology during somatic development and in adulthood. Effects of sex hormones on the liver may be direct, through hepatic receptors, or indirect by modulating endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions of GH. Sex hormones can modulate GH actions by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and peripherally, by modulating GH signaling pathways. The endocrine and/or metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to sex hormone-related compounds and their influence on the GH-liver axis are largely unknown. A better understanding of these interactions in physiological and pathological states will contribute to preserve health and to improve clinical management of patients with growth, developmental, and metabolic disorders.

  14. Placental steroid hormone biosynthesis in primate pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, E D; Pepe, G J

    1990-02-01

    and thus the metabolism of estradiol, while androgens exert marked inhibitory effects on placental progesterone formation, at least in vitro. Not surprisingly, the regulation of placental progesterone and estrogen formation also is multifactorial. Thus, aromatase activity is stimulated synergistically by cAMP and phorbol esters, an effect that is suppressed by peptide growth factors. Therefore, the autocrine/paracrine and multifactorial regulation of hormone biosynthesis that has been relatively well documented in other tissues should be recognized as important in the primate placenta. Finally, the basic mechanisms underlying regulation of steroidogenesis within the fetoplacental unit during primate pregnancy appear similar, in important ways, to those of widely used laboratory animals, such as the rat and rabbit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  15. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Karman, Bethany N. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Craig, Zelieann R. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 μM) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ►TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ►Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ►TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  16. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. {yields} Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. {yields} Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor {alpha}, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  17. Perception of Plant Steroid Hormones at the Cell Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianming

    2013-03-25

    The proposed research had two main objectives: 1) investigating the molecular mechanism by which BRs activate the BRI1-containing steroid receptor; and 2) to investigate the molecular mechanism of BRI1 function. During the course of this project, several research papers were published from other laboratories, which reported studies similar to our proposed experiments. We therefore changed our research direction and focused our research efforts on 1) molecular genetic studies of several extragenic suppressors of a weak bri1-9 mutant (which were named as EMS-mutagenized bri1 suppressor or ebs) and 2) biochemical characterization of the protein products of the cloned EBS genes. This switch turned out to be extremely successful and led to a surprising discovery that the dwarf phenotype of the well-studied bri1-9 mutant is not due to the failure of the bri1 receptor to bind the plant steroid hormone but rather caused by the retention of a structurally-imperfect but biochemically-competent bri1-9 and its subsequent degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. This initial discovery coupled with subsequent cloning and further studies of additional EBS genes significantly increased our understanding of the protein quality control mechanisms in plants, a severely under-studied research topic in plant biology.

  18. Parasites and steroid hormones: corticosteroid and sex steroid synthesis, their role in the parasite physiology and development.

    PubMed

    Romano, Marta C; Jiménez, Pedro; Miranda-Brito, Carolina; Valdez, Ricardo A

    2015-01-01

    In many cases parasites display highly complex life cycles that include the penetration and permanence of the larva or adults within host organs, but even in those that only have one host, reciprocal, intricate interactions occur. Evidence indicates that steroid hormones have an influence on the development and course of parasitic infections. The host gender's susceptibility to infection, and the related differences in the immune response are good examples of the host-parasite interplay. However, the capacity of these organisms to synthesize their own steroidogenic hormones still has more questions than answers. It is now well-known that many parasites synthesize ecdysteroids, but limited information is available on sex steroid and corticosteroid synthesis. This review intends to summarize some of the existing information in the field. In most, but not all parasitosis the host's hormonal environment determines the susceptibility, the course, and severity of parasite infections. In most cases the infection disturbs the host environment, and activates immune responses that end up affecting the endocrine system. Furthermore, sex steroids and corticosteroids may also directly modify the parasite reproduction and molting. Available information indicates that parasites synthesize some steroid hormones, such as ecdysteroids and sex steroids, and the presence and activity of related enzymes have been demonstrated. More recently, the synthesis of corticosteroid-like compounds has been shown in Taenia solium cysticerci and tapeworms, and in Taenia crassiceps WFU cysticerci. In-depth knowledge of the parasite's endocrine properties will contribute to understand their reproduction and reciprocal interactions with the host, and may also help designing tools to combat the infection in some clinical situations.

  19. Towards the emerging crosstalk: ERBB family and steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    D'Uva, Gabriele; Lauriola, Mattia

    2016-02-01

    Growth factors acting through receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) of ERBB family, along with steroid hormones (SH) acting through nuclear receptors (NRs), are critical signalling mediators of cellular processes. Deregulations of ERBB and steroid hormone receptors are responsible for several diseases, including cancer, thus demonstrating the central role played by both systems. This review will summarize and shed light on an emerging crosstalk between these two important receptor families. How this mutual crosstalk is attained, such as through extensive genomic and non-genomic interactions, will be addressed. In light of recent studies, we will describe how steroid hormones are able to fine-tune ERBB feedback loops, thus impacting on cellular output and providing a new key for understanding the complexity of biological processes in physiological or pathological conditions. In our understanding, the interactions between steroid hormones and RTKs deserve further attention. A system biology approach and advanced technologies for the analysis of RTK-SH crosstalk could lead to major advancements in molecular medicine, providing the basis for new routes of pharmacological intervention in several diseases, including cancer.

  20. Effects of steroid hormones on five functional parameters of Tetrahymena: evolutionary conclusions.

    PubMed

    Kohidai, László; Katona, Júlia; Csaba, György

    2003-03-01

    The unicellular Tetrahymena pyriformis was studied for chemotaxis, chemotactic selection, phagocytosis, growth and body shape changes in the presence of water soluble (beta-cyclodextrin-coupled) steroid hormones (testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, hydrocortisone and dexamethasone). Testosterone was chemoattractant over a wide range of concentrations, while progesterone and dexamethasone were active only at one concentration (10(-5) and 10(-6) mg ml(-1) respectively) and were either neutral or repellent at other concentrations. Hydrocortisone and estradiol were unambiguously chemorepellent. Chemotactic selection enhanced the effect of testosterone and estradiol, while in the case of hydrocortisone the action was reversed. The other parameters were mildly influenced by the steroid hormones. The results call attention to the fine molecular recognition capacity of Tetrahymena and to the possible rapid effects of steroid hormones at membrane receptors at a very low evolutionary eukaryotic level.

  1. Changes in steroid hormones during an international powerlifting competition.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Bénédicte; Labsy, Zakaria; Baillot, Aurélie; Vibarel-Rebot, Nancy; Parage, Gaston; Albrings, Detlev; Lasne, Françoise; Collomp, Katia

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess changes in the steroid hormone levels of elite athletes during an international powerlifting competition. Baseline cortisol, DHEA and testosterone were determined in saliva samples in 19 (8 men, 11 women) junior and sub-junior athletes on the day before competition, and then on the competition day during the official weighing and in the hour after competition. Performance was determined by total output and the Wilks formula. No change in saliva steroid concentrations was observed between samples collected on the day before competition and the weighing samples. There was no gender effect on cortisol concentrations but saliva testosterone levels were always significantly higher in men than in women (p<0.01), as was end-competition DHEA (p<0.05). Cortisol and DHEA were significantly increased in male and female athletes after the competition (respectively, p<0.01 and p<0.05), whereas end-competition testosterone concentrations were only significantly increased in men (p<0.01). Significant relationships were demonstrated between performance and end-competition cortisol levels in women and end-competition testosterone levels in men. These data indicate that workouts during an international powerlifting competition produce a significant increase in adrenal steroid hormones in both genders, with an increase in male gonadal steroid hormone. Further studies are necessary to examine the changes in oestradiol and progesterone in women and their potential impact on performance during international powerlifting competition.

  2. Psychological, social, and spiritual effects of contraceptive steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Hanna; Cortés, Manuel E

    2015-08-01

    Governments and society have accepted and enthusiastically promoted contraception, especially contraceptive steroid hormones, as the means of assuring optimal timing and number of births, an undoubted health benefit, but they seldom advert to their limitations and side effects. This article reviews the literature on the psychological, social, and spiritual impact of contraceptive steroid use. While the widespread use of contraceptive steroid hormones has expanded life style and career choices for many women, their impact on the women's well-being, emotions, social relationships, and spirituality is seldom mentioned by advocates, and negative effects are often downplayed. When mentioned at all, depression and hypoactive sexual desire are usually treated symptomatically rather than discontinuing their most frequent pharmacological cause, the contraceptive. The rising incidence of premarital sex and cohabitation and decreased marriage rates parallel the use of contraceptive steroids as does decreased church attendance and/or reduced acceptance of Church teaching among Catholics. Lay summary: While there is wide, societal acceptance of hormonal contraceptives to space births, their physical side effects are often downplayed and their impact on emotions and life styles are largely unexamined. Coincidental to the use of "the pill" there has been an increase in depression, low sexual desire, "hook-ups," cohabitation, delay of marriage and childbearing, and among Catholics, decreased church attendance and reduced religious practice. Fertility is not a disease. Birth spacing can be achieved by natural means, and the many undesirable effects of contraception avoided.

  3. Sex steroid hormones and circulating IgE levels.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Mathur, R S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The possible influence of sex steroid hormones on circulating IgE levels in general and IgE anti-Candida antibodies in particular was studied by quantification of plasma levels of progesterone, estradiol and IgE (total and anti-Candida-specific) in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and during pregnancy. IgE levels during the follicular and luteal phases were not significantly different, although the mean values for the luteal phase were slightly lower. This trend was apparent in daily samples from two normal females during one menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, when the levels of circulating sex steroids were high, IgE levels were only slightly higher than in the follicular and luteal phases. In men and in gonadal dysgenetics, circulating progesterone levels were similar to those of women during the follicular phase (i.e., lower than in the luteal phase or in pregnancy), but the IgE levels were not different. The apparently low levels of IgE during the luteal phase may therefore be due to physiological factors other than fluctuations in the sex steroid hormones. From the present studies, it is apparent that sex steroid hormones have little or no effect on humoral IgE levels, in marked contrast to previously described correlations for other immunoglobulins, especially anti-Candida antibodies.

  4. Psychological, social, and spiritual effects of contraceptive steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Hanna; Cortés, Manuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Governments and society have accepted and enthusiastically promoted contraception, especially contraceptive steroid hormones, as the means of assuring optimal timing and number of births, an undoubted health benefit, but they seldom advert to their limitations and side effects. This article reviews the literature on the psychological, social, and spiritual impact of contraceptive steroid use. While the widespread use of contraceptive steroid hormones has expanded life style and career choices for many women, their impact on the women's well-being, emotions, social relationships, and spirituality is seldom mentioned by advocates, and negative effects are often downplayed. When mentioned at all, depression and hypoactive sexual desire are usually treated symptomatically rather than discontinuing their most frequent pharmacological cause, the contraceptive. The rising incidence of premarital sex and cohabitation and decreased marriage rates parallel the use of contraceptive steroids as does decreased church attendance and/or reduced acceptance of Church teaching among Catholics. Lay summary: While there is wide, societal acceptance of hormonal contraceptives to space births, their physical side effects are often downplayed and their impact on emotions and life styles are largely unexamined. Coincidental to the use of “the pill” there has been an increase in depression, low sexual desire, “hook-ups,” cohabitation, delay of marriage and childbearing, and among Catholics, decreased church attendance and reduced religious practice. Fertility is not a disease. Birth spacing can be achieved by natural means, and the many undesirable effects of contraception avoided. PMID:26912936

  5. Steroid hormone receptors in cancer development: a target for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nihal; Kumar, Raj

    2011-01-01

    The steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) are ligand-dependent intracellular transcription factors that are known to influence the development and growth of many human cancers. SHRs pass signals from a steroid/hormone to the target genes by interacting with specific response element DNA sequences and various coregulatory proteins that consists of activators and/or corepressors. Disruptions in physiological functions of SHRs leads to several types of malignancies such as breast cancer, leukemia and lymphoma, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and lung cancer among others. Steroids/hormones/SHRs and their coregulators have opened up a unique window for novel steroid-based targeted therapies for cancer. Thus, dysregulation of SHR signaling in cancers compared with normal tissues can be exploited to target drugs that prevent and treat human cancers. In recent years, hormonal therapy has made a major contribution to the treatment of several cancers including reduced recurrence rates and longer survival rates. Development of various steroid receptor modulators and their potential therapeutic efficacies has provided us a great opportunity to effectively manage diseases like cancer in future. In this review article, we have summarized up-to-date knowledge of the role of SHRs in the development and progression of cancers, and potential endocrine-based therapeutic approaches to tackle these diseases.

  6. Noninvasive measurement of steroid hormones in zebrafish holding-water.

    PubMed

    Félix, Ana S; Faustino, Ana I; Cabral, Eduarda M; Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has recently emerged as a new animal model in neuroendocrinology and behavior (e.g., stress physiology and ecotoxicology studies). In these areas, the concentrations of steroid hormones in the blood are often used to study the endocrinological status of individuals. However, due to the small body size of zebrafish, blood sampling is difficult to perform and the amount of plasma obtained per sample for assaying hormones is very small (ca. 1-5 μL), and therefore most studies have been using whole-body hormone concentrations, which implies sacrificing the individuals and hampers sequential sampling of the same individual. Here a noninvasive method to assay steroid hormones from zebrafish holding-water, based on the fact that steroids are released into the fish holding-water through the gills by passive diffusion, is validated. Cortisol and the androgen 11-ketotestosterone (KT) were measured in water samples and compared to plasma levels in the same individuals. Cortisol released to holding-water correlates positively with plasma concentrations, but there was a lack of correlation between KT water and circulating levels. However, KT levels showed a highly significant sex difference that can be used to noninvasively sex individuals. An ACTH challenge test demonstrated that an induced increase in circulating cortisol concentration can be reliably detected in holding-water levels, hence attesting the responsiveness of holding-water levels to fluctuations in circulating levels.

  7. Noninvasive Measurement of Steroid Hormones in Zebrafish Holding-Water

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Ana S.; Faustino, Ana I.; Cabral, Eduarda M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has recently emerged as a new animal model in neuroendocrinology and behavior (e.g., stress physiology and ecotoxicology studies). In these areas, the concentrations of steroid hormones in the blood are often used to study the endocrinological status of individuals. However, due to the small body size of zebrafish, blood sampling is difficult to perform and the amount of plasma obtained per sample for assaying hormones is very small (ca. 1–5 μL), and therefore most studies have been using whole-body hormone concentrations, which implies sacrificing the individuals and hampers sequential sampling of the same individual. Here a noninvasive method to assay steroid hormones from zebrafish holding-water, based on the fact that steroids are released into the fish holding-water through the gills by passive diffusion, is validated. Cortisol and the androgen 11-ketotestosterone (KT) were measured in water samples and compared to plasma levels in the same individuals. Cortisol released to holding-water correlates positively with plasma concentrations, but there was a lack of correlation between KT water and circulating levels. However, KT levels showed a highly significant sex difference that can be used to noninvasively sex individuals. An ACTH challenge test demonstrated that an induced increase in circulating cortisol concentration can be reliably detected in holding-water levels, hence attesting the responsiveness of holding-water levels to fluctuations in circulating levels. PMID:23445429

  8. Effects of Steroid Hormone in Avian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo Rivas, R. E.; Nieto, M. Paz-Calderón; Kamiyoshi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of testosterone (T) and estradiol-17β (E2) on the production of progesterone (P4) by granulosa cells, and of the E2 on the production of P4 and T by theca internal cells. In the first experiment, granulosa cells isolated from the largest (F1) and third largest (F3) preovulatory follicle were incubated for 4 h in short-term culture system, P4 production by granulosa cells of both F1 and F3 was increased in a dose-dependent manner by ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH), but not T or E2. In the second experiment, F1 and F3 granulosa cells cultured for 48 h in the developed monolayer culture system were recultured for an additional 48 h with increasing doses of various physiological active substances existing in the ovary, including T and E2. Basal P4 production for 48 h during 48 to 96 h of the cultured was about nine fold greater by F1 granulosa cells than by F3 granulosa cells. In substances examined oLH, chicken vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (cVIP) and T, but not E2, stimulated in a dose-dependent manner P4 production in both F1 and F3 granulosa cells. In addition, when the time course of P4 production by F1 granulosa cells in response to oLH, cVIP, T and E2 was examined for 48 h during 48 to 96 h of culture, although E2 had no effect on P4 production by granulosa cells of F1 during the period from 48 to 96 h of culture, P4 production with oLH was found to be increased at 4 h of the culture, with a maximal 9.14 fold level at 6 h. By contrast, P4 production with cVIP and T increased significantly (p<0.05) from 8 and 12 h of the culture, respectively, with maximal 6.50 fold response at 12 h and 6, 48 fold responses at 36 h. Furthermore, when F1 granulosa cells were precultured with E2 for various times before 4 h culture with oLH at 96 h of culture, the increase in P4 production in response to oLH with a dose-related manner was only found at a pretreatment time of more than 12 h. In the third experiment, theca

  9. The mitochondrion as a primary site of action of steroid and thyroid hormones: presence and action of steroid and thyroid hormone receptors in mitochondria of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Psarra, A-M G; Solakidi, S; Sekeris, C E

    2006-02-26

    Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that regulate events related to energy production and apoptosis. These processes are modulated, in turn, by steroid and thyroid hormones in the course of their actions on metabolism, growth and development. In this context, a direct effect of these hormones on the mitochondrial-linked processes, possibly by way of cognate mitochondrial receptors, has been proposed. In this paper we review data from the literature and present new findings supporting this concept. Receptors for steroid hormones, glucocorticoids and estrogens, and for T(3), have been detected in mitochondria by immunofluorescence labeling and confocal laser microscopy, by Western blotting of mitochondrial proteins and by immunogold electron microscopy. Furthermore, the mitochondrial genome contains nucleotide sequences with high similarity to known hormone-responsive elements, which interact with the appropriate receptors to confer hormone-dependent activation of reporter genes in transfection experiments. Thus, thyroid hormone stimulates mitochondrial transcription mediated by the cognate receptor when added to an in organello mitochondrial system, capable of faithful transcription.

  10. New insights into the role of sex steroid hormones in pregnancy: possible therapeutic approach by sex steroid hormones for the treatment of both preeclampsia and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, S; Mizutani, E

    2015-03-01

    Fetal peptide hormones are essential for the development of fetus, which increase in accordance with pregnancy term. Concentration of these hormones within the feto-placental unit is normally higher than that of maternal circulation. Since these hormones are biologically active, the leakage of these hormones into the maternal circulation is regulated by degradation activity by placental aminopeptidases, in order to maintain the balance between carriage of pregnancy and onset of labor.Because the concentration of these hormones, being regulated by the amount of endogenous production and by physiological degradation by enzymes in the blood and tissue, the balance between production and degradation is a definitive element for maintaining normal gestation and term delivery.The changes of the balance between fetal angiotensin II (A-II) and vasopressin (AVP) andA-II and AVP degrading enzymes, between aminopeptidase A (APA) and placental leucine aminopeptidase( P-LAP) - in the placenta and maternal blood due to fetal stress such as hypoxia - are the provable causes of preeclampsia or preterm labor.Induction of APA and P-LAP by estradiol benzoate (E2) and progesterone (P) from placenta has been demonstrated. They are involved in the regulation of fetal peptide hormones via placental aminopeptidases in homeostasis of pregnancy.Recently it was shown that both APA and P-LAP could be potentially safe and effective drugs for preeclampsia and preterm labor. The authors' proposed sex steroid treatment with dose increasing manner by gestational week (sex steroid treatment) for severe preeclampsia and preterm labor could be candidates replacing conventional treatments. In light of lacking safe and effective medication, the proposed sex steroid treatment is worthwhile for the prospective controlled studies for the treatment of both preeclampsia and preterm labor.

  11. Dairy Wastewater, Aquaculture, and Spawning Fish as Sources of Steroid Hormones in the Aquatic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziej, E. P.; Harter, T.; Sedlak, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    A suite of androgens, estrogens, and progestins were measured in samples from dairy farms, aquaculture facilities, and surface waters with actively spawning fish using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) to assess the potential importance of these sources of steroid hormones to surface waters. In a dairy waste lagoon, the endogenous estrogens 17beta-estradiol and estrone, and the androgens testosterone and androstenedione were detected at concentrations as high as 650 ng/L. Samples from nearby groundwater monitoring wells demonstrated removal of steroid hormones in the subsurface. Samples from nearby surface waters and tile drains likely impacted by animal wastes demonstrated the sporadic presence of the steroids 17beta-estradiol, estrone, testosterone, and medroxyprogesterone, usually at concentrations near or below 1 ng/L. The endogenous steroids estrone, testosterone, and androstenedione were detected in the raceways and effluents of three fish hatcheries at concentrations near 1 ng/L. Similar concentrations were detected in a river containing spawning adult Chinook salmon. These results indicate that dairy wastewater, aquaculture effluents, and even spawning fish are sources that can lead to detectable concentrations of steroid hormones in surface waters and that the concentrations of these compounds exhibit considerable temporal and spatial variation.

  12. Dairy wastewater, aquaculture, and spawning fish as sources of steroid hormones in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Kolodziej, Edward P; Harter, Thomas; Sedlak, David L

    2004-12-01

    A suite of androgens, estrogens, and progestins were measured in samples from dairy farms, aquaculture facilities, and surface waters with actively spawning fish using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/ MS) to assess the potential importance of these sources of steroid hormones to surface waters. In a dairywaste lagoon, the endogenous estrogens 17beta-estradiol and estrone and the androgens testosterone and androstenedione were detected at concentrations as high as 650 ng/L. Samples from nearby groundwater monitoring wells demonstrated removal of steroid hormones in the subsurface. Samples from nearby surface waters and tile drains likely impacted by animal wastes demonstrated the sporadic presence of the steroids 17beta-estradiol, estrone, testosterone, and medroxyprogesterone, usually at concentrations near or below 1 ng/L. The endogenous steroids estrone,testosterone, and androstenedione were detected in the raceways and effluents of three fish hatcheries at concentrations near 1 ng/L. Similar concentrations were detected in a river containing spawning adult Chinook salmon. These results indicate that dairy wastewater, aquaculture effluents, and even spawning fish can lead to detectable concentrations of steroid hormones in surface waters and that the concentrations of these compounds exhibit considerable temporal and spatial variation.

  13. Pentachlorophenol disrupts steroid hormone metabolism at concentrations that reduce survival and fecundity of Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, L.G.; LeBlanc, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    Alterations in steroid metabolism by environmental endocrine disrupters can significantly affect steroid hormone-dependent processes such as growth and reproduction. Exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been shown to elicit a variety of endocrine-related adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to establish whether concentrations of PCP that adversely affect survival, growth, or reproduction of Daphnia magna during chronic exposure also elicit changes in steroid hormone metabolism. Survival and/or reproduction of daphnids was significantly reduced from exposure to 1.0, 0.50 and 0.25 mg/L PCP. Following chronic exposure to PCP, daphnids were incubated with [{sup 14}C]testosterone and the testosterone metabolites eliminated were identified and quantified. The rate of testosterone hydroxyl-metabolite elimination was not significantly different from controls. However, elimination of two of the glucose-conjugated metabolites of testosterone decreased in a PCP concentration-dependent manner. Adult daphnids were next exposed to these concentrations of PCP for only 48 hours and effects on steroid metabolism assessed. As observed following chronic exposure, PCP had no effect on the elimination of hydroxyl-metabolites. However, elimination of glucose and sulfate conjugates of testosterone were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that, (1) PCP alters steroid biotransformation activities at concentrations that affect survival and reproduction, and (2) effects on steroid metabolism can be detected following short-term exposure to PCP. Thus, this biochemical parameter may serve as a biomarker of chronic toxicity associated with PCP.

  14. [Heterologous expression of functionally active human cytochrome P-450s. Cytochrome P-450IIIA4 catalyzes the biotransformation of the anabolic steroid hormone methandrostenolone].

    PubMed

    Krynetskiĭ, E Iu; Kovaleva, I E; Luzikov, V N

    1994-02-01

    The expression of the cytochrome P450IIIA4 gene in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast using the shuttle vector pYeDP1-8/2 has been carried out. The microsomal fraction isolated from the transformed yeast cells was used for biotransformation of the anabolic steroid hormone-methandrostenolone (MA). The microsomal oxidation products were analyzed by HPLC and two-dimensional TLC. It was shown that microsomes of the yeasts expressing human cytochrome P450IIIA4 catalyze the MA conversion into its 6 beta-hydroxy derivative. An identical product is formed via a reaction catalyzed by human liver microsomes. The use of the heterological system of cytochrome P450IIIA4 expression has made it possible to establish its role in MA metabolism. The experimental system simulates the first phase of the drug biotransformation in liver cells.

  15. Structural and functional relationships of the steroid hormone receptors’ N-terminal transactivation domain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Litwack, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are members of a family of ligand inducible transcription factors, and regulate the transcriptional activation of target genes by recruiting coregulatory proteins to the pre-initiation machinery. The binding of these coregulatory proteins to the steroid hormone receptors is often mediated through their two activation functional domains, AF1, which resides in the N-terminal domain, and the ligand-dependent AF2, which is localized in the C-terminal ligand binding domain. Compared to other important functional domains of the steroid hormone receptors, our understanding of the mechanisms of action of the AF1 are incomplete, in part, due to the fact that, in solution, AF1 is intrinsically disordered (ID). However, recent studies have shown that AF1 must adopt a functionally active and folded conformation for its optimal activity under physiological conditions. In this review, we summarize and discuss current knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms of AF1-mediated gene activation, focusing on AF1 conformation and coactivator binding. We further propose models for the binding/folding of the AF1 domains of the steroid hormone receptors and their protein-protein interactions. The population of ID AF1 can be visualized as a collection of many different conformations, some of which may be assuming the proper functional folding for other critical target binding partners that result in ultimate assembly of AF1:coactivator complexes and subsequent gene regulation. Knowledge of the mechanisms involved therein will significantly help in understanding how signals from a steroid to a specific target gene are conveyed. PMID:19666041

  16. The Role of Steroid Hormones in the Modulation of Neuroinflammation by Dietary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Cabral-Costa, João Victor; Mazucanti, Caio Henrique; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones, such as sex hormones and glucocorticoids, have been demonstrated to play a role in different cellular processes in the central nervous system, ranging from neurodevelopment to neurodegeneration. Environmental factors, such as calorie intake or fasting frequency, may also impact on such processes, indicating the importance of external factors in the development and preservation of a healthy brain. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and glucocorticoid activity play a role in neurodegenerative processes, including in disorders such as in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Sex hormones have also been shown to modulate cognitive functioning. Inflammation is a common feature in neurodegenerative disorders, and sex hormones/glucocorticoids can act to regulate inflammatory processes. Intermittent fasting can protect the brain against cognitive decline that is induced by an inflammatory stimulus. On the other hand, obesity increases susceptibility to inflammation, while metabolic syndromes, such as diabetes, are associated with neurodegeneration. Consequently, given that gonadal and/or adrenal steroids may significantly impact the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration, via their effect on inflammatory processes, this review focuses on how environmental factors, such as calorie intake and intermittent fasting, acting through their modulation of steroid hormones, impact on inflammation that contributes to cognitive and neurodegenerative processes.

  17. The Role of Steroid Hormones in the Modulation of Neuroinflammation by Dietary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Cabral-Costa, João Victor; Mazucanti, Caio Henrique; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones, such as sex hormones and glucocorticoids, have been demonstrated to play a role in different cellular processes in the central nervous system, ranging from neurodevelopment to neurodegeneration. Environmental factors, such as calorie intake or fasting frequency, may also impact on such processes, indicating the importance of external factors in the development and preservation of a healthy brain. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and glucocorticoid activity play a role in neurodegenerative processes, including in disorders such as in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Sex hormones have also been shown to modulate cognitive functioning. Inflammation is a common feature in neurodegenerative disorders, and sex hormones/glucocorticoids can act to regulate inflammatory processes. Intermittent fasting can protect the brain against cognitive decline that is induced by an inflammatory stimulus. On the other hand, obesity increases susceptibility to inflammation, while metabolic syndromes, such as diabetes, are associated with neurodegeneration. Consequently, given that gonadal and/or adrenal steroids may significantly impact the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration, via their effect on inflammatory processes, this review focuses on how environmental factors, such as calorie intake and intermittent fasting, acting through their modulation of steroid hormones, impact on inflammation that contributes to cognitive and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26869995

  18. Steroid hormone signaling during development has a latent effect on adult male sexual behavior in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana

    PubMed Central

    Bear, Ashley; Prudic, Kathleen L.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that steroid hormones regulate sexual behavior in vertebrates via organizational and activational effects. However, whether the organizational/activational paradigm applies more broadly to the sexual behavior of other animals such as insects is not well established. Here we describe the hormonal regulation of a sexual behavior in the seasonally polyphenic butterfly Bicyclus anynana is consistent with the characteristics of an organizational effect. By measuring hormone titer levels, quantifying hormone receptor gene expression in the brain, and performing hormone manipulations, we demonstrate steroid hormone signaling early in pupal development has a latent effect on adult male sexual behavior in B. anynana. These findings suggest the organizational/activational paradigm may be more highly conserved across animal taxa than previously thought. PMID:28328961

  19. Steroid hormone signaling during development has a latent effect on adult male sexual behavior in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    PubMed

    Bear, Ashley; Prudic, Kathleen L; Monteiro, Antónia

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that steroid hormones regulate sexual behavior in vertebrates via organizational and activational effects. However, whether the organizational/activational paradigm applies more broadly to the sexual behavior of other animals such as insects is not well established. Here we describe the hormonal regulation of a sexual behavior in the seasonally polyphenic butterfly Bicyclus anynana is consistent with the characteristics of an organizational effect. By measuring hormone titer levels, quantifying hormone receptor gene expression in the brain, and performing hormone manipulations, we demonstrate steroid hormone signaling early in pupal development has a latent effect on adult male sexual behavior in B. anynana. These findings suggest the organizational/activational paradigm may be more highly conserved across animal taxa than previously thought.

  20. Coordinated steroid hormone-dependent and independent expression of multiple kallikreins in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2007-03-01

    The regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones plays an important role in the normal development and function of many organs, as well in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers. Previous experiments have shown that many kallikrein genes are under steroid hormone regulation in breast cancer cell lines. We here examine the coordinated expression of multiple kallikrein genes in several breast cancer cell lines after steroid hormone stimulation. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with various steroid hormones and kallikrein (KLK/hK) expression of hK3 (prostate-specific antigen, PSA), hK5, hK6, hK7, hK8, hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 was analyzed at the RNA level via RT-PCR and at the protein level by immunofluorometric ELISA assays. We identified several distinct hK hormone-dependent and hormone-independent expression patterns. Hormone-specific modulation of expression was seen for several kallikreins in BT-474, MCF-7, and T-47D cell lines. hK6 was specifically up-regulated upon estradiol treatment in all three cell lines whereas PSA expression was induced by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and norgestrel stimulation in BT-474 and T-47D. hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 were specifically up-regulated by DHT in T-47D and by estradiol in BT-474 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of upstream proximal promoter sequences for these hKs did not identify any recognizable hormone-response elements (HREs), suggesting that the coordinated activation of these four hKs represents a unique expression "cassette", utilizing a common hormone-dependent mechanism. We conclude that groups of human hKs are coordinately expressed in a steroid hormone-dependent manner. Our data supports clinical observations linking expression of multiple hKs with breast cancer prognosis.

  1. Relationship between dioxin and steroid hormones in sera of Vietnamese men.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian Liang; Kido, Teruniko; Okamoto, Rie; Manh, Ho Dung; Maruzeni, Shoko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Honma, Seijiro; Nakano, Takeshi; Takasuga, Takumi; Nhu, Dang Duc; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Son, Le Ke

    2014-05-01

    A recent study found an inverse correlation between serum TCDD levels and serum testosterone in the US veterans, while there is little known on the dioxin and steroid hormones about Vietnamese men. We collected blood samples from 48 men who had resided in a hotspot when exposure happened and 38 men in a non-sprayed area. Some steroid hormones levels showed significant differences between two areas. There were no correlations between steroid hormones and dioxin TEQ, after ajusting for age and other factors. Our findings indicate that steroid hormones of Vietnamese men did not correlate with dioxin TEQ in two areas.

  2. Colonic transit in rats: effect of ovariectomy, sex steroid hormones, and pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.P.; Bhojwani, A.

    1986-07-01

    In vitro studies suggest that the female sex steroid hormones (estrogen (E) and progesterone (P)) can affect the myoelectric and mechanical activity of colonic smooth muscle. The present study was designed to examine the influence of the hormones on colonic transit in vivo. Transit was assessed by quantifying the distribution within the colon of a radiolabeled marker (0.5 Ci Na2V CrO4), using the geometric center method of analysis. Studies were performed with adult male rats and the following groups of female rats: nonpregnant, ovariectomized, ovariectomy plus hormone pretreatment, and pregnant (day 18). Hormone-pretreated animals were studied 24 h following the fourth injection. The data can be summarized as follows. 1) Colonic transit was affected by the timing of the estrus cycle. 2) Ovariectomy eliminated the biphasic transit pattern observed in estruscycling females and resulted in a geometric center value comparable with that of the metestrus-diestrus animals. 3) E + P pretreatment of ovariectomized rats resulted in a significant decrease in the geometric center compared with the untreated ovariectomized rats. 4) The geometric center value in pregnant anials and hormone-pretreated animals. 5) Adult male rats had a geometric center value of 4.12 +/- 0.29. The results suggest that a relation exists between colonic transit and the circulating levels of the steroid hormones.

  3. Lonidamine affects testicular steroid hormones in immature mice

    SciTech Connect

    Traina, Maria Elsa . E-mail: Traina@iss.it; Guarino, Maria; Natoli, Alessia; Romeo, Antonella; Urbani, Elisabetta

    2007-05-15

    The effects on the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis of the well-known antispermatogenic drug lonidamine (LND) has not been elucidated so far. In the present study, the possible changes of the testicular steroid hormones were evaluated in immature mice for a better characterization of the LND adverse effects both in its use as antitumoral agent and male contraceptive. Male CD1 mice were orally treated on postnatal day 28 (PND28) with LND single doses (0 or 100 mg/kg b.w.) and euthanized every 24 h from PND29 to PND32, on PND35 and on PND42 (1 and 2 weeks after the administration, respectively). Severe testicular effects were evidenced in the LND treated groups, including: a) significant testis weight increase, 24 h and 48 h after dosing; b) sperm head counts decrease (more than 50% of the control) on PND29-32; c) damage of the tubule morphology primarily on the Sertoli cell structure and germ cell exfoliation. All these reproductive endpoints were recovered on PND42. At the same time, a significant impairment of the testicular steroid balance was observed in the treated mice, as evidenced by the decrease of testosterone (T) and androstenedione (ADIONE) and the increase of 17OH-progesterone (17OH-P4) on the first days after dosing, while the testicular content of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) was unchanged. The hormonal balance was not completely restored afterwards, as levels of T, ADIONE and 17OH-P4 tended to be higher in the treated mice than in the controls, on PND35 and PND42. These data showed for the first time that LND affects intratesticular steroids in experimental animals. However further data are needed both to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the impairment of these metabolic pathways and to understand if the androgens decrease observed after LND administration could be partially involved in the testicular damage.

  4. A KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CONFORMATIONAL FLEXIBILITY OF STEROID HORMONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a set of 10 androgen steroids and estradiol (E2), the kinetic feasibility of conformation flexibility of the cyclic moieties was studied under the constraint of maintaining the B/C trans and C/D trans ring fusion of the natural and biologically active enantiomer. To this end,...

  5. Regulation of rat luteinizing hormone subunit messenger ribonucleic acids by gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, S D; Bowers, S M; Need, L R; Chin, W W

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) biosynthesis. We have studied the regulation of LH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels by gonadal-steroid hormones in the rat. In one set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically gonadectomized (GDX) and killed 1, 3, 7, 14, 22, and 31 d postoperatively. In another set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically GDX and were injected subcutaneously with testosterone propionate (500 micrograms/100 g body wt per d) or 17 beta-estradiol 3-benzoate (10 micrograms/100 g body wt per d), respectively, beginning 3 wk postoperatively. Levels of serum LH were determined by radioimmunoassay and levels of LH subunit mRNAs in single pituitary glands were determined by blot hybridization analysis using labeled synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes that correspond to portions of the coding regions of the rat alpha- and LH beta-subunit mRNAs. 4 wk after gonadectomy, serum LH levels rose nine- and 20-fold, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels rose six- and 10-fold, and LH beta-subunit levels rose seven- and 14-fold, compared with controls in males and females, respectively. In gonadal-steroid hormone-treated male and female GDX rats, serum LH levels fell to 8 and 36% of control values, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels declined to 22 and 19%, and LH beta-subunit mRNA levels declined to 6 and 10% of control values, 48 h after injections were initiated, in males and females, respectively. We conclude that gonadal-steroid hormones negatively regulate the levels of both subunit mRNAs in GDX rats in a pattern that parallels the changes in serum LH values. These data suggest that gonadal-steroid hormone regulation of LH biosynthesis occurs, at least in part, at the level of LH subunit mRNAs due to effects at the transcriptional and/or RNA stability levels. Images PMID:2418065

  6. Steroid hormones and brain development: some guidelines for understanding actions of pseudohormones and other toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, B.S.

    1987-10-01

    Gonadal, adrenal, and thyroid hormones affect the brain directly, and the sensitivity to hormones begins in embryonic life with the appearance of hormone receptor sites in discrete populations of neurons. Because the secretion of hormones is also under control by its neural and pituitary targets, the brain-endocrine axis during development is in a delicately balanced state that can be upset in various ways, and any agent that disrupts normal hormone secretion can upset normal brain development. Moreover, exogenous substances that mimic the actions of natural hormones can also play havoc with CNS development and differentiation. This paper addresses these issues in the following order: First, actions of glucocorticoids on the developing nervous system related to cell division dendritic growth and neurotransmitter phenotype will be presented followed by a discussion of the developmental effects of synthetic steroids. Second, actions of estrogens related to brain sexual differentiation will be described, followed by a discussion of the actions of the nonsteroidal estrogen, diethylstilbestrol, as an example of exogenous estrogenic substances. The most important aspect of the potency of exogenous estrogens appears to be the degree to which they either bypass protective mechanisms or are subject to transformations to more active metabolites. Third, agents that influence hormone levels or otherwise modify the neuroendocrine system, such as nicotine, barbiturates, alcohol, opiates, and tetrahydrocannabinol, will be noted briefly to demonstrate the diversity of toxic agents that can influence neural development and affect personality, cognitive ability, and other aspects of behavior. 53 references.

  7. The steroid hormone biosynthesis pathway as a target for endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, J Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Various chemicals found in the human and wildlife environments have the potential to disrupt endocrine functions in exposed organisms. Increasingly, the enzymes involved in the steroid biosynthesis pathway are being recognized as important targets for the actions of various endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Interferences with steroid biosynthesis may result in impaired reproduction, alterations in (sexual) differentiation, growth, and development and the development of certain cancers. Steroid hormone synthesis is controlled by the activity of several highly substrate-selective cytochrome P450 enzymes and a number of steroid dehydrogenases and reductases. Particularly aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens, has been the subject of studies into the mechanisms by which chemicals interfere with sex steroid hormone homeostasis and function, often related to (de)feminization and (de)masculinazation processes. Studies in vivo and in vitro have focussed on ovarian and testicular function, with less attention given to other steroidogenic organs, such as the adrenal cortex. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms by which chemicals interfere with the function of steroidogenic enzymes in various tissues and organisms. The endocrine toxicities and mechanisms of action related to steroidogenesis of a number of classes of drugs and environmental contaminants are discussed. In addition, several potential in vitro bioassays are reviewed for their usefulness as screening tools for the detection of chemicals that can interfere with steroidogenesis. Analysis of the currently scattered state of knowledge indicates that still relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of interference of chemicals with steroidogenesis and their potential toxicity in steroidogenic tissues, neither in humans nor in wildlife. Considerably more detailed and systematic research in this area of

  8. The rate of change in declining steroid hormones: a new parameter of healthy aging in men?

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Andreas; Philipp, Michel; Lozza, Niclà; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Research on healthy aging in men has increasingly focused on age-related hormonal changes. Testosterone (T) decline is primarily investigated, while age-related changes in other sex steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], estradiol [E2], progesterone [P]) are mostly neglected. An integrated hormone parameter reflecting aging processes in men has yet to be identified. 271 self-reporting healthy men between 40 and 75 provided both psychometric data and saliva samples for hormone analysis. Correlation analysis between age and sex steroids revealed negative associations for the four sex steroids (T, DHEA, E2, and P). Principal component analysis including ten salivary analytes identified a principal component mainly unifying the variance of the four sex steroid hormones. Subsequent principal component analysis including the four sex steroids extracted the principal component of declining steroid hormones (DSH). Moderation analysis of the association between age and DSH revealed significant moderation effects for psychosocial factors such as depression, chronic stress and perceived general health. In conclusion, these results provide further evidence that sex steroids decline in aging men and that the integrated hormone parameter DSH and its rate of change can be used as biomarkers for healthy aging in men. Furthermore, the negative association of age and DSH is moderated by psychosocial factors. PMID:27589836

  9. The rate of change in declining steroid hormones: a new parameter of healthy aging in men?

    PubMed

    Walther, Andreas; Philipp, Michel; Lozza, Niclà; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-09-20

    Research on healthy aging in men has increasingly focused on age-related hormonal changes. Testosterone (T) decline is primarily investigated, while age-related changes in other sex steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], estradiol [E2], progesterone [P]) are mostly neglected. An integrated hormone parameter reflecting aging processes in men has yet to be identified. 271 self-reporting healthy men between 40 and 75 provided both psychometric data and saliva samples for hormone analysis. Correlation analysis between age and sex steroids revealed negative associations for the four sex steroids (T, DHEA, E2, and P). Principal component analysis including ten salivary analytes identified a principal component mainly unifying the variance of the four sex steroid hormones. Subsequent principal component analysis including the four sex steroids extracted the principal component of declining steroid hormones (DSH). Moderation analysis of the association between age and DSH revealed significant moderation effects for psychosocial factors such as depression, chronic stress and perceived general health. In conclusion, these results provide further evidence that sex steroids decline in aging men and that the integrated hormone parameter DSH and its rate of change can be used as biomarkers for healthy aging in men. Furthermore, the negative association of age and DSH is moderated by psychosocial factors.

  10. Supression of the steroid-primed luteinizing hormone surge in the female rat by sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate: Relationship to hypothalamic catecholamines and GnRH neuronal activation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rodents, hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) has a role in stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that triggers the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). NE synthesis from dopamine requires the presence of dopamine--hydroxylase (DH) an...

  11. Measurement of steroid hormones in plasma by isocratic high performance liquid chromatography coupled to radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Boschi, S; De Iasio, R; Mesini, P; Bolelli, G F; Sciajno, R; Pasquali, R; Capelli, M

    1994-11-01

    The study of steroidal profiles requires simultaneous determinations of various steroid hormones that cannot be appropriately carried out with the conventional routine immunoassays. Moreover, there are several trials for which the assessment of multiple steroids from a single serum sample is mandatory. In this paper we describe a procedure for simultaneously measuring steroid hormones using a unified solid phase extraction which allows the measurement of both unconjugated and conjugated steroids from 1 ml of sample and a combination of HPLC with isocratic elution followed by RIA. The entire procedure was preliminary carried out for the measurement of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulphated conjugate, androstenedione and 17 hydroxyprogesterone. The use of this technique allows precise and accurate measurements of steroid profile with a single serum aliquot and could be helpful in the diagnosis of various form of endocrine disorders.

  12. An acute stressor alters steroid hormone levels and activity but not sexual behavior in male and female Ocoee salamanders (Desmognathus ocoee).

    PubMed

    Woodley, Sarah K; Lacy, Eva L

    2010-08-01

    Stressors that are chronic have clear suppressive effects on reproductive behaviors in both males and females. Stressors that are acute have effects on reproductive behavior that are less clear. We measured the effects of an acute bout of handling in laboratory-housed male and female Ocoee salamanders (Desmognathus ocoee), a species with a prolonged mating season. Handling resulted in decreased locomotory activity and elevated plasma corticosterone, a hallmark of the vertebrate stress response. Handling also decreased plasma testosterone in males and elevated plasma estradiol in females. Despite the handling-induced changes in hormone levels, handling had minimal impact on courtship and mating. Other species in which reproduction is insensitive to acute stressors may live in extreme environments with limited reproductive opportunities, whereas Ocoee salamanders live in a relatively temperate environment with multiple reproductive opportunities. Together, these data indicate that an allostatic response to a stressor can alter locomotory activity and elevate corticosterone without suppressing nonessential behaviors like courtship and mating in a species in which reproductive opportunities can occur over a period of multiple months. The lack of reproductive suppression in Ocoee salamanders might be due to the low energetic cost of courtship and mating in this species combined with potentially elevated energetic stores, highlighting the importance of considering energy budgets when making predictions about behavioral effects of acute stressors.

  13. From molecule to market: steroid hormones and financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Coates, John M; Gurnell, Mark; Sarnyai, Zoltan

    2010-01-27

    Little is known about the role of the endocrine system in financial decision-making. Here, we survey research on steroid hormones and their cognitive effects, and examine potential links to trader performance in the financial markets. Preliminary findings suggest that cortisol codes for risk and testosterone for reward. A key finding of this endocrine research is the different cognitive effects of acute versus chronic exposure to hormones: acutely elevated steroids may optimize performance on a range of tasks; but chronically elevated steroids may promote irrational risk-reward choices. We present a hypothesis suggesting that the irrational exuberance and pessimism observed during market bubbles and crashes may be mediated by steroid hormones. If hormones can exaggerate market moves, then perhaps the age and sex composition among traders and asset managers may affect the level of instability witnessed in the financial markets.

  14. The role of alcohol and steroid hormones in human aggression.

    PubMed

    von der Pahlen, Bettina

    2005-01-01

    The association between alcohol and aggressive behavior is well established although a direct causal relationship has proven hard to demonstrate. There are, however, indications that alcohol facilitates aggression in individuals who already have a predisposition to behave aggressively. Aggressive personality disorders have in turn been explained by elevated testosterone level. A one-to-one relation between increased levels of testosterone and aggression has been, nevertheless, difficult to reveal. Two metabolites of testosterone, estradiol and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), have been studied much less in human aggressive behavior. Estradiol might reduce androgenic effects and have a counterbalancing influence on aggression. DHT, again, has a much higher affinity than testosterone to androgen receptors, and there are indications that some of the effects of testosterone-mediating aggressive behavior occur after aromatization. Disregard of seasonal and circadian fluctuations in male testosterone production might be responsible for some of the inconclusive testosterone-aggression results. In addition, increasing age decreases both aggressive behavior and testosterone production in males. Cortisol has yielded conflicting results as a mediator in aggressive behavior. Both higher and lower levels have been reported in aggressive and abusive men. Finally, the acute and chronic effects of alcohol influence the steroid hormone levels in various ways. The present understanding of the etiology of aggression is still vague. It is clear that a multidimensional approach, combining both biological and psychosocial factors, will be necessary for the development of a more general concept of human aggression in the future.

  15. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  16. Intrinsic epigenetic factors cooperate with the steroid hormone ecdysone to govern dendrite pruning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kirilly, Daniel; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Lim, Edwin Kok Hao; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Cheng; Liao, Qiuming; Wang, Haifeng; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Wang, Hongyan; Yu, Fengwei

    2011-10-06

    Pruning that selectively removes unnecessary axons/dendrites is crucial for sculpting neural circuits during development. During Drosophila metamorphosis, dendritic arborization sensory neurons, ddaCs, selectively prune their larval dendrites in response to the steroid hormone ecdysone. However, it is unknown whether epigenetic factors are involved in dendrite pruning. Here, we analyzed 81 epigenetic factors, from which a Brahma (Brm)-containing chromatin remodeler and a histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) were identified for their critical roles in initiating dendrite pruning. Brm and CBP specifically activate a key ecdysone response gene, sox14, but not EcR-B1. Furthermore, the HAT activity of CBP is important for sox14 expression and dendrite pruning. EcR-B1 associates with CBP in the presence of ecdysone, which is facilitated by Brm, resulting in local enrichment of an active chromatin mark H3K27Ac at the sox14 locus. Thus, specific intrinsic epigenetic factors cooperate with steroid hormones to activate selective transcriptional programs, thereby initiating neuronal remodeling.

  17. Do mollusks use vertebrate sex steroids as reproductive hormones? II. Critical review of the evidence that steroids have biological effects.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander P

    2013-02-01

    In assessing the evidence as to whether vertebrate sex steroids (e.g. testosterone, estradiol, progesterone) have hormonal actions in mollusks, ca. 85% of research papers report at least one biological effect; and 18 out of 21 review papers (published between 1970 and 2012) express a positive view. However, just under half of the research studies can be rejected on the grounds that they did not actually test steroids, but compounds or mixtures that were only presumed to behave as steroids (or modulators of steroids) on the basis of their effects in vertebrates (e.g. Bisphenol-A, nonylphenol and sewage treatment effluents). Of the remaining 55 papers, some can be criticized for having no statistical analysis; some for using only a single dose of steroid; others for having irregular dose-response curves; 40 out of the 55 for not replicating the treatments; and 50 out of 55 for having no within-study repetition. Furthermore, most studies had very low effect sizes in comparison to fish-based bioassays for steroids (i.e. they had a very weak 'signal-to-noise' ratio). When these facts are combined with the fact that none of the studies were conducted with rigorous randomization or 'blinding' procedures (implying the possibility of 'operator bias') one must conclude that there is no indisputable bioassay evidence that vertebrate sex steroids have endocrinological or reproductive roles in mollusks. The only observation that has been independently validated is the ability of estradiol to trigger rapid (1-5 min) lysosomal membrane breakdown in hemocytes of Mytilus spp. This is a typical 'inflammatory' response, however, and is not proof that estradiol is a hormone - especially when taken in conjunction with the evidence (discussed in a previous review) that mollusks have neither the enzymes necessary to synthesize vertebrate steroids nor nuclear receptors with which to respond to them.

  18. Variation with semilunar periodicity of plasma steroid hormone production in the mudskipper Boleophthalmus pectinirostris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Hong, Wanshu; Chen, Shixi; Zhang, Qiyong

    2008-02-01

    Variation in the production of the plasma steroid hormones E(2), 17alpha-OHP and T in females and T and 11-KT in males, was investigated in the mudskipper Boleophthalmus pectinirostris during the spawning season. Females with oocytes at the vitellogenic stage (GSI 5.97-6.86%) and mature males with GSI of 0.255-0.288% were collected at intervals of 3-4 days within the two complete semilunar cycles from May 31 to June 30, 2006. The results showed that variations in the levels of plasma steroid hormones were synchronized obviously with semilunar periodicity in both females and males. Each steroid hormone level exhibited two cycles, each cycle with a peak. In females, the first peaks in plasma E(2), 17alpha-OHP and T levels were observed 3 days after the first lunar quarter, and the second ones, 4 days after the last lunar quarter. In males, the first peaks of plasma T and 11-KT levels occurred 3 days after the first lunar quarter, and the second ones, at the last lunar quarter. The fact that, in the present study, changes in the levels of plasma steroid hormones were synchronized with semilunar periodicity, although the fish were at the same stages of gonadal development, suggests that variation of plasma steroid hormones is basically regulated by biological rhythms (Zeitgebers), and that tidal movement (with its semilunar periodicity) is the major environmental factor stimulating steroid hormone production in B. pectinirostris.

  19. The influence of androgenic steroid hormones on female aggression in 'atypical' mammals.

    PubMed

    French, Jeffrey A; Mustoe, Aaryn C; Cavanaugh, Jon; Birnie, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    Dimorphism on dominance and agonistic behaviour in mammals tends to be strongly biased toward males. In this review, we focus on a select few species of mammals in which females are as or more aggressive than males, and/or are dominant to males, and explore the role of androgenic hormones in mediating this important difference. While the data are not as clear-cut as those published on traditional laboratory mammals, our review highlights important endocrine substrates for both organizational and activational influences of steroids on female aggressive behaviour. We highlight areas in which further observations and experiments are crucial, especially the potential facilitative effects of androgens on female aggression. Finally, new and innovative techniques, including molecular genetics and receptor pharmacology, portend important insights into the ways in which androgenic hormones regulate aggressive behaviour in 'atypical' female mammals.

  20. UTX coordinates steroid hormone-mediated autophagy and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Donna; Aung-Htut, May T.; Lorensuhewa, Nirmal; Nicolson, Shannon; Zhu, Wenying; Mills, Kathryn; Cakouros, Dimitrios; Bergmann, Andreas; Kumar, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Correct spatial and temporal induction of numerous cell type-specific genes during development requires regulated removal of the repressive histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) modification. Here we show that the H3K27me3 demethylase dUTX is required for hormone-mediated transcriptional regulation of apoptosis and autophagy genes during ecdysone-regulated programmed cell death of Drosophila salivary glands. We demonstrate that dUTX binds to the nuclear hormone receptor complex Ecdysone Receptor/Ultraspiracle, and is recruited to the promoters of key apoptosis and autophagy genes. Salivary gland cell death is delayed in dUTX mutants, with reduced caspase activity and autophagy that coincides with decreased apoptosis and autophagy gene transcripts. We further show that salivary gland degradation requires dUTX catalytic activity. Our findings provide evidence for an unanticipated role for UTX demethylase activity in regulating hormone-dependent cell death and demonstrate how a single transcriptional regulator can modulate a specific complex functional outcome during animal development. PMID:24336022

  1. The spatial and temporal regulation of the hormonal signal. Role of mitochondria in the formation of a protein complex required for the activation of cholesterol transport and steroids synthesis.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Duarte, Alejandra; Cooke, Mariana; Orlando, Ulises; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Solano, Angela R; Lemos, Jose R; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2013-05-22

    The mitochondria are critical for steroidogenesis since the ability of cholesterol to move into mitochondria to be available for cytochrome P450, CYP11A1, determines the efficacy of steroid production. Several proteins kinases, such as PKA, MEK and ERK which are essential to complete steroidogenesis, form a mitochondria-associated complex. The protein-protein interactions between kinases and key factors during the transport of cholesterol takes place in the contact sites between the two mitochondrial membranes; however, no mitochondrial targeting sequence has been described for these kinases. Here we discuss the possibility that mitochondrial reorganization may be mediating a compartmentalized cellular response. This reorganization could allow the physical interaction between the hormone-receptor complex and the enzymatic and lipidic machinery necessary for the complete steroid synthesis and release. The movement of organelles in specialized cells could impact on biological processes that include, but are not limited to, steroid synthesis.

  2. Cubilin dysfunction causes abnormal metabolism of the steroid hormone 25(OH) vitamin D(3).

    PubMed

    Nykjaer, A; Fyfe, J C; Kozyraki, R; Leheste, J R; Jacobsen, C; Nielsen, M S; Verroust, P J; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Moestrup, S K; Ray, R; Gliemann, J; Willnow, T E; Christensen, E I

    2001-11-20

    Steroid hormones are central regulators of a variety of biological processes. According to the free hormone hypothesis, steroids enter target cells by passive diffusion. However, recently we demonstrated that 25(OH) vitamin D(3) complexed to its plasma carrier, the vitamin D-binding protein, enters renal proximal tubules by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockout mice lacking the endocytic receptor megalin lose 25(OH) vitamin D(3) in the urine and develop bone disease. Here, we report that cubilin, a membrane-associated protein colocalizing with megalin, facilitates the endocytic process by sequestering steroid-carrier complexes on the cellular surface before megalin-mediated internalization of the cubilin-bound ligand. Dogs with an inherited disorder affecting cubilin biosynthesis exhibit abnormal vitamin D metabolism. Similarly, human patients with mutations causing cubilin dysfunction exhibit urinary excretion of 25(OH) vitamin D(3). This observation identifies spontaneous mutations in an endocytic receptor pathway affecting cellular uptake and metabolism of a steroid hormone.

  3. New steroid derivative with hypoglycemic activity

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2014-01-01

    Data indicates that some steroid derivatives may induce changes on glucose levels; nevertheless, data are very confusing. Therefore, more pharmacological data are needed to characterize the activity induced by the steroid derivatives on glucose levels. The aim of this study was to synthesize a new steroid derivative for evaluate its hypoglycemic activity. The effects of steroid derivative on glucose concentration were evaluated in a diabetic animal model using glibenclamide and metformin as controls. In addition, the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate was bound to Tc-99m using radioimmunoassay methods, to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the steroid derivative over time. The results showed that the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate induces changes on the glucose levels in similar form than glibenclamide. Other data showed that the biodistribution of Tc-99m-steroid derivativein brain was higher in comparison with spleen, stomach, intestine liver and kidney. In conclusion, the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate exerts hypoglycemic activity and this phenomenon could depend of its physicochemical properties which could be related to the degree of lipophilicity of the steroidderivative. PMID:25550906

  4. New steroid derivative with hypoglycemic activity.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2014-01-01

    Data indicates that some steroid derivatives may induce changes on glucose levels; nevertheless, data are very confusing. Therefore, more pharmacological data are needed to characterize the activity induced by the steroid derivatives on glucose levels. The aim of this study was to synthesize a new steroid derivative for evaluate its hypoglycemic activity. The effects of steroid derivative on glucose concentration were evaluated in a diabetic animal model using glibenclamide and metformin as controls. In addition, the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate was bound to Tc-99m using radioimmunoassay methods, to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the steroid derivative over time. The results showed that the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate induces changes on the glucose levels in similar form than glibenclamide. Other data showed that the biodistribution of Tc-99m-steroid derivativein brain was higher in comparison with spleen, stomach, intestine liver and kidney. In conclusion, the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate exerts hypoglycemic activity and this phenomenon could depend of its physicochemical properties which could be related to the degree of lipophilicity of the steroidderivative.

  5. INTERLABORATORY STUDY ON THE USE OF STEROID HORMONES IN EXAMINING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, there has been an increased use of the measurement of sex steroid hormone levels in the blood of animals exposed to chemicals as an indicator of reproductive impairment or an alteration in endocrine function. Although levels of hormones are often compared among ...

  6. The influence of steroid sex hormones on the cognitive and emotional processing of visual stimuli in humans.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C

    2013-10-01

    Steroid sex hormones are responsible for some of the differences between men and women. In this article, I review evidence that steroid sex hormones impact on visual processing. Given prominent sex-differences, I focus on three topics for sex hormone effects for which there is most research available: 1. Preference and mate choice, 2. Emotion and recognition, and 3. Cerebral/perceptual asymmetries and visual-spatial abilities. For each topic, researchers have examined sex hormones and visual processing using various methods. I review indirect evidence addressing variation according to: menstrual cycle phase, pregnancy, puberty, and menopause. I further address studies of variation in testosterone and a measure of prenatal testosterone, 2D:4D, on visual processing. The most conclusive evidence, however, comes from experiments. Studies in which hormones are administrated are discussed. Overall, many studies demonstrate that sex steroids are associated with visual processing. However, findings are sometimes inconsistent, differences in methodology make strong comparisons between studies difficult, and we generally know more about activational than organizational effects.

  7. Occurrence of steroid hormones and antibiotics in shallow groundwater impacted by livestock waste control facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Snow, Daniel D.; Damon-Powell, Teyona; Miesbach, David

    2011-04-01

    Wastewater impoundments at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) represent a potential source of veterinary pharmaceuticals and steroid hormone contamination to shallow groundwater. This study investigates the occurrence of seventeen veterinary pharmaceuticals and thirteen steroid hormones and hormone metabolites in lagoons and adjacent groundwater at operating swine and beef cattle facilities. These sites were chosen because subsurface geology and previous monitoring of nitrate, ammonia and chloride levels in shallow ground water strongly indicated direct infiltration, and as such represent worst cases for ground water contamination by waste water. Pharmaceutical compounds detected in samples obtained from cattle facilities include sulfamerazine; sulfamethazine; erythromycin; monensin; tiamulin; and sulfathiazole. Lincomycin; ractopamine; sulfamethazine; sulfathiazole; erythromycin; tiamulin and sulfadimethoxine were detected in wastewater samples obtained from swine facilities. Steroid hormones were detected less frequently than veterinary pharmaceuticals in this study. Estrone, testosterone, 4-androstenedione, and androsterone were detected in wastewater impoundments at concentrations ranging from 30 to 3600 ng/L, while only estrone and testosterone were detected in groundwater samples at concentrations up to 390 ng/L. The co-occurrence of veterinary pharmaceutical and steroid hormone contamination in groundwater at these locations and the correlation between pharmaceutical occurrence in lagoon wastewater and hydraulically downgradient groundwater indicates that groundwater underlying some livestock wastewater impoundments is susceptible to contamination by veterinary pharmaceuticals and steroid hormones originating in wastewater lagoons.

  8. Occurrence of steroid hormones and antibiotics in shallow groundwater impacted by livestock waste control facilities.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Snow, Daniel D; Damon-Powell, Teyona; Miesbach, David

    2011-04-25

    Wastewater impoundments at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) represent a potential source of veterinary pharmaceuticals and steroid hormone contamination to shallow groundwater. This study investigates the occurrence of seventeen veterinary pharmaceuticals and thirteen steroid hormones and hormone metabolites in lagoons and adjacent groundwater at operating swine and beef cattle facilities. These sites were chosen because subsurface geology and previous monitoring of nitrate, ammonia and chloride levels in shallow ground water strongly indicated direct infiltration, and as such represent worst cases for ground water contamination by waste water. Pharmaceutical compounds detected in samples obtained from cattle facilities include sulfamerazine; sulfamethazine; erythromycin; monensin; tiamulin; and sulfathiazole. Lincomycin; ractopamine; sulfamethazine; sulfathiazole; erythromycin; tiamulin and sulfadimethoxine were detected in wastewater samples obtained from swine facilities. Steroid hormones were detected less frequently than veterinary pharmaceuticals in this study. Estrone, testosterone, 4-androstenedione, and androsterone were detected in wastewater impoundments at concentrations ranging from 30 to 3600ng/L, while only estrone and testosterone were detected in groundwater samples at concentrations up to 390ng/L. The co-occurrence of veterinary pharmaceutical and steroid hormone contamination in groundwater at these locations and the correlation between pharmaceutical occurrence in lagoon wastewater and hydraulically downgradient groundwater indicates that groundwater underlying some livestock wastewater impoundments is susceptible to contamination by veterinary pharmaceuticals and steroid hormones originating in wastewater lagoons.

  9. Metabolic profiling of cholesterol and sex steroid hormones to monitor urological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ju-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol and sex steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens play a critical role in the development and progression of urological diseases such as prostate cancer. This disease remains the most commonly diagnosed malignant tumor in men and is the leading cause of death from different cancers. Attempts to understand the role of cholesterol and steroid metabolism in urological diseases have been ongoing for many years, but despite this, our mechanistic and translational understanding remains elusive. In order to further evaluate the problem, we have taken an interest in metabolomics; a discipline dedicated to the systematic study of biologically active metabolites in cells, tissues, hair and biofluids. Recently, we provided evidence that a quantitative measurement of cholesterol and sex steroid metabolites can be successfully achieved using hair of human and mouse models. The overall goal of this short review article is to introduce current metabolomic technologies for the quantitative biomarker assay development and also to provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms that trigger the pathological condition. Furthermore, this review will place a particular emphasis on how to prepare biospecimens (e.g., hair fiber), quantify molecular profiles and assess their clinical significance in various urological diseases. PMID:27580660

  10. Yeast-based reporter assays for the functional characterization of cochaperone interactions with steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, Heather A; Cox, Marc B

    2009-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptor-mediated reporter assays in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been an invaluable tool for the identification and functional characterization of steroid hormone receptor-associated chaperones and cochaperones. This chapter describes a hormone-inducible androgen receptor-mediated beta-galactosidase reporter assay in yeast. In addition, the immunophilin FKBP52 is used as a specific example of a receptor-associated cochaperone that acts as a positive regulator of receptor function. With the right combination of receptor and cochaperone expression plasmids, reporter plasmid, and ligand, the assay protocol described here could be used to functionally characterize a wide variety of nuclear receptor-cochaperone interactions. In addition to the functional characterization of receptor regulatory proteins, a modified version of this assay is currently being used to screen compound libraries for selective FKBP52 inhibitors that represent attractive therapeutic candidates for the treatment of steroid hormone receptor-associated diseases.

  11. Metabolism of steroid hormones by Taenia solium and Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, P; Valdez, R A; Romano, M C

    2006-06-01

    Previous in vitro experiments showed that both, Taenia crassiceps and Taenia solium cysticerci have the ability to metabolize exogenous androstenedione to testosterone. Here we evaluate on the capacity of both cysticerci to synthesize several sex steroid hormones, using different hormonal precursors. Experiments using thin layer chromatography (TLC) showed that both cysticerci were able to produce (3)H-hydroxyprogesterone, (3)H-androstenedione and (3)H-testosterone when (3)H-progesterone was used as the precursor. They also synthesized (3)H-androstenediol and (3)H-testosterone when (3)H-dehydroepiandrosterone was the precursor. In addition, both cysticerci interconverted (3)H-estradiol and (3)H-estrone. These results, strongly suggest the presence and activity of the Delta4 and Delta5 steroid pathway enzymes, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta(5-4) isomerase-like enzyme (3beta-HSD), that converts androstenediol into testosterone; and the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase that interconverts estradiol and estrone, in both types of cysticerci.

  12. Possible role of the aromatase-independent steroid metabolism pathways in hormone responsive primary breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hanamura, Toru; Niwa, Toshifumi; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Kurosumi, Masafumi; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Ito, Ken-ichi; Hayashi, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) exert antiproliferative effects by reducing local estrogen production from androgens in postmenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer. Previous reports have shown that androgen metabolites generated by the aromatase-independent enzymes, 5α-androstane-3β, 17β-diol (3β-diol), androst-5-ene-3β, and 17β-diol (A-diol), also activate estrogen receptor (ER) α. Estradiol (E2) can also reportedly be generated from estrone sulfate (E1S) pooled in the plasma. Estrogenic steroid-producing aromatase-independent pathways have thus been proposed as a mechanism of AI resistance. However, it is unclear whether these pathways are functional in clinical breast cancer. To investigate this issue, we assessed the transcriptional activities of ER in 45 ER-positive human breast cancers using the adenovirus estrogen-response element-green fluorescent protein assay and mRNA expression levels of the ER target gene, progesterone receptor, as indicators of ex vivo and in vivo ER activity, respectively. We also determined mRNA expression levels of 5α-reductase type 1 (SRD5A1) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3β-HSD type 1; HSD3B1), which produce 3β-diol from androgens, and of steroid sulfatase (STS) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD type 1; HSD17B1), which produce E2 or A-diol from E1S or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. SRD5A1 and HSD3B1 expression levels were positively correlated with ex vivo and in vivo ER activities. STS and HSD17B1 expression levels were positively correlated with in vivo ER activity alone. Elevated expression levels of these steroid-metabolizing enzymes in association with high in vivo ER activity were particularly notable in postmenopausal patients. Analysis of the expression levels of steroid-metabolizing enzymes revealed positive correlations between SRD5A1 and HSD3B1, and STS and HSD17B1. These findings suggest that the SRD5A1-HSD3B1 as well as the STS-HSD17B pathways, could contributes

  13. Pilot study of adrenal steroid hormones in hair as an indicator of chronic mental and physical stress

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, E.; Barthel, A; Petrowski, K.; Stalder, T.; Kirschbaum, C.; Bornstein, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the quantitative analysis of moderators affecting the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis in health and sickness is still unreliable. This is, in particular, due to physiological factors such as pulsatile ultradian and circadian glucocorticoid secretion as well as to methodological limitations of the current techniques for steroid hormone determination. Based on this background, the determination of long-term hair steroid concentrations is an important methodological improvement allowing for the quantitative analysis of chronic HPA axis-activation. In order to determine the relationship between chronic mental and physical stress and a chronic activation of the HPA axis, we performed a cross-sectional pilot-study with 40 healthy students and examined the relationships between physical activity, mental burden(s), subjective stress perceptions, depressiveness, anxiety, physical complaints, sense of coherence, resilience, and the long-term integrated steroid hormone levels in hair. The results showed that the concentrations of cortisol, cortisone, and dehydroepiandrosterone in hair were significantly correlated to mental (p = 0.034) and physical stress (p = 0.001) as well as to subjective stress perception (p = 0.006). We conclude that steroid concentrations in hair are decisive predictors for an increase in the long-term-HPA axis activity. Moreover, this biomarker is suitable for capturing the stresslevel after burdening events and physical activity. PMID:27174654

  14. Do steroid hormones play a role in the etiology of glioma?

    PubMed

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Etgen, Anne M; Rohan, Thomas E

    2010-10-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor and have a very poor prognosis. Little is known, however, about the etiology of these tumors. Evidence from a number of sources suggests that endogenous steroid hormones may play a role in the development of gliomas. First, the descriptive epidemiology of glioma suggests a relative protection of females compared with males, particularly during the premenopausal years. Second, some gliomas and glioblastomas express estrogen receptors (ER), especially ERβ, as well as aromatase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of testosterone to estradiol, and possibly other steroid hormone receptors. Third, experimental studies indicate that glioblastomas transplanted into animals grow at a slower rate in females compared with males. Finally, experimental studies show that estradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol, and a number of selective estrogen receptor modulators inhibit proliferation of gliomas and induce cell death. These hormonal agonists and antagonists may act either through classical steroid hormone receptors or independently of such receptors. In view of these findings, further clinical, experimental, and epidemiologic studies are needed to elucidate the role of steroid hormone agonists and antagonists in the development and proliferation of glioma. If hormonal pathways are involved in gliomagenesis, this could eventually lead to the design of preventive strategies.

  15. SEX-STEROID AND THYROID HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM CONTAMINATED AND REFERENCE LAKES IN FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-...

  16. Functional elements of the steroid hormone-responsive promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, M G; Lee, J W; Huang, M; Peterson, D O

    1990-01-01

    Transcription from the promoter of mouse mammary tumor virus is subject to induction by several classes of steroid hormones as well as to repression by a negative regulatory element present in the long terminal repeats of proviral DNA. In order to characterize the functional elements of the promoter that in some way must respond to these regulatory signals, a number of promoter mutations were constructed, including a set of linker-scanning mutations across the entire promoter region. Analysis of these mutated promoters with a transient-transfection assay defined at least three mutation-sensitive promoter elements that are required for both basal and hormone-induced transcription. One mutation-sensitive region contains a TATA element located at approximately position -30 with respect to the start of transcription. A second mutation-sensitive region contains two 10-base-pair direct repeats located between positions -60 and -38, within which are embedded three copies of octamer-related sequences; complete disruption of this region of the promoter leads to a more severe decrease in transcription than do any of the linker-scanning mutations, suggesting that the repeated sequences may be at least partially functionally redundant. Gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays were used to demonstrate specific binding of a nuclear protein to this region of the promoter. A third mutation-sensitive region contains a binding site for nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) located between positions -77 and -63. Site-directed mutations in the NF-1-binding site which increase the apparent affinity of NF-1 for the promoter in vitro do not decrease the hormone dependence of transcription, suggesting that transcriptional activation mediated by steroid hormone-receptor complexes cannot be explained by facilitation or stabilization of the interaction of promoter sequences with NF-1 and consistent with the idea that binding of NF-1 is not rate determining in transcription from the mouse mammary tumor

  17. Antiglucocorticosteroid effects suggest why steroid hormone is required for receptors to bind DNA in vivo but not in vitro.

    PubMed

    Groyer, A; Schweizer-Groyer, G; Cadepond, F; Mariller, M; Baulieu, E E

    Sequence-specific interaction between steroid hormone receptors (R) and DNA hormone-responsive elements (HRE) takes place in vitro irrespective of the presence of hormone and even when R is liganded with an antagonist. In vivo, in contrast, the presence of hormone is mandatory for glucocorticosteroid (G) receptor-HRE interaction to occur and no HRE occupancy is detected in the presence of an antagonist. One possible explanation is that in vivo R is originally complexed with a protein that prevents its binding to target HREs. The hormone would then induce the dissociation of the oligomer, thus unmasking the functional DNA binding domain of the receptor. The unliganded, non DNA-binding 8S-form of the chick GR is a hetero-oligomer including the relative molecular mass (Mr) 94,000 steroid-binding unit (4S-GR), and the non-steroid-binding, non-DNA-binding 90,000 protein common to all classes of 8S-R and identified as heat-shock protein (hsp 90). We report here that triamcinolone acetonide (TA) promotes the transformation of 8S-GR to 4S-GR complexes both in explants and in cell-free conditions and that the high-affinity antiglucocorticosteroid RU 486 stabilizes the 8S-GR, as assessed by gradient sedimentation and HPLC. However, in vitro TA- and RU 486- 4S-GR showed comparable DNA-binding activity. These results suggest that the lack of affinity for DNA of the 8S form of GR may be attributable in vivo to the interaction of the 4S-GR protein with hsp 90, and that hormone binding might trigger a conformational change which results in the release of active 4S-GR.

  18. Preventing Anabolic Steroid Use: Guidelines and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June; Rauhe, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Information about anabolic steroids should be included in the school health curriculum as early as possible. The paper presents suggestions for planning education programs and offers a variety of activities and strategies appropriate for many age groups, including case studies, story completion, posters, demonstrations, projects, creative writing,…

  19. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors.

  20. Effects of steroid hormone on estrogen sulfotransferase and on steroid sulfatase expression in endometriosis tissue and stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Piccinato, Carla A; Neme, Rosa M; Torres, Natália; Sanches, Lívia Renta; Derogis, Priscilla Bento Mattos Cruz; Brudniewski, Heloísa F; Rosa e Silva, Júlio C; Ferriani, Rui A

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease that afflicts about 10% of women in their reproductive age, causing severe pain and infertility. The potential roles of female steroid hormones in modulating key estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, steroid sulfatase (STS) and estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), were investigated. The expression of STS and SULT1E1 mRNA in biopsy samples (n=78) of superficial and deep endometriotic lesions, eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis and endometrium from control patients were compared according to the menstrual cycle phase. Increased STS gene expression was detected in superficial and deep-infiltrating lesions and a reduced SULT1E1 expression was also observed in the eutopic endometrium relative to the superficial lesions. Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was detected between STS and SULT1E1 mRNA expression levels in biopsy specimens collected from the endometriosis patients, and not in control individuals. The actions of female steroid hormones on SULT1E1 and STS expression were evidenced in endometriosis, revealed by increased expression levels in the luteal phase of the cycle. There was an increased STS expression in primary eutopic and ectopic endometrial stromal cells treated with estradiol and progesterone (representative of the luteal phase, n=3). Although an increased STS mRNA expression was observed in hormone-induced endometrial stromal cells in vitro, no difference could be detected between the hormone treatment groups in estradiol formation from estradiol sulfate measured by LC-MS-MS. Interestingly, a greater expression of STS was observed in stromal cells from eutopic endometrium with an agreement in estradiol formation originated from estradiol sulfate. The differential regulation of STS and SULT1E1 could provide insights for novel studies of the therapeutic use of STS inhibitors.

  1. Residual ovarian activity during oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, A M; Fauser, B C J M

    2002-01-01

    Steroid drugs with contraceptive properties have been available in the clinical setting for over four decades and are still subject to improvement. Estrogens, progestins and anti-progestins have been used alone or in various combinations, regimens and routes of administration to favour the balance between efficacy and undesirable effects. One of the most important changes in this respect is the gradual lowering of steroid dosage in commercially available contraceptives. Current steroid contraceptive pills still achieve the goal of suppression of pituitary-ovarian activity, but the margins for error are minimal. In this review the available data on modes of action and the effects on suppressing pituitary-ovarian activity by different forms of oral contraception are reassessed. Although pregnancy rates provide a crude measure of contraceptive efficacy, no benchmark for pituitary-ovarian inhibition is available to test the suppressive potential of contraceptive drugs. Consequently, many studies provide incomplete and/or incomparable results. For the further study of those forms of steroid contraception that rely predominantly on suppression of ovarian activity, prevention of dominant follicles selection should be the objective.

  2. Biogas final digestive byproduct applied to croplands as fertilizer contains high levels of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Björklund, Erland; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Hansen, Martin

    2013-09-01

    In this study we evaluate and demonstrate the occurrence of nine natural and one synthetic steroid hormone, including estrogens, androgens and progestagens in biogas final digestate byproduct (digestion liquid) commonly used as an agricultural fertilizer. We investigated two biogas sites that utilize different anaerobic digestion technologies (mesophilic and thermophilic) from swine manure and other organic wastes. Individual hormone concentration levels were observed up to 1478 ng g(-1) dry weight or 22.5 mg kg(-1) N with estrone and progesterone reaching highest concentration levels. Evaluation of the potential environmental burden through the application in agriculture was also assessed on the basis of predicted environmental concentrations. This study indicates that the biogas digestion process does not completely remove steroid hormones from livestock manure and use of final digestate byproduct on croplands contributes to the environmental emission of hormones.

  3. Dielectric screening of early differentiation patterns in mesenchymal stem cells induced by steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Ron, Amit; Shur, Irena; Daniel, Ramiz; Singh, Ragini Raj; Fishelson, Nick; Croitoru, Nathan; Benayahu, Dafna; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-06-01

    In the framework of this study, target identification and localization of differentiation patterns by means of dielectric spectroscopy is presented. Here, a primary pre-osteoblastic bone marrow-derived MBA-15 cellular system was used to study the variations in the dielectric properties of mesenchymal stem cells while exposed to differentiation regulators. Using the fundamentals of mixed dielectric theories combined with finite numerical tools, the permittivity spectra of MBA-15 cell suspensions have been uniquely analyzed after being activated by steroid hormones to express osteogenic phenotypes. Following the spectral analysis, significant variations were revealed in the dielectric properties of the activated cells in comparison to the untreated populations. Based on the differentiation patterns of MBA-15, the electrical modifications were found to be highly correlated with the activation of specific cellular mechanisms which directly react to the hormonal inductions. In addition, by describing the dielectric dispersion in terms of transfer functions, it is shown that the spectral perturbations are well adapted to variations in the electrical characteristics of the cells. The reported findings vastly emphasize the tight correlation between the cellular and electrical state of the differentiated cells. It therefore emphasizes the vast abilities of impedance-based techniques as potential screening tools for stem cell analysis.

  4. Steroid hormones alter neuroanatomy and aggression independently in the tree lizard

    PubMed Central

    Kabelik, David; Weiss, Stacey L.; Moore, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    KABELIK, D., Weiss S. L. AND MOORE M. C. Steroid hormones alter neuroanatomy and aggression independently in the tree lizard. PHYSIOL BEHAV 00(0) 000-000, 0000. –Steroid hormones affect changes in both neuroanatomy and aggressive behavior in animals of various taxa. However, whether changes in neuroanatomy directly underlie changes in aggression is unknown. We investigate this relationship among steroid hormones, neuroanatomy, and aggression in a free-living vertebrate with a relatively simple nervous system, the tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus). Weiss and Moore [1] manipulated testosterone and progesterone levels in adult male tree lizards and found that both hormones facilitated aggressive behavior toward a conspecific. In this study, we examined the brains of a subset of these animals to determine whether changes in limbic morphology were associated with hormone-induced changes in aggressive behavior. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone and/or progesterone cause changes in neural morphology that are necessary for the expression of testosterone’s effects on aggressive behavior. We found that both hormones increased aggression; however, only testosterone induced changes in neuroanatomy. Testosterone increased the size of both the amygdala and nucleus sphericus. However, we could detect no individual correlations between neuroanatomy and aggression levels suggesting that the observed large-scale changes in neuroanatomy are not precisely reflective of changes in mechanisms underlying aggression. PMID:17996258

  5. Determination of steroid hormones in bovine milk by LC-MS/MS and their levels in Swiss Holstein cow milk.

    PubMed

    Goyon, Alexandre; Cai, Julia Zhenzhen; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Hartmann, Christoph; Shao, Bing; Mottier, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic and natural steroid hormones have attracted some attention in recent years as endocrine active substances (EAS) that interact or interfere with the endocrine system. Endogenous hormones occur naturally in food of animal origin, among which bovine milk represents an important source. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of steroid hormones (oestrogens, androgens, progestogens and glucocorticoids) in cow's milk samples from three farms in Switzerland. An isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of 12 hormones in milk. Some hormonal levels from individual cows showed large variations. The average levels of the hormones analysed (17α-estradiol = 31 ng kg(-)(1), 17β-estradiol = 6 ng kg(-)(1), estrone = 159 ng kg(-)(1), 4-androstenedione = 684 ng kg(-)(1), progesterone = 15486 ng kg(-)(1), 17-hydroxyprogesterone = 214 ng kg(-)(1), cortisone = 112 ng kg(-)(1), and cortisol = 235 ng kg(-)(1)) were comparable with literature data. Estriol, testosterone and androstenediols were not detected at their respective limit of quantification. No significant differences of hormonal content among milk from cows at different lactation/calving numbers were evidenced, except for progesterone and 4-androstenedione. Due to confounding parameters linked to the physiological stage of the animal, like pregnancy and gestational stage (pregnancy trimester), the causal correlation between the variation of the levels for these two hormones and the lactation/calving number could not be unambiguously demonstrated.

  6. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  7. Effect of combined hormonal and insulin therapy on the steroid hormone receptors and growth factors signalling in diabetic mice prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fávaro, Wagner J; Cagnon, Valéria H A

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes causes harmful effects on prostatic morphology and function. However, there still are doubts about the occurrence of various diseases in the prostate, as well as abnormal angiogenesis in relation to diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to correlate and quantify the level of the steroid hormone receptors and the angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in non-obese diabetic mice (Nod) after combined hormonal and insulin therapy. Sixty mice were divided into six groups after 20 days of diabetes: the control group received 0.9% NaCl, as did the diabetic group. The diabetic-insulin group received insulin, the diabetic-testosterone group received testosterone cypionate, the diabetic-oestrogen group received 17β-oestradiol, and the diabetic-insulin–testosterone–oestrogen group received insulin, testosterone and oestrogen simultaneously. After 20 days, the ventral lobe was processed for immunocytochemical and hormonal analyses. The results showed that the lowest serum testosterone and androgen receptor levels were found in the diabetic group and the highest testosterone and androgen receptor levels in the diabetic-insulin–testosterone–oestrogen group. The serum oestrogen level and its receptor showed changes opposite to those of testosterone and its receptor. The endostatin reactivity was mainly decreased in diabetic mice. The greatest IGFR-1 and VEGF reactivities occurred in diabetic mice. Thus, diabetes led to the prostatic hormonal imbalance, affecting molecular dynamics and angiogenesis in this organ. Combined insulin and steroid hormone therapy partially restored the hormonal and angiogenic imbalance caused by diabetes. PMID:21039986

  8. Effect of combined hormonal and insulin therapy on the steroid hormone receptors and growth factors signalling in diabetic mice prostate.

    PubMed

    Fávaro, Wagner J; Cagnon, Valéria H A

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes causes harmful effects on prostatic morphology and function. However, there still are doubts about the occurrence of various diseases in the prostate, as well as abnormal angiogenesis in relation to diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to correlate and quantify the level of the steroid hormone receptors and the angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in non-obese diabetic mice (Nod) after combined hormonal and insulin therapy. Sixty mice were divided into six groups after 20 days of diabetes: the control group received 0.9% NaCl, as did the diabetic group. The diabetic-insulin group received insulin, the diabetic-testosterone group received testosterone cypionate, the diabetic-oestrogen group received 17β-oestradiol, and the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group received insulin, testosterone and oestrogen simultaneously. After 20 days, the ventral lobe was processed for immunocytochemical and hormonal analyses. The results showed that the lowest serum testosterone and androgen receptor levels were found in the diabetic group and the highest testosterone and androgen receptor levels in the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group. The serum oestrogen level and its receptor showed changes opposite to those of testosterone and its receptor. The endostatin reactivity was mainly decreased in diabetic mice. The greatest IGFR-1 and VEGF reactivities occurred in diabetic mice. Thus, diabetes led to the prostatic hormonal imbalance, affecting molecular dynamics and angiogenesis in this organ. Combined insulin and steroid hormone therapy partially restored the hormonal and angiogenic imbalance caused by diabetes.

  9. Correlation between plasma steroid hormones and vitellogenin profiles and lunar periodicity in the female golden rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M D; Takemura, A; Takano, K

    2000-09-01

    Characteristics of the lunar reproductive cycle in the golden rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus, were determined by histological observations of ovarian development, and immunological measurements of plasma steroid hormones, estradiol-17beta (E2), testosterone (T), 17alpha,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) and 17alpha,20beta,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20beta-S), and vitellogenin (VTG). Ovarian and plasma samples were collected every week according to the lunar phases from May to July. Weekly change of gonadosomatic index (GSI) showed two peaks at the first lunar quarter in June and July. Yolky oocytes were also observed around this time. Histological observations revealed that the vitellogenic oocytes appeared again 1 week after spawning and developed synchronously. These results suggest that this species is a multiple spawner and the oocyte development is in a group-synchronous manner. Plasma steroid hormones (E2, T, DHP and 20beta-S) and VTG levels changed in parallel with changes in GSI. The peak of plasma VTG level occurred prior to spawning. These cyclic changes of plasma steroid hormones and VTG support the hypothesis that lunar periodicity is the major factor in stimulating reproductive activity of S. guttatus.

  10. The information encoded by the sex steroid hormones testosterone and estrogen: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zahavi, Amotz; Perel, Marina

    2011-07-07

    It is suggested that the sex steroid hormones testosterone and estrogen (SSH) provide receptor cells with reliable information on protein synthesis and on the level of oxidative metabolism in the cells of the gonads. The SSH are derived from the oxidation of cholesterol. This oxidation is a side reaction of the oxidative processes in the mitochondria that generate most of the energy to the organism. The amount of SSH that is synthesized is correlated to the partial pressure of oxygen at the synthesizing cells. The amount of free SSH that a cell can hold is checked by the damage that free steroids may cause. This damage is prevented by proteins that bind with SSH. As a result, SSH levels are correlated also with the ability of the SSH synthesizing cell to produce proteins that bind with them. A cell can only synthesize SSH in relation to the oxidative processes within it and to its ability to produce the binding proteins necessary to prevent the damage caused by SSH. As a result, the information conveyed by SSH is reliable. We examine the specific damage caused by testosterone and estrogen, and suggest why each of them is best suited for its function. Although both SSH can provide similar information on the metabolism in the cells that synthesize them, there are secondary reasons why testosterone and estrogen were selected to serve particular functions. Testosterone improves the efficiency of the proton pump at the mitochondria in producing ATP, but increases oxidative damage. Estrogen on the other hand decreases oxygen damage but also decreases the efficiency of the proton pump. These differences between the two SSH may explain why females use estrogen to inform the body about the activity of the cells in their gonads while males do it by testosterone. The increased oxidative damage may also explain why in males the testosterone that reaches the brain is turned into estrogen. We also suggest why fish use 11-keto testosterone and why insects do not use these two

  11. Do mollusks use vertebrate sex steroids as reproductive hormones? Part I: Critical appraisal of the evidence for the presence, biosynthesis and uptake of steroids.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander P

    2012-11-01

    The consensus view is that vertebrate-type steroids are present in mollusks and perform hormonal roles which are similar to those that they play in vertebrates. Although vertebrate steroids can be measured in molluscan tissues, a key question is 'Are they formed endogenously or they are picked up from their environment?'. The present review concludes that there is no convincing evidence for biosynthesis of vertebrate steroids by mollusks. Furthermore, the 'mollusk' genome does not contain the genes for key enzymes that are necessary to transform cholesterol in progressive steps into vertebrate-type steroids; nor does the mollusk genome contain genes for functioning classical nuclear steroid receptors. On the other hand, there is very strong evidence that mollusks are able to absorb vertebrate steroids from the environment; and are able to store some of them (by conjugating them to fatty acids) for weeks to months. It is notable that the three steroids that have been proposed as functional hormones in mollusks (i.e. progesterone, testosterone and 17β-estradiol) are the same as those of humans. Since humans (and indeed all vertebrates) continuously excrete steroids not just via urine and feces, but via their body surface (and, in fish, via the gills), it is impossible to rule out contamination as the sole reason for the presence of vertebrate steroids in mollusks (even in animals kept under supposedly 'clean laboratory conditions'). Essentially, the presence of vertebrate steroids in mollusks cannot be taken as reliable evidence of either endogenous biosynthesis or of an endocrine role.

  12. Downregulation of steroid hormone receptor expression and activation of cell signal transduction pathways induced by a chiral nonylphenol isomer in mouse sertoli TM4 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Nie, Shaoping; Yu, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoyin; Huang, Danfei; Xie, Mingyong

    2017-02-01

    Nonylphenols (NPs) are considered as important environmental toxicants and potential endocrine disrupting compounds which can disrupt male reproductive system. 4-[1-Ethyl-1-methylhexy] phenol (4-NP65 ) is one of the main isomers of technical nonylphenol mixtures. In the present study, effect of NPs was evaluated from an isomer-specific viewpoint using 4-NP65 . Decreased mRNA expression levels of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-β, androgen receptor (AR) and progesterone receptor (PR) were observed in the cells exposed to 4-NP65 for 24 h. Furthermore, 4-NP65 treatment evoked significant decrease in protein expression levels of ER-α and ER-β. Levels of mullerian inhibiting substance and transferrin were found to change significantly in 4-NP65 challenged cells. Additionally, JNK1/2-MAPK pathway was activated due to 4-NP65 exposure, but not ERK1/2 and p38-MAPK pathways. Meanwhile, 4-NP65 increased the p-Akt level and showed no effects on the Akt level which indicated that Akt pathway was activated by 4-NP65 . In conclusion, these findings have shown that 4-NP65 exposure affected expression of cell receptors and cell signaling pathways in Sertoli TM4 cells. We proposed that molecular mechanism of reproductive damage in Sertoli cells induced by NPs may be mediated by cell receptors and/or cell signal transduction pathways, and that the effects were dependent on the side chain of NP isomers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 469-476, 2017.

  13. Steroid Hormone (20-Hydroxyecdysone) Modulates the Acquisition of Aversive Olfactory Memories in Pollen Forager Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Lisa H.; McQuillan, H. James; Aiken, Alastair; Vergoz, Vanina; Mercer, Alison R.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we examine effects of the steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-E), on associative olfactory learning in the honeybee, "Apis mellifera." 20-E impaired the bees' ability to associate odors with punishment during aversive conditioning, but did not interfere with their ability to associate odors with a food reward (appetitive…

  14. Steer responses to feeding soybean hulls and steroid hormone implantation on toxic tall fescue pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yearling steers were grazed on endophyte-infected ‘Kentucky-31’ tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) pastures for 77 days in 2007 and for 86 days in 2008 to evaluate effects of feeding pelleted soybean hulls (PSBH) and steroid hormone implants (SHI) on steer performance and physiology. Steers were str...

  15. Fate of steroid hormones in sewage sludge and poultry litter prior to land application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steroid hormones can act as potent endocrine disruptors when released into the environment. The main sources of these chemicals are thought to be wastewater treatment plant discharges and waste from animal feeding operations. While these compounds have frequently been found in wastewater effluents...

  16. Steroid hormones in biosolids and poultry litter: A comparison of potential environmental inputs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steroid hormones can act as potent endocrine disruptors when released into the environment. The main sources of these chemicals are thought to be wastewater treatment plant discharges and waste from animal feeding operations. While these compounds have frequently been found in wastewater effluents...

  17. Reassessing the role of growth hormone and sex steroids in thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyeyoung; Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    The concomitant decline in growth hormone (GH) and increase in sex steroid production with age is thought to be responsible for thymic involution. If changes in the production of these hormones trigger or sustain thymic involution, that process should be accelerated in little mice, which have a genetic deficiency resulting in reduced production of thymopoietic GH, and delayed in the hypogonadal strain, which fails to produce thymocytotoxic sex steroids. The results indicated that thymic involution in both strains progressed in a manner similar to their normal littermates. That blocking sex steroid production did not delay thymic involution was surprising since castration reportedly increases thymus cellularity. Re-examination of that phenomenon revealed that, while gonadectomy results in increased thymus size, its effects are transient, and the thymus ultimately undergoes involution. Taken together, these data suggest that age-related changes in the endocrine system do not underlie thymic involution.

  18. Steroid hormones and the stroma-vascular cells of the adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Volat, Fanny; Bouloumié, Anne

    2013-09-01

    The stroma-vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue (AT) is a heterogeneous cell fraction composed of progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and immune cells. SVF plays a key role in AT homeostasis and growth as well as in obesity-associated pathologies. The SVF cell composition and phenotype are distinct according to AT location and adiposity. Such discrepancies influence AT function and are involved in obesity-associated disorders such as chronic inflammation. Investigations performed in recent years in rodents and humans provided evidence that the stroma-vascular cells contribute to the conversion of steroid hormones in AT and are also steroid targets. This review describes the link between steroids and SVF depending on gender, adiposity, and AT location and highlights the potential role of sex and corticosteroid hormones in adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and their contributions in AT inflammation.

  19. Sex steroid hormones in relation to Barrett's esophagus: an analysis of the FINBAR Study.

    PubMed

    Cook, M B; Wood, S; Hyland, P L; Caron, P; Drahos, J; Falk, R T; Pfeiffer, R M; Dawsey, S M; Abnet, C C; Taylor, P R; Guillemette, C; Murray, L J; Anderson, L A

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we observed strong positive associations between circulating concentrations of free testosterone and free dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in relation to Barrett's esophagus in a US male military population. To replicate these findings, we conducted a second study of sex steroid hormones and Barrett's esophagus in the Factors Influencing the Barrett/Adenocarcinoma Relationship (FINBAR) Study based in Northern Ireland and Ireland. We used mass spectrometry to quantitate EDTA plasma concentrations of nine sex steroid hormones and ELISA to quantitate sex hormone-binding globulin in 177 male Barrett's esophagus cases and 185 male general population controls within the FINBAR Study. Free testosterone, free DHT, and free estradiol were estimated using standard formulas. Multivariable logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of associations between exposures and Barrett's esophagus. While plasma hormone and sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations were not associated with all cases of Barrett's esophagus, we did observe positive associations with estrogens in younger men (e.g. estrone + estradiol ORcontinuous per ½IQR  = 2.92, 95%CI:1.08, 7.89), and free androgens in men with higher waist-to-hip ratios (e.g. free testosterone ORcontinuous per ½IQR  = 2.71, 95%CI:1.06, 6.92). Stratification by body mass index, antireflux medications, and geographic location did not materially affect the results. This study found evidence for associations between circulating sex steroid hormones and Barrett's esophagus in younger men and men with higher waist-to-hip ratios. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether sex steroid hormones are consistently associated with esophageal adenocarcinogenesis.

  20. Sex steroid hormone levels in breast adipose tissue and serum in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Falk, Roni T; Gentzschein, Elisabet; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Ioffe, Olga B; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Sherman, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of circulating estrogens and androgens are linked to higher breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women; however, little is known about hormone levels within the breast. Hormone concentrations within the breast may not be reflected in the blood and are likely important contributors to breast carcinogenesis. We used a previously validated method to measure levels of estrone, estradiol, androstenedione, and testosterone in adipose tissue removed as part of breast excisions performed for cancer in 100 postmenopausal women (69 ER/PR +/+ and 31 ER/PR -/-) participating in a breast cancer case-control study. We also measured the same steroid hormones, as well as estrone sulfate, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in serum from these patients and 100 controls matched on ages at blood collection and on menopause. Overall, concentrations of serum hormones did not vary significantly between controls and cases. However, women with ER-/PR- breast cancers had lower circulating levels of all measured sex steroid hormones and higher SHBG levels than women with ER+/PR+ breast cancers and controls. Similarly, hormone concentrations in breast adipose tissue were higher among women with ER+/PR+ compared to ER-/PR- breast cancer, although differences were only significant for testosterone. These data demonstrate that high sex steroid concentrations in both serum and adipose tissues are more strongly related to ER+/PR+ than ER-/PR- breast cancers. Measurement of sex hormones in serum and in the microenvironment may help in understanding the hormonal etiology of breast cancer, suggest methods for prevention, and have value in gauging treatment response and prognosis.

  1. The relationship between plasma steroid hormone concentrations and the reproductive cycle in the Northern Pacific rattlesnake, Crotalus oreganus.

    PubMed

    Lind, Craig M; Husak, Jerry F; Eikenaar, Cas; Moore, Ignacio T; Taylor, Emily N

    2010-05-01

    We describe the reproductive cycle of Northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus) by quantifying steroid hormone concentrations and observing reproductive behaviors in free-ranging individuals. Additionally, we examined reproductive tissues from museum specimens. Plasma steroid hormone concentrations were quantified for both male and female snakes throughout the active season (March-October). We measured testosterone (T), 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and corticosterone (B) concentrations in both sexes and 17beta-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) in females only. We observed reproductive behaviors (e.g., consortship, courtship, and copulation) in the field and measured testis and follicle size in male and female snakes from museum collections to relate steroid hormone concentrations to the timing of reproductive events. Our study revealed that C. oreganus in central California exhibits a bimodal pattern of breeding, with most mating behavior occurring in the spring and some incidences of mating behavior observed in late summer/fall. Each breeding period corresponded with elevated androgen (T or DHT) levels in males. Testes were regressed in the spring when the majority of reproductive behavior was observed in this population, and they reached peak volume in August and September during spermatogenesis. Although we did not detect seasonal variation in female hormone concentrations, some females had high E2 in the spring and fall, coincident with mating and with increased follicle size (indicating vitellogenesis) in museum specimens. Females with high E2 concentrations also had high T and DHT concentrations. Corticosterone concentrations in males and females were not related either to time of year or to concentrations of any other hormones quantified. Progesterone concentrations in females also did not vary seasonally, but this likely reflected sampling bias as females tended to be underground, and thus unobtainable, in summer months when P would be

  2. The bifunctional role of steroid hormones: implications for therapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Ablation of the androgen-signaling axis is currently a dominant theme in developmental therapeutics in prostate cancer. Highly potent inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor (AR) function have formally improved survival in castration-resistant metastatic disease. Resistance to androgen-ablative strategies arises through diverse mechanisms. Strategies to preserve and extend the success of hormonal therapy while mitigating the emergence of resistance have long been of interest. In preclinical models, intermittent hormonal ablative strategies delay the emergence of resistant stem-cell-driven phenotypes, but clinical studies in hormone-naive disease have not observed more than noninferiority over continual androgen ablation. In castration-resistant disease, response and improvement in subjective quality of life with therapeutic testosterone has been observed, but so too has symptomatic and life-threatening disease acceleration. The multifunctional and paradoxical role of steroid hormones in regulating proliferation and differentiation, as well as cell death, requires deeper understanding. The lack of molecular biomarkers that predict the outcome of hormone supplementation in a particular clinical context remains an obstacle to individualized therapy. Biphasic patterns of response to hormones are identifiable in vitro, and endocrine-regulated neoplasms that proliferate after prolonged periods of hormone deprivation appear preferentially sex steroid-suppressible. This review examines the relevance of a translational framework for studying therapeutic androgens in prostate cancer.

  3. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... 19-23, 2016 DEA Museum and Visitors' Center Steroids Last Updated: Monday, April 3, 2017 What is ... heart disease, liver damage Addiction Read More about Steroids Be Informed. Search for information about a drug ...

  4. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... about being the very best in your favorite sport, not to mention earning a big salary. But ... t the kind of steroids getting attention in sports. When people say steroids (say: STARE-oydz), they ...

  5. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark . E-mail: dan@bc.georgetown.edu

    2005-08-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids.

  6. Degradation and behavior of natural steroid hormones in cow manure waste during biological treatments and ozone oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ermawati, Rahyani; Morimura, Shigeru; Tang, Yueqin; Liu, Kai; Kida, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    An efficient treatment process for screened cow manure waste, particularly for the degradation of natural steroid hormones, was developed. The first step in this process was a draw-and-fill process for thermophilic anaerobic digestion. After fourfold dilution with tap water, continuous feeding was performed for the aerobic treatment of the effluent from the anaerobic treatment. Batchwise ozone oxidation was then carried out for the degradation of the natural steroid hormones that remained in the effluent from the aerobic treatment. A yeast two-hybrid assay was performed to evaluate hormonal degradation. Significant reductions in the concentrations of total VFA, BOD(5), COD(Cr), TOC, TS, VSS, and natural steroid hormones were demonstrated in the effluent from the biological treatments. The removal ratios of such concentrations were 99.7%, 90%, 79%, 84%, 51%, 58%, and 99%, respectively. Although the concentrations of the remaining TOC and COD(Cr) remained constant, natural steroid hormones were completely removed by ozone oxidation.

  7. Cross-reactivity of steroid hormone immunoassays: clinical significance and two-dimensional molecular similarity prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoassays are widely used in clinical laboratories for measurement of plasma/serum concentrations of steroid hormones such as cortisol and testosterone. Immunoassays can be performed on a variety of standard clinical chemistry analyzers, thus allowing even small clinical laboratories to do analysis on-site. One limitation of steroid hormone immunoassays is interference caused by compounds with structural similarity to the target steroid of the assay. Interfering molecules include structurally related endogenous compounds and their metabolites as well as drugs such as anabolic steroids and synthetic glucocorticoids. Methods Cross-reactivity of a structurally diverse set of compounds were determined for the Roche Diagnostics Elecsys assays for cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate, estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone. These data were compared and contrasted to package insert data and published cross-reactivity studies for other marketed steroid hormone immunoassays. Cross-reactivity was computationally predicted using the technique of two-dimensional molecular similarity. Results The Roche Elecsys Cortisol and Testosterone II assays showed a wider range of cross-reactivity than the DHEA sulfate, Estradiol II, and Progesterone II assays. 6-Methylprednisolone and prednisolone showed high cross-reactivity for the cortisol assay, with high likelihood of clinically significant effect for patients administered these drugs. In addition, 21-deoxycortisol likely produces clinically relevant cross-reactivity for cortisol in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, while 11-deoxycortisol may produce clinically relevant cross-reactivity in 11β-hydroxylase deficiency or following metyrapone challenge. Several anabolic steroids may produce clinically significant false positives on the testosterone assay, although interpretation is limited by sparse pharmacokinetic data for some of these drugs. Norethindrone therapy may impact immunoassay measurement

  8. Evaluation of steroid hormones and their receptors in development and progression of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Nigel C; Rajandram, Retnagowri; Ng, Keng Lim

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a peak in interest in evaluating the roles of androgen and estrogen receptors in RCC pathogenesis in the late 20th century, with some positive outcomes for RCC therapy that targeted estrogen receptors, especially for metastatic disease. Since that time, however, there have been few studies that look at use of steroid hormone modulators for RCC, especially in the light of new therapies such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and new immune therapies, which are having some success for treatment of metastatic RCC. This review summarises past and current literature and attempts to stimulate renewed interest in research into the steroid hormones and their receptors, which might be used to effect, for example, in combination with the other newer targeted therapies for RCC. PMID:28326246

  9. WHO scientific group meeting on cardiovascular disease and steroid hormone contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1997-11-28

    More than 100 million women worldwide are thought to use steroid hormone contraceptive methods, with an estimated 93 million women using combined oral contraceptives (COCs). The composition and use of these contraceptive preparations, especially those of COCs, have changed dramatically over the years. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Scientific Group Meeting on Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception during November 3-7, 1997, to review current scientific data on the use of steroid hormone contraception as they relate to the risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and venous thromboembolic disease. The group also reviewed the incidence of cardiovascular disease among women of reproductive age in general, how the effect of risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be changed using hormonal contraceptives, and whether different compositions of COCs have different cardiovascular risk profiles. The group was comprised of the authors of background papers prepared for the meeting and experts from around the world. The scientific group's conclusions are presented. The incidence and mortality rates of all cardiovascular diseases are very low among reproductive-age women. For women who do not smoke, who have their blood pressure checked, and who do not have hypertension or diabetes, the risk of myocardial infarction in COC users is not increased regardless of age. While current users of COCs have a low absolute risk of venous thromboembolism, their risk is still 3-6 times greater than that of nonusers, with the risk probably being highest during the first year of use.

  10. The digitalis-like steroid hormones: new mechanisms of action and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Maoz; Shpolansky, Uri; Rosen, Haim; Lichtstein, David

    2007-05-16

    Digitalis-like compounds (DLC) are a family of steroid hormones synthesized in and released from the adrenal gland. DLC, the structure of which resembles that of plant cardiac glycosides, bind to and inhibit the activity of the ubiquitous cell surface enzyme Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. However, there is a large body of evidence suggesting that the regulation of ion transport by Na(+), K(+)-ATPase is not the only physiological role of DLC. The binding of DLC to Na(+), K(+)-ATPase induces the activation of various signal transduction cascades that activate changes in intracellular Ca(++) homeostasis, and in specific gene expression. These, in turn, stimulate endocytosis and affect cell growth and proliferation. At the systemic level, DLC were shown to be involved in the regulation of major physiological parameters including water and salt homeostasis, cardiac contractility and rhythm, systemic blood pressure and behavior. Furthermore, the DLC system has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, cancer and depressive disorders. This review evaluates the evidence for the different aspects of DLC action and delineates open questions in the field.

  11. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate.

  12. Generation of breast cancer stem cells by steroid hormones in irradiated human mammary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Cui, Xing; Wang, Bing; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation was shown to result in an increased risk of breast cancer. There is strong evidence that steroid hormones influence radiosensitivity and breast cancer risk. Tumors may be initiated by a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). In order to assess whether the modulation of radiation-induced breast cancer risk by steroid hormones could involve CSCs, we measured by flow cytometry the proportion of CSCs in irradiated breast cancer cell lines after progesterone and estrogen treatment. Progesterone stimulated the expansion of the CSC compartment both in progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer cells and in PR-negative normal cells. In MCF10A normal epithelial PR-negative cells, progesterone-treatment and irradiation triggered cancer and stemness-associated microRNA regulations (such as the downregulation of miR-22 and miR-29c expression), which resulted in increased proportions of radiation-resistant tumor-initiating CSCs.

  13. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  14. Embryonic sex steroid hormones accumulate in the eggshell of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shohei; Saito, Yoshimichi; Osawa, Akihisa; Katsumata, Etsuko; Karaki, Isuke; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Steroids hormones such as estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) are involved in gonadal differentiation of oviparous animals with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), and are greatly distributed. This hypothesizes that these embryonic steroid hormones probably accumulate in the eggshell throughout blood or/and chorioallantoic fluid in sea turtle species with TSD, producing females at higher temperature. To demonstrate this hypothesis, concentrations of E2 and T in the blood plasma from the hatchling loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and in their eggshells were measured by radioimmunoassay. In the present study we propose that both concentrations of E2 and T in the blood plasma are correlated with amounts of these sex steroids in the eggshell. Moreover, contents of E2 in the eggshell showed a significant positive correlation with mean incubation temperatures during a thermosensitive period in the experimental nests, whereas T contents in the eggshell did not. Taken together, these findings indicated that embryonic E2 and T that accumulated in the eggshell can be extracted and measured. Furthermore, the present study suggested that contents of E2 in the eggshell may differ between male and female, and monitoring of these steroids is a useful method to identify the sex of loggerhead sea turtle hatchling.

  15. The influence of trilostane on steroid hormone metabolism in canine adrenal glands and corpora lutea-an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ouschan, C; Lepschy, M; Zeugswetter, F; Möstl, E

    2012-03-01

    Trilostane is widely used to treat hyperadrenocorticism in dogs. Trilostane competitively inhibits the enzyme 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which converts pregnenolone (P5) to progesterone (P4) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstendione (A4). Although trilostane is frequently used in dogs, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on canine steroid hormone biosynthesis is still an enigma. Multiple enzymes of 3β-HSD have been found in humans, rats and mice and their presence might explain the contradictory results of studies on the effectiveness of trilostane. We therefore investigated the influence of trilostane on steroid hormone metabolism in dogs by means of an in vitro model. Canine adrenal glands from freshly euthanized dogs and corpora lutea (CL) were incubated with increasing doses of trilostane. Tritiated P5 or DHEA were used as substrates. The resulting radioactive metabolites were extracted, separated by thin layer chromatography and visualized by autoradiography. A wide variety of radioactive metabolites were formed in the adrenal glands and in the CL, indicating high metabolic activity in both tissues. In the adrenal cortex, trilostane influences the P5 metabolism in a dose- and time-dependent manner, while DHEA metabolism and metabolism of both hormones in the CL were unaffected. The results indicate for the first time that there might be more than one enzyme of 3β-HSD present in dogs and that trilostane selectively inhibits P5 conversion to P4 only in the adrenal gland.

  16. Rainfall Driven Sorting of Soils and Manure in Beef Feedlot Pens, Implications for Steroid Hormone Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, R.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has documented elevated estrogenic and androgenic activity in surface waters receiving cattle feedlot effluent, while current research shows that significant concentrations of hydrophobic steroid hormones are transported in the solid phase of feedlot pen surface runoff. Accumulated manure in beef feedlot pens includes organic matter ranging from colloidal particles to partially digested feed, forming a complex soil-manure conglomerate at the pen surface. We hypothesized that the transport of solid phase particles in rainfall runoff on beef feedlots would be influenced but not limited by shield layer development. Soils and manure at a beef feedlot were evaluated before and after rainfall-runoff events to determine changes in soil composition and structure. Runoff samples were also collected during an hour of runoff and analyzed for suspended solids. Results indicate that rainfall actively sorts the soil and manure components through raindrop impact, depression storage and runoff. However, transport of solid phase constituents was found to be elevated throughout the hydrograph. This suggests that the surface shield layer conceptualization applied to other soils should be modified before application to the soil-manure conglomerate found in beef feedlot pens.

  17. Assessing reproductive status in elasmobranch fishes using steroid hormones extracted from skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Prohaska, Bianca K; Tsang, Paul C W; Driggers, William B; Hoffmayer, Eric R; Wheeler, Carolyn R; Brown, A Christine; Sulikowski, James A

    2013-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes (sharks, skates, and rays) are particularly susceptible to anthropogenic threats, making a thorough understanding of their life history characteristics essential for proper management. Historically, elasmobranch reproductive data have been collected by lethal sampling, an approach that is problematic for threatened and endangered species. However, recent studies have demonstrated that non-lethal approaches can be as effective as lethal ones for assessment of the reproductive status of an animal. For example, plasma has been used to examine concentrations of steroid hormones. Additionally, skeletal muscle tissue, which can be obtained non-lethally and with minimal stress, can also be used to quantify concentrations of steroid hormones. Skeletal muscle progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol concentrations were determined to be statistically significant indicators of reproductive status in the oviparous Leucoraja erinacea, the yolk-dependent viviparous Squalus acanthias, and the yolk-sac placental viviparous Rhizoprionodon terraenovae. The results of the present study demonstrate that steroid hormones present in non-lethally harvested skeletal muscle tissue can be used as reliable indicators of reproductive status in elasmobranchs.

  18. The role of steroid hormones in the development of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pařízek, A; Dušková, M; Vítek, L; Šrámková, M; Hill, M; Adamcová, K; Šimják, P; Černý, A; Kordová, Z; Vráblíková, H; Boudová, B; Koucký, M; Malíčková, K; Stárka, L

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a disorder of liver function, commonly occurring in the third trimester but sometimes also as soon as the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Symptoms of this disorder include pruritus, plus abnormal values of bile acids and hepatic transaminases. After birth, symptoms disappear and liver function returns to normal. Though ICP is relatively non-complicated and often symptomatically mild from the point-of-view of the mother, it presents a serious risk to the fetus, making this disease the subject of great interest. The etiology and pathogenesis of ICP is multifactorial and as yet not fully elucidated. Hormonal factors likely play a significant role, along with genetic as well as exogenous factors. Here we summarize the knowledge of changes in steroid hormones and their role in the development of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. In addition, we consider the role of exogenous factors as possible triggers of steroid hormone changes, the relationship between metabolic steroids and bile acids, as well as the combination of these factors in the development of ICP in predisposed pregnant women.

  19. Steroid hormone inactivation is required during the juvenile-adult transition in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, Kim F; Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B

    2010-12-14

    Steroid hormones are systemic signaling molecules that regulate juvenile-adult transitions in both insects and mammals. In insects, pulses of the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) are generated by increased biosynthesis followed by inactivation/clearance. Although mechanisms that control 20E synthesis have received considerable recent attention, the physiological significance of 20E inactivation remains largely unknown. We show that the cytochrome P450 Cyp18a1 lowers 20E titer during the Drosophila prepupal to pupal transition. Furthermore, this reduction of 20E levels is a prerequisite to induce βFTZ-F1, a key factor in the genetic hierarchy that controls early metamorphosis. Resupplying βFTZ-F1 rescues Cyp18a1-deficient prepupae. Because Cyp18a1 is 20E-inducible, it appears that the increased production of steroid is responsible for its eventual decline, thereby generating the regulatory pulse required for proper temporal progression of metamorphosis. The coupling of hormone clearance to βFTZ-F1 expression suggests a general mechanism by which transient signaling drives unidirectional progression through a multistep process.

  20. G-protein-coupled receptor controls steroid hormone signaling in cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di; Zhao, Wen-Li; Cai, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in animal steroid hormone signaling, but their mechanism is unclear. In this research, we report that a GPCR called ErGPCR-2 controls steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) signaling in the cell membrane of the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. ErGPCR-2 was highly expressed during molting and metamorphosis. 20E, via ErGPCR-2, regulated rapid intracellular calcium increase, protein phosphorylation, gene transcription, and insect metamorphosis. ErGPCR-2 was located in the cell surface and was internalized by 20E induction. GPCR kinase 2 participated in 20E-induced ErGPCR-2 phosphorylation and internalization. The internalized ErGPCR-2 was degraded by proteases to desensitize 20E signaling. ErGPCR-2 knockdown suppressed the entrance of 20E analog [3H] ponasterone A ([3H]Pon A) into the cells. ErGPCR-2 overexpression or blocking of ErGPCR-2 internalization increased the entrance of [3H]Pon A into the cells. However, ErGPCR-2 did not bind to [3H]Pon A. Results suggest that ErGPCR-2 transmits steroid hormone 20E signaling and controls 20E entrance into cells in the cell membrane. PMID:25728569

  1. Expression of sex steroid hormone receptors in C cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bléchet, Claire; Lecomte, Pierre; De Calan, Loïc; Beutter, Patrice; Guyétant, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that C cells are twice as numerous in male than in female thyroids and that C cell hyperplasia (CCH) is much more frequent in men. These findings suggest regulation involving sex steroid hormones through the expression of sex steroid hormone receptors on C cells. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed an immunohistochemical study of estrogen receptors alpha (ER alpha) and beta (ER beta), progesterone receptors (PR), and androgen receptors (AR) on specimens from a series of 40 patients operated on for a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC; n=28; female 18, male 10) and/or CCH (n=19; female 6, male 13). ER beta was the only receptor to be consistently expressed in CCH (100%) and MTC (96.5%), whereas ER alpha was never expressed. PR and AR were rarely expressed in MTC (7 and 14%, respectively). AR was expressed in half the CCH cases (53%), with a trend to male predominance (61% in men vs 33% in women). Our study is the first to describe ER beta expression in CCH. In addition, our findings suggest that CCH, and possibly MTC, might be influenced by sex steroid hormones, namely, estrogens and androgens, through the expression of ER beta and AR on C cells.

  2. Skin permeation of different steroid hormones from polymeric coated liposomal formulations.

    PubMed

    Biruss, Babette; Valenta, Claudia

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the effect of various polymers (polycarbophil, chitosan-EDTA, polymeric emulsifier and carrageenan) on the permeation, the chemical and microbial stability of 17-beta-estradiol, progesterone, cyproterone acetate (cpa) and finasteride incorporated in DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) liposomes has been investigated. The liposomes contained 1% (w/w) of the steroid hormones. Standard diffusion experiments were performed. Drug stability was monitored by analysing the steroid hormone content in the different formulations over a time period of 8 weeks and visually inspecting for microbial contamination. In addition, viscosity measurements were performed. The permeation rate could be improved by addition of polymeric agents depending on their type and drug. In all tested formulations, finasteride exhibited the highest diffusion. Both the chemical and the microbial stability of the hormones were significantly improved by the polymers in comparison to the pure liposomes after an observation period of 8 weeks. After that time microbial stability was still evident for all semisolid formulations. In contrast to this in the pure liposomes already after 2 weeks the steroid drugs showed complete insufficient chemical stability and microbial contamination. Additional rheological measurements indicated an influence of the polymers and drugs on the viscosity in all formulations. The elasticity predominated in nearly all polymeric formulations.

  3. The effects of prenatal sex steroid hormones on sexual differentiation of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Karaismailoğlu, Serkan; Erdem, Ayşen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the anatomical, physiological and neurochemical gender-related differences in the brain occur prenatally. The sexual differences in the brain are affected by sex steroid hormones, which play important roles in the differentiation of neuroendocrine system and behavior. Testosterone, estrogen and dihydrotestosterone are the main steroid hormones responsible for the organization and sexual differentiation of brain structures during early development. The structural and behavioral differences in the female and male brains are observed in many animal species; however, these differences are variable between species. Animal and human (in vivo imaging and postmortem) studies on sex differences in the brain have shown many differences in the local distribution of the cortex, the gray-white matter ratio, corpus callosum, anterior commissure, hypothalamus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, limbic system and neurotransmitter systems. This review aims to evaluate the anatomical, physiological and neurochemical differences in the female and male brains and to assess the effect of prenatal exposure to sex steroid hormones on the developing brain. PMID:24592097

  4. Assessing reproductive status in elasmobranch fishes using steroid hormones extracted from skeletal muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Prohaska, Bianca K.; Tsang, Paul C. W.; Driggers, William B.; Hoffmayer, Eric R.; Wheeler, Carolyn R.; Brown, A. Christine; Sulikowski, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes (sharks, skates, and rays) are particularly susceptible to anthropogenic threats, making a thorough understanding of their life history characteristics essential for proper management. Historically, elasmobranch reproductive data have been collected by lethal sampling, an approach that is problematic for threatened and endangered species. However, recent studies have demonstrated that non-lethal approaches can be as effective as lethal ones for assessment of the reproductive status of an animal. For example, plasma has been used to examine concentrations of steroid hormones. Additionally, skeletal muscle tissue, which can be obtained non-lethally and with minimal stress, can also be used to quantify concentrations of steroid hormones. Skeletal muscle progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol concentrations were determined to be statistically significant indicators of reproductive status in the oviparous Leucoraja erinacea, the yolk-dependent viviparous Squalus acanthias, and the yolk-sac placental viviparous Rhizoprionodon terraenovae. The results of the present study demonstrate that steroid hormones present in non-lethally harvested skeletal muscle tissue can be used as reliable indicators of reproductive status in elasmobranchs. PMID:27293612

  5. The Impact of Genetics and Hormonal Contraceptives on the Steroid Profile in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Jenny J.; Mullen, Jenny E.; Berglund Lindgren, Emma; Ericsson, Magnus; Ekström, Lena; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén

    2014-01-01

    The steroid module of the Athlete Biological Passport, the newest innovation in doping testing, is currently being finalized for implementation. Several factors, other than doping, can affect the longitudinal steroid profile. In this study, we investigated the effect of hormonal contraceptives (HC) as well as the effect of three polymorphisms on female steroid profiles in relation to doping controls. The study population consisted of 79 female elite athletes between the ages of 18 and 45. HC were used by 32% of the subjects. A full urinary steroid profile was obtained using World Anti-Doping Agency accredited methods. In addition all subjects were genotyped for copy number variation of UGT2B17 and SNPs in UGT2B7 and CYP17. Subjects using HC excreted 40% less epitestosterone as compared to non-users (p = 0.005) but showed no difference in testosterone excretion. When removing individuals homozygous for the deletion in UGT2B17, the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E) ratio was 29% higher in the HC group (p = 0.016). In agreement with previous findings in men, copy number variation of UGT2B17 had significant effect on female urinary testosterone excretion and therefore also the T/E ratio. Subjects homozygous for the T allele of CYP17 showed a lower urinary epitestosterone concentration than the other CYP17 genotypes. It is of great importance that the athlete’s steroidal passport can compensate for all possible normal variability in steroid profiles from women. Therefore, considering the large impact of HC on female steroid profiles, we suggest that the use of HC should be a mandatory question on the doping control form. PMID:24782830

  6. Steroid hormone runoff from agricultural test plots applied with municipal biosolids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Gray, James L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Davis, Jessica G.; ReVollo, Rhiannon C.; Borch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The potential presence of steroid hormones in runoff from sites where biosolids have been used as agricultural fertilizers is an environmental concern. A study was conducted to assess the potential for runoff of seventeen different hormones and two sterols, including androgens, estrogens, and progestogens from agricultural test plots. The field containing the test plots had been applied with biosolids for the first time immediately prior to this study. Target compounds were isolated by solid-phase extraction (water samples) and pressurized solvent extraction (solid samples), derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Runoff samples collected prior to biosolids application had low concentrations of two hormones (estrone -1 and androstenedione -1) and cholesterol (22.5 ± 3.8 μg L-1). In contrast, significantly higher concentrations of multiple estrogens (-1), androgens (-1), and progesterone (-1) were observed in runoff samples taken 1, 8, and 35 days after biosolids application. A significant positive correlation was observed between antecedent rainfall amount and hormone mass loads (runoff). Hormones in runoff were primarily present in the dissolved phase (<0.7-μm GF filter), and, to a lesser extent bound to the suspended-particle phase. Overall, these results indicate that rainfall can mobilize hormones from biosolids-amended agricultural fields, directly to surface waters or redistributed to terrestrial sites away from the point of application via runoff. Although concentrations decrease over time, 35 days is insufficient for complete degradation of hormones in soil at this site.

  7. Steroid hormone excretion is enhanced by sucrose feeding to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, T.C.; Hsu, H.; Saunders, J.P.; Kim, S.S.; Given-Proctor, J.; Ahrens, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    The hypothesis tested was that feeding rats sucrose rather than invert sugar (50:50 mixture of glucose and fructose) or cornstarch would result in a more rapid excretion of intravenously injected 1,2-/sup 3/H aldosterone or 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H cortisol. The three carbohydrate sources provided 45% of dietary energy when fed, respectively, to one of three groups of 10 male, Sprague Dawley rats. After 4 or 8 weeks of ad lib feeding of the three diets 5 ..mu..CI of /sup 3/H-labeled hormones were injected intravenously and % recovery in urine and feces was measured for 4 days by liquid scintillation counting. Nearly 90% of the /sup 3/H injected as 1,2-/sup 3/H aldosterone was recovered over 4 days in the excreta of the sucrose fed rats. This recovery of /sup 3/H from aldosterone was significantly greater (P < 0.01) than when invert sugar (65%) or cornstarch (60%) were fed. The recovery of /sup 3/H from intravenously injected 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H cortisol followed a similar pattern. The authors anticipate that the excretion of all metabolic end products and xenobiotics excreted as glucuronides would be enhanced by sucrose feeding. Oxocarbonium ions from the glucose portion of sucrose digestion in the mammalian small intestine are thought to compete with oxocarbonium ions from the glucuronic acid portion of glucuronide hydrolysis. Such competition may slow glucuronide hydrolysis and promote glucuronide excretion, including the glucuronides derived from aldosterone and cortisol.

  8. MAP kinases p38 and JNK are activated by the steroid hormone 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 in the C2C12 muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Claudia G; Ronda, Ana C; de Boland, Ana Russo; Boland, Ricardo

    2006-03-01

    In chick skeletal muscle cell primary cultures, we previously demonstrated that 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 [1alpha,25(OH)2D3], the hormonally active form of vitamin D, increases the phosphorylation and activity of the extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase isoforms ERK1 and ERK2, their subsequent translocation to the nucleus and involvement in DNA synthesis stimulation. In this study, we show that other members of the MAP kinase superfamily are also activated by the hormone. Using the muscle cell line C2C12 we found that 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 within 1 min phosphorylates and increases the activity of p38 MAPK. The immediately upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 3/6 (MKK3/MKK6) were also phosphorylated by the hormone suggesting their participation in p38 activation. 1Alpha,25(OH)2D3 was able to dephosphorylate/activate the ubiquitous cytosolic tyrosine kinase c-Src in C2C12 cells and studies with specific inhibitors imply that Src participates in hormone induced-p38 activation. Of relevance, 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 induced in the C2C12 line the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase activating protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-kinase 2) and subsequent phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in a p38 kinase activation-dependent manner. Treatment with the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, blocked p38 phosphorylation caused by the hormone and inhibited the phosphorylation of its downstrean substrates. 1Alpha,25(OH)2D3 also promotes the phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal protein kinases (JNK 1/2), the response is fast (0.5-1 min) and maximal phosphorylation of the enzyme is observed at physiological doses of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 (1 nM). The relative contribution of ERK-1/2, p38, and JNK-1/2 and their interrelationships in hormonal regulation of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation remain to be established.

  9. The potential function of steroid sulphatase activity in steroid production and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Teruo; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2004-01-01

    The first step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone. StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory) protein plays a crucial role in the intra-mitochondrial movement of cholesterol. STS (steroid sulphatase), which is present ubiquitously in mammalian tissues, including the placenta, adrenal gland, testis and ovary, desulphates a number of 3beta-hydroxysteroid sulphates, including cholesterol sulphate. The present study was designed to examine the effect of STS on StAR protein synthesis and steroidogenesis in cells. Steroidogenic activities of COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with a vector for the cholesterol P450scc (cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage enzyme) system, named F2, a StAR expression vector (pStAR), and an STS expression vector (pSTS) were assayed. Whole-cell extracts were subjected to SDS/PAGE and then to Western blot analysis. pSTS co-expressed in COS-1 cells with F2 and pStAR increased pregnenolone synthesis 2-fold compared with that of co-expression with F2 and pStAR. Western blot analysis using COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with pSTS, F2 and pStAR revealed that StAR protein levels increased, whereas STS and P450scc protein levels did not change. The amount of StAR protein translation products increased when pSTS was added to an in vitro transcription-translation reaction mixture. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the 37 kDa StAR pre-protein disappeared significantly ( P <0.01) more slowly in COS-1 cells that had been transfected with pSTS than in COS-1 cells that had not been transfected with pSTS. The increase in StAR protein level is not a result of an increase in StAR gene expression, but is a result of both an increase in translation and a longer half-life of the 37 kDa pre-StAR protein. In conclusion, STS increases StAR protein expression level and stimulates steroid production. PMID:14969586

  10. Are genes of human intelligence related to the metabolism of thyroid and steroids hormones? - endocrine changes may explain human evolution and higher intelligence.

    PubMed

    Correia, H R; Balseiro, S C; de Areia, M L

    2005-01-01

    We propose the hypothesis that genes of human intelligence are related with metabolism of thyroid and steroids hormones, which have a crucial role in brain development and function. First, there is evidence to support the idea that during hominid evolution small genetic differences were related with significant endocrine changes in thyroid and steroids hormones. Second, these neuroactive hormones are also related with unique features of human evolution such as body and brain size increase, penis and breast enlargement, pelvic sexual dimorphism, active sexuality, relative lack of hair and higher longevity. Besides underling many of the differences between humans and great apes, steroids hormones promote brain growth and development, are important in the myelination process, explain sexual dimorphisms in brain and intelligence and improve specific cognitive abilities in humans. Supporting our hypothesis, recent studies indicate differences in neuroactive hormones metabolism between humans and non-human primates. Furthermore, a link between X chromosome genes and sex steroids may explain why the frequency of genes affecting intelligence is so high on the X chromosome. This association suggests that, during hominid evolution, there was a positive feedback in both sexes on the same genes responsible for secondary sexual character development and intelligence. This interaction leads to acceleration of development of human brain and intelligence. Finally, we propose that neuroactive hormone therapy may provide significant improvement in some cognitive deficits in all stages of human life and in cases of neurodegenerative diseases. However, further investigation is needed, mainly in the enzymatic machinery, in order to understand the direct role of these hormones in intelligence.

  11. The impact of nandrolone decanoate and growth hormone on biosynthesis of steroids in rats.

    PubMed

    Grönbladh, Alfhild; Johansson, Jenny; Kushnir, Mark M; Bergquist, Jonas; Hallberg, Mathias

    2013-12-11

    Growth hormone (GH) and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are commonly used in sports communities. Several studies have suggested an association between GH and AAS. We have investigated the impact of GH in rats treated with nandrolone decanoate (ND). Male Wistar rats received ND (15 mg/kg) every third day during three weeks and were subsequently treated with recombinant human GH (1.0I U/kg) for ten consecutive days. Plasma samples were collected and peripheral organs (i.e. heart, liver, testis and thymus) were dissected and weighed. Concentration of thirteen endogenous steroids was measured in the rat plasma samples using high specificity LC-MS/MS methods. Seven steroids were detected and quantified, and concentrations of estrone, testosterone, and androstenedione were significantly different among the groups, while concentrations of pregnenolone, DHEA, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and corticosterone were not altered. Administration of rhGH alone altered the plasma steroid distribution, and the results demonstrated significantly increased concentrations of plasma estrone as well as decreased concentrations of testosterone and androstenedione in the ND-treated rats. Administration of rhGH to ND-pretreated rats did not reverse the alteration of the steroid distribution induced by ND. Administration of ND decreased the weight of the thymus, and addition of rhGH did not reverse this reduction. However, rhGH administration induced an enlargement of thymus. Taken together, the plasma steroid profile differed in the four groups, i.e. control, AAS, rhGH and the combination of AAS and rhGH treatment.

  12. Sex Steroid Hormones Matter for Learning and Memory: Estrogenic Regulation of Hippocampal Function Inmale and Female Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Karyn M.; Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17ß-estradiol (E[subscript 2]), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes…

  13. Effect of steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, on epithelial mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer development.

    PubMed

    Jeon, So-Ye; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    As the primary female sex steroid hormones, estrogens and progesterone play important roles to regulate growth, differentiation, and function of a broad range of target tissues in the human body and maintain the function of female reproductive tissues. Ovarian cancer is the most cause of cancer death in gynecological malignancy. Despite enormous outcomes in the understanding of ovarian cancer pathology, this disease has resulted in poor survival rates since most patients are asymptomatic until the disease has been metastasized. The exact molecular events leading to metastasis of ovarian tumor cells have not yet been well elucidated, although it is recognized that the acquisition of capacity for migration and invasiveness would be a necessary prerequisite. During metastasis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process, in which epithelial cells lose their intracellular adhesion and cell polarity and acquire increased motility and invasive properties to become mesenchymal like cells. The process of cancer cells to undergo EMT is regulated through the up- and down- regulation of a multiple cellular markers and signaling proteins. In this review, we focused the roles of women sex steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in ovarian cancer, especially the ovarian cancer undergoing EMT and metastatic process. All things considered, we may suggest that progesterone is a potent hormone which inhibits the growth of human ovarian cancer cells and development to metastasis whereas estrogen may act as a risk factor of ovarian cancer progression and that progesterone therapy may be an alternative clinically effective tool for the treatment of human ovarian cancer.

  14. Steroid hormone levels in pregnancy and 1 year postpartum using isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Guo, Tiedong; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Soldin, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish normal, trimester-specific reference intervals for serum 17β-estradiol, progesterone (P), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol, androstenedione, DHEA, and DHEAS, measured simultaneously using isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Design Sequential cohort study. Patient(s) Healthy women undergoing a normal pregnancy (age, 25–38 years; mean, 30 years) attending a prenatal well clinic at gestation weeks 12, 22, and 32 and approximately 1 year postpartum. Main Outcome Measure(s) Trimester-specific reference intervals of endogenous steroid hormones analyzed using an isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure photoionization source with deuterium-labeled internal standards. Result(s) Serum estradiol, P, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 11-deoxycortisol increased throughout pregnancy; cortisol increased up to the second trimester and then remained steady, while androstenedione increased by 80 percent by gestation week 12, then remained constant. Serum DHEA-S decreased by 50% by the third trimester. Conclusion(s) Trimester-specific reference intervals are reported for eight serum steroids. The ratios of individual serum hormone concentrations during pregnancy relative to their 1-year postpartum concentrations illustrate the expected normal trends of changes in hormone concentrations during pregnancy. PMID:16169406

  15. Effect of microwave hydrolysis on transformation of steroidal hormones during anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge cake.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Hanna; Eskicioglu, Cigdem

    2013-09-15

    Fate and removal of 16 steroidal (estrogenic, androgenic and progestogenic) hormones were studied during advanced anaerobic digestion of sludge cake using microwave (MW) pretreatment. Effect of pretreatment temperature (80, 120, 160 °C), operating temperature (mesophilic at 35 ± 2 °C, thermophilic at 55 ± 2 °C) and sludge retention time (SRT: 20, 10, 5 days) were studied employing eight lab-scale semi-continuously fed digesters. To determine the potential effect of MW hydrolysis, hormones were quantified in total (sorbed + soluble) and supernatant (soluble) phases of the digester influent and effluent streams. Seven of 16 hormones were above the method reporting limit (RL) in one or more of the samples. Hormone concentrations in total phase of un-pretreated (control) and pretreated digester feeds ranged in <157-2491 ng/L and <157-749 ng/L, respectively. The three studied factors were found to be statistically significant (95% confidence level) in removal of one or more hormones from soluble and/or total phase. MW hydrolysis of the influent resulted in both release (from sludge matrix) and attenuation of hormones in the soluble phase. Accumulation of estrone (E1) as well as progesterone (Pr) and androstenedione (Ad) in most of the digesters indicated possible microbial transformations among the hormones. Compared to controls, all pretreated digesters had lower total hormone concentrations in their influent streams. At 20 days SRT, highest total removal (E1+E2+Ad +Pr) was observed for the thermophilic control digester (56%), followed by pretreated mesophilic digesters at 120 °C and 160 °C with around 48% efficiency. In terms of conventional performance parameters, relative (to control) improvements of MW pretreated digesters at a 5-d SRT ranged in 98-163% and 57-121%, for volatile solids removal and methane production, respectively.

  16. Doping with growth hormone/IGF-1, anabolic steroids or erythropoietin: is there a cancer risk?

    PubMed

    Tentori, Lucio; Graziani, Grazia

    2007-05-01

    Anabolic steroid and peptide hormones or growth factors are utilized to increase the performance of athletes of professional or amateur sports. Despite their well-documented adverse effects, the use of some of these agents has significantly grown and has been extended also to non-athletes with the aim to improve appearance or to counteract ageing. Pre-clinical studies and epidemiological observations in patients with an excess of hormone production or in patients chronically treated with hormones/growth factors for various pathologies have warned about the potential risk of cancer development and progression which may be also associated to the use of certain doping agents. Anabolic steroids have been described to provoke liver tumours; growth hormone or high levels of its mediator insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have been associated with colon, breast, and prostate cancers. Actually, IGF-1 promotes cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis either by triggering other growth factors or by interacting with pathways which have an established role in carcinogenesis and cancer promotion. More recently, the finding that erythropoietin (Epo) may promote angiogenesis and inhibit apoptosis or modulate chemo- or radiosensitivity in cancer cells expressing the Epo receptor, raised the concern that the use of recombinant Epo to increase tissue oxygenation might favour tumour survival and aggressiveness. Cancer risk associated to doping might be higher than that of patients using hormones/growth factors as replacement therapy, since enormous doses are taken by the athletes often for a long period of time. Moreover, these substances are often used in combination with other licit or illicit drugs and this renders almost unpredictable all the possible adverse effects including cancer. Anyway, athletes should be made aware that long-term treatment with doping agents might increase the risk of developing cancer.

  17. Towards an understanding of the evolution of the chorioallantoic placenta: steroid biosynthesis and steroid hormone signaling in the chorioallantoic membrane of an oviparous reptile.

    PubMed

    Cruze, Lori; Kohno, Satomi; McCoy, Michael W; Guillette, Louis J

    2012-09-01

    Amniotes, mammals, reptiles, and birds form common extraembryonic membranes during development to perform essential functions, such as protection, nutrient transfer, gas exchange, and waste removal. Together with the maternal uterus, extraembryonic membranes of viviparous (live-bearing) amniotes develop as an endocrine placenta that synthesizes and responds to steroid hormones critical for development. The ability of these membranes to synthesize and respond to steroid hormone signaling has traditionally been considered an innovation of placental amniotes. However, our laboratory recently demonstrated that this ability extends to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of an oviparous (egg-laying) amniote, the domestic chicken, and we hypothesized that steroidogenic extraembryonic membranes could be an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of all amniotes because of similarities in basic structure, function, and shared evolutionary ancestry. In this study, we examined steroid hormone synthesis and signaling in the CAM of another oviparous amniote, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). We quantified mRNA expression of a steroidogenic factor involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis (NR5A1), the key steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of progestins (HSD3B1), androgens (CYP17A1), and estrogens (CYP19A1), and the receptors involved in the signaling of progestins (PR), androgens (AR), estrogens (ESR1 and ESR2), and glucocorticoids (GR). Furthermore, we performed protein immunolocalization for PR and ESR1. Collectively, our findings indicate that the alligator CAM has the capability to regulate, synthesize, and respond to steroid hormone signaling, thus, supporting our hypothesis that the extraembryonic membranes of Amniota share a unifying characteristic, that is, the ability to synthesize and respond to steroid hormones.

  18. Steroid and metabolic hormonal profile of porcine serum vis-à-vis ovarian follicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Naskar, Soumen; Borah, S.; Vashi, Y.; Thomas, R.; Sarma, D. K.; Goswami, J.; Dhara, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to understand whether serum level of the steroid and metabolic hormones may be indicative of their level in ovarian follicular fluid (FF) in porcine, and its influence on fertility. Materials and Methods: Ovaries from pigs (n=32) of two genetic groups, namely, native (Ghungroo; n=16) and crossbred (Hampshire × Ghungroo; n=16) were collected. Both the genetic groups comprised gilts (n=8) and sows (n=8), and sows were in luteal phase of estrus cycle. FF was aspirated from small, medium and large follicles, and centrifuged for the collection of supernatant for further analysis. Blood samples were collected from the same animals, and serum was separated. Hormones, namely, cortisol, T3, T4 and testosterone were estimated by radioimmunoassay. Two-way ANOVA was used for analysis of data considering genetic background (native or crossbred), stage of reproductive life (gilt or sow), and source of sample (serum or FF) as fixed effects. Results: It was observed that all the hormones except cortisol differed significantly (p<0.01) based on genetic background. Stage of reproductive life and source of sample did not affect the studied hormonal level. Within the genetic groups, stage of reproductive life influenced T3 (p<0.01), cortisol (p<0.05) and testosterone (p<0.01) level in crossbred pigs as compared to T3 (p<0.01) only in native pigs. The level of T3 in serum, as well as FF, was higher (p<0.01) in Ghungroo gilts compared to sows. However, a reverse of this was observed in the case of crossbred pigs. The level of cortisol (p<0.05) and testosterone (p<0.01) was higher in crossbred sows than gilts in both serum and FF. Conclusion: The study revealed that serum level of the steroid and metabolic hormones is indicative of their level in the ovarian FF. Further, varying level of steroid and metabolic hormones in pigs based on genetic background may be due to variation in body size, rate of energy metabolism and stage of (re)productive life. PMID

  19. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Barber, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (Kom, L kg-1) for 17β-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17α-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17β-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  20. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, J.H.; Ryan, J.N.; Barber, L.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (K om, L kg-1) for 17??-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17??-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg -1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17??-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  1. The expression of serum steroid sex hormones and steroidogenic enzymes following intraperitoneal administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in male rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijie; Tang, Xue; Kong, Yili; Ma, Haitian; Zou, Sixiang

    2010-03-01

    The adrenals of humans and primates could secrete large amounts of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphate ester (DHEA-S) in the circulation, which act as precursors of active steroid hormones in a long series of peripheral target intracrine tissues. The marked decline of serum DHEA and DHEA-S concentrations with age in humans has been incriminated in the development of various pathologies. Therefore, this study aims to provide detailed information on the effects of the intraperitoneal injection of DHEA on circulating steroid hormones and their metabolites and their trade-off relationship over 24 h in male rats. In this study, 100 healthy adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, 25 mg kg(-1) DHEA-treated and 100 mg kg(-1) DHEA-treated. The animals were sacrificed at 0, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 or 24 h, and the samples were collected for subsequent analysis. Total cholesterol (TC) markedly decreased 3h after the administration of 100 mg kg(-1) DHEA, but markedly increased 12h after administration. The DHEA-S, progesterone (P), testosterone (T), oestradiol (E(2)), cortisol (Cor) and aldosterone (Ald) concentrations also markedly increased after DHEA administration, with serum DHEA-S, T, E(2) and Cor levels peaking at 1.5 h. Over time, steroid hormone levels were depressed, but serum Cor and Ald levels were markedly elevated relative to the control group at 24 h. Furthermore, DHEA treatment produced a significant increase in P450scc, 17beta-HSDIII, CYP17alpha and 3beta-HSD mRNA expression at 1.5 h, but a decided decrease in P450scc and StAR mRNA expression at 12 and 24 h, and CYP17alpha and 17beta-HSDIII expression at 12 h in the 100 mg kg(-1) DHEA group. In total, the results of the present study indicate that DHEA at high pharmacological doses may affect steroid through an effect on steroidogenic enzymes.

  2. Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Doctors use anabolic steroids to treat some hormone problems in men, delayed ... from some diseases. Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. Using ...

  3. Data for stable formulation of steroid hormone receptor-targeted liposomes for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyanka; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Narayan, Kumar Pranav

    2016-06-01

    A detailed description of steroid hormone ligand containing liposomes and their stability has been given. Liposomes were complexed with β-gal DNA and used to transfect cancer and non-cancer cells. The stability of the liposomes and lipoplexes were analysed using dynamic light scattering and DNA-binding gel images. The formulations were used to assess the delivery of anticancer gene, p53 in cancer cells. The dataset consists of DNA-binding gel images, transfection, cytotoxicity and reverse transcriptase PCR images.

  4. Steroid hormones promote bovine oocyte growth and connection with granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Makita, Miho; Miyano, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    Many approaches have been investigated for growing oocytes in vitro in mammals. To support oocyte growth in vitro, the culture systems must meet certain conditions for maintaining connections between oocytes and surrounding granulosa cells. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of combinations of 17β-estradiol (E2) and androstenedione (A4) on in vitro growth of bovine oocytes and to determine the number of connections between the oocyte and granulosa cells. Oocyte-granulosa cell complexes (OGCs) collected from early antral follicles (0.4-0.7 mm in diameter) were cultured for 14 days in a medium with different concentrations of E2 and A4, either alone or in combinations. We then assessed the number of transzonal projections (TZPs), which extend from granulosa cells through the zona pellucida to the oolemma. During in vitro growth culture, OGC structures were maintained in the medium with steroid hormones. The mean diameter of oocytes grown in the medium with both E2 and A4 was increased from 95.8 μm to around 120 μm, larger than oocytes grown without steroid hormones (109.9 μm) and similar in size to in vivo fully grown oocytes (119.4 μm) from 4- to 6-mm antral follicles. In subsequent in vitro maturation culture (22 hours), 30% (12 of 40) and 34% (14 of 41) of oocytes grown with E2 or A4 alone, respectively, matured to metaphase II; meanwhile, oocytes grown with a combination of E2 and A4 matured to metaphase II at a high rate (58%, 23 of 40). Growing oocytes isolated from early antral follicles had many uniformly distributed TZPs throughout the zona pellucida. After 14 days of culture, there was a significant decrease in the number of TZPs in oocytes grown without steroid hormones, whereas the number of TZPs was maintained in oocytes grown with steroid hormones. In particular, oocytes grown with E2 alone or with a combination of E2 and A4 had numbers of TZPs similar to oocytes before growth culture. In conclusion, a combination of

  5. Exposure assessment of prepubertal children to steroid endocrine disruptors. 2. Determination of steroid hormones in milk, egg, and meat samples.

    PubMed

    Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Laille, Julie; Monteau, Fabrice; Andre, François; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2008-05-14

    In the present study, the occurrence of the main sex steroid hormones in milk, egg, and meat was evaluated on the basis of a highly specific gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry measurement method. Globally, the results indicated that targeted estrogens and androgens occurred at similar levels (concentration levels in the 10-100 ng kg (-1) range) in the analyzed muscle and milk samples. The same compounds occurred at about 10-fold higher concentrations (i.e., in the 100-1000 ng kg (-1) range) in eggs and kidney samples. More precisely, egg and milk appeared as a non-negligible sources of estradiol (i.e., 2.2 +/- 0.8 and 3.1 +/- 2.0 ng day (-1), respectively), whereas testosterone exposure is caused by ingestion of meat and/or egg (i.e., 12.2 +/- 48.2 and 5.2 +/- 2.3 ng day (-1), respectively). The provided exposure data will be further exploited in the scope of a risk assessment study regarding endocrine disruption associated with these molecules.

  6. Enrichment of steroid hormones in water with porous and hydrophobic polymer-based SPE followed by HPLC-UV determination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinfen; Zhang, Man; Tong, Changlun; Wu, Jianmin; Liu, Weiping

    2013-10-01

    There have been great concerns about the persistence of steroid hormones in surface water. Since the concentrations of these compounds in water samples are usually at a trace level, the efficient enrichment of steroid hormones is vital for further analysis. In this work, a porous and hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and characterized. The composition of solvent used as porogen in the synthetic process was shown to have an effect on the morphology of the polymer, which was successfully used as an SPE sorbent for simultaneously enriching steroid hormones in surface water samples. The recoveries of the steroid hormones on the custom-made polymer ranged from 93.4 to 106.2%, whereas those on commercialized ENVI-18, LC-18, and Oasis HLB ranged from 54.8 to 104.9, 66 to 93.6, and 77.2 to 106%, respectively. Five types of steroid hormones were simultaneously measured using HPLC-UV after they were enriched by the custom-made sorbent. Based on these findings, the SPE-HPLC method was developed. The LODs of this method for estriol, estradiol, estrone, androstenedione, progesterone were 0.07, 0.43, 0.61, 0.27, and 0.42 μg/L, respectively, while precision and reproducibility RSDs were <6.40 and 7.49%, respectively.

  7. Steroid hormones, prostanoids, and angiogenic systems during rescue of the corpus luteum in pigs.

    PubMed

    Przygrodzka, E; Kaczmarek, M M; Kaczynski, P; Ziecik, A J

    2016-02-01

    In order to characterize the transition of the corpora lutea (CL) from acquisition of luteolytic sensitivity to rescue of luteal function: i) the expression of 38 factors associated with steroids, prostanoids, and angiogenic systems and ii) concentrations of the main hormones responsible for maintenance of CL function in cyclic and pregnant pigs were examined. Additionally, the effect of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and F2 α on luteal function during the estrous cycle and pregnancy was evaluated in vitro. Significantly up-regulated gene expression was revealed in CL collected on day 14 of the estrous cycle (CYP19A1, ESR2, PTGS2, HIF1A, and EDN1) and on days 12-14 of pregnancy (SCARB1, PGRMC1, STAR, HSD3B1, NR5A1, PTGFR, PTGER4, and VEGFA). Elevated concentrations of estradiol-17β and PGE2 occurred in CL on days 12 and 14 of pregnancy respectively, while an increased intraluteal PGF2 α content was noted on day 14 of the estrous cycle. Both PGs increased the synthesis of progesterone by cultured luteal slices obtained on day 14 of pregnancy, in contrast to the action of PGF2 α on the corresponding day of the estrous cycle. PGE2 stimulated cAMP production via PTGER2 and PTGER4, while PGF2 α elevated the content of CREB in cultured luteal slices from CL of pregnant pigs. In silico analysis showed that infiltration of lymphocytes and apoptosis of microvascular endothelium were activated in CL on day 12 of the estrous cycle vs pregnancy. Summarizing, an abundance of E2 and PGE2 during pregnancy regulates specific pathways responsible for steroidogenesis, the prostanoid signaling system and angiogenesis during rescue from luteolysis in porcine CL.

  8. Steroid sex hormone dynamics during estradiol-17β induced gonadal differentiation in Paralichthys olivaceus (Teleostei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; You, Feng; Liu, Mengxia; Wu, Zhihao; Wen, Aiyun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli; Zhang, Peijun

    2010-03-01

    Steroid sex hormones, such as estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T), are important regulators of sex change in fish. In this study, we examined the effects of E2 treatment on the dynamics of E2 and T during gonadal differentiation in the olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using histology and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Flounder larvae were divided into five groups (G0-G4), and fed with 0 (control), 0.2, 2, 20 and 100 mg E2/kg feed from 35 to 110 day post hatching (dph). Fish growth in the G1 and G2 groups was not significantly different from that of the control group ( P>0.05), while fish in the G3 and G4 groups were less active and showed growth depression and high mortality. The gonads of fish in the G3 and G4 groups were smaller and surrounded by hyperplastic connective tissue. The frequency of females in the G0-G4 groups was 54.5%, 75.0%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. The RIA analyses of E2 and T showed that T levels decreased during gonadal differentiation, and increased slightly at the onset of ovarian differentiation, while E2 levels increased gradually and peaked at the onset of ovarian differentiation in the control group. In the E2-treated groups, T levels decreased before the onset of ovarian differentiation. E2 levels were high on the 48 dph, but declined to a lower level on the 54 dph, and then increased gradually during gonadal differentiation. And a sharp increase of E2 levels were observed in all E2-treated groups at the onset of ovarian differentiation. The data suggest that T and E2 play important roles during gonadal differentiation, and an E2 dose of 2 mg/kg feed could induce sex reversal in P. olivaceus.

  9. Steroid hormone related effects of marine persistent organic pollutants in human H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Kampman, Ellen; Steegenga, Wilma T; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-06-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) 126 and 153, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), tributyltin (TBT), and methylmercury (MeHg) can be accumulated in seafood and then form a main source for human exposure. Some POPs have been associated with changes in steroid hormone levels in both humans and animals. This study describes the in vitro effects of these POPs and mixtures thereof in H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Relative responses for 13 steroid hormones and 7 genes involved in the steroidogenic pathway, and CYP1A1, were analyzed. PFOS induced the most pronounced effects on steroid hormone levels by significantly affecting 9 out of 13 hormone levels measured, with the largest increases found for 17β-estradiol, corticosterone, and cortisol. Furthermore, TCDD, both PCBs, and TBT significantly altered steroidogenesis. Increased steroid hormone levels were accompanied by related increased gene expression levels. The differently expressed genes were MC2R, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, and CYP19A1 and changes in gene expression levels were more sensitive than changes in hormone levels. The POP mixtures tested showed mostly additive effects, especially for DHEA and 17β-estradiol levels. This study shows that some seafood POPs are capable of altering steroidogenesis in H295R cells at concentrations that mixtures might reach in human blood, suggesting that adverse health effects cannot be excluded.

  10. Morphologic responses of the mouse ovarian surface epithelium to ovulation and steroid hormonal milieu.

    PubMed

    Gotfredson, Garry S; Murdoch, William J

    2007-02-01

    Ovarian cancer of surface epithelial origin is an ovulation- and endocrine-related disease. It appears that a cell transformed by genotoxins generated at follicular rupture is propagated during postovulatory wound repair. A consequent steroid hormonal imbalance favoring the mitogenic estrogens is a prospective predisposing factor in ovarian neoplasia. Protection against epithelial ovarian cancer is conferred by progesterone. The objective of this study was to characterize the acute effects of ovulation and steroid hormonal exposure on morphologic responses of surface epithelial cells of mouse ovaries. Follicular development and ovulation were induced in immature animals with equine and human (=Day 0) choriogonadotropins, respectively. On Day 2 (approximately 36 hrs after ovulation), surface epithelial classifications presented in histologic sections were altered from simple (single-layered) squamous and cuboidal toward stratification; this trend was reversed (i.e., reverted to the control status) on Days 4-8. Shifts in the ovarian epithelium from simple to stratified were accentuated following postovulatory (Days 1-8) treatment with estradiol. Surface epithelia of ovaries obtained after 1 week of progesterone administration were exclusively of a simple phenotype. We conclude that the proliferative/procarcinogenic reaction of the ovarian surface epithelium to ovulation is exacerbated by estrogen and counteracted by progesterone.

  11. DAF as a therapeutic target for steroid hormones: implications for host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Bogdan; Nowicki, Stella

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a concise historic prospective and a summary of accumulated knowledge on steroid hormones, DAF expression, and therapeutic implication of steroid hormone treatment on multiple pathologies, including infection and the host-pathogen interactions. DAF/CD55 plays multiple physiologic functions including tissue protection from the cytotoxic complement injury, an anti-inflammatory function due to its anti-adherence properties which enhance transmigration of monocytes and macrophages and reduce tissue injury. DAF physiologic functions are essential in many organ systems including pregnancy for protection of the semiallogeneic fetus or for preventing uncontrolled infiltration by white cells in their pro- and/or anti-inflammatory functions. DAF expression appears to have multiple regulatory tissue-specific and/or menstrual cycle-specific mechanisms, which involve complex signaling mechanisms. Regulation of DAF expression may involve a direct or an indirect effect of at least the estrogen, progesterone, and corticosteroid regulatory pathways. DAF is exploited in multiple pathologic conditions by pathogens and viruses in chronic tissue infection processes. The binding of Escherichia coli bearing Dr adhesins to the DAF/CD55 receptor is DAF density dependent and triggers internalization of E. coli via an endocytic pathway involving CD55, lipid rafts, and microtubules. Dr+ E. coli or Dr antigen may persist in vivo in the interstitium for several months. Further understanding of such processes should be instrumental in designing therapeutic strategies for multiple conditions involving DAF's protective or pathologic functions and tailoring host expression of DAF.

  12. Pigments, Parasites and Personalitiy: Towards a Unifying Role for Steroid Hormones?

    PubMed Central

    Kittilsen, Silje; Johansen, Ida Beitnes; Braastad, Bjarne Olai; Øverli, Øyvind

    2012-01-01

    A surging interest in the evolution of consistent trait correlations has inspired research on pigment patterns as a correlate of behavioural syndromes, or “animal personalities”. Associations between pigmentation, physiology and health status are less investigated as potentially conserved trait clusters. In the current study, lice counts performed on farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar naturally infected with ectoparasitic sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis showed that individual fish with high incidence of black melanin-based skin spots harboured fewer female sea lice carrying egg sacs, compared to less pigmented fish. There was no significant association between pigmentation and lice at other developmental stages, suggesting that host factors associated with melanin-based pigmentation may modify ectoparasite development to a larger degree than settlement. In a subsequent laboratory experiment a strong negative correlation between skin spots and post-stress cortisol levels was revealed, with less pigmented individuals showing a more pronounced cortisol response to acute stress. The observation that lice prevalence was strongly increased on a fraction of sexually mature male salmon which occurred among the farmed fish further supports a role for steroid hormones as mediators of reduced parasite resistance. The data presented here propose steroid hormones as a proximate cause for the association between melanin-based pigmentation and parasites. Possible fundamental and applied implications are discussed. PMID:22493685

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyls as hormonally active structural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, J.D. ); Waller, C.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Among the environmental chemicals that may be able to disrupt the endocrine systems of animals and humans, the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a chemical class of considerable concern. One possible mechanism by which PCBs may interfere with endocrine function is their ability to mimic natural hormones. These actions reflect a close relationship between the physicochemical properties encoded in the PCB molecular structure and the responses they evoke in biological systems. These physiocochemical properties determine the molecular reactivities of PCBs and are responsible for their recognition as biological acceptors and receptors, as well as for triggering molecular mechanisms that lead to tissue response. [open quotes]Coplanarity[close quotes] of PCB phenyl rings and [open quotes]laterality[close quotes] of chlorine atoms are important structural features determining specific binding behavior with proteins and certain toxic responses in biological systems. We compare qualitative structure-activity relationships for PCBs with the limited information on the related non-coplanar chlorinated diphenyl ethers, providing further insights into the nature of the molecular recognition processes and support for the structural relationship of PCBs to thyroid hormones. Steriodlike activity requires conformational restriction and possibility hydroxylation. We offer some simple molecular recognition models to account for the importance of these different structural features in the structure-activity relationships that permit one to express PCB reactivities in terms of dioxin, thyroxine, and estradiol equivalents. The available data support the involvement of PCBs as mimics of thyroid and other steroidal hormones. The potential for reproductive and developmental toxicity associated with human exposure to PCBs is of particular concern. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Reproductive steroid hormones and recurrence-free survival in women with a history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rock, Cheryl L; Flatt, Shirley W; Laughlin, Gail A; Gold, Ellen B; Thomson, Cynthia A; Natarajan, Loki; Jones, Lovell A; Caan, Bette J; Stefanick, Marcia L; Hajek, Richard A; Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Pierce, John P

    2008-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies fairly consistently show in postmenopausal women that reproductive steroid hormones contribute to primary breast cancer risk, and this association is strongly supported by experimental studies using laboratory animals and model systems. Evidence linking sex hormone concentrations with risk for recurrence in women diagnosed with breast cancer is limited; however, beneficial effects of antiestrogenic therapy on recurrence-free survival suggest that these hormones affect progression and risk for recurrence. This study examined whether baseline serum concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin were associated with recurrence-free survival in a nested case-control cohort of women from a randomized diet trial (Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study) who were followed for >7 years after diagnosis. In 153 case-control pairs of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women in this analysis, total estradiol [hazard ratio (HR), 1.41 per unit increase in log concentration; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-1.97], bioavailable estradiol (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.03-1.53), and free estradiol (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03-1.65) concentrations were significantly associated with risk for recurrence. Recurred women had an average total estradiol concentration that was double that of nonrecurred women (22.7 versus 10.8 pg/mL; P = 0.05). Testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin concentrations did not differ between cases and controls and were not associated with risk for recurrence. Although genetic and metabolic factors likely modulate the relationship between circulating sex hormones and risk, results from this study provide evidence that higher serum estrogen concentration contributes to risk for recurrence in women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer.

  15. Quantitative analysis of steroid hormones in human hair using a column-switching LC-APCI-MS/MS assay.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Stalder, Tobias; Foley, Paul; Rauh, Manfred; Deng, Huihua; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2013-06-01

    The analysis of steroid hormones in hair is increasingly used in the field of stress-related research to obtain a retrospective index of integrated long-term hormone secretion. Here, most laboratories have so far relied on immunochemical assays originally developed for salivary analyses. Although these assays are fast and easy to perform, they have a reduced reliability and specificity due to cross-reactivity with other substances and are limited to the detection of one hormone at a time. Here, we report the development of a LC-MS/MS-based method for simultaneous identification of endogenous concentrations of seven steroid hormones (cortisol, cortisone, testosterone, progesterone, corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione) in human hair. Hair samples were washed with isopropanol and steroid hormones were extracted from 10mg whole, nonpulverized hair by methanol incubation. A column switching strategy for on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) was applied, followed by analyte detection on an AB Sciex API 5000 QTrap mass spectrometer. Results indicated linearity of the method for all steroids over ranges of 0.09-90pg/mg (0.9-900pg/mg for DHEA) with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9995 and 0.9999. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were between 3.7 and 9.1%. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were below (or equal to) 0.1pg/mg for all steroids, except of DHEA for which the LOQ was 0.9pg/mg. An analysis of 30 natural hair samples (15 men/15 women) using this method confirmed that all steroid hormones could be quantified at endogenous levels in each individual. In addition, the use of whole hair samples and on-line SPE resulted in a significant reduction in sample throughput times, increasing the applicability of this method for research questions where a larger number of samples needs to be processed.

  16. TeBG- and CBG-bound steroid hormones in rabbits are available for influx into uterus in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, G.; Steingold, K.A.; Pardridge, W.M.; Judd, H.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of gonadal or adrenal steroid hormones in rabbits often does not bear the expected inverse relationship with hormone binding to testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) or corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). This suggests TeBG or CBG may not impede steroid hormone delivery to tissues. The effects of rabbit plasma proteins on the influxes of {sup 3}H-labeled steroids from the circulation into the rabbit uterus were measured in vivo using a tissue sampling single-injection technique. In the absence of plasma proteins, estradiol (E{sub 2}) and testosterone (T) were freely diffusible through the uterine microvasculature (i.e., extraction >80%). The extractions of dihydrostestosterone (DHT) and corticosterone (B) ranged from 60 to 72%, while that of cortisol (F) was reduced at 40%. Rabbit serum exerted no inhibition of the influxes of the steroids tested. The influxes of T and B greatly exceeded the rates that would be expected if only the free and albumin-bound fractions estimated in vitro were diffusible in vivo. However, the extraction of ({sup 3}H)corticosteroid-binding globulin or bovine ({sup 3}H)albumin were low, consistent with little, if any, extravascular uptake of the plasma proteins. The results indicate both albumin-bound and globulin-bound steroid hormone are available for transport into the uterus in the rabbit in vivo without significant exodus of the plasma protein, per se.

  17. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that your adrenal glands make to fight stress associated with illnesses and injuries. They reduce inflammation and affect the immune system. You may need to take corticosteroids to treat ...

  18. Phospholipase Cγ1 Connects the Cell Membrane Pathway to the Nuclear Receptor Pathway in Insect Steroid Hormone Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Cai, Mei-Juan; Zheng, Chuan-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the classical nuclear receptor pathway, there is a nongenomic pathway in the cell membrane that regulates gene expression in animal steroid hormone signaling; however, this mechanism is unclear. Here, we report that the insect steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) regulates calcium influx via phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCG1) to modulate the protein kinase C phosphorylation of the transcription factor ultraspiracle (USP1) in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The PLCG1 mRNA levels are increased during the molting and metamorphic stages. The depletion of PLCG1 by RNA interference can block 20E-enhanced pupation, cause larvae death and pupation defects, and repress 20E-induced gene expression. 20E may induce the tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCG1 at the cytosolic tyrosine kinase (Src) homology 2 domains and then determine the migration of PLCG1 toward the plasma membrane. The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) inhibitor suramin, Src family kinase inhibitor PP2, and the depletions of ecdysone-responsible GPCR (ErGPCR) and Gαq restrain the 20E-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCG1. PLCG1 participates in the 20E-induced Ca2+ influx. The inhibition of GPCR, PLC, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, and calcium channels represses the 20E-induced Ca2+ influx. Through calcium signaling, PLCG1 mediates the transcriptional activation driven by the ecdysone-response element. Through PLCG1 and calcium signaling, 20E regulates PKC phosphorylation of USP1 at Ser-21 to determine its ecdysone-response element binding activity. These results suggest that 20E activates PLCG1 via the ErGPCR and Src family kinases to regulate Ca2+ influx and PKC phosphorylation of USP1 to subsequently modulate gene transcription for metamorphosis. PMID:24692553

  19. Effect of growth promotants on the occurrence of endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones on feedlot soils and in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplements and growth promotants containing steroid hormones are routinely administered to beef cattle to improve feeding efficiency, reduce behavioral problems, and enhance production. As a result, beef cattle manure will contain both synthetic steroids as well as a range of endogenous steroids i...

  20. Effect of gonadal steroid hormones on formalin-induced temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Torres-Chávez, K E; Sanfins, J M; Clemente-Napimoga, J T; Pelegrini-Da-Silva, A; Parada, C A; Fischer, L; Tambeli, C H

    2012-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that gonadal steroid hormones decrease formalin-induced temporomandibular joint nociception in rats. Given that the attenuation of inflammation is a potential mechanism underlying this antinociceptive effect, we evaluated the effect of gonadal steroid hormones on formalin-induced temporomandibular joint inflammation. Plasma extravasation, a major sign of acute inflammation, and neutrophil migration, an important event related to tissue injury, were evaluated. Formalin induced significantly lower temporomandibular joint plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration in proestrus females than in males and in diestrus females. Since estradiol serum level is high in proestrus females and low in diestrus females and in males, these findings suggest that the high physiological level of estradiol decreases temporomandibular joint inflammation. Estradiol but not progesterone administration in ovariectomized females significantly decreased formalin-induced plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration, an effect that was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration were not affected by orchiectomy, but testosterone or estradiol administration in orchidectomized males significantly decreased them. The androgen receptor antagonist flutamide blocked the anti-inflammatory effect of testosterone while ICI 182780 blocked that of estradiol in males. Previous intravenous administration of a nonspecific selectin inhibitor significantly decreased formalin-induced temporomandibular joint nociception and neutrophil migration in males, revealing a potent and positive correlation between temporomandibular joint nociception and inflammation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of estradiol and testosterone in the temporomandibular joint region and suggest that this effect may mediate, at least in part, the antinociceptive effect of these hormones.

  1. Caloric Restriction Effect on Proinflammatory Cytokines, Growth Hormone, and Steroid Hormone Concentrations during Exercise in Judokas

    PubMed Central

    Abedelmalek, Salma; Chtourou, Hamdi; Souissi, Nizar; Tabka, Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caloric restriction on the immune and hormonal responses during exercise in judo athletes. In a randomised order, 11 male judokas (age: 20.45 ± 0.51; height: 1.71 ± 0.3 m; and body weight: 75.9 ± 3.1 kg) participate in this study during a period of weight maintenance (baseline) and after 7 days of caloric restriction (CR). All subjects performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during the two conditions. Values for nutrient intakes were obtained from a 7 d food record kept during a period of weight maintenance and after a 7-day food restriction (−5~6 MJ/day). Our results showed that CR resulted in significant decreases in body weight (P < 0.05) and performance (P < 0.05). However, heart rate and SJFT index (P < 0.05) increase significantly during CR in comparison to baseline. Moreover, exercise leads to a significant increase in testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone (GH), leukocytes, neutrophils, TNF-α, and IL-6, in both CR and baseline conditions. Compared to baseline, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly higher during CR condition (P < 0.05). Additionally, CR leads to an increase in cortisol and GH (P < 0.05) and a decrease in testosterone concentrations (P < 0.05). PMID:26075039

  2. Senescence and steroid hormone receptor reactivities in accessory sex glands of elderly rats (Sprague-Dawley) following exogenous hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Eduardo Marcelo; Fávaro, Wagner José; Montico, Fabio; Hetzl, Amanda Cia; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the stromal and epithelial distribution of AR, ERα and ERβ reactivities in the different accessory sex glands of elderly rats and during strong hormonal changes. Ten month old male rats were divided into six senile groups and submitted to treatment: Senile/Control group (SC); Senile/Testosterone group (ST): Senile/Estrogen group (SE); Castrated group (CA); Castrated/Testosterone group (CT); Castrated/Estrogen group (CE). After a 30-day treatment, the prostatic ventral lobe (VL), dorsal lobe (DL) and coagulating gland (CG) samples were processed for immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting. The results showed that AR immunoreactivity was characterized in the epithelium of VL and DL in senile/control rats and senile rats submitted to exogenous hormonal therapy. AR reactivity in the coagulating gland was verified predominantly in the stromal cells in the different experimental groups. ERα reactivity occurred predominantly in the stromal compartment in all accessory sex glands. In the DL and CG, ERα immunoreactivities were intense in the groups which received testosterone (ST) and estrogen (SE). ERβ immunoreactivity in the CG was verified in the stromal compartment in the different experimental groups, showing a positive response to both increased testosterone and estrogen levels. ERβ reactivity, in the DL, was intensified in the stroma of senile rats with higher serum testosterone levels, and in senile rats with increased serum estrogen levels, especially in the glandular epithelium. Thus, the results revealed different distribution pattern of steroid hormone receptors in each one of the prostatic lobes in senescence, especially in the prostate dorsal lobe and coagulating gland, which is a fundamental factor due to the fact that major prostatic diseases occur in a later period of life.

  3. Deciduoma growth in the ovariectomized guinea pig: steroid hormone-mediated vascular support of endometrial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Garris, D R

    1988-05-01

    The ability of ovarian steroid hormones to modulate experimentally induced decidual tissue (DT) growth and the associated changes in uterine blood flow rates (UBF) was examined in ovariectomized guinea pigs after uterine trauma (designated day 0 of the studies). Uteri that were exposed, but not manipulated, served as controls. Uterine and DT weights as well as UBF, rates, were subsequently recorded on either day 5 or 10 posttrauma. Oil treatment failed to induce an increase in either control or traumatized uterine weights between days 5 and 10, and trauma had no effect on UBF rates in either group. Daily progesterone (P; 2 mg) treatment induced a significant elevation in DT weight by day 10 and elevated UBF rates between days 5 and 10 relative to control values. Daily P treatment augmented by estradiol (E2; 1 microgram) therapy on days 0 and 1 induced a significant increase in DT weights and UBF rates between days 5 and 10 in both control and DT groups relative to those in oil-treated animals. Combined P and E2 (P/E2) treatment induced a moderate increase in DT weight by day 10 posttrauma and elevated UBF rates in both control and DT groups. Acute treatment (i.e. days -3 to 0) with these steroid regimens indicated that neither P nor P/E2 treatment maintained DT growth. However, day -3 to 0 treatment with P in combination with a single day 0 injection of E2 allowed for maximal DT growth by day 10 and maintained elevated UBF rates relative to control values. P/E2 treatment between days -3 and 0 also induced an increase in UBF rates in both control and DT uteri relative to those in oil-treated animals. These results indicate that E2 is essential for supporting the P-directed differentiation and proliferation of stimulated guinea pig endometrium into DT. The ability of decidualization to occur in the absence of chronic steroid support indicates that uterine sensitization for cellular differentiation in this species only requires that the endometrium be initially primed

  4. Sexual dimorphism on cytokines expression in the temporomandibular joint: the role of gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Torres-Chávez, Karla E; Fischer, Luana; Teixeira, Juliana Maia; Fávaro-Moreira, Nadia Cristina; Obando-Pereda, Gustavo Alberto; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Tambeli, Claudia Herrera

    2011-10-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain-related conditions are generally characterized by local inflammation; however, little studies have focused on the role of gonadal hormones in the expression of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines. Therefore, we asked whether gonadal steroid hormones affect formalin-induced cytokines expression in the rat temporomcandibular joint. The expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 was significantly higher in males than in diestrus and proestrus females and was decreased by orchiectomy and restored by testosterone replacement. The expression of IL-6 was significantly higher in diestrus and proestrus females than in males, and was decreased by ovariectomy and restored by estradiol or progesterone administration. We conclude that testosterone increases the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and CINC-1, and estradiol and progesterone increase the expression of IL-6. New clinical approaches based on inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators are starting to supplant traditional immunosuppressive therapies and gonadal hormones may influence their effectiveness or clinical dosage.

  5. The relationship between sex steroids and sex-hormone-binding globulin in plasma in physiological and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, S K; Loughlin, T; Culliton, M; McKenna, T J

    1985-09-01

    Physiological and many pathological changes in plasma sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels have been attributed to the opposing effects of androgens which lower, and oestrogens which elevate, levels. We examined four clinical situations in which changes in SHBG levels may not be explained by sex steroid alterations. (1) Dexamethasone caused an increase in SHBG levels in hyperandrogenaemic hirsute women whether or not androgens were suppressed. (2) In male patients with untreated isolated gonadotrophin deficiency there was a highly significant correlation between SHBG levels and age, but there was no relationship between the levels of SHBG and those of plasma testosterone, androstenedione or DHEAS. (3) Two 46-XY siblings, phenotypic female subjects with complete androgen insensitivity, demonstrated a marked decline in SHBG levels between the ages of 9-13 and 12-16 years. (4) SHBG was suppressed in obese oligomenorrhoeic women while plasma concentrations of testosterone, androstenedione and oestradiol were normal and that of oestrone was elevated; however, the testosterone:SHBG ratio, an index of free testosterone, was elevated. These observations indicate that the decline in SHBG levels which normally occurs in men during the second decade of life is independent of androgen activity and is under the influence of as yet unidentified factors. Glucocorticoids in small doses under the influence of as yet unidentified factors. Glucocorticoids in small doses increase SHBG levels independently of sex steroid alterations while elevated free testosterone concentration may contribute to suppression of SHBG in obesity.

  6. Gonadotropins in the Russian Sturgeon: Their Role in Steroid Secretion and the Effect of Hormonal Treatment on Their Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yom-Din, Svetlana; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Aizen, Joseph; Boehm, Benjamin; Shpilman, Michal; Golan, Matan; Hurvitz, Avshalom; Degani, Gad; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    In the reproduction process of male and female fish, pituitary derived gonadotropins (GTHs) play a key role. To be able to specifically investigate certain functions of Luteinizing (LH) and Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii; st), we produced recombinant variants of the hormones using the yeast Pichia pastoris as a protein production system. We accomplished to create in vitro biologically active heterodimeric glycoproteins consisting of two associated α- and β-subunits in sufficient quantities. Three dimensional modelling of both GTHs was conducted in order to study the differences between the two GTHs. Antibodies were produced against the unique β-subunit of each of the GTHs, in order to be used for immunohistochemical analysis and to develop an ELISA for blood and pituitary hormone quantification. This detection technique revealed the specific localization of the LH and FSH cells in the sturgeon pituitary and pointed out that both cell types are present in substantially higher numbers in mature males and females, compared to immature fish. With the newly attained option to prevent cross-contamination when investigating on the effects of GTH administration, we compared the steroidogeneic response (estradiol and 11-Keto testosterone (11-KT) in female and males, respectively) of recombinant stLH, stFSH, and carp pituitary extract in male and female sturgeon gonads at different developmental stages. Finally, we injected commercially available gonadotropin releasing hormones analog (GnRH) to mature females, and found a moderate effect on the development of ovarian follicles. Application of only testosterone (T) resulted in a significant increase in circulating levels of 11-KT whereas the combination of GnRH + T did not affect steroid levels at all. The response pattern for estradiol demonstrated a similar situation. FSH levels showed significant increases when GnRH + T was administered, while no changes were present in

  7. Combined Treatment with Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Analog and Anabolic Steroid Hormone Increased Pubertal Height Gain and Adult Height in Boys with Early Puberty for Height.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Horikawa, Reiko

    2012-04-01

    Twenty-one boys with a height of 135 cm or less at onset of puberty were treated with a combination of GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone, and their pubertal height gain and adult height were compared with those of untreated 29 boys who enter puberty below 135 cm. The mean age at the start of treatment with a GnRH analog, leuprorelin acetate depot (Leuplin(®)) was 12.3 yr, a mean of 1.3 yr after the onset of puberty, and GnRH analog was administered every 3 to 5 wk thereafter for a mean duration of 4.1 yr. The anabolic steroid hormone was started approximately 1 yr after initiation of treatment with the GnRH analog. The mean pubertal height gain from onset of puberty till adult height was significantly greater in the combination treatment group (33.9 cm) than in the untreated group (26.4 cm) (p<0.0001). The mean adult height was significantly greater in the combination treatment group (164.3 cm) than in the untreated group (156.9 cm) (p<0.0001). The percentage of subjects with an adult height of 160 cm or taller was 90.5% (19/21) in the combination treatment group, and it was 13.8% (4/29) in the untreated group (p<0.0001). Since growth of the penis and pubic hair is promoted by the anabolic steroid hormone, no psychosocial problems arose because of delayed puberty. No clinically significant adverse events appeared. Combined treatment with GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone significantly increased height gain during puberty and adult height in boys who entered puberty with a short stature, since the period until epiphyseal closure was extended due to deceleration of the bone age maturation by administration of the GnRH analog and the growth rate at this time was maintained by the anabolic steroid hormone.

  8. Event-related brain potentials to emotional images and gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia and paired controls

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Julie; Mendrek, Adrianna; Germain, Martine; Hot, Pascal; Lavoie, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Prominent disturbances in the experience, expression, and emotion recognition in patients with schizophrenia have been relatively well documented over the last few years. Furthermore, sex differences in behavior and brain activity, associated with the processing of various emotions, have been reported in the general population and in schizophrenia patients. Others proposed that sex differences should be rather attributed to testosterone, which may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Also, it had been suggested that estradiol may play a protective role in schizophrenia. Surprisingly, few studies investigating this pathology have focused on both brain substrates and gonadal steroid hormone levels, in emotional processing. In the present study, we investigated electrocortical responses related to emotional valence and arousal as well as gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia. Event-Related Potentials (ERP) were recorded during exposition to emotional pictures in 18 patients with schizophrenia and in 24 control participants paired on intelligence, manual dominance and socioeconomic status. Given their previous sensitivity to emotional and attention processes, the P200, N200 and the P300 were selected for analysis. More precisely, emotional valence generally affects early components (N200), which reflect early process of selective attention, whereas emotional arousal and valence both influences the P300 component, which is related to memory context updating, and stimulus categorization. Results showed that, in the control group, the amplitude of the N200 was significantly more lateralized over the right hemisphere, while there was no such lateralization in patients with schizophrenia. In patients with schizophrenia, significantly smaller anterior P300 amplitude was observed to the unpleasant, compared to the pleasant. That anterior P300 reduction was also correlated with negative symptoms. The N200 and P300 amplitudes were positively

  9. Effects of 17 α-methyltestosterone on transcriptome, gonadal histology and sex steroid hormones in rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiancao; Liu, Shaozhen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Yanping; Yuan, Cong; Chen, Shu; Wang, Zaizhao

    2015-09-01

    The 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), a synthetic androgen, is known for its interference effects on the endocrine system. Aiming to investigate the transcriptome profiling of gonads induced by MT and to understand the molecular mechanism by which MT causes adverse effects in fish, transcriptome profiling of gonads, gonadal histology and the sex steroid hormones in response to MT were analyzed in Gobiocypris rarus. Eight libraries, 4 from the ovary and 4 from the testis, were constructed and sequenced and then a total number of clean reads per sample ranging from 7.03 to 9.99 million were obtained. In females, a total of 191 transcripts were differentially regulated by MT, consisting of 102 up-regulated transcripts and 89 down-regulated transcripts. In males, 268 differentially expressed genes with 108 up-regulated and 160 down-regulated were detected upon MT exposure. Testosterone serves as the major sex steroid hormone content in G. rarus of both sexes. The concentrations of 17β-estradiol, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were significantly increased in females and decreased in males after MT exposure. Interestingly, MT caused a decreased number of vitellogenic oocytes in the ovary and spermatozoa in the testis. After MT exposure, four differentially expressed genes (ndufa4, slc1a3a, caskin-2 and rpt3) were found in G. rarus of both sexes. Overall, we suggest that MT seemed to affect genes involved in pathways related to physiological processes in the gonads of G. rarus. These processes include the electron transfer of Complex IV, endothelial cell activation, axon growth and guidance, and proteasome assembly and glutamate transport metabolic.

  10. Ouija board: A transcription factor evolved for only one target in steroid hormone biosynthesis in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Yuko S.; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transcription factors generally regulate gene expression of multiple targets. In contrast, our recent finding suggests that the zinc finger protein Ouija board controls steroid hormone biosynthesis through specific regulation of only one gene spookier in Drosophila. It sheds light on a specialized but essential factor that evolved for one target. PMID:27434771

  11. Performance and physiology of steers grazing toxic tall fescue as influenced by feeding soybean hulls and implanting with steroid hormones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A grazing experiment with steers grazing toxic tall fescue indicated that feeding pelleted soybean hulls in conjunction with steroid hormone implants can increase steer weight gain, and feeding soyben hulls can reduce the severity of fescue toxicosis Ergot alkaloids produced by a fungal endophyte...

  12. Effect of rainfall timing and tillage on the transport of steroid hormones in runoff from manure amended row crop fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure generated from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) represents one of the major sources of steroid hormones found in surface water. This paper presents results of a study conducted near Concord, NE to determine the effects of manure handling (compost vs. stockpile), tillage (no-till...

  13. Influence of dioxin exposure upon levels of prostate-specific antigen and steroid hormones in Vietnamese men.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian Liang; Kido, Teruhiko; Honma, Seijiro; Okamoto, Rie; Manh, Ho Dung; Maruzeni, Shoko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nakano, Takeshi; Koh, Eitetsu; Takasuga, Takumi; Nhu, Dang Duc; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Son, Le Ke

    2016-04-01

    Most studies on the relationship between Agent Orange and prostate cancer have focused on US veterans of the Vietnam War. There have been few studies focusing on the relationship between levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and dioxins or steroid hormones in Vietnamese men. In 2009-2011, we collected blood samples from 97 men who had resided in a "dioxin hotspot" and 85 men from a non-sprayed region in Vietnam. Then levels of PSA, dioxins, and steroid hormones were analyzed. Levels of most dioxins, furans, and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls were higher in the hotspot than those in the non-sprayed region. Levels of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and estradiol differed significantly between the hotspot and the non-sprayed region, but there were no correlations between levels of PSA and steroid hormones and dioxins in either of the two regions. Our findings suggest that PSA levels in Vietnamese men are not associated with levels of dioxin or steroid hormones in these two regions.

  14. Linking steroid hormone levels to sexual maturity index and energy reserves in Nereis diversicolor from clean and polluted estuaries.

    PubMed

    Durou, C; Mouneyrac, C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare seasonal variations of reproduction physiology of the ragworm Nereis diversicolor --a key species in estuarine ecosystems--originating from a clean (Authie) and multi-polluted (Seine) estuaries. A particular attention was carried out in female worms, on relationships between sexual maturity stages, energy reserves (glycogen and lipids) and steroid hormone levels (progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, and testosterone). Sexual maturity index (SMI), energy reserves and steroid hormones are clearly influenced by season in worms from both sites. Depleted steroid hormone levels were depicted in specimens exhibiting high sexual maturity stage and energy reserves. Intersite analysis has revealed all over the sampling period:--a sexual precocity in worms from Seine,--glycogen concentrations generally higher in worms from Authie,--no clear tendency for lipids,--no differences in steroid hormone levels. Sexual precocity and lower glycogen levels in Seine could be explained by a specific strategy above all devoted to reproduction in these worms. Chemical stress could be a possible explanation of these observations.

  15. Methodology of the thyroid gland disease decision-making using profiling in steroid hormone pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sun; Yoon, Chang No

    2007-02-19

    To find out the genetic factors of outbreak of thyroid gland disease, we developed the thyroid gland decision-making system, which processes the metabolic profile in steroid hormone map using a statistical method. Metabolic profile is a measured data of lots of mixed materials that includes not only known metabolites, but also unknown ones, which is estimated to have an influence on the thyroid gland disease. Therefore, to develop thyroid gland disease decision-making system, analyzing metabolic profile containing multi-materials would be useful for diagnosing thyroid gland disease. Because experimental values used for system construction are area values for the retention time, the observations are preprocessed through variable transition and t-test to use the area values concurrently and the highly correlated materials are estimated by principal component analysis. The thyroid gland decision-making system developed through the logistic regression is an excellent system demonstrating 98.7% accuracy in the classification table.

  16. The fate of pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, UV-filters and pesticides during MBR treatment.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Nghiem, Long D

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between molecular properties and the fate of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) in the aqueous and solid phases during wastewater treatment by MBR. A set of 29 TrOCs was selected to represent pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, UV-filters and pesticides that occur ubiquitously in municipal wastewater. Both adsorption and biodegradation/transformation were found responsible for the removal of TrOCs by MBR treatment. A connection between biodegradation and molecular structure could be observed while adsorption was the dominant removal mechanism for the hydrophobic (logD>3.2) compounds. Highly hydrophobic (logD>3.2) but readily biodegradable compounds did not accumulate in sludge. In contrast, recalcitrant compounds with a moderate hydrophobicity, such as carbamazepine, accumulated significantly in the solid phase. The results provide a framework to predict the removal and fate of TrOCs by MBR treatment.

  17. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  18. Proliferation of rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cells in culture: Lack of mitogenic response to steroid or gonadotropic hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Toth-Fejel, Suellen; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2002-06-30

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer and approximately 90% of ovarian cancers derive from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), yet the biology of the OSE is poorly understood. Factors associated with increased risk of non-hereditary ovarian cancer include the formation of inclusion cysts, effects of reproductive hormones cytokeratin, vimentin, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, estrogen receptor-a, and progesterone receptor. We show that these cells activate MAP Kinase and proliferate in response to extracellular calcium, as do human and rat OSE. In contrast, the gonadotropic hormones FSH (4-400 IU/L), LH (8.5-850 IU/l), and hCG (10-1000 IU/l) fail to stimulate proliferation. We find that concentrations of progesterone and estrogen normally present in follicles just prior to ovulation ( ~1000 ng/ml) significantly decrease the number of mitotically active RhOSE cells as determined by PCNA labelling, total cell count, and 3H-thymidine uptake, while lower steroid concentrations have no effect.

  19. Steroidal hormones in agricultural runoff: Lessons from studies at multiple scales in Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. P.; Aga, D.; Dutta, S.; Vaicunas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Emerging contaminants such as steroidal hormones have raised considerable environmental concerns and in elevated concentrations have been shown to cause physiological and reproductive disorders in aquatic and wildlife species. Large or concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in agricultural landscapes can be an important source of steroidal hormones, especially, if animal waste or manure is applied to the land and runs off with surface waters. Delaware is a state with a large poultry industry where a significant portion of poultry litter is applied to agricultural lands as fertilizer. Over the past four years, we have investigated the potential threat posed by hormones in agricultural landscapes by determining the concentrations of estrogens at various scales - field plots (Dutta et al. 2010; Journal of Environmental Quality); watershed scale (Dutta et al., 2012; Water Air Soil Pollution) and statewide surveys of surface waters (Vaicunas et al., submitted; Journal of American Water Resources Association). This talk summarizes the key lessons that we have learnt from these studies. Special emphasis was placed on evaluating the pollution potential under typical agronomic conditions and under natural storm and runoff conditions. Estrogen analysis was performed using LC-MS/MS. The key questions that we addressed were: (a) What are the concentrations and forms (free versus conjugate) of estrogens in runoff? Do the concentrations exceed environmental thresholds? (b) How do the concentrations in runoff change with time after land-application of manure? (c) How do the estrogens concentrations vary across different landscape positions and what are the key runoff flow paths? Our results suggest that concentrations of estrogens in runoff were low and much below the levels that have been used for exposure or toxicological assays. Concentrations of conjugated forms of estrogens were higher than the free, more toxic, forms. However, since these forms are inter

  20. Sex steroid hormones do not enhance the direct stimulatory effect of kisspetin-10 on the secretion of growth hormone from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat Ahmed, Ahmed; Saito, Hayato; Sawada, Tatsuru; Yaegashi, Tomoyoshi; Jin, Jin; Sawai, Ken; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of kisspeptin10 (Kp10) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells, and evaluate the ability of sex steroid hormones to enhance the sensitivity of somatotrophic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 8-11-month-old castrated calves were incubated for 12 h with estradiol (E(2), 10(-8) mol/L),progesterone (P(4), 10(-8) mol/L), testosterone (T, 10(-8) mol/L), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2 h with Kp10. The amount of GH released in the medium was measured by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Kp10 (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L) significantly stimulated the secretion of GH from the AP cells regardless of steroid treatments (P < 0.05), and E(2), P(4), and T had no effect on this response. The GH-releasing response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH, 10(-8) mol/L) was significantly greater than that to Kp10 (P < 0.05). The present results suggest that Kp10 directly stimulates the release of GH from somatotrophic cells and sex steroid hormones do not enhance the sensitivity of these cells to Kp10. Furthermore, they suggest that the GH-releasing effect of Kp10 is less potent than that of GHRH.

  1. NFκB and glucocorticoid receptor activity in steroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Charlotte; Dhanda, Ashwin; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Dimambro, Alexandra; Lightman, Stafford; Dayan, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Resistance to the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of steroids is an important clinical problem that complicates the treatment of approximately 30% of patients with conditions for which steroids are normally first-line therapy. Previous studies have shown that steroid-resistant (SR) patients have more severe disease and higher levels of inflammatory cytokine production than steroid-sensitive (SS) patients, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain poorly understood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers were tested for steroid resistance by their in vitro response to the anti-proliferative effects of dexamethasone. The SR cohort had high baseline levels of NFκB DNA binding activity, equivalent to that in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated SS cells. In SR cells, dexamethasone exposure, but not PHA, increased binding of the p65 NFκB subunit to the κB promoter element. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was not detected at either the κB promoter element or the glucocorticoid response element (GRE), suggesting that it does not translocate to the nucleus in these cells. Conversely, in SS cells, baseline p65 DNA binding activity was low and significantly increased by PHA, but not by dexamethasone. Unlike in SR cells, GR was detected at the κB element and at the GRE. These findings suggest that in SR patients, steroids may be harmful by increasing NFκB activity which would exacerbate disease by increasing transcription of inflammatory cytokines.

  2. Highly sensitive simultaneous quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Johänning, Janina; Heinkele, Georg; Precht, Jana C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Tamoxifen is a mainstay in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and is metabolized to more than 30 different compounds. Little is known about in vivo concentrations of estrogenic metabolites E-metabolite E, Z-metabolite E, and bisphenol and their relevance for tamoxifen efficacy. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method for tamoxifen metabolites bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E as well as for the sex steroid hormones estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone. Plasma samples were subjected to protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction. Upon derivatization with 3-[(N-succinimide-1-yl)oxycarbonyl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide, all analytes were separated on a sub-2-μm column with a gradient of acetonitrile in water with 0.1 % of formic acid. Analytes were detected on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Our method demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. The lower limits of quantification were 12, 8, and 25 pM for bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E, respectively, and 4 pM for estradiol and estrogen, 50 pM for testosterone and androstenedione, and 25 pM for progesterone. The method was applied to plasma samples of postmenopausal patients taken at baseline and under tamoxifen therapy. Graphical Abstract Sample preparation and derivatization for highly sensitive quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by HPLC-MS/MS.

  3. Effect Modification of Obesity on Associations between Endogenous Steroid Sex Hormones and Arterial Calcification in Women at Midlife

    PubMed Central

    El Khoudary, Samar R.; Wildman, Rachel P.; Matthews, Karen; Powell, Lynda; Hollenberg, Steven M.; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine whether obesity modify the effects of endogenous steroid sex hormones on arterial calcification in women at midlife. Methods Associations between estradiol, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin and free androgen index and the presence and extent of coronary and aortic calcification were evaluated in 187 obese (body mass index ≥30) and 281 non-obese (body mass index <30) women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. Logistic and linear regressions were used as appropriate. Results Prevalence rates of coronary and aortic calcification were significantly higher among obese compared to non-obese (P <0.001, for both). In multivariable analyses, steroid sex hormones were not associated with presence of coronary calcification. However, for extent of coronary calcification, significant interactions were found between obesity and both sex hormone binding globulin (P<0.0001) and free androgen index (P=0.008). In non-obese women, higher sex hormone binding globulin (P=0.0006) and lower free androgen index (P=0.01) were associated with greater extent of coronary calcification while lower sex hormone binding globulin was associated with greater extent of coronary calcification in obese women (P=0.05). For aortic calcification outcomes, higher sex hormone binding globulin was associated with presence of aortic calcification among non-obese (OR:1.64, 95%CI:1.16, 2.32, for each 1-SD greater sex hormone binding globulin). Conclusions Associations between endogenous steroid sex hormones and arterial calcification vary by obesity status among perimenopausal women. Further research is needed to better understand the possible mechanisms. PMID:21471825

  4. Convergent Pathways for Steroid Hormone-and Neurotransmitter-Induced Rat Sexual Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, S. K.; Allen, J. M. C.; Clark, J. H.; Blaustein, J. D.; O'Malley, B. W.

    1994-08-01

    Estrogen and progesterone modulate gene expression in rodents by activation of intracellular receptors in the hypothalamus, which regulate neuronal networks that control female sexual behavior. However, the neurotransmitter dopamine has been shown to activate certain steroid receptors in a ligand-independent manner. A dopamine receptor stimulant and a D_1 receptor agonist, but not a D_2 receptor agonist, mimicked the effects of progesterone in facilitating sexual behavior in female rats. The facilitatory effect of the neurotransmitter was blocked by progesterone receptor antagonists, a D_1 receptor antagonist, or antisense oligonucleotides to the progesterone receptor. The results suggest that in rodents neurotransmitters may regulate in vivo gene expression and behavior by means of cross-talk with steroid receptors in the brain.

  5. Sex-steroid and thyroid hormone concentrations in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from contaminated and reference lakes in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grain, D.A.; Guillette, L.J.; Pickford, D.B.; Percival, H.F.; Woodward, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-171?? (E2), testosterone (T), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) in juvenile alligators (60-140 cm total length) from two contaminated lakes and one reference lake in Florida. First, the data were analyzed by comparing hormone concentrations among males and females from the different lakes. Whereas there were no differences in plasma E2 concentrations among animals of the three lakes, male alligators from the contaminated lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee) had significantly lower plasma T concentrations compared 10 males from the reference take (Lake Woodruff). Concentrations of thyroid hormones also differed in animals of the three lakes, with T4 concentrations being elevated in Lake Okeechobee males compared to Lake Woodruff males. Second, the relationship between body size and hormone concentration was examined using regression analysis. Most notably for steroid hormones, no clear relationship was detected between E2 and total length in Apopka females (r2 0.09, p = 0.54) or between T and total length in Apopka males (r2 = 0.007, p = 0.75). Females from Apopka (r2 = 0.318, p = 0.09) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.222, p = 0.09) exhibited weak correlations between T3 and total length. Males from Apopka (r2 = 0.015, p = 0.66) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.128, p = 0.19) showed no correlation between T4 and total length. These results indicate: some of the previously reported abnormalities in steroid hormones of hatchling alligators persist, at least, through the juvenile years; steroid and thyroid hormones are related to body size in juvenile alligators from the reference lake, whereas alligators living in lakes Apopka and Okeechobee experience alterations in circulating thyroid and steroid

  6. Offspring sex in a TSD gecko correlates with an interaction between incubation temperature and yolk steroid hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guo-Hua; Yang, Jing; Wang, Jin; Ji, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    We incubated eggs of the Japanese gecko Gekko japonicus at three temperatures, and measured yolk testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels at three time points in embryonic development (oviposition, 1/3 of incubation, and 2/3 of incubation), to examine whether maternal influence on offspring sex via yolk steroid hormone deposition is significant in the species. Eggs incubated at 24 °C and 32 °C produced mostly females, and eggs incubated at 28 °C almost a 50:50 sex ratio of hatchlings. Female-producing eggs were larger than male-producing eggs. Clutches in which eggs were incubated at the same temperature produced mostly same-sex siblings. Yolk T level at laying was negatively related to eggs mass, and yolk E2/T ratio was positively related to egg mass. Results of two-way ANOVA with incubation temperature and stage as the factors show that: yolk E2 level was higher at 32 °C than at 24 °C; yolk T level was higher, whereas yolk E2/T ratio was smaller, at 28 °C than at 24 °C; yolk E2 and T levels were higher at 2/3 than at 1/3 of incubation. Our data in G. japonucus show that: (1) maternal influence on offspring sex via yolk steroid hormone deposition is significant; (2) incubation temperature affects the dynamics of developmental changes in yolk steroid hormones; (3) influences of yolk steroid hormones on offspring sex are secondary relative to incubation temperature effects; and (4) offspring sex correlates with an interaction between incubation temperature and yolk steroid hormones.

  7. Steroid Receptor RNA Activator Stimulates Proliferation as Well as Apoptosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Rainer B.; Chua, Steven S.; Barron, Niall; Söder, Bettina M.; DeMayo, Francesco; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2003-01-01

    Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) is an RNA that coactivates steroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription in vitro. Its expression is strongly up-regulated in many human tumors of the breast, uterus, and ovary, suggesting a potential role in pathogenesis. To assess SRA function in vivo, a transgenic-mouse model was generated to enable robust human SRA expression by using the transcriptional activity of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. Transgenic SRA was expressed in the nuclei of luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland and tissues of the male accessory sex glands. Distinctive evidence for SRA function in vivo was obtained from the elevated levels of estrogen-controlled expression of progesterone receptor in transgenic mammary glands. Although overexpression of SRA showed strong promoting activities on cellular proliferation and differentiation, no alterations progressed to malignancy. Epithelial hyperplasia was accompanied by increased apoptosis, and preneoplastic lesions were cleared by focal degenerative transformations. In bitransgenic mice, SRA also antagonized ras-induced tumor formation. This work indicates that although coactivation of steroid-dependent transcription by SRA is accompanied by a proliferative response, overexpression is not in itself sufficient to induce turmorigenesis. Our results underline an intricate relationship between the different physiological roles of steroid receptors in conjunction with the RNA activator in the regulation of development, tissue homeostasis, and reproduction. PMID:14517287

  8. Effects of steroid hormones on differentiated glandular epithelial and stromal cells in a three dimensional cell culture model of the canine endometrium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oestrogens and progesterone have a significant impact on the endometrium during the canine oestrous cycle. Their receptors mediate plasma steroid hormone levels and are expressed in several endometrial cell types. Altered steroid receptor expression patterns are involved in serious uterine diseases; however the mechanisms of hormone action during pathogenesis in these tissues remain unclear. The development of 3D culture systems of canine endometrial cells provides an opportunity for the effects of steroid hormones to be quantitatively assessed in a more in vivo-like setting. The present study aimed to determine the effects of the steroid hormones 17β-estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on the expression of the oestrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR), and on proliferative activity, in a 3D co-culture system of canine uterine origin, comprising differentiated endometrial glands, and stromal cells (SCs). Results Morphology, differentiation, and apical-basolateral polarity of cultured glandular epithelial cells (GECs) were comparable to those in native uterine tissue as assessed by immunohistochemistry using differentiation markers (β-catenin, laminin), lectin histochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. Supplementation of our 3D-culture system with E (at 15, 30 and 100 pg/mL) resulted in constant levels of ER expression in GECs, but reduced expression levels in SCs. PR expression was reduced in both GECs and SCs following treatment with E. 3 ng/mL P resulted in increased ER expression in GECs, but a decrease in SCs. PR expression in GECs increased in all P-treated groups, whereas PRs in SCs decreased with the lowest and highest doses, but increased with the middle dose of treatment. Proliferative activity, assessed by Ki67 staining, remained below 1% in all assays and cell types. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the applicability of our 3D organotypic canine endometrium-derived culture system for cellular-level studies. 3D

  9. The current preference for the immuno-analytical ELISA method for quantitation of steroid hormones (endocrine disruptor compounds) in wastewater in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Manickum, Thavrin; John, Wilson

    2015-07-01

    requirements for steroid hormone quantitation. Further optimization of the sensitivity of the chemical-analytical LC-tandem mass spectrometry methods, especially for wastewater screening, in South Africa is required. Risk assessment studies showed that it was not practical to propose standards or allowable limits for the steroid estrogens E1, E2, EE2, and E3; the use of predicted-no-effect concentration values of the steroid estrogens appears to be appropriate for use in their risk assessment in relation to aquatic organisms. For raw water sources, drinking water, raw and treated wastewater, the use of bioassays, with trigger values, is a useful screening tool option to decide whether further examination of specific endocrine activity may be warranted, or whether concentrations of such activity are of low priority, with respect to health concerns in the human population. The achievement of improved quantitation limits for immuno-analytical methods, like ELISA, used for compound quantitation, and standardization of the method for measuring E2 equivalents (EEQs) used for biological activity (endocrine: e.g., estrogenic) are some areas for future EDC research.

  10. Effects of growth hormone and/or sex steroid administration on whole-body protein turnover in healthy aged women and men.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Blackman, Marc R; Herreman, Karen; Pabst, Katharine M; Harman, S Mitchell; Caballero, Benjamin

    2005-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced activities of the growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and sex steroid axes, and with decreased lean body mass and protein synthesis. Using a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design, we studied the effects of 6 months of administration of GH alone, sex hormone alone (hormone replacement therapy in women, testosterone enanthate [T] in men), or GH plus sex hormone on protein turnover in healthy men (n=60) and women (n=43), aged 65 to 88 years (mean, 71+/-4.4 years). Growth hormone administration significantly increased IGF-I levels in both sexes, more markedly in men. Sex steroid administration increased the levels of estrogen and testosterone in women and men, respectively (P=.05). Protein turnover was measured before and after the 26-week treatment period by means of a primed, constant l-[1-(13)C]leucine infusion. In men, GH plus T administration increased leucine flux from 80.2+/-2.8 to 93.6+/-4.2 micromol.h-1.kg-1 (P=.02). Leucine oxidation did not change significantly after hormone treatment in either sex. Growth hormone treatment led to nonsignificant upward trends in nonoxidative leucine disposal in men (9.1+/-5.2 mol.h-1.kg-1) and women (7.6+/-7.1 mol.h-1.kg-1). Among all groups combined, changes in nonoxidative leucine disposal were directly related to those of serum IGF-I level (r=0.248, P<.02). Whole-body protein turnover increased in GH plus T-treated men (0.6+/-0.2 g protein.kg-1.d-1; P<.01). These data suggest that low-dose GH administration increases protein synthesis in healthy aged women and men, and that the coadministration of testosterone plus GH enhances this effect in elderly men.

  11. Impact of biosolids and wastewater effluent application to agricultural land on steroidal hormone content in lettuce plants.

    PubMed

    Shargil, Dorit; Gerstl, Zev; Fine, Pinchas; Nitsan, Ido; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    One of the major concerns for human health in the past decade is the potential dangers posed by increased concentrations of steroidal hormones in soils and water. These hormones are considered to be endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), which may harm human health when exposed to high concentrations, or in the case of long term exposure to lower concentrations. In a 3 year study, two steroids, estrone and testosterone, were measured in lettuce plants irrigated with wastewater effluents and freshwater and treated with several types of biosolids. The relative contribution of the different factors, mainly irrigation water and biosolids, to the hormone levels in the lettuce plants was determined. It was found that irrigation water, which contained significant amounts of hormones, had the most substantial effect, whereas biosolids had only minor influence on hormone levels in the lettuce. The hormone levels in the plants were compared to the FDA recommendation for daily consumption in food, and were found to exceed the recommended level (when consumed by a typical individual), and therefore could have negative physiological impacts. Overall this study shows that biosolids have little effect on hormone uptake by lettuce, and it emphasizes the negative impact of irrigation water on these levels, which is of concern to public health.

  12. Prolactin, EGFR, vimentin and α-actin profiles in elderly rat prostate subjected to steroid hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Hetzl, Amanda Cia; Montico, Fabio; Kido, Larissa Akemi; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and relate the prolactin (PR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), α-actin and vimentin immunoreactivity in the prostate of elderly rats subjected to steroid hormonal imbalance. Senile and young rats were divided into the young group (YNG), the senile group (SE), the castrated group (CAS), the estrogen-deficient group (ED), the castrated+estrogen group (CASE), and the estrogen-deficient+androgen group (EDTEST). PR and EGFR increased in the estrogen and androgen ablation groups. In addition, EGFR influenced the immunolocalization by changing it from the prostatic stroma to the epithelium in elderly rats. Hormone ablation in elderly rats, not only related to androgen but also estrogen, led to increased stromal EGFR immunolocalization. The α-actin pattern decreased in the groups with estrogenic imbalance. Moreover, vimentin increased in the senile and estrogen deficient group. To conclude, we can suggest that EGFR contributed towards the proliferative process in the prostate, by means however, of different mechanisms, considering the androgenic and estrogenic pathways. Also, our results indicated that prolactin could be activated not only in an androgen-independent pathway but also in an estrogen independent pathway. Finally, PR and vimentin immunolocalization increase, in the prostatic stroma in the group showing estrogenic ablation, could be one of the factors which contribute to the reactive stroma formation.

  13. Linking physiological approaches to marine vertebrate conservation: using sex steroid hormone determinations in demographic assessments.

    PubMed

    Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Mangel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sex, age and sexual maturation are key biological parameters for aspects of life history and are fundamental information for assessing demographic changes and the reproductive viability and performance of natural populations under exploitation pressures or in response to environmental influences. Much of the information available on the reproductive condition, length at sexual maturity and sex determinations of endangered species has been derived from direct examination of the gonads in dead animals, either intentionally or incidentally caught, or from stranded individuals. However, morphological data, when used alone, do not provide accurate demographic information in sexually monomorphic marine vertebrate species (e.g. sharks, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans). Hormone determination is an accurate and non-destructive method that provides indirect information about sex, reproductive condition and sexual maturity of free-ranging individuals. Correlations between sex steroid concentrations and biochemical parameters, gonadal development and state, reproductive behaviour and secondary external features have been already demonstrated in many species. Different non-lethal approaches (e.g. surgical and mark-recapture procedures), with intrinsic advantages and disadvantages when applied on free-ranging organisms, have been proposed to asses sex, growth and reproductive condition. Hormone determination from blood samples will generate valuable additional demographic information needed for stock assessment and biological conservation.

  14. Differentiating Isobaric Steroid Hormone Metabolites Using Multi-Stage Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedmon, Lauren; Barnes, Jeremy S.; Nguyen, Hien P.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2013-03-01

    Steroid hormones and their metabolites are currently undergoing clinical trials as potential therapeutics for traumatic brain injury (TBI). To support this work, it is necessary to develop improved procedures for differentiating isobaric species in this compound class. Equilin sulfate (E-S), estrone sulfate (E1-S), 17α-dihydroequilin sulfate (ADHE-S), and 17β-dihydroequilin sulfate (BDHE-S) are primary constituents in hormone replacement therapies, such as Premarin, which are among pharmaceuticals being investigated for TBI treatment. The latter three compounds are isomers and can be difficult to differentiate in trace analytical determinations. In this work, a systematic study of the fragmentation of ADHE-S, BDHE-S, E1-S, and E-S under different stages of higher order tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) and variation of collision energy, allowed optimization of conditions for distinguishing the isomeric structures. For epimeric variants (e.g., ADHE-S versus BDHE-S; α- versus β-stereoisomerization in the C-17 position), differentiation was achieved at MS4 and fragmentation was demonstrated through MS5. Computational analysis was performed to further explore differences in the fragmentation pathways due to changes in stereochemistry.

  15. Persistent organic contaminants and steroid hormones levels in Morelet's crocodiles from the Southern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Jauregui, Mauricio; Valdespino, Carolina; Salame-Méndez, Arturo; Aguirre-León, Gustavo; Rendón-Vonosten, Jaime

    2012-04-01

    Effects of endocrine disruptors on reproductive variables of top predators, such as alligators and crocodiles, have long been cited. Due to their long life span, these predators provide us with historic contaminant annals. In this study we tried to test whether lifestyle (free-ranging vs. farm animals) and reproductive age of Morelet's crocodiles in Campeche, Mexico, affect the bioaccumulation of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Subsequently, we tested to see whether their concentration was related to steroid hormones (testosterone and estradiol-17β) levels once normal cyclic hormone variation and reproductive age had been taken into account. From the group of contaminants considered (analyzed as families), only frequency of hexachlorocyclohexanes (∑HCH) and ∑PCB permitted analyses. Whereas there was a greater concentration of ∑HCH bioaccumulated by free-ranging crocodiles, ∑PCB was found in equal quantities in free-ranging and farm animals. No difference was observed in relation to reproductive age for any of the contaminants. However, ∑PCB concentrations were related to testosterone levels among female crocodiles. This androgenic effect of ∑PCB has not been reported previously. Because testosterone promotes aggressive behavior in vertebrates, excessive aggression during the estrous season, or when female crocodiles should be caring for their young, could result in reproductive failure in Morelet's crocodiles and potential long-term decline of the population.

  16. Functional interaction of hybrid response elements with wild-type and mutant steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Truss, M; Chalepakis, G; Slater, E P; Mader, S; Beato, M

    1991-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can be divided into two subfamilies according to the structure of their DNA binding domains and the nucleotide sequences which they recognize. The glucocorticoid receptor and the progesterone receptor (PR) recognize an imperfect palindrome (glucocorticoid responsive element/progesterone responsive element [GRE/PRE]) with the conserved half-sequence TGTYCY, whereas the estrogen receptor (ER) recognizes a palindrome (estrogen responsive element) with the half-sequence TGACC. A series of symmetric and asymmetric variants of these hormone responsive elements (HREs) have been tested for receptor binding and for the ability to mediate induction in vivo. High-resolution analysis demonstrates that the overall number and distribution of contacts with the N-7 position of guanines and with the phosphate backbone of various HREs are quite similar for PR and ER. However, PR and glucocorticoid receptor, but not ER, are able to contact the 5'-methyl group of thymines found in position 3 of HREs, as shown by potassium permanganate interference. The ER mutant HE84, which contains a single amino acid exchange, Glu-203 to Gly, in the knuckle of ER, creates a promiscuous ER that is able to bind to GRE/PREs by contacting this thymine. Elements with the sequence GGTCAcagTGTYCT that represent hybrids between an estrogen response element and a GRE/PRE respond to estrogens, glucocorticoids, and progestins in vivo and bind all three wild-type receptors in vitro. These hybrid HREs could serve to confer promiscuous gene regulation. Images PMID:2038329

  17. Linking physiological approaches to marine vertebrate conservation: using sex steroid hormone determinations in demographic assessments

    PubMed Central

    Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Mangel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sex, age and sexual maturation are key biological parameters for aspects of life history and are fundamental information for assessing demographic changes and the reproductive viability and performance of natural populations under exploitation pressures or in response to environmental influences. Much of the information available on the reproductive condition, length at sexual maturity and sex determinations of endangered species has been derived from direct examination of the gonads in dead animals, either intentionally or incidentally caught, or from stranded individuals. However, morphological data, when used alone, do not provide accurate demographic information in sexually monomorphic marine vertebrate species (e.g. sharks, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans). Hormone determination is an accurate and non-destructive method that provides indirect information about sex, reproductive condition and sexual maturity of free-ranging individuals. Correlations between sex steroid concentrations and biochemical parameters, gonadal development and state, reproductive behaviour and secondary external features have been already demonstrated in many species. Different non-lethal approaches (e.g. surgical and mark–recapture procedures), with intrinsic advantages and disadvantages when applied on free-ranging organisms, have been proposed to asses sex, growth and reproductive condition. Hormone determination from blood samples will generate valuable additional demographic information needed for stock assessment and biological conservation. PMID:27293619

  18. Steroid hormones and the Luftwaffe. A venture into fundamental strategic research and some of its consequences: the Birch reduction becomes a birth reduction.

    PubMed

    Birch, A J

    1992-08-01

    I recount my involvement in the development of biologically active, totally synthetic steroid hormones since 1941. The reasons for my approach to the first total synthesis of a potent androgen are given. I touch on the even more important general synthetic outcomes from ideas generated by the search for useful amounts of a cortically active hormone, such as novel angular methylations, partial hydrogenations of aromatic systems (Birch reductions), and novel usages in synthesis based on the unique structures so generated. The Birch process was critical for synthesis of the first oral contraceptives. A need to explain the structures of Birch reduction products and the experimental requirements resulted in further elucidations of the mechanism of reduction processes, notably for aromatic compounds. The first theoretical and practical distinction between structures of products as determined by a reaction rate or an equilibrium position was first exploited experimentally in the deconjugation of cholest-4-en-3-one in the final step of the first facile total synthesis of cholesterol. A knowledge gained of the biosynthesis of steroids and its specific enzymes helped to initiate my general polyketide theory of biosynthesis and also my idea of outdoing enzyme achievements with organometallic complexes ("inorganic enzyme chemistry"). I assert the high historic importance of steroids in promoting the advance of general organic chemistry within many fields.

  19. Smartphone-based colorimetric ELISA implementation for determination of women's reproductive steroid hormone profiles.

    PubMed

    Ogirala, Tejaswi; Eapen, Ashley; Salvante, Katrina G; Rapaport, Tomas; Nepomnaschy, Pablo A; Parameswaran, Ash M

    2017-01-12

    Biologists frequently collect and analyze biospecimens in naturalistic (i.e., field) conditions to ascertain information regarding the physiological status of their study participants. Generally, field-collected biospecimens need to be stored frozen in the field and then transported frozen to laboratory facilities where traditional biomarker assays, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), are conducted. As proper storage and transport of frozen specimens is often logistically difficult and expensive, particularly in nonurban field settings, methods that reduce the need for specimen storage and transport would benefit field-research dependent disciplines such as biology, ecology and epidemiology. One limiting factor to running assays in the field is the use of large and expensive equipment to visualize and quantify the assays, such as microplate readers. Here, we describe an implementation of colorimetric ELISA visualization and quantification using two novel and portable imaging instrumentation systems and data processing techniques for the determination of women's reproductive steroid hormone profiles. Using the light absorbance and transmittance properties of the chemical compounds that make up the hormone assay, we were able to estimate unknown hormone concentrations using a smartphone system and a webcam system. These estimates were comparable to those from a standard laboratory multiple reader (smartphone: accuracy = 82.20%, R (2) > 0.910; webcam: accuracy = 87.59%, R (2) > 0.942). This line of applied research, in the long run, is expected to provide necessary information for examining the extent to which reproductive function varies within and between populations and how it is influenced by psychosocial, energetic and environmental challenges. Our validation of these novel, portable visualization and quantification systems allows for the eventual development of a compact and economical closed system which can be used to quantify

  20. Ovarian steroidogenesis and the role of sex steroid hormones on ovarian growth and maturation of the Japanese eel.

    PubMed

    Kazeto, Yukinori; Tosaka, Ryota; Matsubara, Hajime; Ijiri, Shigeho; Adachi, Shinji

    2011-11-01

    Three sex steroid hormones, estradiol-17β (E2), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), and 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), are well established as primary estrogen, androgen, and progestin, respectively, in teleost fish. Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica, would be a suitable candidate to study ovarian steroid physiology of fish because the ovarian growth and steroidogenesis is dormant under laboratory condition but can be induced by administration of exogenous gonadotropic reagents. In this review, we summarized our work on the function and production of sex steroid hormones in the ovary of the Japanese eel during ovarian growth and oocyte maturation artificially induced by treatment with extract of salmon pituitary. In vitro and in vivo assays suggest that 11-KT and E2 play primary roles in previtellogenic and vitellogenic growth of oocytes, respectively, whereas DHP is essential for induction of final oocyte maturation. We also reviewed the correlation between ovarian steroidogenesis to produce these sex steroid hormones, serum titers and gene expression.

  1. Steroid toxicity and detoxification in ascomycetous fungi.

    PubMed

    Cvelbar, Damjana; Zist, Vanja; Kobal, Katja; Zigon, Dušan; Zakelj-Mavrič, Marija

    2013-02-25

    In the last couple of decades fungal infections have become a significant clinical problem. A major interest into fungal steroid action has been provoked since research has proven that steroid hormones are toxic to fungi and affect the host/fungus relationship. Steroid hormones were found to differ in their antifungal activity in ascomycetous fungi Hortaea werneckii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus oryzae. Dehydroepiandrosterone was shown to be the strongest inhibitor of growth in all three varieties of fungi followed by androstenedione and testosterone. For their protection, fungi use several mechanisms to lower the toxic effects of steroids. The efficiency of biotransformation in detoxification depended on the microorganism and steroid substrate used. Biotransformation was a relatively slow process as it also depended on the growth phase of the fungus. In addition to biotransformation, steroid extrusion out of the cells contributed to the lowering of the active intracellular steroid concentration. Plasma membrane Pdr5 transporter was found to be the most effective, followed by Snq2 transporter and vacuolar transporters Ybt1 and Ycf1. Proteins Aus1 and Dan1 were not found to be involved in steroid import. The research of possible targets of steroid hormone action in fungi suggests that steroid hormones inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae and H. werneckii. Results of this inhibition caused changes in the sterol content of the cellular membrane. The presence of steroid hormones most probably causes the degradation of the Tat2 permease and impairment of tryptophan import.

  2. Reproductive activity in the peninsular pronghorn determined from excreted gonadal steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Holland, Jeff; Eng, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Fecal hormone monitoring was employed to better define annual patterns of reproductive steroid metabolites from a breeding pair of peninsular pronghorn (Antilocapra americana peninsularis) maintained at the Los Angeles Zoo. Notably in the female, increased excretion of estrogen metabolites occurred during the breeding season (Jun-Aug), and a biphasic pattern in progestagen activity was measured during gestation. Of additional interest, a preterm increase in estrogen that continued for an additional 64 days post partum. Male androgen activity correlated with the female estrogen patterns, with a single successful copulation occurring during the breeding season; interestingly however, the male exhibited no reproductive behaviors during the female's preterm/post partum estrogen increase. These data are the first reproductive steroid profiles for the peninsular pronghorn and provide valuable insight that will aid efforts that link the species' reproductive physiology with conservation management.

  3. Immunocytochemical Localization of Sex Steroid Hormone Receptors in Normal Human Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sijie; Han, Bing; Liu, Guojin; Li, Songyun; Ouellet, Johanne; Labrie, Fernand; Pelletier, Georges

    2010-01-01

    The sex steroids, estrogens, progesterone, and androgens, all play a role in mammary development and function. To precisely identify the sites of action of these steroids, we studied the localization of the estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ, the progesterone receptor A (PRA) and PRB, and androgen receptors (AR) in the normal human mammary gland. Immunocytochemical localization of ERα, ERβ, PRA, PRB, and AR was performed with reduction mammoplasty specimens from premenopausal women. ERα, PRA, PRB, and AR were localized mostly to the inner layer of epithelial cells lining acini and intralobular ducts, as well as to myoepithelial cells scattered in the external layer of interlobular ducts. AR was also found in some stromal cells. ERβ staining was more widespread, resulting in epithelial and myoepithelial cells being labeled in acini and ducts as well as stromal cells. These results suggest that all sex steroids can directly act on epithelial cells to modulate development and function of the human mammary gland. Estrogens and androgens can also indirectly influence epithelial cell activity by an action on stromal cells. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:509–515, 2010) PMID:20026671

  4. Ovarian steroid hormones modulate the expression of progesterone receptors and histone acetylation patterns in uterine leiomyoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Gabriela Dos Santos; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Branchini, Gisele; Pizzolato, Lolita Schneider; Capp, Edison; Corleta, Helena von Eye

    2017-03-16

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign smooth muscle cell tumors in women. Estrogen (E2), progesterone (P4) and environmental factors play important roles in the development of these tumors. New treatments, such as mifepristone, have been proposed. We evaluated the gene expression of total (PRT) and B (PRB) progesterone receptors, and the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase (HDAC) activity after treatment with E2, P4 and mifepristone (RU486) in primary cell cultures from uterine leiomyoma and normal myometrium. Compared to myometrium, uterine leiomyoma cells showed an increase in PRT mRNA expression when treated with E2, and increase in PRB mRNA expression when treated with E2 and P4. Treatment with mifepristone had no significant impact on mRNA expression in these cells. The HDAC activity was higher in uterine leiomyoma compared to myometrial cells after treatment with E2 and E2 + P4 + mifepristone. HAT activity was barely detectable. Our results suggest that ovarian steroid hormones modulate PR, and mifepristone was unable to decrease PRT and PRB mRNA. The higher activity of HDAC leiomyoma cells could be involved in transcriptional repression of genes implicated in normal myometrium cell function, contributing to the maintenance and growth of uterine leiomyoma.

  5. Interactions of xenobiotics with steroid hormone receptors and the sex-steroid binding protein in spotted seatrout

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.; Ghosh, S.; Pinter, J.; Sperry, T.; Breckenridge-Miller, D.; Laidley, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    A variety of xenobiotics, such as DDT, methoxychlor and PCB mixtures and Kepone have estrogenic actions and disrupt reproduction in mammals by binding to nuclear estrogen receptors (ER). These xenobiotics were tested for their ability to bind to the hepatic ER of a marine fish, spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus). Several of the DDT derivatives, Kepone and PCB mixtures also bound to the seatrout ER over a range of 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}3}M. Moreover, Kepone was shown to have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic actions in an in vitro liver slice vitellogenesis assay. These estrogenic compounds were also tested for their ability to bind to nuclear and plasma membrane progestogen (20{beta}-S) receptors in ovarian tissues and to the sex-steroid binding protein in seatrout plasma. Kepone, methoxychlor and o,p{prime}-DDT caused concentration dependent displacement of {sup 3}H2O{beta}-S from its plasma membrane receptor and inhibition of 20{beta}-S induced final maturation in an in vitro assay over the range of 10{sup {minus}7}--10{sup {minus}3}M, but did not alter steroid binding to the nuclear progestogen receptor. Significant binding of methoxychlor and the other organochlorines to the sex steroid binding protein was also observed. It is concluded from these studies that a variety of xenobiotics with estrogenic actions can also bind to other steroid receptors and binding proteins to influence other endocrine-mediated processes.

  6. Ovarian activity in the scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) determined by faecal steroid analysis.

    PubMed

    Morrow, C J; Monfort, S L

    1998-10-01

    Ultrasonography and radioimmunoassay (RIA) of serum oestradiol-17beta, luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone, and faecal oestrogen and progestin was used to assess ovarian activity in the scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah). Ovarian examination using ultrasonography revealed maximal follicle and corpus luteum (CL) diameters of 15 and 32 mm, respectively. Steroid hormone metabolite distribution among individual faecal pellets within the same defaecation was relatively homogeneous with coefficients of variation averaging 10.2+/-1.8% and 16.2+/-4.6% for oestrogens and progestins, respectively. Elevated faecal oestrogen concentrations were associated with large (> 10 mm) antral follicles detected by ultrasonography. Periovulatory peaks in faecal oestrogen excretion, coincident with nadirs in progestin excretion, were detected in three females. Faecal progestin excretion exhibited a similar temporal pattern to serum progesterone concentrations, with a time lag of approximately 16 h. Faecal progestin concentrations corresponded with the presence of functional CL and proved useful for monitoring luteal function, spontaneous and prostaglandin-F2alpha analogue-induced luteolysis and anovulation. In summary, faecal steroid monitoring is a practical, noninvasive method for characterising ovarian steroid excretion and has potential for facilitating the application of assisted reproductive technologies in scimitar-horned oryx.

  7. Steroidobacter denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov., a steroidal hormone-degrading gammaproteobacterium.

    PubMed

    Fahrbach, Michael; Kuever, Jan; Remesch, Markko; Huber, Birgit E; Kämpfer, Peter; Dott, Wolfgang; Hollender, Juliane

    2008-09-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, designated strain FS(T), was isolated from anoxic digested sludge on oestradiol [17beta-oestra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17-diol] or testosterone (17beta-hydroxyandrost-4-en-3-one) as the sole source of carbon and energy with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Strain FS(T) represents the first known bacterium to grow anaerobically on both oestradiol (C-18) and testosterone (C-19). Steroidal hormones were degraded completely by nitrate reduction to dinitrogen monoxide, which was further reduced to dinitrogen in stationary-phase cultures. Gram-negative cells were slightly curved rods, 0.3-0.5 x 0.6-1.6 microm in size, motile, non-fermentative, non-spore-forming and catalase- and oxidase-positive, showing optimal growth at pH 7.0, 28 degrees C and 0.1% (w/v) NaCl. Beside steroidal hormones, the bacterium utilized only a narrow range of organic substrates with nitrate as the electron acceptor, including several fatty acids and glutamate. No aerobic or anaerobic growth occurred on liquid or solid complex media. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain FS(T) has no known close relatives and represents a distinct lineage within the Gammaproteobacteria. Together with the genera Nevskia, Hydrocarboniphaga, Solimonas and Sinobacter (less than 88% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to strain FS(T)), it forms a phylogenetic cluster separated from the families Chromatiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae and Xanthomonadaceae. The quinone system of strain FS(T) consisted exclusively of ubiquinone Q-8. The dominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Spermidine in combination with putrescine and traces of sym-homospermidine were the basic polyamines. The major fatty acids detected in testosterone- or heptanoate-grown cells were C(15:0) and C(17:1)omega8c, minor hydroxylated fatty acids were C(11:0) 3-OH and C(12:0) 3-OH. The G+C content of the DNA was 61.9 mol%. Based on the high 16S rRNA gene sequence

  8. Aspects of the steroid response in fungi.

    PubMed

    Cresnar, Bronislava; Zakelj-Mavric, Marija

    2009-03-16

    The number of fungal infections is increasing due to higher numbers of immunocompromised patients. Unfortunately, drug resistance represents a major additional problem in clinical praxis. Therefore factors contributing to infection by opportunistic pathogens, and to their growth and drug resistance are of major importance. It has been known for some time that mammalian steroid hormones are toxic to fungi. In this paper the response of fungi to the presence of steroid hormones will be discussed at different levels. First, the effect of steroid hormones on fungal growth, morphology and virulence will be considered. Processes affecting steroid intracellular concentration will be discussed; steroid uptake and, even more, steroid extrusion are currently of special interest. The role of biotransformation in the detoxification of active steroids will be taken into consideration and phases of steroid metabolism in fungal cells will be compared to phases of classical xenobiotic metabolism. Steroid signaling in fungi is presently not yet clear. It results in a global response of fungi to steroid hormones. Some of the genes differentially expressed in fungi as the result of exposure to steroid hormones may contribute to fungal drug resistance.

  9. Building a better hormone therapy? How understanding the rapid effects of sex steroid hormones could lead to new therapeutics for age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Frick, Karyn M

    2012-02-01

    A wealth of data collected in recent decades has demonstrated that ovarian sex-steroid hormones, particularly 17β-estradiol (E2), are important trophic factors that regulate the function of cognitive regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. The loss of hormone cycling at menopause is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in women, and the onset of memory decline in animal models. However, hormone therapy is not currently recommended to prevent or treat cognitive decline, in part because of its detrimental side effects. In this article, it is proposed that investigations of the rapid effects of E2 on hippocampal function be used to further the design of new drugs that mimic the beneficial effects of E2 on memory without the side effects of current therapies. A conceptual model is presented for elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms through which sex-steroid hormones modulate memory, and a specific hypothesis is proposed to account for the rapid memory-enhancing effects of E2. Empirical support for this hypothesis is discussed as a means of stimulating the consideration of new directions for the development of hormone-based therapies to preserve memory function in menopausal women.

  10. Therapeutic uses of contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Starks, G C

    1984-09-01

    During the past 20 years, contraceptive steroids have undergone significant changes as the result of an increased understanding of their metabolic, pharmacologic, and hormonal activities. During this time, prospective and retrospective epidemiologic studies have elucidated several noncontraceptive health benefits of oral contraceptive steroids, including their therapeutic effects for endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, polycystic ovarian disease, and benign breast disease. From this review it appears that the benefits of oral contraceptive steroids in young, healthy, nonsmoking women far outweigh their more publicized, infrequent risks.

  11. Bisphenol A Exposure, Ovarian Follicle Numbers, and Female Sex Steroid Hormone Levels: Results from a CLARITY-BPA Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Brehm, Emily; Gao, Liying; Rattan, Saniya; Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Flaws, Jodi A

    2017-03-16

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical found in thermal receipts, and food and beverage containers. Previous studies have shown that BPA can affect the numbers and health of ovarian follicles and the production of sex steroid hormones, but they often did not include a wide-range of doses of BPA, used a small sample size, focused on relatively short-term exposures to BPA, and/or did not examine the consequences of chronic BPA exposure on the ovaries or steroid levels. Thus, this study was designed to examine the effects of a wide range of doses of BPA on ovarian morphology and sex steroid hormone production. Specifically, this study tested the hypothesis that prenatal and continuous BPA exposure reduces ovarian follicle numbers and sex steroid hormone levels. To test this hypothesis, rats were dosed with vehicle, ethinyl estradiol (0.05 and 0.5 μg/kg bw/day), or BPA (2.5, 25, 250, 2,500, and 25,000 μg/kg bw/day) from gestation day 6 until 1 year as part of the Consortium Linking Academic and Regulatory Insights on BPA Toxicity (CLARITY-BPA). Ovaries and sera were collected on postnatal days 1, 21, 90, 6 months, and 1 year. The ovaries were subjected to histological evaluation of follicle numbers and the sera subjected to measurements of estradiol and progesterone. Collectively, these data indicate that BPA exposure at some doses and time-points affects ovarian follicle numbers and sex steroid levels, but these effects are different than those observed with ethinyl estradiol exposure and some previous studies on BPA.

  12. Steroid hormones and aggression in female Galápagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Dustin R; Wikelski, Martin

    2005-09-01

    We studied steroid hormone patterns and aggression during breeding in female Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Females display vigorously towards courting males after copulating (female-male aggression), as well as fight for and defend nest sites against other females (female-female aggression). To understand the neuroendocrine basis of this aggressive behavior, we examined changes in testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), corticosterone (CORT), and progesterone (P4) during the mating and nesting periods, and then measured levels in nesting females captured during aggressive interactions. Testosterone reached maximal levels during the mating stage when female-male aggression was most common, and increased slightly, but significantly, during the nesting stage when female-female aggression was most common. However, fighting females had significantly lower T, but higher E2 and P4, than non-fighting females. It remains unclear whether these changes in hormone levels during aggressive interactions are a cause or a consequence of a change in behavior. Our results support the "challenge hypothesis", but suggest that E2 and/or P4 may increase in response to aggressive challenges in females just as T does in males. Females may be rapidly aromatizing T to elevate circulating levels of E2 during aggressive interactions. This hypothesis could explain why non-fighting females had slightly elevated baseline T, but extremely low E2, during stages when aggressive interactions were most common. Although P4 increased rapidly during aggressive encounters, it is unclear whether it acts directly to affect behavior, or indirectly via conversion to E2. The rapid production and conversion of E2 and P4 may be an important mechanism underlying female aggression in vertebrates.

  13. Comparative effects of daily and weekly boron supplementation on plasma steroid hormones and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Mofid, Mahmoud; Asgari, Ali Reza; Hedayati, Mehdi; Daneshpour, Maryam-Saddat

    2011-01-01

    Boron possesses widespread properties in biochemistry and nutrition. Acute supplementation with 11.6 mg of boron resulted in a significant increase in plasma boron concentration. Given such a fast bioavailability, the objective was to determine whether acute (hourly or daily), and weekly supplementation could have any significant biological effects on the steroid hormones and further on some inflammatory biomarkers. Eight healthy male volunteers attended the laboratory on three occasions (days 0, 1 and 7). On the first day (day 0), a blood sample collection at 8.00 A.M was followed by ingestion of placebo with the breakfast. On the next day (supplementation-day 1), similar procedure was followed by ingestion of a capsule containing 10mg of boron. On both occasions blood was collected every 2h for the next 6h. Subjects were requested to consume a capsule of 10mg boron every day with their breakfast, and on the day 7, the blood collection was carried out at 8.00 A.M, again. Boron in plasma increased significantly following hours and weekly consumption. Six hours supplementation showed a significant decrease on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), high sensitive CRP (hsCRP) and TNF-α level. After one week (in samples taken at 8.00 A.M, only), the mean plasma free testosterone increased and the mean plasma estradiol decreased significantly. Dihydrotestosterone, cortisol and vitamin D was elevated. Also, concentrations of all three inflammatory biomarkers decreased after supplementation. Of note, despite decreased proinflammatory cytokines, based on recent clinical data, this must be the first human study report to show an increase level of free testosterone after boron consumption.

  14. Effects of a diet regimen on pituitary and steroid hormones in male ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Tegelman, R; Aberg, T; Pousette, A; Carlström, K

    1992-07-01

    Serum concentrations of androgens, cortisol, androgen binding proteins, pituitary hormones, together with anthropometric variables and sports performance were studied in two different elite male ice hockey teams. One of the teams (DIF, n = 22) participated in a special dietary program including reduction in fat from approximately 40 per cent of total energy intake (E%) to less than 30 E% and an increase in carbohydrate intake from 45 E% to about 55 E%, while the other (SSK, n = 21) served as a control group and had no special dietary program. The study covered a 7-month period. Basal values of serum testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), non-SHBG-bound testosterone (NST), cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS) and LH did not differ between the two teams. Serum concentrations of testosterone, SHBG, NST and cortisol increased significantly during the study period in the DIF group and were, with the exception of SHBG, significantly higher than in the SSK group at the end of the study (33.0 vs 26.8 nmol/l, p less than 0.05; 22.5 vs 18.3 nmol/l, p less than 0.05; and 548 vs 464 nmol/l, p less than 0.01). The ratio between NST and cortisol which was used as an index of anabolic/catabolic steroid balance did not change in either group during the study. A significant decrease in the serum concentrations of LH during the observation period was found in the SSK group. The endocrine differences between the teams may be explained by a relative negative energy balance in DIF, together with a reduced fat and increased carbohydrate intake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Expression of Sex Steroid Hormone Receptors in Vagal Motor Neurons Innervating the Trachea and Esophagus in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Ichi Matsuda, Ken; Bando, Hideki; Takanami, Keiko; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The medullary vagal motor nuclei, the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), innervate the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα), in relation to innervation of the trachea and esophagus via vagal motor nuclei in mice. AR and ERα were expressed in the rostral NA and in part of the DMV. Tracing experiments using cholera toxin B subunit demonstrated that neurons of vagal motor nuclei that innervate the trachea and esophagus express AR and ERα. There was no difference in expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between trachea- and esophagus-innervating neurons. These results suggest that sex steroid hormones may act on vagal motor nuclei via their receptors, thereby regulating functions of the trachea and esophagus. PMID:27006520

  16. DEHP (DI-N-ETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE), WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION, INDUCES DOSE DEPENDENT DECREASES IN FETAL TESTIS GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEHP (di-n-ethylhexyl phthalate), when administered during sexual differentiation, induces dose dependent decreases in fetal testis gene expression and steroid hormone synthesis.
    Vickie S. Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Kathy Bobseine, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, and ...

  17. Steroid hormone effects on intercellular communication between term pregnant human myometrial cells before labor.

    PubMed

    Ciray, H N; Bäckström, T; Ulmsten, U; Roomans, G M

    1996-08-01

    The appearance of gap junctions (GJs) between myometrial smooth muscle cells is one of the major events associated with the onset of labor. We have employed dye-coupling and electrical-current injection techniques to study the mechanisms by which steroid hormones regulate GJs in term pregnant myometrium of women before labor. Progesterone (P4) did not alter the input resistance (Ro) of the tissues when added to Tyrode's solution, which was used as control treatment. Octanol, the putative gap junctional uncoupling agent, increased the Ro of the cells compared to the control and P4-treated groups. The membrane potential (Em) did not differ between these groups. However, when P4 was applied after the tissue was perfused with estradiol (E2), the results changed dramatically: the Em hyperpolarized, and the Ro increased. Octanol increased the Ro in E2-treated tissues, but did not affect the Em. Consecutive application of E2, octanol, E2, and P4 resulted in rapid changes in the Ro of the cells. Dye-coupling was mostly detected between cells from controls and E2-treated tissues. These results indicate that P4 exerts its effects in the presence of E2 and that P4 has rapid effects on the intercellular communication between human myometrial cells.

  18. Isoform/variant mRNAs for sex steroid hormone receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shuji; Shoda, Tomoko; Kato, Junzo; Hoshi, Kazuhiko

    2003-04-01

    The open reading frames of human sex steroid hormone receptors (hSSHRs) are composed of eight exons. In addition, the presence of various exons - including 5'-untranslated exons, alternative coding exons and novel 'intronic' exons - has been demonstrated in the genes encoding hSSHRs. The isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs generated from thes e exons can be tentatively classified into seven types. In type 1, different mRNAs are generated with the use of alternative transcription start sites. In type 2, one or more exons are skipped. In type 3, one or more exons are duplicated. In type 4, distinct mRNAs containing different 5'-untranslated exon(s) are synthesized. In type 5, distinct mRNAs possessing different coding exon(s) are generated. In type 6, mRNA is synthesized by intronic exons and coding exons 4/5-8. In type 7, mRNA with insertion of intronic exon(s) is generated. Here, we review the isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs and the structure of the genes encoding them.

  19. Variation in steroid hormone levels among Caribbean Anolis lizards: endocrine system convergence?

    PubMed

    Husak, Jerry F; Lovern, Matthew B

    2014-04-01

    Variation in aggression among species can be due to a number of proximate and ultimate factors, leading to patterns of divergent and convergent evolution of behavior among even closely related species. Caribbean Anolis lizards are well known for their convergence in microhabitat use and morphology, but they also display marked convergence in social behavior and patterns of aggression. We studied 18 Anolis species across six ecomorphs on four different Caribbean islands to test four main hypotheses. We hypothesized that species differences in aggression would be due to species differences in circulating testosterone (T), a steroid hormone implicated in numerous studies across vertebrate taxa as a primary determinant of social behavior; more aggressive species were expected to have higher baseline concentrations of T and corticosterone. We further hypothesized that low-T species would increase T and corticosterone levels during a social challenge. Within three of the four island assemblages studied we found differences in T levels among species within an island that differ in aggression, but in the opposite pattern than predicted: more aggressive species had lower baseline T than the least aggressive species. The fourth island, Puerto Rico, showed the pattern of baseline T levels among species we predicted. There were no patterns of corticosterone levels among species or ecomorphs. One of the two species tested increased T in response to a social challenge, but neither species elevated corticosterone. Our results suggest that it is possible for similarities in aggression among closely related species to evolve via different proximate mechanisms.

  20. Is a sex-determining gene(s) necessary for sex-determination in amphibians? Steroid hormones may be the key factor.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians have 2 genetic sex-determining systems, one with male (XX/XY) and one with female (ZZ/ZW) heterogamety. While the ancestral state of sex-determination is thought to be female heterogamety, male and female heterogametic types were probably once interchangeable. The Japanese frog Rana rugosa has both XX/XY and ZZ/ZW systems within a single species in certain local populations. However, steroid hormones can alter the phenotypic sex epigenetically. In R. rugosa, steroidogenic enzyme expression starts before sex-determination in the indifferent gonad, and these enzymes become active in both male and female tadpoles. Androgens are produced in the indifferent gonad of male tadpoles at high levels, whereas estrogens are synthesized in females. In this regard, the observed enhanced expression of the hormone-metabolizing genes, CYP19 in the female gonad and CYP17 in males, may be crucial for sex-determination. Moreover, with FSH known to increase estrogen synthesis in the vertebrate ovary, observed upregulation of FSH receptor (FSHR) expression in the indifferent gonad of female tadpoles is intriguing. These data suggest that steroid hormones could be crucial for sex-determination in R. rugosa, with the consequence that upregulation of CYP19 and FSHR expression is necessary for female and CYP17 for male sex-determination.

  1. Interplay between steroid signalling and microRNAs: implications for hormone-dependent cancers.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Claire E; Dart, D Alwyn; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2014-10-01

    Hormones are key drivers of cancer development. To date, interest has largely been focussed on the classical model of hormonal gene regulation, but there is increasing evidence for a role of hormone signalling pathways in post-translational regulation of gene expression. In particular, a complex and dynamic network of bi-directional interactions with microRNAs (miRs) at all stages of biogenesis and during target gene repression is emerging. miRs, which act mainly by negatively regulating gene expression through association with 3'-UTRs of mRNA species, are increasingly understood to be important in development, normal physiology and pathogenesis. Given recent demonstrations of altered miR profiles in a diverse range of cancers, their ability to function as oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and hormonal regulation of miRs, understanding mechanisms by which miRs are generated and regulated is vitally important. miRs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and then processed in the nucleus by the Drosha-containing Microprocessor complex and in the cytoplasm by Dicer, before mature miRs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex. It is increasingly evident that multiple cellular signalling pathways converge upon the miR biogenesis cascade, adding further layers of regulatory complexity to modulate miR maturation. This review summarises recent advances in identification of novel components and regulators of the Microprocessor and Dicer complexes, with particular emphasis on the role of hormone signalling pathways in regulating their activity. Understanding hormone regulation of miR production and how this is perturbed in cancer are critical for the development of miR-based therapeutics and biomarkers.

  2. Organizational and activational effects of sex steroids on kisspeptin neuron development

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Matthew C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Kisspeptin, encoded by the Kiss1 gene, is a neuropeptide required for puberty and adult reproductive function. Understanding the regulation and development of the kisspeptin system provides valuable knowledge about the physiology of puberty and adult fertility, and may provide insights into human pubertal or reproductive disorders. Recent studies, particularly in rodent models, have assessed how kisspeptin neurons develop and how hormonal and non-hormonal factors regulate this developmental process. Exposure to sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) during critical periods of development can induce organizational (permanent) effects on kisspeptin neuron development, with respect to both sexually dimorphic and non-sexually dimorphic aspects of kisspeptin biology. In addition, sex steroids can also impart activational (temporary) effects on kisspeptin neurons and Kiss1 gene expression at various times during neonatal and peripubertal development, as they do in adulthood. Here, we discuss the current knowledge—and in some cases, lack thereof—of the influence of hormones and other factors on kisspeptin neuronal development. PMID:22728025

  3. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 terminates G-protein-coupled receptor function in steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Wang, Di; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals across the cell membrane. GPCR kinases (GRKs) desensitize GPCR signals in the cell membrane. However, the role and mechanism of GRKs in the desensitization of steroid hormone signaling are unclear. In this study, we propose that GRK2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in response to induction by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), which determines its translocation to the cell membrane of the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. GRK2 protein expression is increased during the metamorphic stage because of induction by 20E. Knockdown of GRK2 in larvae causes accelerated pupation, an increase in 20E-response gene expression, and advanced apoptosis and metamorphosis. 20E induces translocation of GRK2 from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane via steroid hormone ecdysone-responsive GPCR (ErGPCR-2). GRK2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 680 after induction by 20E, which leads to the translocation of GRK2 to the cell membrane. GRK2 interacts with ErGPCR-2. These data indicate that GRK2 terminates the ErGPCR-2 function in 20E signaling in the cell membrane by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:27412951

  4. Role of splanchnic nerve on steroid-hormone-induced alteration of adrenomedullary catecholamines in untreated and reserpinized pigeon.

    PubMed

    Mahata, S K; Ghosh, A

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to ascertain (1) the effect of steroid hormones (corticosterone, dexamethasone, deoxycorticosterone, progesterone, testosterone and oestrogen) on the neural regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamine (CA) content, and (2) the neural modulation of the effect of glucocorticoid hormones (corticosterone and dexamethasone) on reserpine-induced resynthesis of CA. The experiment was conducted on unilaterally splanchnic-denervated pigeons. The findings revealed that 7 consecutive days of steroid treatments (2.5 mg.kg b.w.-1, i.m.) resulted in significant changes of CA content. Interestingly, the changes of epinephrine (E) content differed significantly between the innervated and denervated glands. This clearly indicates that the splanchnic nerve regulates steroid-induced alterations of E content in the pigeon. The results further revealed that the glucocorticoid hormones augmented reserpine-induced resynthesis of CA specifically in the innervated glands. This confirms that the splanchnic nerve is essential for the synergistic action of glucocorticoids and reserpine in accelerating resynthesis of CA.

  5. In vitro and in vivo thermal activation of steroid-receptor complexes from rats and ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus).

    PubMed

    Zivadinović, D; Andjus, R K

    1995-02-01

    Using 3H-labelled triamcinolone acetonide (3HTA, synthetic steroid hormone), it was shown that the in vitro time course kinetics of thermal activation of 3HTA-receptor complexes exhibited the same temperature dependence in liver cytosols prepared from hibernating ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) as in cytosols from the rat. When 3HTA was injected in vivo to animals hibernating with a body temperature of 3 degrees C, the activation and nuclear uptake of the in vivo formed steroid-receptor complexes proceeded at a slow rate, comparable to the one predicted by in vitro studies. In the hibernator, the results are not indicative of adaptive modifications at the level of thermal activation, but prove that steroid action does proceed at a temperature incompatible with hypothermic survival in the nonhibernator.

  6. 17β-trenbolone, an anabolic–androgenic steroid as well as an environmental hormone, contributes to neurodegeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Fucui; Liu, Daicheng

    2015-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. In a large number of neurodegenerative diseases (for example, Alzheimer's disease (AD)), patients do not carry the mutant genes. Other risk factors, for example the environmental factors, should be evaluated. 17β-trenbolone is a kind of environmental hormone as well as an anabolic–androgenic steroid. 17β-trenbolone is used as a growth promoter for livestock in the USA. Also, a large portion of recreational exercisers inject 17β-trenbolone in large doses and for very long time to increase muscle and strength. 17β-trenbolone is stable in the environment after being excreted. In the present study, 17β-trenbolone was administered to adult and pregnant rats and the primary hippocampal neurons. 17β-trenbolone's distribution and its effects on serum hormone levels and Aβ42 accumulation in vivo and its effects on AD related parameters in vitro were assessed. 17β-trenbolone accumulated in adult rat brain, especially in the hippocampus, and in the fetus brain. It altered Aβ42 accumulation. 17β-trenbolone induced apoptosis of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro and resisted neuroprotective function of testosterone. Presenilin-1 protein expression was down-regulated while β-amyloid peptide 42 (Aβ42) production and caspase-3 activities were increased. Both androgen and estrogen receptors mediated the processes. 17β-trenbolone played critical roles in neurodegeneration. Exercisers who inject large doses of trenbolone and common people who are exposed to 17β-trenbolone by various ways are all influenced chronically and continually. Identification of such environmental risk factors will help us take early prevention measure to slow down the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • The widely used anabolic–androgenic steroid 17β-trenbolone has neurotoxicity. • 17β-trenbolone crosses the blood brain barrier and placental barrier. • Rat has high level of 17

  7. Association of serum inorganic phosphate with sex steroid hormones and vitamin D in a nationally representative sample of men.

    PubMed

    Wulaningsih, W; Van Hemelrijck, M; Michaelsson, K; Kanarek, N; Nelson, W G; Ix, J H; Platz, E A; Rohrmann, S

    2014-11-01

    Defects in bone regulatory pathways have been linked to chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and cancer. In men, a link between bone metabolism and gonadal hormones has been suggested. However, to date, there is lack of evidence on the association between serum inorganic phosphate (Pi) and sex steroid hormones. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between Pi, sex steroid hormones and a known Pi metabolic regulator, vitamin D, in men in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III). From NHANES III, we selected 1412 men aged 20+ who participated in the morning session of Phase I (1988-1991) with serum measurements of Pi, sex hormones, and vitamin D. Multivariable linear regression was used to calculate crude and geometric mean Pi by total and estimated free testosterone and estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, androstanediol glucuronide (AAG), and vitamin D. Similar analyses were performed while stratifying by race/ethnicity and vitamin D levels. We found a lack of statistically significant difference in geometric means of Pi across quintiles of concentrations of sex hormones, indicating a tight regulation of Pi. However, Pi levels were inversely associated with calculated free testosterone in non-Hispanic black men, with geometric mean levels of Pi of 1.16 and 1.02 ng/mL for those in the lowest and highest quintiles of free testosterone, respectively (p-trend < 0.05). A similar but weaker pattern was seen between total testosterone and Pi. An inverse association was also seen between AAG and Pi in men with vitamin D concentration below the median (<24.2 ng/mL). No associations were observed among men with vitamin D levels at or above the median. Our findings suggest a weak link among sex hormones, vitamin D, and Pi in men. The observed effects of race/ethnicity and vitamin D indicate a complex association involving various regulators of Pi homeostasis.

  8. 17β-trenbolone, an anabolic-androgenic steroid as well as an environmental hormone, contributes to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fucui; Liu, Daicheng

    2015-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. In a large number of neurodegenerative diseases (for example, Alzheimer's disease (AD)), patients do not carry the mutant genes. Other risk factors, for example the environmental factors, should be evaluated. 17β-trenbolone is a kind of environmental hormone as well as an anabolic-androgenic steroid. 17β-trenbolone is used as a growth promoter for livestock in the USA. Also, a large portion of recreational exercisers inject 17β-trenbolone in large doses and for very long time to increase muscle and strength. 17β-trenbolone is stable in the environment after being excreted. In the present study, 17β-trenbolone was administered to adult and pregnant rats and the primary hippocampal neurons. 17β-trenbolone's distribution and its effects on serum hormone levels and Aβ42 accumulation in vivo and its effects on AD related parameters in vitro were assessed. 17β-trenbolone accumulated in adult rat brain, especially in the hippocampus, and in the fetus brain. It altered Aβ42 accumulation. 17β-trenbolone induced apoptosis of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro and resisted neuroprotective function of testosterone. Presenilin-1 protein expression was down-regulated while β-amyloid peptide 42 (Aβ42) production and caspase-3 activities were increased. Both androgen and estrogen receptors mediated the processes. 17β-trenbolone played critical roles in neurodegeneration. Exercisers who inject large doses of trenbolone and common people who are exposed to 17β-trenbolone by various ways are all influenced chronically and continually. Identification of such environmental risk factors will help us take early prevention measure to slow down the onset of neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Intracellular colocalization of HAP1/STBs with steroid hormone receptors and its enhancement by a proteasome inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujinaga, Ryutaro; Takeshita, Yukio; Yoshioka, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Shinoda, Shuhei; Islam, Md. Nabiul; Jahan, Mir Rubayet; Yanai, Akie; Kokubu, Keiji; Shinoda, Koh

    2011-07-15

    The stigmoid body (STB) is a cytoplasmic inclusion containing huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1), and HAP1/STB formation is induced by transfection of the HAP1 gene into cultured cells. In the present study, we examined the intracellular colocalization of HAP1/STBs with steroid hormone receptors (SHRs), including the androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and mineralocorticoid receptor, in COS-7 cells cotransfected with HAP1 and each receptor. We found that C-terminal ligand-binding domains of all SHRs had potential for colocalization with HAP1/STBs, whereas only AR and GR were clearly colocalized with HAP1/STBs when each full-length SHR was coexpressed with HAP1. In addition, it appeared that HAP1/STBs did not disrupt GR and AR functions because the receptors on HAP1/STBs maintained nuclear translocation activity in response to their specific ligands. When the cells were treated with a proteasome inhibitor, GR and AR localized outside HAP1/STBs translocated into the nucleus, whereas the receptors colocalized with HAP1/STBs persisted in their colocalization even after treatment with their ligands. Therefore, HAP1/STBs may be involved in cytoplasmic modifications of the nuclear translocation of GR and AR in a ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  10. Hormone activation induces nucleosome positioning in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Sergey; Gelius, Birgitta; Almouzni, Geneviève; Wrange, Örjan

    2000-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by glucocorticoid hormone. A robust hormone- and receptor-dependent activation could be reproduced in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The homogeneous response in this system allowed a detailed analysis of the transition in chromatin structure following hormone activation. This revealed two novel findings: hormone activation led to the establishment of specific translational positioning of nucleosomes despite the lack of significant positioning in the inactive state; and, in the active promoter, a subnucleosomal particle encompassing the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding region was detected. The presence of only a single GR-binding site was sufficient for the structural transition to occur. Both basal promoter elements and ongoing transcription were dispensable. These data reveal a stepwise process in the transcriptional activation by glucocorticoid hormone. PMID:10698943

  11. Ionizing radiation effects on sex steroid hormone levels in serum and milt of freshwater fish Oreochromis mossambicus.

    PubMed

    Saiyad Musthafa, M; Jawahar Ali, A; Mohamed Ahadhu Shareef, T H; Vijayakumar, S; Iyanar, K; Thangaraj, K

    2014-03-01

    Effects of gamma rays on the sex steroid hormone levels [testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and 17β-estradiol (E2)] were studied in the freshwater fish Oreochromis mossambicus. Gamma radiation induced effects on hormone levels reported here for the first time in the fish. Since radionuclides released accidentally or during a nuclear disaster can contaminate inland water bodies, biomonitoring methods are required for assessing the impacts of certain dose levels of radiation that may ultimately result in ionizing radiation exposure to both humans and non-human biota. Three groups of (n=15 in each group) fishes were irradiated with a single dose of (60)Co 10Gy, 15Gy and 20Gy with a duration of .33, .50 and .66min. Significant decrease of the hormone levels was seen at higher doses of 15Gy and 20Gy. The sex steroid hormone levels in the fishes are vital for sperm production, development, differential functions related to the physiology and reproductive behavior. This study serves as biomonitoring tool to assess the ionizing radiation effects on reproductive behavior of aquatic biota.

  12. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways.

  13. Steroid hormone production in testis, ovary, and adrenal gland of immature rats irradiated in utero with /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Inano, H.; Suzuki, K.; Ishii-Ohba, H.; Imada, Y.; Kumagai, R.; Kurihara, S.; Sato, A.

    1989-02-01

    Pregnant rats received whole-body irradiation at 20 days of gestation with 2.6 Gy lambda rays from a 60Co source. Endocrinological effects before maturation were studied using testes and adrenal glands obtained from male offspring and ovaries from female offspring irradiated in utero. Seminiferous tubules of the irradiated male offspring were remarkably atrophied with free germinal epithelium and containing only Sertoli cells. Female offspring also had atrophied ovaries. Testicular tissue obtained from intact and 60Co-irradiated rats was incubated with 14C-labeled pregnenolone, progesterone, 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, and androstenedione as a substrate. Intermediates for androgen production and catabolic metabolites were isolated after the incubation. The amounts of these metabolites produced by the irradiated testes were low in comparison with the control. The activities of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17 alpha-hydroxylase, C17,20-lyase, and delta 4-5 alpha-reductase in the irradiated testes were 30-40% of those in nonirradiated testes. Also, the activities of 17 beta- and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases were 72 and 52% of the control, respectively. In adrenal glands, the 21-hydroxylase activity of the irradiated animals was 38% of the control, but the delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity was comparable to that of the control. On the other hand, the activity of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of the irradiated ovary was only 19% of the control. These results suggest that 60Co irradiation of the fetus in utero markedly affects the production of steroid hormones in testes, ovaries, and adrenal glands after birth.

  14. Altered diurnal pattern of steroid hormones in relation to various behaviors, external factors and pathologies: A review.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Baillot, A; Forget, H; Coquerel, A; Rieth, N; Vibarel-Rebot, N

    2016-10-01

    The adrenal and gonadal stress steroids [i.e., cortisol, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)] have gathered considerable attention in the last few decades due to their very broad physiological and psychological actions. Their diurnal patterns have become a particular focus following new data implicating altered diurnal hormone patterns in various endocrine, behavioral and cardiovascular risk profiles. In this review of the current literature, we present a brief overview of the altered diurnal patterns of these hormones that may occur in relation to chronic stress, nutritional behaviors, physical exercise, drugs and sleep deprivation/shift. We also present data on the altered diurnal hormone patterns implicated in cardiometabolic and psychiatric/neurologic diseases, cancer and other complex pathologies. We consider the occasionally discrepant results of the studies, and summarize the current knowledge in this new field of interest, underlining the potential effects on both biological and psychological functioning, and assess the implications of these effects. Last, we conclude with some practical considerations and perspectives.

  15. Differential changes in steroid hormones before competition in bonobos and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Wobber, Victoria; Hare, Brian; Maboto, Jean; Lipson, Susan; Wrangham, Richard; Ellison, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    A large body of research has demonstrated that variation in competitive behavior across species and individuals is linked to variation in physiology. In particular, rapid changes in testosterone and cortisol during competition differ according to an individual's or species’ psychological and behavioral responses to competition. This suggests that among pairs of species in which there are behavioral differences in competition, there should also be differences in the endocrine shifts surrounding competition. We tested this hypothesis by presenting humans’ closest living relatives, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus), with a dyadic food competition and measuring their salivary testosterone and cortisol levels. Given that chimpanzees and bonobos differ markedly in their food-sharing behavior, we predicted that they would differ in their rapid endocrine shifts. We found that in both species, males showed an anticipatory decrease (relative to baseline) in steroids when placed with a partner in a situation in which the two individuals shared food, and an anticipatory increase when placed with a partner in a situation in which the dominant individual obtained more food. The species differed, however, in terms of which hormone was affected; in bonobo males the shifts occurred in cortisol, whereas in chimpanzee males the shifts occurred in testosterone. Thus, in anticipation of an identical competition, bonobo and chimpanzee males showed differential endocrine shifts, perhaps due to differences in perception of the situation, that is, viewing the event either as a stressor or a dominance contest. In turn, common selection pressures in human evolution may have acted on the psychology and the endocrinology of our competitive behavior. PMID:20616027

  16. An isotope-dilution standard GC/MS/MS method for steroid hormones in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Lindley, Chris E.; Losche, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    An isotope-dilution quantification method was developed for 20 natural and synthetic steroid hormones and additional compounds in filtered and unfiltered water. Deuterium- or carbon-13-labeled isotope-dilution standards (IDSs) are added to the water sample, which is passed through an octadecylsilyl solid-phase extraction (SPE) disk. Following extract cleanup using Florisil SPE, method compounds are converted to trimethylsilyl derivatives and analyzed by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Validation matrices included reagent water, wastewater-affected surface water, and primary (no biological treatment) and secondary wastewater effluent. Overall method recovery for all analytes in these matrices averaged 100%; with overall relative standard deviation of 28%. Mean recoveries of the 20 individual analytes for spiked reagent-water samples prepared along with field samples analyzed in 2009–2010 ranged from 84–104%, with relative standard deviations of 6–36%. Detection levels estimated using ASTM International’s D6091–07 procedure range from 0.4 to 4 ng/L for 17 analytes. Higher censoring levels of 100 ng/L for bisphenol A and 200 ng/L for cholesterol and 3-beta-coprostanol are used to prevent bias and false positives associated with the presence of these analytes in blanks. Absolute method recoveries of the IDSs provide sample-specific performance information and guide data reporting. Careful selection of labeled compounds for use as IDSs is important because both inexact IDS-analyte matches and deuterium label loss affect an IDS’s ability to emulate analyte performance. Six IDS compounds initially tested and applied in this method exhibited deuterium loss and are not used in the final method.

  17. Expression of xenobiotic and steroid hormone metabolizing enzymes in human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Haas, Susanne; Pierl, Christiane; Harth, Volker; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon; Hamann, Ute; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter

    2006-10-15

    The potential to metabolize endogenous and exogenous substances may influence breast cancer development and tumor growth. Therefore, the authors investigated the protein expression of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoforms and cytochrome P450 (CYP) known to be involved in the metabolism of steroid hormones and endogenous as well as exogenous carcinogens in breast cancer tissue to obtain new information on their possible role in tumor progression. Expression of GST pi, mu, alpha and CYP1A1/2, 1A2, 3A4/5, 1B1, 2E1 was assessed by immunohistochemistry for primary breast carcinomas of 393 patients from the German GENICA breast cancer collection. The percentages of positive tumors were 50.1 and 44.5% for GST mu and CYP2E1, and ranged from 13 to 24.7% for CYP1A2, GST pi, CYP1A1/2, CYP3A4/5, CYP1B1. GST alpha was expressed in 1.8% of tumors. The authors observed the following associations between strong protein expression and histopathological characteristics: GST expression was associated with a better tumor differentiation (GST mu, p = 0.018) and with reduced lymph node metastasis (GST pi, p = 0.02). In addition, GST mu expression was associated with a positive estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status (p < 0.001). CYP3A4/5 expression was associated with a positive nodal status (p = 0.018). Expression of CYP1B1 was associated with poor tumor differentiation (p = 0.049). Our results demonstrate that the majority of breast carcinomas expressed xenobiotic and drug metabolizing enzymes. They particularly suggest that GST mu and pi expression may indicate a better prognosis and that strong CYP3A4/5 and CYP1B1 expression may be key features of nonfavourable prognosis.

  18. Endogenous steroid profiling by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics for the detection of natural hormone abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Blokland, M H; Van Tricht, E F; Van Rossum, H J; Sterk, S S; Nielen, M W F

    2012-01-01

    For years it has been suspected that natural hormones are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle in the European Union. Unfortunately there is a lack of methods and criteria that can be used to detect the abuse of natural hormones and distinguish treated from non-treated animals. Pattern recognition of steroid profiles is a promising approach for tracing/detecting the abuse of natural hormones administered to cattle. Traditionally steroids are analysed in urine as free steroid after deconjugation of the glucuronide (and sulphate) conjugates. The disadvantage of this deconjugation is that valuable information about the steroid profile in the sample is lost. In this study we develop a method to analyse steroids at very low concentration levels (ng l(-1)) for the free steroid, glucuronide and sulphate conjugates in urine samples. This method was used to determine concentrations of natural (pro)hormones in a large population (n = 620) of samples from male and female bovine animals and from bovine animals treated with testosterone-cypionate, estradiol-benzoate, dihydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone. The data acquired were used to build a statistical model applying the multivariate technique 'Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy' (SIMCA). It is demonstrated that by using this model the results of the urine analysis can indicate which animal may have had illegal treatment with natural (pro)hormones.

  19. Serotonergic outcome, stress and sexual steroid hormones, and growth in a South American cichlid fish fed with an L-tryptophan enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Leonel; Ramallo, Martín Roberto; Moreira, Renata Guimarães; Höcht, Christian; Somoza, Gustavo Manuel; Silva, Ana; Pandolfi, Matías

    2015-11-01

    Reared animals for edible or ornamental purposes are frequently exposed to high aggression and stressful situations. These factors generally arise from conspecifics in densely breeding conditions. In vertebrates, serotonin (5-HT) has been postulated as a key neuromodulator and neurotransmitter involved in aggression and stress. The essential amino acid L-tryptophan (trp) is crucial for the synthesis of 5-HT, and so, leaves a gateway for indirectly augmenting brain 5-HT levels by means of a trp-enriched diet. The cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus, locally known as chanchita, is an autochthonous, potentially ornamental species and a fruitful laboratory model which behavior and reproduction has been studied over the last 15years. It presents complex social hierarchies, and great asymmetries between subordinate and dominant animals in respect to aggression, stress, and reproductive chance. The first aim of this work was to perform a morphological description of chanchita's brain serotonergic system, in both males and females. Then, we evaluated the effects of a trp-supplemented diet, given during 4weeks, on brain serotonergic activity, stress and sexual steroid hormones, and growth in isolated specimens. Results showed that chanchita's brain serotonergic system is composed of several populations of neurons located in three main areas: pretectum, hypothalamus and raphe, with no clear differences between males and females at a morphological level. Animals fed with trp-enriched diets exhibited higher forebrain serotonergic activity and a significant reduction in their relative cortisol levels, with no effects on sexual steroid plasma levels or growth parameters. Thus, this study points to food trp enrichment as a "neurodietary'' method for elevating brain serotonergic activity and decreasing stress, without affecting growth or sex steroid hormone levels.

  20. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F.; Carino, C.

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Comorbid Depression: Possible Linkage with Steroid Hormones, Cytokines, and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Richards, Misty; Nakajima, Shingo; Adachi, Naoki; Furuta, Miyako; Odaka, Haruki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates a connection between growth factor function (including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF), glucocorticoid levels (one of the steroid hormones), and the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. Because both BDNF and glucocorticoids regulate synaptic function in the central nervous system, their functional interaction is of major concern. Interestingly, alterations in levels of estrogen, another steroid hormone, may play a role in depressive-like behavior in postpartum females with fluctuations of BDNF-related molecules in the brain. BDNF and cytokines, which are protein regulators of inflammation, stimulate multiple intracellular signaling cascades involved in neuropsychiatric illness. Pro-inflammatory cytokines may increase vulnerability to depressive symptoms, such as the increased risk observed in patients with cancer and/or autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss the possible relationship between inflammation and depression, in addition to the cross-talk among cytokines, BDNF, and steroids. Further, since nutritional status has been shown to affect critical pathways involved in depression through both BDNF function and the monoamine system, we also review current evidence surrounding diet and supplementation (e.g., flavonoids) on BDNF-mediated brain functions. PMID:25309465

  2. Effect of growth promotants on the occurrence of endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones on feedlot soils and in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Kranz, William L; Mader, Terry L; Shapiro, Charles A; Donk, Simon J van; Shelton, David P; Tarkalson, David D; Zhang, Tian C

    2012-02-07

    Supplements and growth promotants containing steroid hormones are routinely administered to beef cattle to improve feeding efficiency, reduce behavioral problems, and enhance production. As a result, beef cattle manure will contain both synthetic steroids as well as a range of endogenous steroids including androgens, estrogens, and progestogens. A two-year controlled study was conducted in which beef cattle were administered steroid hormones via subcutaneous implants and feed additives and the occurrence of 16 endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones and metabolites was evaluated in runoff from beef cattle feedlots and in manure and soil collected from feedlot surfaces. Samples were extracted and analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometryfor metabolites of the synthetic androgen trenbolone acetate, 17α-trenbolone, 17β-trenbolone, for the nonsteroidal semisynthetic estrogen agonist, α-zearalanol, and the synthetic progesterone melengesterol acetate, as well as a wide range of endogeneous estrogens, androgens, and fusarium metabolites. Synthetic steroids including trenbolone metabolites and melengestrol acetate were detected in fresh manure and in feedlot surface soils from cattle administered synthetic steroids at concentrations up to 55 ± 22 ng/g dry weight (dw) (17α-trenbolone) and 6.5 ± 0.4 ng/g dw (melengesterol acetate). Melengesterol acetate was detected in 6% of runoff samples from feedlots holding cattle administered synthetic steroids at concentrations ranging up to 115 ng/L. The presence of melengesterol acetate in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations has not been previously reported. Synthetic steroids were not detected in manure or runoff from control cattle. A wide range of endogenous hormones were detected in runoff and feedlot surface soils and manure from cattle given synthetic steroids and from control cattle, with no statistically significant differences in concentration. These results indicate that runoff from

  3. Quantification of three steroid hormone receptors of the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination: their tissue distributions and the effect of environmental change on their expressions.

    PubMed

    Endo, Daisuke; Park, Min Kyun

    2003-12-01

    Sex steroid hormones play a central role in the reproduction of all vertebrates. These hormones function through their specific receptors, so the expression levels of the receptors may reflect the responsibility of target organs. However, there was no effective method to quantify the expression levels of these receptors in reptilian species. In this study, we established the competitive-PCR assay systems for the quantification of the mRNA expression levels of three sex steroid hormone receptors in the leopard gecko. These assay systems were successfully able to detect the mRNA expression level of each receptor in various organs of male adult leopard geckoes. The expression levels of mRNA of these receptors were highly various depending on the organs assayed. This is the first report regarding the tissue distributions of sex steroid hormone receptor expressions in reptile. The effects of environmental conditions on these hormone receptor expressions were also examined. After the low temperature and short photoperiod treatment for 6 weeks, only the androgen receptor expression was significantly increased in the testes. The competitive-PCR assay systems established in this report should be applicable for various studies of the molecular mechanism underlying the reproductive activity of the leopard gecko.

  4. Regulation of object recognition and object placement by ovarian sex steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Tuscher, Jennifer J; Fortress, Ashley M; Kim, Jaekyoon; Frick, Karyn M

    2015-05-15

    The ovarian hormones 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) are potent modulators of hippocampal memory formation. Both hormones have been demonstrated to enhance hippocampal memory by regulating the cellular and molecular mechanisms thought to underlie memory formation. Behavioral neuroendocrinologists have increasingly used the object recognition and object placement (object location) tasks to investigate the role of E2 and P4 in regulating hippocampal memory formation in rodents. These one-trial learning tasks are ideal for studying acute effects of hormone treatments on different phases of memory because they can be administered during acquisition (pre-training), consolidation (post-training), or retrieval (pre-testing). This review synthesizes the rodent literature testing the effects of E2 and P4 on object recognition (OR) and object placement (OP), and the molecular mechanisms in the hippocampus supporting memory formation in these tasks. Some general trends emerge from the data. Among gonadally intact females, object memory tends to be best when E2 and P4 levels are elevated during the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and in middle age. In ovariectomized females, E2 given before or immediately after testing generally enhances OR and OP in young and middle-aged rats and mice, although effects are mixed in aged rodents. Effects of E2 treatment on OR and OP memory consolidation can be mediated by both classical estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), and depend on glutamate receptors (NMDA, mGluR1) and activation of numerous cell signaling cascades (e.g., ERK, PI3K/Akt, mTOR) and epigenetic processes (e.g., histone acetylation, DNA methylation). Acute P4 treatment given immediately after training also enhances OR and OP in young and middle-aged ovariectomized females by activating similar cell signaling pathways as E2 (e.g., ERK, mTOR). The few studies that have administered both hormones in combination suggest that treatment can enhance OR and OP, but that effects

  5. Aging influences steroid hormone release by mink ovaries and their response to leptin and IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-01-21

    The aim of our study was to understand whether ovarian steroid hormones, and their response to the metabolic hormones leptin and IGF-I leptin, could be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging via changes in basal release of ovarian progesterone and estradiol. For this purpose, we compared the release of progesterone and estradiol by ovarian fragments isolated from young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks cultured with and without leptin and IGF-I (0, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml). We observed that isolated ovaries of older animals produced less progesterone but not less estradiol than the ovaries of young animals. Leptin addition stimulated estradiol release by the ovarian tissue of young animals but inhibited it in older females. Leptin did not influence progesterone output by the ovaries of either young or older animals. IGF-I inhibited estradiol output in young but not old animals, whereas progesterone release was inhibited by IGF-I irrespective of the animal age. Our observations demonstrate the involvement of both leptin and IGF-I in the control of mink ovarian steroid hormones release. Furthermore, our findings suggest that reproductive aging in minks can be due to (a) reduction in basal progesterone release and (b) alterations in the response of estradiol but not of progesterone to leptin and IGF-I.

  6. Aging influences steroid hormone release by mink ovaries and their response to leptin and IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    Sirotkin, Alexander V.; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of our study was to understand whether ovarian steroid hormones, and their response to the metabolic hormones leptin and IGF-I leptin, could be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging via changes in basal release of ovarian progesterone and estradiol. For this purpose, we compared the release of progesterone and estradiol by ovarian fragments isolated from young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks cultured with and without leptin and IGF-I (0, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml). We observed that isolated ovaries of older animals produced less progesterone but not less estradiol than the ovaries of young animals. Leptin addition stimulated estradiol release by the ovarian tissue of young animals but inhibited it in older females. Leptin did not influence progesterone output by the ovaries of either young or older animals. IGF-I inhibited estradiol output in young but not old animals, whereas progesterone release was inhibited by IGF-I irrespective of the animal age. Our observations demonstrate the involvement of both leptin and IGF-I in the control of mink ovarian steroid hormones release. Furthermore, our findings suggest that reproductive aging in minks can be due to (a) reduction in basal progesterone release and (b) alterations in the response of estradiol but not of progesterone to leptin and IGF-I. PMID:26794607

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of trichloroethylene on steroid hormone and insulin levels in normal men.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, V H; Chia, S E; Ong, C N

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the serum levels of insulin and some adrenal steroid hormones in men chronically exposed to low doses of trichloroethylene (TCE). A total of 85 workers participated in this study. Each worker had urine collected and analyzed for trichloroacetic acids (UTCA) on the same day that a blood sample was taken for analyses of serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), androstenedione, cortisol, aldosterone, and insulin. The mean concentration of environmental TCE was 29.6 ppm and the mean UTCA was 22.4 mg/g creatinine (range 0.8-136.4). TCE exposure did not cause any significant changes to the adrenal steroid hormone productions. The results showed that UTCA was significantly correlated to serum insulin levels. Insulin and SHBG responded in tandem, with the highest levels found in workers exposed to TCE for less than 2 years; levels of both parameters were significantly lowered in those exposed for more than 2 years. A triphasic response in insulin levels to TCE, which depended on the duration of exposure, was noted. Initial exposure caused an acute rise in insulin levels. This was followed by a fall to normal levels in those exposed 2-4 years and then a slight rise in those exposed for more than 6 years. The mechanism for this pattern of response to TCE exposure is yet unknown. PMID:9417767

  8. Wet- and dry-season steroid hormone profiles and stress reactivity of an insular dwarf snake, the Hog Island boa (Boa constrictor imperator).

    PubMed

    Holding, Matthew L; Frazier, Julius A; Dorr, Scott W; Pollock, Nicholas B; Muelleman, P J; Branske, Amber; Henningsen, Sloane N; Eikenaar, Cas; Escallón, Camilo; Montgomery, Chad E; Moore, Ignacio T; Taylor, Emily N

    2014-01-01

    Field endocrine studies providing new comparisons for inference into the evolutionary and ecological factors shaping organismal physiology are important, often yielding novel physiological insights. Here, we explored factors associated with the sex steroid hormone concentrations and adrenocortical response to capture stress in Hog Island boas (Boa constrictor imperator) in the Cayos Cochinos archipelago of Honduras to generate comparative field hormone data from a tropical reptile and test the island tameness hypothesis. Baseline concentrations of testosterone, corticosterone, estradiol, and progesterone were measured during the wet and dry seasons, and an acute stressor of 1 h in a cloth bag was used to assess the stress response. Plasma steroid concentrations in these snakes were generally low in comparison to other taxa. Higher testosterone concentrations in males and higher estradiol and corticosterone concentrations in females were observed during the wet season compared to the dry season, which may be indicative of mating activities and vitellogenesis during this period. Snakes displayed a 15-fold increase in corticosterone concentrations in response to capture stress, a rise that was not impacted by whether a snake had been captured during previous years. The adrenocortical stress response was greater in males and positively related to body temperature. We suggest that this system merits future inquiries into the physiology and behavior of B. c. imperator, particularly as a model for studying insular impacts on diverse life history characters.

  9. Growth-related changes in histology and immunolocalization of steroid hormone receptors in gonads of the immature male green turtle (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Saori; Suzuki, Masatsugu; Kamezaki, Naoki; Shima, Tatsuya; Wakatsuki, Motoki; Kon, Yasuhiro; Ohtaishi, Noriyuki

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the population dynamics of sea turtles require histological evaluation of the ontogenetic development and the activity of the gonads for reproduction. To investigate the growth-related changes of gonads in the immature male green turtle (Chelonia mydas), the histological changes of testes and epididymides and the localization of the androgen receptor, estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta, and progesterone receptor were examined. The testes were categorized histologically into six developmental stages, and a scarce relationship between straight carapace length and gonadal development was confirmed based on the histological analysis. Several kinds of steroid hormone receptors were examined to show distributions in both testes and epididymides, for which their immunoreactivities were enhanced according to the developmental stage of the testes. These results suggest that straight carapace length is not an adequate indicator of maturity determination, whereas histological and immunohistochemical evaluations are useful in identifying the growth stages of green turtles, owing to the higher sensitivity to steroid hormones that appear during growth.

  10. Influence of music on steroid hormones and the relationship between receptor polymorphisms and musical ability: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that music confers plasticity to the brain. In a preliminary pilot study, we examined the effect of music listening on steroid hormones and the relationship between steroid hormone receptor polymorphisms and musical ability. Twenty-one subjects (10 males and 11 females) were recruited and divided into musically talented and control groups. The subjects selected (1) music they preferred (chill-inducing music) and (2) music they did not like. Before and after the experiments, saliva was collected to measure the levels of steroid hormones such as testosterone, estradiol, and cortisol. DNA was also isolated from the saliva samples to determine the androgen receptor (AR) and arginine vasopressin receptor 1A genotypes. Advanced Measures of Music Audiation (AMMA) was used to determine the musical ability of the subjects. With both types of music, the cortisol levels decreased significantly in both sexes. The testosterone (T) levels declined in males when they listened to both types of music. In females, the T levels increased in those listening to chill-inducing music but declined when they listened to music they disliked. However, these differences were not significant. The 17-beta estradiol levels increased in males with both types of music, whereas the levels increased with chill-inducing music but declined with disliked music in females. The AMMA scores were higher for the short repeat length-type AR than for the long repeat length-type. Comparisons of AR polymorphisms and T levels before the experiments showed that the T levels were within the low range in the short repeat length-type group and there was a positive relationship with the repeat length, although it was not significant. This is the first study conducted in humans to analyze the relationships between the AR gene, T levels, and musical ability. PMID:24348454

  11. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steroid sulfatase (STS) cleaves the sulfate moiety off steroid sulfates, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate (DHEAS), the inactive sulfate ester of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA. Deficient DHEA sulfation, the opposite enzymatic reaction to that catalyzed by STS, results in androgen excess by increased conversion of DHEA to active androgens. STS deficiency (STSD) due to deletions or inactivating mutations in the X-linked STS gene manifests with ichthyosis, but androgen synthesis and metabolism in STSD have not been studied in detail yet. Patients and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 30 males with STSD (age 6–27 y; 13 prepubertal, 5 peripubertal, and 12 postpubertal) and 38 age-, sex-, and Tanner stage-matched healthy controls. Serum and 24-hour urine steroid metabolome analysis was performed by mass spectrometry and genetic analysis of the STS gene by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing. Results: Genetic analysis showed STS mutations in all patients, comprising 27 complete gene deletions, 1 intragenic deletion and 2 missense mutations. STSD patients had apparently normal pubertal development. Serum and 24-hour urinary DHEAS were increased in STSD, whereas serum DHEA and testosterone were decreased. However, total 24-hour urinary androgen excretion was similar to controls, with evidence of increased 5α-reductase activity in STSD. Prepubertal healthy controls showed a marked increase in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in postpubertal controls and in STSD patients of any pubertal stage. Conclusions: In STSD patients, an increased 5α-reductase activity appears to compensate for a reduced rate of androgen generation by enhancing peripheral androgen activation in affected patients. In healthy controls, we discovered a prepubertal surge in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in STSD, indicative of physiologically up-regulated STS activity before puberty. This may

  12. First attempt to monitor luteinizing hormone and reproductive steroids in urine samples of the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis).

    PubMed

    Amaral, Rodrigo S; Rosas, Fernando C W; Graham, Laura H; da Silva, Vera M F; Oliveira, Claudio A

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) in urine samples of Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis; Mammalia: Sirenia) and to monitor urinary LH and reproductive steroids during the ovarian cycle in this species. Urine samples were collected from two captive males following a hormonal challenge with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. The urinary LH results from hormonal challenge were compared with urinary androgens for the purpose of EIA validation. Furthermore, urine samples were collected daily, over a 12-wk period, from two captive adult females, for 2 consecutive yr. The urinary LH pattern from females was compared with the patterns of urinary progestagens and estrogen conjugates throughout the ovarian cycle. An LH peak was observed in both male Amazonian manatees after the hormonal challenge, occurring prior to or together with peak androgen levels. In the females, the ovarian cycle ranged from 40 to 48 days (mean of 43.7 days). Two distinct peaks of estrogen conjugates were observed across all cycles analyzed, and the urinary LH peaks observed were accompanied by peaks of urinary estrogen conjugates. The EIA was validated as a method for the quantification of urinary LH from Amazonian manatees, as it was able to detect variations in the levels of LH in urine samples. These results suggest that T. inunguis exhibits a peculiar hormonal pattern during the ovarian cycle. Therefore, further studies are desirable and necessary to clarify the relationship between this hormonal pattern and morphological changes, as well as mating behavior, in Amazonian manatee.

  13. Identification of hormone-interacting amino acid residues within the steroid-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other steroid hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Stroemstedt, P.E.; Persson, B.; Cederlund, E.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Joernvall, H.

    1988-05-15

    Purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was covalently charged with (/sup 3/H)glucocorticoid by photoaffinity labeling (UV irradiation of (/sup 3/H)triamcinolone acetonide-glucocorticoid receptor) or affinity labeling (incubation with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate). After labeling, separate samples of the denatured receptor were cleaved with trypsin (directly or after prior succinylation), chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. Labeled residues in the peptides obtained were identified by radiosequence analysis. The peaks of radioactivity corresponded to Met-622 and Cys-754 after photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)triamcinolone acetonide and Cys-656 after affinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate. The labeled residues are all positioned within hydrophobic segments of the steroid-binding domain. The patterns of hydropathy and secondary structure for the glucocorticoid receptor are highly similar to those for the progestin receptor and similar but less so to those for the estrogen receptor and to those for c-erb A.

  14. Sex steroid hormones matter for learning and memory: estrogenic regulation of hippocampal function in male and female rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes the effects of E2 on hippocampal spinogenesis, neurogenesis, physiology, and memory, with particular attention paid to the effects of E2 in male rodents. The estrogen receptors, cell-signaling pathways, and epigenetic processes necessary for E2 to enhance memory in female rodents are also discussed in detail. Finally, practical considerations for working with female rodents are described for those investigators thinking of adding females to their experimental designs. PMID:26286657

  15. Effect of growth factors and steroid hormones on heme oxygenase and cyclin D1 expression in primary astroglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, V; Grasso, S; Tomassoni, D; Traini, E; Raciti, G; Viola, M; Li Volti, G; Campisi, A; Amenta, F; Avola, R

    2015-03-01

    Astrocyte activity may be modulated by steroid hormones and GFs. This study investigates the interaction between glucocorticoids or estrogens and GFs on the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclin D1 in astrocyte cultures at 14 days treated for 48 or 60 hr with dexamethasone (DEX) or 48 hr with 17β-estradiol (E2) alone or with GFs added only in the last 12 or 24 hr. Twelve- or twenty-four-hour epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment significantly enhanced HO-1 expression in astrocyte cultures pretreated for 48 hr with DEX. A highly significant increase in HO-1 expression was obtained after the last-12-hr EGF treatment in 48-hr E2-pretreated astrocyte cultures; this enhancement was particularly significant in 48-hr E2-pretreated cultures as well as in the last-12-hr insulin-treated ones pretreated for 48 hr with E2. Sixty-hour DEX-alone pretreatment as well as the last-12-hr EGF treatment in 60-hr DEX-pretreated astrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of cyclin D1 expression. A significant decrease of cyclin D1 expression in the last-12-hr insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1)-treated cultures pretreated for 60 hr with DEX was observed. A highly significant enhancement in cyclin D1 expression in 14 days in vitro astrocyte cultures pretreated with E2 alone for 48 hr and treated in the last 12 hr with IGF-1 in 48-hr E2-pretreated cultures was found. Finally, the data highlight an interactive dialogue between the growth factors and glucocorticoids or estrogens during the maturation of astroglial cells in culture that may control the HO-1 and cyclin D1 expression as well as proliferating astroglial cells during the cell cycle.

  16. A correlation of fecal volatiles and steroid hormone profiles with behavioral expression during estrous cycle of goat, Capra hircus.

    PubMed

    SankarGanesh, Devaraj; Ramachandran, Rajamanickam; Muniasamy, Samuthirapandi; Saravanakumar, Veluchamy Ramesh; Suriyakalaa, Udhayaraj; Kannan, Soundarapandian; Archunan, Govindaraju; Achiraman, Shanmugam

    2014-09-15

    Chemical signals (both volatile and non-volatile) form the major communication channels in animals. These signals are transferred mainly through excretory sources to facilitate inter-individual communication. In particular, the reproductive cycle of female mammals, including goats, exhibits significant changes in the constituents of their excretory products, and female mammals also express different behavioral patterns. We propose that feces is one of the important sources of chemo-signals in goats. However, the behavioral patterns and analysis of excretory sources based on chemical communication have not yet been studied in the Indian goat, Capra hircus. To validate our hypothesis, we analyzed the behavioral patterns and the volatiles and steroid hormone profiles in the feces samples of female goats during the estrous cycle. Here, we synchronized the estrous cycle in six female goats and obtained feces samples. The samples were extracted with dichloromethane and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A portion of the sample was used for hormone assay to confirm the phases in the estrous cycle. Induction of she-goats into estrus was detected from the vaginal swelling, mucus discharge, restlessness, reduced milk secretion, bellowing, bleating, frequent urination, standing heat, allowing the male to mount, mounting on other females and teasing of males. The repeated male behaviors viz., flehmen, mounting, penile protrusion, body rubbing, dominance over other males and finally coitus with estrus female by male goats were observed. Analysis of volatiles revealed a total of twenty-four compounds combining all the phases in the estrous cycle. Among those, some of the volatile compounds and two antioxidants (ascorbic acid and vitamin E) were estrus-specific. Based on the fecal steroid analysis, higher level of estradiol during estrus and higher level of progesterone during post-estrus were observed. The behavioral patterns of female and male goats combined

  17. Oct-GnRH, the first protostomian gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide and a critical mini-review of the presence of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Hiroyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    In protostome and deuterosome invertebrates, neurosecretory cells play major roles in the endocrine system. The optic glands of cephalopods are indicators of sexual maturation. In mature octopuses, optic glands enlarge and secrete a gonadotropic hormone. A peptide with structural features similar to that of vertebrate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was isolated from the octopus, Octopus vulgaris, and was named oct-GnRH. The discovery of oct-GnRH has triggered structural determinations and predictions of other mollusc GnRH-like peptides in biochemical and in silico studies. Interestingly, cephalopods studied so far are characterized by a single molecular form of oct-GnRH with a C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence, which is critical for gonadotropin-releasing activity in vertebrates. Other molluscan GnRH-like peptides lack the C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence but have -X-NH2 or -Pro-Gly although all protostome GnRH-like peptides have yet to be sequenced. In marine molluscs, relationships between GnRH-like peptides and sex steroids have been studied to verify the hypothesis that molluscs have vertebrate-type sex steroid system. However, it is currently questionable whether such sex steroids are present and whether they play endogenous roles in the reproductive system of molluscs. Because molluscs uptake and store steroids from the environment and fishes release sex steroids into the external environment, it is impossible to rule out the contamination of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs. The function of key enzymes of steroidogenesis within molluscs remains unclear. Thus, evidence to deny the existence of the vertebrate-type sex steroid system in molluscs has been accumulated. The elucidation of substances, which regulate the maturation and maintenance of gonads and other reproductive functions in molluscs will require rigorous and progressive scientific study.

  18. Ergosteroids III. Syntheses and biological activity of seco-steroids related to dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Reich, I L; Lardy, H; Wei, Y; Marwah, P; Kneer, N; Powell, D R; Reich, H J

    1998-10-01

    The unusual activity of some D-ring-seco estrogens led us to prepare several seco steroids related to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and to test for their ability to mimic thyroid hormone and 7-oxo-DHEA (1) as inducers of thermogenic enzymes in rats' livers. Only one, 3 beta-acetoxy-17a-oxa-androst-5-ene-7,17-dione (17), was capable of inducing both mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. The closely related 3 beta-hydroxy-17a-oxa-androsta-5,15-diene-7,17-diones (both 14 alpha and 14 beta, 14 and 15) induce the formation of malic enzyme but not of glycerophosphate dehydrogenase. The 3 beta-propionyl ester of the above 14 alpha steroid was not active, presumably because it was not deacylated in vivo. The 16,17 dicarboxylic acid (9) produced by opening the D-ring also induced the formation of malic enzyme but not of glycerophosphate dehydrogenase. 3 beta-Acetoxyandrost-5-ene-7,16,17-trione, an intermediate in the synthesis of D-ring seco compounds enhanced the formation of both enzymes. Twelve other D-ring seco compounds were not active. Seco androstanes oxygenated at position 7 and with expanded A or B rings were not active.

  19. A Hormonally Active Malignant Struma Ovarii

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Carolina; Salame, Latife; Padilla-Longoria, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Struma ovarii is a rare monodermal variant of ovarian teratoma that contains at least 50% thyroid tissue. Less than 8% of struma ovarii cases present with clinical and biochemical evidence of thyrotoxicosis due to ectopic production of thyroid hormone and only 5% undergo malignant transformation into a papillary thyroid carcinoma. Only isolated cases of hormonally active papillary thyroid carcinoma developing within a struma ovarii have been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who presented with clinical signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as a left adnexal mass, which proved to be a thyroid hormone-producing, malignant struma ovarii. PMID:27882257

  20. An orthotopic xenograft model of intraneural NF1 MPNST suggests a potential association between steroid hormones and tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, George Q; Li, Hua; Fishbein, Lauren; Thomson, Susanne A; Hwang, Min S; Scarborough, Mark T; Yachnis, Anthony T; Wallace, Margaret R; Mareci, Thomas H; Muir, David

    2007-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are the most aggressive cancers associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Here we report a practical and reproducible model of intraneural NF1 MPNST, by orthotopic xenograft of an immortal human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line into the sciatic nerves of female scid mice. Intraneural injection of the cell line sNF96.2 consistently produced MPNST-like tumors that were highly cellular and showed extensive intraneural growth. These xenografts had a high proliferative index, were angiogenic, had significant mast cell infiltration and rapidly dominated the host nerve. The histopathology of engrafted intraneural tumors was consistent with that of human NF1 MPNST. Xenograft tumors were readily examined by magnetic resonance imaging, which also was used to assess tumor vascularity. In addition, the intraneural proliferation of sNF96.2 cell tumors was decreased in ovariectomized mice, while replacement of estrogen or progesterone restored tumor cell proliferation. This suggests a potential role for steroid hormones in supporting tumor cell growth of this MPNST cell line in vivo. The controlled orthotopic implantation of sNF96.2 cells provides for the precise initiation of intraneural MPNST-like tumors in a model system suitable for therapeutic interventions, including inhibitors of angiogenesis and further study of steroid hormone effects on tumor cell growth.

  1. Steroid hormone receptor gene expression in human breast cancer cells: inverse relationship between oestrogen and glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, R E; Lee, C S; Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Clarke, C L; Sutherland, R L

    1990-12-15

    The relative expression in human breast cancer cells of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) encoding different steroid hormone receptors is unknown. Accordingly, mRNA levels in total RNA extracted from 13 human breast cancer cell lines were measured by Northern analysis employing complementary DNA probes for the human oestrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), androgen (AR), vitamin D3 (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR). The 7 ER+ lines expressed a single 6.4 kilobases (kb) ER mRNA. Interestingly, low concentrations of ER mRNA were detected in the ER- cell lines, MDA-MB-330 and BT 20. PR mRNA, predominantly a 13.5 kb species, was expressed in the 6 lines known to be ER+, PR+ by radioligand binding; however, one ER+ cell line, MDA-MB-134, failed to express PR mRNA. A 10.5 kb AR mRNA was expressed at significantly higher levels in ER+ than ER- cell lines. All cell lines expressed a single 4.6 kb mRNA for VDR and a single 7.4 kb mRNA for GR. ER and PR mRNA levels were positively correlated (p = 0.011) and each was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels (p less than or equal to 0.009). ER, PR and AR mRNAs were negatively associated with GR levels (p less than or equal to 0.012), while ER and AR mRNA levels were negatively correlated with mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor. In contrast, levels of VDR mRNA were unrelated to the concentration of any other steroid receptor mRNA. Our data demonstrate the coordinate expression of ER, PR and AR genes, and an inverse relationship between sex steroid hormone receptor and GR gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

  2. Sexual differentiation of the copulatory neuromuscular system in green anoles (Anolis carolinensis): normal ontogeny and manipulation of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Melissa M; Wade, Juli

    2005-09-05

    The copulatory neuromuscular system of green anoles is sexually dimorphic and differentiates during embryonic development, although details of the process were unknown. In Experiment 1, we determined the time course of normal ontogeny. Both male and female embryos possessed bilateral copulatory organs (hemipenes) and associated muscles until incubation day 13; the structures completely regressed in female embryos by incubation day 19 (total incubation 34 days). In Experiment 2, we treated eggs with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, or vehicle on both incubation days 10 and 13 to determine whether these steroid hormones mediate sexual differentiation. These time points fall between gonadal differentiation, which was determined in Experiment 1 to complete before day 10, and regression of the peripheral copulatory system in females. Tissue was collected on the day of hatching. Gonads were classified as testes or ovaries; presence versus absence of hemipenes and muscles, and the number and size of copulatory motoneurons were determined. Copulatory system morphology of vehicle-treated animals matched their gonadal sex. Hemipenes and muscles were absent in estradiol-treated animals, and androgens rescued the hemipenes and muscles in most females. Both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone treatment also caused hypertrophy of the hemipenes, which were everted in animals treated with these steroids. Copulatory motoneurons, assessed on the day of hatching in both experiments, were not dimorphic in size or number. Steroid treatment significantly increased motoneuron size and number overall, but no significant differences were detected in pairwise comparisons. These data demonstrate that differentiation of peripheral copulatory neuromuscular structures occurs during embryonic development and is influenced by gonadal steroids (regression by estradiol and enhancement by androgens), but associated motoneurons do not differentiate until later in life.

  3. Determination of steroid hormones in human plasma by GC-triple quadrupole MS.

    PubMed

    Matysik, Silke; Schmitz, Gerd

    2015-07-01

    A fast and sensitive GC-MS/MS method is proposed to determine pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), testosterone and dihydrotestosterone from human plasma. Steroids were extracted by liquid/liquid extraction, and derivatized with N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoracetamide. Electron ionization at 30eV was applied to generate high abundant precursor ions. Specific precursor/product transitions were generated a priori for each compound of interest and these assays were then used to selectively detect and quantify these steroids. Using the selected reaction monitoring mode, detection limits in the pg/ml (subnmol/l) range could be achieved for all four steroid compounds. The method was validated for imprecision, and recovery and applied in a pilot study in patients with hypercholesterolemia. Associations of increased cholesterol biosynthesis and low testosterone and dihydrotestosterone concentrations were found.

  4. In situ relationship between energy reserves and steroid hormone levels in Nereis diversicolor (O.F. Müller) from clean and contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Mouneyrac, C; Pellerin, J; Moukrim, A; Ait Alla, A; Durou, C; Viault, N

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, in situ, the temporal effects of urban effluent discharge on energy reserves and steroid hormone levels in the intrasedimentary worm Nereis diversicolor. Results have shown no differences in energy reserves (glycogen, lipids) in organisms originating from a contaminated site (Oued Souss) and a comparatively clean site (Oualidia). Both sites are located on the Moroccan Atlantic coast. In contrast, steroid hormone (progesterone, testosterone, and 17beta-estradiol) levels were significantly decreased in animals from Oued Souss. The differences in the responses suggest that organisms from the polluted site have been exposed to endocrine disruptors.

  5. Quantitative trait loci predicting circulating sex steroid hormones in men from the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald L.; Ardanaz, Eva; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Diver, W. Ryan; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loïc; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Stattin, Pär; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Kaaks, Rudolf; Hunter, David J.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies suggest a heritable component to circulating sex steroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). In the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, 874 SNPs in 37 candidate genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway were examined in relation to circulating levels of SHBG (N = 4720), testosterone (N = 4678), 3α-androstanediol-glucuronide (N = 4767) and 17β-estradiol (N = 2014) in Caucasian men. rs1799941 in SHBG is highly significantly associated with circulating levels of SHBG (P = 4.52 × 10−21), consistent with previous studies, and testosterone (P = 7.54 × 10−15), with mean difference of 26.9 and 14.3%, respectively, comparing wild-type to homozygous variant carriers. Further noteworthy novel findings were observed between SNPs in ESR1 with testosterone levels (rs722208, mean difference = 8.8%, P = 7.37 × 10−6) and SRD5A2 with 3α-androstanediol-glucuronide (rs2208532, mean difference = 11.8%, P = 1.82 × 10−6). Genetic variation in genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway is associated with differences in circulating SHBG and sex steroid hormones. PMID:19574343

  6. The role of sexual steroid hormones in the direct stimulation by Kisspeptin-10 of the secretion of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, A Ahmed; Saito, H; Sawada, T; Yaegashi, T; Goto, Y; Nakajima, Y; Jin, J; Yamashita, T; Sawai, K; Hashizume, T

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of Kisspeptin-10 (Kp10) on the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin (PRL) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells and evaluate the ability of sex steroids to enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic and lactotropic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 7-week-old male calves were incubated for 12h with estradiol (E(2); 10(-8)M), progesterone (P(4); 10(-8)M), testosterone (T; 10(-8)M), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2h with Kp10 (10(-6)M). The amounts of LH, FSH and PRL released into the culture medium after the 2-h incubation period were examined. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of LH from the AP cells treated with E(2) and T (P<0.05), but not from the P(4)-treated cells. In contrast, Kp10 had no effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the steroid treatment. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of PRL (P<0.05), the sexual steroid hormones having no effect. The LH- or FSH-releasing response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10(-8)M) and PRL-releasing response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH; 10(-8)M) were significantly greater than those to Kp10 (P<0.05). The present results suggest that E(2) and T, but not P(4), enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic cells to the secretion of LH in response to Kp10. However, Kp10 had no stimulatory effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the effect of sex steroids. Kp10 directly stimulates the secretion of PRL from the pituitary cells, and sex steroids do not enhance the sensitivity of lactotropic cells to Kp10. Furthermore, the LH- and FSH-releasing effect and the PRL-releasing effect of Kp10 are less potent than that of GnRH and TRH, respectively.

  7. Neuropeptidase activity is down-regulated by estradiol in steroid-sensitive regions of the hypothalamus in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Lisa A.; Cyr, Nicole E.; Qiao, Jana W.; DeFries, Christa C.; Tetel, Marc J.; Wolfson, Adele J.

    2012-01-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) are neuropeptidases involved in the hydrolysis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a key component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH is regulated in part by feedback from steroid hormones such as estradiol. Previously, we demonstrated that TOP levels are down-regulated by estradiol in reproductively-relevant regions of the female rodent brain. The present study supports these findings by showing that TOP enzyme activity, as well as protein levels, in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of female mice are controlled estradiol. We further demonstrate that PEP levels in this same brain region are down-regulated by estradiol in parallel with those of TOP. These findings provide evidence that these neuropeptidases are part of the fine control of hormone levels in the HPG axis. PMID:22672888

  8. Effects of sex steroid hormones, thyroid hormone levels, and insulin regulation on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Changsheng, Chen; Jiangfang, Fu; Bin, Gao; Nanyan, Zhang; Xiaomiao, Li; Deqiang, Li; Ying, Xing; Wensong, Zai; Qiuhe, Ji

    2010-12-01

    Our study is to determine the expression of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, insulin, and C-peptide in Chinese male patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). This study covered 102 patients with hyperthyroidism from Xijing Hospital. According to whether occurrence of TPP or not, patients were divided into two groups (those that were hyperthyroid with and without TPP) that were, matched with age, blood pressure, urea, and creatinine. We found the body mass index (BMI) in patients with TPP was higher than that in pure hyperthyroidism patients. The levels of the total thyroxine (T4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) were significantly lower in patients with TPP compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients, while serum testosterone levels were higher compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients. Moreover, after glucose administration, the concentration of insulin at 60, 120, and 180 min were significantly higher in patients with TPP than those in pure hyperthyroidism patients. The insulin area under the curve (AUC) was significantly increased in patients with TPP compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients. The levels of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, and insulin were different in Chinese male patients with TPP compared to those with only hyperthyroidism.

  9. Rapid and sensitive analysis of phthalate metabolites, bisphenol A, and endogenous steroid hormones in human urine by mixed-mode solid-phase extraction, dansylation, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, He-xing; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Ying; Jiang, Qing-wu

    2013-05-01

    Steroid hormone levels in human urine are convenient and sensitive indicators for the impact of phthalates and/or bisphenol A (BPA) exposure on the human steroid hormone endocrine system. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method for determination of 14 phthalate metabolites, BPA, and ten endogenous steroid hormones in urine was developed and validated on the basis of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The optimized mixed-mode solid phase-extraction separated the weakly acidic or neutral BPA and steroid hormones from acidic phthalate metabolites in urine: the former were determined in positive ion mode with a methanol/water mobile phase containing 10 mM ammonium formate; the latter were determined in negative ion mode with a acetonitrile/water mobile phase containing 0.1 % acetic acid, which significantly alleviated matrix effects for the analysis of BPA and steroid hormones. Dansylation of estrogens and BPA realized simultaneous and sensitive analysis of the endogenous steroid hormones and BPA in a single chromatographic run. The limits of detection were less than 0.84 ng/mL for phthalate metabolites and less than 0.22 ng/mL for endogenous steroid hormones and BPA. This proposed method had satisfactory precision and accuracy, and was successfully applied to the analyses of human urine samples. This method could be valuable when investigating the associations among endocrine-disrupting chemicals, endogenous steroid hormones, and relevant adverse outcomes in epidemiological studies.

  10. Correspondence between Gonadal Steroid Hormone Concentrations and Secondary Sexual Characteristics Assessed by Clinicians, Adolescents, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Bin; Hillman, Jennifer; Biro, Frank M.; Ding, Lili; Dorn, Lorah D.; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent sexual maturation is staged using Tanner criteria assessed by clinicians, parents, or adolescents. The physiology of sexual maturation is driven by gonadal hormones. We investigate Tanner stage progression as a function of increasing gonadal hormone concentration and compare performances of different raters. Fifty-six boys (mean age,…

  11. Plasma steroid hormone levels in female flounder Platichthys flesus and the influence of fluctuating hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Damasceno-Oliveira, A; Fernández-Durán, B; Gonçalves, J; Couto, E; Canário, A V M; Coimbra, J

    2012-11-01

    The reproductive cycle in teleosts is timed to guarantee that eggs hatch in the right place at the right time, with environmental factors playing important roles in entraining and controlling the entire process. The effects of some environmental factors, like temperature and photoperiod, are now well understood. There are only a few studies regarding the effects of hydrostatic pressure (HP) on the reproductive cycle, in spite of its importance as a ubiquitous factor in all biological environments and affecting all living organisms. Hydrostatic pressure is of particular importance in fish because they can also experience rapid and cyclic changes in HP due to vertical movements in the water column. The aim of the present research was to investigate the effects of vertical migrations on the reproductive steroids of maturing female flounder. After a 14 day exposure to cyclic hydrostatic pressure (with a period of 12.4h and with a maximum peak of 800 kPa of absolute hydrostatic pressure), fish showed significantly lower plasmatic concentrations of "5β,3α" steroids, metabolites of the putative maturation-inducing steroid in flounder (17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one). Results indicate that environmentally realistic cyclic changes of hydrostatic pressure can influence the metabolism of reproductive steroids. This suggests a physiological role of tidally-associated vertical migrations, affecting oocyte maturation and retarding the reproductive cycle in this species until the spawning ground is attained.

  12. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPOUNDS ON STEROID HORMONE PRODUCTION IN H295R CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    H295R cells constitute a pluripotent cell line that has retained the enzymatic ability to produce steroids along the entire steroidogenic pathway, including C19 androgens and C18 estrogens. For this reason, they have been a valued research tool, and have been employed in an ever...

  13. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin and Sex Steroids Among Premenopausal Women in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Stentz, Frankie B.; Murphy, Mary Beth; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: It is unknown whether intensive lifestyle modification (ILS) or metformin changes sex steroids among premenopausal women without a history of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Objectives: We examined 1-year intervention impact on sex steroids (estradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione [A4]) and SHBG and differences by race/ethnicity. Participants: A subgroup of Diabetes Prevention Program participants who were premenopausal, not using estrogen, without a history of PCOS or irregular menses, and who reported non-Hispanic white (NHW), Hispanic, or African-American race/ethnicity (n = 301). Interventions: Randomization arms were 1) ILS with the goals of weight reduction of 7% of initial weight and 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity exercise, 2) metformin 850 mg twice a day, or 3) placebo. Results: Neither intervention changed sex steroids compared to placebo. ILS, but not metformin, increased median SHBG by 3.1 nmol/L (∼11%) compared to decreases of 1.1 nmol/L in the placebo arm (P < .05). This comparison remained significant after adjustment for changes in covariates including waist circumference. However, associations with glucose were not significant. Median baseline A4 was lower in Hispanics compared to NHWs (5.7 nmol/L vs 6.5 nmol/L, P < .05) and increases in A4 were greater in Hispanics compared to NHWs (3.0 nmol/ vs 1.2 nmol/L, P < .05), and these differences did not differ significantly by intervention arm. No other racial/ethnic differences were significant. Conclusions: Among premenopausal glucose-intolerant women, no intervention changed sex steroids. ILS increased SHBG, although associations with glucose were not significant. SHBG and sex steroids were similar by race/ethnicity, with the possible exception of lower baseline A4 levels in Hispanics compared to NHWs. PMID:23709655

  14. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  15. Comprehensive Assessment of Hormones, Phytoestrogens, and Estrogenic Activity in an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  16. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-03

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  17. Effect of steroids on the activation status of platelets in patients with Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Bhoria, Preeti; Sharma, Saniya; Varma, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of platelets in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients--which is still somewhat controversial--is of potential interest, because activated platelets tend to aggregate (leading to excessive clotting or thromboembolic events) but cannot do so when platelet numbers are low, as in ITP. Although corticosteroids are the first line of therapy in ITP, the effect of steroids on activation of platelets has not been evaluated so far. We examined the status of platelet activation (with and without stimulation with ADP) in ITP patients, at the start of therapy (pre-steroid treatment, naive) and post-steroid treatment (classified on the basis of steroid responsiveness). We used flow cytometry to evaluate the levels of expression of P-selectin, and PAC-1 binding to platelets of 55 ITP patients and a similar number of healthy controls, treated with and without ADP. We found that platelets in ITP patients exist in an activated state. In patients who are responsive to steroids, the treatment reverses this situation. Also, the fold activation of platelets upon treatment with ADP is more in healthy controls than in ITP patients; treatment with steroids causes platelets in steroid-responsive patients to become more responsive to ADP-activation, similar to healthy controls. Thus steroids may cause changes in the ability of platelets to get activated with an agonist like ADP. Our results provide new insights into how, and why, steroid therapy helps in the treatment of ITP.

  18. Antiproliferative, Cytotoxic, and Apoptotic Activity of Steroidal Oximes in Cervicouterine Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Luis; Hernández-Linares, María Guadalupe; Escobar, María L; López-Muñoz, Hugo; Zenteno, Edgar; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Guerrero-Luna, Gabriel; Carrasco-Carballo, Alan; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jesús

    2016-11-14

    Steroidal sapogenins have shown antiproliferative effects against several tumor cell lines; and their effects on human cancer cells are currently under study. Changes in the functionality on the steroidal structure make it possible to modify the biological activity of compounds. Herein, we report the synthesis and in vitro antitumor activity of two steroidal oxime compounds on cervical cancer cells. These derivatives were synthesized from the steroidal sapogenin diosgenin in good yields. The in vitro assays show that the steroidal oximes show significant antiproliferative activity compared to the one observed for diosgenin. Cell proliferation, cell death, and the cytotoxic effects were determined in both cervical cancer cells and human lymphocytes. The cancer cells showed apoptotic morphology and an increased presence of active caspase-3, providing the notion of a death pathway in the cell. Significantly, the steroidal oximes did not exert a cytotoxic effect on lymphocytes.

  19. Effects of levetiracetam and valproic acid monotherapy on sex-steroid hormones in prepubertal children--results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Bitsche, Gabriele; Svalheim, Sigrid; Tauboll, Erik; Haberlandt, Edda; Wildt, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Luef, Gerhard

    2010-02-01

    The influence of levetiracetam (LEV) and valproic acid (VPA) monotherapy on sex-steroid hormone profile was investigated in thirty prepubertal children. VPA-treated children showed greatest androstendione concentrations when compared to LEV treated children (p=0.016) and to controls (p=0.011). All other reproductive endocrine hormones were similar among groups. In conclusion, LEV does not seem to induce changes in reproductive endocrine functions as well as clinically relevant endocrine side effects in prepubertal children.

  20. Reproductive status of captive Loggerhead sea turtles based on serum levels of gonadal steroid hormones, corticosterone and thyroxin.

    PubMed

    Valente, Ana Luisa S; Velarde, Roser; Parga, Maria Luz; Marco, Ignasi; Lavin, Santiago; Alegre, Ferran; Cuenca, Rafaela

    2011-02-01

    Serum levels of gonadal steroid hormones, corticosterone and thyroxin (T(4)), were monitored monthly in two male and one female captive Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) over a period of 12 months in 2004 and 3 months in 2006. Ovary ultrasonography was performed in April and July 2006. The turtles were kept together in an outdoor sea pool in natural temperature and photoperiod conditions from May to November, then in separate indoor pools from December to April. Circulating hormone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Oestradiol levels in the female turtle surged significantly in July, as did the progesterone level in September. Total testosterone levels were different in both males, but both peaked in September. The peaks of oestradiol in the female and testosterone in the males did not coincide, both showing delay with respect to the hormone cycle described in free-ranging Loggerhead sea turtles. A seasonal pattern in T(4) levels was not observed. The three captive turtles showed very low corticosterone levels throughout the year, with a September peak coinciding with the peaks of progesterone in females and testosterone in males. The results suggested that conditions of captivity should be as close as possible to natural conditions throughout the entire year since the process of vitellogenesis in this species is protracted. Exposure to natural conditions for only a few months is insufficient to induce reproduction/oviposition.

  1. Brain levels of sex steroid hormones in men and women during normal aging and in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Emily R.; Chang, Lilly; Head, Elizabeth H.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Pike, Christian J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationships between normal aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and brain levels of sex steroid hormones in men and women. In postmortem brain tissue from neuropathologically normal, postmenopausal women, we found no age-related changes in brain levels of either androgens or estrogens. In comparing women with and without AD at different ages, brain levels of estrogens and androgens were lower in AD cases aged 80 years and older but not significantly different in the 60–79 year age range. In male brains, we observed that normal aging was associated with significant decreases in androgens but not estrogens. Further, in men aged 60–79 years, brain levels of testosterone but not estrogens were lower in cases with mild neuropathological changes as well as those with advanced AD neuropathology. In male cases over age 80, brain levels hormones did not significantly vary by neuropathological status. To begin investigating the relationships between hormone levels and indices of AD neuropathology, we measured brain levels of soluble β-amyloid (Aβ). In male cases with mild neuropathological changes, we found an inverse relationship between brain levels of testosterone and soluble Aβ. Collectively, these findings demonstrate sex-specific relationships between normal, age-related depletion of androgens and estrogens in men and women, which may be relevant to development of AD. PMID:19428144

  2. Effect of hormone metabolism genotypes on steroid hormone levels and menopausal symptoms in a prospective population-based cohort of women experiencing the menopausal transition

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Su, H. Irene; Sammel, Mary D.; Lin, Hui; Tran, Teo V.; Gracia, Clarisa R.; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated whether genes involved in the metabolism of steroid hormones are associated with hormone levels or menopausal symptoms. Methods We used a population-based prospective sample of 436 African American (AA) and European American (EA) women who were premenopausal at enrollment and were followed longitudinally through menopause. We evaluated the relationship between steroid hormone metabolism genotypes at COMT, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP19, SULT1A1, and SULT1E1 with hormone levels and menopausal features. Results In EA women, SULT1E1 variant carriers had lower levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SULT1A1 variant carriers had lower levels of estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and testosterone compared with women who did not carry these variant alleles. In AA women, CYP1B1*3 genotypes were associated with hot flashes (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40–0.95). Interactions of CYP1A2 genotypes were associated with hot flashes across menopausal stage (P = 0.006). Interactions of CYP1B1*3 (P = 0.02) and CYP1B1*4 (P = 0.03) with menopausal stage were associated with depressive symptoms. In EA women, SULT1A1*3 was associated with depressive symptoms (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.41–0.68) and hot flashes (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.64–2.63). There were significant interactions between SULT1A1*3 and hot flashes (P < 0.001) and between SULT1A1*2 and depressive symptoms (P = 0.007) on menopausal stage, and there were race-specific effects of SULT1A1*2, SULT1A1*3, CYP1B1*3, and CYP3A4*1B on menopause. Conclusions Our results suggest that genotypes are associated with the occurrence of menopause-related symptoms or the timing of the menopausal transition. PMID:20505544

  3. Characteristics and biological role of steroid hormone receptors in neuroepithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, P; Butti, G; Zibera, C; Scerrati, M; Gibelli, N; Roselli, R; Magrassi, L; Sica, G; Rossi, G; Robustelli della Cuna, G

    1990-11-01

    Tissue samples from 57 patients with neuroepithelial tumors (25 glioblastomas, 18 anaplastic astrocytomas, and 14 astrocytomas) were analyzed in order to evaluate the presence of estrogen, progesterone, glucocorticoid, and androgen receptors. Glucocorticoid- and androgen-specific binding proteins were present in 38.6% and 21.6% of the cases, respectively. Only a few tumors showed estrogen or progesterone receptors. A correlation was found between grade of anaplasia, patient's sex and age, and presence of glucocorticoid and androgen receptors. The biological role of these two receptors was investigated in 10 primary cell cultures derived from neuroepithelial tumors. For this purpose, dexamethasone and testosterone were added to culture medium at different concentrations (from 50 to 0.016 micrograms/ml). A significant stimulation of the cell growth was observed in four of five glucocorticoid receptor-positive cultures when dexamethasone in doses ranging from 2 to 0.016 microgram/ml was added to the culture. No modulation of the growth was observed in glucocorticoid receptor-negative cultures at the same doses. Higher dexamethasone doses induced a significant decrease of the growth index independently from the glucocorticoid receptor status. All of the cultures tested for testosterone activity were negative for androgen receptors. This hormone induced an inhibition of the growth index at doses ranging from 50 to 0.4 micrograms/ml. The data suggest that neuroepithelial tumors contain specific glucocorticoid and androgen binding proteins. Glucocorticoid receptors modulate the growth of cultured neuroepithelial tumors in the presence of different concentrations of dexamethasone.

  4. Sex steroids and the male skeleton: a tale of two hormones.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Filip; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2010-02-01

    Traditionally, the stronger male skeleton was considered to result from higher androgen levels in men compared to women. However, the regulation of male bone growth by sex steroids appears more complex than originally anticipated. Based on clinical observations and studies in animal models, not only androgens and androgen receptor (AR), but also estrogens and estrogen receptor-alpha (not ERbeta) are required for optimal bone mineral acquisition during male growth. In addition, both sex steroids are involved in the maintenance of male skeletal health. In fact, bone loss and fracture risk have been associated with estrogen exposure in elderly men. Overall, a compelling body of evidence suggests that both androgens and estrogens are crucial for male skeletal growth and maintenance.

  5. On-line solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry optimized for the analysis of steroid hormones in urban wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Paul B; Prévost, Michèle; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2013-10-15

    An analytical method based on on-line SPE-LC-APCI-MS/MS has been developed for the detection and quantification of eight selected estrogenic and progestagenic steroid hormones; estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), levonorgestrel (LEVO), medroxyprogesterone (MEDRO), norethindrone (NORE) and progesterone (PROG) in wastewater matrices. The injection volume could range from 1 to 10-mL according to the expected concentration of steroid hormones in matrix. The method characteristics are: analysis time per sample (<15 min), acceptable recovery values (71-95%), good precision (RSD ≤ 10%) and limits of detection at the low-nanogram per liter levels in affluent and effluent wastewaters (8-60 ng L(-1)). In particular, a detailed discussion of optimization parameters impacting overall performance of the method has been presented (sample collection, filtration and storage). All optimization and validation experiments for the on-line SPE method and chromatographic separation were performed in environmentally-relevant wastewater matrices. This method represents a compromise between analysis time, higher sample throughput capabilities, sample volume and simplicity for the analysis of both progestagenic and estrogenic steroid hormones in a single run, with LODs and LOQs sufficiently low to detect and quantify them in environmental wastewater matrices. Thus, the applicability of the method was tested on affluent and effluent wastewaters from two wastewater treatment facilities using different processes (biological and physico-chemical) to evaluate their removal efficiency for the detected steroid hormones.

  6. Use of a surrogate to evaluate the impact of tillage on the transport of steroid hormones from manure-amended agricultural field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef feedlot manure distributed to row crop production areas is a potential surface water contaminant source of the steroid hormones commonly used in beef cattle production. This article reports on research conducted at the University of Nebraska Haskell Agricultural Laboratory near Concord, Nebrask...

  7. Using Digital Images of the Zebra Finch Song System as a Tool to Teach Organizational Effects of Steroid Hormones: A Free Downloadable Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Beck McCauley, Lisa M.; Pham, Anh P.; Ruiz, Maureen L.; Fong, Michelle C.; Cui, Xinran

    2011-01-01

    Zebra finch song behavior is sexually dimorphic: males sing and females do not. The neural system underlying this behavior is sexually dimorphic, and this sex difference is easy to quantify. During development, the zebra finch song system can be altered by steroid hormones, specifically estradiol, which actually masculinizes it. Because of the…

  8. Role of genetics and sex steroid hormones in male androgenetic alopecia and female pattern hair loss: an update of what we now know.

    PubMed

    Yip, Leona; Rufaut, Nick; Sinclair, Rod

    2011-05-01

    The role of genetic predisposition and the influence of sex steroid hormones are indisputable to the pathogenesis of male androgenetic alopecia (MAGA). The role of sex steroid hormones in female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is less known. A good knowledge of the pathophysiology underlying MAGA and FPHL empowers the clinician to confidently counsel patients and make informed therapeutic decisions. Vigorous research in recent years has provided greater insight into the role of genetics and sex steroids in physiological hair growth and cycling, as well as in hair follicle miniaturization, the histological hallmark of MAGA and FPHL. In the present review article directed towards clinicians, we discuss the current understanding of the role of androgens and oestrogens, as well as genetic associations with MAGA and FPHL. We also briefly discuss the interpretation of direct-to-consumer genetic testing for baldness to help clinicians understand the limitations of such tests.

  9. Pathways and genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in male pigs: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Robic, Annie; Faraut, Thomas; Prunier, Armelle

    2014-03-01

    This paper reviews state-of-the-art knowledge on steroid biosynthesis pathways in the pig and provides an updated characterization of the porcine genes involved in these pathways with particular focus on androgens, estrogens, and 16-androstenes. At least 21 different enzymes appear to be involved in these pathways in porcine tissues together with at least five cofactors. Until now, data on several porcine genes were scarce or confusing. We characterized the complete genomic and transcript sequences of the single porcine CYP11B gene. We analyzed the porcine AKR1 gene cluster and identified four AKR1C, one AKR1C like genes and one AKR1E2 gene. We provide evidence that porcine AKR1C genes are not orthologous to human AKR1C. A new nomenclature is thus needed for this gene family in the pig. Thirty-two genes are now described: transcript (30+2 characterized in this study) and genomic (complete: 18+1 and partial: 12+1) sequences are identified. However, despite increasing knowledge on steroid metabolism in the pig, there is still no explanation of why porcine testes can produce androstenone and epiandrosterone, but not dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is also a reduced steroid.

  10. Expression of focal adhesion kinase in endometrial stromal cells of women with endometriosis was adjusted by ovarian steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lin; Ma, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the effects of ovarian steroid hormones on focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression in ESCs and whether there is alteration in women with endometriosis. FAK expression was assessed by western blotting analysis. Elevated expression of FAK was seen in the cultured ESCs treated with estrogen (P < 0.05). Expression of FAK protein was not changed in ESCs after treated by progesterone or treated by estrogen and progesterone. The level of up-regulation by estrogen in endometriosis is significantly higher than that from women without endometriosis (P < 0.05). FAK expression in endometrial stromal cells from endometriosis was more sensitive to estrogen, which might contribute to the pathogenesis and progress of endometriosis.

  11. Annual changes in plasma levels of cortisol and sex steroid hormones in male rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ya-Yi; Han, Xiao-Dong; Suzuki, Yuzuru

    2001-09-01

    The profiles of cortisol, testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one in male rainbow trout reared under constant water temperature and natural photoperiod were determined by radioimmunoassay. Gonads of male rainbow trout reached maturity when the fish were two years old. Changes in the plasma levels of both sex steroid hormones and cortisol were closely related to the GSI. Plasma levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 17α; 20β-dihydroxy 4-pregnene-3-one showed a clear peak in the annual breeding season, when the GSI reached their maxima. Plasma cortisol levels also showed clearly seasonal changes in both two- and three-year-old fish. The results suggest that the elevated plasma levels of cortisol may not just be due to stresses during the breeding season but have certain physiological functions in the reproduction of rainbow trout.

  12. DIAGNOSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Steroid Hormone Analysis in Diagnosis and Treatment of DSD Position Paper of EU COST Action BM 1303 "DSDnet".

    PubMed

    Kulle, Alexandra; Krone, Nils; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Schuler, Gerhard; Greaves, Ronda; Juul, Anders; de Rijke, Yolanda; Hartmann, Michaela; Saba, Alessandro; Hiort, Olaf; Wudy, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    Disorders or differences in sex development (DSD) comprise a heterogeneous group of conditions with an atypical sex development. For optimal diagnosis highly specialized laboratory analyses are required across European countries. Working group 3 of EU COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action BM 1303 "DSDnet" "Harmonisation of Laboratory Assessment" has developed recommendations on laboratory assessment for DSD regarding the use of technologies and analytes to be investigated. This position paper on steroid hormone analysis in diagnosis and treatment of DSD was compiled by a group of specialists in DSD and/or hormonal analysis, either from participating European Countries or international partner countries. The topics discussed comprised analytical methods (immunoassay/mass spectrometry based methods), matrices (urine/serum/saliva) and harmonisation of laboratory tests. The following positions were agreed upon: Support of the appropriate use of immunoassay and mass spectrometry based methods for diagnosis and monitoring of DSD. Serum/plasma and urine are established matrices for analysis. Laboratories performing analyses for DSD need to operate within a quality framework and actively engage in harmonisation processes so that results and their interpretation are the same irrespective of the laboratory they are performed in. Participation in activities of peer comparison such as sample exchange or when available subscribing to a relevant external quality assurance program should be achieved. The ultimate aim of the guidelines is the implementation of clinical standards for diagnosis and appropriate treatment of DSD to achieve the best outcome for patients, no matter where patients are investigated or managed.

  13. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation of the photoelectron spectra of famous biological active steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2014-11-01

    The photoelectron spectra of some famous steroids, important in biology, were calculated in the gas phase. The selected steroids were 5α-androstane-3,11,17-trione, 4-androstane-3,11,17-trione, cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dexamethasone, estradiol and cholesterol. The calculations were performed employing symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method using the 6-311++G(2df,pd) basis set. The population ratios of conformers of each steroid were calculated and used for simulating the photoelectron spectrum of steroid. It was found that more than one conformer contribute to the photoelectron spectra of some steroids. To confirm the calculated photoelectron spectra, they compared with their corresponding experimental spectra. There were no experimental gas phase Hesbnd I photoelectron spectra for some of the steroids of this work in the literature and their calculated spectra can show a part of intrinsic characteristics of this molecules in the gas phase. The canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization of each steroid were calculated at the HF/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. The spectral bands of each steroid were assigned by natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations. Knowing the electronic structures of steroids helps us to understand their biological activities and find which sites of steroid become active when a modification is performing under a biological pathway.

  14. Treatment of idiopathic short stature: effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs, aromatase inhibitors and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Leo

    2011-01-01

    Modulation of sex steroid action on the growth plate can, at least theoretically, increase adult height in children and adolescents with idiopathic short stature. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy during adolescence has been shown effective in a placebo-controlled study, but to obtain clinically significant increases in adult height, the treatment duration must be lengthy (several years). Furthermore, such treatment seems to compromise bone health and, because of the resulting delay in pubertal development, likely has psychosocial consequences. Therefore, GnRH analogs are no longer recommended to augment height in adolescents with short stature and normally timed puberty. Aromatase inhibitors are probably more effective than GnRH analogs in promoting increased adult height in children with short stature and, unlike GnRH analogs, do not delay pubertal development in males. However, due to a dearth of safety data with aromatase inhibitors for the treatment of short stature, their use outside a research setting is currently not recommended. Positive effects of anabolic steroids on adult height have not been documented.

  15. Asynchronic steroid activity of Leydig and Sertoli cells related to spermatogenic and testosterone cycle in Phymaturus antofagastensis.

    PubMed

    Boretto, J M; Ibargüengoytía, N R; Jahn, G A; Acosta, J C; Vincenti, A E; Fornés, M W

    2010-05-01

    The severe environments where Phymaturus lizards inhabit in the Andes highlands and in Patagonia, Argentina, impose restrictions on their reproduction, offering a framework for the development of life history strategies to overcome hard weather conditions. Among them, prolonged female cycles, asynchrony between sexes in receptivity, and sperm storage in males, were described. Asynchrony in the reproductive timing between males and females is a consequence of different energy requirements for gametogenesis, and often imply the existence of cellular mechanisms to enhance fertilization, such as the asynchronic steroid synthesis between testicular compartments, allowing gametogenesis independently of mating. In the present study ultrastructural and hormone assays were combined for the first time in liolaemids. Specifically, morphological features of steroid activity in Leydig and Sertoli cells, and serum testosterone concentrations have been studied in the lizard Phymaturus antofagastensis. Leydig and Sertoli cells presented morphological features characteristic of steroid synthesis during the spermatogenesis, and evident asynchronic steroid production between testicular compartments. Active Sertoli cells and inactive Leydig cells were observed in spring and autumn, while in mid-summer their steroid activity was synchronic in coincidence with maximal abundance of spermatozoa in epididymis. Serum testosterone concentration was at its maximum in mid-summer (126-230 ng ml(-1)), and minimum in late spring (4-24 ng ml(-1)) and early autumn (2-17 ng ml(-1)). In view of these results, P. antofagastensis males show an original approach to adjust their reproductive activity to physiological and environmental constraints at high latitudes and altitudes in the Andean highlands of Argentina.

  16. New active series of growth hormone secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Guerlavais, Vincent; Boeglin, Damien; Mousseaux, Delphine; Oiry, Catherine; Heitz, Annie; Deghenghi, Romano; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio; Ghé, Corrado; Catapano, Filomena; Muccioli, Giampiero; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2003-03-27

    New growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) analogues were synthesized and evaluated for growth hormone releasing activity. This series derived from EP-51389 is based on a gem-diamino structure. Compounds that exhibited higher in vivo GH-releasing potency than hexarelin in rat (subcutaneous administration) were then tested per os in beagle dogs and for their binding affinity to human pituitary GHS receptors and to hGHS-R 1a. Compound 7 (JMV 1843, H-Aib-(d)-Trp-(d)-gTrp-formyl) showed high potency in these tests and was selected for clinical studies.(1)

  17. [Endocrino-pharmacological study of reproduction: Role and biosynthesis of steroid hormones in the feto-placental unit].

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Masubuchi, Y; Komoriyama, K

    1981-03-01

    Although considerable information is available concerning steroidogenesis in the human fetus, the function of the different steroids formed during pregnancy and the factors regulating this delicate hormones balance are poorly understood. During human pregnancy, the placenta synthesizes large quantities of progesterone, estradiol, estrone and estriol and secretes these hormones into both the maternal and fetal circulations; progesterone from maternal lipoprotein-cholesterol, estradiol and estrone from maternal and fetal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS), and estriol largely from fetal 16 alpha-OH-DHAS. It has been demonstrated that preimplantation blastocysts of several animal species have the capacity to accumulate steroids to pregnenolone to progesterone, and to interconvert estrone and estradiol. Estetrol (E4), 15 alpha-hydroxy derivative of estriol is an interesting compound, since its formation is relatively unique to fetal liver function. Of special interest is that placental sulfatase deficiencies result in an extension of the gestation, and Cesarean section has to be done. This raises the question of the role of estrogens in determining the onset of labor, much as in the case of anencephaly. In general, progesterone may decline prior to an abortion, but there has not been a direct application to clinical practice. Estrogen levels during pregnancy are influenced by factors other than fetal well-being and include fetal weight, placental enzyme function, fetal adrenal function, maternal intestinal flora, maternal renal excretion and maternal liver function. Although not yet extensively utilized, such a dynamic test as the infusion of DHAS may yield useful information within a short period in otherwise complicated cases related to fetal and placental function.

  18. KNDy Neurons Modulate the Magnitude of the Steroid-Induced Luteinizing Hormone Surges in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Helena, Cleyde V; Toporikova, Natalia; Kalil, Bruna; Stathopoulos, Andrea M; Pogrebna, Veronika V; Carolino, Ruither O; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Bertram, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is the most potent stimulator of LH release. There are two kisspeptin neuronal populations in the rodent brain: in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and in the arcuate nucleus. The arcuate neurons coexpress kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin and are called KNDy neurons. Because estradiol increases kisspeptin expression in the AVPV whereas it inhibits KNDy neurons, AVPV and KNDy neurons have been postulated to mediate the positive and negative feedback effects of estradiol on LH secretion, respectively. Yet the role of KNDy neurons during the positive feedback is not clear. In this study, ovariectomized rats were microinjected bilaterally into the arcuate nucleus with a saporin-conjugated neurokinin B receptor agonist for targeted ablation of approximately 70% of KNDy neurons. In oil-treated animals, ablation of KNDy neurons impaired the rise in LH after ovariectomy and kisspeptin content in both populations. In estradiol-treated animals, KNDy ablation did not influence the negative feedback of steroids during the morning. Surprisingly, KNDy ablation increased the steroid-induced LH surges, accompanied by an increase of kisspeptin content in the AVPV. This increase seems to be due to lack of dynorphin input from KNDy neurons to the AVPV as the following: 1) microinjections of a dynorphin antagonist into the AVPV significantly increased the LH surge in estradiol-treated rats, similar to KNDy ablation, and 2) intra-AVPV microinjections of dynorphin in KNDy-ablated rats restored LH surge levels. Our results suggest that KNDy neurons provide inhibition to AVPV kisspeptin neurons through dynorphin and thus regulate the amplitude of the steroid-induced LH surges.

  19. Steroidal Saponins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, N. P.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. B.; Mandal, D.

    The medicinal activities of plants are generally due to the secondary metabolites (1) which often occur as glycosides of steroids, terpenoids, phenols etc. Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides, characterized by their strong foam-forming properties in aqueous solution. The cardiac glycosides also possess this, property but are classified separately because of their specific biological activity. Unlike the cardiac glycosides, saponins generally do not affect the heart. These are classified as steroid or triterpenoid saponins depending on the nature of the aglycone. Steroidal glycosides are naturally occurring sugar conjugates of C27 steroidal compounds. The aglycone of a steroid saponin is usually a spirostanol or a furostanol. The glycone parts of these compounds are mostly oligosaccharides, arranged either in a linear or branched fashion, attached to hydroxyl groups through an acetal linkage (2, 3). Another class of saponins, the basic steroid saponins, contain nitrogen analogues of steroid sapogenins as aglycones.

  20. The endocrine activity of beef cattle wastes: do growth-promoting steroids make a difference?

    PubMed

    Sellin, Marlo K; Snow, Daniel D; Gustafson, Sarah T; Erickson, Galen E; Kolok, Alan S

    2009-05-17

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the endocrine activity of wastes from trenbolone acetate:estradiol (TBA:E)-implanted steers to that of wastes from unimplanted steers. To accomplish this, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to urine or fecal slurry from TBA:E-implanted or unimplanted steers for 7 days. Following exposures, hepatic vitellogenin (vtg) mRNA expression and secondary sexual characteristics were assessed. Among both males and females, there were no differences in vtg mRNA expression between fish exposed to urine from implanted or unimplanted steers at any of the concentrations tested. Furthermore, concentrations of steroid hormones in the urine of implanted and unimplanted steers were similar. These findings indicate a lack of differences in the endocrine activity of urine from TBA:E-implanted and unimplanted steers. With regard to the fecal slurry exposures, there were no significant differences in vtg mRNA expression among females from any of the groups; however, significant differences in male vtg mRNA expression were detected. Specifically, males exposed to 1600 mg dry feces/L from implanted cattle experienced an 840-fold increase in vtg mRNA expression relative to both unexposed males and males exposed to the corresponding fecal concentration from unimplanted steers. These males also appeared to experience a reduction in male secondary sexual characteristics. These findings suggest that steroids associated with the wastes from TBA:E-implanted steers have both feminizing and demasculinizing effects on male fish. Furthermore, these effects are most likely due to the presence of estrogenic compounds, which were detected in the liquid portion of the fecal slurry from TBA:E-implanted steers, but not in that of unimplanted steers. The findings of this study indicate the presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds in the urine and feces of cattle and suggest that the implant history of cattle alters the endocrine activity of

  1. Expression of steroid hormone receptors in benign hepatic tumors. An immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Masood, S; West, A B; Barwick, K W

    1992-12-01

    Many hepatic adenomas have been demonstrated to have a clear relationship with oral contraceptive use, and it is presumed that there may be hormone receptors within the cytoplasm or nucleus of adenoma cells that mediate tumor growth in response to hormonal stimulation. Only a small number of examples of benign hepatic tumors have been analyzed for the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors, and there has been a lack of consensus with regard to the findings. All previous studies have determined receptor levels by biochemical methods. In a retrospective study, we employed specific monoclonal antibodies against estrogen and progesterone receptors in 10 benign paraffin-embedded hepatic lesions: five examples of hepatic adenoma and five examples of focal nodular hyperplasia. All patients were female, except for one male with adenoma and one male with focal nodular hyperplasia. No patient had received tamoxifen citrate or any other form of hormonal therapy for their hepatic lesion. Positive controls included benign and malignant breast tissue. No positive staining was seen in hepatic adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, or normal adjacent liver parenchyma. Intense positive staining was seen in all positive control tissues. This negative result with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies in an established immunohistochemical method for analysis of estrogen and progesterone receptors does not exclude the presence of these receptors in benign hepatic lesions, but does suggest that, if present, they occur in much smaller amounts than in benign and malignant breast tissue. The presence of hormone receptors in benign hepatic tumors deserves further study.

  2. Involvement of Novel Multifunctional Steroid Hormone Receptor Coactivator, E6-Associated Protein, in Prostate Gland Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Angelman syndrome-associated protein, E6-AP, is a coactivator for the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Mol Cell Biol 19:1182-9. 26. Hsiao PW, Chang C...Albrecht U, Atkins CM, Noebels JL, Eichele G, Sweatt JD, Beaudet AL 1998 Mutation of the Angelman ubiquitin ligase in mice causes increased cytoplasmic

  3. Adolescent anabolic steroid use, gender, physical activity, and other problem behaviors*.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kathleen E; Hoffman, Joseph H; Barnes, Grace M; Sabo, Don; Melnick, Merrill J; Farrell, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    To test the comparative value of strain theory and problem behavior theory as explanations of adolescent anabolic steroid use, this study examined gender-specific relationships among steroid use, physical activity, and other problem behaviors. Based on the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1997 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a nationally representative sample of over 16,000 U.S. public and private high school students, binge drinking, cocaine use, fighting, and sexual risk-taking were associated with higher odds of lifetime steroid use. In gender-specific analyses, steroid use was strongly associated with female fighting and smokeless tobacco use as well as male sexual risk. Neither athletic participation nor strength conditioning predicted odds of steroid use after controlling for problem behaviors, nor did steroid-using athletes report more frequent use than steroid-using nonathletes. The study's limitations and policy implications were noted. These data suggest that other problem behaviors such as substance use, fighting, and sexual risk are better predictors of adolescent steroid use than physical activity. Interventions to prevent steroid use should not be limited to male participants in organized sports programs, but should also target adolescents identified as at risk for other problem behaviors.

  4. Effects of acute unilateral ovariectomy to pre-pubertal rats on steroid hormones secretion and compensatory ovarian responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we analyzed the existence of asymmetry in the secretion of steroid hormones in pre-pubertal female rats treated with unilateral ovariectomy (ULO) or unilateral perforation of the abdominal wall (sham-surgery). Treated rats were sacrificed at different times after surgery. Since sham-surgery had an apparent effect on the age of first vaginal estrous (FVE) and serum levels hormone, the results of the sham surgery groups were used to assess the effects of their respective surgery treatment groups. On the day of FVE, compensatory ovulation (CO) and compensatory ovarian hypertrophy (COH) were similar in animals with ULO, regardless of the ovary remaining in situ. In ULO treated animals, progesterone (P4) levels were higher than in animals with sham-surgery one hour after treatment but lower in rats sacrificed at FEV. Left-ULO resulted in lower testosterone (T) concentration 48 and 72 hours after surgery. In rats with Right-ULO lower T concentrations were observed in rats sacrificed one or 72 hours after surgery, and at FVE. ULO (left or right) resulted in lower estradiol (E2) concentrations one or 72 hours after treatment. In rats with Left-ULO, E2 levels were higher 48 hours after surgery and at FVE. Left-ULO resulted in higher levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) five hours after surgery and at FVE. FSH levels were higher in rats with Right-ULO sacrificed on FVE. The present results suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat both ovaries have similar capacities to secrete P4, and that the right ovary has a higher capacity to secrete E2. Taken together, the present results support the idea that the effects of ULO result from the decrease in glandular tissue and changes in the neural information arising from the ovary. PMID:21450102

  5. Luteinizing hormone, sex steroids and extracorporeal circulation - a promising link to treat retroperitoneal sarcomas. A reconsideration of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Angela Madalina

    2012-10-01

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas are rare and aggressive tumors with a negative prognosis as there is currently no satisfactory treatment for them. The only proven factor that can significantly increase the otherwise poor survival of sarcoma patients is the radically of resection. However, the completeness of resection is hindered by the hypervascularized nature of sarcomas and the frequent involvement of major blood vessels. In this context, we propose to operate on retroperitoneal sarcomas only with the use of extracorporeal circulation, applying vascular clamps above and below the tumor, even with short periods of hypothermic circulatory arrest in complex cases. This technique would allow the surgeon to achieve complete tumor resections, approach large blood vessels easier and perform sofisticated vascular reconstructions with no fear of hemorrhage which is fundamental to achieve a bloodless surgical field. Also, we speculate on the etiology of retroperitoneal sarcomas that appear mostly during the period of menopause/andropause. Although both estrogens and androgens have been incriminated in inducing various cancer types, including sarcomas, an endogenous estradiol cathabolyte has been shown to have anti-tumor effects. Considering that during menopause/andropause sex steroid levels actually decrease, our second working hypothesis is that the increasing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and especially luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, together with the relative estrogen/androgen imbalance, may be the triggering cause. Also, a certain level of estrogens (Methoxyestradiol) may be essential in limiting tumor development and dedifferentiation. Given that extragonadal sarcomas appear to behave as endocrine tumors, a targeted hormonal therapy, together with controlled radical resections in complex cases of tumor vascular involvement, would certainly provide a strong link to both prevention and treatment of retroperitoneal sarcomas and even of cancer in general.

  6. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, Patrick R. Brannick, Katherine E. Wang, Wei Gupta, Rupesh K. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-04-01

    inhibits the production of antral follicle produced sex steroid hormones.

  7. Evolutionary origin of the mitochondrial cholesterol transport machinery reveals a universal mechanism of steroid hormone biosynthesis in animals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Steroidogenesis begins with the transport of cholesterol from intracellular stores into mitochondria via a series of protein-protein interactions involving cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins located at both the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. In adrenal glands and gonads, this process is accelerated by hormones, leading to the production of high levels of steroids that control tissue development and function. A hormone-induced multiprotein complex, the transduceosome, was recently identified, and is composed of cytosolic and outer mitochondrial membrane proteins that control the rate of cholesterol entry into the outer mitochondrial membrane. More recent studies unveiled the steroidogenic metabolon, a bioactive, multimeric protein complex that spans the outer-inner mitochondrial membranes and is responsible for hormone-induced import, segregation, targeting, and metabolism of cholesterol by cytochrome P450 family 11 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP11A1) in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The availability of genome information allowed us to systematically explore the evolutionary origin of the proteins involved in the mitochondrial cholesterol transport machinery (transduceosome, steroidogenic metabolon, and signaling proteins), trace the original archetype, and predict their biological functions by molecular phylogenetic and functional divergence analyses, protein homology modeling and molecular docking. Although most members of these complexes have a history of gene duplication and functional divergence during evolution, phylogenomic analysis revealed that all vertebrates have the same functional complex members, suggesting a common mechanism in the first step of steroidogenesis. An archetype of the complex was found in invertebrates. The data presented herein suggest that the cholesterol transport machinery is responsible for steroidogenesis among all vertebrates and is evolutionarily conserved throughout the entire animal kingdom.

  8. Antifungal activity of steroidal glycosides from Yucca gloriosa L.

    PubMed

    Favel, A; Kemertelidze, E; Benidze, M; Fallague, K; Regli, P

    2005-02-01

    The antifungal activity of a crude steroidal glycoside extract from Yucca gloriosa flowers, named alexin, was investigated in vitro against a panel of human pathogenic fungi, yeasts as well as dermatophytes and filamentous species. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by an agar dilution method. Alexin had a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, found to reside entirely in the spirostanoid fraction. The major tigogenyl glycosides, yuccaloeside B and yuccaloeside C, exhibited MICs between 0.39 and 6.25 microg[sol ]mL for all the tested yeast strains except for two (C. lusitaniae and C. kefyr). They were also active against several clinical Candida isolates known to be resistant to the usual antifungal agents. The MICs for the dermatophytes were between 0.78 and 12.5 microg[sol ]mL. The most sensitive filamentous species was A. fumigatus (MIC = 1.56 microg[sol ]mL). For most of the strains, the MICs of both glycosides were similar to those of the reference antifungal agent.

  9. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  10. Cell culture approaches to understanding the actions of steroid hormones on the insect nervous system.

    PubMed

    Levine, R B; Weeks, J C

    1996-01-01

    During metamorphosis of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, ecdysteroids regulate the dendritic remodeling and programmed death of identified motoneurons. These changes contribute to the dramatic reorganization of behavior that accompanies metamorphosis. As a step toward elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms by which ecdysteroids affect neuronal phenotype, we have investigated the responses of Manduca motoneurons to ecdysteroids in vitro. Following dendritic regression at the end of larval life, thoracic leg motoneurons placed in culture respond to ecdysteroids by an increase in branching complexity, similar to events in vivo. Growth cone structure is affected markedly by ecdysteroids. At pupation, a rise in ecdysteroids triggers the segment-specific death of proleg motoneurons: the same segmental pattern of death is observed when motoneurons from different segments are removed from the nervous system and exposed to ecdysteroids in vitro. These studies provide strong evidence that Manduca motoneurons are direct targets of steroid action and set the stage for further studies of the specific mechanisms involved.

  11. Effects of transdermal application of 7-oxo-DHEA on the levels of steroid hormones, gonadotropins and lipids in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Sulcová, J; Hill, M; Masek, Z; Ceska, R; Novácek, A; Hampl, R; Stárka, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 7-oxo-DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) on the serum levels of steroid sexual hormones, gonadotropins, lipids and lipoproteins in men. 7-oxo-DHEA was applied onto the skin as a gel to 10 volunteers aged 27 to 72 years for 5 consecutive days. The single dose contained 25 mg 7-oxo-DHEA. Serum concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, cortisol, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A-I and B and lipoprotein(a) were measured before the beginning and shortly after the end of the steroid application. After the treatment, we noted the following significant changes: a decline of testosterone and estradiol levels, increase of LH, HDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I levels. The decrease of total cholesterol levels was of the borderline significance. A slight but significant increase was found in apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein(a). The most expressive was the fall of the atherogenic index. We suggest that the gel containing 7-oxo-DHEA might be a suitable drug for improving the composition of the steroid and lipid parameters in elderly men.

  12. Steroids, spinal cord and pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy

    2011-10-01

    During the whole life, the nervous system is continuously submitted to the actions of different categories of hormones, including steroids. Therefore, the interactions between hormonal compounds and neural tissues are subjected to intense investigations. While a majority of studies focus on the brain, the spinal cord (SC) has received little attention, although this structure is also an important part of the central nervous system, controlling motor and sensory functions. To point out the importance of interactions between hormones and the SC in the regulation of neurobiological activities, we recapitulated and discussed herein various key data, revealing that the pivotal role played by the SC in nociception and pain modulation, directly depends on the SC ability to metabolize and synthesize steroidal molecules. The paper suggests that future investigations aiming to develop effective strategies against chronic pain, must integrate regulatory effects exerted by hormonal steroids on the SC activity, as well as the actions of endogenous neurosteroids locally synthesized in spinal neural networks.

  13. Molecular identification of genes involved in testicular steroid synthesis and characterization of the responses to hormones stimulation in testis of Japanese sea bass (Lateolabrax japonicas).

    PubMed

    Chi, Mei L; Wen, Hai S; Ni, Meng; He, Feng; Li, Ji F; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Pei; Chai, Sen H; Ding, Yu X; Yin, Xiang H

    2014-06-01

    Testicular steroids are critical hormones for the regulation of spermatogenesis in male teleosts and their productions have been reported to be regulated by gonadotropins and gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the Japanese sea bass (Lateolabrax japonicas), the reproductive endocrine, particularly regarding the production and regulation of testicular steroids, are not well understood. For this reason, we first cloned and characterized the response of several key genes regulating the production of testicular steroids and, second, we analyzed the changes of mRNA profiles of these genes during testicular development cycle and in the administration of hCG and GnRHa with corresponding testosterone level in serum, GSI and histological analyses. We succeeded in cloning the full-length cDNAs for the fushi tarazu factor-1 (FTZ-F1) homologues (FTZ-F1a and FTZ-F1b), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in Japanese sea bass. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of these proteins clearly showed that these genes in Japanese sea bass were homologous to those of other piscine species. During the testicular development cycle and hCG/GnRHa administration, quantification of jsbStAR transcripts revealed a trend similar to their serum testosterone levels, while a reciprocal relationship was founded between the serum concentrations of testosterone and jsbAMH and the links between gonadal expression of jsbStAR, jsbAMH and jsbFTZ-F1 were also observed. Our results have identified for the first time several key genes involved in the regulation of steroid production and spermatogenesis in the Japanese sea bass testis and these genes are all detected under gonadotropic hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone control.

  14. Effects on steroid hormones secretion resulting from the acute stimulation of sectioning the superior ovarian nerve to pre-pubertal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the adult rat, neural signals arriving to the ovary via the superior ovarian nerve (SON) modulate progesterone (P4), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) secretion. The aims of the present study were to analyze if the SON in the pre-pubertal rat also modulates ovarian hormone secretion and the release of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing (LH) hormone. P4, T, E2, FSH and LH serum levels were measured 30 or 60 minutes after sectioning the SON of pre-pubertal female rats. Our results indicate that the effects on hormone levels resulting from unilaterally or bilaterally sectioning the SON depends on the analyzed hormone, and the time lapse between surgery and autopsy, and that the treatment yielded asymmetric results. The results also suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat the neural signals arriving to the ovaries via the SON regulate the enzymes participating in P4, T and E2 synthesis in a non-parallel way, indicating that the mechanisms regulating the synthesis of each hormone are not regulated by the same signals. Also, that the changes in the steroids hormones are not explained exclusively by the modifications in gonadotropins secretion. The observed differences in hormone levels between rats sacrificed 30 and 60 min after surgery reflect the onset of the compensatory systems regulating hormones secretion. PMID:23110668

  15. Effects of sex steroid hormones on neuromedin S and neuromedin U2 receptor expression following experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Maghool, Fatemeh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Hajializadeh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroprotective effects of female gonadal steroids are mediated through several pathways involving multiple peptides and receptors after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two of these peptides are including the regulatory peptides neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS), and their common receptor neuromedin U2 receptor (NMUR2). This study investigates the effects of physiological doses of estradiol and progesterone on brain edema, NMS and NMU as well as NMUR2 expression following TBI. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized female rats were given high-and low-dose of female sex steroid hormones through implantation of capsules for a week before trauma. The brain NMUR2 expression, prepro-NMS expression, NMU content, and water content (brain edema) were evaluated 24 hr after TBI induced by Marmarou’s method. Results: Percentage of brain water content in high- and low-dose estradiol, and in high- and low- dose progesterone was less than vehicle (P<0.01). Results show high expression of prepro-NMS in high dose progesterone (TBI-HP) rats compared to the high dose estrogen (TBI-HE), as well as vehicle (P<0.01). NMU content in low-dose progesterone (TBI-LP) group was more than that of vehicle group (P<0.001). Furthermore a difference in NMU content observed between TBI-HP compared to TBI-HE, and vehicle (P<0.05). The NMUR2 mRNA expression revealed an upregulation in TBI-HP rats compared to the TBI-HE group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings indicate that progesterone attenuates brain edema and induces an increase in NMS and its receptor which may mediate the anti-edematous effect of progesterone after TBI. PMID:27872704

  16. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  17. Prediagnostic Sex Steroid Hormones in Relation to Male Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Louise A.; Key, Tim J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Michels, Karin B.; Sesso, Howard D.; Ursin, Giske; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Wood, Shannon N.; Falk, Roni T.; Parisi, Dominick; Guillemette, Chantal; Caron, Patrick; Turcotte, Véronique; Habel, Laurel A.; Isaacs, Claudine J.; Riboli, Elio; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Cook, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although previous studies have implicated a variety of hormone-related risk factors in the etiology of male breast cancers, no previous studies have examined the effects of endogenous hormones. Patients and Methods Within the Male Breast Cancer Pooling Project, an international consortium comprising 21 case-control and cohort investigations, a subset of seven prospective cohort studies were able to contribute prediagnostic serum or plasma samples for hormone quantitation. Using a nested case-control design, multivariable unconditional logistic regression analyses estimated odds ratios and 95% CIs for associations between male breast cancer risk and 11 individual estrogens and androgens, as well as selected ratios of these analytes. Results Data from 101 cases and 217 matched controls were analyzed. After adjustment for age and date of blood draw, race, and body mass index, androgens were found to be largely unrelated to risk, but circulating estradiol levels showed a significant association. Men in the highest quartile had an odds ratio of 2.47 (95% CI, 1.10 to 5.58) compared with those in the lowest quartile (trend P = .06). Assessment of estradiol as a ratio to various individual androgens or sum of androgens showed no further enhancement of risk. These relations were not significantly modified by either age or body mass index, although estradiol was slightly more strongly related to breast cancers occurring among younger (age < 67 years) than older men. Conclusion Our results support the notion of an important role for estradiol in the etiology of male breast cancers, similar to female breast cancers. PMID:25964249

  18. Modulatory effects of sex steroid hormones on brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tyrosine kinase B expression during adolescent development in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Hill, R A; Wu, Y W C; Kwek, P; van den Buuse, M

    2012-05-01

    Sex steroid hormones and neurotrophic factors are involved in pruning and shaping the adolescent brain and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental illness. We aimed to determine the association between altered levels of sex steroid hormones during adolescent development and neurotrophic signalling in the C57Bl/6 mouse. We first performed a week by week analysis from pre-pubescence to adulthood in male and female C57Bl/6 mice, measuring serum levels of testosterone and oestradiol in conjunction with western blot analysis of neurotrophin expression in the forebrain and hippocampal regions. Second, we manipulated adolescent sex steroid hormone levels by gonadectomy and hormone replacement at the pre-pubescent age of 5 weeks. Young-adult forebrain and hippocampal neurotrophin expression was then determined. Male mice showed significant changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the forebrain regions during weeks 7-10, which corresponded significantly with a surge in serum testosterone. Castration and testosterone or di-hydrotestosterone replacement experiments revealed an androgen receptor-dependent effect on BDNF-tyrosine kinase (Trk) B signalling in the forebrain and hippocampal regions during adolescence. Female mice showed changes in BDNF-TrkB signalling at a much earlier time point (weeks 4-8) in the forebrain and hippocampal regions and these did not correspond with changes in serum oestradiol. Ovariectomy actually increased BDNF expression but decreased TrkB phosphorylation in the forebrain regions. 17β-Oestradiol replacement had no effect, suggesting a role for other ovarian hormones in regulating BDNF-TrkB signalling in the adolescent female mouse brain. These results suggest the differential actions of sex steroid hormones in modulating BDNF-TrkB signalling during adolescence. These data provide insight into how the male and female brain changes in response to altered levels of

  19. Sex steroids and the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hajszan, Tibor; Milner, Teresa A; Leranth, Csaba

    2007-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the finding that the dentate gyrus contains more granule cells in the male than in the female of certain mouse strains provided the first indication that the dentate gyrus is a significant target for the effects of sex steroids during development. Gonadal hormones also play a crucial role in shaping the function and morphology of the adult brain. Besides reproduction-related processes, sex steroids participate in higher brain operations such as cognition and mood, in which the hippocampus is a critical mediator. Being part of the hippocampal formation, the dentate gyrus is naturally involved in these mechanisms and as such, this structure is also a critical target for the activational effects of sex steroids. These activational effects are the results of three major types of steroid-mediated actions. Sex steroids modulate the function of dentate neurons under normal conditions. In addition, recent research suggests that hormone-induced cellular plasticity may play a larger role than previously thought, particularly in the dentate gyrus. Specifically, the regulation of dentate gyrus neurogenesis and synaptic remodeling by sex steroids received increasing attention lately. Finally, the dentate gyrus is influenced by gonadal hormones in the context of cellular injury, and the work in this area demonstrates that gonadal hormones have neuroprotective potential. The expression of estrogen, progestin, and androgen receptors in the dentate gyrus suggests that sex steroids, which could be of gonadal origin and/or synthesized locally in the dentate gyrus, may act directly on dentate cells. In addition, gonadal hormones could also influence the dentate gyrus indirectly, by subcortical hormone-sensitive structures such as the cholinergic septohippocampal system. Importantly, these three sex steroid-related themes, functional effects in the normal dentate gyrus, mechanisms involving neurogenesis and synaptic remodeling, as well as neuroprotection, have

  20. Steroid Hormone Signaling Is Essential for Pheromone Production and Oenocyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yin Ning; Tan, Kah Junn; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Many of the lipids found on the cuticles of insects function as pheromones and communicate information about age, sex, and reproductive status. In Drosophila, the composition of the information-rich lipid profile is dynamic and changes over the lifetime of an individual. However, the molecular basis of this change is not well understood. To identify genes that control cuticular lipid production in Drosophila, we performed a RNA interference screen and used Direct Analysis in Real Time and gas chromatography mass spectrometry to quantify changes in the chemical profiles. Twelve putative genes were identified whereby transcriptional silencing led to significant differences in cuticular lipid production. Amongst them, we characterized a gene which we name spidey, and which encodes a putative steroid dehydrogenase that has sex- and age-dependent effects on viability, pheromone production, and oenocyte survival. Transcriptional silencing or overexpression of spidey during embryonic development results in pupal lethality and significant changes in levels of the ecdysone metabolite 20-hydroxyecdysonic acid and 20-hydroxyecdysone. In contrast, inhibiting gene expression only during adulthood resulted in a striking loss of oenocyte cells and a concomitant reduction of cuticular hydrocarbons, desiccation resistance, and lifespan. Oenocyte loss and cuticular lipid levels were partially rescued by 20-hydroxyecdysone supplementation. Taken together, these results identify a novel regulator of pheromone synthesis and reveal that ecdysteroid signaling is essential for the maintenance of cuticular lipids and oenocytes throughout adulthood. PMID:27333054

  1. Polymorphisms in genes of the steroid receptor superfamily modify postmenopausal breast cancer risk associated with menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    2010-06-15

    Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) is associated with increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Nuclear receptors are involved in steroid hormone- and xenobiotic-mediated signal transduction playing a crucial role in regulating gene expression. Therefore, variations within these genes may influence HT-associated breast cancer risk. We investigated 3,149 postmenopausal breast cancer patients and 5,489 controls from 2 German population-based case-control studies. Thirty-three polymorphisms selected on the basis of known or putative functional relevance located in ESR1, ESR2, PGR, PXR and AR were genotyped. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess multiplicative statistical interaction between polymorphisms and duration of estrogen-progestagen therapy and of estrogen monotherapy with regard to breast cancer risk assuming log-additive and codominant modes of inheritance. We observed an increased risk for women carrying short AR_(CAG) alleles of <22 repeats associated with combined estrogen-progestagen therapy compared with those with long alleles (> or =22 repeats) (p(interaction) = 0.03). Additionally, risk associated with combination therapy use was significantly modified by 2 PXR polymorphisms with reduction of risk effects in carriers of the minor PXR_rs6785049_G and PXR_rs1054191_A alleles (p(interaction) = 0.04 and 0.05, respectively). Variants in both ESR1 and ESR2 modified risk associated with estrogen monotherapy use. Higher risk were observed in homozygotes for the major ESR1_rs910416_T allele (p(interaction) < 0.01) and in homozygotes for the minor ESR2_rs1271572_T, major ESR2_rs4986938_G and minor ESR2_rs928554_G alleles (p(interaction) = 0.02, 0.05, 0.02, respectively). Risk effect modification by ESR1_rs910416 and AR_(CAG)n polymorphisms remained significant after correction for multiple testing. We conclude that genetic variants in nuclear receptor genes may modify HT-associated postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

  2. Synthesis and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids: structure/activity studies.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Victoria; Murray, Ana P; Maier, Marta S

    2013-11-01

    Disulfated and trisulfated steroids have been synthesized from cholesterol and their acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity has been evaluated. In our studies we have found that the activity was not only dependent on the location of the sulfate groups but on their configurations. 2β,3α,6α-trihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one trisulfate (18) was the most active steroid with an IC50 value of 15.48 μM comparable to that of 2β,3α-dihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one disulfate (1). Both compounds were found to be less active than the reference compound eserine. The butyrylcholinesterase activity of 1 and 18 was one magnitude lower than that against acetylcholinesterase revealing a selective inhibitor profile.

  3. Side effects of anabolic androgenic steroids: pathological findings and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Andreas; Thieme, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Side effects of anabolic steroids with relevance in forensic medicine are mainly due to life-threatening health risks with potential fatal outcome and cases of uncertain limitations of criminal liability after steroid administration. Both problems are typically associated with long-term abuse and excessive overdose of anabolic steroids. Side effects may be due to direct genomic or nongenomic activities (myotrophic, hepatotoxic), can result from down-regulation of endogenous biosynthesis (antiandrogenic) or be indirect consequence of steroid biotransformation (estrogenic).Logically, there are no systematic clinical studies available and the number of causally determined fatalities is fairly limited. The following compilation reviews typical abundant observations in cases where nonnatural deaths (mostly liver failure and sudden cardiac death) were concurrent with steroid abuse. Moreover, frequent associations between structural characteristics and typical side effects are summarized.

  4. Moderate Heat Challenge Increased Yolk Steroid Hormones and Shaped Offspring Growth and Behavior in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Aline; Chanson, Marine; Delaveau, Joël; Mercerand, Frédéric; Möstl, Erich; Calandreau, Ludovic; Arnould, Cécile; Leterrier, Christine; Collin, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental challenges might affect the maternal organism and indirectly affect the later ontogeny of the progeny. We investigated the cross-generation impact of a moderate heat challenge in chickens. We hypothesized that a warm temperature–within the thermotolerance range- would affect the hormonal environment provided to embryos by mothers, and in turn, affect the morphology and behavioral phenotype of offspring. Methodology/Principal Findings Laying hens were raised under a standard thermal condition at 21°C (controls) or 30°C (experimental) for 5 consecutive weeks. A significant increase was observed in the internal temperature of hens exposed to the warm treatment; however plasma corticosterone levels remained unaffected. The laying rate was not affected, but experimental hens laid lighter eggs than the controls during the treatment. As expected, the maternal thermal environment affected yolk hormone contents. Eggs laid by the experimental hens showed significantly higher concentrations of yolk progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol. All chicks were raised under standard thermal conditions. The quality of hatchlings, growth, feeding behavior and emotional reactivity of chicks were analyzed. Offspring of experimental hens (C30 chicks) were lighter but obtained better morphological quality scores at hatching than the controls (C21 chicks). C30 chicks expressed lesser distress calls when exposed to a novel food. Unlike C21 chicks, C30 chicks expressed no preference for energetic food. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that moderate heat challenge triggers maternal effects and modulate the developmental trajectory of offspring in a way that may be adaptive. This suggests that the impact of heat challenges on captive or wild populations might have a cross-generation effect. PMID:23451257

  5. Effect of methomyl on sex steroid hormone and vitellogenin levels in serum of male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and recovery pattern.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shun-Long; Qiu, Li-Ping; Hu, Geng-Dong; Fan, Li-Min; Song, Chao; Zheng, Yao; Wu, Wei; Qu, Jian-Hong; Li, Dan-Dan; Chen, Jia-Zhang; Xu, Pao

    2017-03-02

    Tilapia were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of 0, 0.2, 2, 20 or 200 μg/L for 30 days, then transferred to methomyl-free water for 18 days. E2 , T, 11-KTand VTG in serum were examined. There were no significant changes in all the parameters in serum of tilapia exposed to 0.2 μg/L and 2 μg/L methomyl compared to the control. However, 20 μg/L and 200 μg/L have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system of male tilapia, as shown by its ability to increase VTG and E2 and decrease T and 11-KT in serum. Thus it would appear the no observed adverse effect level for sexual steroid hormones of methomyl is lower than 2 μg/L. Recovery data showed that the effects produced by 20μg/L were reversible but not at 200μg/L. Furthermore, the sensitivity of above parameters to methomyl followed the order of VTG>E2 >11-KT>T>GSI, suggesting VTG being the better biomarkers.

  6. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone regulation of the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) receptor phosphorylation for VHDL uptake.

    PubMed

    Dong, Du-Juan; Liu, Wen; Cai, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-04-01

    During the metamorphic stage of holometabolous insects, the biosynthetic precursors needed for the synthesis of a large number of adult proteins are acquired from the selective absorption of storage proteins. The very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL), a non-hexameric storage protein, is consumed by the fat body from the hemolymph through VHDL receptor (VHDL-R)-mediated endocytosis. However, the mechanism of the uptake of VHDL by a VHDL-R remains unclear. In this study, a VHDL-R from Helicoverpa armigera was found to be involved in 20E-regulated VHDL uptake through the regulation of steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). The transcripts of VHDL-R were detected mainly in the fat body and integument during the wandering stage. The transcription of VHDL-R was upregulated by 20E through the ecdysteroid receptor (EcRB1) and Ultraspiracle (USP1). In addition, 20E stimulates the phosphorylation of VHDL-R through protein kinase C for ligand binding. VHDL-R knockdown in larvae results the inhibition of development to adulthood. These data imply that 20E regulates VHDL-R on both transcriptional and posttranslational levels for VHDL absorption.

  7. The Interaction between a Sexually Transferred Steroid Hormone and a Female Protein Regulates Oogenesis in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Francesco; Gabrieli, Paolo; South, Adam; Valim, Clarissa; Mancini, Francesca; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2013-01-01

    Molecular interactions between male and female factors during mating profoundly affect the reproductive behavior and physiology of female insects. In natural populations of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, blood-fed females direct nutritional resources towards oogenesis only when inseminated. Here we show that the mating-dependent pathway of egg development in these mosquitoes is regulated by the interaction between the steroid hormone 20-hydroxy-ecdysone (20E) transferred by males during copulation and a female Mating-Induced Stimulator of Oogenesis (MISO) protein. RNAi silencing of MISO abolishes the increase in oogenesis caused by mating in blood-fed females, causes a delay in oocyte development, and impairs the function of male-transferred 20E. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that MISO and 20E interact in the female reproductive tract. Moreover MISO expression after mating is induced by 20E via the Ecdysone Receptor, demonstrating a close cooperation between the two factors. Male-transferred 20E therefore acts as a mating signal that females translate into an increased investment in egg development via a MISO-dependent pathway. The identification of this male–female reproductive interaction offers novel opportunities for the control of mosquito populations that transmit malaria. PMID:24204210

  8. Effects of the plant steroidal hormone, 24-epibrassinolide, on the mitotic index and growth of onion (Allium cepa) root tips.

    PubMed

    Howell, W M; Keller, G E; Kirkpatrick, J D; Jenkins, R L; Hunsinger, R N; McLaughlin, E W

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of the steroidal plant hormone, 24-epibrassinolide (BL), on the mitotic index and growth of onion (Allium cepa) root tips. The classical Allium test was used to gather and quantify data on the rate of root growth, the stages of mitosis, and the number of mitoses in control and BL-treated groups of onions. Low doses of BL (0.005 ppm) nearly doubled the mean root length and the number of mitoses over that of controls. Intermediate doses of BL (0.05 ppm) also produced mean root lengths and number of mitoses that were significantly greater than those of the controls. The highest dose of BL (0.5 ppm) produced mean root lengths and number of mitoses that were less than control values, but the differences were not statistically significant. Examination of longitudinally sectioned root tips produced relatively similar results. This study confirms the suppositions of previous authors who have claimed that exogenously applied BL can increase the number of mitoses in plants, but failed to show cytogenetic data. This is the first report detailing the effects of BL on chromosomes and the cell cycle.

  9. Sex steroid and thyroid hormone receptor expressions in the thyroid of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) during different life stages.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Skotko, Jeremy P; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Boggs, Ashley S P; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2011-06-01

    The expression of estrogen receptors, ESR1 (ERα) and ESR2 (ERβ), and androgen receptors (AR) in the thyroid gland has been reported in few vertebrate species other than a few mammals. This study reports the presence of sex steroid hormone receptors and thyroid receptors (ERα, ERβ, AR, TRα, and TRβ) in the thyroid gland of the American alligator at several life stages. It provides a semiquantification and distribution of ERα in the thyroid follicle cells using an immunohistochemical approach as well as reports quantitative differences in mRNA expression of ERα, ERβ, TRα, TRβ, and AR in the same tissue using quantitative real time-PCR (Q-PCR) with primers designed specifically for alligators. The thyroid tissue of the American alligator expresses ERα, ERβ, and AR at all of the life stages examined here although no statistically significant differences were observed between male and female in thyroid mRNA expression for any of the genes analyzed. No sexual dimorphism was observed in ERα immunostaining. No statistical analysis across life stages were performed due to confounding factor of season.

  10. The interaction between a sexually transferred steroid hormone and a female protein regulates oogenesis in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Francesco; Gabrieli, Paolo; South, Adam; Valim, Clarissa; Mancini, Francesca; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2013-10-01

    Molecular interactions between male and female factors during mating profoundly affect the reproductive behavior and physiology of female insects. In natural populations of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, blood-fed females direct nutritional resources towards oogenesis only when inseminated. Here we show that the mating-dependent pathway of egg development in these mosquitoes is regulated by the interaction between the steroid hormone 20-hydroxy-ecdysone (20E) transferred by males during copulation and a female Mating-Induced Stimulator of Oogenesis (MISO) protein. RNAi silencing of MISO abolishes the increase in oogenesis caused by mating in blood-fed females, causes a delay in oocyte development, and impairs the function of male-transferred 20E. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that MISO and 20E interact in the female reproductive tract. Moreover MISO expression after mating is induced by 20E via the Ecdysone Receptor, demonstrating a close cooperation between the two factors. Male-transferred 20E therefore acts as a mating signal that females translate into an increased investment in egg development via a MISO-dependent pathway. The identification of this male-female reproductive interaction offers novel opportunities for the control of mosquito populations that transmit malaria.

  11. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation.

  12. Placental steroids in cattle: hormones, placental growth factors or by-products of trophoblast giant cell differentiation?

    PubMed

    Schuler, G; Greven, H; Kowalewski, M P; Döring, B; Ozalp, G R; Hoffmann, B

    2008-07-01

    The bovine placenta produces large amounts of steroids, mainly estrone (E1) and progesterone (P4). Specific features of bovine placental steroidogenesis are 1) the expression of all enzymes needed for the production of estrogens from cholesterol in the trophoblast 2) an only marginal and temporal contribution to peripheral maternal P4 levels restricted to a period between approx. days 150 - 240 of gestation 3) the predominance of sulfoconjugated over free E1 and 4) a complementary setting of steroidogenic enzymes in the two morphologically discriminable trophoblast cell types, the uninucleated trophoblast cells (UTC) and the trophoblast giant cells (TGC). In cattle so far no definite information is available on the specific biological roles of placental estrogens and P4. However, the detection of estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors in the placentomes suggests a role primarily as local regulators of caruncular growth, differentiation and functions. Inconsistent with a function as a caruncular growth factor is the strong evidence that in cattle placental estrogens enter the maternal compartment almost completely as estrone sulfate (E1S), which is not active at classical nuclear receptors. On the other hand, E1S may be converted locally to free active estrogens via the action of steroid sulfatase (StS), which has been detected in specific parts of the bovine caruncular epithelium. Alternatively or in addition, StS expression in the caruncular epithelium may serve the utilization of sulfated neutral steroid precursors (e.g. pregnenolone sulfate or cholesterol sulfate) supplied with maternal blood, thus providing free substrates for further metabolization in the adjacent trophoblast. The down-regulation of P450scc and P450c17 and the up-regulation of 3beta-HSD and aromatase during the differentiation of TGC from UTC in parallel with the up-regulation of ER beta and estrogen sulfotransferase in maturing TGC suggests a function of placental estrogens primarily

  13. Steroid osteopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving steroids or having disease processes which increase natural steroid production often demonstrate ''the classic x-ray changes'' of avascular necrosis of bone. Bone scintigraphy in these patients most frequently demonstrates an increased radionuclide localization. The literature suggests that the increased activity is related to healing of the avascular process. In a recent study of Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD), 37 of the children had multiple studies and increased activity within the epiphysis during revascularization was extremely rare. Not only are the scintigraphic findings in steroid osteopathy dissimilar to that in healing LCPD, but the time interval for healing is much to short for that of a vascular necrosis and no patients demonstrated an avascular phase on bone scintigraphy. Of 15 children with renal transplants on steroid therapy, 9 demonstrated x-ray and clinical findings of osteopathy. In 8 of 9 instances, bone scintigraphy showed increased localization of radionuclide in the affected bone. Improvement or a return to normal occurred in those patients in whom steroids were discontinued. The following is a proposed mechanism for steroid osteopathy. Steroids affect the osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity of bone and weaken its internal structure. Ordinary stress produces microtrabecular fractures. Fractures characteristically stimulate reactive hyperemia and increase bone metabolism. The result is increased bone radiopharmaceutical localization. The importance of recognizing this concept is that steroid osteopathy is preventable by reducing the administered steroid dose. As opposed to avascular necrosis, bone changes are reversible.

  14. Steroidal Saponins from Furcraea hexapetala Leaves and Their Phytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Calle, Juan M; Pérez, Andy J; Simonet, Ana M; Guerra, José O; Macías, Francisco A

    2016-11-23

    Four new steroidal saponins (1-4) along with 13 known saponins were isolated from the leaves of Furcraea hexapetala. The new compounds were identified as (20R,22R,25R)-3β-hydroxy-5α-spirostan-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (1), (25R)-3β-hydroxy-5α-spirost-20(21)-en-12-one 3-O-{α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (2), (25R)-5α-spirostan-3β-ol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (3), and (25R)-5β-spirostan-3β-ol 3-O-{β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-O-β-d-galactopyranoside} (4) by spectroscopic analysis, including one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The phytotoxicity of the isolated compounds against the standard target species Lactuca sativa was evaluated. Structure-activity relationships for these compounds with respect to phytotoxic effects are discussed.

  15. Steroid regulation of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M M; Albrecht, E D

    1996-11-01

    Investigation into the hormonal control of sexual behavior has a rich and extensive history. For many researchers currently active in the field, the physiological psychologist Frank A. Beach is recognized as the modern father of the study of hormones and behavior. His publication of the seminal book Hormones and Behavior-A Survey of Interrelationships Between Endocrine Secretions and Patterns of Overt Response, published in 1948, was a compilation of the previous 20 years of research establishing that gonadal secretions acted in the brain and modulated behavior. The question of precisely how hormones can alter brain functioning in a coordinated fashion and profoundly influence the patterns of behavioral responsiveness remains unanswered. As with many research areas, application of new techniques and approaches to the problem reveals additional layers of complexity and previously unimagined relationships between hormones, brain, and behavior. In addition, with the increasing understanding that the brain is a target organ for steroids, the implications of the ramifications of this steroid sensitivity have broadened. The hormonal regulation of sexual behavior is not an isolated aspect of steroid action in the brain; rather, it is one component of a host of physiological responses influenced by steroids. These include such diverse responses as anxiety, aggression, feeding, and learning and memory. An appreciation of the diverse effects of steroids has emerged from studies on sexual behavior, and a mutually beneficial relationship between this and other aspects of behavioral neuroscience has flourished and endured. As with all of neuroscience, this research area has been dynamic and progressive and has additionally benefited from a long history of comparative and integrative approaches to animal behavior.

  16. The presence of two distinct prolactin receptors in seabream with different tissue distribution patterns, signal transduction pathways and regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xigui; Jiao, Baowei; Fung, Chun Kit; Zhang, Yong; Ho, Walter K K; Chan, Chi Bun; Lin, Haoran; Wang, Deshou; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2007-08-01

    Two prolactin receptors (PRLRs) encoded by two different genes were identified in the fugu and zebrafish genomes but not in the genomes of other vertebrates. Subsequently, two cDNA sequences corresponding to two PRLRs were identified in black seabream and Nile tilapia. Phylogenetic analysis of PRLR sequences in various vertebrates indicated that the coexistence of two PRLRs in a single species is a unique phenomenon in teleosts. Both PRLRs in teleosts (the classical one named as PRLR1, the newly identified one as PRLR2) resemble the long-form mammalian PRLRs. However, despite their overall structural similarities, the two PRLR subtypes in fish share very low amino acid similarities (about 30%), mainly due to differences in the intracellular domain. In particular, the Box 2 region and some intracellular tyrosine residues are missing in PRLR2. Tissue distribution study by real-time PCR in black seabream (sb) revealed that both receptors (sbPRLR1 and sbPRLR2) are widely expressed in different tissues. In gill, the expression level of sbPRLR2 is much higher than that of sbPRLR1. In the intestine, the expression of sbPRLR1 is higher than that of sbPRLR2. The expression levels of both receptors are relatively low in most other tissues, with sbPRLR1 generally higher than sbPRLR2. The sbPRLR1 and sbPRLR2 were functionally expressed in cultured human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Both receptors can activate the beta-casein and c-fos promoters; however, only sbPRLR1 but not sbPRLR2 can activate the Spi promoter upon receptor stimulation in a ligand-specific manner. These results indicate that both receptors share some common functions but are distinctly different from each other in mobilizing post-receptor events. When challenged with different steroid hormones, the two PRLRs exhibited very different gene expression patterns in the seabream kidney. The sbPRLR1 expression was up-regulated by estradiol and cortisol, whereas testosterone had no significant effect. For sbPRLR2

  17. The reproductive biology of male cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus): do plasma steroid hormones predict the mating season?

    PubMed

    Graham, Sean P; Earley, Ryan L; Hoss, Shannon K; Schuett, Gordon W; Grober, Matthew S

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the proximate causation of the two major types of mating seasons described for North American pitvipers, we conducted a field study of the cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus) in Georgia from September 2003 to May 2005 that included an extensive observational regime and collection of tissues for behavioral, anatomical, histological, and hormone analysis. Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) of plasma samples and standard histological procedures were conducted on reproductive tissues. Evidence from the annual testosterone (T) and sexual segment of the kidney (SSK) cycle and their relationship to the spermatogenic cycle provide correlative evidence of a unimodal mating pattern in this species of pitviper, as these variables consistently predict the mating season in all snake species previously examined under natural conditions. In most reptiles studied to date, high plasma levels of T and corticosterone (CORT) coincide during the mating period, making the cottonmouth an exception to this trend; we suggest two possible explanations for increased CORT during spring (regulation of a spring basking period), and decreased CORT during summer (avoiding reproductive behavioral inhibition), in this species.

  18. Shaking the myth: Body mass, aggression, steroid hormones, and social dominance in wild house mouse.

    PubMed

    Hiadlovská, Z; Mikula, O; Macholán, M; Hamplová, P; Vošlajerová Bímová, B; Daniszová, K

    2015-11-01

    In social mammals, the position of a male in the group's hierarchy strongly affects his reproductive success. Since a high social rank is often gained through competition with other males, selection should favour bigger males over smaller ones. We may therefore predict faster growth and/or delayed sexual maturity in dominant males. Likewise, dominants should have higher levels of testosterone, hormone important in many aspects of male dominance. Less obvious is the relationship between dominance and levels of corticosterone but generally higher concentrations are expected in subordinate individuals. We studied body growth, sexual maturation and endocrinal changes in males of two house mouse subspecies, raised in fraternal pairs. Since Mus musculus domesticus is the subspecies which dominates mutual encounters with Mus musculus musculus we predicted higher growth rate, delayed puberty and aggression, and higher testosterone and corticosterone levels in domesticus males compared to musculus. In all comparisons, no differences were found between dominant and subordinate musculus brothers. On the other hand, in M. m. domesticus, dominant males revealed a different growth trajectory and lower corticosterone levels than subordinate males but not delayed puberty and higher testosterone concentrations, thus contradicting our predictions. In inter-subspecific comparisons, musculus males matured earlier but became aggressive at the same time as domesticus males. The musculus testosterone ontogeny suggests that social positions in this subspecies remain unfixed for an extended period and that the increasing levels probably reflect prolonged hierarchy contests. It appears that the ontogeny of behaviour and physiological traits diverge cryptically between the two subspecies.

  19. Exposure to the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone modulates agonistic interactions in male Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, V L; Cromarty, S I; Sipala, M W; Kass-Simon, G

    2012-11-01

    In this study we present evidence that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) affects agonistic behavior in male American lobsters and that male and female animals differ in their response to the hormone. Thirty-minute staged fights were conducted between large males exposed either to artificial seawater (ASW) or 20E and small, anosmic opponents. The nephropores of both combatants were blocked. Fights were videotaped and quantitatively analyzed for aggressive, defensive and avoidance behaviors using an ethogram in which behaviors are ranked according to aggressiveness. Unlike female lobsters, exposing male lobsters to 20E did not increase their aggressive behavior; however, there was a marginally significant trend toward an increase in defensive behaviors with a lower aggressive content than in their ASW-exposed counterparts. The opponents of 20E-exposed animals performed significantly more aggressive behaviors than their counterparts. In fights with 20E-exposed animals, the overall aggressive intensity of the fight was increased and the animals performed a greater number of avoidance behaviors. Unlike the effects of 20E on females, where exposure to 20E caused an increase in overall agonistic arousal, males only exhibited a change in frequency of their behaviors. These findings suggest that while 20E affects both males and females in agonistic encounters, the nature of the effect is different for the two sexes.

  20. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed.

  1. Changes in the content of sex steroid hormone receptors in the growing and regressing ovaries of Gallus domesticus during development.

    PubMed

    González-Morán, María Genoveva; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Germán-Castelán, Liliana; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Sex steroids participate in the regulation of reproduction in female chickens. In this work, we determined the content of androgen receptor (AR), intracellular progesterone receptor isoforms (PR-A and PR-B), membrane progesterone receptor γ (mPRγ) and estrogen receptor α (ER-α) in the left growing and right regressing ovaries of Gallus domesticus from 13-day-old chicken embryos to 1-month-old chickens by western blot analysis. A marked difference in the morphological characteristics of the left and the right ovaries during development was observed. Results show a higher content of AR in the left ovary than in the right one in all ages. In the left ovary, the highest content of AR was observed on day 13 of embryonic development, and diminished with age. In the right ovary, AR was expressed from day 13 of embryonic development to 1-day-old, and became undetectable at 1-week and 1-month-old. In the left ovary, PR isoforms were not detected on day 13 of embryonic development, but they presented a marked expression after hatching. In the right ovary, the highest expression of both PR isoforms was found on 1-day-old, and significantly decreased with age. PR-B was the predominant isoform on 1-day and 1-month old in the left ovary, whereas PR-A was the predominant one on day 13 of embryonic development in the right ovary. Interestingly, mPRγ was detected at 1-week and 1-month-old in the left ovary meanwhile in the right ovary, it was detected from day 13 of embryonic development to 1-day-old. ER-α was only detected in the left ovary from day 13 to 1-week-old, while in 1-month-old chickens, it was expressed in both ovaries. In the left ovary, ER-α content was lower from 1-day to 1-month-old as compared with day 13 of embryonic development. Our results demonstrate a differential expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between the left growing and the right regressing ovary, and throughout chickens' age; and this is the first report about mPR expression in birds.

  2. Changes in strength, power, and steroid hormones during a professional rugby union competition.

    PubMed

    Argus, Christos K; Gill, Nicholas D; Keogh, Justin W L; Hopkins, Will G; Beaven, C Martyn

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess changes in strength, power, and levels of testosterone and cortisol over a 13-week elite competitive rugby union season. Thirty-two professional rugby union athletes from a Super 14 rugby team (age, 24.4 +/- 2.7 years; height, 184.7 +/- 6.2 cm; mass, 104.0 +/- 11.2 kg; mean +/- SD) were assessed for upper-body and lower-body strength (bench press and box squat, respectively) and power (bench throw and jump squat, respectively) up to 5 times throughout the competitive season. Salivary testosterone and cortisol samples, along with ratings of perceived soreness and tiredness, were also obtained before each power assessment. An effect size of 0.2 was interpreted as the smallest worthwhile change. A small increase in lower-body strength was observed over the study period (8.5%; 90% confidence limits +/-7.2%), whereas upper-body strength was maintained (-1.2%; +/-2.7%). Decreases in lower-body power (-3.3%; +/-5.5%) and upper-body power (-3.4; +/-4.9%) were small and trivial. There were moderate increases in testosterone (54%; +/-27%) and cortisol (97%; +/-51%) over the competitive season, and the testosterone to cortisol ratio showed a small decline (22%; +/-25%), whereas changes in perceived soreness and tiredness were trivial. Individual differences over the competitive season for all measures were mostly trivial or inestimable. Some small to moderate relationships were observed between strength and power; however, relationships between hormonal concentrations and performance were mainly trivial but unclear. Positive adaptation in strength and power may be primarily affected by cumulative training volume and stimulus over a competitive season. Greater than 2 resistance sessions per week may be needed to improve strength and power in elite rugby union athletes during a competitive season.

  3. Steroid hormones block amyloid fibril-induced 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) formazan exocytosis: relationship to neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Schubert, D

    1998-12-01

    Perhaps the most reproducible early event induced by the interaction of amyloid beta peptide (A beta) with the cell is the inhibition of cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction. We recently demonstrated that cytotoxic amyloid peptides such as A beta and human amylin inhibit cellular MTT reduction by dramatically enhancing MTT formazan exocytosis. We now show the following: (a) Insulin and glucagon, when converted to fibrils with beta-pleated sheet structure, induce MTT formazan exocytosis that is indistinguishable from that induced by A beta. NAC35, an amyloidogenic fragment of alpha-synuclein (or NACP), also induces MTT formazan exocytosis. (b) All protein fibrils with the beta-pleated sheet structure examined are toxic to rat hippocampal neurons. (c) Many sterol sex hormones (e.g., estradiol and progesterone) block amyloid fibril-enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis as well as MTT formazan exocytosis in control cells by acting at a common late step in the exocytic pathway. Steroids fail, however, to protect hippocampal neurons from acute amyloid fibril toxicity. These findings suggest that the ability to enhance MTT formazan exocytosis and to induce neurotoxicity are common biological activities of protein fibrils with beta-pleated sheet structure but that enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis is not sufficient for acute A beta neurotoxicity.

  4. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a family of steroids acutely controlling steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Rammouz, Georges; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-11-01

    Steroids metabolically derive from lipid cholesterol, and vertebrate steroids additionally derive from the steroid pregnenolone. Pregnenolone is derived from cholesterol by hydrolytic cleavage of the aliphatic tail by mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP11A1, located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Delivery of cholesterol to CYP11A1 comprises the principal control step of steroidogenesis, and requires a series of proteins spanning the mitochondrial double membranes. A critical member of this cholesterol translocation machinery is the integral outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18kDa, TSPO), a high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding protein. The cholesterol-binding site of TSPO consists of a phylogenetically conserved cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC). Previous studies from our group identified 5-androsten-3β,17,19-triol (19-Atriol) as drug ligand for the TSPO CRAC motif inhibiting cholesterol binding to CRAC domain and steroidogenesis. To further understand 19-Atriol's mechanism of action as well as the molecular recognition by the TSPO CRAC motif, we undertook structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of the 19-Atriol molecule with a variety of substituted steroids oxygenated at positions around the steroid backbone. We found that in addition to steroids hydroxylated at carbon C19, hydroxylations at C4, C7, and C11 contributed to inhibition of cAMP-mediated steroidogenesis in a minimal steroidogenic cell model. However, only substituted steroids with C19 hydroxylations exhibited specificity to TSPO, its CRAC motif, and mitochondrial cholesterol transport, as the C4, C7, and C11 hydroxylated steroids inhibited the metabolic transformation of cholesterol by CYP11A1. We thus provide new insights into structure-activity relationships of steroids inhibiting mitochondrial cholesterol transport and steroidogenic cholesterol metabolic enzymes.

  5. 195 EXPRESSION OF MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELL (MSC) MARKERS IN THE EQUINE ENDOMETRIUM AND IN VITRO INFLUENCE OF STEROID HORMONES ON ENDOMETRIAL-DERIVED MSC.

    PubMed

    Rink, E; Kuhl, J; Aurich, C; French, H; Nino-Fong, R; Watson, E; Donadeu, F X

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) are multipotent precursor cells that have been isolated from many tissues, including endometrium in some species. These cells are necessary for tissue homeostasis, which in the cycling equine endometrium is regulated in part by changes in concentration of steroid hormones. The expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors during the oestrous cycle has been studied before, but MSC gene expression is not reported as well as the effects of steroid hormones on in vitro proliferation of endometrial MSC. This study was designed to investigate the influence of steroid hormones on endometrial MSC proliferation in vitro and to examine mRNA expression of MSC markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105) in the healthy equine endometrium during the oestrous cycle. Equine endometrial tissue was collected postmortem (n=6) and digested using a dissociation medium and mucin-1-bound magnetic beads were utilised to remove epithelial cells from the resulting single-cell solution. The cells were expanded in culture and, at passage 4, incubated with 3 different concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone for 5 days. For the proliferation analysis the Alamar Blue® assay was used according to manufacturer instructions. Endometrial biopsies, for quantitative RT-PCR analysis, were taken from healthy mares (n=5) on Day 5 and 13 post-ovulation, during oestrus (1 follicle >3.5cm, pronounced uterine oedema), and seasonal anestrous (seasonal anovulation). The ΔCt values were used for statistical analysis using SPSS Statistics 22 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY). Data for quantitative PCR are presented as gene expression relative to the mean of 18S and GAPDH. No significant differences in proliferation could be detected in the various groups incubated with steroid hormones compared with the controls supplemented with charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum. Detectable levels of mRNA for all 5 MSC markers analysed were present throughout the oestrous cycle. While the

  6. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cooke, Mariana; Soria, Gastón; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of mitochondrial dynamics (a balance in fusion/fission events and changes in mitochondria subcellular distribution) to key biological process has been reported, the contribution of changes in mitochondrial fusion to achieve efficient steroid production has never been explored. The mitochondria are central during steroid synthesis and different enzymes are localized between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum to produce the final steroid hormone, thus suggesting that mitochondrial fusion might be relevant for this process. In the present study, we showed that the hormonal stimulation triggers mitochondrial fusion into tubular-shaped structures and we demonstrated that mitochondrial fusion does not only correlate-with but also is an essential step of steroid production, being both events depend on PKA activity. We also demonstrated that the hormone-stimulated relocalization of ERK1/2 in the mitochondrion, a critical step during steroidogenesis, depends on mitochondrial fusion. Additionally, we showed that the SHP2 phosphatase, which is required for full steroidogenesis, simultaneously modulates mitochondrial fusion and ERK1/2 localization in the mitochondrion. Strikingly, we found that mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression, a central protein for mitochondrial fusion, is upregulated immediately after hormone stimulation. Moreover, Mfn2 knockdown is sufficient to impair steroid biosynthesis. Together, our findings unveil an essential role for mitochondrial fusion during steroidogenesis. These discoveries highlight the importance of organelles' reorganization in specialized cells, prompting the exploration of the impact that organelle dynamics has on biological processes that include, but are not limited to, steroid synthesis.

  7. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Mottram, D R; George, A J

    2000-03-01

    Anabolic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone modified to enhance the anabolic rather than the androgenic actions of the hormone. The anabolic effects are considered to be those promoting protein synthesis, muscle growth and crythopoiesis. There are numerous side-effects to anabolic steroids, including hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioural effects and, in males, reduced fertility and gynaccomastia. Anabolic steroids were added to the International Olympic Committee's list of banned substances in 1975. The majority of 'evidence' concerning the efficacy of anabolic steroids as performance enhancing agents is anecdotal. In the main, experimental investigations have been poorly designed scientifically, clinically and statistically. The percentage of positive test results from IOC accredited laboratories has remained consistently low. However, athletes take their steroids during training and out-of-competition testing is not conducted in all countries, although international co-operation is now under consideration. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence, steroids users will continue to hold the view that their effects are efficacious and they are therefore unlikely to be persuaded to curtail their use.

  8. Long-term monitoring of fecal steroid hormones in female snow leopards (Panthera uncia) during pregnancy or pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kodzue; Inada, Sayaka; Seki, Kazuya; Sasaki, Aiko; Hama, Natsuki; Kusunoki, Hiroshi

    2011-05-02

    Knowledge of the basic reproductive physiology of snow leopards is required urgently in order to develop a suitable management conditions under captivity. In this study, the long-term monitoring of concentrations of three steroid hormones in fecal matter of three female snow leopards was performed using enzyme immunoassays: (1) estradiol-17β, (2) progesterone and (3) cortisol metabolite. Two of the female animals were housed with a male during the winter breeding season, and copulated around the day the estradiol-17β metabolite peaked subsequently becoming pregnant. The other female was treated in two different ways: (1) first housed with a male in all year round and then (2) in the winter season only. She did not mate with him on the first occasion, but did so latter around when estradiol-17β metabolite peaked, and became pseudopregnant. During pregnancy, progesterone metabolite concentrations increased for 92 or 94 days, with this period being approximately twice as long as in the pseudopregnant case (31, 42, 49 and 53 days). The levels of cortisol metabolite in the pseudopregnant female (1.35 µg/g) were significantly higher than in the pregnant females (0.33 and 0.24 µg/g) (P<0.05). Similarly, during the breeding season, the levels of estradiol-17β metabolite in the pseudopregnant female (2.18 µg/g) were significantly higher than those in the pregnant females (0.81 and 0.85 µg/g) (P<0.05). Unlike cortisol the average levels of estradiol-17β during the breeding season were independent of reproductive success.The hormone levels may also be related to housing conditions and the resulting reproductive success in female leopards. The female housed with a male during the non-breeding season had high levels of cortisol metabolites and low levels of estradiol-17β in the breeding season, and failed to become pregnant. This indicates that housing conditions in snow leopards may be an important factor for normal endocrine secretion and resulting breeding success.

  9. Nongenomic Actions of Adrenal Steroids in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Evanson, Nathan K.; Herman, James P.; Sakai, Randall R.; Krause, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are released by the adrenal cortex in response to stress and hydromineral imbalance. Historically, adrenocorticosteroid actions are attributed to effects on gene transcription. More recently, however, it has become clear that genome-independent pathways represent an important facet of adrenal steroid actions. These hormones exert nongenomic effects throughout the body, but a significant portion of their actions are specific to the central nervous system. These actions are mediated by a variety of signalling pathways, and lead to physiologically meaningful events in vitro and in vivo. Here we review nongenomic effects of adrenal steroids in the central nervous system at the levels of behaviour, neural system activity, individual neurone activity, and subcellular signalling activity. A clearer understanding of adrenal steroid activity in the central nervous system will lead to a better ability both to treat human disease, and to reduce side-effects of steroid treatments already in use. PMID:20367759

  10. Effects of prenatal treatment with antiandrogens on luteinizing hormone secretion and sex steroid concentrations in adult spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta.

    PubMed

    Place, Ned J; Holekamp, Kay E; Sisk, Cheryl L; Weldele, Mary L; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Drea, Christine M; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal androgen treatment can alter LH secretion in female offspring, often with adverse effects on ovulatory function. However, female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), renowned for their highly masculinized genitalia, are naturally exposed to high androgen levels in utero. To determine whether LH secretion in spotted hyenas is affected by prenatal androgens, we treated pregnant hyenas with antiandrogens (flutamide and finasteride). Later, adult offspring of the antiandrogen-treated (AA) mothers underwent a GnRH challenge to identify sex differences in the LH response and to assess the effects of prenatal antiandrogen treatment. We further considered the effects of blocking prenatal androgens on plasma sex steroid concentrations. To account for potential differences in the reproductive state of females, we suppressed endogenous hormone levels with a long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHa) and then measured plasma androgens after an hCG challenge. Plasma concentrations of LH were sexually dimorphic in spotted hyenas, with females displaying higher levels than males. Prenatal antiandrogen treatment also significantly altered the LH response to GnRH. Plasma estradiol concentration was higher in AA-females, whereas testosterone and androstenedione levels tended to be lower. This trend toward lower androgen levels disappeared after GnRHa suppression and hCG challenge. In males, prenatal antiandrogen treatment had long-lasting effects on circulating androgens: AA-males had lower T levels than control males. The sex differences and effects of prenatal antiandrogens on LH secretion suggest that the anterior pituitary gland of the female spotted hyena is partially masculinized by the high androgen levels that normally occur during development, without adverse effects on ovulatory function.

  11. Serum levels of reproductive steroid hormones in captive sand tiger sharks, Carcharias taurus (Rafinesque), and comments on their relation to sexual conflicts.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, A D; Murru, F L; Rasmussen, L E L; Whitaker, B R; Violetta, G C

    2008-12-01

    Levels of reproductively-related steroids were determined in captive male sand tiger sharks, Carcharias taurus, maintained at two institutions: SeaWorld Adventure Park Orlando and the National Aquarium in Baltimore. Sexual conflicts were absent at the former, but were documented at the latter. Serum titers of 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone were determined via radioimmunoassay in adult male sharks from 1988 to 2000. Sampling overlap between the two institutions occurred for 3 months of the year, but steroid concentrations were compared only for April due to the occurrence of sexual conflicts in the sharks at the National Aquarium in Baltimore in that month. For April, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone were significantly higher in the SeaWorld males, and progesterone was significantly higher in the National Aquarium in Baltimore males, while estradiol was not significantly different. Steroid levels were also determined from serial samples taken monthly over 17 months from three male sharks and one female shark at the National Aquarium in Baltimore in 2001-2002 and were compared with corresponding observed sexual conflicts. The steroid levels obtained showed distinct annual hormonal cycles in the male sharks and corroborated a biennial cycle for the single serially-sampled female shark. Furthermore, the steroid levels for individual males correlated with sexual conflicts as well as their position within the male dominance hierarchy. As this species is depleted in some regions globally, insight into the steroid profile of mature sand tiger sharks is important for a greater understanding of the relationship between their reproductive physiology and behavior, and may aid in captive management and reproduction.

  12. The effect of steroid hormones on the mRNA expression of oct4 and sox2 in uterine tissue of the ovariectomized mice model of menopause

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Marzieh; Zavareh, Saeed; Ghorbanian, Mohammad Taghi; Paylakhi, Seyed Hassan; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The uterus is a dynamic tissue responding to hormonal changes during reproductive cycles. As such, uterine stem cells have been studied in recent years. Transcription factors oct4 and sox2 are critical for effective maintenance of pluripotent cell identity. Objective: The present research evaluated the mRNA expression of oct4 and sox2 in the uterine tissues of ovariectomized mice treated with steroid hormones. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, adult virgin female mice were ovariectomized and treated with estradiol 17β (E2), progesterone (P4), and a combination of E2 and P4 (E2 & P4) for 5 days. Uterine tissues were removed, and immunofluorescent (IF) staining and quantitative real-time PCR of oct4 and sox2 markers were performed. Results: IF showed oct4 and sox2 expression in the uterine endometrium and myometrium among all groups. The mRNA expression of oct4 (p=0.022) and sox2 (p=0.042) in the E2-treated group significantly were decreased compared to that in the control group. By contrast, the mRNA expression of oct4 and sox2 in the P4 (p=0.641 and 0.489 respectively) and E2 & P4-treated groups (p=0.267 and 0.264 respectively) did not show significant differences compared to the control group. Conclusion: The results indicate ovarian steroid hormones change the expression of oct4 and sox2 in the mice uterine tissues, which suggest the involvement of steroid hormonal regulation in uterine stem cells. PMID:27525332

  13. Development of a multi-class steroid hormone screening method using Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Boggs, Ashley S P; Bowden, John A; Galligan, Thomas M; Guillette, Louis J; Kucklick, John R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring complex endocrine pathways is often limited by indirect measurement or measurement of a single hormone class per analysis. There is a burgeoning need to develop specific direct-detection methods capable of providing simultaneous measurement of biologically relevant concentrations of multiple classes of hormones (estrogens, androgens, progestogens, and corticosteroids). The objectives of this study were to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for multi-class steroid hormone detection using biologically relevant concentrations, then test limits of detection (LOD) in a high-background matrix by spiking charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum (FBS) extract. Accuracy was tested with National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) with certified concentrations of cortisol, testosterone, and progesterone. 11-Deoxycorticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, adrenosterone, androstenedione, cortisol, corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, estriol, estrone, equilin, pregnenolone, progesterone, and testosterone were also measured using isotopic dilution. Dansyl chloride (DC) derivatization was investigated maintaining the same method to improve and expedite estrogen analysis. Biologically relevant LODs were determined for 15 hormones. DC derivatization improved estrogen response two- to eight-fold, and improved chromatographic separation. All measurements had an accuracy ≤14 % difference from certified values (not accounting for uncertainty) and relative standard deviation ≤14 %. This method chromatographically separated and quantified biologically relevant concentrations of four hormone classes using highly specific fragmentation patterns and measured certified values of hormones that were previously split into three separate chromatographic methods.

  14. Cell surface receptor interactions of C 27-steroid hormone ecdysterone immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylyk, O. M.; Kotzuruba, A. V.; Buchanevich, O. M.; Gula, N. M.; Bakai, E. A.

    1999-04-01

    Concurrent binding of ecdysterone immobilized on the nanodispersed magnetite with intact rat cells in the presence of free ecdysterone was investigated. The results imply the existence of high affinity ecdysterone-specific binding sites on the surface of liver and spleen macrophages, thymus and spleen lymphocytes, erythrocytes and hepatocytes. Membrane effects may be involved in the signal transduction mechanisms activated by ecdysterone.

  15. ERR Gamma: Does an Orphan Nuclear Receptor Link Steroid Hormone Biogenesis to Endocrine Resistance?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    pair of breast cancer cell lines – one sensitive to endocrine therapy (SUM44) and the other resistant to endocrine therapy (LCCTam, TAM). We found...expression and/or activity regulates the level of cholesterol in a pair of breast cancer cell lines – one sensitive to endocrine therapy (SUM44) and...endocrine therapies . 1.1.2. Selective estrogen receptor downregulators (SERDs) The pure ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (hereafter called fulvestrant ) binds

  16. Influx of testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) and TeBG-bound sex steroid hormones into rat testis and prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, R.; Pardridge, W.M.; Musto, N.A.

    1988-07-01

    The availability of testosterone and estradiol to Sertoli and prostate cells is dependent upon 1) the permeability properties of the blood-tubular barrier (BTB) of the testis or prostate cell membrane, and 2) sex steroid binding to plasma proteins, such as albumin or testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG). Sex steroid influx into these tissues was studied after in vivo arterial bolus injections of (/sup 3/H)testosterone or (/sup 3/H)estradiol in anesthetized rats. Both testosterone and estradiol were readily cleared across the BTB or prostate cell membrane in the absence of plasma proteins and in the presence of human pregnancy serum, in which testosterone or estradiol are 80-95% distributed to TeBG. The extravascular extraction of (/sup 3/H)TeBG across the BTB or prostate plasma membrane (73 +/- 2% (+/- SE) and 92 +/- 9%, respectively) was significantly greater than extraction of (/sup 3/H)albumin or other plasma space markers and indicative of a rapid first pass clearance of TeBG by Sertoli or prostate cells. In summary, these studies indicate that 1) testosterone and estradiol are readily cleared by Sertoli and prostate cells; 2) albumin- and TeBG-bound sex steroids represent the major circulating pool of bioavailable hormone for testis or prostate; and 3) the TeBG-sex steroid complex may be nearly completely available for influx through the BTB or prostate plasma membrane.

  17. Excessive use of Steroid Hormone & beneficial effects of True St. 36 acupuncture on malignant brain tumors--part I; how to estimate non-invasively presence of excess dose of Steroid Hormone in patients, baseball players & other professional athletes from its toxic effects on heart & pancreas, as well as persistent or recurrent infection--part II.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    Using accurate organ representation areas map of the face, originally mapped by the author using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Resonance Phenomena between two identical substances, one can make quick non-invasive screening of diseases by visual inspection, particularly if it is chronic degenerative disease, as they often develop deep crease or creases or discoloration on the pathological organ representation area. However, even if there are no visible abnormalities in the organ representation areas, the author found that when the individual is using excessive Steroid Hormones for malignant brain tumors, other medical purposes, and competitive sports, not only did the left ventricle and pancreas become very abnormal when examined by the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, and Steroid Hormone accumulate in these organs with abnormally increased 8-OH-dG & TXB2, and Folic Acid & Telomere markedly reduce, but also the organ representation areas of the pancreas and left ventricle on the face showed similar abnormalities. Thus, using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, one can quickly and non-invasively screen the Steroid Hormone induced abnormalities of the heart and pancreas, and their organ representation areas of various parts of the body, including the face, tongue, ears, hands and feet. For malignant tumors including brain tumors, acupuncture on True ST. 36 or ST. 37 was found to be highly beneficial by reducing cancer cell telomere to practically 0, while increasing normal cell telomere moderately. The author's study over the past 15 years indicates that photographs of the human body, including pictures that appear in newspapers and magazines, have almost identical information as the information taken directly from the body surfaces of patients or individual athletes. Some examples of the application of this principle for the noninvasive estimation of the presence of Steroid Hormones using a photograph of the individual receiving the Steroid Hormone for medical reasons, or for the purpose of

  18. Seasonal and sex-related variations in serum steroid hormone levels in wild and farmed brown trout Salmo trutta L. in the north-west of Spain.

    PubMed

    Fregeneda-Grandes, Juan M; Hernández-Navarro, Salvador; Fernandez-Coppel, Ignacio A; Correa-Guimaraes, Adriana; Ruíz-Potosme, Norlan; Navas-Gracia, Luis M; Aller-Gancedo, J Miguel; Martín-Gil, Francisco J; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2013-12-01

    Serum steroid profiles were investigated in order to evaluate the potential use of circulating sex steroid levels as a tool for sex identification in brown trout. Changes in the serum concentrations of testosterone (T), progesterone (P), 17-β-estradiol (E2), and cortisol (F) in wild and farmed mature female and male brown trout, Salmo trutta L., were measured in each season (January, May, July, and October) in six rivers and four hatcheries located in the north-west of Spain. Serum cortisol levels in farmed brown trout were significantly higher and showed a seasonal pattern opposite to that found in wild trout. Because levels of the hormones under study can be affected by disruptive factors such as exposure to phytoestrogens (which alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis) and infection with Saprolegnia parasitica (which alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis), both factors are taken into account.

  19. Occurrence of pharmaceutically active and non-steroidal estrogenic compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia.

    PubMed

    Al-Rifai, Jawad H; Gabelish, Candace L; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2007-10-01

    The discovery that natural and synthetic chemicals, in the form of excreted hormones and pharmaceuticals, as well as a vast array of compounds with domestic and industrial applications, can enter the environment via wastewater treatment plants and cause a wide variety of environmental and health problems even at very low concentrations, suggests the need for improvement of water recycling. Three Australian wastewater recycling schemes, two of which employ reverse osmosis (RO) technology, the other applying ozonation and biological activated carbon filtration, have been studied for their ability to remove trace organic contaminants including 11 pharmaceutically active compounds and two non-steroidal estrogenic compounds. Contaminant concentrations were determined using a sensitive analytical method comprising solid phase extraction, derivatization and GC with MS using selected ion monitoring. In raw wastewater, concentrations of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications were comparable to those found in wastewaters around the world. Remarkably, removal efficiencies for the three schemes were superior to literature values and RO was responsible for the greatest proportion of contaminant removal. The ability of RO membranes to concentrate many of the compounds was demonstrated and highlights the need for continued research into monitoring wastewater treatment, concentrate disposal, improved water recycling schemes and ultimately, safer water and a cleaner environment.

  20. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  1. Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor/Translocator Protein Global Knock-out Mice Are Viable with No Effects on Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lan N.; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R.; Pelton, Susanne H.; Butler, W. Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M.; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo−/−) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo−/− mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo−/− mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  2. Influence of substituting dietary soybean for air-classified sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) meal on egg production and steroid hormones in early-phase laying hens.

    PubMed

    Laudadio, V; Ceci, E; Nahashon, S N; Introna, M; Lastella, N M B; Tufarelli, V

    2014-02-01

    Soybean meal (SBM) is the most widely and expensive protein source used in the formulation of poultry diets; however, when the price of SBM increases, poultry nutritionists seek alternative sources that are more economical in formulating least-cost rations. This research aimed to evaluate the effects of dietary air-classified sunflower meal (SFM) on some productive parameters and plasma steroid hormones in laying hens. In this trial, 20-week-old laying hens (ISA Brown strain) in the early phase of production were randomly assigned to two groups and fed wheat middlings-based diets containing soybean (135 g/kg; 48% CP) or air-classified SFM (160 g/kg; 41% CP) as the main protein source. Laying performance, egg size and feed conversion ratio were evaluated for 10 week. Plasma steroid hormones (progesterone and oestradiol) in the hens were quantified weekly. Substituting SBM with air-classified SFM did not change (p > 0.05) the hens' growth performance, whereas feed consumption and efficiency were positively influenced (p < 0.05) by SFM treatment. Egg production rate was improved in hens fed the SFM diet (p < 0.05), as well as the percentage of medium-size eggs that was higher for SFM treatment (p < 0.05). Steroid hormones levels were affected by dietary treatment (p < 0.01). From our findings, it could be effective to include air-classified SFM in early-phase laying hen diets as an alternative protein source substituting SBM, without negative influence on productive performance and egg traits, reducing also the production costs.

  3. Reversal of age-associated decline in immune response to Pnu-imune vaccine by supplementation with the steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Garg, M; Bondada, S

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that murine antibody responses to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide (Pnu-Imune) vaccine declined with age. Here we present data to support the concept that age-associated immune defects are not only due to intrinsic defects in immune cells but are also due to extrinsic factors emanating from the neuroendocrine system. We found that supplementation with dehydroepiandrosterone, a steroid hormone known to be reduced in the aged, corrects the immune deficiency of aged mice and significantly enhanced their splenic immune responses to the Pnu-Imune vaccine. PMID:8478117

  4. Sexual activity and plasma levels of sex steroids in the aspic viper Vipera aspis L. (Reptilia, Viperidae).

    PubMed

    Saint Girons, H; Bradshaw, S D; Bradshaw, F J

    1993-09-01

    Reproductive behavior and associated sexual activity was studied in individual male and female Vipera aspis over a 3-year period in western France in an attempt to correlate mating behavior with blood levels of gonadal sex steroids. Males had higher average levels of both testosterone (T) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) than females. Levels of progesterone (P) did not differ significantly between the two sexes but estradiol-17 beta (E2) concentrations were significantly higher in females during the season of mating. Spring mating behavior and copulation in males was associated with significantly increased levels of T and DHT, compared with postmating males; and a similar, but not significant trend, was evident with autumnal mating. The only statistically significant hormonal difference detected in males showing no sexual activity in autumn, was an elevated level of E2 at 0.52 +/- 0.20 ng/ml compared with 0.09 +/- 0.03 ng/ml in spring-breeding males (P = 0.05). Estrus in females is associated with increased levels of all four steroids but significant only for E2 and DHT. Levels of P were significantly reduced in females displaying seasonal anestrous in the spring immediately following reproduction. Females not displaying estrus in either spring or autumn had significantly lower plasma DHT and E2. Although mating behavior in males is associated statistically with elevated levels of T and DHT, a tight correlation is not obvious at the individual level, suggesting that increased concentrations of androgens are a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for mating. The data from V. aspis suggest that, as in a number of other reptilian species, high circulating levels of androgens function to "condition" or "organize" sexual behavior in males which may be displayed at some later time, well after actual levels have fallen, thus engendering the impression that reproductive behavior may be temporally dissociated from essential hormonal stimuli.

  5. T-2 toxin regulates steroid hormone secretion of rat ovarian granulosa cells through cAMP-PKA pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Tu, Di; Yuan, Li-Yun; Yi, Jin-e; Tian, Yanan

    2015-02-03

    T-2 toxin is a secondary metabolite produced by Fusarium genus and is a common contaminant in food and feedstuffs of cereal origin. In porcine granulosa cells(GC), T-2 toxin has been shown to inhibit the steroidogenesis; however, the mechanism has not been well understood. Gonadotropin-stimulated steroidogenesis is regulated by the cAMP-PKA pathway. In this study, we investigated potential mechanisms for T-2 toxin-induced reproductive toxicity focusing on the critical steps of the cAMP-PKA pathway affected by T-2 toxin. We first analyzed the effects of T-2 toxin on progesterone and estrogen production in rat granulosa cells. For this purpose the granulosa cells were cultured for 48 h in 10% fetal bovine serum-containing medium followed by 24h in serum-free medium containing FSH (10 ng/ml) and androstenedione (3 ng/ml), both are required for normal steroidogenesis. Treatment of these cells with T-2 toxin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of cells and the steroid hormone production. Cellular cyclic AMP levels were dose-dependently inhibited by T-2 toxin (0, 1, 10 and 100 nM, 24 h). Furthermore, we found that although the induction of progesterone by 8-Br-cAMP (a FSH mimetic) and 22R-HC (substrate for progesterone) could both be inhibited by T-2 toxin treatment, the T-2-imposed inhibitory effects could be reversed by increasing doses of 22R-HC, while increasing 8-Br-cAMP had no effects, suggesting that T2 toxin targeted at distinct mechanisms. cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a rate limiting protein in progesterone synthesis. Exposure to T2 toxin caused significant suppression of StAR expression as determined by Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR suggesting StAR is a sensitive target for T-2 toxin. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that T2 toxin inhibits steroidogenesis by suppressing cAMP-PKA pathway and StAR is a target for T-2-toxin. The antisteroidogenesis effects were observable at low T-2 dose (1 ng

  6. Response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge: Seasonal variation in steroid production in a viviparous lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ashley; Jones, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis plays a central role in the regulation of gamete maturation, sex steroid production and the stimulation of reproductive behaviours in vertebrates. In seasonal breeders, the timely activation and deactivation of this control system is important to ensure successful reproduction: this process is not well understood in species which breed irregularly. Males of the viviparous blotched blue-tongued lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea, breed annually, while females display a multiennial cycle. We investigated seasonal variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis responsiveness in both sexes of T. nigrolutea. We measured changes in plasma concentrations of testosterone and estrogen in response to a single intraperitoneal injection of a GnRH agonist, chicken-II LH-RH, at three reproductively distinct times of year. Plasma testosterone concentrations in males were significantly increased during gonadal quiescence, but not initial or final spermatogenesis. There was no estrogen response in males at any time of year. Conversely, in females, there was an increase in plasma testosterone, but not estrogen, concentration, in reproductively quiescent females several months in advance of a successful pregnancy. These results indicate clear variation in HPG axis activity with sex, season and reproductive condition in this seasonally breeding viviparous lizard. This study opens the way for further investigation into the mechanisms by which internal (body condition) and external seasonal cues (temperature and photoperiod) are coordinated to regulate reproduction in irregularly-breeding reptiles.

  7. Breeding period-associated changes in semen quality, concentrations of LH, PRL, gonadal steroid and thyroid hormones in domestic goose ganders (Anser anser f. domesticus).

    PubMed

    Gumułka, Małgorzata; Rozenboim, Israel

    2015-03-01

    In flocks of geese fertility decreases in the second half of the breeding season. The reasons for this reduction in reproduction ability are still unclear. This study measured changes in semen quality variables throughout the period of intensive breeding in relation to hormonal concentrations associated with the sexual activity of ganders. Semen was collected (2×/week) from 2-year-old ganders in the period February-June. Standard ejaculation parameters and spermatozoa (spz) membrane integrity after E/N and SYBR-14/PI staining were evaluated. The DNA Fragmentation Index was measured by flow cytometry and sperm quality factors (SQF). The plasma levels of T, E2, P4, LH, PRL, THs in relation to semen parameters were evaluated. In ejaculate collected at the onset of the second half of breeding (April - spring period), a reduction in sperm concentration and % of liveE/N and liveSYBR-14+/PI- spz was shown. At this time, decrease in concentrations of LH and T and increase in PRL were found as well as moderate changes in THs were observed. However, in May a second peak in T and sperm production occurred. The DFI-% was higher in the middle part of breeding. Gonadal steroids concentration were not good prognostic marker of the reproductive potential of ganders. We suggest that a marked decline in LH and T in the spring period indicated the onset of endocrine changes mediated by PRL and THs resulting in progressive regression of testis functions. The lowest SQF in the spring/summer period coincided with the highest PRL suggesting an anti-spermatogenic action of PRL in ganders.

  8. Contraceptive steroid concentrations in women with early active schistosomiasis: lack of effect of antischistosomal drugs.

    PubMed

    el-Raghy, I; Back, D J; Osman, F; Orme, M L; Fathalla, M

    1986-04-01

    Plasma concentrations of the oral contraceptive steroids (OCS) ethinyloestradiol (EE2) and levonorgestrel (LNG) have been determined in women with early active schistosomiasis and compared to those obtained in healthy volunteers. Steroid concentrations following a single dose of Ovral (500 micrograms LNG, 50 micrograms EE2) or during a multiple dose regimen were unaffected by the disease. There was no significant effect of the antischistosomal drugs praziquantel (40 mg X kg-1) or metrifonate (10 mg X kg-1 X 3 at 2-week intervals) on plasma steroid concentrations. In regular users of OCS, significantly higher concentrations of LNG were observed than in women who received only a single dose. We conclude that there is no pharmacokinetic reason for withholding OCS from patients with early active schistosomiasis who are also receiving either praziquantel or metrifonate.

  9. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Long-Term Control Medications Inhaled Steroids Inhaled Steroids Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... more about steroids? What are some common inhaled steroids? Common inhaled steroids include: Asmanex ® (mometasone) Alvesco ® (ciclesonide) ...

  10. Inhibition of sunfish feeding by defensive steroids from aquatic beetles: Structure activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Gerhart, D J; Bondura, M E; Commito, J A

    1991-07-01

    The vertebrate hormone deoxycorticosterone is the most commonly occurring component of defensive secretions from aquatic beetles in the family Dytiscidae. Deoxycorticosterone and the structurally related steroids pregn-4-en-20α:-ol-3-one and pregn-4-en-20β-ol-3-one were tested for their ability to inhibit feeding by bluegill sunfish,Lepomis macrochirus, in laboratory assays. Deoxycorticosterone at oral doses of 660μg (2 x 10(-6) mol) per pellet caused 94% inhibition in the acceptance of artificial food pellets. At the same molar dosage, pregn-4-en-20α-ol-3-one inhibited food consumption by 58%, while its epimer, pregn-4-en-20β-ol-3-one, did not significantly inhibit feeding. These results indicate that specific stereochemical conditions must be satisfied for the pregnenes to be noxious toL. macrochirus and suggest the existence of a receptor-ligand interaction. The potency of the three steroids in assays of feeding inhibition contradicts earlier results based on toxicity and anesthetic assays in which fish were immersed in solutions of steroids.

  11. Identification of SRC3/AIB1 as a Preferred Coactivator for Hormone-activated Androgen Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Li, Jun; He, Yuanzheng; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-Leong; Xu, H.Eric

    2010-09-17

    Transcription activation by androgen receptor (AR), which depends on recruitment of coactivators, is required for the initiation and progression of prostate cancer, yet the mechanisms of how hormone-activated AR interacts with coactivators remain unclear. This is because AR, unlike any other nuclear receptor, prefers its own N-terminal FXXLF motif to the canonical LXXLL motifs of coactivators. Through biochemical and crystallographic studies, we identify that steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC3) (also named as amplified in breast cancer-1 or AIB1) interacts strongly with AR via synergistic binding of its first and third LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis and functional studies confirm that SRC3 is a preferred coactivator for hormone-activated AR. Importantly, AR mutations found in prostate cancer patients correlate with their binding potency to SRC3, corroborating with the emerging role of SRC3 as a prostate cancer oncogene. These results provide a molecular mechanism for the selective utilization of SRC3 by hormone-activated AR, and they link the functional relationship between AR and SRC3 to the development and growth of prostate cancer.

  12. [The reaction of hormones of hypophysis-thyroid gland's endocrinal axis on vibration pathology and on condition of it's correction with liquid oxygen and anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Abzianidze, E N

    2007-06-01

    The experiment was held on white male rats. After the tests had been finished, by means of immunofermental method the concentration of thyroid (T3 and T4) and thyrotrophic (TSH) hormones were defined in the blood of animals in condition of vibropathology and it's correction with liquid oxygen and retabolil. The research showed, that the level of TSH, T3 and T4 decreased in condition of vibropathology and it's correction with anabolic steroid compare with control groups. But against of background liquid oxygen's injection the level of TSH increased, but the concentration of T3 and T4 were reduced compare with control group, though they were increased compare with the rest groups of experimental animals. As a result of the search, it was established, that the impact of vibration on the organism of male rats causes important changes in the hypophysis-thyroid gland's endocrinal axis, particularly it takes place the hypofunction of thyroid gland. And it's worth to mention that the correction of vibropathology with liquid oxygen cause positive influence and changes in the organism. There is a positively expressed normalization of thyroid and thyrotrophic hormones' concentration, but the correction of vibropathology with anabolic steroid has not been a successful one.

  13. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  14. Fecal steroid monitoring for assessing gonadal and adrenal activity in the golden eagle and peregrine falcon.

    PubMed

    Staley, Airica M; Blanco, Juan M; Dufty, Alfred M; Wildt, David E; Monfort, Steven L

    2007-08-01

    We examined the efficacy of noninvasive monitoring of endocrine function via fecal steroid immunoassays in the golden eagle and peregrine falcon. High-pressure liquid chromatography analyses of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (fGCM) revealed that minor percentages of immunoreactive fGCM co-eluted with [(3)H]corticosterone in both sexes of the eagle (2.5-2.7%) and falcon (7.5-11.9%). In contrast, most fecal estrogen metabolites in eagle and falcon females co-eluted with radiolabeled estradiol-17beta ([(3)H]; 57.6, 64.6%, respectively) or estrone ([(3)H]; 26.9, 4.1%, respectively). Most fecal progestin metabolite immunoreactivity in the female eagle (24.8%) and falcon (21.7%) co-eluted with progesterone ([(14)C]). Most fecal androgen metabolite immunoreactivity in eagle (55.8%) and falcon (63.7%) males co-eluted with testosterone ([(14)C]). Exogenous adrenocorticotropin hormone induced increased fGCM excretion above pre-treatment in both species, but only significantly (P < 0.05) in the eagle. Both species showed increased fGCM after saline administration, suggesting the detection of 'handling stress.' Both species exhibited enterohepatic and renal recirculation of administered steroids as demonstrated by biphasic and triphasic excretion patterns. Thus, noninvasive fecal hormone monitoring is a valid and promising tool for assessing gonadal and adrenal status in rare and threatened birds-of-prey.

  15. Plasma LH and steroid hormones in King penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) during the onset of the breeding cycle.

    PubMed

    Mauget, R; Jouventin, P; Lacroix, A; Ishii, S

    1994-01-01

    Temporal changes in plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone were measured throughout molt and the onset of reproduction in free-living male and female King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) at Crozet Island (46 degrees S, 51 degrees E). In both sexes, LH concentrations began to rise as soon as molting ended, before the departure for refeeding at sea, suggesting that the beginning of reproductive activity is not associated with refeeding and/or courtship behavior. LH remained at high values throughout courtship and decreased to lower levels during incubation. Gonadotrophin secretion covaried with sustained plasma testosterone levels in males and increased estradiol and progesterone levels (peaking at copulation) in females.

  16. Steroids from the roots of Asparagus officinalis and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-Feng; Lin, Yu-Ying; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2008-06-01

    One new (Sarsasapogenin O) and seven known steroids were isolated from the roots of Asparagus officinalis L. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including various 2D-NMR techniques, hydrolysis, and by comparison of spectral data of known compounds. These compounds together with nine steroids which were previously isolated from this plant, were tested for cytotoxic activity. Among them, eight compounds displayed significant cytotoxicities against human A2780, HO-8910, Eca-109, MGC-803, CNE, LTEP-a-2, KB and mouse L1210 tumor cells.

  17. Exposure of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) to silver nanoparticles and 17α-ethinylestradiol mixtures: Implications for contaminant uptake and plasma steroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Julia; Salaberria, Iurgi; Styrishave, Bjarne; Staňková, Radka; Ciesielski, Tomasz M; Olsen, Anders J; Posch, Wilfried; Flaten, Trond P; Krøkje, Åse; Salvenmoser, Willi; Jenssen, Bjørn M

    2017-01-01

    Combined exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) and anthropogenic contaminants can lead to changes in bioavailability, uptake and thus effects of both groups of contaminants. In this study we investigated effects of single and combined exposures of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (AgNPs) and the synthetic hormone 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on tissue uptake of both contaminants in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Silver uptake and tissue distribution (gills, liver, kidney, stomach, muscle and bile) were analyzed following a 14-day, 2-h daily pulsed exposure to AgNPs (2 μg L(-1) and 200 μg L(-1)), Ag(+) (50 μg L(-1)), EE2 (50 ng L(-1)) and AgNP + EE2 (2 or 200 μg L(-1)+50 ng L(-1)). Effects of the exposures on plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) levels, EE2 and steroid hormone concentrations were investigated. The AgNP and AgNP + EE2 exposures resulted in similar Ag concentrations in the tissues, indicating that combined exposure did not influence Ag uptake in tissues. The highest Ag concentrations were found in gills. For the Ag(+) exposed fish, the highest Ag concentrations were measured in the liver. Our results show dissolution processes of AgNPs in seawater, indicating that the tissue concentrations of Ag may partly originate from ionic release. Plasma EE2 concentrations and Vtg induction were similar in fish exposed to the single contaminants and the mixed contaminants, indicating that the presence of AgNPs did not significantly alter EE2 uptake. Similarly, concentrations of most steroid hormones were not significantly altered due to exposures to the combined contaminants versus the single compound exposures. However, high concentrations of AgNPs in combination with EE2 caused a drop of estrone (E1) (female fish) and androstenedione (AN) (male and female fish) levels in plasma below quantification limits. Our results indicate that the interactive effects between AgNPs and EE2 are limited, with only high concentrations of AgNPs triggering

  18. Hindbrain lactate regulates preoptic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron GnRH-I protein but not AMPK responses to hypoglycemia in the steroid-primed ovariectomized female rat.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-07-09

    Steroid positive-feedback activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) neuroendocrine axis propagates the pre ovulatory LH surge, a crucial component of female reproduction. Our work shows that this key event is restrained by inhibitory metabolic input from hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons. GnRH neurons express the ultra-sensitive energy sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK); here, we investigated the hypothesis that GnRH nerve cell AMPK and peptide neurotransmitter responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia are controlled by hindbrain lack of the oxidizable glycolytic end-product L-lactate. Data show that hypoglycemic inhibition of LH release in steroid-primed ovariectomized female rats was reversed by coincident caudal hindbrain lactate infusion. Western blot analyses of laser-microdissected A2 neurons demonstrate hypoglycemic augmentation [Fos, estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β), phosphoAMPK (pAMPK)] and inhibition (dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, GLUT3, MCT2) of protein expression in these cells, responses that were normalized by insulin plus lactate treatment. Hypoglycemia diminished rostral preoptic GnRH nerve cell GnRH-I protein and pAMPK content; the former, but not the latter response was reversed by lactate. Results implicate caudal hindbrain lactoprivic signaling in hypoglycemia-induced suppression of the LH surge, demonstrating that lactate repletion of that site reverses decrements in A2 catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme and GnRH neuropeptide precursor protein expression. Lack of effect of lactate on hypoglycemic patterns of GnRH AMPK activity suggests that this sensor is uninvolved in metabolic-inhibition of positive-feedback-stimulated hypophysiotropic signaling to pituitary gonadotropes.

  19. Synergistic effect of 5-HT1A and σ1 receptor activation on prefrontal dopaminergic transmission under circulating steroid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Naoki; Ago, Yukio; Hasebe, Shigeru; Nishimura, Akira; Mori, Kazuya; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)1A and σ1 receptors have been implicated in psychiatric disorders. We previously found that combined 5-HT reuptake inhibition and σ1 receptor activation has a synergistic effect on prefrontal dopaminergic transmission in adrenalectomized/castrated mice lacking circulating steroid hormones. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying this neurochemical synergism. Systemic administration of fluvoxamine, a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor with agonistic activity towards the σ1 receptor, increased prefrontal dopamine (DA) levels, and adrenalectomy/castration potentiated this fluvoxamine-induced increase in DA. This enhancement of DA release was blocked by WAY100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist), but not by ritanserin (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist), azasetron (a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist) or SB269970 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist). Individually, osemozotan (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) and (+)-SKF-10,047 (a σ1 receptor agonist) did not alter prefrontal monoamine levels in adrenalectomized/castrated and sham-operated mice differentially. In contrast, co-administration of these drugs increased prefrontal DA levels to a greater extent in adrenalectomized/castrated mice than in sham-operated animals. Furthermore, co-administration of osemozotan and (+)-SKF-10,047 increased expression of the neuronal activity marker c-Fos in the ventral tegmental area of adrenalectomized/castrated mice, but not in sham-operated animals. These findings suggest that combined activation of 5-HT1A and σ1 receptors has a synergistic effect on prefrontal dopaminergic transmission under circulating steroid deficiency, and that this interaction may play an important role in the regulation of the prefrontal DA system.

  20. Seasonal patterns of plasma steroid hormones in males and females of the bearded dragon lizard, Pogona barbata.

    PubMed

    Amey, A P; Whittier, J M

    2000-03-01

    Pogona barbata is an Australian lizard that produces several large clutches of eggs between August and December (spring to early summer). Mating takes place around ovulation. The seasonal pattern of reproductive hormones in males and females of P. barbata was determined by radioimmunoassay of plasma progesterone (P), estradiol-17beta (E-17beta), corticosterone (B), and total androgen (TA). In females, P began to rise in August and was elevated from September to December. Corticosterone and TA were detectable but low and did not vary with time of year or reproductive condition. Estradiol-17beta was only detectable in a few females and exhibited no elevation with vitellogenic activity. These results suggest that B and TA are not involved in female reproduction. Estrogens may be either so low they could not be detected or they were present in a form other than estradiol-17beta. The high sensitivity of the estradiol-17beta radioimmunoassay suggests the latter. In males, TA peaked at the beginning of spring. They then declined to a minimum during November and December. However, concentrations recovered in the postbreeding activity period, January to April (summer and autumn). These patterns are consistent with the observation of maximum spermatogenic activity in spring, followed by the cessation of spermatogenesis directly after the breeding period and testicular recrudescence in February (late summer).

  1. Gonadotropin-induced changes in oviducal mRNA expression levels of sex steroid hormone receptors and activin-related signaling factors in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Forouhar, Sara; Kohno, Satomi; Botteri, Nicole L; Hamlin, Heather J; Guillette, Louis J

    2012-01-15

    Oviducts respond to hormonal cues from ovaries with tissue proliferation and differentiation in preparation of transporting and fostering gametes. These responses produce oviducal microenvironments conducive to reproductive success. Here, we investigated changes in circulating plasma sex steroid hormones concentrations and ovarian and oviducal mRNA expression to an in vivo gonadotropin (FSH) challenge in sexually immature, five-month-old alligators. Further, we investigated differences in these observed responses between alligators hatched from eggs collected at a heavily-polluted (Lake Apopka, FL) and minimally-polluted (Lake Woodruff, FL) site. In oviducts, we measured mRNA expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors and also beta A and B subunits which homo- or heterodimerize to produce the transforming growth factor activin. In comparison, minimal inhibin alpha subunit mRNA expression suggests that these oviducts produce a primarily activin-dominated signaling milieu. Ovaries responded to a five-day FSH challenge with increased expression of steroidogenic enzyme mRNA which was concomitant with increased circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations. Oviducts in the FSH-challenged Lake Woodruff alligators increased mRNA expression of progesterone and androgen receptors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the activin signaling antagonist follistatin. In contrast, Lake Apopka alligators displayed a diminished increase in ovarian CYP19A1 aromatase expression and no increase in oviducal AR expression, as compared to those observed in Lake Woodruff alligators. These results demonstrate that five-month-old female alligators display an endocrine-responsive ovarian-oviducal axis and environmental pollution exposure may alter these physiological responses.

  2. Gonadotropin-induced changes in oviducal mRNA expression levels of sex steroid hormone receptors and activin-related signaling factors in the alligator

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon C.; Forouhar, Sara; Kohno, Satomi; Botteri, Nicole L.; Hamlin, Heather J.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Oviducts respond to hormonal cues from ovaries with tissue proliferation and differentiation in preparation of transporting and fostering gametes. These responses produce oviducal microenvironments conducive to reproductive success. Here we investigated changes in circulating plasma sex steroid hormones concentrations and ovarian and oviducal mRNA expression to an in vivo gonadotropin (FSH) challenge in sexually immature, five-month-old alligators. Further, we investigated differences in these observed responses between alligators hatched from eggs collected at a heavily-polluted (Lake Apopka, FL) and minimally-polluted (Lake Woodruff, FL) site. In oviducts, we measured mRNA expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors and also beta A and B subunits which homo- or heterodimerize to produce the transforming growth factor activin. In comparison, minimal inhibin alpha subunit mRNA expression suggests that these oviducts produce a primarily activin-dominated signaling milieu. Ovaries responded to a five-day FSH challenge with increased expression of steroidogenic enzyme mRNA which was concomitant with increased circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations. Oviducts in the FSH-challenged Lake Woodruff alligators increased mRNA expression of progesterone and androgen receptors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the activin signaling antagonist follistatin. In contrast, Lake Apopka alligators displayed a diminished increase in ovarian CYP19A1 aromatase expression and no increase in oviducal AR expression, as compared to those observed in Lake Woodruff alligators. These results demonstrate that five-month-old female alligators display an endocrine-responsive ovarian-oviducal axis and environmental pollution exposure may alter these physiological responses. PMID:22154572

  3. 5 Alpha-reductase inhibitory and antiandrogenic activities of novel steroids in hamster seminal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Bratoeff, Eugene; Flores, Eugenio; Ramírez, Elena; Calleros, Jorge; Montes, Diana; Quiroz, Alexandra; Heuze, Ivonne

    2002-11-01

    The pharmacological activity of several 16-bromosubstituted trienediones 4 and 5, 16-methyl substituted dienediones 6 and 7 and the 16-methyl substituted trienedione 8 was determined on gonadectomized hamster seminal vesicles by measuring the in vitro conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and also the ability of these steroids to bind to the androgen receptor. Steroids 6 and 7 when injected together with T decreased the weight of the seminal vesicles thus showing an antiandrogenic effect. Compounds 5 and 6 reduced substantially the conversion of T to DHT and therefore can be considered good inhibitors for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase; however both steroids failed to form a complex with the androgen receptor. On the other hand compound 7 which showed a very small inhibitory activity for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase, exhibited a very high affinity for the androgen receptor and thus can be considered an effective antiandrogen. This compound also reduced substantially the weight of the seminal vesicles. Steroids 4 and 8 did not reduce the weight of the seminal vesicles and exhibited a low affinity for the androgen receptor; 8 showed a weak 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity, whereas 4 exhibited a weak androgenic effect.

  4. PERCEPTION OF THE MOLTING HORMONE 20-HYDROXECDYSONE BY HOMARUS AMERICANUS: LOCALIZATION OF STEROID RECEPTORS AND EFFECT ON BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing evidence that hormones, when released from an animal into the environment, act as chemical signals to other organisms. There is also evidence to suggest that hormones are released by lobsters during sexual and agonistic encounters to signal conspecifics. The go...

  5. The role of steroid hormones in protogynous sex change in the Blackeye goby, Coryphopterus nicholsii (Teleostei: Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Kroon, F J; Liley, N R

    2000-05-01

    To detect and describe correlations between steroid concentrations and sexual function in the protogynous Coryphopterus nicholsii, we examined whole-body concentrations of the gonadal steroids testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), and 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2). Our results show that T, 11-KT, and 17beta-E2 are naturally occurring steroids in both female and male C. nicholsii. Further, mean whole-body concentrations of T and 11-KT in males were approximately twice those in females, whereas mean whole-body concentration of 17beta-E2 in females was almost twice that in males. Second, we tested hypotheses on the causation of sex change arising from these correlations between steroid concentrations and sexual function. We examined the effects of administration of 11-KT, 11-KA, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, and an aromatase inhibitor (Fadrozole) on gonadal structures of mature females. Complete sex change was induced by 11-KT, 11-KA, and Fadrozole. Our results strongly suggest that an increase in 11-KT concentration and perhaps also a decrease in 17beta-E2 concentration are involved in mediating natural sex change in C. nicholsii.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of RACK1 and modulation of its expression: Role of steroid hormones and significance in health and aging.

    PubMed

    Buoso, Erica; Galasso, Marilisa; Serafini, Melania Maria; Ronfani, Melania; Lanni, Cristina; Corsini, Emanuela; Racchi, Marco

    2017-02-09

    The Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a scaffold protein for different kinases and membrane receptors. RACK1 can shuttle proteins to their sites of action, facilitate cross-talk among distinct signaling pathways or recruit other signaling proteins into the complexes. Therefore, it is a key mediator of various pathways and is involved in various biological events including development, immune response, brain activity and cancer. Because of its importance, it is of extreme significance to understand the transcriptional mechanisms governing its expression. The identification of regulatory elements in the promoter of RACK1 shed some light on its transcriptional modulation in physiological and pathological context. Literature data support the existence of a complex hormonal balance, between glucocorticoids and androgens, in the control of RACK1 expression due to specific and complex interactions on the RACK1 promoter. These and other informations suggest that a better understanding of RACK1 transcriptional regulation is essential to unravel its role. Furthermore, the modulation of its expression in physiological or pathological conditions may be of interest in different context, such as aging and cancer.

  7. Sex Steroid Hormone Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Pesticide Use, and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Nested Case–Control Study within the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Carol H.; Barry, Kathryn Hughes; Andreotti, Gabriella; Alavanja, Michael C. R.; Cook, Michael B.; Kelly, Scott P.; Burdett, Laurie A.; Yeager, Meredith; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Koutros, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic investigations suggest that certain pesticides may alter sex steroid hormone synthesis, metabolism or regulation, and the risk of hormone-related cancers. Here, we evaluated whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in hormone homeostasis alter the effect of pesticide exposure on prostate cancer risk. We evaluated pesticide–SNP interactions between 39 pesticides and SNPs with respect to prostate cancer among 776 cases and 1,444 controls nested in the Agricultural Health Study cohort. In these interactions, we included candidate SNPs involved in hormone synthesis, metabolism or regulation (N = 1,100), as well as SNPs associated with circulating sex steroid concentrations, as identified by genome-wide association studies (N = 17). Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multiplicative SNP–pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. We translated p-values for interaction into q-values, which reflected the false discovery rate, to account for multiple comparisons. We observed a significant interaction, which was robust to multiple comparison testing, between the herbicide dicamba and rs8192166 in the testosterone metabolizing gene SRD5A1 (p-interaction = 4.0 × 10−5; q-value = 0.03), such that men with two copies of the wild-type genotype CC had a reduced risk of prostate cancer associated with low use of dicamba (OR = 0.62 95% CI: 0.41, 0.93) and high use of dicamba (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.68), compared to those who reported no use of dicamba; in contrast, there was no significant association between dicamba and prostate cancer among those carrying one or two copies of the variant T allele at rs8192166. In addition, interactions between two organophosphate insecticides and SNPs related to estradiol metabolism were observed to result in an increased risk of prostate cancer. While replication is

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus P450 monooxygenases and evaluation of their activity towards steroids.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Shibata, Daisuke; Kino, Kuniki

    2009-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) open reading frames (ORFs) identified in genome sequences of Bacillus species are potential resources for new oxidation biocatalysts. Phylogenetic analysis of 29 Bacillus P450 ORFs revealed that the P450s consist of a limited number of P450 families, CYP102, CYP106, CYP107, CYP109, CYP134, CYP152, and CYP197. Previously, we identified the catalytic activities of three P450s of Bacillus subtilis towards steroids by rapid substrate screening using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS). Here, we further applied this method to evaluate the activity of Bacillus cereus P450s towards steroids. Five P450 genes were cloned from B. cereus ATCC 10987 based on its genomic sequence and were expressed in Escherichia coli. These P450s were reacted with a mixture of 30 compounds that mainly included steroids, and the reaction mixtures were analyzed using FT-ICR/MS. We found that BCE_2659 (CYP106) catalyzed the monooxygenation of methyltestosterone, progesterone, 11-ketoprogesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and chlormadinone acetate. BCE_2654 (CYP107) monooxygenated testosterone enanthate, and BCE_3250 (CYP109) monooxygenated testosterone and compactin. Based on the phylogenetic relationship and the known substrate specificities including ones identified in this study, we discuss the catalytic potential of Bacillus P450s towards steroids.

  9. Induction of steroidal hydroxylase activity by plant defence compounds in the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus lunatus

    PubMed

    Vitas; Smith; Plavec; Kesselmeier; Pajic; Ferlan; Zigon; Kelly; Komel

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the endogenous role of the commercially important inducible steroid hydroxylase cytochrome P450s of fungi was in defense against plant toxophores/secondary metabolites. Two plant defense compounds, the aglycones tomatidine and solanidine, the steroidal glycoalkaloid alpha-tomatine and the triterpene saponin beta-escin were tested as inducers of 11beta/14alpha-steroid hydroxylase in the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus lunatus. The extracts of saponins from the roots of Primula veris and green oat leaves were also tested as inducers of 11beta/14alpha-hydroxylation activity in progesterone biotransformation with the same fungus. Induction of steroid hydroxylase and inhibition of activity in some cases support our hypothesis that their endogenous function is in biochemical defence against secondary metabolites. 4-Pregnene-3,11,20-trione was added as a substrate for biotransformation with C. lunatus. We isolated from culture broth 14alpha-hydroxy-4-pregnene-3,11,20-trione, and the hitherto unreported compounds, 7alpha,14alpha-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3,11,20-trione and 7alpha-hydroxy-pregna-4,8(14)-diene-3,11,20-trione.

  10. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  11. Determination of pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, and endocrine-disrupting personal care products in sewage sludge by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiyi; Huang, Qiuxin; Cui, Jianlan; Zhang, Kun; Tang, Caiming; Peng, Xianzhi

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive method has been developed and validated for the determination of diverse groups of pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, and hormone-like personal care products in sewage sludge. Samples were extracted by ultrasonic-assisted extraction followed by solid-phase extraction cleanup. For determination of estrogens and hormone-like phenolic compounds, sample extracts were further derivatized with dansyl chloride and purified with silica gel column chromatography to improve the analytical sensitivity. The chemicals were determined by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. Recoveries ranged mostly from 63% to 119% with relative standard deviations within 15%. Method quantification limits were 0.1-3 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) for sewage sludge. The method was applied to a preliminary investigation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in sewage sludge and sediment in the Pearl River Delta, South China. Triclosan, triclocarban, 2-phenylphenol, bisphenol A, and parabens were ubiquitously detected at 3.6-5088.2 ng g(-1) dw in sludge and 0.29-113.1 ng g(-1) dw in sediment samples, respectively. Estrone, carbamazepine, metoprolol, and propranolol were also frequently quantified in the sludge and sediment samples. The dewatering process caused no significant losses of these PPCPs in sewage sludge.

  12. The effects of social isolation on steroid hormone levels are modulated by previous social status and context in a cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, L; Oliveira, R F

    2014-01-01

    Social isolation is a major stressor which impacts the physiology, behaviour and health of individuals in gregarious species. However, depending on conditional and contextual factors, such as social status and group composition, social isolation may be perceived differently by different individuals or even by the same individuals at different times. Here we tested the effects of social status (territorial vs. non-territorial) and previous group composition (i.e. type of social group: mixed sex group with two territorial males, TT vs. mixed sex group with one territorial and one non-territorial male, TnT) on the hormonal response (androgens and cortisol) to social isolation in a cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus). The different steroid hormones measured responded differentially to social isolation, and their response was modulated by social factors. Social isolation elicited a decrease of 11-keto formation only in territorial males, whereas non-territorial males present a non-significant trend for increasing KT levels. Testosterone did not respond to social isolation. Cortisol only increased in isolated individuals from TnT groups irrespective of social status (i.e. both in territorials and non-territorials). These results suggest that it is the perception of social isolation and not the objective structure of the situation that triggers the hormonal response to isolation.

  13. Full automation of solid-phase microextraction/on-fiber derivatization for simultaneous determination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and steroid hormones by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Lan, Chongyu; Liu, Hongtao; Dong, Jun; Luan, Tiangang

    2006-09-01

    A fully automated method using direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) and headspace on-fiber silylation for simultaneous determinations of exogenous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and endogenous steroid hormones in environmental aqueous and biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and compared to a previously reported manual method. Three EDCs and five endocrine steroid hormones were selected to evaluate this method. The extraction and derivatization time, ion strength, pH, incubation temperature, sample volume, and extraction solvent were optimized. Satisfactory results in pure water were obtained in terms of linearity of calibration curve (R2=0.9932-1.0000), dynamic range (3 orders of magnitude), precision (4-9% RSD), as well as LOD (0.001-0.124 microg L(-1)) and LOQ (0.004-0.413 microg L(-1)), respectively. These results were similar to those obtained using a manual method, and moreover, the precision was improved. This new automated method has been applied to the determinations of target compounds in real samples used in our previous study on a manual SPME method. Exogenous octylphenol (OP), technical grade nonylphenol (t-NP), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) were at 0.13, 5.03, and 0.02 microg L(-1) in river water and 3.76, 13.25, and 0.10 microg L(-1) in fish serum, respectively. Natural steroid hormones estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and testosterone (T) were at 0.19, 0.11, and 6.22 microg L(-1) in river water; and in female fish serum E1, E2, and pregnenolone (PREG) were at 1.37, 1.95, and 6.25 microg L(-1), respectively. These results were confirmed by the manual method. The developed fully automated SPME and on-fiber silylation procedures showed satisfactory applications in environmental analysis and the performances show improved precision and a reduced analysis time compared to the manual method.

  14. Influence of Acidification on the Partitioning of Steroid Hormones among Filtrate, Filter Media, and Retained Particulate Matter.

    PubMed

    Havens, Sonya M; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn D C; Mieritz, Mark G; Shafer, Martin M; Schauer, James J

    2016-09-01

    Hormone contamination of aquatic systems has been shown to have deleterious effects on aquatic biota. However, the assessment of hormone contamination of aquatic environments requires a quantitative evaluation of the potential effects of sample preservation on hormone concentrations. This study investigated the influence of acidification (pH 2) of surface water samples on the partitioning of hormones among filtrate, filter media, and filter-retained particulate matter. Hormones were spiked into unpreserved and sulfuric acid-preserved ultrapure water and surface water runoff samples. The samples were filtered, and hormones were extracted from the filter and filtrate and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Acidification did not influence the partitioning of hormones onto the filter media. For the majority of the hormones investigated in this study, the partitioning of hormones to the filter-retained particulate matter was not influenced by acidification. Acidification increased the partitioning of progesterone and melengestrol acetate onto the retained particulate matter (about 25% for both analytes). Incorporation of an isotopically labeled internal standard (ISTD) for progesterone accounted for the loss of progesterone to the filter-retained particulates and resulted in accurate concentrations of progesterone in the filtrate. The incorporation of an ISTD for melengestrol acetate, however, was unable to account for the loss of melengestrol acetate to the retained particulates and resulted in underestimations of melengestrol acetate in the filtrate. Our results indicate that the analysis of melengestrol acetate in acid preserved surface runoff samples should be conducted on the filter-retained particulates as well as the filtrate.

  15. The Effects of Sex Steroids on Spatial Performance: A Review and an Experimental Clinical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liben, Lynn S.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Finkelstein, Jordan W.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Kunselman, Susan; Schwab, Jacqueline; Dubas, Judith Semon; Demers, Laurence M.; Lookingbill, Georgia; D'Arcangelo, M. Rose; Krogh, Holleen R.; Kulin, Howard E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between sex hormones and spatial performance among adolescents treated with sex steroids for delayed puberty. Found that spatial performance varied according to gender but did not vary with levels of actively circulating sex steroids. Reviewed physiological mechanisms, developmental periods, and past empirical work…

  16. How much is enough? Modulation of dose-response curve for steroid receptor-regulated gene expression by changing concentrations of transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Simons, S Stoney

    2006-01-01

    The position of the dose-response curve for steroid-regulated gene expression determines how much variation in response will accompany the normal physiological changes in circulating steroid. Over the last several years, it has become clear that the concentration of steroid hormone required for half-maximal induction or repression by a given receptor-steroid complex, which is normally called the EC50, is not constant for all responsive genes. Thus, the position of the dose-response curve can change so that a single concentration of steroid produces very different percentages of maximal activity. This, in turn, allows for the differential expression of genes by a common steroid hormone concentration during development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Here we review the variety of factors that influence the EC50 and position of the dose-response curve for steroid hormone receptors, discuss what is known about the mechanisms, and highlight promising areas for future research.

  17. Research on cholesterol, steroidal hormones and liposoluble vitamins by thin layer chromatography in some adipose organs of anuran amphibians. II. Liposoluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Dore, B; Usai, P

    1976-01-01

    By means of thin layer chromatography and selective detection, vitamin A acetate, vitamin E and vitamin E acetate, vitamin D3 and cholesterol were identified in the prepericardic body, adrenal tissue, fat bodies and testis of Bubo bufo, as well as in the prepericardic body of Rana esculenta. On the contrary, liposoluble vitamins could not be isolated from the adipose tissue occurring in the thoracic cavity of Rana esculenta, or in Bufo bufo muscles. The results are discussed in correlation with the histological structure of the prepericardic body and the presumptive identification therein of steroid hormones. Lastly, the functional analogy between the prepericardic body and fat bodies in anuran amphibians and the brown adipose tissue of mammals is also postulated.

  18. Linear growth in children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis requiring steroid therapy: natural history and effects of growth hormone treatment on linear growth.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Lucidarme, N; Prieur, A M; Ruiz, J C; Czernichow, P

    2001-01-01

    We assessed linear growth and final height retrospectively in a group of 24 patients suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) during childhood who had received steroid therapy. In these patients, there was a significant loss of height of more than 2 standard deviations during the first years of the disease, which correlated positively with the duration of prednisone therapy. After remission of the disease and discontinuation of prednisone treatment, 70% of the patients achieved catch-up growth, although 30% showed a persistent loss of height. Their mean final height was strongly correlated with their mean height at the end of steroid therapy and was significantly different between the group of patients with catch-up growth and the group without catch-up growth. This pattern of growth observed in patients with JIA should help us to define strategies of growth hormone (GH) treatment in these patients in order to improve their final height. We have previously reported the beneficial effects on growth and body composition of 1 year of GH treatment in a group of 14 growth-retarded patients suffering from JIA who received glucocorticoid therapy. These patients (n = 13) were treated again with GH at the same dosage (0.46 mg/kg/week [0.07 mg/kg/day]) for another 3-year period. GH treatment markedly increased growth velocity in these patients, but had a minor effect on height SDS, suggesting that these children will remain short when adults. Starting GH therapy in these patients earlier after the onset of the disease may prevent growth deterioration and metabolic complications induced by chronic inflammation and long-term steroid therapy.

  19. Lack of cyclical fluctuations of endometrial GLUT4 expression in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: Evidence for direct regulation of GLUT4 by steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoqin; Feng, Yi; Lin, Jin-Fang; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-12-01

    Background Determination of the role of steroid hormones in expression and regulation of endometrial glucose transport 4 (GLUT4) in humans is important for understanding endometrial disorders such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone-imbalance disease. Methods Endometrial biopsy samples were collected from non-PCOS patients with regular menstrual cycles or with hyperplasia and from PCOS patients with or without hyperplasia. In addition, endometrial tissues from postmenopausal women were incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 10 IU/ml), 17β-estradiol (E2, 10 nM), progesterone (P4, 100 nM), or a combination of E2 and P4 for 24 h. The expression of GLUT4 was measured at the mRNA level using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and at the protein level using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results A cyclical change in GLUT4 expression pattern was observed in non-PCOS patients, and a high level of GLUT4 expression was seen in the proliferative phase compared to the secretory phase. Low levels of GLUT4 expression were found in PCOS patients compared to menstrual cycle phase-matched non-PCOS patients, and there was no significant change in GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients during the menstrual cycle. GLUT4 was localized in both epithelial and stromal cells, with notable changes in epithelial cells. We postulate that decreased GLUT4 expression might be regulated by steroid hormones. In support of this, we showed that in cultured endometrial tissues hCG and E2 alone had no effect on GLUT4 expression. However, P4 alone and P4 in combination with E2 decreased GLUT4 expression. Compared with non-PCOS controls, PCOS patients with endometrial hyperplasia exhibited decreased GLUT4 expression in particular in the epithelial cells. Conclusion We conclude that P4 can induce changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression during the menstrual cycle and that abnormal hormonal conditions such as PCOS disrupt normal patterns

  20. Lack of cyclical fluctuations of endometrial GLUT4 expression in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: Evidence for direct regulation of GLUT4 by steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peng; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoqin; Feng, Yi; Lin, Jin-Fang; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Background Determination of the role of steroid hormones in expression and regulation of endometrial glucose transport 4 (GLUT4) in humans is important for understanding endometrial disorders such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone-imbalance disease. Methods Endometrial biopsy samples were collected from non-PCOS patients with regular menstrual cycles or with hyperplasia and from PCOS patients with or without hyperplasia. In addition, endometrial tissues from postmenopausal women were incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 10 IU/ml), 17β-estradiol (E2, 10 nM), progesterone (P4, 100 nM), or a combination of E2 and P4 for 24 h. The expression of GLUT4 was measured at the mRNA level using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and at the protein level using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results A cyclical change in GLUT4 expression pattern was observed in non-PCOS patients, and a high level of GLUT4 expression was seen in the proliferative phase compared to the secretory phase. Low levels of GLUT4 expression were found in PCOS patients compared to menstrual cycle phase-matched non-PCOS patients, and there was no significant change in GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients during the menstrual cycle. GLUT4 was localized in both epithelial and stromal cells, with notable changes in epithelial cells. We postulate that decreased GLUT4 expression might be regulated by steroid hormones. In support of this, we showed that in cultured endometrial tissues hCG and E2 alone had no effect on GLUT4 expression. However, P4 alone and P4 in combination with E2 decreased GLUT4 expression. Compared with non-PCOS controls, PCOS patients with endometrial hyperplasia exhibited decreased GLUT4 expression in particular in the epithelial cells. Conclusion We conclude that P4 can induce changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression during the menstrual cycle and that abnormal hormonal conditions such as PCOS disrupt normal patterns

  1. Food deprivation explains effects of mouthbrooding on ovaries and steroid hormones, but not brain neuropeptide and receptor mRNAs, in an African cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Grone, Brian P; Carpenter, Russ E; Lee, Malinda; Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

    2012-06-01

    Feeding behavior and reproduction are coordinately regulated by the brain via neurotransmitters, circulating hormones, and neuropeptides. Reduced feeding allows animals to engage in other behaviors important for fitness, including mating and parental care. Some fishes cease feeding for weeks at a time in order to provide care to their young by brooding them inside the male or female parent's mouth. Maternal mouthbrooding is known to impact circulating hormones and subsequent reproductive cycles, but neither the full effects of food deprivation nor the neural mechanisms are known. Here we ask what effects mouthbrooding has on several physiological processes including gonad and body mass, brain neuropeptide and receptor gene expression, and circulating steroid hormones in a mouthbrooding cichlid species, Astatotilapia burtoni. We ask whether any observed changes can be explained by food deprivation, and show that during mouthbrooding, ovary size and circulating levels of androgens and estrogens match those seen during food deprivation. Levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) mRNA in the brain were low in food-deprived females compared to controls and in mouthbrooding females compared to gravid females. Levels of mRNA encoding two peptides involved in regulating feeding, hypocretin and cholecystokinin, were increased in the brains of food-deprived females. Brain mRNA levels of two receptors, GnRH receptor 2 and NPY receptor Y8c, were elevated in mouthbrooding females compared to the fed condition, but NPY receptor Y8b mRNA was differently regulated by mouthbrooding. These results suggest that many, but not all, of the characteristic physiological changes that occur during mouthbrooding are consequences of food deprivation.

  2. Korean Red Ginseng Up-regulates C21-Steroid Hormone Metabolism via Cyp11a1 Gene in Senescent Rat Testes.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hye; Kim, Si-Kwan; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Sung-Won; Sohn, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Soo Cheol; Choi, Sangdun; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-09-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) has been shown to have anti-aging effects in animal and clinical studies. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ginseng exerts these effects remain unknown. Here, the anti-aging effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) in rat testes was examined by system biology analysis. KRG water extract prepared in feed pellets was administered orally into 12 month old rats for 4 months, and gene expression in testes was determined by microarray analysis. Microarray analysis identified 33 genes that significantly changed. Compared to the 2 month old young rats, 13 genes (Rps9, Cyp11a1, RT1-A2, LOC365778, Sv2b, RGD1565959, RGD1304748, etc.) were up-regulated and 20 genes (RT1-Db1, Cldn5, Svs5, Degs1, Vdac3, Hbb, LOC684355, Svs5, Tmem97, Orai1, Insl3, LOC497959, etc.) were down-regulated by KRG in the older rats. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of untreated aged rats versus aged rats treated with KRG showed that the affected most was Cyp11a1, responsible for C21-steroid hormone metabolism, and the top molecular and cellular functions are organ morphology and reproductive system development and function. When genes in young rat were compared with those in the aged rat, sperm capacitation related genes were down-regulated in the old rat. However, when genes in the old rat were compared with those in the old rat treated with KRG, KRG treatment up-regulated C21-steroid hormone metabolism. Taken together, Cyp11a1 expression is decreased in the aged rat, however, it is up-regulated by KRG suggesting that KRG seems enhance testes function via Cyp11a1.

  3. Nitrite-induced alterations in sex steroids and thyroid hormones of Labeo rohita juveniles: effects of dietary vitamin E and L-tryptophan.