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Sample records for active structural fiber

  1. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    1. Lin, Y., Zhi, Z. and Sodano, 2012, “Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers for Multifunctional Structural Capacitors...Multifunctional Structural Capacitors Consisting of Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers, 18 th International Conference on... Strontium Titanate Coated SiC Fibers,” Electronic Materials and Applications 2011, Jan. 19 th –21 st Orlando, FL (Invited). 9. Lin, Y., Shaffer

  2. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  3. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  4. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  5. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  6. Using Plasma-Activated High Performance Fibers with Nanocrystalline Structure in Producing New Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, V.; Korneeva, N.

    2008-08-01

    A wet-pull-out method for investigation of interaction between the high performance polyethylene (HPPE) fiber and polymer matrix is discussed. The paper concerns a cold plasma technique for improving the bond of the HPPE fibers to the matrices and the fibers impregnation with the matrix. Controlled parameters are pull-out force and the height of the matrix capillary lifting along the fiber both in air and in vacuum, in combination with plasma activation of the fibers. The method allows one to estimate the wetting and impregnation of multi-filament fiber with the matrix and simultaneously measure the joint strength. Coupled action of plasma treatment and vacuum impregnation of the fibers improves the joint strength by a factor of 3. Plasma activated HPPE fibers impregnated in air show the value of shear strength τ of 4 Kg/mm2. To understand the effect of treatment initial and plasma-activated fibers were used to fabricate composite materials (CM). The properties and failure modes were compared to those of CM reinforced with untreated fibers. The failure mode of CM reinforced with plasma-activated fibers points to a high strength of the bond between the fibers and the matrix.

  7. Micromechanical analysis of constitutive properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kenny; Dai, Qingli

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be very important in the application of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. The PSF is fabricated by coating the piezoceramic onto the silicon carbide core fiber with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process to overcome the fragile nature of the monolithic piezoelectric materials. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The PSF laminate transducer has electrical inputs/outputs that are delivered through a separate etched interdigital electrode layer. This study analyzed the electromechanical properties with the generalized dilute scheme for active PSF composite laminate by considering multiinclusions. The well-known Mori-Tanaka approach was used to evaluate the concentration tensor in the multi-inclusion micromechanics model. To accurately predict the transverse properties, the extended role of mixtures were applied by considering the inclusions' geometry and shape. The micromechanical finite element modeling was also conducted with representative volume element (RVE) to compare with the micromechanics analysis on the electromechanical properties. The micromechanics analysis and finite element micromechanical modeling were conducted with varied fiber geometry dimensions and volume fractions. These comparison studies indicate the combined micromechanics models with the generalized dilute scheme can effectively predict the electro-elastic properties of multi-inclusion PSF composites.

  8. Active rigidization of carbon-fiber reinforced polymer composites for ultra-lightweight space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-03-01

    An active approach for initiating rigidization in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) thermosets links controllable mechanical stiffening to inherent electrical resistivity. With direct applications toward the rigidization of ultra-lightweight, inflatable space structures, temperature-controlled resistive heating is used to create oncommand rigidization. As required by the on-orbit conditions in space, flexible, rigidizable structures demand stable and space-survivable materials that incorporate techniques for providing shape control and structural stiffening. Methods currently employed to achieve a mechanical hardening include many passive techniques: UV curing, sub-T g hardening, and hydro-gel evaporation. The benefits of a passive system (simplicity, energy efficiency) are offset by their inherent lack of control, which can lead to long curing times and weak spots due to uneven curing. In efforts to significantly reduce the transition time of the composite from a structurally-vulnerable state to a fully-rigidized shape and to increase control of the curing process, an active approach is taken. Specifically, temperature-controlled internal resistive heating initiates thermoset curing in a coated carbon fiber composite to form an electrically-controlled, thermally-activated material. Through controlled heating, this research examines how selective temperature control can be used to prescribe matrix consolidation and material rigidization on two different thermosetting resins, U-Nyte Set 201A and 201B. Feedback temperature control, based on a PID control algorithm, was applied to the process of resistive heating. Precise temperature tracking (less than 1.1°C RMS or +/-3.3% error) was achieved for controlled sample heating. Using samples of the thermoset-coated carbon-fiber tow, composite hardening through resistive heating occurred in 24 minutes and required roughly 1 W-hr/inch of electrical energy. The rigidized material was measured to be 14-21 times stiffer

  9. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  10. Reorganization of stress fiber-like structures in spreading platelets during surface activation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Itoh, K

    1998-12-01

    Alpha-Actinin and myosin were associated into reorganized actin cable networks and partly formed stress fiber-like structures in platelets during surface activation. Double-label immunofluorescence staining using antibodies against alpha-actinin and platelet myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed that alpha-actinin and myosin were colocalized in the cell center at the early stage of activation and dynamically redistributed with shape change. In the later stage, two proteins were colocalized around the granulomeres. alpha-Actinin was also seen beneath the surface membrane while myosin was not. Occasionally, both proteins were segregated, revealed granular staining in the cell body of flattened platelets and often aligned irregular alternate arrangement in the actin cables. Immunoelectron microscopy (immunogold) employing antibodies against MHC and myosin light chain (MLC) demonstrated that myosin, associated with actin cytoskeleton was precisely filamentous (328 nm in average length, 15 nm in width) and bipolar with a central bare zone, since MLCs were located at both ends. Myosin formed a cluster composed of several filaments with repeating alignment, suggesting each cluster corresponded to the granular staining pattern of immunofluorescence. These observations indicated that the organization of alpha-actinin and myosin in actin cables in activated platelets resembled that in stress fibers in various cultured cells.

  11. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E.; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S.; Maksimov, Georgy V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the “axon-SC” interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+—influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization. PMID:27455410

  12. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Carbon-Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites am produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity far use in gas separations. Carbon fiber composites are prepared at ORNL, usually in plate or tubular form, by vacuum molding from water slurries containing phenolic resin and chopped isotropic petroleum pitch fibers. The composites are activated at the CAER in steam or CO{sub 2} using samples of dimensions up to 1.5 x 4 x 12 cm that are cut from the original plates. One of the objectives is to produce uniformly activated composites, which is especially critical when attempting to active large monoliths. It has been found that there are appreciable variations in the density and permeability of the as-formed composites that must relate to the forming technique. These variations are expected to exert some influence on the rate and extent of reaction and surface area development. In attempting to uniformly activate the composites, two reactor configurations have been investigated. In the more successful arrangement, steam ''is introduced at several points along the length of the composite. A reduction in steam partial pressure from 95vol% to 44vol% significantly improved the uniformity of surface area distribution. Activation with CO{sub 2} was still better, which is attributed to the much slower reaction rate than with steam. Measurements of composite dimensions have shown that there is an overall shrinkage during activation. A direct correlation is found between dimensional shrinkage and burnoff, and is similar for a and steam activation. The causes of the shrinkage are not yet clear. At

  13. Pitch-based activated carbon fibers: The effect of precursor composition on pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekinalp, Halil Levent

    Although researchers have previously investigated the effect of precursor differences on the final properties of activated carbon fibers (ACFs), those precursors were not well-characterized. In particular, detailed information about their molecular composition and anisotropy was not available. In this study, seven oligomeric fractions, each of well-defined composition and molecular weight (mol wt) distribution, were isolated from a commercially produced isotropic petroleum pitch (i.e., Marathon M-50) and used for the production of ACFs. Four of these precursors of varying oligomeric composition were fully isotropic and three contained different levels of mesophase, so that the effects of molecular composition and molecular order were successfully isolated from each other. After the precursors were melt-spun into fibers and stabilized, they were processed by so-called "direct activation", whereby carbonization and activation occurred simultaneously. Separate carbonization tests were also carried out in order to separate out the effects of carbonization vs. activation. Carbonization weight loss was found to be higher for fibers prepared from lower average mol wt (480--550 Da) precursors. The presence of mesophase per se did not affect weight loss during carbonization. On the other hand, activation weight loss (˜28 percent) was found to be essentially independent of precursor mol wt for all isotropic fibers. (Activation weight loss for mesophase-containing fibers was much lower.) The micropore volume of the ACFs was found to increase with decreasing precursor mol wt. However, the ratio of pores smaller than 7 A (i.e., the desired pore size for hydrogen storage) to the total pore volume (3.9--30 A) was found to be essentially constant for all isotropic precursors, suggesting that a similar activation mechanism occurred for all of these materials, with both new pore formation and pore widening proceeding at similar rates. For mesophase-containing precursors, on the

  14. Robust, Brillouin Active Embedded Fiber-Is-The-Sensor System in Smart Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Chung

    1996-01-01

    Extensive review of our proposed sensing scheme, based mainly on the forward Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering (GAWBS) with backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (sBs) as an auxiliary scheme for system fault tolerance has been completed during this project period. This preliminary study is conducted for a number of reasons. The most significant reasons lie in the essential capability of the system to measure temperature and pressure. These two measurands have been proposed to be sensed by sBs in our proposal. Temperature and pressure/strain are important measurands in structural monitoring, so that the effectiveness of sensing by sBs needs to be further examined. It has been pointed out initially that sBs shift will be dependent on temperature and pressure/strain simultaneously. The shift versus temperature or strain is linear. Now, the question is how can these two measurands be separated when sBs is used to sense an environment, in which both temperature and strain are changing simultaneously. Typical sBs shift plotted versus strain and varying temperature is shown in Fig. 1. As is clear, a fiber initially stressed will relax with rising temperature. This is verified by a displacement to the right with rising temperature of the sBs shift vs strain curves in the figure. A way to circumvent this ambiguity is by employing two fibers, one pre-stressed and the other is a free fiber. The latter will measure temperature and subtracting data in the latter fiber from those of the former will give us net strain readings. This is a laborious approach, since it involves the use of two identical fibers, and this is hard to accomplish, especially when many sensors are needed. Additional multiplexing of the data stream for data subtraction becomes a necessity.

  15. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Thien, Andrew B.

    2006-01-10

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage to the actual

  16. Structural diagnostics using optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surace, Giuseppe; Chiaradia, Agostino

    1997-11-01

    After establishing the basis for assessing the structural implications of introducing a widespread sensor architecture in laminated composite materials in order to precisely identify and locate damage, the paper addresses the problem of structural diagnostics with a discussion of the development of several optical sensors. The research project will first investigate a passive optical fiber impact sensor to be implemented in the matrix of a composite material used in aeronautic and automotive applications. The senor's operating principle is based on the changes in propagation conditions occurring in a fiber subjected to transverse compression: under these circumstances, structural microdistortions produce local energy losses and hence a reduction in the optical power which propagates in the fiber and can be measured at its opposite end. As optical power losses also take place as a result of micro-bending of the optical fiber's longitudinal axis, a preliminary feasibility study will measure power attenuation versus fiber curve radius as the first step in the development of an optical fiber delamination sensor which locates separations between the layers of a composite material, i.e. debonding of sandwich panel core faces. Finally, an active impact sensor will be developed which uses optical fiber's sensitivity to pressure changes to detect the pressure gradient caused by an approaching vehicle or obstacle. The automotive industry will be able to make strategic use of these sensors, for example by installing them on vehicle sides to active the side airbag in the event of impact or collision.

  17. Mechanochromic Fibers with Structural Color.

    PubMed

    Li, Houpu; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-21

    Responsive photonic crystals have been widely developed to realize tunable structural colors by manipulating the flow of light. Among them, mechanochromic photonic crystals attract increasing attention due to the easy operation, high safety and broad applications. Recently, mechanochromic photonic crystal fibers were proposed to satisfy the booming wearable smart textile market. In this Concept, the fundamental mechanism, fabrication, and recent progress on mechanochromic photonic crystals, especially in fiber shape, are summarized to represent a new direction in sensing and displaying.

  18. Activation and micropore structure determination of carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves. Topical report, 30 March 1994--14 April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, You Qing

    1995-05-19

    Progress in developing novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are activated using steam or CO{sub 2}, in order to produce uniform activation through the material and to control the pore structure and adsorptive properties. There is an overall shrinkage during activation, which is directly correlated with burnoff; burnoff above 40% results in fracture. Burnoffs higher than 10% does not produce any benefit for separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures. Five samples of CFCMS have been prepared for testing as molecular sieves; all have relatively narrow pore size distributions with average pore diameters around 6A.

  19. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    PubMed Central

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks’ disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  20. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  1. Active PZT fibers: a commercial production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, Harold B.; Pascucci, Marina R.; Parish, Mark V.; Bent, Aaron A.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1999-07-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) active fibers, from 80 to 250 micrometers in diameter, are produced for the AFOSR/DARPA funded Active Fiber Composites Consortium (AFCC) Program and commercial customers. CeraNova has developed a proprietary ceramics-based technology to produce PZT mono-filaments of the required purity, composition, straightness, and piezoelectric properties for use in active fiber composite structures. CeraNova's process begins with the extrusion of continuous lengths of mono-filament precursor fiber from a plasticized mix of PZT-5A powder. The care that must be taken to avoid mix contamination is described using illustrations form problems experiences with extruder wear and metallic contamination. Corrective actions are described and example microstructures are shown. The consequences of inadequate lead control are also shown. Sintered mono- filament mechanical strength and piezoelectric properties data approach bulk values but the validity of such a benchmark is questioned based on variable correlation with composite performance measures. Comb-like ceramic preform structures are shown that are being developed to minimize process and handling costs while maintaining the required mono-filament straightness necessary for composite fabrication. Lastly, actuation performance data are presented for composite structures fabricated and tested by Continuum Control Corporation. Free strain actuation in excess of 2000 microstrain are observed.

  2. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  3. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  4. High temperature structural fibers: Status and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The key to high temperature structural composites is the selection and incorporation of continuous fiber reinforcement with optimum mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Critical fiber property needs are high strength, high stiffness, and retention of these properties during composite fabrication and use. However, unlike polymeric composites where all three requirements are easily achieved with a variety of commercially available carbon-based fibers, structural fibers with sufficient stiffness and strength retention for high temperature metal, intermetallic, and ceramic composites are not available. The objective here is to discuss in a general manner the thermomechanical stability problem for current high performance fibers which are based on silicon and alumina compositions. This is accomplished by presenting relevant fiber property data with a brief discussion of potential underlying mechanisms. From this general overview, some possible materials engineering approaches are suggested which may lead to minimization and/or elimination of this critical stability problem for current high temperature fibers.

  5. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  6. Synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Y.Q.; Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Kimber, G.

    1994-12-31

    The production and application of low-cost, general purpose carbon fibers and activated fibers are emerging technologies with exciting potential, although at present their cost is too high to find widespread use. Production and R and D have been limited and to data, only a small range of precursors has been studied: petroleum pitches, coal extracts and coal tar pitches. Both processing costs and the properties of the fiber products are dependent on the nature of the starting material. Commercial precursors have been limited to the pitches produced from high temperature pyrolysis or cracking processes and are similar in composition and molecular structure. Suitable coal-based precursors can be produced with a wide range of composition, and at moderate cost, by methods such as low temperature carbonization, solvent extraction, hydropyrolysis and mild coal liquefaction. It is of interest to investigate the synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from precursors of different origins to elucidate the influence of precursor materials on fiber formation and processing, and their structure and properties. It is also of practical importance to understand the relationships between the type of starting materials (for example, coals) and the processing methods, and the properties of fiber precursors that can be produced from them. In the present study, the authors describe the synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from the products of the first stage of coal liquefaction.

  7. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  8. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  9. Ventricular fiber optimization utilizing the branching structure.

    PubMed

    Washio, Takumi; Yoneda, Kazunori; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Kariya, Taro; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm that optimizes the ventricular fiber structure of the human heart. A number of histological studies and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging analyses have revealed that the myocardial fiber forms a right-handed helix at the endocardium. However, the fiber formation changes its orientation as a function of transmural depth, becoming a left-handed helix at the epicardium. To determine how nature can construct such a structure, which obtains surprising pumping performance, we introduce macroscopic modeling of the branching structure of cardiac myocytes in our finite element ventricular model and utilize this in an optimization process. We put a set of multidirectional fibers around a central fiber orientation at each point of the ventricle walls and simulate heartbeats by generating contraction forces along each of these directions. We examine two optimization processes using the workloads or impulses measured in these directions to update the central fiber orientation. Both processes improve the pumping performance towards an optimal value within several tens of heartbeats, starting from an almost-flat fiber orientation. However, compared with the workload optimization, the impulse optimization produces better agreement with experimental studies on transmural changes of fiber helix angle, streamline patterns of characteristic helical structures, and temporal changes in strain. Furthermore, the impulse optimization is robust under geometrical changes of the heart and tends to homogenize various mechanical factors such as the stretch and stretch rate along the fiber orientation, the contraction force, and energy consumption. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites.

  11. Performance of brazed graphite, carbon-fiber composite, and TZM materials for actively cooled structures; Qualification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smid, I. ); Croessmann, C.D.; Watson, R.D. ); Linke, J. ); Cardella, A.; Bolt, H,. ); Reheis, N.; Kny, E. )

    1991-07-01

    The divertor of a near-term fusion device has to withstand high heat fluxes, heat shocks, and erosion caused by the plasma. Furthermore, it has to be maintainable through remote techniques. Above all, a good heat removal capability across the interface (low-Z armor/heat sink) plus overall integrity after many operational cycles are needed. To meet all these requirements, an active metal brazing technique is applied to bond graphite and carbon-fiber composite materials to a heat sink consisting of a Mo-41Re coolant tube through a TZM body. Plain brazed graphite and TZM tiles are tested for their fusion-relevant properties. The interfaces appear undamaged after thermal cycling when the melting point of the braze joint is not exceeded and when the graphite armor is {gt}4 mm thick. High heat flux tests are performed on three actively cooled divertor targets. The braze joints show no sign of failure after exposure to thermal loads {approximately}25% higher than the design value surface heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}.

  12. Photoconductivity of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity. 54 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  14. Structural health monitoring system/method using electroactive polymer fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Carnell, Lisa A. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for monitoring the structural health of a structure of interest by coupling one or more electroactive polymer fibers to the structure and monitoring the electroactive responses of the polymer fiber(s). Load changes that are experienced by the structure cause changes in the baseline responses of the polymer fiber(s). A system for monitoring the structural health of the structure is also provided.

  15. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Solvent recovery improved with activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    A non-woven net of activated carbon fibers as absorbing media, representing a major advancement in vapor recovery technology, is presented. The carbon fiber exhibits mass transfer coefficients for adsorption description of up to 100 times that of conventional systems.

  17. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  18. Dynamic Sensing Performance of a Point-Wise Fiber Bragg Grating Displacement Measurement System Integrated in an Active Structural Control System

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Liao, Heng-Tseng; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system which can measure the transient response of out-of-plane point-wise displacement responses is set up on a smart cantilever beam and the feasibility of its use as a feedback sensor in an active structural control system is studied experimentally. An FBG filter is employed in the proposed fiber sensing system to dynamically demodulate the responses obtained by the FBG displacement sensor with high sensitivity. For comparison, a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is utilized simultaneously to verify displacement detection ability of the FBG sensing system. An optical full-field measurement technique called amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI) is used to provide full-field vibration mode shapes and resonant frequencies. To verify the dynamic demodulation performance of the FBG filter, a traditional FBG strain sensor calibrated with a strain gauge is first employed to measure the dynamic strain of impact-induced vibrations. Then, system identification of the smart cantilever beam is performed by FBG strain and displacement sensors. Finally, by employing a velocity feedback control algorithm, the feasibility of integrating the proposed FBG displacement sensing system in a collocated feedback system is investigated and excellent dynamic feedback performance is demonstrated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the FBG sensor is capable of performing dynamic displacement feedback and/or strain measurements with high sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22247683

  19. Application of optical fibers in microfluidic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Dorota; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Dybko, Artur

    2004-09-01

    Two constructions of microfluidic structures are described in this paper. A fiber optic chemical coupler and a microcell for spectrophotometric measurements were designed and tested. The structures were made of polymer optical fibers (PMMA) which were incorporated into polymeric material i.e. poly(dimethylsiloxane). The structures were tested as detectors in refractometric experiment (saccharose solutions with different concentrations were used), in absorbance measurement (solutions of a bromothymol blue with different pH were used) and in fluorescence tests (solution of erythrosine was used).

  20. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF COMPOSITE LAMINATES WITH EMBEDDED PIEZOELECTRIC FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Puthillath, Padma K.; Blackshire, James L.

    2009-03-03

    The actuation of ultrasonic guided waves in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer plate from embedded metal core piezoelectric fibers is studied for structural health monitoring applications. A linear array of fibers embedded at the midplane can generate guided waves transverse to the fiber direction. Finite element simulations show that a significant source influence is associated with the small diameter piezoelectric fibers.

  1. Acoustical properties of nonwoven fiber network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascan, Mevlut

    Sound insulation is one of the most important issues for the automotive and building industries. Because they are porous fibrous structures, textile materials can be used as sound insulating and sound absorbing materials. Very high-density materials such as steel can insulate sound very effectively but these rigid materials reflect most of the sound back to the environment, causing sound pollution. Additionally, because high-density, rigid materials are also heavy and high cost, they cannot be used for sound insulation for the automotive and building industries. Nonwoven materials are more suitable for these industries, and they can also absorb sound in order to decrease sound pollution in the environment. Therefore, nonwoven materials are one of the most important materials for sound insulation and absorption applications materials. Insulation and absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics depend on fiber geometry and fiber arrangement within the fabric structure. Because of their complex structure, it is very difficult to define the microstructure of nonwovens. The structure of nonwovens only has fibers and voids that are filled by air. Because of the complexity of fiber-void geometry, there is still not a very accurate theory or model that defines the structural arrangement. A considerable amount of modeling has been reported in literature [1--19], but most models are not accurate due to the assumptions made. Voids that are covered by fibers are called pores in nonwoven structures and their geometry is very important, especially for the absorption properties of nonwovens. In order to define the sound absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics, individual pore structure and the number of pores per unit thickness of the fabric should be determined. In this research, instead of trying to define pores, the properties of the fibers are investigated and the number of fibers per volume of fabric is taken as a parameter in the theory. Then the effect of the nonwoven

  2. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  3. Tailoring micro-mesoporosity in activated carbon fibers to enhance SO₂ catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Diez, Noel; Alvarez, Patricia; Granda, Marcos; Blanco, Clara; Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Wróbel-Iwaniec, Iwona; Sliwak, Agata; Machnikowski, Jacek; Menendez, Rosa

    2014-08-15

    Enhanced SO2 adsorption of activated carbon fibers is obtained by tailoring a specific micro-mesoporous structure in the fibers. This architecture is obtained via metal catalytic activation of the fibers with a novel precursor, cobalt naphthenate, which contrary to other precursors, also enhances spinnability and carbon fiber yield. In the SO2 oxidation, it is demonstrated that the combination of micropores and large mesopores is the main factor for an enhanced catalytic activity which is superior to that observed in other similar microporous activated carbon fibers. This provides an alternative way for the development of a new generation of catalytic material.

  4. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  5. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking.

  6. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  7. Preparation of magnetic nickel hollow fibers with a trilobe structure using cellulose acetate fibers as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changfeng; Li, Ping; Zhang, Lixiong

    2013-02-01

    Nickel hollow fibers with trilobe shape in cross section and monolithic nickel structures composed of trilobe shaped nickel hollow fibrous networks were prepared by using cellulose acetate fibers from cigarette filters as the template. Magnetic ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers were then fabricated by using the nickel-based hollow fibers as the support. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that nickel hollow fibers and ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers retain the morphology of the cellulose acetate fibers, and the monolithic nickel structures can be prepared by pre-shaping the cellulose acetate fibers. The thickness of the nickel layer can be regulated by controlling the electroless plating times. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of the trilobe shaped nickel hollow fibers and ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers are 27.78 and 21.59 emu/g and 78 and 61 Oe, respectively.

  8. Graded Activation in Frog Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Costantin, L. L.; Taylor, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    The membrane potential of frog single muscle fibers in solutions containing tetrodotoxin was controlled with a two-electrode voltage clamp. Local contractions elicited by 100-ms square steps of depolarization were observed microscopically and recorded on cinefilm. The absence of myofibrillar folding with shortening to striation spacings below 1.95 µm served as a criterion for activation of the entire fiber cross section. With depolarizing steps of increasing magnitude, shortening occurred first in the most superficial myofibrils and spread inward to involve axial myofibrils as the depolarization was increased. In contractions in which the entire fiber cross section shortened actively, both the extent of shortening and the velocity of shortening at a given striation spacing could be graded by varying the magnitude of the depolarization step. The results provide evidence that the degree of activation of individual myofibrils can be graded with membrane depolarization. PMID:4540418

  9. Biodegradable polymeric fiber structures in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye; Reis, Rui L

    2009-03-01

    Tissue engineering offers a promising new approach to create biological alternatives to repair or restore function of damaged or diseased tissues. To obtain three-dimensional tissue constructs, stem or progenitor cells must be combined with a highly porous three-dimensional scaffold, but many of the structures purposed for tissue engineering cannot meet all the criteria required by an adequate scaffold because of lack of mechanical strength and interconnectivity, as well as poor surface characteristics. Fiber-based structures represent a wide range of morphological and geometric possibilities that can be tailored for each specific tissue-engineering application. The present article overviews the research data on tissue-engineering therapies based on the use of biodegradable fiber architectures as a scaffold.

  10. Aircraft fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a sought after concept that is expected to advance military maintenance programs, increase platform operational safety and reduce its life cycle cost. Such concept is further considered to constitute a major building block of any Integrated Health Management (IHM) capability. Since 65% to 80% of military assets' Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is devoted to operations and support (O&S), the aerospace industry and military sectors continue to look for opportunities to exploit SHM systems, capability and tools. Over the past several years, countless SHM concepts and technologies have emerged. Among those, fiber optic based systems were identified of significant potential. This paper introduces the elements of an SHM system and investigates key issues impeding the commercial implementation of fiber optic based SHM capability. In particular, this paper presents an experimental study of short gauge, intrinsic, spectrometric-based in-fiber Bragg grating sensors, for potential use as a component of an SHM system. Fiber optic Bragg grating sensors are evaluated against resistance strain gauges for strain monitoring, sensitivity, accuracy, reliability, and fatigue durability. Strain field disturbance is also investigated by "embedding" the sensors under a photoelastic coating in order to illustrate sensor intrusiveness in an embedded configuration.

  11. Advanced fiber-composite hybrids--A new structural material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    Introduction of metal foil as part of matrix and fiber composite, or ""sandwich'', improves strength and stiffness for multidirectional loading, improves resistance to cyclic loading, and improves impact and erosion resistance of resultant fiber-composite hybrid structure.

  12. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  13. Flexible filamentous virus structure from fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Gerald; Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah; McCullough, Ian; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Ghabrial, Said

    2008-10-24

    Fiber diffraction data have been obtained from Narcissus mosaic virus, a potexvirus from the family Flexiviridae, and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a potyvirus from the family Potyviridae. Analysis of the data in conjunction with cryo-electron microscopy data allowed us to determine the symmetry of the viruses and to make reconstructions of SMV at 19 {angstrom} resolution and of another potexvirus, papaya mosaic virus, at 18 {angstrom} resolution. These data include the first well-ordered data ever obtained for the potyviruses and the best-ordered data from the potexviruses, and offer the promise of eventual high resolution structure determinations.

  14. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  15. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  16. Enhanced-performance active fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentilman, Richard L.; McNeal, Kelley; Schmidt, Gerald E.; Pizzochero, Alessandro E.; Rossetti, George A., Jr.

    2003-08-01

    Active fiber composites (AFCs) find applications in a variety of industrial, commercial, and aerospace markets as both actuators and sensors. Among the key attributes of AFCs relative to conventional monolithic piezoceramic actuators are high strain energy density, unidirectional response, conformability, and robustness. Recently, performance enhancements in AFCs have been demonstrated through the use of a modified injection molding process to produce piezoceramic modules with multiple identical fibers of a uniform rectangular cross section. AFC actuators made from Type II PZT fiber modules exhibit free micro-strains of 1830 +/- 30 ppm at a peak-peak E-field drive of 26.1 kV/cm, and show exceptional part-to-part uniformity. In addition, AFCs made from injection molded PMN-PT fiber modules show a low-field d33 of 650 pm/V. The successful incorporation of PMN-PT materials into AFCs also demonstrates the viability of using highly textured ceramic PMN-PT piezofibers, for which even larger increases in strain response are expected.

  17. Designing the Structure of Carbon Fibers for Optimal Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Vautard, Frederic; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber manufacturing follows generic processing steps: formation of thermoplastic fibers, stabilization, and carbonization. The final structures and end properties of the carbon fiber can differ significantly depending on the precursor chemistry and the associated processing sciences. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and mesophase pitch are the predominant precursors used in the production of carbon fibers. PAN-based carbon fibers consist of nanocrystalline graphitic domains typically 1.5 5 nm in size surrounded by amorphous carbon; in contrast, pitch-based carbon fibers are 10 50 nm crystallites with the graphitic (002) planes mostly aligned parallel to the fiber axis. It has been seen that the skin core structure of PAN-based carbon fibers plays a significant role in their mechanical properties. Designing a more homogenous carbon fiber microstructure by controlling the starting polymer and process parameters results in a different set of tensile strengths and elastic moduli. In this study the microstructural defect distribution (0.1 200 nm), measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, was shown to be directly related to the tensile strength of the carbon fibers. Here the formation of carbon structures from various polymer precursors is reviewed. Such a comprehensive understanding offers the opportunity to design carbon fiber microstructures with improved properties and to ultimately create new types of carbon fibers from alternative precursors at reduced cost.

  18. Fiber optic sensor reliability issues in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihong; Bassam, Asadollah; Jia, Hongqiang; Tennant, Adam; Ansari, Farhad

    2005-05-01

    Reliability is an important aspect of any sensor, and especially in terms of long term monitoring of structures. Some issues pertaining to the reliability of optical fiber sensors in civil structures are discussed in this article. The strength and fatigue properties of optical fibers influence their performance, and life span. Lessons learnt from the reliability of optical fibers in the telecommunication industry are useful for assessment of reliability in optical fiber sensors. However, optical fiber sensors go through additional manufacturing steps, handling processes, and in general operate under environmental conditions and stress levels different from the telecommunication lines. In general, optical fiber sensors in structures are subjected to fatigue loading under high stresses. Other reliability concerns pertain to the effects of the packaging, installation issues at the construction site. These issues along with some of the results acquired from fatigue tests on fiber optic Bragg gratings and long gauge interferometric sensors are discussed in this article.

  19. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N.; Poulin, P.; Bartholome, C.; Marioli-Riga, Z.

    2010-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT) fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  20. Fiber optic smart structures and skins III; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Sept. 19-21, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Udd, E.; Claus, R.O. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg )

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on fiber-optically equipped 'smart' aerospace structures discusses topics in fiber-embedding in materials, the relationship of sensors to signal-processing capabilities, materials evaluation methods, active structural control, and damage assessment. Attention is given to the USAF Astronautics Laboratory's smart structures/skins program, on-orbit structural health monitoring, optimal coatings for smart structure fiber-optic sensors, a composite material-embedded fiber-optic Fabry-Perot strain rosette, and the embedding of fiber-optic sensors in Ti-matrix composites. Also discussed are neural-network processing of fiber-optic sensors and sensor arrays, the degradation of laminate composites by embedded fiber-optic sensors, a 'smart strut' interferometric differential-strain sensor, shape-memory alloys for flexible structure control, and the optical-signal analysis of impact-induced fracture in smart structures.

  1. Combined electromechanical impedance and fiber optic diagnosis of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlavin, Jon; Zagrai, Andrei; Clemens, Rebecca; Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joey; Moslehi, Behzad; Patel, Ronak; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Faridian, Fereydoun

    2014-03-01

    Electromechanical impedance is a popular diagnostic method for assessing structural conditions at high frequencies. It has been utilized, and shown utility, in aeronautic, space, naval, civil, mechanical, and other types of structures. By contrast, fiber optic sensing initially found its niche in static strain measurement and low frequency structural dynamic testing. Any low frequency limitations of the fiber optic sensing, however, are mainly governed by its hardware elements. As hardware improves, so does the bandwidth (frequency range * number of sensors) provided by the appropriate enabling fiber optic sensor interrogation system. In this contribution we demonstrate simultaneous high frequency measurements using fiber optic and electromechanical impedance structural health monitoring technologies. A laboratory specimen imitating an aircraft wing structure, incorporating surfaces with adjustable boundary conditions, was instrumented with piezoelectric and fiber optic sensors. Experiments were conducted at different structural boundary conditions associated with deterioration of structural health. High frequency dynamic responses were collected at multiple locations on a laboratory wing specimen and conclusions were drawn about correspondence between structural damage and dynamic signatures as well as correlation between electromechanical impedance and fiber optic sensors spectra. Theoretical investigation of the effect of boundary conditions on electromechanical impedance spectra is presented and connection to low frequency structural dynamics is suggested. It is envisioned that acquisition of high frequency structural dynamic responses with multiple fiber optic sensors may open new diagnostic capabilities for fiber optic sensing technologies.

  2. Infrared Fibers for Use in Space-Based Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared optical fibers are finding a number of applications including laser surgery, remote sensing, and nuclear radiation resistant links. Utilizing these fibers in space-based structures is another application, which can be exploited. Acoustic and thermal sensing are two areas in which these fibers could be utilized. In particular, fibers could be embedded in IM7/8552 toughened epoxy and incorporated into space structures both external and internal. ZBLAN optical fibers are a candidate, which have been studied extensively over the past 20 years for terrestrial applications. For the past seven years the effects of gravity on the crystallization behavior of ZBLAN optical fiber has been studied. It has been found that ZBLAN crystallization is suppressed in microgravity. This lack of crystallization leads to a fiber with better transmission characteristics than its terrestrial counterpart.

  3. Reinforcement of a porous collagen scaffold with surface-activated PLA fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Huang, Changbin; Feng, Yujie; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Gu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid porous collagen scaffold mechanically reinforced with surface-activated poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fiber was prepared. PLA fibers, 20 mum in diameter and 1 mm in length, were aminolyzed with hexanediamine to introduce free amino groups on the surfaces. After the amino groups were transferred to aldehyde groups by treatment with glutaraldehyde, different amounts (1.5, 3, 5 and 8 mg) of surface-activated PLA fibers were homogeneously mixed with 2 ml type-I collagen solution (pH 2.8, 0.6 wt%). This mixture solution was then freeze-dried and cross-linked to obtain collagen sponges with surface-activated PLA fiber. Scanning electron microscopy observation indicated that the collagen sponges had a highly interconnected porous structure with an average pore size of 170 mum, irrespective of PLA fiber incorporation. The dispersion of surface-activated PLA fibers was homogeneous in collagen sponge, in contrast to unactivated PLA fibers. The compression modulus test results showed that, compared with unactivated PLA fibers, the surface-activated PLA fibers enhanced the resistance of collagen sponge to compression more significantly. Cytotoxicity assay by MTT test showed no cytotoxicity of these collagen sponges. L929 mouse fibroblast cell-culture studies in vitro revealed that the number of L929 cells attached to the collagen sponge with surface-activated PLA fibers, both 6 h and 24 h after seeding, was higher than that in pure collagen sponge and sponge with unactivated PLA fibers. In addition, a better distribution of cells infiltrated in collagen sponge with surface-activated PLA fibers was observed by histological staining. These results indicated that the collagen sponge reinforced with surface-activated PLA fibers is a promising biocompatible scaffold for tissue engineering.

  4. A biomechanical perspective on stress fiber structure and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Kassianidou, Elena; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Stress fibers are actomyosin-based bundles whose structural and contractile properties underlie numerous cellular processes including adhesion, motility and mechanosensing. Recent advances in high-resolution live-cell imaging and single-cell force measurement have dramatically sharpened our understanding of the assembly, connectivity, and evolution of various specialized stress fiber subpopulations. This in turn has motivated interest in understanding how individual stress fibers generate tension and support cellular structure and force generation. In this review, we discuss approaches for measuring the mechanical properties of single stress fibers. We begin by discussing studies conducted in cell-free settings, including strategies based on isolation of intact stress fibers and reconstitution of stress fiber-like structures from purified components. We then discuss measurements obtained in living cells based both on inference of stress fiber properties from whole-cell mechanical measurements (e.g., atomic force microscopy) and on direct interrogation of single stress fibers (e.g., subcellular laser nanosurgery). We conclude by reviewing various mathematical models of stress fiber function that have been developed based on these experimental measurements. An important future challenge in this area will be the integration of these sophisticated biophysical measurements with the field’s increasingly detailed molecular understanding of stress fiber assembly, dynamics, and signal transduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25896524

  5. Manufacturing of Smart Structures Using Fiber Placement Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matthew M.; Glowasky, Robert A.; McIlroy, Bruce E.; Story, Todd A.

    1996-01-01

    Smart structures research and development, with the ultimate aim of rapid commercial and military production of these structures, are at the forefront of the Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost-Effective Structures (SPICES) program. As part of this ARPA-sponsored program, MDA-E is using fiber placement processes to manufacture integrated smart structure systems. These systems comprise advanced composite structures with embedded fiber optic sensors, shape memory alloys, piezoelectric actuators, and miniature accelerometers. Cost-effective approaches and solutions to smart material synthesis in the fiber-placement process, based upon integrated product development, are discussed herein.

  6. Strength Analysis of Coconut Fiber Stabilized Earth for Farm Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokela, O. S.; P. O, Alada

    2012-07-01

    Investigation of the strength characteristic of soil from alluvial deposit of River Benue in makurdi stabilized with coconut fiber as a stabilizer was carried as local building material for farm structure. Processed coconut fibers were mixed with the soil at four different mix ratios of 1% fiber, 2% fiber, 3% fiber and 4% fiber by percentage weight with 0% fiber as control. Compaction test and compressive strength were carried out on the various stabilizing ratio. From the compaction test, the correlation between the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content is a second order polynomial with a coefficient of 63% obtained at1.91kg/m3and 20.0% respectively while the compressive strength test shows an optimum failure load of 8.62N/mm2 at 2%fibre:100% soil mix ratio at 2.16 maximum dry density.

  7. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  8. Fiber optic smart structures and skins II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 5-8, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on embedded fiber-optics incorporating 'smart' structural systems and structural surfaces discusses topics in the nature and current status of university- and government-sponsored smart-structure development programs, manufacturing and cure-monitoring for composite smart structures, smart-structure damage assessment, smart-structure actuators, and smart-structure sensors and components. Attention is given to fiber-optic sensor selection, the optical properties of curing epoxies, the automated production of smart structures, damage-detection in composites with embedded fiber-optic interferometers, fiber-optic strain and impact sensors, dynamically-tunable smart composites, smart structures incorporating artificial neural networks, active structural acoustic control with smart structures, and fiber-optic shape sensing for flexible structures.

  9. Optical fiber sensors for materials and structures characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, D. K.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The final technical report on Optical Fiber Sensors for Materials and Structures Characterization, covering the period August 1990 through August 1991 is presented. Research programs in the following technical areas are described; sapphire optical fiber sensors; vibration analysis using two-mode elliptical core fibers and sensors; extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer development; and coatings for fluorescent-based sensor. Research progress in each of these areas was substantial, as evidenced by the technical publications which are included as appendices.

  10. Study of oil sorption behavior of filled and structured fiber assemblies made from polypropylene, kapok and milkweed fibers.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, R S; Das, Dipayan; Karan, C Praba

    2011-02-15

    This article reports on oil sorption behavior of fiber assemblies made up of single natural and synthetic fibers as well as blend of natural and synthetic fibers when tested with high density oil and diesel oil. A series of filled fiber assemblies were prepared from 100% polypropylene, kapok, and milkweed fibers and another series of bonded structured fiber assemblies were prepared from a 70/30 blend of kapok and polypropylene fibers and a 70/30 blend of milkweed and polypropylene fibers. It was observed that the porosity of the fiber assemblies played a very important role in determining its oil sorption capacity. The polypropylene fiber assembly exhibited the highest sorption capacity (g/g) followed by the kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies at porosity <0.98. At higher porosities (above 0.98), polypropylene filled fiber assembly has poor sorption capacity due to large sized inter fiber pore. The kapok and milkweed fibers have intra fiber porosities of 0.81 and 0.83, respectively. All the fiber assemblies showed higher oil sorption capacity with the high density oil as compared to the diesel oil. As the kapok and milkweed fiber have low cellulose content, hence their slow degradation is an advantage in fresh and marine water applications. The good sorption capacity of kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies along with their bio-degradable nature offer great scope for structuring them into fiber assemblies with large porosity and uniform pores to have efficient oil sorbents.

  11. Fiber: composition, structures, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Sims, Ian M; Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    Kiwifruit dietary fiber consists of cell-wall polysaccharides that are typical of the cell walls of many dicotyledonous fruits, being composed of pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and cellulose. The kiwifruit pectic polysaccharides consist of homo- and rhamnogalacturonans with various neutral, (arabino)-galactan side chains, while the hemicelluloses are mostly xyloglucan and xylan. The proportions of pectic polysaccharide, hemicellulose, and cellulose in both green 'Hayward' and 'Zespri® Gold' are similar and are little affected by in vitro exposure to gastric and small intestinal digestion. The hydration properties of the kiwifruit-swelling and water retention capacity-are also unaffected by foregut digestion, indicating that the functional properties of kiwifruit fiber survive in the foregut. However, in the hindgut, kiwifruit fiber is fermented, but whole kiwifruit consumed in association with slowly fermented fiber leads to distal displacement of fermentation, indicating that hindgut benefits of kiwifruit may result from its interaction with other dietary sources of fiber.

  12. Invariant variational structures on fibered manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupka, Demeter

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a relatively complete theory of invariance of global, higher-order integral variational functionals in fibered spaces, as developed during a few past decades. We unify and extend recent results of the geometric invariance theory; new results on deformations of extremals are also included. We show that the theory can be developed by means of the general concept of invariance of a differential form in geometry, which does not require different ad hoc modifications. The concept applies to invariance of Lagrangians, source forms and Euler-Lagrange forms, as well as to extremals of the given variational functional. Equations for generators of invariance transformations of the Lagrangians and the Euler-Lagrange forms are characterized in terms of Lie derivatives. As a consequence of invariance, we derive the global Noether's theorem on existence of conserved currents along extremals, and discuss the meaning of conservation equations. We prove a theorem describing extremals, whose deformations by a vector field are again extremals. The general settings and structures we use admit extension of the global invariance theory to variational principles in physics, especially in field theory.

  13. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  14. Active fiber composites for the generation of Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Birchmeier, M; Gsell, D; Juon, M; Brunner, A J; Paradies, R; Dual, J

    2009-01-01

    Active fiber composites (AFC) are thin and conformable transducer elements with orthotropic material properties, since they are made of one layer of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. They are suitable for applications in structural health monitoring systems (SHM) with acoustic non-destructive testing methods (NDT). In the presented work the transfer behavior of an AFC as an emitter of transient elastic waves in plate-like structures is investigated. The wave field emitted by an AFC surface bonded on an isotropic plate was simulated with the finite-difference method. The model includes the piezoelectric element and the plate and allows the simulation of the elastic wave propagation. For comparison with the model experiments using a laser interferometer for non-contact measurements of particle velocities at different points around the AFC on the surface of the plate were performed. Transfer functions defined as the ratio of the electric voltage excitation signal and the resulting surface velocity at a specific point are separately determined for the two fundamental Lamb wave modes. In order to take the orthotropic behavior of the AFC into account the transfer functions are determined for several points around the AFC. Results show that the AFC is capable to excite the fundamental symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb wave mode. The antisymmetric mode is mainly radiated in the direction of the piezoelectric fibers, while the symmetric mode is spread over a larger angle. The amplitudes of the emitted waves depend on the frequency of the excitation as well as on the geometric dimensions of the transducer.

  15. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  16. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  17. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  18. Packaging aluminum impacting on optical fiber with Singlemode-Multimode-Singlemode (SMS) fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Damayanti; Hatta, Agus; Pratama, Detak Yan

    2016-11-01

    Bare fiber strain sensor and packaged strain sensor of a step-index singimode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure are investigated numerically and experimentally. Strain sensor packaging was done to protect optical fiber from the damaged. Sensor performance was investigated by using operation wavelength 1550 nm it is demonstrated that for strain measurement from 0-1060 μɛ Based on the numerical test the sensitivity of bare fiber strain sensor on the length of 44.35 mm is 0.0023 dBm/μɛ while the result of the experiment test is 0.0022 dBm/ μɛ. Based on the numerical test of packaged fiber strain sensor the sensitivity is 0.0021 dBm/ μɛ while the result of the experiment is 0.0015 dBm/ μɛ.

  19. A novel structure optical fiber radiation dosimeter for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weimin; Qin, Zhuang; Ma, Yu; Zhao, Wenhui; Hu, Yaosheng; Zhang, Daxin; Chen, Ziyin; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-04-01

    An investigation into a novel in-vivo PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) fiber-optic dosimeter to monitor the dose of ionizing radiation, both for instantaneous and integrating measurements, for radiotherapy applications is proposed. This fiber sensor is designed as an intracorporal X-ray ionizing sensor to enhance the curative effect of radiotherapy. The fiber-optic dosimeter is made in a PMMA fiber, whose core is micromachined to create a small diameter (0.25 to 0.5 mm) hole at one fiber end. An inorganic scintillating material, terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) is chosen as the sensing material, because it can fluoresce on immediately under exposure of ionizing radiation (X-Rays or electron beam). This sensing material is filled and packaged in the small hole by epoxy resin adhesive. This kind of novel structure dosimeter shows high light coupling efficiency compared with other kind of inorganic scintillation dosimeter. This fiber-optic dosimeter shows good repeatability with a maximum deviation of 0.16%. The testing results of the fiber-optic dosimeter are perfectly proportional to the data of IC with R2 as 0.9999. In addition, the fiber sensor shows excellent isotropic in its radial angular dependence. All the experiments indicate that the fiber-optic dosimeter is properly used for patient in-vivo dosimeter such as brachytherapy applications or intraoperative radiation therapy.

  20. Ultrafine cellulose acetate fibers with nanoscale structural features.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifeng; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2008-09-01

    Nano-structural features were introduced to ultrafine cellulose acetate (CA) fibers by electrospinning of its mixtures with either poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) PVP or beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) in DMF, followed by dissolution of the added PVP or beta-CD. The presence of the charge-holding PVP enabled fiber formation from CA below its entanglement chain length and improved the electrospinning efficiency to produce bicomponent fibers with wide ranging diameters from 30 to 650 nm. At up to 50% contents, the PVP in the bicomponent fibers was phase-separated from CA and, upon removal, resulting in highly angulated fiber surfaces with nanometer-size spherulites and sub-micron size ridges and grooves. Adding beta-CD to CA enabled fiber formation at concentrations below the chain entanglement concentration Ce (16.5%). Hydrogen bonding between beta-CD and CA, as evident by FTIR, helped to distribute beta-CD as individual molecules in the CA matrix and producing more uniform and finer (130-150 nm in diameters) fibers, irrespective of their beta-CD contents. Removal of beta-CD from the fibers originally containing 40% beta-CD, generated nanoporous fibers with 2-nm nanopores and 70% increase in specific surface and doubled pore volume.

  1. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  2. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  3. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  4. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  5. Polymer optical fiber grating as water activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the water content within a product has long been required in the chemical processing, agriculture, food storage, paper manufacturing, semiconductor, pharmaceutical and fuel industries. The limitations of water content measurement as an indicator of safety and quality are attributed to differences in the strength with which water associates with other components in the product. Water activity indicates how tightly water is "bound," structurally or chemically, in products. Water absorption introduces changes in the volume and refractive index of poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA. Therefore for a grating made in PMMA based optical fiber, its wavelength is an indicator of water absorption and PMMA thus can be used as a water activity sensor. In this work we have investigated the performance of a PMMA based optical fiber grating as a water activity sensor in sugar solution, saline solution and Jet A-1 aviation fuel. Samples of sugar solution with sugar concentration from 0 to 8%, saline solution with concentration from 0 to 22%, and dried (10ppm), ambient (39ppm) and wet (68ppm) aviation fuels were used in experiments. The corresponding water activities are measured as 1.0 to 0.99 for sugar solution, 1.0 to 0.86 for saline solution, and 0.15, 0.57 and 1.0 for the aviation fuel samples. The water content in the measured samples ranges from 100% (pure water) to 10 ppm (dried aviation fuel). The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits good sensitivity and consistent response, and Bragg wavelength shifts as large as 3.4 nm when the sensor is transferred from dry fuel to wet fuel.

  6. Insights into microstructure and chemistry of active fiber core material produced by the granulated silica method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, H.; Etissa, D.; Romano, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of special fibers relies on new methods and materials to incorporate new functionalities into optical fibers by virtues of dopants and structure. In particular, the granulated silica method allows to rapidly produce active fibers with high dopant content and with virtually any microstructure. The implementation of this production method requires a multitude of process steps at various temperatures and temperature gradients that can significantly influence the optical properties of the produced preforms and fibers. To better understand and optimize the processes of active material production and fiber drawing parameters we have done a thorough analysis of microstructure, phase development, crystallinity and chemical mapping of active fiber cores produced by a combination of sol-gel process and granulated silica method with and without employment of a CO2 laser treatment. The microstructure of fibers have been analyzed with a diverse suite of techniques in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), revealing formation of various silica polymorphs and distribution of active elements (i.e. Yb and P) into the core structure. Our results show the presence of another polymorph of silica with low crystallinity dispersed in the main amorphous polymorph (i.e. quartz). We conclude that in spite of importance of homogeneous distribution of Yb and P into the core, the formation of various silica polymorphs resulting from materials processing has to be considered.

  7. Kinetics of the structural transformations in a carbon fiber on its high-temperature treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, S.D.; Puchkov, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of experimental results, a mathematical description is proposed of the two-stage process of structural transformations in a carbon fiber on its high-temperature treatment. A characteristic feature of the structural transformations was the change in the rate of propagation of a longitudinal ultrasonic wave. The effective activation energies of the process have been calculated.

  8. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  9. Recent standardization activities on radio on fiber (RoF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Hiroyo; Kuri, Toshiaki; Kanno, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    The Radio on Fiber (RoF) technologies are unique transmission means of radio analog signals through optical fiber cables. These technologies are currently discussed at international standard organizations such as ITU-T, IEC, APT and IEEE802. This invited paper summarizes RoF standardization activities at those standard organizations.

  10. Electrical activation of artificial muscles containing polyacrylonitrile gel fibers.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, H B; Gebhart, N; Kim, K J; Shahinpoor, M

    2000-01-01

    Gel fibers made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are known to elongate and contract when immersed in caustic and acidic solutions, respectively. The amount of contraction for these pH-activated fibers is 50% or greater, and the strength of these fibers is shown to be comparable to that of human muscle. Despite these attributes, the need of strong acids and bases for actuation has limited the use of PAN gel fibers as linear actuators or artificial muscles. Increasing the conductivity by depositing platinum on the fibers or combining the fibers with graphite fibers has allowed for electrical activation of artificial muscles containing gel fibers when placed in an electrochemical cell. The electrolysis of water in such a cell produces hydrogen ions at an artificial muscle anode, thus locally decreasing the pH and causing the muscle to contract. Reversing the electric field allows the PAN muscle to elongate. A greater than 40% contraction in artificial muscle length in less than 10 min is observed when it is placed as an electrode in a 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution and connected to a 10 V power supply. These results indicate potential in developing electrically activated PAN muscles and linear actuators, which would be much more applicable than chemically activated muscles.

  11. Design and fabrication of advanced fiber alignment structures for field-installable fiber connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Sánchez Martínez, Alberto; Beri, Stefano; Debaes, Christof; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-06-01

    Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH) networks have been adopted as a potential replacement of traditional electrical connections for the 'last mile' transmission of information at bandwidths over 1Gb/s. However, the success and adoption of optical access networks critically depend on the quality and reliability of connections between optical fibers. In particular a further reduction of insertion loss of field-installable connectors must be achieved without a significant increase in component cost. This requires precise alignment of fibers that can differ in terms of ellipticity, eccentricity or diameter and seems hardly achievable using today's widespread ferrule-based alignment systems. Novel low-cost structures for bare fiber alignment with outstanding positioning accuracies are strongly desired as they would allow reducing loss beyond the level achievable with ferrule-bore systems. However, the realization of such alignment system is challenging as it should provide sufficient force to position the fiber with sub-micron accuracy required in positioning the fiber. In this contribution we propose, design and prototype a bare-fiber alignment system which makes use of deflectable/compressible micro-cantilevers. Such cantilevers behave as springs and provide self-centering functionality to the structure. Simulations of the mechanical properties of the cantilevers are carried out in order to get an analytical approximation and a mathematical model of the spring constant and stress in the structure. Elastic constants of the order of 104 to 105N/m are found out to be compatible with a proof stress of 70 MPa. Finally a first self-centering structure is prototyped in PMMA using our Deep Proton Writing technology. The spring constants of the fabricated cantilevers are in the range of 4 to 6 × 104N/m and the stress is in the range 10 to 20 MPa. These self-centering structures have the potential to become the basic building blocks for a new generation of field-installable connectors.

  12. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  13. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers.

  14. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Illarramendi, María Asunción; Villatoro, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel. PMID:26134107

  15. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Illarramendi, María Asunción; Villatoro, Joel

    2015-06-30

    Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel.

  16. Block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with catalytic activity and pH-response.

    PubMed

    Hilke, Roland; Pradeep, Neelakanda; Madhavan, Poornima; Vainio, Ulla; Behzad, Ali Reza; Sougrat, Rachid; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2013-08-14

    We fabricated block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with self-assembled, shell-side, uniform pore structures. The fibers in these membranes combined pores able to respond to pH and acting as chemical gates that opened above pH 4, and catalytic activity, achieved by the incorporation of gold nanoparticles. We used a dry/wet spinning process to produce the asymmetric hollow fibers and determined the conditions under which the hollow fibers were optimized to create the desired pore morphology and the necessary mechanical stability. To induce ordered micelle assembly in the doped solution, we identified an ideal solvent mixture as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. We then reduced p-nitrophenol with a gold-loaded fiber to confirm the catalytic performance of the membranes.

  17. Narrowband random lasing in a Bismuth-doped active fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, Ivan A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Skvortsov, Mikhail I.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.; Melkumov, Mikhail A.; Babin, Sergey A.; Dianov, Evgeny M.

    2016-01-01

    Random fiber lasers operating via the Rayleigh scattering (RS) feedback attract now a great deal of attention as they generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam with the efficiency and performance comparable and even exceeding those of fiber lasers with conventional cavities. Similar to other random lasers, both amplification and random scattering are distributed here along the laser medium being usually represented by a kilometers-long passive fiber with Raman gain. However, it is hardly possible to utilize normal gain in conventional active fibers as they are usually short and RS is negligible. Here we report on the first demonstration of the RS-based random lasing in an active fiber. This became possible due to the implementation of a new Bi-doped fiber with an increased amplification length and RS coefficient. The realized Bi-fiber random laser generates in a specific spectral region (1.42 μm) exhibiting unique features, in particular, a much narrower linewidth than that in conventional cavity of the same length, in agreement with the developed theory. Lasers of this type have a great potential for applications as Bi-doped fibers with different host compositions enable laser operation in an extremely broad range of wavelengths, 1.15–1.78 μm. PMID:27435232

  18. Narrowband random lasing in a Bismuth-doped active fiber.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Ivan A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Skvortsov, Mikhail I; Podivilov, Evgeniy V; Melkumov, Mikhail A; Babin, Sergey A; Dianov, Evgeny M

    2016-07-20

    Random fiber lasers operating via the Rayleigh scattering (RS) feedback attract now a great deal of attention as they generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam with the efficiency and performance comparable and even exceeding those of fiber lasers with conventional cavities. Similar to other random lasers, both amplification and random scattering are distributed here along the laser medium being usually represented by a kilometers-long passive fiber with Raman gain. However, it is hardly possible to utilize normal gain in conventional active fibers as they are usually short and RS is negligible. Here we report on the first demonstration of the RS-based random lasing in an active fiber. This became possible due to the implementation of a new Bi-doped fiber with an increased amplification length and RS coefficient. The realized Bi-fiber random laser generates in a specific spectral region (1.42 μm) exhibiting unique features, in particular, a much narrower linewidth than that in conventional cavity of the same length, in agreement with the developed theory. Lasers of this type have a great potential for applications as Bi-doped fibers with different host compositions enable laser operation in an extremely broad range of wavelengths, 1.15-1.78 μm.

  19. Narrowband random lasing in a Bismuth-doped active fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Ivan A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Skvortsov, Mikhail I.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.; Melkumov, Mikhail A.; Babin, Sergey A.; Dianov, Evgeny M.

    2016-07-01

    Random fiber lasers operating via the Rayleigh scattering (RS) feedback attract now a great deal of attention as they generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam with the efficiency and performance comparable and even exceeding those of fiber lasers with conventional cavities. Similar to other random lasers, both amplification and random scattering are distributed here along the laser medium being usually represented by a kilometers-long passive fiber with Raman gain. However, it is hardly possible to utilize normal gain in conventional active fibers as they are usually short and RS is negligible. Here we report on the first demonstration of the RS-based random lasing in an active fiber. This became possible due to the implementation of a new Bi-doped fiber with an increased amplification length and RS coefficient. The realized Bi-fiber random laser generates in a specific spectral region (1.42 μm) exhibiting unique features, in particular, a much narrower linewidth than that in conventional cavity of the same length, in agreement with the developed theory. Lasers of this type have a great potential for applications as Bi-doped fibers with different host compositions enable laser operation in an extremely broad range of wavelengths, 1.15–1.78 μm.

  20. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  1. Rational design of fiber forming supramolecular structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Benjamin K; Kanahara, Satoko M

    2016-01-01

    Recent strides in the development of multifunctional synthetic biomimetic materials through the self-assembly of multi-domain peptides and proteins over the past decade have been realized. Such engineered systems have wide-ranging application in bioengineering and medicine. This review focuses on fundamental fiber forming α-helical coiled-coil peptides, peptide amphiphiles, and amyloid-based self-assembling peptides; followed by higher order collagen- and elastin-mimetic peptides with an emphasis on chemical / biological characterization and biomimicry. PMID:27022140

  2. Biological glass fibers: Correlation between optical and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Sundar, Vikram C.; Yablon, Andrew D.; Weaver, James C.; Chen, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Biological systems have, through the course of time, evolved unique solutions for complex optical problems. These solutions are often achieved through a sophisticated control of fine structural features. Here we present a detailed study of the optical properties of basalia spicules from the glass sponge Euplectella aspergillum and reconcile them with structural characteristics. We show these biosilica fibers to have a distinctive layered design with specific compositional variations in the glass/organic composite and a corresponding nonuniform refractive index profile with a high-index core and a low-index cladding. The spicules can function as single-mode, few-mode, or multimode fibers, with spines serving as illumination points along the spicule shaft. The presence of a lens-like structure at the end of the fiber increases its light-collecting efficiency. Although free-space coupling experiments emphasize the similarity of these spicules to commercial optical fibers, the absence of any birefringence, the presence of technologically inaccessible dopants in the fibers, and their improved mechanical properties highlight the advantages of the low-temperature synthesis used by biology to construct these remarkable structures. PMID:14993612

  3. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine; Karra, Reddy

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  4. Temperature insensitive single-mode-multimode-single-mode fiber optic structures with two multimode fibers in series.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Saurabh Mani; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Manoj; Bock, Wojtek J

    2014-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate a temperature insensitive single-mode-multimode-single-mode fiber optic structure consisting of two in-series multimode fibers of appropriate lengths and of opposite temperature sensitivities. A simple approximate expression to estimate the required length ratio of the multimode fiber sections has also been derived whose prediction is found in good agreement with the experiment. The study should be useful in realizing various fiber optic devices based on multimode interference with zero temperature cross sensitivity.

  5. Intestinal morphology and enzymatic activity in newly weaned pigs fed contrasting fiber concentrations and fiber properties.

    PubMed

    Hedemann, M S; Eskildsen, M; Laerke, H N; Pedersen, C; Lindberg, J E; Laurinen, P; Knudsen, K E Bach

    2006-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of fiber source and concentration on morphological characteristics, mucin staining pattern, and mucosal enzyme activities in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. The experiment included 50 pigs from 10 litters weaned at 4 wk of age (BW 8.6 +/- 1.4 kg) and divided into 5 treatment groups. Diets containing fiber of various physico-chemical properties and concentrations were formulated to contain 73, 104, or 145 g of dietary fiber/kg of DM. The diets were based on raw wheat and barley flours. Pectin and barley hulls, representing soluble and insoluble fiber sources, respectively, were used to increase the fiber concentration. The pigs were fed the experimental diets for 9 d, and then the pigs were euthanized and the entire gastrointestinal tract was removed. Tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine and from the mid colon. Inclusion of pectin in the diets significantly decreased (P < 0.001) ADFI and ADG compared with pigs fed no pectin. The villi and the crypts were shorter in pigs fed pectin-containing diets, but the villous height/crypt depth ratio was unaltered. Pectin significantly decreased the area of mucins in the crypts of the small intestine, indicating that the pigs fed the pectin-containing diet would probably be more susceptible to pathogenic bacteria, although this cannot be separated from the impact on ADFI. The lectin-binding pattern of the intestinal mucosa was unaffected by diet. The activity of lactase and maltase was increased in pigs fed diets with high fiber content, whereas sucrase activity was increased in pigs fed the pectin-containing diets. The activity of the peptidases, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, was increased when feeding high fiber diets, whereas the activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase remained unaffected by the experimental diets. In conclusion, the reduced feed intake observed with the pectin-containing diets could explain the

  6. Graphite fiber reinforced structure for supporting machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Kovach, Louis; Hurst, John S.

    1978-01-01

    Machine tools utilized in precision machine operations require tool support structures which exhibit minimal deflection, thermal expansion and vibration characteristics. The tool support structure of the present invention is a graphite fiber reinforced composite in which layers of the graphite fibers or yarn are disposed in a 0/90.degree. pattern and bonded together with an epoxy resin. The finished composite possesses a low coefficient of thermal expansion and a substantially greater elastic modulus, stiffness-to-weight ratio, and damping factor than a conventional steel tool support utilized in similar machining operations.

  7. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-04-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability.

  8. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Fiber Paper by Active Screen Plasma Nitriding and Its Microwave Heating Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Naishu; Ma, Shining; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) treatment was performed on polyacrylonitrile carbon fiber papers. Electric resistivity and microwave loss factor of carbon fiber were described to establish the relationship between processing parameters and fiber's ability to absorb microwaves. The surface processing effect of carbon fiber could be characterized by dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer testing on composites made of carbon fiber. When the process temperature was at 175 °C, it was conducive to obtaining good performance of dynamical mechanical properties. The treatment provided a way to change microwave heating properties of carbon fiber paper by performing different treatment conditions, such as temperature and time parameters. Atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that, during the course of ASPN treatment on carbon fiber paper, nitrogen group was introduced and silicon group was removed. The treatment of nitrogen-doped carbon fiber paper represented an alternative promising candidate for microwave curing materials used in repairing and heating technology, furthermore, an efficient dielectric layer material for radar-absorbing structure composite in metamaterial technology.

  9. Ceramic Fiber Structures for Cryogenic Load-Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This invention is intended for use as a load-bearing device under cryogenic temperatures and/or abrasive conditions (i.e., during missions to the Moon). The innovation consists of small-diameter, ceramic fibers that are woven or braided into devices like ropes, belts, tracks, or cables. The fibers can be formed from a variety of ceramic materials like silicon carbide, carbon, aluminosilicate, or aluminum oxide. The fiber architecture of the weave or braid is determined by both the fiber properties and the mechanical requirements of the application. A variety of weave or braid architectures is possible for this application. Thickness of load-bearing devices can be achieved by using either a 3D woven structure, or a layered, 2D structure. For the prototype device, a belt approximately 0.10 in. (0.25 cm) thick, and 3.0 in. (7.6 cm) wide was formed by layering and stitching a 2D aluminosilicate fiber weave.

  10. Deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and alters amylin fiber structure

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Buchanan, Lauren E.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Deamidation of asparagine and glutamine is the most common non-enzymatic, post-translational modification. Deamidation can influence the structure, stability, folding, and aggregation of proteins and has been proposed to play a role in amyloid formation. However there are no structural studies of the consequences of deamidation on amyloid fibers, in large part because of the difficulty of studying these materials using conventional methods. Here we examine the effects of deamidation on the kinetics of amyloid formation by amylin, the causative agent of type 2 diabetes. We find that deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and the deamidated material is able to seed amyloid formation by unmodified amylin. Using site-specific isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we show that fibers formed by samples that contain deamidated polypeptide contain reduced amounts of β-sheet. Deamidation leads to disruption of the N-terminal β-sheet between Ala-8 and Ala-13, but β-sheet is still retained near Leu-16. The C-terminal sheet is disrupted near Leu-27. Analysis of potential sites of deamidation together with structural models of amylin fibers reveals that deamidation in the N-terminal β-sheet region may be the cause for the disruption of the fiber structure at both the N- and C-terminal β-sheet. Thus, deamidation is a post-translational modification that creates fibers which have an altered structure, but can still act as a template for amylin aggregation. Deamidation is very difficult to detect with standard methods used to follow amyloid formation, but isotope labeled IR spectroscopy provides a means for monitoring sample degradation and investigating the structural consequences of deamidation. PMID:22734583

  11. Fiber optic hot-wire flowmeter based on a metallic coated hybrid long period grating/fiber Bragg grating structure.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Paulo; Jorge, Pedro A S; Rego, Gaspar; Frazão, Orlando; Santos, José Luís; Ferreira, Luís Alberto; Araújo, Francisco

    2011-06-10

    In this work an all-optical hot-wire flowmeter based on a silver coated fiber combining a long period grating and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) structure is proposed. Light from a pump laser at 1480  nm propagating down the fiber is coupled by the long period grating into the fiber cladding and is absorbed by the silver coating deposited on the fiber surface over the Bragg grating structure. This absorption acts like a hot wire raising the fiber temperature locally, which is effectively detected by the FBG resonance shift. The temperature increase depends on the flow speed of the surrounding air, which has the effect of cooling the fiber. It is demonstrated that the Bragg wavelength shift can be related to the flow speed. A flow speed resolution of 0.08  m/s is achieved using this new configuration.

  12. The structure of mesophase fiber-forming pitches

    SciTech Connect

    Kirda, V.S.; Khrenkova, T.M.; Zamanova, L.V.; Nikolaeva, L.V.; Fedoseev, S.D.

    1993-12-31

    The structural features of several pitches, obtained from cracking residues and a pitch-like material, have been investigated as to their fiber-forming ability. The residues were obtained by heat treatments of cracking residues of a residual and two types of distillates. Infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction results are discussed.

  13. The performance of integrated active fiber composites in carbon fiber laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, M.; Brunner, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric elements integrated into fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix laminates can provide various functions in the resulting adaptive or smart composite. Active fiber composites (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers can be used as a component in a smart material system, and can be easily integrated into woven composites. However, the impact of integration on the device and its functionality has not been fully investigated. The current work focuses on the integration and performance of AFC integrated into carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates, focusing on the strain sensor performance of the AFC-CFRP laminate under tensile loading conditions. AFC were integrated into cross-ply CFRP laminates using simple insertion and interlacing of the CFRP plies, with the AFC always placed in the 90° ply cutout area. Test specimens were strained to different strain levels and then cycled with a 0.01% strain amplitude, and the resulting signal from the AFC was monitored. Acoustic emission monitoring was performed during tensile testing to provide insight to the failure characteristics of the PZT fibers. The results were compared to those from past studies on AFC integration; the strain signal of AFC integrated into CFRP was much lower than that for AFC integrated into woven glass fiber laminates. However, the profiles of the degradations of the AFC signal resulting from the strain were nearly identical, showing that the PZT fibers fragmented in a similar manner for a given global strain. The sensor performance recovered upon unloading, which is attributed to the closure of cracks between PZT fiber fragments.

  14. Research on optical fiber magnetic field sensors based on multi-mode fiber and spherical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Tong, Zheng-rong; Zhang, Wei-hua; Luan, Pan-pan; Zhao, Yue; Xue, Li-fang

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor with a magnetic fluid (MF)-coated intermodal interferometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The interferometer is formed by sandwiching a segment of single mode fiber (SMF) between a segment of multi-mode fiber (MMF) and a spherical structure. It can be considered as a cascade of the traditional SMF-MMF-SMF structure and MMF-SMF-sphere structure. The transmission spectral characteristics change with the variation of applied magnetic field. The experimental results exhibit that the magnetic field sensitivities for wavelength and transmission loss are 0.047 nm/mT and 0.215 dB/mT for the interference dip around 1 535.36 nm. For the interference dip around 1548.41nm, the sensitivities are 0.077 nm/mT and 0.243 dB/mT. Simultaneous measurement can be realized according to the different spectral responses.

  15. Thermostructural tailoring of fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant area of interest in design of complex structures involves the study of multidisciplined problems. The coordination of several different intricate areas of study to obtain a particular design of a structure is a new and pressing area of research. In the past, each discipline would perform its task consecutively using the appropriate inputs from the other disciplines. This process usually required several time-consuming iterations to obtain a satisfactory design. The alternative pursued here is combining various participating disciplines and specified design requirements into a formal structural computer code. The main focus of this research is to develop a multidiscipline structural tailoring method for select composite structures and to demonstrate its application to specific areas. The development of an integrated computer program involves the coupling of three independent computer programs using an excutive module. This module will be the foundation for integrating a structural optimizer, a composites analyzer and a thermal analyzer. With the completion of the executive module, the first step was taken toward the evolution of multidiscipline software in the field of composite mechanics. Through the use of an array of cases involving a variety of objective functions/constraints and thermal-mechanical load conditions, it became evident that simple composite structures can be designed to a combined loads environment.

  16. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  17. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  18. Structural Laminate Aluminum-Glass-Fiber Materials 1441-Sial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestov, V. V.; Antipov, V. V.; Senatorova, O. G.; Sidel'nikov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure, composition and set of properties of specimens and components, and some parameters of the process of production of a promising FML class of metallic polymers based on sheets of high-modulus ( E 79 GPa) alloy 1441 with reduced density ( d 2.6 g/cm3) and an optimized glued prepreg reinforced with fibers of high-strength high-modulus VMPglass are described. Results of fire and fatigue tests of a promising 1441-SIAL structural laminate are presented.

  19. Optical fiber sensors and signal processing for intelligent structure monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert; Claus, R. O.; Lindner, D. K.; Thomas, Daniel; Cox, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The analytic and experimental performance of optical fiber sensors for the control of vibration of large aerospace and other structures are investigated. In particular, model domain optical fiber sensor systems, are being studied due to their apparent potential as distributed, low mass sensors of vibration over appropriate ranges of both low frequency and low amplitude displacements. Progress during the past three months is outlined. Progress since September is divided into work in the areas of experimental hardware development, analytical analysis, control design and sensor development. During the next six months, tests of a prototype closed-loop control system for a beam are planned which will demonstrate the solution of several optical fiber instrumentation device problems, the performance of the control system theory which incorporates the model of the modal domain sensor, and the potential for distributed control which this sensor approach offers.

  20. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  1. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  2. Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

    2009-08-01

    A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a strength closely associated to a specified structure damage state is used for bonding zigzagged configured optic fibers on the surfaces of the structure. Sensing the local deformation of the structure, the epoxy modulates the signal change within the optic fiber in response to the damage state of the structure. A monotonic loading test is conducted on a steel specimen installed with the proposed sensing system using selected epoxy that will crack at the designated strain level, which indicates the damage of the steel structure. Then, using the selected epoxy, a varying degree of cyclic loading amplitudes, which is associated with different damage states, is applied on a second specimen. The test results show that the specimen's damage can be identified by the optic sensors, and its maximum local deformation can be recorded by the sensing system; moreover, the damage evolution can also be identified.

  3. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  4. Damage to lens fiber cells causes TRPV4-dependent Src family kinase activation in the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, M; Mandal, A; Delamere, N A

    2015-11-01

    The bulk of the lens consists of tightly packed fiber cells. Because mature lens fibers lack mitochondria and other organelles, lens homeostasis relies on a monolayer of epithelial cells at the anterior surface. The detection of various signaling pathways in lens epithelial cells suggests they respond to stimuli that influence lens function. Focusing on Src Family Kinases (SFKs) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), we tested whether the epithelium can sense and respond to an event that occurs in fiber mass. The pig lens was subjected to localized freeze-thaw (FT) damage to fibers at posterior pole then the lens was incubated for 1-10 min in Krebs solution at 37 °C. Transient SFK activation in the epithelium was detectable at 1 min. Using a western blot approach, the ion channel TRPV4 was detected in the epithelium but was sparse or absent in fiber cells. Even though TRPV4 expression appears low at the actual site of FT damage to the fibers, SFK activation in the epithelium was suppressed in lenses subjected to FT damage then incubated with the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 (10 μM). Na,K-ATPase activity was examined because previous studies report changes of Na,K-ATPase activity associated with SFK activation. Na,K-ATPase activity doubled in the epithelium removed from FT-damaged lenses and the response was prevented by HC067047 or the SFK inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Similar changes were observed in response to fiber damage caused by injection of 5 μl hyperosmotic NaCl or mannitol solution beneath the surface of the posterior pole. The findings point to a TRPV4-dependent mechanism that enables the epithelial cells to detect remote damage in the fiber mass and respond within minutes by activating SFK and increasing Na,K-ATPase activity. Because TRPV4 channels are mechanosensitive, we speculate they may be stimulated by swelling of the lens structure caused by damage to the fibers. Increased Na,K-ATPase activity gives the lens greater capacity to

  5. Regional mechanics determine collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts.

    PubMed

    Fomovsky, Gregory M; Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2012-05-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shape, and/or location produce different patterns of mechanical stretch that guide evolving collagen fiber structure. We tested the effects of infarct shape and location using a combined experimental and computational approach. We studied mechanics and collagen fiber structure in cryoinfarcts in 53 Sprague-Dawley rats and found that regardless of shape or orientation, cryoinfarcts near the equator of the left ventricle stretched primarily in the circumferential direction and developed circumferentially aligned collagen, while infarcts at the apex stretched similarly in the circumferential and longitudinal directions and developed randomly oriented collagen. In a computational model of infarct healing, an effect of mechanical stretch on fibroblast and collagen alignment was required to reproduce the experimental results. We conclude that mechanical environment determines collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts. Our results suggest that emerging post-infarction therapies that alter regional mechanics will also alter infarct collagen structure, offering both potential risks and novel therapeutic opportunities.

  6. Cross-stiffened continuous fiber structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewen, John R.; Suarez, Jim A.

    1993-01-01

    Under NASA's Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications (NCWFA) program, Contract NAS1-18784, Grumman is evaluating the structural efficiency of graphite/epoxy cross-stiffened panel elements fabricated using innovative textile preforms and cost effective Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Resin Film Infusion (RFI) processes. Two three-dimensional woven preform assembly concepts have been defined for application to a representative window belt design typically found in a commercial transport airframe. The 3D woven architecture for each of these concepts is different; one is vertically woven in the plane of the window belt geometry and the other is loom woven in a compressed state similar to an unfolded eggcrate. The feasibility of both designs has been demonstrated in the fabrication of small test element assemblies. These elements and the final window belt assemblies will be structurally tested, and results compared.

  7. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  8. Transport properties of ribbon-shaped carbon fibers: Property-structure relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Nidia Constanza

    Mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers are an ideal material for applications in which high rates of heat dissipation and low mass are required. Unfortunately, the high cost of current commercial high thermal conductivity mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers has limited their use in high volume applications. Understanding how the structure develops during the fiber formation process and how this structure relates to the final fiber properties is the way to optimizing the fiber properties while reducing the processing costs. Ribbon-shaped fibers have been developed at Clemson University and are being evaluated as a low-cost high thermal conductivity alternative fiber to traditional round-shaped fibers. However, the characterization of the thermal transport properties of carbon fibers is a difficult and time-consuming process. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transport (both thermal and electronic) properties of ribbon-shaped fibers produced from an AR mesophase at different processing conditions, to characterize the structure of these fibers, to study their structure-property relationships, and to develop a model capable of estimating the thermal conductivity of carbon fibers based upon their structural parameters. For this purpose, several sets of ribbon fibers were produced from an AR mesophase at different spinning temperatures and shear rates and heat treated at a final temperature of 2400°C. The electrical resistivities, magnetoresistances and thermal conductivities of these fibers were measured and the structural parameters were determined with x-ray techniques. Two approaches (a short-fiber composite, and a periodic composite) were utilized to model the relationship between the structure of the fiber and its thermal conductivity. The results of this study confirmed that ribbon-shaped fibers develop excellent transport properties at lower graphitization temperatures than those used commercially for round-shaped fibers. Additionally, for the first

  9. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  10. Applications of compound fiber Bragg grating structures in lightwave communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lawrence R.

    Photonic networks have been identified as one solution that can satisfy the growing demand for bandwidth due to increased Internet traffic and the information superhighway. New enabling photonic technologies will be required in order to successfully implement, operate, and manage these all-photonic networks. In this thesis, we develop fiber Bragg grating technology for realizing photonic components that can perform a wide variety of optical signal processing functions for aggressive network management and performance requirements. First, we show how to tailor the spectral response of chirped moiré fiber Bragg gratings so that they can be used as transmission passband filters. We have fabricated filters having near ideal filter response which will be useful for providing wavelength selectivity in wavelength-division-multiplexed and wavelength routing networks. Second, we demonstrate the first hybrid wavelength- encodingt/time-spreading optical code-division multiple- access system using chirped moiré fiber Bragg gratings for encoding/decoding. Limitations imposed by the electronic bottleneck due to optical-to-electrical and electrical-to-optical conversions are overcome since all encoding/decoding operations are performed all- optically. Third, we realize a simple and cost-effective means using serial fiber Bragg grating arrays for performing power equalization among different wavelength channels in an erbium-doped fiber amplifier module. Such a module will be critical for compensating the deleterious effects of gain nonuniformity and transients in wavelength-division- multiplexed or wavelength routing networks. Finally, we demonstrate two different actively mode- locked erbium-doped fiber lasers that simultaneously emit two wavelengths with stable room-temperature operation. Wavelength spacings of 1.8 nm and 0.7 nm have been achieved-the closest reported to date. These lasers will find applications in high-performance transmission systems seeking to exploit

  11. Multipoint refractive index and temperature fiber optic sensor based on cascaded no core fiber-fiber Bragg grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Shan; Zhao, Junfa; Li, Hongqiang; Bai, Hua; Miao, Changyun

    2017-02-01

    A multipoint fiber optic sensor based on two cascaded multimode interferometer (MMI) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) structures is proposed and demonstrated for simultaneous measurement of refractive index (RI) and temperature. The MMI is fabricated by splicing a section of no-core fiber (NCF) with two single-mode fibers. The suitable NCF lengths of 19.1 and 38.8 mm are selected by simulations to achieve wavelength division multiplexing. The two MMIs are sensitive to RI and temperature with the maximal RI sensitivities of 429.42228 and 399.20718 nm/RIU in the range of 1.333 to 1.419 and the temperature sensitivities of 10.05 and 10.22 pm/°C in the range of 26.4°C to 100°C, respectively. However, the FBGs are only sensitive to the latter with the sensitivities of 10.4 and 10.73 pm/°C. Therefore, dual-parameter measurement is obtained and cross-sensitivity issue can be solved. The distance between the two sensing heads is up to 12 km, which demonstrates the feasibility of long-distance measurement. During measurement, there is no mutual interference to each sensing head. The experimental results show that the average errors of RI are 7.61×10-4 RIU and 6.81×10-4 RIU and the average errors of temperature are 0.017°C and 0.012°C, respectively. This sensor exhibits the advantages of high RI sensitivity, dual-parameter and long-distance measurement, low cost, and easy and repeatable fabrication.

  12. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals.

  13. Hierarchical fiber-optic delamination detection system for carbon fiber reinforced plastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Banshoya, Hidehiko; Shingo, Ii; Takeda, Nobuo

    2012-10-01

    This study develops a delamination detection system by extending our previous approach for monitoring surface cracks in a large-scale composite structure. In the new system, numerous thin glass capillaries are embedded into a composite structure, and internal pressure in the built-in capillary sensors, based on comparative vacuum monitoring (CVM), is maintained as a vacuum. When delamination is induced, the capillary sensors located within the delaminated area are breached, and atmospheric air flows into the capillaries. The consequent pressure change within the capillaries is then converted into axial strain in a surface-mounted optical fiber through a transducing mechanism, which is connected to the capillaries. By monitoring the strain distribution along the optical fiber, it is possible to identify a transducing mechanism in which the pressure change occurred and thus to specify the location of the delamination. This study begins by establishing a novel sensor embedding/extracting method. The airflow characteristic in the capillary sensors is then comprehensively evaluated, determining the basic performance of the new system. The proposed detection technique is validated by taking a step-by-step approach, and finally the hierarchical fiber-optic delamination detection system is demonstrated. A further advance to be combined with a self-healing concept is also discussed.

  14. Relative humidity sensor based on SMS fiber structure using multimode coreless fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafrani, Sanif; Hatta, Agus M.; Kusumawardhani, Apriani

    2016-11-01

    Singlemode-Multimode-Singlemode (SMS) optical fiber structure using multimode coreless have been able to sense changes in relative humidity. In this experiment the measured humidity is 60 % -90 %, while the method is done by comparing the relative humidity changes with the change in output power in the optical fiber. Then the underlying phenomena is the change in the refractive index of air as the cladding MMF coreless due to changes in relative humidity. It has been done three length variations MMF coreless to add sensitivity sensor, and the obtained sensor by 22.30 mm MMF length have the greatest sensitivity, that is 0.0747 dBm / %. Obtained conclusions on length variation will cause any change in the sensitivity significantly in relative humidity between 75 % -80 %.

  15. Hollow Fibers as Structured Packing for Olefin/Paraffin Separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, D.; Barbero, R. S.; Delvin, D. J.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.; Cussler, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the hollow fibers replace conventional trays and/or structured packing. Using a column less than 40 cm long, an {approx} 8% enrichment of propylene from a 30% propane/70%propylene mixture was achieved. An HTU as low as 8.8 cm was obtained. Such a low HTU has not been previously reported for propane/propylene separations. The mass transfer time was less than one second.

  16. Test of spectral emission and absorption characteristics of active optical fibers by direct side pumping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Luo, Yanhua; Sathi, Zinat M; Azadpeyma, Nilram; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2012-08-27

    Emission and absorption are two main properties of active optical fibers that are important for fiber amplifiers and lasers. We propose a direct side pumping scheme for non-deconstructive evaluation of active optical fibers. This scheme enables a simple in situ test of both emission and absorption characteristics without cutting fiber and produces good accuracy with very low pumping background. A commercial Er-doped fiber and a home-made Bi/Er co-doped optical fiber have been tested to demonstrate that the scheme is a useful alternative technique for characterizing active optical fiber or waveguides.

  17. Effect of polymer viscosities on the fiber structure and membrane properties of polypropylene/polyethylene bicomponent hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Satoshi; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Polypropylene (PP) / Polyethylene (PE) bicomponent microporous hollow fiber membranes were prepared through the bicomponent melt spinning and drawing processes. Fibers of hollow shape were firstly prepared through the melt spinning process by introducing the air into the core part of the fiber cross-section. Annealing and drawing processes were applied to thus prepared fibers to furnish the membrane properties to the fibers. In this study, high and low molecular weight PP, HMwPP and LMwPP, were used. Viscosity of HMwPP was higher than that of PE, while viscosity of LMwPP was lower than that of PE. In the case of LMwPP/PE fibers, birefringence of PE component increased with take-up velocity and birefringence of LMwPP component was lower than that of PE component at all attainable take-up velocities. In HMwPP/PE fibers, birefringence of both components increased with take-up velocity at low take-up velocities. Birefringence of HMwPP component increased continuously with further increase of take-up velocity, however that of PE component decreased significantly at the take-up velocity higher than 1 km/min. In this region, birefringence of HMwPP component in HMwPP/PE bicomponent hollow fibers was much higher than that of LMwPP component in LMwPP/PE hollow fibers. Hollow fiber membrane which was prepared by annealing and drawing of HMwPP/PE hollow fibers showed 10 times higher air transmission rate than that of LMwPP/PE fibers. In addition, air transmission rate increased with an increase in the HMwPP composition. These results indicate that the structure of PP component in the as-spun fiber undertake a crucial role on membrane properties in PP/PE bicomponent hollow fiber membrane.

  18. Adsorption of SOx and NOx in activated viscose fibers.

    PubMed

    Plens, Ana Carolina O; Monaro, Daniel L G; Coutinho, Aparecido R

    2015-01-01

    SOx and NOx are emissions resulting from combustion processes and are the main agents that contribute to the formation of acid rain, which causes harm to humans and the environment. Several techniques for removing these pollutants are applied in i.e. oil refineries, thermoelectric that use petroleum oils and vehicular pollution. Among these, highlight the adsorption of contaminants by the usage of activated carbon fibers and activated carbon, which are characterized by high surface area and uniform distribution of pores, providing appropriate conditions for application in processes of removing environmental contaminants. In the present work, activated viscose fibers (AVF) were prepared and applied in adsorption experiments of NO and SO2. The materials produced showed high values of surface area, with a predominance of micro pores with diameters in the range of 1.0 nm. The AVF had satisfactory performance in the removal of contaminants and are compatible with other synthetic fibers. Thus, the formation of active sites of carbon provides contaminants adsorption, demonstrating that carbon fibers cloth can be applied for the removal of pollutants.

  19. Influence of boron on structure and oxidation behavior of graphite fiber, P120

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Jane Y; Jones, Prof. Linda E

    2004-01-01

    P120 fibers, derived from mesophase pitch, were substitutionally doped with boron in the concentration ranges of 200-4600 ppm. An oxidation study was carried out in dry air at 973, 1023, and 1073 K at 95 kPa. Boron is preferentially positioned into the less disordered core region and in the external surface area (skin) of the fiber. Upon oxidation these regions are preferentially protected. Oxidation rates decreased by a factor up to 3, varying with boron concentration, burn-off level and oxidation temperature. The activation energy of oxidation increased from 151 kJ/mol for heat-treated P120 fibers to 180 kJ/mol for fibers with 3300 ppm B, then decreased to 122 kJ/mol for fibers containing 4600 ppm of boron. The observed decrease in oxidation rate is directly attributed to the location and concentration of boron. Boron doping inhibits oxidation by blocking specific active sites. It is proposed that 1000 ppm B as a threshold concentration at which the electronic, chemical, and physical (structural) behavior could be modified.

  20. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of B, Ce Co-doped TiO2 hollow fibers photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingping; Sun, Xiaogang; Xing, Jun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2014-07-01

    A series of B, Ce co-doped TiO2 (B, Ce-TiO2) photocatalytic materials with a hollow fiber structure were successfully prepared by template method using boric acid, ammonium ceric nitrate and tetrabutyltitanate as precursors and cotton fibers as template, followed by calcination at 500°C in an N2 atmosphere for 2 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) were employed to characterize the morphology, crystal structure, surface structure, and optical absorption properties of the samples. The photocatalytic performance of the samples was studied by photodegradation phenol in water under UV light irradiation. The results showed that the TiO2 fiber materials have hollow structures, and the fiber structure materials showed better photocatalytic properties for the degradation of phenol than pure TiO2 under UV light. In the experiment condition, the photocatalytic activity of B, Ce co-doped TiO2 fibers was optimal of all the prepared samples. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of B, Ce co-doped TiO2 fiber photocatalyst was also confirmed, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 fibers remained above 90% of that of the fresh sample after being used four times. The material was easily removed by centrifugal separation from the medium. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants.

  1. Innovative design of composite structures: Use of curvilinear fiber format to improve structural efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    To increase the effectiveness and efficiency of fiber-reinforced materials, the use of fibers in a curvilinear rather than the traditional straightline format is explored. The capacity of a laminated square plate with a central circular hole loaded in tension is investigated. The orientation of the fibers is chosen so that the fibers in a particular layer are aligned with the principle stress directions in that layer. Finite elements and an iteration scheme are used to find the fiber orientation. A noninteracting maximum strain criterion is used to predict load capacity. The load capacities of several plates with different curvilinear fibers format are compared with the capacities of more conventional straightline format designs. It is found that the most practical curvilinear design sandwiches a group of fibers in a curvilinear format between a pair of +/-45 degree layers. This design has a 60% greater load capacity than a conventional quasi-isotropic design with the same number of layers. The +/-45 degree layers are necessary to prevent matrix cracking in the curvilinear layers due to stresses perpendicular to the fibers in those layers. Greater efficiencies are achievable with composite structures than now realized.

  2. Superfine powdered activated carbon incorporated into electrospun polystyrene fibers preserve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur G; Hoogesteijn von Reitzenstein, Natalia; Schoepf, Jared; Ladner, David; Hristovski, Kiril D; Westerhoff, Paul

    2017-03-17

    A composite material consisted of superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC) and fibrous polystyrene (PS) was fabricated for the first time by electrospinning. SPAC is produced by pulverizing powdered activated carbon. The diameter of SPAC (100-400nm) is more than one hundred times smaller than conventional powdered activated carbon, but it maintains the internal pore structure based on organic micropollutant adsorption isotherms and specific surface area measurements. Co-spinning SPAC into PS fibers increased specific surface area from 6m(2)/g to 43m(2)/g. Unlike metal oxide nanoparticles, which are non-accessible for sorption from solution, electrospinning with SPAC created porous fibers. Composite SPAC-PS electrospun fibers, containing only 10% SPAC, had 30% greater phenanthrene sorption compared against PS fibers alone. SPAC particles embedded within the polymer were either partially or fully incorporated, and the accessibility of terminal adsorption sites were conserved. Conserving the adsorptive functionality of SPAC particles in electrospun non-woven polymeric fiber scaffolding can enable their application in environmental applications such as drinking water treatment.

  3. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs.

  4. Structural monitoring by curvature analysis using interferometric fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, D.; Vurpillot, S.; Casanova, N.; Kronenberg, P.

    1998-04-01

    All structures undergo deformations under the effects of loads or degradation of the constituent materials. The deformations of any structure (bridges, dams, frames, shells, tunnels, towers, wings, trusses,0964-1726/7/2/007/img9) contain a lot of information about its health state. By measuring these deformations it is possible to analyse the loading and aging behavior of the structure. The presented method analyses a structure by subdividing it into sections and cells. The deformation of each of these macro-elements is first analysed separately to obtain local information about the materials, and then combined to provide insight on the global behavior. Examples of these techniques applied to civil engineering structures fitted with long-gage-length fiber optic sensors show the variety of information that can be obtained using this powerful analysis technique.

  5. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  6. Electromagnetic modeling of periodically-structured fiber-reinforced single-layer laminate with multiple fibers missing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-C.; Li, C.-Y.; Lesselier, D.; Zhong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling of periodically-structured, fiber-reinforced laminates with fibers missing is investigated, this applying as well to similarly disorganized photonic crystals at optical frequencies. Parallel cylindrical fibers are periodically embedded within a layer sandwiched between two half-spaces. Absent fibers destroy the periodicity. The supercell concept involving an auxiliary periodic structure provides subsidiary solutions, wherein plane-wave illumination can be analyzed with the help of the Floquet theorem, while the field response due to a line source can be calculated from the pertinent plane-wave expansion. Accuracy, computational efficacy and versatility of the above approaches are illustrated by comprehensive numerical simulations with in particular comparisons to results provided by a finite-element code, all-purpose but computationally demanding, this work seen as the first step to the localization of missing fibers in a damaged laminate and imaging thereof.

  7. Structural characterization of the lignin from jute (Corchorus capsularis) fibers.

    PubMed

    del Río, José C; Rencoret, Jorge; Marques, Gisela; Li, Jiebing; Gellerstedt, Göran; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2009-11-11

    The structural characteristics of the lignin from jute (Corchorus capsularis ) fibers, which are used for high-quality paper pulp production, were studied. The lignin content (13.3% Klason lignin) was high compared to other nonwoody bast fibers used for pulp production. The lignin structure was characterized by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), 2D-NMR, and thioacidolysis. Upon Py-GC/MS, jute fibers released predominantly products from syringylpropanoid units with the S/G ratio being 2.1 and a H/G/S composition of 2:33:65. 2D-NMR of the milled wood lignin (MWL) isolated from jute fibers showed a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (72% of total side chains), followed by beta-beta' resinol-type linkages (16% of total side chains) and lower amounts of beta-5' phenylcoumaran (4%) and beta-1' spirodienone-type (4%) linkages and cinnamyl end groups (4%). The high predominance of the S-lignin units, together with the high proportion of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages, which are easily cleaved during alkaline cooking, are advantageous for pulping. On the other hand, a small percentage (ca. 4%) of the lignin side chain was found to be acetylated at the gamma-carbon, predominantly over syringyl units. The analysis of desulphurated thioacidolysis dimers provided additional information on the relative abundances of the various carbon-carbon and diaryl ether bonds and the type of units (syringyl or guaiacyl) involved in each of the above linkage types. Interestingly, the major part of the beta-beta' dimers included two syringyl units, indicating that most of the beta-beta' substructures identified in the HSQC spectra were of the syringaresinol type (pinoresinol being absent), as already observed in the lignin of other angiosperms.

  8. Use of nondestructive inspection and fiber optic sensing for damage characterization in carbon fiber fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidigk, Stephen; Le, Jacqui; Roach, Dennis; Duvall, Randy; Rice, Tom

    2014-04-01

    To investigate a variety of nondestructive inspection technologies and assess impact damage characteristics in carbon fiber aircraft structure, the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center, operated by Sandia National Labs, fabricated and impact tested two full-scale composite fuselage sections. The panels are representative of structure seen on advanced composite transport category aircraft and measured approximately 56"x76". The structural components consisted of a 16 ply skin, co-cured hat-section stringers, fastened shear ties and frames. The material used to fabricate the panels was T800 unidirectional pre-preg (BMS 8-276) and was processed in an autoclave. Simulated hail impact testing was conducted on the panels using a high velocity gas gun with 2.4" diameter ice balls in collaboration with the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Damage was mapped onto the surface of the panels using conventional, hand deployed ultrasonic inspection techniques, as well as more advanced ultrasonic and resonance scanning techniques. In addition to the simulated hail impact testing performed on the panels, 2" diameter steel tip impacts were used to produce representative impact damage which can occur during ground maintenance operations. The extent of impact damage ranges from less than 1 in2 to 55 in2 of interply delamination in the 16 ply skin. Substructure damage on the panels includes shear tie cracking and stringer flange disbonding. It was demonstrated that the fiber optic distributed strain sensing system is capable of detecting impact damage when bonded to the backside of the fuselage.

  9. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  10. Physical properties of nano-titania hollow fibers and their photocatalytic activity in the decomposition of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Zhang, Yaxing; Shi, Zhongliang; Wang, Shaofeng

    2013-01-01

    A series of nano-titania (TiO2) photocatalytic materials with a hollow fiber structure were successfully prepared using tetra- n-butyl titanate (Ti(OC4H9)4) as precursor and cotton fiber as the template. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements were employed to characterize the morphology, crystal structure, and surface structure of the samples. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were studied by phenol photodegradation in water under UV irradiation. The effect of calcination temperature, photocatalyst dosage, initial concentration of phenol and irradiation time on the photodegradation of phenol was studied. Results showed that the TiO2 fiber materials have hollow structures, indicating that these materials had a large specific surface area. The fiber structure material showed better photocatalytic properties for the degradation of phenol than pure TiO2 under UV light, and the sample calcined at 500°C exhibited the highest phenol photodegradation efficiency. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of the photocatalyst was also confirmed, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 fiber remained ca. 90% of photocatalytic activity of the fresh sample after being used four times. Moreover, TiO2 fiber was easily recovered by centrifugal separation from water.

  11. Soliton generation from an actively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating an electro-optic fiber modulator.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Mikael; Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik

    2012-01-30

    This work demonstrates an actively mode-locked fiber laser operating in soliton regime and employing an all-fiber electro-optic modulator. Nonlinear polarization rotation is utilized for femtosecond pulse generation. Stable operation of the all-fiber ring laser is readily achieved at a fundamental repetition rate of 2.6 MHz and produces 460 fs pulses with a spectral bandwidth of 5.3 nm.

  12. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of...Florida,Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,Gainesville,FL,32611 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND... Kevlar , Vectra, etc. •Nanowire act to reinforce and functionally grade the interface •Nanowires are piezoelectric and semiconductive Henry A Sodano

  13. Structural Health Monitoring with Fiber Bragg Grating and Piezo Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J.; Faridian, Ferey; Moslehi, Behzad; Sotoudeh, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is one of the most important tools available for the maintenance, safety, and integrity of aerospace structural systems. Lightweight, electromagnetic-interference- immune, fiber-optic sensor-based SHM will play an increasing role in more secure air transportation systems. Manufacturers and maintenance personnel have pressing needs for significantly improving safety and reliability while providing for lower inspection and maintenance costs. Undetected or untreated damage may grow and lead to catastrophic structural failure. Damage can originate from the strain/stress history of the material, imperfections of domain boundaries in metals, delamination in multi-layer materials, or the impact of machine tools in the manufacturing process. Damage can likewise develop during service life from wear and tear, or under extraordinary circumstances such as with unusual forces, temperature cycling, or impact of flying objects. Monitoring and early detection are key to preventing a catastrophic failure of structures, especially when these are expected to perform near their limit conditions.

  14. Strain of optic-fiber/giant magnetostrictive film structure in magnetic field by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiafei; Pan, Mengchun; Xin, Jianguang; Chen, Dixiang

    2008-12-01

    The magnetostrictive transducer is the most important part of the optic-fiber magnetic field sensor, and the optic-fiber/giant magnetostrictive(GMS) film coupled structure is a novel coupling form of the magnetostrictive transducer. Always we analyze the coupled structure based on the entire coupled structure being sputtered GMS material without tail-fibers. In practical application, the coupled structure has tail-fibers without films at two ends. When the entire coupled structure is immersed in the detected magnetic field, the detected magnetic field causes the GMS film strain then causing optic-fiber strain. This strain transmission process is different from it in the coupled structure entirely with GMS films without tail-fibers. The strain transmission relationship can be calculated theoretically in the coupled structure without tail-fibers, but it's complicated to theoretically calculate the strain transmission relationship in the coupled structure with tail-fibers. After large numbers of calculations and analyses by ANSYS software, we figure out some relationships of the two strain transmission processes in the respective structures and the stress distribution in the tail-fibers. These results are helpful to the practical application of the optic-fiber/ GMS film coupled structure.

  15. The Effect of Heat on Structural Characteristics and Water Absorption Behavior of Agave Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Dip

    2008-04-01

    The structural characteristics and water absorptions behavior agave fibers were investigated over a range of temperature by using XRD, IR, TG and gravimetric methods. Three distinct thermal processes were observed during heating the fiber in the temperature range 310-760 K in air, oxygen and nitrogen invariably. The cellulose structures of the fibers were unaffected on heating up to 450 K. The samples showed thermal decomposition processes beyond 500 K. Fibers displayed a two-stage diffusion behavior. The structural parameters and kinetic of water absorption of the fibers at specific temperatures were analyzed.

  16. Fiber Bragg grating sensors for structural and railway applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, H. Y.; Liu, S. Y.; Guan, B. O.; Chung, W. H.; Chan, T. H.; Cheng, L. K.

    2005-02-01

    Historically, due to the high cost of optical devices, fiber-optics sensor systems were only employed in niche areas where conventional electrical sensors are not suitable. This scenario changed dramatically in the last few years following the explosion of the Internet which caused the rapid expansion of the optical fiber telecommunication industry and substantially driven down the cost of optical components. In recent years, fiber-optic sensors and particularly fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have attracted a lot of interests and are being used in numerous applications. We have conducted several field trials of FBG sensors for railway applications and structural monitoring. About 30 FBG sensors were installed on the rail tracks of Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp. for train identification and speed measurements and the results obtained show that FBG sensors exhibit very good performance and could play a major role in the realization of "Smart Railway". FBG sensors were also installed on Hong Kong's landmark TsingMa Bridge, which is the world longest suspension bridge (2.2 km) that carries both trains and regular road traffic. The trials were carried out with a high-speed (up to 20 kHz) interrogation system based on CCD and also with a interrogation unit that based on scanning optical filter (up to 70 Hz). Forty FBGs sensors were divided into 3 arrays and installed on different parts of the bridge (suspension cable, rocker bearing and truss girders). The objectives of the field trial on the TsingMa Bridge are to monitor the strain of different parts of the bridge under railway load and highway load, and to compare the FBG sensors' performance with conventional resistive strain gauges already installed on the bridge. The measured results show that excellent agreement was obtained between the 2 types of sensors.

  17. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) reinforced by carbon fibers: Structural parameters of fibers and fiber-polymer adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghong; Wu, Defeng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Weidong

    2012-10-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) composites containing carbon fibers (CFs) with or without surface treatment were prepared via melt mixing. The mechanical properties of the PVDF/CF composites were then studied to explore the relations between the short-range and long-range structures of CFs and the properties of the composites. The results showed that the presence of CFs had a reinforcement effect on the PVDF and the Nielsen model was used to describe the concentration effect of CFs, especially at the lower concentration levels. The short-range aspect ratio structure and the long-range orientation structure of the CFs are the two most important structures that affected the final properties of the composites. The effective aspect ratio and orientation degree of the CFs in the PVDF matrix can be evaluated by the Halpin-Tsai and the Krenchel-COX models, which agree well with the experimental observations. After surface treatment, the CFs show stronger reinforcement effect due to reduced interfacial tension and increased interfacial area between two phases

  18. Structural carbohydrates in a plant biomass: correlations between the detergent fiber and dietary fiber methods.

    PubMed

    Godin, Bruno; Agneessens, Richard; Gerin, Patrick; Delcarte, Jérôme

    2014-06-18

    We compared the detergent fiber and dietary fiber methods to analyze the cellulose and hemicellulose contents of commelinid and non-commelinid magnoliophyta biomass. A good linear correlation was found between both methods. Compared to the more accurate dietary fiber method, the detergent fiber method overestimates the content of cellulose, whereas the detergent fiber method, as compared to the dietary fiber method, overestimates and underestimates the hemicellulose content in commelinid and non-commelinid magnoliophyta biomass, respectively. Because of the good linear correlations, conversion factors were determined to predict the cellulose, hemicellulose, and xylan contents to be expected from the dietary fiber method, on the basis of analyses made by the faster, cheaper, and more commonly practiced detergent fiber method. Nevertheless, the dietary fiber method offers the advantage of providing the detailed composition of the hemicelluloses (xylan, arabinan, hemicellulosic glucan, galactan, and mannan), and that is of interest for biorefining purposes.

  19. Active Q-switching of a fiber laser using a modulated fiber Fabry-Perot filter and a fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Manuel, Rodolfo; Kaboko, J. J. M.; Shlyagin, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple and robust actively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber ring cavity laser. The Q-switching is based on dynamic spectral overlapping of two filters, namely a fiber Bragg grating-based filter and a fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter. Using 3.5 m of erbium-doped fiber and a pump power of only 60 mW, Q-switched pulses with a peak power of 9.7 W and a pulse duration of 500 ns were obtained. A pulse repetition rate can be continuously varied from a single shot to a few KHz.

  20. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in composite structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The gains in structural efficiency are investigated that can be achieved by aligning the fibers in some or all of the layers in a laminate with the principal stress directions in those layers. The name curvilinear fiber format is given to this idea. The problem studied is a plate with a central circular hole subjected to a uniaxial tensile load. An iteration scheme is used to find the fiber directions at each point in the laminate. Two failure criteria are used to evaluate the tensile load capacity of the plates with a curvilinear format, and for comparison, counterpart plates with a conventional straightline fiber format. The curvilinear designs for improved tensile capacity are then checked for buckling resistance. It is concluded that gains in efficiency can be realized with the curvilinear format.

  1. On the structural organization of isolated bovine lens fiber junctions.

    PubMed

    Zampighi, G; Simon, S A; Robertson, J D; McIntosh, T J; Costello, M J

    1982-04-01

    Junctions between fiber cells of bovine lenses have been isolated in milligram quantities, without using detergents or proteases. The structure of the isolated junctions has been studied by thin-section, negative-stain, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy and by x-ray diffraction. The junctions are large and most often have an undulating surface topology as determined by thin sectioning and freeze-fracture. These undulations resemble the tongue-and-groove interdigitations between lens fiber cells previously seen by others (D. H. Dickson and G. W. Crock, 1972, Invest. Ophthalmol. 11:809-815). In sections, the isolated junctions display a pentalamellar structure approximately 13-14 nm in overall thickness, which is significantly thinner than liver gap junctions. Each junctional membrane contains in the plane of the lipid bilayers distinct units arranged in a square lattice with a center-to-center spacing of 6.6 nm. Freeze-fracture replicas of the junctions fractured transversely show that the repeating units extend across the entire thickness of each membrane. Each unit is probably constructed from four identical subunits, with each subunit containing a protein of an apparent molecular weight of 27,000. We conclude that the lens junctions are structurally and chemically, different from gap junctions and could represent a new kind of intercellular contact, not simply another crystalline state of the gap junction protein.

  2. Effects of undernutrition on diaphragm fiber size, SDH activity, and fatigue resistance.

    PubMed

    Sieck, G C; Lewis, M I; Blanco, C E

    1989-05-01

    The influence of prolonged nutritional deprivation on the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and cross-sectional areas of individual fibers in the rat diaphragm and deep portion of the medial gastrocnemius (MGr) muscles was determined. Fatigue resistance of the diaphragm was measured by means of an in vitro nerve-muscle strip preparation. Fiber SDH activity and cross-sectional area were quantified by means of an image processing system. Diaphragm fatigue resistance was significantly improved in the nutritionally deprived (ND) group. In both muscles, nutritional deprivation resulted in a significant decrease in fiber cross-sectional area (both type I and II), type II fibers showing greater atrophy. The SDH activities of type I and II fibers in the diaphragm were not affected by nutritional deprivation. This contrasted with a significant decrease in the SDH activity of both type I and II fibers in the MGr of ND animals. An assessment of the interrelationships between fiber atrophy and fiber SDH activity revealed a greater effect of malnutrition on those diaphragm type II fibers that had the lowest relative SDH activities and the largest cross-sectional areas. By comparison, the effect of malnutrition on type I and II fibers in the MGr was nonselective with regard to fiber SDH activity. We conclude that the enhanced diaphragm fatigue resistance in the ND animals does not result from an increase in the oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and is best explained by the pattern of diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy.

  3. A robust all-fiber active Q-switched 1-µm Yb3+ fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintov, Yoav; Goldring, Sharone; Pearl, Shaul; Lebiush, Eyal; Sfez, Bruno; Malka, Dror; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-09-01

    An all-fiber active Q-switched Yb3+-doped fiber laser at 1 µm is presented. The laser is composed of a ring resonator with an embedded all-fiber Q-switch element, based on a null coupler with an attached piezoelectric transducer (PZT). The PZT is used as an acoustic actuator, for inducing longitudinal acoustic disturbance along the null coupler and causing light coupling between the null coupler's ports. A stable operation is achieved with an overall average output power of up to 275 mW at various pulse repetition rates (PRR), ranging from 10 to 35 kHz and typical pulse energy of 15 μJ. In addition, a self-monitoring method is implemented by an embedded microcontroller, in order to maintain stable Q-switch performance, in changing environmental conditions. An average power of 8.5 W and pulse energy of 420 μJ at a PRR of 20 kHz are demonstrated in a master oscillator power amplifier containing the Q-switched laser, followed by a power amplifier.

  4. Spectral structure and stability studies on microstructure-fiber continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xun; Kimmel, Mark; Zeek, Erik; Shreenath, Aparna P.; Trebino, Rick P.; Windeler, Robert S.

    2003-07-01

    Although previous direct measurements of the microstructure-fiber continuum have all showed a smooth and stable spectrum, our cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (XFROG) full-intensity-and-phase characterization of the continuum pulse, utilizing sum-frequency-generation with a pre-characterized reference pulse and the angle-dithered-crystal technique, indicates that fine-scale spectral structure exists on a single-shot basis, contrary to previous observations. In particular, deep and fine oscillations are found in the retrieved spectrum, and the retrieved trace contains a "measles" pattern, whereas the measured trace and the independently-measured spectrum are rather smooth. The discrepancy is shown to be the result of unstable single-shot spectral structure. Although the XFROG measurement is not able to directly measure the single-shot fine structure in the trace, the redundancy of information in FROG traces enables the retrieval algorithm to correctly recognize the existence of the spectral fine structure, and restore the structure in the retrieved trace and spectrum. Numerical simulations have supported our hypothesis, and we directly observed the fine spectral structure in single-shot measurements of the continuum spectrum and the structure was seen to be highly unstable, the continuum spectrum appearing smooth only when many shots are averaged. Despite the structure and instability in the continuum spectrum, coherence experiments also reveal that the spectral phase is rather stable, being able to produce well-defined spectral fringes across the entire continuum bandwidth.

  5. Influence of heat treatment of rayon-based activated carbon fibers on the adsorption of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Rong, Haiqin; Ryu, Zhenyu; Zheng, Jingtang; Zhang, Yuanli

    2003-05-15

    The influence of heat treatment of rayon-based activated carbon fibers on the adsorption behavior of formaldehyde was studied. Heat treatment in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen for rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs) resulted in a significant increase in the adsorption capacities and prolongation of breakthrough time on removing of formaldehyde. The effect of different heat-treatment conditions on the adsorption characteristics was investigated. The porous structure parameters of the samples under study were investigated using nitrogen adsorption at the low temperature 77.4 K. The pore size distributions of the samples under study were calculated by density functional theory. With the aid of these analyses, the relationship between structure and adsorption properties of rayon-based ACFs for removing formaldehyde was revealed. Improvement of their performance in terms of adsorption selectivity and adsorption rate for formaldehyde were achieved by heat post-treatment in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen.

  6. Growth and structure of microscale fibers as precursors of alumina nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivoshapkin, Pavel V.; Krivoshapkina, Elena F.; Dudkin, Boris N.

    2013-07-01

    There is a new proposed technique for obtaining two types of nanoscale aluminum oxide fibers using a sol-gel method. At the surface of hydrated aluminum oxide gels a spontaneous fiber structure formation takes place, where crystalline ammonium chloride acts as the basic component. These synthesized fibers have been studied by SEM, ТEM, XRPD and DTA methods, and by FTIR spectroscopy. Nanoscale fibers are generated by thermal treatment of fiber structures. Organic components being present in the system, the alumina fiber diameter is 100-150 nm, while in their absence the diameter varies from 50 to 90 nm. Mechanisms of the fiber growth and nanoscale aluminum oxide fiber formation in the process of thermal treatment are proposed .

  7. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  8. Changes in the structural properties and rate of hydrolysis of cotton fibers during extended enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lushan; Zhang, Yuzhong; Gao, Peiji; Shi, Dongxia; Liu, Hongwen; Gao, Hongjun

    2006-02-20

    An extended enzymatic hydrolysis of cotton fibers by crude cellulase from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S-38 is described with characterization of both the enzyme changes of activities and cellulose structure. The hydrolysis rates declined drastically during the early stage and then slowly and steadily throughout the whole hydrolysis process the same trend could be seen during the following re-hydrolysis process. Morphological and structural changes to the fibers, such as swelling, frequent surface erosion, and variation in the packing and orientation of microfibrils, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Observation of X-ray diffraction and IR spectra suggests that the hydrolysis process results in a gradual increase in the relative intensity of the hydrogen bond network, and a gradual decrease in the apparent crystal size of cellulose. The I(alpha) crystal phase was hydrolyzed more easily than was the I(beta) crystal phase. Apart from the inactivation of CBHs activity, changes in the packing and arrangement of microfibrils and the structural heterogeneity of cellulose during hydrolysis could be responsible for the reduction in the rate of reaction, especially in its later stages. The results indicate that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose occurs on the outer layer of the fiber surface and that, following this, the process continues in a sub-layer manner.

  9. Novel multifunctional structures based on redistribution of optical power as basis for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiška, Petr; Skapa, Jan; Vašinek, Vladimír; Kašík, Ivan; Matějec, Vlastimil

    2008-12-01

    Sensors built with the help of optical fibers can measure almost all magnitudes in these days [3]. In our research we design new novel multifunctional structures that afford concurrently utilizing of optical fiber for telecommunications and measurements. These fibers are designed to work on two wavelengths. On telecommunication wavelength of 1550 nm these fibers are operating in single mode regime and on measurement wavelength of 850 nm they are working in quasisingle mode regime. Complicated profiles of refractive indexes provide four LP modes on 850 nm that are supported by fibers and that transmit a significant amount of power. First samples of these hybrid fibers have already been made thanks to grant cooperation with Academy of Science of Czech Republic. These refractive index profiles have to be designed in such way that all supported modes should carry approximate the same amount of optical power. The usage of both wavelength means that the light of communication wavelength must not be affected by the fiber activities at the wavelength of 850nm. The consequence is that only redistribution of optical power among supported modes can be applied. The Fourier and wavelet analysis is used to find out the significant points in the progression of the optical power. There are changes in the Fourier spectra and changes in wavelet coefficients. From the Fourier analysis we can predict the progression; wavelet analysis [2] enables us to find out singularities. It is expected, that every change on the fiber has its own "fingerprint" in the redistribution of the optical power. The main instrument is the coupled mode equations [1] following directly from the wave equations for individual modes. They contain a detailed description of the phase and amplitude of all the modes at any point z along the waveguide. But usually we are not interested in the phases and amplitudes of the individual modes. For the most of practical intentions, it is sufficient to know the average of

  10. Melittin selectively activates capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong Kee; Kim, Jin Hyuk

    2004-08-06

    Whole bee venom (WBV)-induced pain model has been reported to be very useful for the study of pain. However, the major constituent responsible for the production of pain by WBV is not apparent. Intraplantar injection of WBV and melittin dramatically reduced mechanical threshold, and increased flinchings and paw thickness. In behavioral experiments, capsaicin pretreatment almost completely prevented WBV- and melittin-induced reduction of mechanical threshold and flinchings. Intraplantar injection of melittin increased discharge rate of dorsal horn neurons only with C fiber input from peripheral receptive field, which was completely blocked by topical application of capsaicin to sciatic nerve. These results suggest that both melittin and WBV induce nociceptive responses by selective activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibers.

  11. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  12. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are complicated over that of ground structures by their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must blend low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. In addition, fabrication considerations including penetrations and joints play a major role. The EMI shielding properties are calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compared to preliminary experimental results and to shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding properties alone.

  13. The structural integrity of affordable thick-section fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S

    1999-06-01

    The Long-Term Research Objectives are to advance the understanding of the mechanics of polymers and polymer composites; develop predictive capabilities as well as experimental characterization and validation tools for the mechanical behavior of these materials; and further develop our knowledge of structure-mechanical property relationships for this class of materials. The approach used was to develop novel experimental tools and use them to characterize the multiaxial failure and fatigue behavior of materials for thick-section fiber composite structures. These tools include capabilities for applying well-defined biaxial and triaxial stress states. These experiments are carefully chosen to provide results that can be used for discriminating evaluation of predictive failure models.

  14. Structural characterization of hair fiber by optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; Robes Velasco, Maria Valeria; Paulo Raele, Marcus; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Vieira, Nilson Dias, Jr.; Baby, Andre Rolim

    2008-09-01

    In this work we use the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique to produce in vitro transversal section images of human hair. It was possible to identify in the A-scan protocol its principal structures: cuticle, cortex and medulla. The mean diameter of medulla was 29 +/- 7 μm and hair diameter was 122 +/- 16 μm in our samples of standard Afro-ethnic hair. We also compared the OCT signal before and after chemical treatment with 18% w/w ammonium thioglycolate solution. After chemical treatment, it was not possible to identify the main structures of hair fiber, due the index matching promoted by deleterious action of chemical agent. A tridimensional image was built starting from 601 cross-sectional images (slices). Each slice was taken in steps of 6.0 μm at 8 frames per second, and the whole 3D image was built in 60 seconds.

  15. Making Plant-Support Structures From Waste Plant Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Robert C.; < oscjmocl. < attjew K/; {ertzbprm. A,amda; Ej (e. Cjad); Hunt, John

    2006-01-01

    Environmentally benign, biodegradable structures for supporting growing plants can be made in a process based on recycling of such waste plant fiber materials as wheat straw or of such derivative materials as paper and cardboard. Examples of structures that can be made in this way include plant plugs, pots, planter-lining mats, plant fences, and root and shoot barriers. No chemical binders are used in the process. First, the plant material is chopped into smaller particles. The particles are leached with water or steam to remove material that can inhibit plant growth, yielding a fibrous slurry. If the desired structures are plugs or sheets, then the slurry is formed into the desired shapes in a pulp molding subprocess. If the desired structures are root and shoot barriers, pots, or fences, then the slurry is compression-molded to the desired shapes in a heated press. The processed materials in these structures have properties similar to those of commercial pressboard, but unlike pressboard, these materials contain no additives. These structures have been found to withstand one growth cycle, even when wet

  16. Automated determination of fibrillar structures by simultaneous model building and fiber diffraction refinement.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; André, Ingemar

    2015-07-01

    For highly oriented fibrillar molecules, three-dimensional structures can often be determined from X-ray fiber diffraction data. However, because of limited information content, structure determination and validation can be challenging. We demonstrate that automated structure determination of protein fibers can be achieved by guiding the building of macromolecular models with fiber diffraction data. We illustrate the power of our approach by determining the structures of six bacteriophage viruses de novo using fiber diffraction data alone and together with solid-state NMR data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of molecular replacement from monomeric and fibrillar templates by solving the structure of a plant virus using homology modeling and protein-protein docking. The generated models explain the experimental data to the same degree as deposited reference structures but with improved structural quality. We also developed a cross-validation method for model selection. The results highlight the power of fiber diffraction data as structural constraints.

  17. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  18. Preparation of activated carbon hollow fibers from ramie at low temperature for electric double-layer capacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Xuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Chengyang; Chen, Mingming; Qi, Tao; Hua, Chao; Ma, Mingguo

    2013-12-01

    Activated carbon hollow fibers (ACHFs) with high surface area were prepared from inexpensive, renewable ramie fibers (RFs) by a single-step activation method under lower temperature than that of other reports. The effects of activation conditions on the pore structure and turbostratic structure of ACHFs were investigated systematically. The results show that ACHFs surface area decreased but micropore volume and conductivity increased as the increase of activation temperature and activation time. The electrochemical measurements of supercapacitors fabricated from these ACHFs electrodes reveal that the electrochemical properties improved with the enhancing of activation degree. However, too high activation temperature can make the ion diffusion resistance increase. It suggests that pore structure and conductivity are as important as surface area to decide the electrochemical performances of ACHFs electrode materials. A maximum capacity of 287 F g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) was obtained for the ACHFs electrode prepared under suitable conditions.

  19. Lack of correspondence between histochemical and structural fiber typing in antennal muscles of the rock lobster Palinurus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C

    1991-01-01

    1. Sarcomere lengths and fine structure were examined in three histochemical fiber types of antennal muscles of the rock lobster. 2. Sarcomere lengths are distributed over a continuum of values from 6.5 to 19 microns. 3. Although a correlation between ATPase activity and sarcomere length is demonstrated, fibers with high ATPase activity do not have the sarcomere length typical of fast contracting fibers. 4. These fibers deviated from the typical fast structure in having long sarcomeres (greater than 6.5 microns) and in having some unusual ultrastructural characteristics (absence of the H-band, presence of Z-tubules, high thin to thick ratio, 5:1) associated with other more classical features. 5. This finding demonstrates that sarcomere length measurements do not always accurately predict the physiological performance of a single muscle fiber. 6. The fiber type composition of two antagonistic antennal muscles is compared and the functional significance of the results is discussed with respect to their role in behavior.

  20. Preparation of native cellulose-AgCl fiber with antimicrobial activity through one-step electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaojun; Zhang, Xiaomin; Luo, Ting; Zhu, Jin; Su, Shengpei

    2017-02-01

    The native Cellulose-AgCl fiber have been firstly fabricated by one-step electrospinning of cellulose solution with poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and AgNO3. X-ray diffraction, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectrometer, Thermo-gravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared are used to characterize the crystal structure, morphology and composition of cellulose-AgCl nanocomposites. The results of SEM indicate that the size of AgCl in cellulose fiber matrix is able to be adjusted by the addition of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The antimicrobial activity of the nanocomposites fiber is also tested against the model microbes E. coli (Gram-negative) and S. aureus (Gram-positive). The results indicate that cellulose-AgCl nanocomposites have a good antimicrobial activity, which is improving with the decrease of AgCl size in fiber matrix. This work provides a novel and simple way to adjust the AgCl size in electrospinning cellulose matrix which can be applied as functional biomaterials.

  1. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  2. Application of Point and Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors to Health Monitoring of Smart Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Jung Ju; Seo, Dae Cheol; Lim, Jeong Ok

    Point optical fiber sensors are useful in the monitoring of localized structural damage, but a large number of the sensors must be multiplexed for large structure monitoring. On the other hand, distributed optical fiber sensors can obtain a continuous distribution of strain or temperature with one sensing fiber, and they are suitable for the large structure monitoring due to their measurement range reaching tens of kilometers. However, the distributed sensors have the spatial resolution of tens of centimeters to several meters, and they measure averaged strain or temperature. In this paper, the application results of transmission-type extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (TEFPI) optical fiber sensors and Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors to structural monitoring are presented. The TEFPI optical fiber sensors and Brillouin distributed sensors were applied to the fatigue damage monitoring of an aluminum plate patched with CFRP composite and the deflection monitoring of an alumimum-bending beam, respectively.

  3. A bioinspired study on the interlaminar shear resistance of helicoidal fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Ribbans, Brian; Li, Yujie; Tan, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Helicoidal fibril structures are identified in many natural animals and plants. This research uses an integrated experimental and modeling approach to study the interlaminar shear resistance of bioinspired helicoidal fiber structures. First, helicoidal fiber-reinforced polymeric composites were created using 3D printed fiber cores and polymeric matrices, including plain, ring and helix reinforced helicoidal specimens. Then, monotonic torsional tests were performed to characterize the composite failure under interlaminar shear stresses, and fractographic characterization was conducted to elucidate corresponding fracture mechanisms in each specimen type. Finally, finite element modeling was performed to explore the critical factors on the interlaminar shear resistance of helicoidal fiber structures. The results showed that fiber-matrix modulus ratios and pitch angles of helix reinforcements played important roles on the interlaminar shear resistance of helicoidal fiber structures.

  4. Holographic fiber bundle system for patterned optogenetic activation of large-scale neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Nairouz; Levinsky, Alexandra; Brosh, Inbar; Kahn, Itamar; Shoham, Shy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Optogenetic perturbation has become a fundamental tool in controlling activity in neurons. Used to control activity in cell cultures, slice preparations, anesthetized and awake behaving animals, optical control of cell-type specific activity enables the interrogation of complex systems. A remaining challenge in developing optical control tools is the ability to produce defined light patterns such that power-efficient, precise control of neuronal populations is obtained. Here, we describe a system for patterned stimulation that enables the generation of structured activity in neurons by transmitting optical patterns from computer-generated holograms through an optical fiber bundle. The system couples the optical system to versatile fiber bundle configurations, including coherent or incoherent bundles composed of hundreds of up to several meters long fibers. We describe the components of the system, a method for calibration, and a detailed power efficiency and spatial specificity quantification. Next, we use the system to precisely control single-cell activity as measured by extracellular electrophysiological recordings in ChR2-expressing cortical cell cultures. The described system complements recent descriptions of optical control systems, presenting a system suitable for high-resolution spatiotemporal optical control of wide-area neural networks in vitro and in vivo, yielding a tool for precise neural system interrogation. PMID:26793741

  5. Survival and relaxation time, pore size distribution moments, and viscous permeability in random unidirectional fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadakis, Manolis M.; Robertson, Teri J.

    2005-03-01

    Computer simulation results are presented for the mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size, for random porous structures consisting of parallel nonoverlapping or partially overlapping fibers. The numerical procedure is based on a discrete step-by-step random walk mechanism simulating the Brownian diffusion trajectories of molecules in the porous media. Numerical results on the viscous permeability of these structures are computed with a method based on electrical conduction principles and compared to a variational bound derived from the mean survival time. The results show that nonoverlapping fiber structures exhibit lower values of the dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size than randomly overlapping fiber structures of the same porosity, while partially overlapping fiber structures show behavior intermediate to those of the two extreme cases. The mean square pore size (second moment of the pore size distribution) is found to be a very good predictor of the mean survival time for non-, partially, and randomly overlapping fiber structures. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of variational bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to structural properties [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all examined fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for porous media formed by partially overlapping particles. The permeability behavior of partially overlapping fiber structures resembles that of nonoverlapping fiber structures for flow parallel to the fibers, but not for transverse flow, where percolation phenomena prevail. The permeability results for beds of unidirectional partially

  6. Survival and relaxation time, pore size distribution moments, and viscous permeability in random unidirectional fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Tomadakis, Manolis M; Robertson, Teri J

    2005-03-01

    Computer simulation results are presented for the mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size, for random porous structures consisting of parallel nonoverlapping or partially overlapping fibers. The numerical procedure is based on a discrete step-by-step random walk mechanism simulating the Brownian diffusion trajectories of molecules in the porous media. Numerical results on the viscous permeability of these structures are computed with a method based on electrical conduction principles and compared to a variational bound derived from the mean survival time. The results show that nonoverlapping fiber structures exhibit lower values of the dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size than randomly overlapping fiber structures of the same porosity, while partially overlapping fiber structures show behavior intermediate to those of the two extreme cases. The mean square pore size (second moment of the pore size distribution) is found to be a very good predictor of the mean survival time for non-, partially, and randomly overlapping fiber structures. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of variational bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to structural properties [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all examined fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for porous media formed by partially overlapping particles. The permeability behavior of partially overlapping fiber structures resembles that of nonoverlapping fiber structures for flow parallel to the fibers, but not for transverse flow, where percolation phenomena prevail. The permeability results for beds of unidirectional partially

  7. Refractive index sensing characterization of a singlemode-claddingless-singlemode fiber structure based fiber ring cavity laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-bo; Tan, Zhongwei; Yin, Bin; Bai, Yunlong; Jian, Shuisheng

    2014-03-10

    This paper firstly demonstrated the refractive index (RI) characteristics of a singlemode-claddingless-singlemode fiber structure filter based fiber ring cavity laser sensing system. The experiment shows that the lasing wavelength shifts to red side with the ambient RI increase. Linear and parabolic fitting are both done to the measurements. The linear fitting result shows a good linearity for applications in some areas with the determination coefficient of 0.993. And a sensitivity of ~131.64nm/RIU is experimentally achieved with the aqueous solution RI ranging from 1.333 to 1.3707, which is competitively compared to other existing fiber-optic sensors. While the 2 order polynomial fitting function, which determination relationship is higher than 0.999, can be used to some more rigorous monitoring. The proposed fiber laser has a SNR of ~50dB, and 3dB bandwidth ~0.03nm.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charles Phillip Michael

    In an aircraft engine at high altitude, the low-pressure turbine (LPT) section can experience low-Reynolds number (Re) flows making the turbine blades susceptible to large separation losses. These losses are detrimental to the performance of the turbine and lead to a roadblock for "higher-lift" blade designs. Accurate prediction of the separation characteristics and an understanding of mitigation techniques are of the utmost importance. The current study conducts simulations of flow control techniques for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) L2A turbine blade at low-Re of 10,000 based on inlet velocity and blade axial chord. This blade was selected for its "high-lift" characteristics coupled with massive separation on the blade at low-Re which provides an excellent test blade for flow control techniques. Flow control techniques involved various configurations of vortex generator jets (VGJs) using momentum injection (i.e. jet blowing). All computations were executed on dual-topology, multi-block, structured meshes and incorporated the use of a parallel computing platform using the message passing interface (MPI) communications. A high-order implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) approach was used in the simulations allowing for a seamless transition between laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow without changing flow solver parameters. A validation study was conducted involving an AFRL L1A turbine blade which showed good agreement with experimental trends for cases which controlled separation in the experiments. The same cases showed good agreement between different grid sizes. The differences between experimental and numerical results are largely attributed to differences in the setup. That is, the simulation did not include freestream turbulence or wind-tunnel wall effects. The flow control study conducted for the L2A blade showed a small degree of separation control for jets placed just downstream (DS) of the separation point. A limited study was conducted

  9. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Automotive Structural Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Battiste, R.L.; Corum, J.M.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1999-11-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design criteria for a chopped-glass-fiber reinforced polymeric composite for automotive structural applications. The criteria closely follow the framework of an earlier criteria document for a continuous-strand-mat (CSM) glass-fiber reference composite. Together these design criteria demonstrate a framework that can be adapted for future random-glass-fiber composites for automotive structural applications.

  10. Fiber ring laser interrogated zeolite-coated singlemode-multimode-singlemode structure for trace chemical detection.

    PubMed

    Lan, X; Huang, J; Han, Q; Wei, T; Gao, Z; Jiang, H; Dong, J; Xiao, H

    2012-06-01

    Zeolite thin films were synthesized on the claddingless multimode portion of a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure to construct a chemical vapor sensor. The zeolite-coated SMS structure was inserted into a fiber ring amplifier to produce a laser line. Combining the strong molecular adsorption capability of the nanoporous zeolite and the high signal-to-noise ratio of the fiber laser, the device was demonstrated for chemical vapor sensing with a low detection limit.

  11. Optical and mechanical properties of hollow-core fibers with cobweb cladding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingyang; Yu, Rongjin; Tian, Zhenguo; Bai, Xiangzhong

    2006-02-01

    This paper explores the possibility of realizing a hollow-core optical fiber, whose cladding is composed of cylindrical alternating layers of air and high-index material with supporting structure. The optical properties and the design criteria of the proposed fiber are evaluated by the compact two-dimensional (2D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In particular, the influence of the number and width of supporting strips on the leakage loss of the fiber is investigated. Furthermore, the mechanical performances of the fiber are estimated by finite-element method, confirming that hollow-core fibers with a reasonable size and number of supporting strips are reliable.

  12. Multimode fiber focusing lens based on plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yihang; Lu, Yongjiao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui; Guan, Chunying; Yuan, Libo

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, a compact all-fiber plasmonic focusing beam generator with single and multiple spots is proposed and demonstrated in a conventional multimode fiber. Here, the focusing beam generator is composed of air slit arrays perforated through the gold films deposited on the end facet of a multimode fiber. The array of nanoscale slits with varying widths is used to modulate phase distribution of the focused light. An all-fiber focusing beam generator provides many advantages, such as self-alignment, high flexibility, lower insert loss, and easy portability, which is of importance to realize optical trapping, micromanipulation, beam shaping, and fiber integrated devices.

  13. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  14. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2003-01-01

    coupled into the optical fiber sensor, a reflection peak will be obtained centered around a wavelength called Bragg-wavelength. The Bragg-wavelength depends on the refractive index and the period of the grating, which both change due to mechanical and thermal strain applied to the sensor. The shift in the Bragg-wavelength is directly proportional to the strain. Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  15. Integration of piezoceramic actuators in fiber-reinforced structures for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Johannes K.; Herold-Schmidt, Ursula; Zaglauer, Helmut W.; Arendts, Franz J.

    1998-06-01

    Up to now experimental and theoretical research on active structures for aerospace applications has put the focus mainly on surface bonded actuators. Simultaneously peizoceramics became the major type of actuating device being investigated for smart structures.In this context various techniques of insulating, bonding and operating these actuators have been developed. However, especially with regard to actuators only a few investigations have dealt with embedding of these components into the load bearing structure so far. With increasing shares of fiber- reinforced plastics applied in aerospace products the option of integrating the actuation capability into the components should be reconsidered during the design process. This paper deals with different aspects related to the integration of piezoceramic actuators into fiber reinforced aerospace structures. An outline of the basic possibilities of either bonding an actuator to the structure's surface or embedding it into the composite is given while the emphasis is put on different aspects related to the latter technology. Subsequently recent efforts at Daimler-Benz Aerospace Dornier concerning aircraft components with surface bonded actuators are presented. Design considerations regarding embedded piezoceramic actuators are discussed. Finally some techniques of non-destructive testing applicable to structures with surface bonded as well as embedded piezoelectric actuators are described.

  16. Calcium-activated force of human muscle fibers following a standardized eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Jun; Widrick, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-01

    Peak Ca(2+)-activated specific force (force/fiber cross-sectional area) of human chemically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fiber segments was determined before and after a fixed-end contraction or an eccentric contraction of standardized magnitude (+0.25 optimal fiber length) and velocity (0.50 unloaded shortening velocity). Fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content was assayed by SDS-PAGE. Posteccentric force deficit, a marker of damage, was similar for type I and IIa fibers but threefold greater for type IIa/IIx hybrid fibers. A fixed-end contraction had no significant effect on force. Multiple linear regression revealed that posteccentric force was explained by a model consisting of a fiber type-independent and a fiber type-specific component (r(2) = 0.91). Preeccentric specific force was directly associated with a greater posteccentric force deficit. When preeccentric force was held constant, type I and IIa fibers showed identical susceptibility to damage, while type IIa/IIx fibers showed a significantly greater force loss. This heightened sensitivity to damage was directly related to the amount of type IIx MHC in the hybrid fiber. Our model reveals a fiber-type sensitivity of the myofilament lattice or cytoskeleton to mechanical strain that can be described as follows: type IIa/IIx > type IIa = type I. If these properties extend to fibers in vivo, then alterations in the number of type IIa/IIx fibers may modify a muscle's susceptibility to eccentric damage.

  17. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  18. Comparison of anterior gluteus medius fiber activation during general exercises and PNF exercises

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activation of anterior gluteus medius fibers during general exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 15 healthy adults. The participants performed general hip abductor strengthening exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises; during both types of exercise, electromyography activity was recorded. [Results] Greater anterior gluteus medius fiber activation was observed during the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises compared with the general hip abductor strengthening exercises. The anterior gluteus medius fibers exhibited greater activity during pattern 2 exercises compared with any other type of exercise. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pattern 2 exercises can selectively activate anterior gluteus medius fibers. PMID:28356634

  19. Comparison of anterior gluteus medius fiber activation during general exercises and PNF exercises.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Kwang; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activation of anterior gluteus medius fibers during general exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 15 healthy adults. The participants performed general hip abductor strengthening exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises; during both types of exercise, electromyography activity was recorded. [Results] Greater anterior gluteus medius fiber activation was observed during the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises compared with the general hip abductor strengthening exercises. The anterior gluteus medius fibers exhibited greater activity during pattern 2 exercises compared with any other type of exercise. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pattern 2 exercises can selectively activate anterior gluteus medius fibers.

  20. Incorporation of experimentally-derived fiber orientation into a structural constitutive model for planar collagenous tissues.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Michael S

    2003-04-01

    Structural constitutive models integrate information on tissue composition and structure, avoiding ambiguities in material characterization. However, critical structural information (such as fiber orientation) must be modeled using assumed statistical distributions, with the distribution parameters estimated from fits to the mechanical test data. Thus, full realization of structural approaches continues to be limited without direct quantitative structural information for direct implementation or to validate model predictions. In the present study, fiber orientation information obtained using small angle light scattering (SALS) was directly incorporated into a structural constitutive model based on work by Lanir (J. Biomech., v. 16, pp. 1-12, 1983). Demonstration of the model was performed using existing biaxial mechanical and fiber orientation data for native bovine pericardium (Sacks and Chuong, ABME, v.26, pp. 892-902, 1998). The structural constitutive model accurately predicted the complete measured biaxial mechanical response. An important aspect of this approach is that only a single equibiaxial test to determine the effective fiber stress-strain response and the SALS-derived fiber orientation distribution were required to determine the complete planar biaxial mechanical response. Changes in collagen fiber crimp under equibiaxial strain suggest that, at the meso-scale, fiber deformations follow the global tissue strains. This result supports the assumption of affine strain to estimate the fiber strains. However, future evaluations will have to be performed for tissue subjected to a wider range of strain to more fully validate the current approach.

  1. Mechanical Properties, Surface Structure, and Morphology of Carbon Fibers Pre-heated for Liquid Aluminum Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachold, Franziska S.; Kozera, Rafal; Singer, Robert F.; Boczkowska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    To efficiently produce carbon fiber-reinforced aluminum on a large scale, we developed a special high-pressure die casting process. Pre-heating of the fibers is crucial for successful infiltration. In this paper, the influence of heating carried out in industrial conditions on the mechanical properties of the fibers was investigated. Therefore, polyacrylonitrile-based high-tensile carbon fiber textiles were heated by infrared emitters in an argon-rich atmosphere to temperatures between 450 and 1400 °C. Single fiber tensile tests revealed a decrease in tensile strength and strain at fracture. Young's modulus was not affected. Scanning electron microscopy identified cavities on the fiber surface as the reason for the decrease in mechanical properties. They were caused by the attack of atmospheric oxygen. The atomic structure of the fibers did not change at any temperature, as x-ray diffraction confirmed. Based on these data, the pre-heating for the casting process can be optimized.

  2. Dual-wavelength nano-engineered Thulium-doped fiber laser via bending of singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, A. Z.; Latiff, A. A.; Paul, M. C.; Yasin, M.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a dual-wavelength fiber laser (DWFL) using nano-engineered Thulium-doped fiber as a gain medium with a bent singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure (SMS) is demonstrated. The SMS structure is packaged systematically using Cr-39 polymer plates to provide linear bending via applied load. Experimental results have proved that the bent SMS is capable to provide highly effective wavelength filter and wavelengths stabilizer by balancing the net cavity gain between the two wavelengths. The DWFL provides very narrow spacing of 0.9 nm, narrow 3 dB spectral linewidth of ∼0.07 nm and SNR of ∼42 dB. Based on stability test, very small mode hopping is observed at the two wavelengths having deviations of ±0 nm and ±0.04 nm respectively. In conjunction, the DWFL provides very stable relative wavelength spacing with a deviation of ±0.04 nm.

  3. Optical fiber load sensor based on a semi-auxetic structure: a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenato, Luca; Pasuto, Alessandro; Galtarossa, Andrea; Palmieri, Luca

    2016-05-01

    In this work a quasi-distributed optical fiber load sensor based on a semi-auxetic structure is presented. By concatenating sections with positive Poisson's ratio to sections with negative one it is possible to precisely encode the distributed load into a strain exerted on a fiber. The sensor is described and a simple proof of concept is built and tested. The fiber is interrogated by means of optical frequency domain reflectometry. The proposed sensor represents just one example of the potential applications of auxetic and semi-auxetic structures and materials in optical fiber sensors development.

  4. A novel Michelson Fabry-Perot hybrid interference sensor based on the micro-structured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaxun; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Zhihai; Wei, Yong; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Xinghua; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel Michelson Fabry-Perot hybrid fiber interference sensor. By integrating a Michelson interferometer in a two-core fiber and a Fabry-Perot interferometer in a micro silica-capillary, we produce the Michelson Fabry-Perot hybrid interference sensor. Owing to the structure characteristic of the micro-structured fiber, this hybrid fiber interference sensor can achieve the measurement of the axial strain and radial bending simultaneously. The measurement sensitivity of the axial train is 0.015 nm/με and the measurement sensitivity of the radial bending is 1.393 nm/m-1.

  5. Integrated hot-compressed water and laccase-mediator treatments of Eucalyptus grandis fibers: structural changes of fiber and lignin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Quan; Wen, Jia-Long; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-02-18

    Eucalyptus grandis fibers were treated with hot-compressed water (HCW) and laccase mediator to enhance the fiber characteristics and to produce an active lignin substrate for binderless fiberboard production. The composition, morphology, and crystallinity index (CrI) analysis of fibers showed that the HCW treatment increased the CrI and lignin content of the treated fibers through partial removal of hemicelluloses. Simultaneously, the HCW treatment produced some granules and holes on the surface of the fibers, which possibly facilitated the accessibility of the laccase mediator. Milled wood lignins and enzymatic hydrolysis lignins isolated from the control and treated fibers were comparatively characterized. A reduction of molecular weight was observed, which indicated that a preferential degradation of lignin occurred after exposure to the laccase mediator. Quantitative (13)C, 2D-HSQC and (31)P NMR characterization revealed that the integrated treatment resulted in the cleavage of β-O-4' linkages, removal of G' (oxidized α-ketone) substructures, and an increase in the S/G ratio and free phenolic hydroxyls.

  6. Fuzzy Fiber Sensors for Structural Composite Health Monitoring (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    submitted to Composite Science and Technology. 14. ABSTRACT Fibers used in composite materials can be coated with carbon nanotubes in a configuration...to provide a self-diagnosing function. Schulte’s group has reported that measuring changes in electrical resistance of carbon fiber reinforced...panels, 12″ × 12″, were fabricated with IM7/977-2 prepreg unidirectional carbon fiber tape. Three panels each were prepared with unidirectional [0]8 or

  7. Ectopic activity in cutaneous regenerating afferent nerve fibers following nerve lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Constantin, Cristina; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2003-11-01

    Spontaneous activity, and mechanical and thermal sensitivity were investigated in regenerating afferent nerve fibers within 4-21 days post sural nerve lesion (crush or transection and resuturing) in anaesthetized rats. About 33-40% of the myelinated (A) and 22-27% of the unmyelinated (C) fibers excited by electrical nerve stimulation exhibited at least one of these ectopic discharge properties. In total 177 A- and 169 C-fibers with ectopic activity were analysed. Most A-fibers (161/177) were mechanosensitive. Spontaneous activity (median 1 imp/s) was present in 23/177 and thermosensitivity in 14/177 A-fibers (13 of them being activated by heat stimuli). Almost all A-fibers (159/177) exhibited only one type of ectopic discharge property. Most C-fibers (94/169) were thermosensitive responding either to cold (n = 45) or to heat stimuli (n = 33) or to both (n = 16). Eighty-four of 169 C-fibers were spontaneously active (median 0.3 imp/s) and 75/169 C-fibers were mechanosensitive. Both the proportion and the discharge rate of spontaneously active C-fibers were significantly higher after crush than after section and resuturing of the nerve. About 60% of the C-fibers (101/169) had only one ectopic discharge property and 40% two or three. In conclusion, regenerating cutaneous afferent A- and C-fibers may develop mechano- and/or thermosensitivity as well as spontaneous activity. We suggest that spontaneous and evoked ectopic activity in regenerating cutaneous afferents are a function of the intrinsic functional properties of these neurons and of the interaction between the regenerating nerve fibers and non-neural cells during Wallerian degeneration in the nerve distal to the nerve lesion.

  8. Electrospun ceramic fibers: Composition, structure and the fate of precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, R. W.; Chowdury, A.; Bender, E. T.; Ramsier, R. D.; Rapp, J. L.; Espe, M. P.

    2008-06-01

    Fibers are electrospun from aluminum acetate/polymer mixtures and characterized by an array of techniques before and after annealing at 1200 °C. We demonstrate that sodium and boron present in the initial starting materials as adducts and stabilizers remain incorporated into the resulting fibers after annealing and pyrolysis of the host polymer. The influence of these minor constituents on the surfaces of the fibers is suggested by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data. The presence of these species may impact potential chemical applications of small diameter ceramic fibers, such as their use as catalytic supports or for chemical decomposition.

  9. Structural Evolution of Silicon Oxynitride Fiber Reinforced Boron Nitride Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunrong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Xie, Zhengfang; Shao, Changwei

    2016-02-01

    The structural evolution of a silicon oxynitride fiber reinforced boron nitride matrix (Si-N-Of/BN) wave-transparent composite at high temperatures was investigated. When heat treated at 1600 °C, the composite retained a favorable bending strength of 55.3 MPa while partially crystallizing to Si2N2O and h-BN from the as-received amorphous structure. The Si-N-O fibers still performed as effective reinforcements despite the presence of small pores due to fiber decomposition. Upon heat treatment at 1800 °C, the Si-N-O fibers already lost their reinforcing function and rough hollow microstructure formed within the fibers because of the accelerated decomposition. Further heating to 2000 °C led to the complete decomposition of the reinforcing fibers and only h-BN particles survived. The crystallization and decomposition behaviors of the composite at high temperatures are discussed.

  10. Hybrid encapsulation structures based on β-carotene-loaded nanoliposomes within electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Zômpero, Rafael Henrique; López-Rubio, Amparo; de Pinho, Samantha Cristina; Lagaron, José María; de la Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid encapsulation structures based on β-carotene-loaded nanoliposomes incorporated within the polymeric ultrathin fibers produced through electrospinning were developed to improve the photostability of the antioxidant. These novel materials were intended to incorporate β-carotene into water-based food formulations, overcoming the existing limitations associated with its hydrophobic character. Initially, both empty and antioxidant-loaded nanoliposomes were developed and incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions. The changes in the solution properties were evaluated to determine their effects on the electrospinning processing. The mixed polymer solutions were subsequently electrospun to produce hybrid nanoliposome-loaded ultrathin fibers. FTIR analysis confirmed the presence of phospholipid molecules inside the electrospun fibers. These ultrathin fibers were evaluated regarding their morphology, diameter, internal β-carotene distribution and stability against UV irradiation. Liposomal release studies from the electrospun fibers were also undertaken, confirming the presence of the liposomal structures after dissolving the electrospun fibers in water.

  11. Carbohydrate components and crystalline structure of organosolv hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) bast fibers pulp.

    PubMed

    Gümüşkaya, Esat; Usta, Mustafa; Balaban, Mualla

    2007-02-01

    Changes in carbohydrate components and crystalline structure of hemp bast fibers during organosolv pulping were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, FT-IR spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The reasons for defibrillation and beating problems with organosolv hemp bast fiber pulp were investigated with reference to these properties of pulp samples. Hemp bast fibers and organosolv pulp samples had low hemicellulose contents and high cellulose contents. It was found that the disorder parameter of cellulose in hemp bast fibers was very low, when crystalline cellulose ratio was high and the crystalline structure of cellulose in hemp bast fibers was very stable. These properties affected defibrillation and beating of organosolv hemp bast fibers pulp negatively.

  12. Distributed fiber optic sensors embedded in technical textiles for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebber, Katerina; Lenke, Philipp; Liehr, Sascha; Noether, Nils; Wendt, Mario; Wosniok, Aleksander

    2010-09-01

    Technical textiles with embedded distributed fiber optic sensors have been developed for the purposes of structural health monitoring in geotechnical and civil engineering. The distributed fiber optic sensors are based on Brillouin scattering in silica optical fibers and OTDR in polymer optical fibers. Such "smart" technical textiles can be used for reinforcement of geotechnical and masonry structures and the embedded fiber optic sensors can provide information about the condition of the structures and detect the presence of any damages and destructions in real time. Thus, structural health monitoring of critical geotechnical and civil infrastructures can be realized. The paper highlights the results achieved in this innovative field in the framework of several German and European projects.

  13. Highly sensitive bending sensor based on multimode-multimode-coreoffset fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yanhui; Ma, Lin; Sun, Jiang; Kang, Zexin; Bai, Yunlong; Jian, Shuisheng

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a simple fiber optic bending sensor based on the multimode-multimode structure combining with the core-offset fiber structure. The multimode-multimode structure is composed of no core fiber (NCF) with hundreds of micrometers in length as a micro-lens for mode conversion, and single mode fiber (SMF) which can be seen as a section of special multimode fiber (MMF) when considered the cladding modes. The transmission spectrum in the experiment agrees well with the numerical model. The sensitivity of the structure can be achieved as high as 11.104 nm/m-1 in the measuring range. Meanwhile, the sensitivity of the neighboring resonance wavelength around 1546 nm exhibits approximately the same sensitivity which is 10.579 nm/m-1. Besides, the strain sensitivity is about -0.927 pm/με within the measuring strain range.

  14. Biobased Nano Porous Active Carbon Fibers for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuxiang; Peng, Lele; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Guangjie; Chen, Jonathan Y; Yu, Guihua

    2016-06-22

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structure have been prepared from wood sawdust using the KOH activation method. A study was conducted to examine the influence of the activation parameters (temperature, alkali/carbon ratio, and time) on the morphology and structure of the as-prepared ACFs developed in the process of pore generation and evolution. Activation temperature was very essential for the formation of utramicropores (<0.6 nm), which greatly contributed to the electric double layer capacitance. The significance of metallic potassium vapor evolved when the temperature was above 800 °C, since the generation of 0.8- and 1.1 nm micropores cannot be ignored. When the the KOH/fiber ratio was increased and the activation time was prolonged, to some extent, the micropores were enlarged to small mesopores within 2-5 nm. The sample with the optimal condition exhibited the highest specific capacitance (225 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1)). Its ability to retain capacitance corresponding to 10 A g(-1) and 6 M KOH was 85.3%, demonstrating a good rate capability. With 10 000 charge-discharge cycles at 3 A g(-1), the supercapacitor kept 94.2% capacity, showing outstanding electrochemical performance as promising electrode material.

  15. Effects of forming conditions on structure, relaxation phenomena, and aging behaviors of glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Changqing

    DSC analysis and DRIFT spectroscopy were combined to study the effects of fiber forming conditions and fiber aging behaviors. An external pressure set-up was incorporated into the former fiber drawing system to manipulate the fiber diameter. Soda-aluminosilicate glass fibers of the same diameter were prepared with this system at the same temperature with various rates. Pre-Tg exotherm of the fibers increased first with drawing rate and decreased when the rate exceeded 8.0 m/s, presumably caused by the shear thinning effects. When the rate is greater than 8.0 m/s, a new structure-related band at 877 cm-1 appeared as a shoulder to the band at 850 cm-1. The band at 877 cm -1 remained intact during the annealing and aging processes, while the band at 850 cm-1 responded sensitively to these processes. Evidence was found for structural orientation in silicate fibers. Four endothermic peaks were found in the DSC curves of long-term aged fibers. The assignments for the peaks were provided. The aging behavior of glass fibers was found to be affected by both the glass composition and the fiber forming conditions.

  16. Fiber optical measurements of electrical activity in canine ventricular preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Amgad; Luther, Gisa E.; Enyeart, Michael; Gilmour, Robert F.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Luther, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is a cardiac arrhythmia that kills over 300,000 people every year in the US alone, yet efforts at finding a cure have been stymied by our incomplete information about patterns of electrical activity in the whole heart. As an excitable medium, the heart is a pattern forming system; but only a very limited subset of patterns is compatible with life. In particular, spiral waves have been associated with both tachycardia and VF, but their origin and spatial and temporal dynamics is not fully understood. We propose a novel measurement technique that combines optical mapping of the epicardial surface with data from intramural fiber optical probe arrays. The data obtained from the fiber optical probes is sparse in space but dense in time. The data processing is based on sequential data assimilation using an ensemble Kalman filter. The ensemble Kalman filter provides a numerically efficient (sub-) optimum state space estimate based on the available spatial and temporal observations. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated with numerical data and arterially perfused canine heart preparations.

  17. Novel electric double-layer capacitor with a coaxial fiber structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuli; Qiu, Longbin; Ren, Jing; Guan, Guozhen; Lin, Huijuan; Zhang, Zhitao; Chen, Peining; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-11-26

    A coaxial electric double-layer capacitor fiber is developed from the aligned carbon nanotube fiber and sheet, which functions as two electrodes with a polymer gel sandwiched between them. The unique coaxial structure enables a rapid transportation of ions between the two electrodes with a high electrochemical performance. These energy storage fibers are also flexible and stretchable, and can be woven into and widely used for electronic textiles.

  18. [Modification of activated carbon fiber for electro-Fenton degradation of phenol].

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Tian, Yao-Jin; Yang, Guang-Ping; Xie, Xin-Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Microwave-modified activated carbon fiber (ACF-1), nitric acid-modified activated carbon fiber (ACF-2), phosphoric acid-modified activated carbon fiber (ACF-3) and ammonia-modified activated carbon fiber (ACF-4) were successfully fabricated. The electro-Fenton catalytic activities of modified activated carbon fiber were evaluated using phenol as a model pollutant. H2O2 formation, COD removal efficiency and phenol removal efficiency were investigated compared with the unmodified activated carbon fiber (ACF-0). Results indicated that ACF-1 showed the best adsorption and electrocatalytic activity. Modification was in favor of the formation of H2O2. The performance of different systems on phenol degradation and COD removal were ACF-1 > ACF-3 > ACF-4 > ACF-2 > ACF-0 and ACF-1 > ACF-4 > ACF-3 > ACF-2 > ACF-0, respectively, which confirmed that electrocatalytic activities of modified activated carbon fiber were better than the unmodified. In addition, phenol intermediates were not the same while using different modified activated carbon fibers.

  19. Self-centering fiber alignment structures for high-precision field installable single-mode fiber connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Vervaeke, Michael; Berghmans, Francis; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    There is a steady increase in the demand for internet bandwidth, primarily driven by cloud services and high-definition video streaming. Europe's Digital Agenda states the ambitious objective that by 2020 all Europeans should have access to internet at speeds of 30Mb/s or above, with 50% or more of households subscribing to connections of 100Mb/s. Today however, internet access in Europe is mainly based on the first generation of broadband, meaning internet accessed over legacy telephone copper and TV cable networks. In recent years, Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH) networks have been adopted as a replacement of traditional electrical connections for the `last mile' transmission of information at bandwidths over 1Gb/s. However, FTTH penetration is still very low (< 5%) in most major Western economies. The main reason for this is the high deployment cost of FTTH networks. Indeed, the success and adoption of optical access networks critically depend on the quality and reliability of connections between optical fibers. In particular a further reduction of insertion loss of field- installable connectors must be achieved without a significant increase in component cost. This requires precise alignment of fibers that can differ in terms of ellipticity, eccentricity or diameter and seems hardly achievable using today's widespread ferrule-based alignment systems. In this paper, we present a field-installable connector based on deflectable/compressible spring structures, providing a self-centering functionality for the fiber. This way, it can accommodate for possible fiber cladding diameter variations (the tolerance on the cladding diameter of G.652 fiber is typically +/-0.7μm). The mechanical properties of the cantilever are derived through an analytical approximation and a mathematical model of the spring constant, and finite element-based simulations are carried out to find the maximum first principal stress as well as the stress distribution distribution in the fiber alignment

  20. Fiber Optics Deliver Real-Time Structural Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    To alter the shape of aircraft wings during flight, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center worked on a fiber optic sensor system with Austin-based 4DSP LLC. The company has since commercialized a new fiber optic system for monitoring applications in health and medicine, oil and gas, and transportation, increasing company revenues by 60 percent.

  1. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  2. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  3. Adaptive control of radiated noise from a cylindrical shell using active fiber composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddu, Gregory; McDowell, Donald; Bingham, Brian S.

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the application of Active Fiber Composite (AFC) actuators, a hybrid piezoelectric device, to the reduction of acoustic radiation from a cylindrical shell by active control methods. AFCs were developed to provide a mechanically robust method for large-area, orthotropic actuation and sensing in active structures. The actuation layer is formed by small diameter piezoelectric fibers that are unidirectionally aligned and imbedded in a resin matrix system. By the nature of its structure, an AFC actuator allows use of the primary piezoelectric effect in the plane of the composite. A cylindrical shell testbed is used for this experiment due to the predominance of this structure, and the resulting general interest, within the field of underwater acoustics. To control acoustic radiation from the cylindrical shell, the AFC actuators, placed at optimal locations determined using numerical models, are used to generate a strain field that counteracts the strain associated with acoustically efficient shell motions. Using an end-mounted accelerometer as the error measurement, an adaptive LMS algorithm is used to minimize the error signal in real-time. Experimental are supplied to validate both the device and the methodology in a complex, real-world environment.

  4. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure.

  5. Nanoimprint of a 3D structure on an optical fiber for light wavefront manipulation.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Koshelev, Alexander; Allen, Frances I; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Wong, Edward; Lum, Paul; Munechika, Keiko; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-09-16

    Integration of complex photonic structures onto optical fiber facets enables powerful platforms with unprecedented optical functionalities. Conventional nanofabrication technologies, however, do not permit viable integration of complex photonic devices onto optical fibers owing to their low throughput and high cost. In this paper we report the fabrication of a three-dimensional structure achieved by direct nanoimprint lithography on the facet of an optical fiber. Nanoimprint processes and tools were specifically developed to enable a high lithographic accuracy and coaxial alignment of the optical device with respect to the fiber core. To demonstrate the capability of this new approach, a 3D beam splitter has been designed, imprinted and optically characterized. Scanning electron microscopy and optical measurements confirmed the good lithographic capabilities of the proposed approach as well as the desired optical performance of the imprinted structure. The inexpensive solution presented here should enable advancements in areas such as integrated optics and sensing, achieving enhanced portability and versatility of fiber optic components.

  6. Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure Using Optical Fiber Sensing Technology: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X. W.; Su, Y. H.; Han, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  7. Nanoimprint of a 3D structure on an optical fiber for light wavefront manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Koshelev, Alexander; Allen, Frances I.; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Wong, Edward; Lum, Paul; Munechika, Keiko; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Integration of complex photonic structures onto optical fiber facets enables powerful platforms with unprecedented optical functionalities. Conventional nanofabrication technologies, however, do not permit viable integration of complex photonic devices onto optical fibers owing to their low throughput and high cost. In this paper we report the fabrication of a three-dimensional structure achieved by direct nanoimprint lithography on the facet of an optical fiber. Nanoimprint processes and tools were specifically developed to enable a high lithographic accuracy and coaxial alignment of the optical device with respect to the fiber core. To demonstrate the capability of this new approach, a 3D beam splitter has been designed, imprinted and optically characterized. Scanning electron microscopy and optical measurements confirmed the good lithographic capabilities of the proposed approach as well as the desired optical performance of the imprinted structure. The inexpensive solution presented here should enable advancements in areas such as integrated optics and sensing, achieving enhanced portability and versatility of fiber optic components.

  8. Structural response of a fiber composite compressor fan blade airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was performed to determine the structural response of a fiber composite airfoil typical of those encountered in high-tip speed compressor fan blades when subjected to load conditions anticipated in such applications. The analysis method consisted of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, and centrifugal. Root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions were investigated. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. The core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design and is sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for the analysis, and to provide quantitative data associated with the various responses which can be helpful in designing composite blades.

  9. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konka, Hari P.; Wahab, M. A.; Lian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension-tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT sensors

  10. Structural, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of electrospun poly(lactic acid)/polyaniline blend fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conducting electrospun fiber mats based on PLA and PAni blends were obtained with average diameter values between 87 and 1,006 nm with PAni quantities from 0 to 5.6 wt.-%. Structural characteristics of fiber mats were compared to cast films with the same amount of PAni and studied by SEM, SAXS, and ...

  11. Structure-properties relation for random networks of fibers with noncircular cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deogekar, S.; Picu, R. C.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of three-dimensional cross-linked random fiber networks composed from fibers of noncircular cross section characterized by two principal moments of inertia is studied in this work. Such fibers store energy in the axial deformation mode and two bending modes of unequal stiffness. We show that the torsional stiffness of fibers becomes important as it determines the relative contribution of the two bending modes to the overall deformation. The scaling of the small strain modulus with the network parameters is established. The large strain deformation of these structures is less sensitive to the shape of the cross section.

  12. Strict dual-mode large-mode-area fiber with multicore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wenxing; Ren, Guobin; Jian, Wei; Jiang, Youchao; Wu, Yue; Yang, Yuguang; Shen, Ya; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new kind of quasi-37-cores fiber structure consisting of 15 conventional cores and 22 air-hole cores. Strict dual-mode condition is systematically analyzed about three structure parameters, core-to-core pitch, relative core diameter, and difference of refractive index between core and cladding. Large effective area about 1910.98 μm2 with low bending loss less than 10-3 dB / m is achieved while keeping strict dual-mode. This structured fiber has a great potential in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

  13. Dual-truncated-cone structure for quasi-distributed multichannel fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihai; Zhu, Zongda; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Yong; Wang, Yushan; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Xinghua; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-09-15

    We propose and demonstrate an effective method to adjust the dynamic range of a fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor by introducing a multimode fiber-sensing probe with a dual-truncated-cone (DTC) structure. When the grind angle of the DTC structure increases, the dynamic range redshifts. Based on this result, we fabricate a quasi-distributed two-channel multimode fiber SPR sensor by cascaded-connecting a DTC-sensing probe of 14° grind angle and a traditional transmitted multimode fiber (TMF)-sensing probe in the same fiber. The corresponding sensitivities of two sensing probes are 3423.08 nm/RIU and 2288.46 nm/RIU. By using this quasi-distributed multichannel fiber SPR-sensing approach, we may improve the detecting accuracy by extracting, calibrating, and compensating for the signals caused by the nonspecific bindings, other physical absorptions, and temperature changes in detecting samples, truly achieving dynamic detection in real-time. The excellence of this multichannel fiber SPR sensor is that the sensitivity of each subchannel-sensing probe stays unreduced after it is cascaded-connected in the main-channel fiber; the sensor is based on the multimode fiber, which is inexpensive, accessible, and convenient to be universalized in applications.

  14. Numerical simulation of fibrous biomaterials with randomly distributed fiber network structure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Stanciulescu, Ilinca

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a computational framework to simulate the mechanical behavior of fibrous biomaterials with randomly distributed fiber networks. A random walk algorithm is implemented to generate the synthetic fiber network in 2D used in simulations. The embedded fiber approach is then adopted to model the fibers as embedded truss elements in the ground matrix, which is essentially equivalent to the affine fiber kinematics. The fiber-matrix interaction is partially considered in the sense that the two material components deform together, but no relative movement is considered. A variational approach is carried out to derive the element residual and stiffness matrices for finite element method (FEM), in which material and geometric nonlinearities are both included. Using a data structure proposed to record the network geometric information, the fiber network is directly incorporated into the FEM simulation without significantly increasing the computational cost. A mesh sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the influence of mesh size on various simulation results. The proposed method can be easily combined with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to include the influence of the stochastic nature of the network and capture the material behavior in an average sense. The computational framework proposed in this work goes midway between homogenizing the fiber network into the surrounding matrix and accounting for the fully coupled fiber-matrix interaction at the segment length scale, and can be used to study the connection between the microscopic structure and the macro-mechanical behavior of fibrous biomaterials with a reasonable computational cost.

  15. Active fibers from sol-gel derived granulated silica: state of the art and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Valerio; Sandoz, Frederic

    2010-10-01

    In the recent past we have studied the granulated silica method as a versatile and cost effective way of fiber preform production. We have used the sol-gel technology combined with a laser-assisted remelting step to produce high homogeneity Rare Earth or Transition Metal - activated microsized particles for the fiber core. For the fiber cladding pure or index-raised granulated Silica has been employed. Silica glass tubes, appropriately filled with these granular materials, are then drawn to fibers, eventually after an optional quality enhancing vitrification step. The process offers a high degree of compositional flexibility with respect to dopants; it further facilitates to achieve high concentrations even in cases when several dopants are used. By this "rapid preform production" technique, that is also ideally suited for the preparation of microstructured optical fibers, several fibers ranging from broadband emitters, PCFs and large mode area fibers have been produced and will be presented here.

  16. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships.

  17. Structure of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber receptor-binding tip

    PubMed Central

    Bartual, Sergio G.; Otero, José M.; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Kahn, Richard; Fox, Gavin C.; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most numerous organisms in the biosphere. In spite of their biological significance and the spectrum of potential applications, little high-resolution structural detail is available on their receptor-binding fibers. Here we present the crystal structure of the receptor-binding tip of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber, which is highly homologous to the tip of the bacteriophage lambda side tail fibers. This structure reveals an unusual elongated six-stranded antiparallel beta-strand needle domain containing seven iron ions coordinated by histidine residues arranged colinearly along the core of the biological unit. At the end of the tip, the three chains intertwine forming a broader head domain, which contains the putative receptor interaction site. The structure reveals a previously unknown beta-structured fibrous fold, provides insights into the remarkable stability of the fiber, and suggests a framework for mutations to expand or modulate receptor-binding specificity. PMID:21041684

  18. Active fiber polymer cladding temperature measurement under conditions of laser generation and amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sypin, V. E.; Prusakov, K. Y.; Ryabushkin, O. A.

    2016-04-01

    Polymer cladding temperature of active fiber in lasing regime is important parameter as it allows determination of fiber core temperature that in turn effects laser generation and amplification efficiency. Besides polymer cladding has much lower temperature damage threshold comparing to fused silica. For example, 200 degrees Kelvin overheating of the polymer cladding can result in fiber degradation. In present paper we introduce novel and simple method for precise temperature measurement of active fibers cladding under conditions of laser generation and amplification. Dependence of longitudinal temperature distribution along active fibers on optical pump power can be determined. This method employs measurement of temperature dependent electrical resistance of the metal wire being in thermal contact with fiber polymer cladding. The wire is reeled on the active fiber segment. Under lasing or amplification conditions the polymer cladding of the active fiber is heated together with coiled metal wire resulting in its electrical resistance change. By measuring resistance variation one can determine the temperature of the given fiber section.

  19. COMPRESSION MOLDED, BIO-FIBER REINFORCED, HIGH PERFORMANCE THERMOSET COMPOSITES FOR STRUCTURAL AND SEMI-STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-09-15

    Major goals for the future of transportation materials include reduced weight of components, reduced cost of materials and increased use of renewable content. Reinforcement of transportation composites with plant fibers has the potential to decrease component weight relative to glass fiber reinforcement, reduce cost of materials relative to carbon fiber reinforcement, and significantly increase the fraction of composite components from a renewable source. Barriers to widespread application of natural fiber reinforced components in structural and semi-structural vehicle applications have included the natural propensity of these materials to uptake moisture and the corresponding loss of mechanical properties with exposure to moisture. Through novel advances in fiber treatment, processing and molding to address moisture absorption and resin interfacing, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is reducing these barriers. Herein we demonstrate natural fiber reinforced composites that are 1) composed of more than 50wt% renewable content, 2) weigh 17% less than glass fiber composites with the same fiber volume, and 3) exhibit wet mechanical properties suitable for semi-structural application. Lower cost, lower energy in production, and reduced greenhouse gas production are anticipated advantages of the described PNNL technologies.

  20. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  1. Embeddable fiber optic strain sensor for structural monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amardeep; Nagarajan, Sriram; Anandan, Sudharshan; Yuan, Lei; Chandrashekhara, K.; Watkins, Steve E.; Xiao, Hai; Phan, Nam

    2013-04-01

    An extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) fiber optic sensor is presented for measurement of strain at high ambient temperatures. The sensor is fabricated using a femto-second (fs) laser. The EFPI sensor is fabricated by micromachining a cavity on the tip of a standard single-mode fiber and is then self-enclosed by fusion splicing another piece of singlemode fiber. The fs-laser based fabrication makes the sensor thermally stable to sustain temperatures as high as 800 °C. The sensor is relatively insensitive towards the temperature as compared to its response towards the applied strain. The sensor can be embedded in Carbon fiber/Bismaleimide (BMI) composite laminates for strain monitoring at high ambient temperatures.

  2. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  3. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  4. Connexin 50 Regulates Surface Ball-and-Socket Structures and Fiber Cell Organization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eddie; Geng, Andrew; Maniar, Ankur M.; Mui, Byron W. H.; Gong, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The roles of gap junction protein connexin 50 (Cx50) encoded by Gja8, during lens development are not fully understood. Connexin 50 knockout (KO) lenses have decreased proliferation of epithelial cells and altered fiber cell denucleation. We further investigated the mechanism for cellular defects in Cx50 KO (Gja8−/−) lenses. Methods Fiber cell morphology and subcellular distribution of various lens membrane/cytoskeleton proteins from wild-type and Cx50 KO mice were visualized by immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. Results We observed multiple morphological defects in the cortical fibers of Cx50 KO lenses, including abnormal fiber cell packing geometry, decreased F-actin enrichment at tricellular vertices, and disrupted ball-and-socket (BS) structures on the long sides of hexagonal fibers. Moreover, only small gap junction plaques consisting of Cx46 (α3 connexin) were detected in cortical fibers and the distributions of the BS-associated beta-dystroglycan and ZO-1 proteins were altered. Conclusions Connexin 50 gap junctions are important for BS structure maturation and cortical fiber cell organization. Connexin 50–based gap junction plaques likely form structural domains with an array of membrane/cytoskeletal proteins to stabilize BS. Loss of Cx50-mediated coupling, BS disruption, and altered F-actin in Cx50 KO fibers, thereby contribute to the small lens and mild cataract phenotypes. PMID:27281269

  5. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  6. The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions isolated from adult bovine and calf lenses were studied using combined electron microscopy, immunolocalization with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-MIP and anti-MP70 (two putative gap junction-forming proteins), and freeze-fracture and label-fracture methods. The major intrinsic protein of lens plasma membranes (MIP) was localized in single membranes and in an extensive network of junctions having flat and undulating surface topologies. In wavy junctions, polyclonal and monoclonal anti-MIPs labeled only the cytoplasmic surface of the convex membrane of the junction. Label-fracture experiments demonstrated that the convex membrane contained MIP arranged in tetragonal arrays 6-7 nm in unit cell dimension. The apposing concave membrane of the junction displayed fracture faces without intramembrane particles or pits. Therefore, wavy junctions are asymmetric structures composed of MIP crystals abutted against particle-free membranes. In thin junctions, anti-MIP labeled the cytoplasmic surfaces of both apposing membranes with varying degrees of asymmetry. In thin junctions, MIP was found organized in both small clusters and single membranes. These small clusters also abut against particle-free apposing membranes, probably in a staggered or checkerboard pattern. Thus, the structure of thin and wavy junctions differed only in the extent of crystallization of MIP, a property that can explain why this protein can produce two different antibody-labeling patterns. A conclusion of this study is that wavy and thin junctions do not contain coaxially aligned channels, and, in these junctions, MIP is unlikely to form gap junction-like channels. We suggest MIP may behave as an intercellular adhesion protein which can also act as a volume-regulating channel to collapse the lens extracellular space. Junctions constructed of MP70 have a wider overall thickness (18-20 nm) and are abundant in the cortical regions

  7. Composites based on cellulose fiber nonwovens and a water soluble polymer 1. Structure and strength-deformation characteristics of cellulose fiber nonwovens and structural characteristics of the composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerpakovska, D.; Kalnins, M.

    2012-03-01

    The results of a study on the strength-deformation characteristics (tensile elastic modulus, ultimate strength, elongation at break, and punching and tearing strengths) of two kinds of cellulose fiber nonwovens (CFNs) with dissimilar void content and different geometrical parameters of cellulose fibers are discussed. The structural characteristics of composites prepared by impregnation with poly(vinyl alcohol) water solutions are analyzed, too. Composites with volume fractions of polymer up to 0.4% and volume fractions of voids up to 0.3% were prepared. Filling of voids by the polymer occurred without significant changes in the structure of CFNs. The fraction of closed voids increased with polymer content.

  8. High capacitive performance of hollow activated carbon fibers derived from willow catkins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Song, Yan; Yan, Rui; Zhao, Ning; Tian, Xiaodong; Li, Xiao; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Zhanjun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we prepared three different kinds of hollow activated carbon fibers (HACFs) from willow catkins (WCs), phenolic- and pitch-based hollow fibers, respectively. The morphology, pore structure, surface chemical composition and electrochemical properties of these hollow fibers were studied in parallel. Due to its high-hollow, cost-effective as well as eco-friendly nature, HACFs derived from WCs can be served as excellent electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage devices. Electrochemical measurements illustrate that the WCs derived HACFs exhibit not only high specific capacitance of 333 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 but also considerable rate capability with a retention of 62.7% (209 F g-1 at 10 A g-1). Symmetric supercapacitor devices that using WCs derived HACFs as electrodes deliver a maximum energy density of ∼8.8 Wh kg-1 at power density of 50 W kg-1 and good cycling performance with 95.5% retention over 3000 cycles at 5 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolytes.

  9. Integration of active fiber composite (AFC) sensors/actuators into glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, Mark M.; Kornmann, Xavier; Huber, Christian; Brunner, Andreas J.; Barbezat, Michel

    2005-05-01

    In the current study Active Fiber Composites (AFC) utilizing Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) fibers with Kapton screen printed interdigitated electrodes (IDE) were integrated into orthotropic glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates to investigate integration issues associated with smart structures and host laminate integrity. To aid in this goal surrogate or "Dummy" AFC (DAFC) were designed using a GFRP core and Kapton outer layers to match the longitudinal mechanical and interface properties of the AFC. These DAFC were used in place of real AFC to expedite test specimen manufacture and evaluation. This allowed efficient investigation of the impact of an integrated AFC-like inclusion on laminate mechanical integrity. Two integration techniques, cutout and simple insertion were investigated using DAFC, with little difference seen between the integrity of laminates prepared using these two methods. Using this testing scheme the influence of device placement in relation to position extending away from the laminate symmetric axis was found to have an effect on laminate integrity in tensile loading. As the DAFC were placed far from the laminate symmetry axis, the ultimate tensile strength and strain of the laminates decreased in a linear manner while the Young's modulus of the laminates remained constant. Similar trends were observed with integrated AFC specimens. The performance of integrated AFC was characterized using monotonic cyclic tensile loading with increasing strain levels. A transition region was observed between strains of 0.05%-0.50%, with a dramatic decrease in AFC sensitivity from a maximum to minimum value.

  10. Integration and reliability of active fiber composite (AFC) sensors/actuators in carbon/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, Mark M.; Belloli, Alberto; Ermanni, Paolo; Barbezat, Michel

    2006-03-01

    In the current study Active Fiber Composites (AFC) utilizing Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) fibers with Kapton (R) screen printed interdigitated electrodes (IDE) were integrated into carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates to investigate integration issues associated with smart structures and host laminate integrity. To aid in this goal surrogate or "dummy" AFC (DAFC) using a composite core and Kapton (R) outer layers (to match the longitudinal mechanical and interface properties of the AFC) were employed. These DAFC were used in place of real AFC to expedite test specimen manufacture and evaluation. This allowed efficient investigation of the impact of an integrated AFC-like inclusion on laminate mechanical integrity. Laminates with integrated AFC were additionally tested with signal monitoring to assess AFC health during the test. Investigation into laminate failure was accomplished via a finite element model of the system which was created in ANSYS to investigate failure in the composite plies. Tsai-Wu failure criterion was calculated to investigate laminate failure characteristics. Integration of AFC into CFRP laminates degraded laminate strength by 13.3% using insertion integration and 7.8% using the interlacing integration technique. The finite element model showed that interlacing integration enabled distribution of critical forces over the entire laminate while insertion integration led to critical forces concentrating over the integration region.

  11. Instrumentation by distributed optical fiber sensors of a new ballastless track structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Gueguen, Ivan; Cailliau, Joël

    2013-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. With its service life of at least 60 years, they require little maintenance and hence they offer great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. A new ballastless track structure has been designed to be circulated up to 300km/h, with a target life of 100 years. It is an interoperable way on concrete slabs that are cast-in-place and slip formed. This structure has been built and tested at the scale one in our laboratory. Indeed, ten millions cyclic loads were applied at 2.5Hz to evaluate the fatigue behaviour under selected mechanical and thermal conditions. To monitor the thermo-mechanical behavior of this new structure and to verify the numerical simulations used for its design, a lot of sensors have been embedded. In particularly, we have tested an optical fiber as distributed sensors to measure strain distribution in the railway model. This sensor can also be used to detect, localize and monitor cracks in concrete slabs. The optical fiber sensing technique ("Rayleigh technique") used in this experimentation has a centimetric spatial resolution which allows to measure complex strain profiles unlike electrical strain gauges which only give local information. Firstly, optical cables used as sensors have been successfully embedded and attached to the reinforcing steel bars in the structure. We have noted that they are resistant enough to resist concrete pouring and working activities. Secondly, strains measured by conventional strain gauges has confirmed the quality of the strain profiles measurements obtained by optical fiber sensors. Moreover, we have found a good agreement between experimental profiles measurements and those obtained by numerical simulations. Early

  12. Damage evaluation and analysis of composite pressure vessels using fiber Bragg gratings to determine structural health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortyl, Nicholas E.

    2005-11-01

    The application of MEMS and nanotechnology (MNT) to the field of structural health monitoring (SHM) is a fairly recent development. The recent change in this focus for MNT has been driven by the need to expand the applications for much of the technologies that were developed in the late 1990s. In addition, many companies desire to expand beyond their target high volume market segments of automotive, wireless communications, and computer peripherals, since these market segments were not as lucrative as first predicted. Most of the aerospace structural health monitoring developmental activity has been sponsored by agencies of the U.S. Government, which serves to pace the examination of these newer technologies to some degree. With that said, efforts are underway by companies such as Acellent Technologies and Blue Road Research to explore various MNT structural health monitoring approaches. The MNT under test include embedded piezoelectric sensors, MEMS accelerometers, time domain region sensors, and topical and embedded single and multi-axis fiber optic Bragg grating sensors. The promise of MNT for the SHM market segment is very enticing. The many wireless communication developments and miniaturization developments of the past five years is very attractive to the SHM community, especially those that are able to reduce the cost and complexity of integration. The main challenge for the community is one of selective integration. That is, certain pieces may be appropriate for SHM systems and certain pieces may not be. The better companies will chose wisely and put forth an approach that can be seamlessly integrated into the larger structure. For over a decade, Blue Road Research has been developing technologies aimed at structural health monitoring of both composite and non-composite parts, through the use of single and multiaxis fiber optic Bragg grating sensors. These sensors are 80 to 120 microns in diameter making them smaller than the diameter of a human hair

  13. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon fiber (ACF) from cotton woven waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jieying Zheng; Zhao, Quanlin; Ye, Zhengfang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared using cotton woven waste as precursor. The cotton woven waste was first partly dissolved by 80% phosphoric acid and then was pre-soaked in 7.5% diammonium hydrogen phosphate solution. Finally, carbonization and activation were proceeded to get ACF. The optimum preparation conditions, including carbonization temperature, carbonization time, activation temperature and activation time, were chosen by orthogonal design. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption test was conducted to characterize the prepared ACF's pore structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) were employed to characterize its chemical properties and morphology. Adsorption of oilfield wastewater was used to evaluate its adsorption properties. The results show that the prepared ACF is in the form of fiber, with the sectional diameters of 11.7 × 2.6 μm and the surface area of 789 m2/g. XPS results show that carbon concentration of the prepared ACF is higher than that of the commercial ACF. When the prepared ACF dosage is 6 g/L, over 80% of COD and over 70% of chrominance can be removed after 24 h of adsorption at 18 °C.

  14. Energy storage on ultrahigh surface area activated carbon fibers derived from PMIA.

    PubMed

    Castro-Muñiz, Alberto; Suárez-García, Fabián; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D; Kyotani, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    High-performance carbon materials for energy storage applications have been obtained by using poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide), PMIA, as a precursor through the chemical activation of the carbonized aramid fiber by using KOH. The yield of the process of activation was remarkably high (25-40 wt%), resulting in activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with ultrahigh surface areas, over 3000 m(2) g(-1) , and pore volumes exceeding 1.50 cm(3) g(-1) , keeping intact the fibrous morphology. The porous structure and the surface chemical properties could easily be controlled through the conditions of activation. The PMIA-derived ACFs were tested in two types of energy storage applications. At -196 °C and 1 bar, H2 uptake values of approximately 3 t% were obtained, which, in combination with the textural properties, rendered it a good candidate for H2 adsorption at high pressure and temperature. The performance of the ACFs as electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors was also investigated. Specific capacitance values between 297 and 531 g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) were obtained in aqueous electrolyte (1 H2 SO4 ), showing different behaviors depending on the surface chemical properties.

  15. Air-structured optical fiber drawn from a 3D-printed preform.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin; Canning, John; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Reid, Zane; Hossain, Md Arafat; Comatti, Jade-Edouard; Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2015-09-01

    A structured optical fiber is drawn from a 3D-printed structured preform. Preforms containing a single ring of holes around the core are fabricated using filament made from a modified butadiene polymer. More broadly, 3D printers capable of processing soft glasses, silica, and other materials are likely to come on line in the not-so-distant future. 3D printing of optical preforms signals a new milestone in optical fiber manufacture.

  16. State-of-Practice on the Dynamic Response of Structures Strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRPs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    ER D C/ G SL S R- 15 -2 State-of-Practice on the Dynamic Response of Structures Strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) G...Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) Robert D. Moser, C. Kennan Crane, Brian H. Green Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and...unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 ERDC/GSL SR-15-2 ii Abstract Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) are

  17. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  18. Active or passive fiber-chip-alignment: approaches to efficient solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Schröder, Henning; Jordan, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    High precision approaches for active and passive alignment and assembly on optoelectronic micro benches have been realized at Fraunhofer IZM for various material systems and different scales. The alignment and reliable mounting of optical subcomponents such as semiconductor laser and photo diodes, micro lenses and micro prisms require far higher mounting and alignment accuracies than for micro-electronic parts. When connecting from silicon photonics chip level to single mode optical fibers, even higher precisions are called for (typically < 100 nm). Alignment and assembly commonly are performed on specialized lab equipment which needs manual operation, consuming a lot of time, with less possibilities for automation. To introduce a higher degree of automatized production, like it has become standard in large volume electronics, one can choose either active or passive alignment processes - or possibly a combination of both. In this article we will present examples of micro-optic benches and optical interconnections that include alignment structures for passive alignment - where the accuracy lies in the components to be assembled, and mounting takes place on a less accurate machine ("fit into place"). But there is also a lot of progress on optical "pick, measure and place" machines that realize a flexible and fully automated active alignment using vision systems and activated components of less cost, with machine and process robustness for usability in industrial environments. As connecting elements, passive optical components like optical fibers are commonly used. These fragile and flexible elements pose additional challenges in secure picking, placing and fixing, at long lengths vs. small diameters. A very recent and specific approach to use more robust plastic optical fibers (POF) for very short and cost effective optical interconnects by means of wire bonding machines will be presented.

  19. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  20. New Fiber Reinforced Waterless Concrete for Extraterrestrial Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H.; Tucker, D.; Ethridge, E.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction mate: iii an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water For the purpose of this paper it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, brick and beam elements. Glass fibers produced from regolith were used as a reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of the sulfur concrete. Glass fibers and glass rebar were produced by melting the lunar regolith simulant. Lunar regolith stimulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline 46100 high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600G. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The viability of sulfur concrete as a construction material for extraterrestrial application is presented. The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced sulfur concrete were investigated.

  1. Determination of pressure drop across activated carbon fiber respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) is considered as an alternative adsorbent to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the development of thinner, lighter, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area and adsorption capacities, thinner critical bed depth, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to measure the pressure drop across different types of commercially available ACFs in respirator cartridges to determine the ACF composition and density that will result in acceptably breathable respirators. Seven ACF types in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were tested. ACFs in cartridges were challenged with pre-conditioned constant air flow (43 LPM, 23°C, 50% RH) at different compositions (single- or combination-ACF type) in a test chamber. Pressure drop across ACF cartridges were obtained using a micromanometer, and compared among different cartridge configurations, to those of the GAC cartridge, and to the NIOSH breathing resistance requirements for respirator cartridges. Single-ACF type cartridges filled with any ACFF had pressure drop measurements (23.71-39.93 mmH2O) within the NIOSH inhalation resistance requirement of 40 mmH2O, while those of the ACFC cartridges (85.47±3.67 mmH2O) exceeded twice the limit due possibly to the denser weaving of ACFC fibers. All single ACFF-type cartridges had higher pressure drop compared to the GAC cartridge (23.13±1.14 mmH2O). Certain ACF combinations (2 ACFF or ACFC/ACFF types) resulted to pressure drop (26.39-32.81 mmH2O) below the NIOSH limit. All single-ACFF type and all combination-ACF type cartridges with acceptable pressure drop had much lower adsorbent weights than GAC (≤15.2% of GAC weight), showing potential for light-weight respirator cartridges. 100% ACFC in cartridges may result to respirators with high breathing resistance and, thus, is not recommended. The more dense ACFF and ACFC types may still be possibly used in respirators by combining them with less dense ACFF materials and/or by

  2. Investigation of load effect on macro-bend losses for an SMS fiber structure with a small bend radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmah, Fitri; Sekartedjo, Sekartedjo; Hatta, Agus Muhamad

    2016-11-01

    Modelling of load effect on macro-bend losses for a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure with small bend radius is presented. Load effect on macro-bend losses for the SMS fiber structure placed between two high-density polyethylene (HDPE) boards are investigated theoretically and experimentally. A model on macro-bend losses for SMS fiber structure is constructed by using the light transmission formula in a straight SMS fiber structure and taking into account the effective number of guided modes due to the macrobending. In the experimental, a mandrel with a diameter of 0.8 mm is used to induce the bend. When the loads are applied on the system, the mandrel will affect the bend losses for the SMS fiber structure. It is shown numerically and experimentally that the bend-loss of SMS fiber structure strongly depends on the applied loads and the multimode fiber (MMF) lengths.

  3. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  4. Quantitative analysis of axonal fiber activation evoked by deep brain stimulation via activation density heat maps

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christian J.; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Lujan, J. Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cortical modulation is likely to be involved in the various therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, it is currently difficult to predict the changes of cortical modulation during clinical adjustment of DBS. Therefore, we present a novel quantitative approach to estimate anatomical regions of DBS-evoked cortical modulation. Methods: Four different models of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS were created to represent variable electrode placements (model I: dorsal border of the posterolateral STN; model II: central posterolateral STN; model III: central anteromedial STN; model IV: dorsal border of the anteromedial STN). Axonal fibers of passage near each electrode location were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography and modeled using multi-compartment cable models. Stimulation-evoked activation of local axon fibers and corresponding cortical projections were modeled and quantified. Results: Stimulation at the border of the STN (models I and IV) led to a higher degree of fiber activation and associated cortical modulation than stimulation deeply inside the STN (models II and III). A posterolateral target (models I and II) was highly connected to cortical areas representing motor function. Additionally, model I was also associated with strong activation of fibers projecting to the cerebellum. Finally, models III and IV showed a dorsoventral difference of preferentially targeted prefrontal areas (models III: middle frontal gyrus; model IV: inferior frontal gyrus). Discussion: The method described herein allows characterization of cortical modulation across different electrode placements and stimulation parameters. Furthermore, knowledge of anatomical distribution of stimulation-evoked activation targeting cortical regions may help predict efficacy and potential side effects, and therefore can be used to improve the therapeutic effectiveness of individual adjustments in DBS patients. PMID:25713510

  5. Pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat epiglottis and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Suzuki, Yujiro; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ishida, Hiroko; Oikawa, Miho; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2011-12-20

    The distribution of pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive (PACAP-IR) nerve fibers was studied in the rat epiglottis and pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the mucous epithelium, and occasionally penetrated the epithelium. These nerve fibers were abundant on the laryngeal side of the epiglottis and in the dorsal and lateral border region between naso-oral and laryngeal parts of the pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were also detected in taste buds within the epiglottis and pharynx. In addition, many PACAP-IR nerve fibers were found around acinar cells and blood vessels. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that distribution of PACAP-IR nerve fibers was similar to that in CGRP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud. However, distributions of PACAP-IR and CGRP-IR nerve fibers innervating mucous glands and blood vessels were different. The retrograde tracing method also demonstrated that PACAP and CGRP were co-expressed by vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons innervating the pharynx. These findings suggest that PACAP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud of the epiglottis and pharynx which originate from the vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory ganglia include nociceptors and chemoreceptors. The origin of PACAP-IR nerve fibers which innervate mucous glands and blood vessels may be the autonomic ganglion.

  6. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  7. Structure-property-processing relationships in Kevlar fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Molecular simulations are carried out to elucidate the differences in the properties of the commercial fibers Kevlar 29, Kevlar 49 and Kevlar 149, which are manufactured under different processing conditions, and are composed of poly(p-phenylene teraphthalamide) (PPTA). In going from Kevlar 29 to Kevlar 49 to Kevlar 149, the axial Young`s modulus increases significantly and the torsion modulus decreases significantly, while the compressive strength stays roughly the same. Previous investigators have shown that the increase in the Young`s modulus arises from increased axial orientation. The present paper addresses the torsion modulus and compressive strength of the fibers.

  8. Graphene-based single fiber supercapacitor with a coaxial structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Zheng, Bingna; Huang, Tieqi; Gao, Chao

    2015-06-07

    A novel all graphene coaxial fiber supercapacitor (GCS) was fabricated, consisting of a continuously wet-spun core graphene fiber and facilely dip-coated graphene sheath. GCS is flexible, lightweight and strong, and is also accompanied by a high specific capacitance of 205 mF cm(-2) (182 F g(-1)) and high energy density of 17.5 μW h cm(-2) (15.5 W h kg(-1)). The energy density was further improved to 104 μW h cm(-2), when an organic ion liquid electrolyte was used.

  9. Hole-pin joining structure with fiber-round-hole distribution of lobster cuticle and biomimetic study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Fan, Jinghong; Gou, Jihua; Lin, Shiyun

    2014-12-01

    Observations of the cuticle of the Boston Spiny Lobster using scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that it is a natural biocomposite consisting of chitin fibers and sclerotic-protein matrix with hierarchical and helicoidal structure. The SEM images also indicate that there is a hole-pin joining structure in the cuticle. In this joining structure, the chitin fibers in the neighborhood of the joining holes continuously round the holes to form a fiber-round-hole distribution. The maximum pullout force of the fibers in the fiber-round-hole distribution, which is closely related to the fracture toughness of the cuticle, is investigated and compared with that of the fibers in non-fiber-round-hole distribution based on their representative models. It is revealed that the maximum pullout force of the fibers in the fiber-round-hole distribution is significantly larger than that of the fibers in the non-fiber-round-hole distribution, and that a larger diameter of the hole results in a larger difference in the maximum pullout forces of the fibers between the two kinds of the fiber distributions. Inspired by the fiber-round-hole distribution found in the cuticle, composite specimens with the fiber-round-hole distribution were fabricated with a special mold and process to mirror the fiber-round-hole distribution. The fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite specimens is tested and compared with that of the conventional composite specimens with the non-fiber-round-hole distribution. It is demonstrated that the fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite specimens with the fiber-round-hole distribution is significantly larger than that of the conventional composite specimens with the non-fiber-round-hole distribution.

  10. Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikodem, Michal P.; Sergeant, Hendrik; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years we have observed growing interest in mode-locked fiber lasers. Development of erbium doped fiber (EDF) amplifiers and WDM technique made 3rd telecommunication window extremely interesting region for ultrafast optics. The main advantages of fiber lasers i.e. narrow linewidth and wide gain bandwidth make them very attractive sources in various applications. In this paper we present an actively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser. Modelocking is obtained using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) coupled into the laser cavity. The impact of different parameters (e.g. light polarization, modulation frequency) is investigated. We study mechanisms of controlling the wavelength of the laser.

  11. Using modalmetric fiber optic sensors to monitor the activity of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, M.; Uzięblo-Zyczkowska, B.; Dziuda, L.; Różanowski, K.

    2011-03-01

    The paper presents the concept of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor system for human psychophysical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes intensity of propagated light to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an multimode fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled by the singlemode optical fiber to detector. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use. We present the laboratory test of comparing their results with the known methods like EKG. addition, the article describes the work on integrated system to human psychophysiology activity monitoring. That system including a EMFIT, microwave, fiber optic and capacitive sensors.

  12. Climbing Fiber Regulation of Spontaneous Purkinje Cell Activity and Cerebellum-Dependent Blink Responses123

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been known for a long time that GABAergic Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as their target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei, are spontaneously active. The cerebellar output will, therefore, depend on how input is integrated into this spontaneous activity. It has been shown that input from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive controls the spontaneous activity in Purkinje cells. While blocking climbing fiber input to the Purkinje cells causes a dramatic increase in the firing rate, increased climbing fiber activity results in reduced Purkinje cell activity. However, the exact calibration of this regulation has not been examined systematically. Here we examine the relation between climbing fiber stimulation frequency and Purkinje cell activity in unanesthetized decerebrated ferrets. The results revealed a gradual suppression of Purkinje cell activity, starting at climbing fiber stimulation frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz. At 4 Hz, Purkinje cells were completely silenced. This effect lasted an average of 2 min after the stimulation rate was reduced to a lower level. We also examined the effect of sustained climbing fiber stimulation on overt behavior. Specifically, we analyzed conditioned blink responses, which are known to be dependent on the cerebellum, while stimulating the climbing fibers at different frequencies. In accordance with the neurophysiological data, the conditioned blink responses were suppressed at stimulation frequencies of ≥4 Hz. PMID:26839917

  13. High endocytotic activity occurs periodically in the endplate region of denervated mouse striated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, G; Tågerud, S

    1995-08-01

    High endocytotic activity after denervation of skeletal muscle occurs in a proportion of muscle fibers (both slow and fast fiber types) in the endplate region. The present study was performed in order to examine if a periodicity in the endocytotic activity could explain why the process is not observed in all fibers at a given time. Three markers, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), rhodamine B isothiocyanate-labeled dextran, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran were used to demonstrate endocytotic activity of muscle fibers of the denervated mouse hemidiaphragm in vivo. Acetylcholine esterase staining was used in conjunction with HRP uptake to determine the proportion of denervated muscle fibers with endocytotic activity in the endplate region at any one time. The results show that 25-50% of the muscle fibers display high endocytotic activity in the endplate region at a given time 10 days after denervation. The existence of a periodicity in this endocytotic activity is suggested by results obtained using two different endocytotic markers administered at time intervals of 0-7 days. We conclude that loss of contact with the innervating motorneuron induces a high endocytotic activity which occurs periodically in the perisynaptic region of skeletal muscle fibers.

  14. A study on the crushing behavior of basalt fiber reinforced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, A.; Veerasimman, A. P.; Vairavan, M.; Francisco, C.; Sultan, M. T. H.

    2016-10-01

    The crushing behavior and energy absorption capacity of basalt fiber reinforced hollow square structure composites are studied under axial compression. Using the hand layup technique, basalt fiber reinforced composites were fabricated using general purpose (GP) polyester resin with the help of wooden square shaped mould of varying height (100 mm, 150 mm and 200 mm). For comparison, similar specimens of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites were also fabricated and tested. Axial compression load is applied over the top end of the specimen with cross head speed as 2 mm/min using Universal Testing Machine (UTM). From the experimental results, the load-deformation characteristics of both glass fiber and basalt fiber composites were investigated. Crashworthiness and mode of collapse for the composites were determined from load-deformation curve, and they were then compared to each other in terms of their crushing behaviors.

  15. Direct core structuring of microstructured optical fibers using focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; André, Ricardo M; Perrella, Christopher; Dellith, Jan; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2016-01-11

    We demonstrate the use of focused ion beam milling to machine optical structures directly into the core of microstructured optical fibers. The particular fiber used was exposed-core microstructured optical fiber, which allowed direct access to the optically guiding core. Two different designs of Fabry-Perot cavity were fabricated and optically characterized. The first cavity was formed by completely removing a section of the fiber core, while the second cavity consisted of a shallow slot milled into the core, leaving the majority of the core intact. This work highlights the possibility of machining complex optical devices directly onto the core of microstructured optical fibers using focused ion beam milling for applications including environmental, chemical, and biological sensing.

  16. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  17. Investigation of Carbon-Polymer Structures with Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myers, G.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several Bragg-grating sensors fabricated within the same optical fiber are buried within multiple-ply carbon-epoxy planar and cylindrical structures. Effect of different orientation of fiber-sensors with respect to carbon fibers in the composite structure is investigated. This is done for both fabric and uni-tape material samples. Response of planar structures to axial and transverse strain up to 1 millistrain is investigated with distributed Bragg-grating sensors. Material properties like Young's Modulus and Poisson ratio is measured. A comparison is made between response measured by sensors in different ply-layers and those bonded on the surface. The results from buried fiber- sensors do not completely agree with surface bonded conventional strain gauges. A plausible explanation is given for observed differences. The planar structures are subjected to impacts with energies up to 10 ft-lb. Effect of this impact on the material stiffness is also investigated with buried fiber-optic Bragg sensors. The strain response of such optical sensors is also measured for cylindrical carbon-epoxy composite structures. The sensors are buried within the walls of the cylinder as well as surface bonded in both the axial as well as hoop directions. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 1500 psi. This is done at both room temperature as well as cryogenic temperatures. The recorded response is compared with that from a conventional strain gauge.

  18. Analytical (mathematical) predictive modeling in fiber optics structural analysis (FOSA): review and extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, Ephraim

    2015-03-01

    An updated version of the paper with revised references has been published The review part of the paper addresses analytical (mathematical) modeling in structural analysis in fiber optics engineering, mostly fiber optics interconnects, and deals with optical fibers subjected to thermal and/or mechanical loading (stresses) in bending, tension, compression, or to the combinations of such loadings. Attributes and significance of predictive modeling are indicated and discussed. The review is based mostly on the author's research conducted at Bell Laboratories, Physical Sciences and Engineering Research Division, Murray Hill, NJ, USA, during his tenure with this company, and, to a lesser extent, on his recent work in the field. The addressed structures include, but are not limited to, optical fibers of finite length: bare fibers; jacketed and dual-coated fibers; fibers experiencing thermal loading; fibers soldered into ferrules or adhesively bonded into capillaries; as well as the roles of geometric and material non-linearity; dynamic response to shocks and vibrations; and possible applications of nano-materials in new generations of coating and cladding systems. The extension part is concerned with a novel, fruitful and challenging directionprobabilistic design for reliability (PDfR) of opto-electronic and photonic products, including optical fibers and interconnects. The rationale behind the PDfR concept is that there is no such thing as zero probability of failure, that the difference between a highly reliable product and an insufficiently reliable product is "merely" in the level of the never zero probability of its failure and that when the operational performance of the product is imperative, the ability to predict, quantify, assure and, if possible and appropriate, even specify its reliability is highly desirable. Accordingly, the objective of the PDfR effort is to quantify the likelihood of an operational failure of a material, device or a system, including the

  19. Fine structure of extracellular fibers in primo-nodes and vessels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong Hyun; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the extracellular matrices in the primo-nodes (PNs) and vessels (PVs) (Bonghan corpuscles and ducts), fine structure of the fibers comprising the extracellular matrices was studied in relation to the diameter and the periodicity to identify the types of the fibers. Electron micrographs of the fibers from the previously published works on the PNs and PVs were analyzed by using MATLAB programming and ImageJ software. The extracellular fibrous components of the PNs and PVs could be classified generally into two groups--thin collagen fibrils and thick non-collagenous wavy bent fibers. The thick bent fibers were fibrin-like. The diameters of the thick bent fibers were 30-200 nm and they were highly bent. This group included organ surface PNs and lymphatic PNs/PVs. The diameters of the collagen fibrils were 30-70 nm. Organ surface, heart, and hypodermis PVs were categorized in this group. The periodicity of bent fibers in an organ surface PN was 16.1 +/- 0.2 (SE) nm, and the periodicity of collagen fibrils in the hypodermis PVs was 37.4 +/- 0.5 (SE) nm. Further investigations are required to reveal the physiological implications of the two types of fibers in the PNs and PVs.

  20. The Structure and Properties of Carbon Fiber Based Adsorbent Monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.; Judkins, R.R.; Rogers, M.R.; Shaw, W.S.

    1998-11-06

    Carbon fiber monoliths manufactured by a novel slurry molding process from isotropic pitch-derived fibers are being developed at ORNL for gas separation and storage applications [1]. Low density (p = 0.2 - 0,3 g/cm3) monoliths have been successfully demonstrated to have an acceptable pressure drop for gas separation applications and are currently being developed for C02/CH4 separations, whereas monoliths with densities in the range p = 0.4 - 0.6 g/cm3 have been "shown to have natural gas storage capacities of >100 VIV at 500 psi pressure and room temperature. Thermal conductivity, as a function of temperature, was measured using the LASER flash, thermal- pulse method. Another approach to minimizing the temperature gradients that develop in a storage bed is to increase the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent carbon. To this end, we have developed hybrid monoliths that contain small fractions of mesophase pitch- derived carbon fibers. Our hybrid monoliths exhibit thermal conductivities in the range 0.2-0.9 W/m.K depending on the blend and density of the monolith. In comparison, a packed bed of granular carbon at comparable density would have a thermal conductivity of approximately 0.1 W/m.K [ 1 ]. The thermal conductivities of several of the hybrid The improved thermal conductivity of our monoliths is attributed to the bonding between the fibers and the incorporation of high thermal conductivity, mesophase pitch-derived carbon fibers. These features are visible in the SEM micrograph in Fig. 4.

  1. Structure and properties of electrospun polymer fibers and applications in biomedical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Cheryl L.

    2006-04-01

    Increased interest in nanotechnology has revived a fiber processing technique invented back in the 1930's. Electrospinning produces nanometer to micron size fibers that are not otherwise achievable using conventional fiber spinning methods. Due to small fiber diameters, high surface area, tailorable surface morphology, and the creation of an interconnected fibrous network, electrospun fibers have found use in a variety of applications. However, a multitude of parameters directly affect the electrospinning process thus requiring a fundamental understanding of how various parameters affect the process and resulting fiber properties. Accordingly, the focus of this dissertation is to provide insight on how solution characteristics and processing parameters directly affect the electrospinning process, and then apply this knowledge to create electrospun membranes for biomedical applications. These fundamental studies provided insight on how to control the electrospinning process; this knowledge was then utilized to electrospin fibrous membranes for biomedical applications. One aspect of this work focused on incorporating low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) into electrospun fibers. Heparin is known for its ability to bind growth factors and thus it plays an integral role in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. The goal of this work was to fabricate functionalized electrospun fibers to produce a biologically active matrix that would allow for the binding and delivery of growth factors for possible drug delivery applications. The electrospinning process was also utilized to fabricate native polymers such as collagen and gelatin into fiber form. The collagen and gelatin fibers were 2--6 mum in diameter and required crosslinking to stabilize the fibers. Crosslinking and sterilization protocols were investigated to optimize the conditions needed to produce collagen and gelatin electrospun membranes to be used in bone regeneration applications. (Abstract shortened

  2. Structure and morphology of regenerated silk nano-fibers produced by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkoob, Shahrzad

    The impressive physical and mechanical properties of natural silk fiberssp1 and the possibility of producing these proteins using biotechnology,sp2 have provided the impetus for recent efforts in both the biosynthesissp{3,4} and the spinning of these protein based biopolymers.sp{5,6,7} The question still remains: whether fibers spun from solutions with similar chemical makeup can produce fibers with similar structures and therefore with the possibility of improved properties. Since genetically engineered silk solutions were not readily available, the first objective of this project was to completely dissolve the Bombyx mori cocoon and the Nephila clavipes dragline silk while maintaining the molecular weight integrity of the polymer. The second objective was to develop a system for re-spinning from very small amount of the resulting silk solutions by the process of electrospinning. The third objective was, to produce regenerated silk fibers with diameters that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the original fibers, suitable for direct observation and analysis by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. And finally, to compare these results to structural information obtained from natural (as spun by the organism) fibers to see if the regenerated solutions are able to form the same structure as the original fibers. Both types of silk fibers were successfully dissolved while maintaining the polymer integrity. Small quantities (25-50 mul) of these solutions were used to electrospin fibers with diameters ranging from 8nm-200nm. The fibers were observed by optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. These nano fibers showed optical retardation, appeared to have a circular cross-section, and were dimensionally stable at temperatures above 280sp°C. Electron diffraction patterns of annealed electrospun fibers of B. mori and N. clavipes showed reflections, demonstrating orientational and semicrystalline order in the material

  3. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung

    2013-01-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2–3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  4. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:23680063

  5. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Bailey, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  6. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Bailey, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphite at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  7. Modeling of a structural coloration of a photonic-crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotsky, A. B.; Bel'skaya, O. A.; Sotskaya, L. I.

    2015-05-01

    Using a method that is based on the application of the Green's theorem and the addition theorem of Graph's cylinder functions, we have obtained a solution of a two-dimensional problem on lateral light diffraction by a photonic-crystal fiber that is formed by a finite number of parallel air channels in a bounded slab. We have investigated scattering cross-section spectra of hexagonally symmetric photonic-crystal fibers. It has been found that these fibers may have a structural coloration, which changes upon their extension.

  8. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1999-02-16

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  9. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1998-04-28

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2,000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2,400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  10. Silicon photodetector structure for direct coupling of optical fibers to integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, Robert W.; Harstead, Edward E.; Amirfazli, A. H.; Cacouris, Theodore; Fossum, Eric R.

    1987-06-01

    A novel detector structure exhibiting real-estate efficient coupling of optical fibers to semiconductor devices is described. The integrated fiber-optic coupler employs vertical insertion of a tapered single-mode fiber into a laser-etched cylindrical hole in the substrate. It features a small surface footprint, mechanical stability, and accurate alignment. Fabricated in silicon, the p-n junction detectors have typically shown responsivities of 0.23 A/W at 0.63 micron, corresponding to a quantum efficiency of 45 percent, and dark currents below 1 nA.

  11. Influences of air calcination and steam activation on microstructure and photocatalytic activity of continuous TiO{sub 2} fibers

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yang; Zhang, Shiying; Xu, Difa

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effects of air calcination and steam activation on TiO{sub 2} fibers were studied. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by degradation of formaldehyde. ► Steam activation promoted the anatase–rutile phase transformation. ► Steam activation decreased grain size and increased special surface area. ► Steam activation improved photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} fibers. -- Abstract: Effects of air calcination and steam activation, on phase transformation, microstructure and photocatalytic activity of continuous TiO{sub 2} fibers prepared by sol–gel method were studied. The fibers were characterized by XRD, SEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of formaldehyde. Results showed that 100% rutile fibers heat-treated in air and steam were obtained at 800 °C and 600 °C, respectively. The anatase grain sizes and special surface areas of the fibers heat-treated at 500 °C in air and steam were 31.6 nm, 22.7 nm, 26.7 m{sup 2}/g and 32.3 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The degradation rates of formaldehyde over the fibers heat-treated at 500 °C in air and steam were 92.3% and 98.6% after 14 h under UV irradiation, respectively. Compared with the air calcination, the steam activation promoted the anatase–rutile phase transformation, reduced the grain size, increased the special surface area, and improved photocatalytic activity of continuous TiO{sub 2} fibers.

  12. Circuit models for Salisbury screens made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials have many useful structural material properties. The electromagnetic perfor- mance of these materials is of great interest for future applications. The work presented in this paper deals with the construction of Salisbury screen microwave absorbers made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sand- wich structures. Specifically, absorbers centered at 7.25 GHz and 12.56 GHz are investigated. Circuit models are created to match the measured performance of the carbon fiber Salisbury screens using a genetic algorithm to extract lumped element circuit values. The screens presented in this paper utilize unidirectional carbon fiber sheets in place of the resistive sheet utilized in the classic Salisbury screen. The theory, models, prototypes, and measurements of these absorbers are discussed.

  13. Structural dynamics of the skeletal muscle fiber by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2008-02-01

    The high degree of structural order in skeletal muscle allows imaging of this tissue by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG). As previously found (Vanzi et al., J. Muscle Cell Res. Motil. 2006) by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal. A full characterization of the polarization-dependence of the SHG signal can provide very selective information on the orientation of the emitting proteins and their dynamics during contraction. We developed a line scan polarization method, allowing measurements of a full polarization curve in intact muscle fibers from skeletal muscle of the frog to characterize the SHG polarization dependence on different physiological states (resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction). The polarization data have been interpreted by means of a model in terms of the average orientation of SHG emitters.The different physiological states are characterized by distinct patterns of SHG polarization. The variation of the orientation of emitting molecules in relation to the physiological state of the muscle demonstrates that one part of SHG signal arises from the globular head of the myosin molecule that cross-links actin and myosin filaments. The dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction, provides the constraints to estimate the fraction of myosin heads generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber.

  14. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  15. Effect of Hindlimb Unweighting on Single Soleus Fiber Maximal Shortening Velocity and ATPase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. S.; Fitts, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    This study characterizes the time course of change in single soleus muscle fiber size and function elicited by hindlimb un weighting (HU) and analyzes the extent to which varying durations of HU altered maximal velocity of shortening (V(sub o)), myofibrillar adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase), and relative content of slow and fast myosin in individual soleus fibers. After 1, 2, or 3 weeks of HU, soleus muscle bundles were prepared and stored in skinning solution at -20 C. Single fibers were isolated and mounted between a motor arm and a transducer, and fiber force, V(sub o), and ATPase activity were measured. Fiber myosin content was determined by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After 1, 2, and 3 weeks of HU, soleus fibers exhibited a progressive reduction in fiber diameter (16, 22, and 42%, respectively) and peak force (42, 48, and 7%, respectively). Peak specific tension was significantly reduced after 1 week of HU (18%) and showed no further change in 2-3 weeks of HU. During 1 and 3 wk of HU, fiber V(sub o) and ATPase showed a significant increase. By 3 week, V(sub o) had increased from 1.32 +/- 0.04 to 2.94 +/- 0.17 fiber lengths/s and fiber ATPase from 291 +/- 16 to 1064 +/- 128 micro-M min(sub -1) mm(sub -3). The percent fibers expressing fast myosin heavy chain increased from 4% to 29% by 3 week of HU, and V(sub o) and ATPase activity within a fiber were highly correlated. However, a large population of fibers after 1, 2, and 3 weeks of HU showed increases in V(sub o) and ATPase but displayed the same myosin protein profile on SDS gels as control fibers. The mechanism eliciting increased fiber V(sub o) and ATPase activity was not obvious but may have been due to increases in fast myosin that went undetected on SDS gels and/or other factors unrelated to the myosin filament.

  16. The molecular structure and physical properties of elastin fibers as revealed by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Green, Ellen; Ellis, Richard; Winlove, Peter

    2008-11-01

    Raman microspectroscopy has been used to investigate the structure of alpha-elastin and fibrous elastin from ligament and aorta, and to explore changes associated with mechanical strain and temperature. Although no vibrational modes associated with cross-linking of the fibers could be identified, the secondary structure of dehydrated fibrous elastin was significantly different from alpha-elastin. The former differed from previous experimental measurements, but was close to the theoretical predictions with 36% beta-structures, 46% unordered, and 18% alpha-helix. Alpha-elastin contained 29% beta-structures, 53% unordered, and 18% alpha-helix. In nuchal fibers the amide I mode was polarized, consistent with the peptide bond. Strains of up to 60% in ligament fiber bundles resulted in no significant shifts in peak position or in secondary structure. Polarization measurements revealed that the peptide bonds and several side chains re-orientated closer to the fiber axis. Heating nuchal fibers to 60 degrees C to increase the energetic component of the elasticity was associated with a 30% increase in the proportion of beta-structures in the amide I band, a 50% increase in the amide III band, and a 50% reduction in the signal from bound water.

  17. Nanowire-in-microtube structured core/shell fibers via multifluidic coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyan; Wang, Nü; Di, Jiancheng; Zhao, Yong; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2010-07-06

    A multifluidic coaxial electrospinning approach is reported here to fabricate core/shell ultrathin fibers with a novel nanowire-in-microtube structure from more optional fluid pairs than routine coaxial electrospinning. The advantage of this approach lies in the fact that it introduces an extra middle fluid between the core and shell fluids of traditional coaxial electrospinning, which can work as an effective spacer to decrease the interaction of the other two fluids. Under the protection of a proper middle fluid, more fluid pairs, even mutually miscible fluids, can be operated to generate "sandwich"-structured ultrathin fibers with a sharp boundary between the core and shell materials. It thereby largely extends the scope of optional materials. Selectively removing the middle layer of the as-prepared fibers results in an interesting nanowire-in-microtube structure. Either homogeneous or heterogeneous fibers with well-tailored sandwich structures have been successfully fabricated. This method is an important extension of traditional co-electrospinning that affords a more universal avenue to preparing core/shell fibers; moreover, the special hollow cavity structure may introduce some extra properties into the conventional core/shell structure, which may find potential applications such as optical applications, microelectronics, and others.

  18. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Christensen, Richard M.; Toland, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  19. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  20. An XPS study for mechanisms of arsenate adsorption onto a magnetite-doped activated carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Li, Xiao-yan; Chen, J Paul

    2010-03-01

    The surface and bulk structures of a newly developed carbon-based iron-containing adsorbent for As(V) adsorption were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD patterns of the adsorbents indicated that the modified activated carbon fiber (MACF) was a simple mixture of the raw activated carbon fiber (RACF) and magnetite. After modification, a porous film was formed on the surface of the MACF with nano-sized magnetite on it. The As(V) uptake on the MACF was highly pH dependent and was facilitated in acidic solutions. XPS studies demonstrated that the surface oxygen-containing functional groups were involved in the adsorption and that magnetite played a key role in As(V) uptake. The dominance of HAsO(4)(2-) in surface complexes and the pH effect on As(V) uptake demonstrated that the monoprotonated bidentate complexes were dominant on the surface of the MACF. No reduction of As(V) was observed on the surface of the ACFs.

  1. Engineered adenovirus fiber shaft fusion homotrimer of soluble TRAIL with enhanced stability and antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J; Wang, L; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, B; Zhu, R; Bi, J; Wu, J; Zhang, H; Wu, H; Yu, B; Kong, W; Yu, X

    2016-01-01

    Successful cancer therapies aim to induce selective apoptosis in neoplastic cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered an attractive anticancer agent due to its tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity. However, earlier studies with recombinant TRAIL revealed many shortcomings, including a short half-life, off-target toxicity and existence of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells. In this study, we developed a novel engineering strategy for recombinant soluble TRAIL by redesigning its structure with the adenovirus knobless fiber motif to form a stable homotrimer with improved antitumor activity. The result is a highly stable fiber-TRAIL fusion protein that could form homotrimers similar to natural TRAIL. The recombinant fusion TRAIL developed here displayed high specific activity in both cell-based assays in vitro and animal tests in vivo. This construct will serve as a foundation for a new generation of recombinant proteins suitable for use in preclinical and clinical studies and for effective combination therapies to overcome tumor resistance to TRAIL. PMID:27336718

  2. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  3. Synthesis and characterization of high photocatalytic activity and stable Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers for photocatalytic degradation of black liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Long, Qiyi; Yin, Chao

    2014-11-01

    The TiO2 fiber was prepared by using cotton fiber as a template, and then Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were synthesized via in situ Ag3PO4 particles onto the surface of TiO2 fiber. Their structure and physical properties were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), specific surface analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectra and photoluminescence spectra (PL). SEM analysis indicated that the well-defined surface morphology of natural cotton fiber was mostly preserved in TiO2 and Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers. Compared with TiO2 fiber, the absorbance wavelengths of Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were apparently red shifted and the PL intensities revealed a significant decrease. By using the photocatalytic degradation of black liquor as a model reaction, the visible light and ultraviolet light catalytic efficiencies of TiO2, Ag3PO4 and Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were evaluated. The reaction results showed that Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers had stronger photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability in repeated and long-term applications. Therefore, the prepared Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers could act as an efficient catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of black liquor, which suggested their promising applications. It was proposed that the •OH radicals played the leading role in the photocatalytic degradation of the black liquor by Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers system.

  4. Structural Health Monitoring Using Textile Reinforcement Structures with Integrated Optical Fiber Sensors.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Kort; Weigand, Frank; Zheng, Yulong; Alwis, Lourdes Shanika; Helbig, Reinhard; Roth, Bernhard

    2017-02-10

    Optical fiber-based sensors "embedded" in functionalized carbon structures (FCSs) and textile net structures (TNSs) based on alkaline-resistant glass are introduced for the purpose of structural health monitoring (SHM) of concrete-based structures. The design aims to monitor common SHM parameters such as strain and cracks while at the same time acting as a structural strengthening mechanism. The sensor performances of the two systems are characterized in situ using Mach-Zehnder interferometric (MZI) and optical attenuation measurement techniques, respectively. For this purpose, different FCS samples were subjected to varying elongation using a tensile testing machine by carefully incrementing the applied force, and good correlation between the applied force and measured length change was observed. For crack detection, the functionalized TNSs were embedded into a concrete block which was then exposed to varying load using the three-point flexural test until destruction. Promising results were observed, identifying that the location of the crack can be determined using the conventional optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) technique. The embedded sensors thus evaluated show the value of the dual achievement of the schemes proposed in obtaining strain/crack measurement while being utilized as strengthening agents as well.

  5. Structural Health Monitoring Using Textile Reinforcement Structures with Integrated Optical Fiber Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Kort; Weigand, Frank; Zheng, Yulong; Alwis, Lourdes Shanika; Helbig, Reinhard; Roth, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Optical fiber-based sensors “embedded” in functionalized carbon structures (FCSs) and textile net structures (TNSs) based on alkaline-resistant glass are introduced for the purpose of structural health monitoring (SHM) of concrete-based structures. The design aims to monitor common SHM parameters such as strain and cracks while at the same time acting as a structural strengthening mechanism. The sensor performances of the two systems are characterized in situ using Mach-Zehnder interferometric (MZI) and optical attenuation measurement techniques, respectively. For this purpose, different FCS samples were subjected to varying elongation using a tensile testing machine by carefully incrementing the applied force, and good correlation between the applied force and measured length change was observed. For crack detection, the functionalized TNSs were embedded into a concrete block which was then exposed to varying load using the three-point flexural test until destruction. Promising results were observed, identifying that the location of the crack can be determined using the conventional optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) technique. The embedded sensors thus evaluated show the value of the dual achievement of the schemes proposed in obtaining strain/crack measurement while being utilized as strengthening agents as well. PMID:28208636

  6. Nondestructive imaging of fiber structure in articular cartilage using optical polarization tractography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xuan; Wang, Yuanbo; Ravanfar, Mohammadreza; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.; Duan, Dongsheng; Yao, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Collagen fiber orientation plays an important role in determining the structure and function of the articular cartilage. However, there is currently a lack of nondestructive means to image the fiber orientation from the cartilage surface. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the newly developed optical polarization tractography (OPT) can image fiber structure in articular cartilage. OPT was applied to obtain the depth-dependent fiber orientation in fresh articular cartilage samples obtained from porcine phalanges. For comparison, we also obtained collagen fiber orientation in the superficial zone of the cartilage using the established split-line method. The direction of each split-line was quantified using image processing. The orientation measured in OPT agreed well with those obtained from the split-line method. The correlation analysis of a total of 112 split-lines showed a greater than 0.9 coefficient of determination (R2) between the split-line results and OPT measurements obtained between 40 and 108 μm in depth. In addition, the thickness of the superficial layer can also be assessed from the birefringence images obtained in OPT. These results support that OPT provides a nondestructive way to image the collagen fiber structure in articular cartilage. This technology may be valuable for both basic cartilage research and clinical orthopedic applications.

  7. Surface Characterization of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites and Aluminum Alloys After Laser Interference Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles D.; Daniel, Claus

    2016-07-01

    The increasing use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (1) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (2) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (3) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg—T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0°/90° plaques were used. The effects of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot were investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology. It was found that an effective resin ablation and a low density of broken fibers for CFPC specimens was attained using laser fluences of 1-2 J/cm2 and number of 2-4 pulses per spot. A relatively large area of periodic line structures due to energy interference were formed on the aluminum surface at laser fluences of 12 J/cm2 and number of 4-6 pulses per spot.

  8. Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of actively pumped single-mode ytterbium-doped optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.; Petrosky, J.; Pochet, M.; Usechak, N. G.; Francis, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    The integration of optical components into the digital processing units of satellite subsystems has the potential to remove interconnect bottlenecks inherent to the volume, mass, complexity, reliability and crosstalk issues of copper-based interconnects. Assuming on-board high-bandwidth communications will utilize passive optical fibers as a communication channel, this work investigates the impact of gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source on both passive optical fibers and ytterbium-doped single-mode fibers operated as amplifiers for a 1060-nm light source. Standard optical patch cables were evaluated along with active Yb-doped double-clad fibers. Varied exposure times and signal transmission wavelengths were used to investigate the degradation of the fibers exposed to total doses above 100 krad (Si). The effect on the amplified signal gain was studied for the Yb-doped fibers. The increased attenuation in the fibers across a broad wavelength range in response to multiple levels of gamma radiation exposure along with the effect that the increased attenuation has on the actively pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier performance, is discussed.

  9. Nonlinear analysis for high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. M.S. Thesis; [turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A unique upward-integrated top-down-structured approach is presented for nonlinear analysis of high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. Based on this approach, a special purpose computer code was developed (nonlinear COBSTRAN) which is specifically tailored for the nonlinear analysis of tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy (TFRS) composite turbine blade/vane components of gas turbine engines. Special features of this computational capability include accounting of; micro- and macro-heterogeneity, nonlinear (stess-temperature-time dependent) and anisotropic material behavior, and fiber degradation. A demonstration problem is presented to mainfest the utility of the upward-integrated top-down-structured approach, in general, and to illustrate the present capability represented by the nonlinear COBSTRAN code. Preliminary results indicate that nonlinear COBSTRAN provides the means for relating the local nonlinear and anisotropic material behavior of the composite constituents to the global response of the turbine blade/vane structure.

  10. Investigation on spectral response of micro-cavity structure by symmetrical tapered fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang; Yan, Xiaojun; Li, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a micro-cavity structure made of symmetrical tapered fiber tips. The waist of a conventional fiber taper fabricated from heating and stretching technique is symmetrically cleaved, and the aligned fiber tips with air gap constitute a Fabry-Perot micro-cavity due to the reflection at the tip facet. The spectral responses of such micro-cavity structure have been investigated both in beam propagation models and experiments. The multibeam interference in the micro-cavity and the impact of the waist diameter and cavity length on the spectral response has been successfully demonstrated. And a micro-cavity structure with 45 μm waist diameter was experimentally achieved, the measured spectra agree well with the simulation ones, indicating that the spectral response of the micro-cavity structure is contributed by both the multibeam interference and the Fabry-Perot micro-cavity.

  11. The features of the optical pumping active fibers with three-piece inner clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Alexander V.; Slobozhanina, Mariya G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents simple model of distribution of the pump radiation in active three-piece inner clad fibers (GTWave3) and analytical solutions of the relevant differential equations. Based on these solutions has been produced the analysis of the dependence distribution of the pump radiation and value of the effective length GTWave3 from key parameters of this type of a fiber (the active-region absorption coefficient and the coupling coefficients). Also in work presents comparison of the pump distribution into the GTWave3 and GTWave2 (two-piece inner clad) fibers.

  12. Fabrication of optical waveguide structures based on PDMS using photoresist fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaso, Peter; Pudiš, Dusan; Martincek, Ivan; Jandura, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We describe fabrication process of optical waveguide structures such as multi-mode optical splitter and optical waveguide with surface Bragg grating in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Technology based on drawing of thin photoresist fiber with diameter up to 100 μm was developed and optimized. In this way, fibers drawn from photoresist form cores of waveguides in PDMS slab. After removal of the photoresist, created air channels can be filled in with different liquids. We prepared multimode waveguide structures in PDMS composed of two PDMS materials with different refractive indices. Using this technology, also complicated waveguide structures were prepared as optical splitter and surface Bragg grating were prepared in PDMS material.

  13. Mechanical and/or neural activity-dependent regulation of soleus muscle fibers of mdx mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Lan, Yong Bo; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Wang, Xiao Dong; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2005-08-01

    Roles of mechanical and/or neural activity in the necrosis -regeneration cycle in the soleus muscle fibers of mdxmicewerestudied. Five-weeks-oldmalemdxand wild type (WT) mice were separated into tenotomy (T), denervation (D), and T+D groups. The distal tendons of the left plantarflexors (soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius) were ablated in the T group. The left sciatic nerve was transected at the gluteal region in the D group. The right limb was kept intact as the normal control. Ambulation was allowed after the surgery. Soleus muscle was sampled 14 days after the surgery and analyses were performed in cross-section of whole muscle and in single fibers removed longitudinally. The total fiber number of the untreated muscle was 913±19 (Mean±SEM) and 872±45 in WT and mdx mice, respectively. The fiber number in mdx mice was decreased 48% by T and 31-35% by D and T+D, which induced fiber atrophy, may be due to either inhibited regeneration or stimulated necrosis. Although fibers with central nuclei or necrosis were not observed in WT muscle, 25-40% of fibers (vs. 40% in the contralateral control side) in treated muscles of mdx mice, analyzed cross-sectionally, were central-nucleated. However, fibers with only central nuclei were not detected in the longitudinally isolated fibers of treated groups, may be due to the phenomenon that the fibers with necrosis were lost in the relaxing solution. But % fibers with both central and peripheral nuclei were decreased and those with peripheral nuclei alone were increased by T. In both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, the % distribution of the central-nucleated relative to total fiber number was not affected by D, but decreased by T in mdx mice (p>0.05). Myonuclear number per mm of fiber length was identical generally, although the number was increased by T. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation was noted in the mdx fibers with necrosis. These data suggested that the localization of myonuclei, as well as either necrosis or

  14. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  15. Structural health monitoring using fiber optic distributed sensors for vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eum, S. H.; Kageyama, K.; Murayama, H.; Uzawa, K.; Ohsawa, I.; Kanai, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Igawa, H.; Shirai, T.

    2007-12-01

    In this study we implemented manufacturing process and strain monitoring of a composite structure by optical fiber sensors for vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VaRTM). Optical fibers with fiber Bragg gratings were embedded into a glass fiber reinforced plastic specimen made by VaRTM and the applicability of structural health monitoring with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) was investigated. In this study, long-gage FBGs which are 10 times longer than ordinary FBGs (which are about 10 mm long) were employed for distributed sensing. We can easily map the strain or temperature profile along gratings by OFDR and the spatial resolution of this sensing technique is about 1 mm. The resin flow process in VaRTM could be monitored by measuring the difference in temperature between the resin and preform. Then, the shrinkage of resin could be also monitored during the curing process. The specimen was then subjected to a bending load in a three-point bending test and the strain distributions along the FBGs were measured. From these results we could show the applicability of distributed sensors to quality assurance of a composite structure made by VaRTM and assessment of the structural integrity of in-service composite structures.

  16. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions.

  17. Evaluation of dialyzer jacket structure and hollow-fiber dialysis membranes to achieve high dialysis performance.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ayaka; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Matsuda, Masato; Ogawa, Takehito; Yakushiji, Taiji; Miyasaka, Takehiro; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the optimum dialyzer jacket structure and hollow-fiber dialysis membrane, both of which are indispensable factors for achieving high dialysis performance, by clarifying the relationship between the dialysis performance and the flow of dialysate and blood in a hollow-fiber dialyzer. We evaluated the clearance, dialysate, and blood flow for four commercially available hollow-fiber dialyzers, namely, the APS-15S, APS-15SA, TS-1.6UL, and CX-1.6U. To evaluate dialysate and blood flow, we measured the residence-time distribution of dialysate and blood flow of these dialyzers by the pulse-response method. We also determined the clearances of urea, creatinine, vitamin B(12), and lysozyme to evaluate the dialysis performance of these dialyzers. While the baffle and taper structures allow effective supply of dialysate into the dialyzer jacket, the hollow-fiber shape, inner diameter, and packing density significantly influence the dialysate flow. In dialyzers with long taper-holding slits, the slit area is a key design parameter for achieving optimum dialysate flow. Similarly, the blood flow is significantly influenced by the structure of the inflowing and outflowing blood ports at the header of a dialyzer, and the shape and inner diameter of the hollow fibers. Hollow fibers with smaller inner diameters cause an increase in blood pressure, which causes blood to enter the hollow fibers more easily. The hollow-fiber shape hardly affects the blood flow. While improved dialysate and blood flow cause higher clearance of low molecular-weight substances, higher membrane area and pure-water permeability accelerate internal filtration, thereby causing an increase in the clearance of large molecular-weight substances.

  18. Temperature calibration of fiber optic strain sensor for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, K.; Ravisankar, K.; Narayanan, T.; Parivallal, S.; Sreeshylam, P.; Aravindan, P. K.

    2003-10-01

    Major civil engineering structures, such as bridges constitute a significant portion of national wealth, and the cost of maintenance of these structures is very high. Structural health monitoring is a cost effective method of maintenance, and it predicts the structural integrity by early detection of degradation of health of the structure. One of the best ways of structural health monitoring is by the use of fiber optic strain sensors, which are eminently suitable for long term monitoring. However, the apparent strain due to variations in temperature at different measurement times may be very large and has to be accounted for. The apparent strain calibration curves of fiber optic strain sensors bonded to three structural materials, namely, steel, aluminum and concrete are obtained from laboratory experiments which can be used for correcting the temperature induced apparent strain from the total strain measured in the structures.

  19. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  20. Photogrammetric Verification of Fiber Optic Shape Sensors on Flexible Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jason P.; Rogge, Matthew D.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-core fiber (MCF) optic shape sensing offers the possibility of providing in-flight shape measurements of highly flexible aerospace structures and control surfaces for such purposes as gust load alleviation, flutter suppression, general flight control and structural health monitoring. Photogrammetric measurements of surface mounted MCF shape sensing cable can be used to quantify the MCF installation path and verify measurement methods.

  1. Optical fiber sensor having a sol-gel fiber core and a method of making

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Jindal, Rajeev; Winstead, Christopher; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-06-06

    A simple, economic wet chemical procedure is described for making sol-gel fibers. The sol-gel fibers made from this process are transparent to ultraviolet, visible and near infrared light. Light can be guided in these fibers by using an organic polymer as a fiber cladding. Alternatively, air can be used as a low refractive index medium. The sol-gel fibers have a micro pore structure which allows molecules to diffuse into the fiber core from the surrounding environment. Chemical and biochemical reagents can be doped into the fiber core. The sol-gel fiber can be used as a transducer for constructing an optical fiber sensor. The optical fiber sensor having an active sol-gel fiber core is more sensitive than conventional evanescent wave absorption based optical fiber sensors.

  2. Liquid level sensor based on fiber ring laser with single-mode-offset coreless-single-mode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zixiao; Tan, Zhongwei; Xing, Rui; Liang, Linjun; Qi, Yanhui; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-10-01

    A novel reflective liquid level sensor based on single-mode-offset coreless-single-mode (SOCS) fiber structure is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Theory analyses and experimental results indicate that offset fusion can remarkably enhance the sensitivity of sensor. Ending-reflecting structure makes the sensor compact and easy to deploy. Meanwhile, we propose a laser sensing system, and the SOCS structure is used as sensing head and laser filter simultaneously. Experimental results show that laser spectra with high optical signal-to-noise ratio (-30 dB) and narrow 3-dB bandwidth (<0.15 nm) are achieved. Various liquids with different indices are used for liquid level sensing, besides, the refractive index sensitivity is also investigated. In measurement range, the sensing system presents steady laser output.

  3. Development of Coconut Trunk Fiber Geopolymer Hybrid Composite for Structural Engineering Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalia, F.; Akifah, N.; Nurfadilla; Subaer

    2017-03-01

    A research on the influence of coconut fiber trunk on mechanical properties based on fly ash has been conducted. The aims of this study was to examine the mechanical properties of geopolymer composites by varrying the concentration of coconut trunk fiber. Geopolymer synthesized by alkali activated (NaOH+H2O+Na2O.3SiO2) and cured at the temperature 700C for one hour. Specimens were synthesized into 5 different mass of fiber 0 g, 0.25 g, 0.50 g, 0.75 g, and 1.00 g keeping fly ash constant. The highest compressive strength was 89.44 MPa for specimen added with 0.50 g of fiber. The highest flexural strength was 7.64 MPa for the same sample. The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) between the matrix of geopolymers and coconut fiber was conducted by using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The chemical composition of the specimen was examined by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The thermal properties of coconut fiber trunk was analyzed using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). It was found that coconut fiber was able to improve the mechanical and microstructure properties of geopolymers composites.

  4. The effect of woven and non-woven fiber structure on mechanical properties polyester composite reinforced kenaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratim, S.; Bonnia, N. N.; Surip, S. N.

    2012-07-01

    The effects of woven and non-woven kenaf fiber on mechanical properties of polyester composites were studied at different types of perform structures. Composite polyester reinforced kenaf fiber has been prepared via hand lay-up process by varying fiber forms into plain weave, twill and mats structure. The reinforcing efficiency of different fiber structure was compared with control of unreinforced polyester sample. It was found that the strength and stiffness of the composites are largely affected by fiber structure. A maximum value for tensile strength of composite was obtained for twill weave pattern of fiber structure while no significant different for plain weave and mat structure. The elastic modulus of composite has shown some improvement on plain and twill weave pattern. Meanwhile, lower value of modulus elasticity achieved by mats structure composite as well as control sample. The modulus of rupture and impact resistance were also analyzed. The improvement of modulus of rupture value can be seen on plain and twill weave pattern. However impact resistance doesn't show significant improvement in all types of structure except for mat fiber. The mechanical properties of kenaf fiber reinforced polyester composite found to be increased with woven and non-woven fiber structures in composite.

  5. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  6. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  7. Investigation of an integrated fiber laser sensor system in ultrasonic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji

    2016-03-01

    Various optical fiber sensors have been utilized in structural health monitoring (SHM) to detect strain, temperature, and the ultrasonic guided wave, which is the main measurand discussed in this study. By leveraging existing ultrasonic optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technique, we proposed a novel sensing concept in which the ultrasonic-induced Bragg wavelength shift was demodulated by an erbium fiber laser (EFL). The ultrasonic sensor and light source, i.e., an FBG and EFL, were seamlessly integrated into a fiber laser sensor system, in which the output power change directly represents the ultrasonic signal. In addition to discussing the theory behind the sensor, we focused on the applications and actual performance of the sensor, including sensitivity, bandwidth, and robustness, in practical ultrasonic SHM. We were able to constantly detect ultrasonic signals in the range of 25 °C-85 °C or simultaneously detect static measurands (temperature or strain) and ultrasonic signals by changing the position of the FBG where it is attached. Because of the diverse structures of the EFL and FBG, we created, investigated, and compared three sensing systems with different properties and advantages to find their most suitable applications and fully explore their maximum potential. In addition, the experimental results from these novel optical fiber sensors were compared to those from a conventional broadband PZT sensor. The results showed that the new sensor has some unique advantages, such as self-adjustable ultrasonic detection.

  8. Innovative design of composite structures: Design, manufacturing, and testing of plates utilizing curvilinear fiber trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rust, R. J.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As a means of improving structural design, the concept of fabricating flat plates containing holes by incorporating curvilinear fiber trajectories to transmit loads around the hole is studied. In the present discussion this concept is viewed from a structural level, where access holes, windows, doors, and other openings are of significant size. This is opposed to holes sized for mechanical fasteners. Instead of cutting the important load-bearing fibers at the hole edge, as a conventional straightline design does, the curvilinear design preserves the load-bearing fibers by orienting them in smooth trajectories around the holes, their loading not ending abruptly at the hole edge. Though the concept of curvilinear fiber trajectories has been studied before, attempts to manufacture and test such plates have been limited. This report describes a cooperative effort between Cincinnati Milacron Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University to design, manufacture, and test plates using the curvilinear fiber trajectory concept. The paper discusses details of the plate design, details of the manufacturing, and a summary of results from testing the plates with inplane compressive buckling loads and tensile loads. Comparisons between the curvilinear and conventional straightline fiber designs based on measurements and observation are made. Failure modes, failure loads, strains, deflections, and other key responses are compared.

  9. Fog Collection on Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Fibers: Influence of Cross Section and Surface Structure.

    PubMed

    Azad, M A K; Krause, Tobias; Danter, Leon; Baars, Albert; Koch, Kerstin; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2017-03-22

    Fog-collecting meshes show a great potential in ensuring the availability of a supply of sustainable freshwater in certain arid regions. In most cases, the meshes are made of hydrophilic smooth fibers. Based on the study of plant surfaces, we analyzed the fog collection using various polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers with different cross sections and surface structures with the aim of developing optimized biomimetic fog collectors. Water droplet movement and the onset of dripping from fiber samples were compared. Fibers with round, oval, and rectangular cross sections with round edges showed higher fog-collection performance than those with other cross sections. However, other parameters, for example, width, surface structure, wettability, and so forth, also influenced the performance. The directional delivery of the collected fog droplets by wavy/v-shaped microgrooves on the surface of the fibers enhances the formation of a water film and their fog collection. A numerical simulation of the water droplet spreading behavior strongly supports these findings. Therefore, our study suggests the use of fibers with a round cross section, a microgrooved surface, and an optimized width for an efficient fog collection.

  10. Analysis of structure and dynamics of superfine polyhydroxybutyrate fibers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A.; Kucherenko, E.; Pantyukhov, P.; Zykova, A.; Karpova, S.; Iordanskii, A.

    2017-02-01

    Creation of polymer matrix systems for targeted drug delivery into a living organism is a challenging problem of modern treatment of various diseases and injuries. Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is commonly used for development of therapeutic systems. The aim of this article is to examine the changes in structure and morphology of fibers in presence of dipyridamole (DPD) as model drug for controlled release. It was found that addition of dipyridamole led to disappearance of spindle-shaped nodules on fibers of PHB in comparison with pure PHB. The research of thermophysical parameters showed that specific melting enthalpy (and the degree of crystallinity) of PHB fibers increased with the addition of DPD. With the increasing of DPD content in PHB fibers, more perfect and equilibrium crystal structure was formed. According to analysis of intercrystalline regions of PHB fibers, it was found that as the crystallinity of PHB in intergranular regions rose, the corresponding decrease of radical rotation speed was observed. It was concluded that fibers of PHB can be used for creating therapeutic systems for targeted and prolonged drug delivery.

  11. Model of the Stress State of a Unidirectional Composite with Cylindrical Fibers Forming a Tetragonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Tanchik, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    A model of the stress-strain state of a unidirectional fiber composite is proposed. A cylindrical sample of an elastic material whose fibers are cylindrical inclusions is considered. The generatrix of inclusions is parallel to the axis of the sample. The distribution of fibers in the sample is modeled with sixteen inclusions forming a tetragonal structure. It is assumed that the sample is subjected to a piecewise constant normal load and the fibers are in a perfect contact with the matrix. The boundary conditions of the problem are satisfied exactly with the help of the generalized Fourier method. The problem is reduced to an infinite system of linear algebraic equations, which is solved numerically by the method of reduction. An analysis of stress distribution in the areas of their highest concentration is given.

  12. Use it or Lose It: Tonic Activity of Slow Motoneurons Promotes Their Survival and Preferentially Increases Slow Fiber-Type Groupings in Muscles of Old Lifelong Recreational Sportsmen

    PubMed Central

    Mosole, Simone; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Loefler, Stefan; Zampieri, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Histochemistry, immuno-histochemistry, gel electrophoresis of single muscle fibers and electromyography of aging muscles and nerves suggest that: i) denervation contributes to muscle atrophy, ii) impaired mobility accelerates the process, and iii) lifelong running protects against loss of motor units. Recent corroborating results on the muscle effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of aged muscles will be also mentioned, but we will in particular discuss how and why a lifelong increased physical activity sustains reinnervation of muscle fibers. By analyzing distribution and density of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow Myosin Heavy Chains (MHC) we are able to distinguish the transforming muscle fibers due to activity related plasticity, to those that adapt muscle fiber properties to denervation and reinnervation. In muscle biopsies from septuagenarians with a history of lifelong high-level recreational activity we recently observed in comparison to sedentary seniors: 1. decreased proportion of small-size angular myofibers (denervated muscle fibers); 2. considerable increase of fiber-type groupings of the slow type (reinnervated muscle fibers); 3. sparse presence of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC. Immuno-histochemical characteristics fluctuate from those with scarce fiber-type modulation and groupings to almost complete transformed muscles, going through a process in which isolated fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC fill the gaps among fiber groupings. Data suggest that lifelong high-level exercise allows the body to adapt to the consequences of the age-related denervation and that it preserves muscle structure and function by saving otherwise lost muscle fibers through recruitment to different slow motor units. This is an opposite behavior of that described in long term denervated or resting muscles. These effects of lifelong high level activity seems to act primarily on motor neurons, in particular on those always more active

  13. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  14. Investigation on a compact in-line multimode-single-mode-multimode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bin; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhi-bo; Feng, Suchun; Bai, Yunlong; Xu, Yao; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-06-01

    We carried out a detailed investigation on a compact in-line multimode single-mode multimode (MSM) fiber structure. Both theoretical modal and experimental setup were established to demonstrate the transmission characteristics and the corresponding responses of the applied strain and temperature. The proposed structure simply involves a section of the single-mode fiber (SMF) spliced to two sections of multimode fiber (MMF) and lead-in and lead-out SMFs. The excited environment-sensitive cladding modes together with the fundamental mode in the central SMF form a typical Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). We analyzed the transmission characteristics of the different length of the middle SMF and the MMF in detail. In the experiment, we obtained the extinction ratio of the MSM fiber structure based MZI comb spectrum which was up to 20 dB, and sensitivities of 0.7096 pm/με (0-2000 με) and 44.12 pm/°C (10-70 °C), which proved the potential sensing applications of the proposed fiber structure.

  15. An Intrinsic Fiber-Optic Sensor for Structure Lightning Current Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel. G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    An intrinsic optical-fiber sensor based on Faraday Effect is developed that is highly suitable for measuring lightning current on aircraft, towers and complex structures. Originally developed specifically for aircraft installations, it is light-weight, non-conducting, structure conforming, and is immune to electromagnetic interference, hysteresis and saturation. It can measure total current down to DC. When used on lightning towers, the sensor can help validate other sensors and lightning detection network measurements. Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Thus, the magnetic field strength can be determined from the light polarization change. By forming closed fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation yields the total current enclosed. A broadband, dual-detector, reflective polarimetric scheme allows measurement of both DC component and AC waveforms with a 60 dB dynamic range. Two systems were built that are similar in design but with slightly different sensitivities. The 1310nm laser system can measure 300 A - 300 kA, and has a 15m long sensing fiber. It was used in laboratory testing, including measuring current on an aluminum structure simulating an aircraft fuselage or a lightning tower. High current capabilities were demonstrated up to 200 kA at a lightning test facility. The 1550nm laser system can measure 400 A - 400 kA and has a 25m fiber length. Used in field measurements, excellent results were achieved in the summer of 2012 measuring rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT), Camp Blanding, Florida. In both systems increased sensitivity can be achieved with multiple fiber loops. The fiber optic sensor provides many unique capabilities not currently possible with traditional sensors. It represents an important new tool for lightning current measurement where low weight

  16. Alcohol sensor based on u-bent hetero-structured fiber optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrialova, Sefi N.; Hatta, Agus M.; Sekartedjo, Sekartedjo

    2016-11-01

    A sensor based on a fiber optic hetero-structure to determine the concentration of alcohol has been proposed. The structure of the sensing probe in this research is a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) which bent into Ushaped and soon called as SMS u-bent. The SMS structure was chosen to get a higher sensitivity. This research utilizes the principle of multimode interference and evanescent field by modifying the cladding with various alcohol concentration. Testing of the sensor's performance has been done by measuring the sensor's power output response to the length of the SMS fiber optic, bending diameter, and alcohol concentration. Based on the experiment result, the ubent SMS fiber optic with 50 mm bending diameter and 63 mm MMF lenght has the highest sensitivity, 3.87 dB/% and the minimum resolution, 0.26 x 10-3 %.

  17. Activated carbon fiber felt and polymer fiber as biofilm carrier in a modified University of Cape Town process for sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongkai

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms on fiber-based carriers have attracted much concern in wastewater treatment processes recently. In this study: (1) a novel sandwich structure fiber-based biofilm carrier was produced, which consisted of an inner core composed of polyacrylonitrile-based activated carbon fiber felt (PAN-ACFF) and an outer coat made of polyester reticular cloth with polypropylene fiber loops; (2) the novel carrier was filled in a step-feeding pilot-scale modified University of Cape Town process (MUCT) for sewage treatment; the MUCT contained a series of pre-anoxic/anaerobic/anoxic-1/anoxic-2/oxic tanks, wherein nitrification liquor was recycled to the anoxic-2 tank and an extra liquor return from the anoxic-1 to the pre-anoxic tank was set up; and (3) the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were continuously tested for two periods as operational parameters alternated. The optimum values were collected in Period II, when the influent loads were 2,100.6 ± 120.3 gCOD/(d m(3)), 205.5 ± 20.4 gTN/(d m(3)), 39.9 ± 3.9 gTP/(d m(3)), the removal percentages were 93.1 ± 1.1% of COD, 39.4 ± 3.5% of TN, and 84.6 ± 3.4% of TP. For COD, NH4(+)-N, and TP, the specific removal loads of filler were 291.5 ± 18.2, 22.9 ± 3.1, 4.8 ± 0.5 (g d)/kg.

  18. Development of Interpretation Algorithm for Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kara

    2002-12-01

    Increasingly, optical fiber sensors, and in particular Bragg grating sensors, are being used in aerospace structures due to their immunity to electrical noise and the ability to multiplex hundreds of sensors into a single optical fiber. This significantly reduces the cost per sensor as the number of fiber connections and demodulation systems required is also reduced. The primary objective of this project is to study the effects of mounting issues such as adhesion, surface roughness, and high strain gradients on the interpretation of the measured strain. This is performed through comparison with electrical strain gage benchmark data. The long-term goal is to integrate such optical fiber Bragg grating sensors into a structural integrity monitoring system for the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle. Previously, researchers at NASA Langley instrumented a composite wingbox with both optical fiber Bragg grating sensors and electrical strain gages during laboratory load-to-failure testing. A considerable amount of data was collected during these tests. For this project, data from two of the sensing optical fibers (each containing 800 Bragg grating sensors) were analyzed in detail. The first fiber studied was mounted in a straight line on the upper surface of the wingbox far from any structural irregularities. The results from these sensors showed a relatively large amount of noise compared to the electrical strain gages, but measured the same averaged strain curve. It was shown that the noise could be varied through the choice of input parameters in the data interpretation algorithm. Based upon the assumption that the strain remains constant along the gage length (a valid assumption for this fiber as confirmed by the measured grating spectra) this noise was significantly reduced. The second fiber was mounted on the lower surface of the wingbox in a pattern that circled surface cutouts and ran close to sites of impact damage, induced before the loading tests. As

  19. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  20. The role of multi-level structure for the improved photocatalytic performance of TiO2 fiber nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bitao; Xin, Junlian; Li, Jianjiao; Zheng, Tao; Wang, Qizhao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    A TiO2 multi-structured fiber nanomaterial was prepared via a template-assisted two-step method, and the effect of the pH value of the precursor solution on the structure of TiO2 nanofibers was mainly investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue solution was used as the model reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic property of the as-prepared TiO2 nanomaterials. Results indicated that the pH value of the precursor solution obviously influenced the formation and microstructure and photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 fiber nanomaterials. The multi-structured fiber nanomaterial showed better photocatalytic property. It was considered that high efficiencies of reactant molecules adsorption, light absorption, and separation of photogenerated e -- h + pairs played crucial roles for enhancing its photocatalytic property. In particular, the need of better understanding the relation of the light absorption and charge transport to the nanostructure has to be pointed out in this paper.

  1. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in structural design of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charette, R. F.; Hyer, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    The influence is investigated of a curvilinear fiber format on load carrying capacity of a layered fiber reinforced plate with a centrally located hole. A curvilinear fiber format is descriptive of layers in a laminate having fibers which are aligned with the principal stress directions in those layers. Laminates of five curvilinear fiber format designs and four straightline fiber format designs are considered. A quasi-isotropic laminate having a straightline fiber format is used to define a baseline design for comparison with the other laminate designs. Four different plate geometries are considered and differentiated by two values of hole diameter/plate width equal to 1/6 and 1/3, and two values of plate length/plate width equal to 2 and 1. With the plates under uniaxial tensile loading on two opposing edges, alignment of fibers in the curvilinear layers with the principal stress directions is determined analytically by an iteration procedure. In-plane tensile load capacity is computed for all of the laminate designs using a finite element analysis method. A maximum strain failure criterion and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion are applied to determine failure loads and failure modes. Resistance to buckling of the laminate designs to uniaxial compressive loading is analyzed using the commercial code Engineering Analysis Language. Results indicate that the curvilinear fiber format laminates have higher in-plane tensile load capacity and comparable buckling resistance relative to the straightline fiber format laminates.

  2. Fiber Optic Sensor Components and Systems for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, R.

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of the funded research effort has been the development of discrete and distributed fiber sensors and fiber optic centered opto-electronic networks for the intelligent monitoring of phenomena in various aerospace structures related to NASA Marshall specific applications. In particular, we have proposed and have been developing technologies that we believe to be readily transferrable and which involve new fabrication techniques. The associated sensors developed can be incorporated into the matrix or on the surfaces of structures for the purpose of sensing stress, strain, temperature-both low and high, pressure field variations, phase changes, and the presence of various chemical constituents.

  3. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The development of structurally efficient, metal-lined, glass-fiber composite pressure vessels. Both the current state-of-the-art and current problems are discussed along with fracture mechanics considerations for the metal liner. The design concepts used for metal-lined, glass-fiber, composite pressure vessels are described and the structural characteristics of the composite designs are compared with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. Results of a current program to evaluate flaw growth and fracture characteristics of the metal liners are reviewed and the impact of these results on composite pressure vessel designs is discussed.

  4. Alcohol sensor based on single-mode-multimode-single-mode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefina Yulias, R.; Hatta, A. M.; Sekartedjo, Sekartedjo

    2016-11-01

    Alcohol sensor based on Single-mode -Multimode-Single-mode (SMS) fiber structure is being proposed to sense alcohol concentration in alcohol-water mixtures. This proposed sensor uses refractive index sensing as its sensing principle. Fabricated SMS fiber structure had 40 m of multimode length. With power input -6 dBm and wavelength 1550 nm, the proposed sensor showed good response with sensitivity 1,983 dB per % v/v with measurement range 05 % v/v and measurement span 0,5% v/v.

  5. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  6. [Measurement of steel corrosion in concrete structures by analyzing long-period fiber grating spectrum character].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Liang, Da-Kai; Zhou, Bing

    2008-11-01

    The consideration on the durability of concrete structures with reinforcement corrosion has become a most urgent problem. A new technique to measure the corrosion of steel in concrete structures was proposed in the present paper. It is based on the microbending characteristic of long period optical grating (LPFG). The temperature spectum character and curvature spectrum character of long period optical fiber grating were studied first. It was shown that the transmission spectrum of long period optical fiber grating shifted right and the transmission of the resonance wavelength was invariable when the temperature increased, while the transmission spectrum of long period optical fiber grating became shallow when the curvature increased, the transmission of the resonance wavelength would increase and it was linear with the curvature. On the basis of the characteristic, a notch shaped pedestal was designed and a long period optical fiber grating was laid on the steel surface. With this method the radial expansion of the steel resulting from the steel corrosion would translate into the curvature of the long period optical fiber grating. The curvature of long period optical fiber grating could be obtained by analyzing the change of spectrum, and then the steel corrosion depth could be measured. This method is simple and immediate and is independent of the variety in temperature, strain and refractive index owing to the inimitable spectrum characteristic of long period optical fiber grating. From the experiment it was found that the precision of the corrosion depth was better than 1.2 microm, and the corrosion depth of 3 mm could be achieved. This measurement could be used to monitor the early to metaphase corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete structures.

  7. Production of continuous piezoelectric ceramic fibers for smart materials and active control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Jonathan D.; Weitz, Gregory E.; Luke, John E.; Cass, Richard B.; Jadidian, Bahram; Bhargava, Parag; Safari, Ahmad

    1997-05-01

    Advanced Cerametrics Inc. has conceived of and developed the Viscous-Suspension-Spinning Process (VSSP) to produce continuous fine filaments of nearly any powdered ceramic materials. VSSP lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fiber tows with 100 and 790 filaments have been spun in continuous lengths exceeding 1700 meters. Sintered PZT filaments typically are 10 - 25 microns in diameter and have moderate flexibility. Prior to carrier burnout and sintering, VSSP PZT fibers can be formed into 2D and 3D shapes using conventional textile and composite forming processes. While the extension of PZT is on the order of 20 microns per linear inch, a woven, wound or braided structure can contain very long lengths of PZT fiber and generate comparatively large output strokes from relatively small volumes. These structures are intended for applications such as bipolar actuators for fiber optic assembly and repair, vibration and noise damping for aircraft, rotorcraft, automobiles and home applications, vibration generators and ultrasonic transducers for medical and industrial imaging. Fiber and component cost savings over current technologies, such as the `dice-and-fill' method for transducer production, and the range of unique structures possible with continuous VSSP PZT fiber are discussed. Recent results have yielded 1-3 type composites (25 vol% PZT) with d33 equals 340 pC/N, K equals 470, and g33 equals 80 mV/N, kt equals 0.54, kp equals 0.19, dh equals 50.1pC/N and gh equals 13 mV/N.

  8. Mechanistic micro-structural theory of soft tissues growth and remodeling: tissues with unidirectional fibers.

    PubMed

    Lanir, Yoram

    2015-04-01

    A new mechanistic theory was developed for soft tissues growth and remodeling (G&R). The theory considers tissues with unidirectional fibers. It is based on the loading-dependent local turnover events of each constituent and on the resulting evolution of the tissue micro-structure, the tissue dimensions and its mechanical properties. The theory incorporates the specific mechanical properties and turnover kinetics of each constituent, thereby establishing a general framework which can serve for future integration of additional mechanisms involved in G&R. The feasibility of the theory was examined by considering a specific realization of tissues with one fibrous constituent (collagen fibers), assuming a specific loading-dependent first-order fiber's turnover kinetics and the fiber's deposition characteristics. The tissue was subjected to a continuous constant rate growth. Model parameters were adopted from available data. The resulting predictions show qualitative agreement with a number of well-known features of tissues including the fibers' non-uniform recruitment density distribution, the associated tissue convex nonlinear stress-stretch relationship, and the development of tissue pre-stretch and pre-stress states. These results show that mechanistic micro-structural modeling of soft tissue G&R based on first principles can successfully capture the evolution of observed tissues' structure and size, and of their associated mechanical properties.

  9. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  10. Fiber properties and their influence on paper structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrado Saucedo, Jose; Ramirez P., R.; Perez R., S.

    1997-08-01

    When we move our considerations of the components of paper, through the manufacture of paper, to the use of paper, we are analyzing the fundamental properties of paper related to its end uses. Paper as a product has a lot of possible uses and they are increasing, nevertheless it is very important in secondary products like corrugated board, etc. Every year the paper world production has an increase of approximately 1.6%. For the year 1994 it was 268,772,000 tons and during 1995 this production was 277,791,000 t. In Mexico for instance in 1994/2,860,162 tons and 1995/3,047,153 tons plus paper importation is possible to reach a per capita consumption of 35.8 kg. All paper quality kinds demand some special paper properties, which require technology, human resources and fibers properties. Surely there are fields to investigate by comparing the fundamental properties of paper and board with those of other materials, that is the reason why research must be done, despite the recent difficult times. In hard times its done distinction on switch of founds from fundamental to applied research and research for immediate development, this is understandable. Nevertheless, to study the relation between fibers and end use performance could well capture and even create a yet unknown market. Rather than adopt the attitude that 'here is paper, let us find markets for it' such research into the fundamental properties of the product will give one a clearer understanding of how it can satisfy future demands and meet possible future specifications. Because it is in meeting these specifications that the future of the industry must depend, it must be clear that money spent in this way now may not produce immediate quantifiable benefits, but it will produce the essential reserves that will in future be turned to good account by the industry.

  11. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  12. Structure and function of myelinated nerve fibers in the rabbit eye following ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenyi; Cringle, Stephen J; Su, Er-Ning; Yu, Paula K; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Sun, Xinghuai; Morgan, William; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2006-02-01

    The rabbit eye presents a valuable model to study the effects of vascular occlusion on the function and structure of myelinated nerve fibers. The rabbit eye has a band of myelinated nerve fibers within the intraocular compartment that are supplied by a narrow band of retinal vasculature. These vessels were transiently occluded ( approximately 8 hours) using laser photocoagulation and the transmission of electrical signals along the nerve fibers was assessed by recording the visual evoked response (VER). Morphological damage was assessed by histological techniques. The ischemic insult produced no permanent change in retinal function as assessed by electroretinography, but the VER was suppressed, indicating failure of nerve fiber transmission. Histologically, the visible damage to the region supported by the retinal vasculature worsened following reperfusion, showing evidence of demyelination and necrosis followed by macrophage responses and gliosis. This rabbit model of ischemia/reperfusion of the retinal vasculature offers a rare opportunity to reliably study the response of myelinated nerve fibers to ischemia/reperfusion insults and has demonstrated the susceptibility of myelinated nerve fibers to such insults.

  13. Structure activity relationships of spiramycins.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Sano, H; Sunazuka, T

    1985-07-01

    Sixty-six derivatives of spiramycin I and neospiramycin I were synthesized and evaluated by four parameters, MIC, affinity to ribosomes (ID50), therapeutic effect in mice and retention time in HPLC. Among the derivatives, 3,3'',4''-tri-O-propionyl- and 3,4''-di-O-acetyl-3''-O-butyrylspiramycin I showed the highest therapeutic effect which was superior to acetylspiramycin. Structure activity relationships of spiramycins are discussed.

  14. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  15. Determination of Cellulose Fiber Structure Using IR Reflectance Spectroscopy of Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and non-destructive method for analyzing the structure of cellulose fibers using IR reflectance spectroscopy from a paper surface was developed and verified for correctness. IR absorption and reflectance spectra of standard paper samples of known composition (sheets made of four fibers of different origin without additives and with additives of kaolin and chalk) were analyzed. Good correlations between these two spectral methods were found for the studied samples. Calibration curves were useful for assessing the structure of cellulose samples from XVIth century historical paper. Data on the degree of cellulose ordering that were obtained from the paper reflectance spectra indicated that the studied sheets consisted mainly of flax fibers with added cotton. This agreed fully with the historical fact that the studied samples were rag papers.

  16. An all fiber-optic multi-parameter structure health monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chennan; Yu, Zhihao; Wang, Anbo

    2016-09-05

    In this work, we present an all fiber-optics based multi-parameter structure health monitoring system, which is able to monitor strain, temperature, crack and thickness of metal structures. This system is composed of two optical fibers, one for laser-acoustic excitation and the other for acoustic detection. A nano-second 1064 nm pulse laser was used for acoustic excitation and a 2 mm fiber Bragg grating was used to detect the acoustic vibration. The feasibility of this system was demonstrated on an aluminum test piece by the monitoring of the temperature, strain and thickness changes, as well as the appearance of an artificial crack. The multiplexing capability of this system was also preliminarily demonstrated.

  17. Design about a novel encapsulation structure of DFB fiber laser hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Huang, Jun-bin

    2014-07-01

    To restrain the fluctuation of the frequency response curves of the Distributed Feedback (DFB) fiber laser applied in underwater sound detection, based on the principles of Helmholtz resonator, an encapsulation structure is designed, which via protective effects of the trepanning sleeve and the tension added to both ends of the fiber laser. The dynamics is numerically analyzed using the finite element software ANSYS, and the prototype of the new kind of hydrophone based on the structure is manufactured and tested utilizing the vibration jet-method. The results showed that the fluctuation of the frequency response of the DFB fiber laser was restrained effectively within the frequency range of 20 Hz to 800 Hz, and acoustic pressure sensitivity reached to -131dB with the fluctuation less than +/-1.5dB.

  18. Effects of hemicellulose removal on cellulose fiber structure and recycling characteristics of eucalyptus pulp.

    PubMed

    Wan, JinQuan; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Qing

    2010-06-01

    Eucalyptus pulp fibers with large differences in cellulose and hemicellulose proportions but similar lignin contents were produced by partial removal of the hemicellulose and studied using Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS (13)C NMR) in combination with spectral fitting, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). There were remarkable differences in both cellulose fibril structure, pore structure and cellulose supermolecular structure between the samples. CP/MAS (13)C NMR combined with spectral fitting demonstrated an increase in average fibril aggregate size (17.9-22.2 nm) with decreasing hemicellulose content. AFM observations revealed that when the hemicellulose content decreased from 27.62% to 19.80%, the average diameters of pores decreased by 12.53%, but increased by 13.55% when the hemicellulose content decreased from 19.80% to 9.09%. XRD and FTIR analysis indicated that cellulose crystallinity increased with decreasing hemicellulose content. The low and high hemicellulose-containing pulps had very different recycling characteristics, which may be explained by the changes observed at cellulose fiber structure level. Fibrils appear to aggregate and form a more compact structure when the hemicellulose is removed, which was caused by a coalescence of the cellulose microfibrils. The removal of hemicellulose had disadvantageous influence on the accessibility of fibers and enhanced fiber flattening during drying, leading to increased sheet density and increased hornification.

  19. Carbon fiber epoxy composites for both strengthening and health monitoring of structures.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-05-06

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the "wet process", which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring.

  20. Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites for Both Strengthening and Health Monitoring of Structures

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the “wet process”, which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring. PMID:25954955

  1. FLPP NGL Structural Subsystems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaredson, D.; Ramusat, G.; Appel, S.; Cardone, T.; Persson, J.; Baiocco, P.; Lavelle, F.; Bouilly, Th.

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP) is the basis for new paradigms, investigating the key elements, logic and roadmaps to prepare the development of the safe, reliable and low cost next European Launch Vehicle (LV) for access to space (dubbed NGL - Next Generation LV), with an initial operational capability mid-next decade. In addition to carry cargo to conventional GTO or SSO, the European NGL has to be flexible enough to cope with new pioneering institutional missions as well as the evolving commercial payloads market. This achievement is broached studying three main areas relevant to ELVs: System concepts, Propulsion and Core Technology During the preliminary design activity, a number of design alternatives concerning NGL main structural subsystems have been investigated. Technology is one of the ways to meet the NGL challenges to either improve the performances or to reduce the cost or both. The relevant requirements allow to steer a ‘top-down’ approach for their conception and to propose the most effective technologies. Furthermore, all these technology developments represent a significant ‘bottom-up’ approach investment and concern a large range of activities. The structural subsystems portfolio of the FLPP ‘Core Technology’ activity encompasses major cutting-edge challenges for maturation of the various subsystems leading to reduce overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic propellants, significantly reducing fabrication and operations cost, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of concurrent engineering methods will allow developments of performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost yielding to safe, low-risk technical approaches for a future development. Potential ability of these advanced structural LV technologies to satisfy the system requirements of the NGL and their current

  2. Carbonic anhydrase immobilized on hollow fiber membranes using glutaraldehyde activated chitosan for artificial lung applications.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, J D; Arazawa, D T; Ye, S-H; Shankarraman, V; Wagner, W R; Federspiel, W J

    2013-11-01

    Extracorporeal CO2 removal from circulating blood is a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of acute respiratory failure. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase accelerates CO2 removal within gas exchange devices by locally catalyzing HCO3 (-) into gaseous CO2 within the blood. In this work, we covalently immobilized carbonic anhydrase on the surface of polypropylene hollow fiber membranes using glutaraldehyde activated chitosan tethering to amplify the density of reactive amine functional groups for enzyme immobilization. XPS and a colorimetric amine assay confirmed higher amine densities on the chitosan coated fiber compared to control fiber. Chitosan/CA coated fibers exhibited accelerated CO2 removal in scaled-down gas exchange devices in buffer and blood (115% enhancement vs. control, 37% enhancement vs. control, respectively). Carbonic anhydrase immobilized directly on hollow fiber membranes without chitosan tethering resulted in no enhancement in CO2 removal. Additionally, fibers coated with chitosan/carbonic anhydrase demonstrated reduced platelet adhesion when exposed to blood compared to control and heparin coated fibers.

  3. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  4. Two structurally discrete GH7-cellobiohydrolases compete for the same cellulosic substrate fiber

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose consisting of arrays of linear beta-1,4 linked glucans, is the most abundant carbon-containing polymer present in biomass. Recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose towards enzymatic degradation is widely reported and is the result of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds within and among the linear glucans. Cellobiohydrolases are enzymes that attack crystalline cellulose. Here we report on two forms of glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases common to all Aspergillii that attack Avicel, cotton cellulose and other forms of crystalline cellulose. Results Cellobiohydrolases Cbh1 and CelD have similar catalytic domains but only Cbh1 contains a carbohydrate-binding domain (CBD) that binds to cellulose. Structural superpositioning of Cbh1 and CelD on the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A 3-dimensional structure, identifies the typical tunnel-like catalytic active site while Cbh1 shows an additional loop that partially obstructs the substrate-fitting channel. CelD does not have a CBD and shows a four amino acid residue deletion on the tunnel-obstructing loop providing a continuous opening in the absence of a CBD. Cbh1 and CelD are catalytically functional and while specific activity against Avicel is 7.7 and 0.5 U.mg prot-1, respectively specific activity on pNPC is virtually identical. Cbh1 is slightly more stable to thermal inactivation compared to CelD and is much less sensitive to glucose inhibition suggesting that an open tunnel configuration, or absence of a CBD, alters the way the catalytic domain interacts with the substrate. Cbh1 and CelD enzyme mixtures on crystalline cellulosic substrates show a strong combinatorial effort response for mixtures where Cbh1 is present in 2:1 or 4:1 molar excess. When CelD was overrepresented the combinatorial effort could only be partially overcome. CelD appears to bind and hydrolyze only loose cellulosic chains while Cbh1 is capable of opening new cellulosic substrate molecules away from the cellulosic

  5. Surface characterization of carbon fiber polymer composites and aluminum alloys after laser interference structuring

    DOE PAGES

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; ...

    2016-05-03

    Here, the increasing use of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (a) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (b) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (c) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg - T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques weremore » used. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot was investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on surface morphology.« less

  6. Surface characterization of carbon fiber polymer composites and aluminum alloys after laser interference structuring

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles David; Daniel, Claus

    2016-05-03

    Here, the increasing use of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (a) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (b) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (c) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg - T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques were used. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot was investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on surface morphology.

  7. A few mode fiber curvature sensor based on two spherical-shape structures modal interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinghu; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Shunyang; Liu, Qin; Li, Qifeng; Xie, Haiyang; Fu, Guangwei; Bi, Weihong; Li, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the equilibrium between fiber sensor performance and cost, a curvature sensor based on Few Mode Fiber(FMF) is proposed. A length of FMF is spliced with waist enlarge between two Single mode Fibers(SMFs) to form two spherical- shape structure. Fiber core mode interfere with clad mode due to the excite and couple function of spherical-shape structure, respectively. The phase difference between the cladding and core regions of the fiber changes with the external strain increase, and then the interference spectrum changes. Two sensors with different length of FMF are fabricated, and the transmission spectrum are obtained. The result shows the optical power at certain wavelength is increasing with the curvature increasing. When the curvature range is 0 0.42m-1 and the FMF is 5.7cm, the curvature sensitivity can be 11.22dB/m-1. When the FMF is 5.9cm, the curvature sensitivity can be climbed to 14.08dB/m-1.

  8. Activated carbon fiber for heterogeneous activation of persulfate: implication for the decolorization of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabin; Hong, Wei; Huang, Tianyin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Wenwei; Wang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used as a green catalyst to activate persulfate (PS) for oxidative decolorization of azo dye. ACF demonstrated a higher activity than activated carbon (AC) to activate PS to decolorize Orange G (OG). The decolorization efficiency of OG increased as ACF loading, PS dosage, and temperature increased. OG decolorization followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, and the activation energy was 40.902 kJ/mol. pH had no apparent effect on OG decolorization. Radical quenching experiments with various radical scavengers (e.g., alcohols, phenol) showed that radical-induced decolorization of OG took place on the surface of ACF, and both SO4 (·-) and HO· were responsible for OG decolorization. The impact of inorganic salts was also evaluated because they are important compositions of dye wastewater. Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) exhibited a promoting effect on OG decolorization, and the accelerating rate increased with elevating dosage of ions. Addition of Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) could increase the adsorption of OG on ACF surface, thus favorable for OG decolorization caused by the surface-bound SO4 (·-) and HO·. Conversely, HCO3 (-) and humic acid (HA) slightly inhibited OG decolorization. The azo band and naphthalene ring on OG were remarkably destructed to other intermediates and finally mineralized to CO2 and H2O.

  9. Development of a new fiber optic vibration sensor and its application to structural health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kazuro; Ohsawa, Isamu; Kanai, Makoto; Machijima, Yuichi; Matsumura, Humio; Nagata, Keiichi

    2003-08-01

    A new fiber-optic vibration sensor has been developed and applied to structural health monitoring. The sensor is based on new finding that frequency of light wave transmitted through an bended optical fiber is shifted by vibration at the bended region. The principle can be explained that Doppler's effect of the light wave which changes its direction in the optical fiber. Several configurations of the sensor have been designed, and very high sensitivity has been achieved in the extremely wide frequency band by applying laser Doppler velocimetory. Practically numberless sensing points can be arranged on a single optical fiber, and regional monitoring which covers large area of the structures can be achieved. The performance of the sensor is examined experimentally by applying to detection of AE signals and elastic wave propagation in the composite material and adhesive joint test specimens. The experimental results show that the sensitivity is almost equivalent to PZT sensor and that failure of composite materials and debonding in the adhesive joint can be detected successfully. The durable, low-cost and high-sensitive sensor can show a new scope to structural health monitoring in the very variety of applications, for examples, composite aerospace structures, energy plants, piping system, infrastructures such as bridges and tunnels, surface and underground facilities. University and industry collaboration initiated a new business of new NDE for health monitoring and diagnostics.

  10. A state-of-the-art assessment of active structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A state-of-the-art assessment of active structures with emphasis towards the applications in aeronautics and space is presented. It is felt that since this technology area is growing at such a rapid pace in many different disciplines, it is not feasible to cover all of the current research but only the relevant work as relates to aeronautics and space. Research in smart actuation materials, smart sensors, and control of smart/intelligent structures is covered. In smart actuation materials, piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, shape memory, electrorheological, and electrostrictive materials are covered. For sensory materials, fiber optics, dielectric loss, and piezoelectric sensors are examined. Applications of embedded sensors and smart sensors are discussed.

  11. Soleus Fiber Force and Maximal Shortening Velocity After Non-Weight Bearing with Intermittent Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Bangart, Jill J.; Karhanek, Miloslav; Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of intermittent weight bearing (IWB) as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing (NWB)-induced alterations in soleus type 1 fiber force (in mN), tension (P(sub o); force per fiber cross-sectional area in kN/sq m), and maximal unloaded shortening velocity (V(sub o), in fiber lengths/s). Adult rats were assigned to one of the following groups: normal weight bearing (WB), 14 days of hindlimb NWB (NWB group), and 14 days of hindlimb NWB with IWB treatments (IWB group). The IWB treatment consisted of four 10-min periods of standing WB each day. Single, chemically permeabilized soleus fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor and were studied at maximal Ca(2+) activation, after which type 1 fiber myosin heavy-chain composition was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. NWB resulted in a loss in relative soleus mass (-45%), with type 1 fibers displaying reductions in diameter (-28%) and peak isometric force (-55%) and an increase in V(sub o) (+33%). In addition, NWB induced a 16% reduction in type 1 fiber P., a 41% reduction in type 1 fiber peak elastic modulus [E(sub o), defined as ((delta)force/(delta)length x (fiber length/fiber cross-sectional area] and a significant increase in the P(sub o)/E(sub o) ratio. In contrast to NWB, IWB reduced the loss of relative soleus mass (by 22%) and attenuated alterations in type 1 fiber diameter (by 36%), peak force (by 29%), and V(sub o)(by 48%) but had no significant effect on P(sub o), E(sub o) or P(sub o)/E(sub o). These results indicate that a modest restoration of WB activity during 14 days of NWB is sufficient to attenuate type 1 fiber atrophy and to partially restore type 1 peak isometric force and V(sub o) to WB levels. However, the NWB-induced reductions in P(sub o) and E(sub o) which we hypothesize to be due to a decline in the number and stiffness of cross bridges, respectively, are considerably less responsive to this

  12. FBG and FOPS for local and global structural health monitoring on a single fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Muneesh; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Ching, Wei Wen; Asundi, A.

    2015-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and fiber optic polarimetric sensors (FOPS) have been widely researched and implemented for structural health monitoring (SHM). FBG essentially provides localized strain information, while FOPS gives a global indication of the structural health of materials. An FBG written on the polarization maintaining (PM) fiber can thus be used for both global structural monitoring and local strain sensing. However each sensor has to be used with its own hardware and processing. For gratings written on PM fibers two Bragg reflections, corresponding to two modes of polarization, are observed. While both Bragg wavelengths shift under longitudinal strain in unison, their relative peak amplitude does not change. In this paper, a novel concept is proposed which makes the peak amplitudes responsive to the longitudinal strain. This relative amplitude of both the peaks is used for the first time to determine the state of polarization (SOP) with no additional optical systems. With this additional information on SOP, PM-FBGs can be used for both, local and global SHM simultaneously. Further, a new design has been proposed which gives improved information on the damaged location in beam structures. This can be further extended to other complex geometries.

  13. Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of Cotton-made Activated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ka Lok

    Activated carbon (AC) is an important functional material due to its outstanding adsorption ability. Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has many advantages over other types of AC: It mainly possesses micropores and has large surface area. Its fibrous structure assures fast intraparticle adsorption kinetics. Finally, it can be made into felt and fabric forms, which would not hinder gas flow and could be easily recollected after use. However, ACF is expensive due to the lack of low cost precursor so its application is restricted. This work aims to use low cost cotton fiber as an ACF precursor. In this work, ACF was successfully synthesized by using raw cotton via ZnCl2 activation. The effects of the sintering temperature during activation, the ZnCl2 concentration during infiltration and the post-treatment after activation on our samples were studied. Our ACF products were characterized via various methods. It was found that our samples retained the fibrous structure of cotton. They contained trace of carbon-oxygen surface groups and were mainly composed of micropores. Their BET surface area (SBET) and pore volume (Vpore) were up to ˜2050 m2/g and 1 cm3/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm of our samples in the Methylene blue (MB) adsorption were studied. The adsorption was very fast and almost reached equilibrium after an hour. Because of their high SBET, the saturated MB capacity in our ACF was found to be 597 mg/g and higher than other commercial AC. The effect of solution pH value on MB adsorption capacity was studied. We found that the basic condition favored MB adsorption while acidic condition lowered the adsorption ability. Adsorption kinetics, saturated adsorption volume (Vads) and desorption process of moisture, ethanol vapor, methanol vapor and acetone vapor by our samples were also evaluated. The adsorption of methanol vapor, ethanol vapor and acetone vapor reached equilibrium within 10 minutes. Our sample also adsorbed moisture

  14. Twist and temperature characteristics of the PD-NSN fiber structure based on in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue; Sun, Chunran; Xiao, Han; Dong, Changbin; Jian, Shuisheng

    2017-01-01

    A novel polarization-dependent (PD) no core-single mode-no core (NSN) fiber structure for twist and temperature sensing has been experimentally investigated. The proposed structure simply involves a section of polarization maintain fiber sandwiched into NSN fiber structure, only using the splicing method. We have analyzed and demonstrated the transmission characteristics of the no core fiber (NCF) with the different lengths. Experimental results indicate that the extinction ratio of the PD-NSN fiber structure comb spectrum based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) various with twist rate. The maximum sensitivity of 0.33904 dB/(rad/m) for range from -240° to 360° is achieved. The temperature sensitivity of the proposed structure reaches 41.89 pm/°C for temperature ranging from 20 to 70 °C in the experiment. By using the peak-wavelength discrimination method, the proposed sensor can overcome the temperature and twist cross-sensitivity effects.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of electrospun poly(butylenes succinate) fiber mats containing PVP-capped silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ligang; Wang, Pingli; Zhao, Zhiguo; Ji, Junhui

    2013-12-01

    In this study, biodegradable poly(butylenes succinate) (PBS) fiber mats containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by the electrospinning process. Small AgNPs (<10 nm) were simply synthesized using polyvinylpyrrolidone as the capping agent as well as the reductant. The morphology of the PBS-AgNPs fiber mats and the distribution of the AgNPs were well characterized by TEM and SEM. The release of Ag from the PBS fiber mats was quantitively determined by ICP. The PBS fiber mats with 0.29 % AgNPs content showed strong antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli with the efficacy as high as 99 %. The effective bactericidal activity on E. coli was demonstrated for a short contacting time with the PBS-AgNPs fiber mats. In addition, the long-term release performance of Ag from the fiber mats can keep inhibiting the bacterial growth in the mats over a long period of time.

  16. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  17. Pore geometry in woven fiber structures: 0{degree}/90{degree} plain-weave cloth layup preform

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Stock, S.R.; Butts, M.D.; Starr, T.L.; Breunig, T.M.; Kinney, J.H.

    1998-05-01

    Composite preform fiber architectures range from the very simple to the complex, and the extremes are typified by parallel continuous fibers and complicated three-dimensional woven structures. Subsequent processing of these preforms to produce dense composites may depend critically on the geometry of the interfiber porosity. The goal of this study is to fully characterize the structure of a 0{degree}/90{degree} cloth layup preform using x-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM). This characterization includes the measurement of intercloth channel widths and their variability, the transverse distribution of through-cloth holes, and the distribution of preform porosity. The structure of the intercloth porosity depends critically on the magnitude and direction of the offset between adjacent cloth layers. The structures observed include two-dimensional networks of open pipes linking adjacent holes, arrays of parallel one-dimensional pipes linking holes, and relatively closed channels exhibiting little structure, and these different structures would appear to offer very different resistances to gas flow through the preform. These measurements, and future measurements for different fiber architectures, will yield improved understanding of the role of preform structure on processing. {copyright} {ital 1998 Materials Research Society.}

  18. Strain measurement in concrete structure using distributed fiber optic sensing based on Brillouin scattering with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforcing vinyl ester rod and bonded to steel reinforcing bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhoa, Cia Y.; Bao, Xiaoyi; Bremner, Theodore W.; Brown, Anthony W.; DeMerchant, Michael D.; Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    2001-08-01

    The strain distribution in a 1.65m long reinforced concrete beam was measured using the distributed fiber optic sensing system developed by Dr. Bao's Fiber Optic Group at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) with center point and two point loading pattern. A spatial resolution of 0.5m was used. Past experience has shown that the bare optical fiber is too fragile to act as a sensor in a reinforced concrete structure. Therefore, in this experiment, two methods of protecting the fibers were incorporated into the concrete beam to increase the fibers' resistance to mechanical damages and prevent chemical reaction from occurring between the fibers and the concrete. The fibers were either embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced vinyl ester (GFRP) rods or bonded to the steel reinforcing bars with an epoxy adhesive. The strain at midspan of the beam as measured by the distributed sensing system was compared with the readings of electrical resistance strain (ERS) and mechanical strain (MS) gauges. The experimental results showed that the pultruded GFRP rods effectively protected the fibers, but the strain readings from the GFRP rods did not agree with the strain measurement of the ERS on the steel reinforcing bars due to the possible slippage of the rods in the concrete. However, the fiber bonded to steel reinforcing bars produced more accurate results and confirmed the potential of this technology to accurately measure strain in a reinforced concrete structure. As expected, the fiber with direct contact to the concrete and steel reinforcing bar, can effectively measured the strain under center point or two point loading.

  19. Development and Ground-Test Validation of Fiber Optic Sensor Attachment Techniques for Hot Structures Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony; Hudson, Larry D.; Richards, W. Lance

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Optic Strain Measurements: a) Successfully attached silica fiber optic sensors to both metallics and composites; b) Accomplished valid EFPI strain measurements to 1850 F; c) Successfully attached EFPI sensors to large scale hot-structures; and d) Attached and thermally validated FBG bond and epsilon(sub app). Future Development a) Improve characterization of sensors on C-C and C-SiC substrates; b) Apply application to other composites such as SiC-SiC; c) Assist development of interferometer based Sapphire sensor currently being conducted under a Phase II SBIR; and d) Complete combined thermal/mechanical testing of FBG on composite substrates in controlled laboratory environment.

  20. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design concepts used for metal-lined glass-fiber composite pressure vessels are described, comparing the structural characteristics of the composite designs with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. The discussion centers around two distinctly different design concepts, which provide the basis for defining metal lined composite vessels as either (1) thin-metal lined, or (2) glass fiber reinforced (GFR). Both concepts are described and associated development problems are identified and discussed. Relevant fabrication and testing experience from a series of NASA-Lewis Research Center development efforts is presented.

  1. A review of harsh environment fiber optic sensing networks for bridge structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Chen, Weimin; Fu, Yumei; Huang, Shanglian

    2006-08-01

    The Opto-electronic Technology Lab of Chongqing University (OTLCU) has been working on bridge structural health monitoring using fiber optic sensors in the past decade. A remote sensing network based on the Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (EFPI) fiber sensor was developed and implemented on several large bridges in Chongqing, China. In this paper, a brief review of the OTLCU's research progress in this field was presented. Contrastive experiments between the EFPI strain sensor and the electrical strain patch (ESP) were introduced. Both internal embedding and surface mounting of the EFPI were studied. The design of the sensing network and two implementation examples were discussed, and some representative monitoring results were given.

  2. NDE of Fiber Reinforced Foam Composite Structures for Future Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, james; Roth, Don; Hopkins, Dale

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the complexities of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber reinforced foam composite structures to be used for aerospace vehicles in the future.Various views of fiber reinforced foam materials are shown and described. Conventional methods of NDE for composites are reviewed such as Micro-computed X-Ray Tomography, Thermography, Shearography, and Phased Array Ultrasonics (PAUT). These meth0ods appear to work well on the face sheet and face sheet ot core bond, they do not provide adequate coverage for the webs. There is a need for additional methods that will examine the webs and web to foam core bond.

  3. Simplified design procedures for fiber composite structural components/joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified step-by-step design procedures are summarized, which are suitable for the preliminary design of composite structural components such as panels (laminates) and composite built-up structures (box beams). Similar procedures are also summarized for the preliminary design of composite bolted and adhesively bonded joints. The summary is presented in terms of sample design cases complemented with typical results. Guidelines are provided which can be used in the design selection process of composite structural components/joints. Also, procedures to account for cyclic loads, hygrothermal effects and lamination residual stresses are included.

  4. Integrin activation and structural rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Junichi; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-08-01

    Among adhesion receptor families, integrins are particularly important in biological processes that require rapid modulation of adhesion and de-adhesion. Activation on a timescale of < 1 s of beta2 integrins on leukocytes and beta3 integrins on platelets enables deposition of these cells at sites of inflammation or vessel wall injury. Recent crystal, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electron microscope (EM) structures of integrins and their domains lead to a unifying mechanism of activation for both integrins that contain and those that lack an inserted (I) domain. The I domain adopts two alternative conformations, termed open and closed. In striking similarity to signaling G-proteins, rearrangement of a Mg2+-binding site is linked to large conformational movements in distant backbone regions. Mutations that stabilize a particular conformation show that the open conformation has high affinity for ligand, whereas the closed conformation has low affinity. Movement of the C-terminal alpha-helix 10 A down the side of the domain in the open conformation is sufficient to increase affinity at the distal ligand-binding site 9,000-fold. This C-terminal "bell-rope" provides a mechanism for linkage to conformational movements in other domains. Recent structures and functional studies reveal interactions between beta-propeller, I, and I-like domains in the integrin headpiece, and a critical role for integrin epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains in the stalk region. The headpiece of the integrin faces down towards the membrane in the inactive conformation, and extends upward in a "switchblade"-like opening upon activation. These long-range structural rearrangements of the entire integrin molecule involving interdomain contacts appear closely linked to conformational changes within the I and I-like domains, which result in increased affinity and competence for ligand binding.

  5. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuday, Eric C; Olree, Kenneth S; Horch, Kenneth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation. PMID:16863593

  6. MoXy fiber with active cooling cap for bovine prostate vaporization with high power 200W 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Steven Y.; Kang, Hyun Wook; Pirzadeh, Homa; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    A novel MoXyTM fiber delivery device with Active Cooling Cap (ACCTM) is designed to transmit up to 180W of 532 nm laser light to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Under such high power tissue ablation, effective cooling is key to maintaining fiber power transmission and ensuring the reliability of the fiber delivery device To handle high power and reduce fiber degradation, the MoXy fiber features a larger core size (750 micrometer) and an internal fluid channel to ensure better cooling of the fiber tip to prevent the cap from burning, detaching, or shattering during the BPH treatment. The internal cooling channel was created with a metal cap and tubing that surrounds the optical fiber. In this study MoXy fibers were used to investigate the effect of power levels of 120 and 200 W on in-vitro bovine prostate ablation using a 532 nm XPSTM laser system. For procedures requiring more than 100 kJ, the MoXy fiber at 200W removed tissue at twice the rate of the current HPS fiber at 120W. The fiber maintained a constant tissue vaporization rate during the entire tissue ablation process. The coagulation at 200W was about 20% thicker than at 120W. In conclusion, the new fibers at 200W doubled the tissue removal rate, maintained vaporization efficiency throughout delivery of 400kJ energy, and induced similar coagulation to the existing HPS fiber at 120W.

  7. Mechanical properties of high performance fibers vis-a-vis applications in flexible structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Varunesh

    Some of the critical properties of high performance organic fibers and fiber assemblies have been addressed vis-a-vis their applications in flexible structural composites. These include: tensile properties; mechanical properties under complex modes of deformation; creep at high tensile loads; changes in physical properties due to thermo-mechanical/chemical treatments used in manufacturing of reinforced rubber goods. The axial elastic modulus of fibers and tautly twisted filament assemblies of high performance organic polymers have been measured along with their crystalline orientation distributions. Based on well established procedures in continuum mechanics of axially symmetric structures, a quantitative relationship has been derived to relate the axial elastic modulus to the second and fourth moment of average crystalline orientation distribution. The latter was determined by X-ray diffraction measurements with yarns. This model, valid for single-phase materials, has been found to provide an excellent fit of data from twisted yams of aromatic polyamide and highly ordered polyethylene fibers, with a wide range of overall crystalline orientation distributions. An important property of concern in engineering applications of polymeric filament assemblies of high performance organic fibers is creep. In this study, creep deformation data of gel-spun Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylne (UHMWPE) SpectraRTM 1000 yams have been fitted to a model obtained through an empirical mechanical analog of the viscoelastic process. The non-linear viscoelastic model composed of stress-dependent non-linear mechanical analogs qualitatively predicted the creep response to a series of step-loads applied on the UHMWPE yarns. To understand the mechanical properties of high performance organic fibers under combined bending and extension, a simple pin-test procedure has been employed to characterize fibers and twisted yarns. The results obtained from the test have been interpreted with

  8. Electrically and Hybrid-Induced Muscle Activations: Effects of Muscle Size and Fiber Type

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Kelly; Faghri, Pouran D.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES) frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz) on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and vastus lateralis (VL)) was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years) participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1) compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) force, and 2) compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz) induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG. PMID:27990244

  9. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train.

  10. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  11. On the structure of nonlinear constitutive equations for fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, Stefan

    1992-01-01

    The structure of constitutive equations for nonlinear multiaxial behavior of transversely isotropic fiber reinforced metal matrix composites subject to proportional loading was investigated. Results from an experimental program were combined with numerical simulations of the composite behavior for complex stress to reveal the full structure of the equations. It was found that the nonlinear response can be described by a quadratic flow-potential, based on the polynomial stress invariants, together with a hardening rule that is dominated by two different hardening mechanisms.

  12. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  13. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  14. Damage detection in FRP structures using fiber Bragg grating dynamic strain sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhu, Yinian; Hui, Li; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2011-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors have become widely used for structural health monitoring in recent decades. The aim of this research is to characterize the dynamic failure signals emitted in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) stay cable and specimens using Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and two types of interferometric demodulation systems, namely Michelson interferometer (MI) and two-wave mixing interferometer (TWMI) for detection. Due to its one-dimensional form, only one FBG and the Michelson interferometer are used for damage monitoring in a carbon FRP stay cable under various types of loading. Michelson interferometer is capable of detecting frequency contents extending up to 500 kHz, where frequency contents below 250 kHz are categorized as matrix failure and those above 300 kHz corresponded to fiber failure. Two channels of FBGs are used with the TWM interferometer to track local damage in coupon-size FRP samples. Using TWM scheme, continuous and burst acoustic emission events are detected with frequency responses extending up to 125 kHz in coupon-size GFRP specimens, limited only by the sampling rate of the data acquisition system. The experimental results suggest that both types of FBG demodulation systems may be suitable for monitoring high frequency mechanical strains in civil structures, providing a tool for local structural damage detection.

  15. Computation of macro-fiber composite integrated thin-walled smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.; Chen, M.; Bai, J.; Li, J.

    2016-07-01

    Due to high flexibility, reliability, and strong actuation forces, piezo fiber based composite smart material, macro-fiber composite (MFC), is increasingly applied in various fields for vibration suppression, shape control, and health monitoring. The complexity arrangement of MFC materials makes them difficult in numerical simulations. This paper develops a linear electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model for composite laminated thin-walled smart structures bonded with MFC patches considering arbitrary piezo fiber orientation. Two types of MFCs are considered, namely, MFC-d31 in which the d 31 effect dominates the actuation forces, and MFC-d33 which mainly uses the d 33 effect. The proposed FE model is validated by static analysis of an MFC bonded smart plate.

  16. Structural and dynamic characterization of ultrafine fibers based on the poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-dipyridamole system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Karpova, S. G.; Staroverova, O. V.; Krutikova, A. A.; Orlov, N. A.; Kucherenko, E. L.; Iordanskii, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    The fibrous materials (the mats) based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) containing the drug, dipiridomole (DPD) were produced by electrospinning (ES). Thermophysical and dynamical properties of the single filaments and the mats were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and probe electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The effect of annealing temperature on the structure and crystallinity of the fibers was examined. It was shown that the loading of DPD influences on both the melting enthalpy and the morphology of the fibers. Besides the analysis of EPR spectra revealed that there are two populations of spin-probes distributed in the rigid and nonrigid amorphous regions of the PHB fibers respectively. For all fibrous materials with different content of DPD (0-5%) the correlation between thermophysical (DSC) and dynamic data (EPR) was observed.

  17. Flexural retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures using Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Ignacio

    An experimental study will be carried out to determine the suitability of Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates (GNFRP) manufactured with hemp fibers, with the purpose of using them as structural materials for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Four identical RC beams, 96 inches long, are tested for the investigation, three control beams and one test beam. The first three beams are used as references; one unreinforced, one with one layer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), one with two layers of CFRP, and one with n layers of the proposed, environmental-friendly, GNFRP plates. The goal is to determine the number of GNFRP layers needed to match the strength reached with one layer of CFRP and once matched, assess if the system is less expensive than CFRP strengthening, if this is the case, this strengthening system could be an alternative to the currently used, expensive CFRP systems.

  18. Long term structural health monitoring by distributed fiber-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichetti, G.; Minardo, A.; Testa, G.; Bernini, R.

    2012-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems allow to detect unusual structural behaviors that indicate a malfunction in the structure, which is an unhealthy structural condition. Depending on the complexity level of the SHM system, it can even perform the diagnosis and the prognosis steps, supplying the required information to carry out the most suitable actuation. While standard SHM systems are based on the use of point sensors (e.g., strain gauges, crackmeters, tiltmeters, etc.), there is an increasing interest towards the use of distributed optical fiber sensors, in which the whole structure is monitored by use of a single optical fiber. In particular, distributed optical fiber sensors based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) permit to detect the strain in a fully distributed manner, with a spatial resolution in the meter or submeter range, and a sensing length that can reach tens of km. These features, which have no performance equivalent among the traditional electronic sensors, are to be considered extremely valuable. When the sensors are opportunely installed on the most significant structural members, this system can lead to the comprehension of the real static behaviour of the structure rather than merely measuring the punctual strain level on one of its members. In addition, the sensor required by Brillouin technology is an inexpensive, telecom-grade optical fiber that shares most of the typical advantages of other fiber-optic sensors, such as high resistance to moisture and corrosion, immunity to electromagnetic fields and potential for long-term monitoring. In this work, we report the result of a test campaign performed on a concrete bridge. In particular, the tests were performed by an portable prototype based on Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Analysis (BOTDA) [1,2]. This type of analysis makes use of a pulsed laser light and a frequency-shifted continuous-wave (CW) laser light, launched simultaneously at the two opposite ends of an optical fiber

  19. Beta-1 integrin is important for the structural maintenance and homeostasis of differentiating fiber cells

    PubMed Central

    Scheiblin, David A.; Gao, Junyuan; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Simirskii, Vladimir N.; Czymmek, Kirk J.; Mathias, Richard T.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    β1-integrin is a heterodimeric transmembrane protein that has roles in both cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interactions. Conditional deletion of β1-integrin from all lens cells during embryonic development results in profound lens defects, however, it is less clear whether this reflects functions in the lens epithelium alone or whether this protein plays a role in lens fibers. Thus, a conditional approach was used to delete β1-integrin solely from the lens fiber cells. This deletion resulted in two distinct phenotypes with some lenses exhibiting cataracts while others were clear, albeit with refractive defects. Analysis of “clear” conditional knockout lenses revealed that they had profound defects in fiber cell morphology associated with the loss of the F-actin network. Physiological measurements found that the lens fiber cells had a two-fold increase in gap junctional coupling, perhaps due to differential localization of connexins 46 and 50, as well as increased water permeability. This would presumably facilitate transport of ions and nutrients through the lens, and may partially explain how lenses with profound structural abnormalities can maintain transparency. In summary, β1-integrin plays a role in maintaining the cellular morphology and homeostasis of the lens fiber cells. PMID:24607497

  20. The shades of gray of the chromatin fiber: recent literature provides new insights into the structure of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin fiber consists of a string of nucleosomes connected by linker DNA regions. The hierarchy of folding of this fiber within the cell has long been controversial, and the existence of an originally described 30 nm fiber has been debated and reviewed extensively. This review contextualizes two recent papers on this topic that suggest the 30 nm fiber to be an over-simplification. The idealized model from the first study provides good insight into the constraints and histone participation in the maintenance of the fiber structure. The second paper provides a theoretical description of a more realistic view of the highly heterogeneous and dynamic chromatin organization in the in vivo setting. It is now time to abandon the highly regular "one start" solenoidal 30 nm structure and replace it with a more realistic highly dynamic, polymorphic fiber.

  1. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  2. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  3. Strigolactones: structures and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Koichi; Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Takeuchi, Yasutomo

    2009-05-01

    Strigolactones released from plant roots induce seed germination of root parasitic weeds, witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche spp.), and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In addition to these functions in the rhizosphere, strigolactones have recently been shown to be a novel class of plant hormones regulating shoot outgrowth. The natural strigolactones identified so far have the common C-D ring moiety, which is thought to be the essential structure for exhibiting biological activity. The introduction of substitutions on the A-B ring moiety of 5-deoxystrigol, the basic strigolactone, affords various strigolactones, e.g. hydroxylation on C-4, C-5 and C-9 leads to orobanchol, strigol and sorgomol respectively. Then, acetylation and probably other derivatisations of these hydroxy-strigolactones would occur. Although the C-2'-(R) stereochemistry was thought to be an important structural feature for potent germination stimulation activity, 2'-epi-strigolactones were found in root exudates of tobacco, rice, pea and other plant species, indicating that at least some plants produce both epimers.

  4. Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical performance used as anodes of structural lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mengjie; Wang, Shubin; Yu, Yalin; Feng, Qihang; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Boming

    2017-01-01

    Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical properties were acquired through a simple chemical oxidation method, and the proposed underlying mechanism was verified. The surface of carboxyl functionalizing carbon fibers is necessary in acquiring functional groups on the surface of carbon fibers to further improve the thermal, electrical or mechanical properties of the fibers. Functionalization should preserve the tensile strength and electrochemical properties of carbon fibers, because the anodes of structural batteries need to have high strength and electrochemical properties. Functionalized with mixed H2SO4/HNO3 considerably reduced the tensile strength of carbon fibers. By contrast, the appearance of H3PO4 preserved the tensile strength of functionalized carbon fibers, reduced the dispersion level of tensile strength values, and effectively increased the concentration of functional acid groups on the surface of carbon fibers. The presence of phosphoric acid hindered the over-oxidation of turbostratic carbon, and consequently preserved the tensile strength of carbon fibers. The increased proportion of turbostratic carbon on the surface of carbon fibers concurrently enhanced the electrochemical properties of carbon fibers.

  5. Efficient Nondestructive Evaluation of Prototype Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermography inspection is an optic based technology that can reduce the time and cost required to inspect propellant tanks or aero structures fabricated from composite materials. Usually areas identified as suspect in the thermography inspection are examined with ultrasonic methods to better define depth, orientation and the nature of the anomaly. This combination of nondestructive evaluation techniques results in a rapid and comprehensive inspection of composite structures. Examples of application of this inspection philosophy to prototype will be presented. Methods organizing the inspection and evaluating the results will be considered.

  6. Antimicrobial and antiviral activities of polyphenolics from Cocos nucifera Linn. (Palmae) husk fiber extract.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Daniele; Wigg, Marcia D; Miranda, Mônica M F S; Rodrigues, Hugo M; Tostes, João B F; Rozental, Sonia; da Silva, Antonio J R; Alviano, Celuta S

    2002-12-01

    The decoction of Cocos nucifera L. husk fiber has been used in northeastern Brazil traditional medicine for treatment of diarrhea and arthritis. Water extract obtained from coconut husk fiber and fractions from adsorption chromatography revealed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The crude extract and one of the fractions rich in catechin also showed inhibitory activity against acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1-ACVr). All fractions were inactive against the fungi Candida albicans, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cryptococcus neoformans. Catechin and epicatechin together with condensed tannins (B-type procyanidins) were demonstrated to be the components of the water extract.

  7. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction.

  8. Effect of sterilization on non-woven polyethylene terephthalate fiber structures for vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Dimitrievska, Sashka; Petit, Alain; Doillon, Charles J; Epure, Laura; Ajji, Abdellah; Yahia, L'Hocine; Bureau, Martin N

    2011-01-10

    Non-woven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers produced via melt blowing and compounded into a 6 mm diameter 3D tubular scaffold were developed with artery matching mechanical properties. This work compares the effects of ethylene oxide (EtO) and low temperature plasma (LTP) sterilization on PET surface chemistry and biocompatibility. As seen through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, LTP sterilization led to an increase in overall oxygen content and the creation of new hydroxyl groups. EtO sterilization induced alkylation of the PET polymer. The in vitro cytotoxicity showed similar fibroblastic viability on LTP- and EtO-treated PET fibers. However, TNF-α release levels, indicative of macrophage activation, were significantly higher when macrophages were incubated on EtO-treated PET fibers. Subcutaneous mice implantation revealed an inflammatory response with foreign body reaction to PET grafts independent of the sterilization procedure.

  9. Cycle Training Increased GLUT4 and Activation of mTOR in Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E.A.; Baker, Jonathan D.; Dykes, Rhesa J.; Duffourc, Michelle M.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if cycle training of sedentary subjects would increase the expression of the principle muscle glucose transporters, six volunteers completed six weeks of progressively increasing intensity stationary cycle cycling. Methods In vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, changes in expression of GLUT1, GLUT4, GLUT5, and GLUT12 were compared using quantitative immunoblots with specific protein standards. Regulatory pathway components were evaluated by immunoblots of muscle homogenates and immunohistochemistry of microscopic sections. Results GLUT1 was unchanged, GLUT4 increased 66%, GLUT12 increased 104%, and GLUT5 decreased 72%. A mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c) and regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and phospho-AMPK) were unchanged, but the muscle hypertrophy pathway component, phospho-mTOR increased 83% after the exercise program. In baseline biopsies, GLUT4 by immunohistochemical techniques was 37% greater in Type I (slow twitch, red) muscle fibers, but the exercise training increased GLUT4 expression in Type II (fast twitch, white) fibers by 50%, achieving parity with the Type I fibers. Baseline phospho-mTOR expression was 50% higher in Type II fibers and increased more in Type II fibers (62%) with training, but also increased in Type I fibers (34%). Conclusion Progressive intensity stationary cycle training of previously sedentary subjects increased muscle insulin-responsive glucose transporters (GLUT4 and GLUT12) and decreased the fructose transporter (GLUT5). The increase in GLUT4 occurred primarily in Type II muscle fibers and this coincided with activation of the mTOR muscle hypertrophy pathway. There was little impact on Type I fiber GLUT4 expression and no evidence of change in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20010125

  10. Adsorption characteristics of acetone, chloroform and acetonitrile on sludge-derived adsorbent, commercial granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Huang, Guan-Yinag; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption characteristics of chloroform, acetone, and acetonitrile on commercial activated carbon (C1), two types of activated carbon fibers (F1 and F2), and sludge adsorbent (S1) was investigated. The chloroform influent concentration ranged from 90 to 7800 ppm and the acetone concentration from 80 to 6900 ppm; the sequence of the adsorption capacity of chloroform and acetone on adsorbents was F2>F1 approximately C1 approximately S1. The adsorption capacity of acetonitrile ranged from 4 to 100 mg/g, corresponding to the influent range from 43 to 2700 ppm for C1, S1, and F1. The acetonitrile adsorption capacity of F2 was approximately 20% higher than that of the other adsorbents at temperatures<30 degrees C. The Freundlich equation fit the data better than the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equations. The adsorption rate of carbon fibers is higher than that of the other adsorbents due to their smaller fiber diameter and higher surface area. The micropore diffusion coefficient of VOC on activated carbon and sludge adsorbent was approximately 10(-4) cm2 s(-1). The diffusion coefficient of VOC on carbon fibers ranged from 10(-8) to 10(-7) cm2 s(-1). The small carbon fiber pore size corresponds to a smaller diffusion coefficient.

  11. Research, development and application of noncombustible Beta fiber structures. [for Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. J.; Cobb, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Beta fiber was selected as the primary material for flexible fibrous structures used in spacecraft and crew systems applications in the Apollo program because it was noncombustible in a 100 percent oxygen atmosphere up to 16.5 psia. It met NASA criteria for outgassing, toxicity, odor, and crew comfort, and possessed sufficient durability to last through the mission. Topics discussed include: study of spacecraft applications; design of Beta fiber textile structures to meet the requirements; selection of surface treatments (finishes, coatings, and printing systems) to impart the required durability and special functional use to the textile structures; development of sewing and fabrication techniques; and testing and evaluation programs, and development of production sources.

  12. Rebar corrosion monitoring in concrete structure under salt water enviroment using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuheng; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; He, Pan; Yan, Jinlin

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is critical for the durability and safety of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion sensors based on fiber optic have proved to exhibit meaningful benefits compared with the conventional electric ones. In recent years, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been used as a new kind of sensing element in an attempt to directly monitor the corrosion in concrete structure due to its remarkable advantages. In this paper, we present a novel kind of FBG based rebar corrosion monitoring sensor. The rebar corrosion is detected by volume expansion of the corroded rebar by transferring it to the axial strain of FBG when concrete structure is soaked in salt water. An accelerated salt water corrosion test was performed. The experiment results showed the corrosion can be monitored effectively and the corrosion rate is obtained by volume loss rate of rebar.

  13. Reconstruction and Visualization of Fiber and Laminar Structure inthe Normal Human Heart from Ex Vivo DTMRI Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-12-18

    Background - The human heart is composed of a helicalnetwork of muscle fibers. These fibers are organized to form sheets thatare separated by cleavage surfaces. This complex structure of fibers andsheets is responsible for the orthotropic mechanical properties ofcardiac muscle. The understanding of the configuration of the 3D fiberand sheet structure is important for modeling the mechanical andelectrical properties of the heart and changes in this configuration maybe of significant importance to understand the remodeling aftermyocardial infarction.Methods - Anisotropic least square filteringfollowed by fiber and sheet tracking techniques were applied to DiffusionTensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DTMRI) data of the excised humanheart. The fiber configuration was visualized by using thin tubes toincrease 3-dimensional visual perception of the complex structure. Thesheet structures were reconstructed from the DTMRI data, obtainingsurfaces that span the wall from the endo- to the epicardium. Allvisualizations were performed using the high-quality ray-tracing softwarePOV-Ray. Results - The fibers are shown to lie in sheets that haveconcave or convex transmural structure which correspond to histologicalstudies published in the literature. The fiber angles varied depending onthe position between the epi- and endocardium. The sheets had a complexstructure that depended on the location within the myocardium. In theapex region the sheets had more curvature. Conclusions - A high-qualityvisualization algorithm applied to demonstrated high quality DTMRI datais able to elicit the comprehension of the complex 3 dimensionalstructure of the fibers and sheets in the heart.

  14. Structural Plasticity of Dentate Granule Cell Mossy Fibers During the Development of Limbic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Steve C.; He, Xiaoping; Loepke, Andreas W.; McNamara, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Altered granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic connectivity may contribute to the development of limbic epilepsy. To explore this possibility, granule cell giant mossy fiber bouton plasticity was examined in the kindling and pilocarpine models of epilepsy using green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic mice. These studies revealed significant increases in the frequency of giant boutons with satellite boutons 2 days and 1 month after pilocarpine status epilepticus, and increases in giant bouton area at 1 month. Similar increases in giant bouton area were observed shortly after kindling. Finally, both models exhibited plasticity of mossy fiber giant bouton filopodia, which contact GABAergic interneurons mediating feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramids. In the kindling model, however, all changes were fleeting, having resolved by 1 month after the last evoked seizure. Together, these findings demonstrate striking structural plasticity of granule cell mossy fiber synaptic terminal structure in two distinct models of adult limbic epileptogenesis. We suggest that these plasticities modify local connectivities between individual mossy fiber terminals and their targets, inhibitory interneurons, and CA3 pyramidal cells potentially altering the balance of excitation and inhibition during the development of epilepsy. PMID:19294647

  15. Cell-autonomous requirements for Dlg-1 for lens epithelial cell structure and fiber cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Charlene; Yamben, Idella F; Shatadal, Shalini; Waldof, Malinda; Robinson, Michael L; Griep, Anne E

    2009-09-01

    Cell polarity and adhesion are thought to be key determinants in organismal development. In Drosophila, discs large (dlg) has emerged as an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation, adhesion, and polarity. Herein, we investigated the role of the mouse homolog of dlg (Dlg-1) in the development of the mouse ocular lens. Tissue-specific ablation of Dlg-1 throughout the lens early in lens development led to an expansion and disorganization of the epithelium that correlated with changes in the distribution of adhesion and polarity factors. In the fiber cells, differentiation defects were observed. These included alterations in cell structure and the disposition of cell adhesion/cytoskeletal factors, delay in denucleation, and reduced levels of alpha-catenin, pERK1/2, and MIP26. These fiber cell defects were recapitulated when Dlg-1 was disrupted only in fiber cells. These results suggest that Dlg-1 acts in a cell autonomous manner to regulate epithelial cell structure and fiber cell differentiation.

  16. Structural health monitoring for insulation panels of LNG carriers using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung Hyun; Son, Young Joo; Kang, Sung Won; Lee, Jae Myung; Na, Sung Soo

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate dynamic failure initiation and failure modes of insulation panels of LNG carriers. Insulation panels of LNG cargo tanks may include mechanical failures such as cracks as well as delaminations within the layers due to impact sloshing loads and fatigue loadings, and these failures cause a significant decrease of structural integrity. In this study, a structural health monitoring system, employing fiber optic sensors is developed for monitoring various failures that can occur in LNG insulation panels. Fiber optic sensors have the advantage of being embedded inside of insulation panels. The signal of embedded fiber optic sensors is used to calculate the strain of insulation panels and is processed by digital filtering to identify damage initiations. It has been observed that the presence of defects and delaminations produce noticeable changes in the strain measurement in a predictable manner. In addition, fiber optic sensors are used to measure static and dynamic strain variations of insulation panels with and without damage. It is expected that this study will be used as a fundamental study for the safety assessment of the LNG insulation panels.

  17. Activity-dependent signal changes in neurons by fiber-coupled microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa

    2014-03-01

    To study neuronal functions in brain, we developed a higher resolution type fiber-coupled microscope (FCM), and measured the activity-dependent fluorescence intensity of the excitable cells over time. FCM was constructed by combining a fluorescence microscope with the high density type of fiber bundle, which consisted of 1.5 x 104 unit fiber in the assemble less than 0.5 mm tip. The spatial resolution was calculated to be 2.4 mm with the 5 mm focal depth. The activity-dependent Ca signals were detectable in each cell of either the pancreatic spheroids or the brain slices. The present FCM is very promising for detailed studies with the live imaging of signal molecules in the body at a single cell level.

  18. Activation of corn cellulose with alcohols to improve its dissolvability in fabricating ultrafine fibers via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haizhen; Ni, Jinping; Chen, Jing; Xue, Wenwen; Wang, Jinggang; Na, Haining; Zhu, Jin

    2015-06-05

    Water and four small molecular alcohols are respectively used to activate corn cellulose (CN cellulose) with the aim to improve the dissolvability in DMAc/LiCl. Among all these activated agents, monohydric alcohols are found to produce the optimal effect of activation in the whole process including of activating, dissolving, and electrospinning of CN cellulose. Meanwhile, well distributed fibers with the diameter of 500nm-2μm are fabricated in electrospinning. Understanding the activation effect of monohydric alcohols with water and polyhydric alcohols, the most effective activated agent is ascertained with the characteristics of small molecular size, low viscosity, and single functionality. This work is definitely initiated to understand the critical principle of CN cellulose in dissolving. Accordingly, a feasible methodology is also established to prepare ultrafine cellulose fibers with good morphology in electrospinning.

  19. Voluntary activation level and muscle fiber recruitment of human quadriceps during lengthening contractions.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; van Mechelen, W; de Haan, A

    2004-08-01

    Voluntary activation levels during lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (angular velocity 60 degrees/s) were investigated by using electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve (triplet, 300 Hz) superimposed on maximal efforts. Recruitment of fiber populations was investigated by using the phosphocreatine-to-creatine ratio (PCr/Cr) of single characterized muscle fibers obtained from needle biopsies at rest and immediately after a series of 10 lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (1 s on/1 s off). Maximal voluntary torque was significantly higher during lengthening (270 +/- 55 N.m) compared with shortening contractions (199 +/- 47 N.m, P < 0.05) but was not different from isometric contractions (252 +/- 47 N.m). Isometric torque was higher than torque during shortening (P < 0.05). Voluntary activation level during maximal attempted lengthening contractions (79 +/- 8%) was significantly lower compared with isometric (93 +/- 5%) and shortening contractions (92 +/- 3%, P < 0.05). Mean PCr/Cr values of all fibers from all subjects at rest were 2.5 +/- 0.6, 2.0 +/- 0.7, and 2.0 +/- 0.7, respectively, for type I, IIa, and IIax fibers. After 10 contractions, the mean PCr/Cr values for grouped fiber populations (regardless of fiber type) were all significantly different from rest (1.3 +/- 0.2, 0.7 +/- 0.3, and 0.8 +/- 0.6 for lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions, respectively; P < 0.05). The cumulative distributions of individual fiber populations after either contraction mode were significantly different from rest (P < 0.05). Curves after lengthening contractions were less shifted compared with curves from isometric and shortening contractions (P < 0.05), with a smaller shift for the type IIax compared with type I fibers in the lengthening contractions. The results indicate a reduced voluntary drive during lengthening contractions. PCr/Cr values of single fibers indicated a hierarchical order of recruitment of all fiber

  20. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  1. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon fiber (ACF) from cotton woven waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jieying; Zhao, Quanlin; Ye, Zhengfang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared using cotton woven waste as precursor. The cotton woven waste was first partly dissolved by 80% phosphoric acid and then was pre-soaked in 7.5% diammonium hydrogen phosphate solution. Finally, carbonization and activation were proceeded to get ACF. The optimum preparation conditions, including carbonization temperature, carbonization time, activation temperature and activation time, were chosen by orthogonal design. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption test was conducted to characterize the prepared ACF's pore structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) were employed to characterize its chemical properties and morphology. Adsorption of oilfield wastewater was used to evaluate its adsorption properties. The results show that the prepared ACF is in the form of fiber, with the sectional diameters of 11.7 × 2.6 μm and the surface area of 789 m2/g. XPS results show that carbon concentration of the prepared ACF is higher than that of the commercial ACF. When the prepared ACF dosage is 6 g/L, over 80% of COD and over 70% of chrominance can be removed after 24 h of adsorption at 18 °C. We demonstrated the catalytic growth of m-axial InxGa1-xN (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.17) nanocolumn arrays with high crystallinity on silicon substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition with trimethylindium (TMIn), triethylgallium (TEGa), and ammonia as precursors. The high quality of InGaN nanocolumns (NCs) were believed to be due to the utilization of TEGa that achieved less carbon impurities and offered more comparable vapor pressure with that of TMIn at low temperature. In addition, these NCs were grown in non-polar m-axis, which the internal electric field of the InGaN that often deteriorates the device performances might be able to be eliminated. Furthermore, the bandgap of this InGaN can be modulated from

  2. Use of thermal imaging in characterization of ceramic fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järveläinen, Matti; Keskinen, Lassi; Levänen, Erkki

    2013-12-01

    Fibrous bodies that contain open porosity can have a very heterogeneous structure that is difficult to characterize in terms of local flow resistance changes within the same sample. This article presents a method that is applicable for a quick analysis of flow distribution even with large samples. In this first attempt to understand how our flow distribution thermal imaging works, we present how the measuring parameters and the results correlate with sample's thickness and density. The results indicate that our method can quickly make a distinction between areas that have different flow resistances because of variations in the sample's density or wall thickness.

  3. A spherical-structure based fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of ammonia gas concentration and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Liu, Dejun; Lian, Xiaokang; Mallik, Arun Kumar; Wei, Fangfang; Sun, Lei; Farrell, Gerald; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    A novel fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of ammonia gas concentration and temperature is proposed. The sensor is fabricated from two sections of single-mode fiber which are cleaved and then a fusion splicer and which is then used to fabricate spherically shaped structures at the end facets. The fusion arc is used to soften the glass which naturally assumes a spherical shape due to surface tension. A short section of multimode fiber is then fusion spliced with the two spherical-shaped ends of the single mode fibers so both the core modes and the cladding modes of the multimode fiber are excited to create two kinds of interference dips: One is created by core modes only which is not sensitive to ammonia gas since the core is isolated by the cladding so the effective refractive index of the core does not change when the refractive index of the environment changes, The other dip is created by the coupling of the core mode and cladding mod, which with a suitable coating is sensitive to ammonia gas. Silica sol-gel was prepared and coated on the fiber surface as a sensing layer for detecting ammonia gas concentration. The experimental results show that the two dips have linear wavelength shift responses but with different sensitivities to ammonia gas concentration (5.03×10-4nm/ppm for dip1 and -2.5×10- 5nm/ppm for dip2) and temperature (0.0067 nm/ºC for dip1 and 0.0149 nm/ºC for dip2. By constructing a wavelength shifts matrix for the two dips vs. ammonia gas concentration and temperature, both the ammonia gas concentration and temperature can be measured simultaneously.

  4. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  5. Activation of peripheral nerve fibers by electrical stimulation in the sole of the foot

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWR) can be evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the sole of the foot. However, elicitation of NWRs is highly site dependent, and NWRs are especially difficult to elicit at the heel. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential peripheral mechanisms for any site dependent differences in reflex thresholds. Results The first part of the study investigated the neural innervation in different sites of the sole of the foot using two different staining techniques. 1) Staining for the Nav1.7 antigen (small nociceptive fibers) and 2) the Sihler whole nerve technique (myelinated part of the nerve). No differences in innervation densities were found across the sole of the foot using the two staining techniques: Nav1.7 immunochemistry (small nociceptive fibers (1-way ANOVA, NS)) and the Sihler’s method (myelinated nerve fibers (1-way ANOVA, NS)). However, the results indicate that there are no nociceptive intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) innervating the heel. Secondly, mathematical modeling was used to investigate to what degree differences in skin thicknesses affect the activation thresholds of Aδ and Aβ fibers in the sole of the foot. The modeling comprised finite element analysis of the volume conduction combined with a passive model of the activation of branching cutaneous nerve fibers. The model included three different sites in the sole of the foot (forefoot, arch and heel) and three different electrode sizes (diameters: 9.1, 12.9, and 18.3 mm). For each of the 9 combinations of site and electrode size, a total of 3000 Aβ fibers and 300 Aδ fibers was modeled. The computer simulation of the effects of skin thicknesses and innervation densities on thresholds of modeled Aδ and Aβ fibers did not reveal differences in pain and perception thresholds across the foot sole as have been observed experimentally. Instead a lack of IENFs at the heel decreased the electrical activation thresholds

  6. Structural, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of electrospun fibers of poly(lactic acid)/polyaniline blend.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conducting electrospun fiber mats based on PLA and PAni blends were obtained with average diameter values between 87 and 1 006nm with PAni quantities from 0 to 5.6 wt.-%. Structural characteristics of fiber mats were compared to cast films with the same amount of PAni and studied by SEM, SAXS, and A...

  7. Recent progress in Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study of compositional, structural, and physical attributes of developmental cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are natural plant products and their end-use qualities depend on their stages of development. In general, the quantity of natural fiber cellulose I (ß 1'4 linked glucose residues) increases rapidly, thus it leads to compositional, structural, and physical attribute variations among the...

  8. Fiber-reinforced concretes with a high fiber volume fraction — a look in future. Can a design determine the fiber amount in concrete in real time in every part of a structure in production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfers, R.

    2010-09-01

    In near future, when the control of the load-bearing capacity of fiber-only-reinforced concrete members will be safely guaranteed, the deletion of the ordinary continuous steel reinforcing bars might be possible. For the time being, it is difficult to change the fiber amount during the casting with today's techniques. Therefore, the fiber concentration has to be determined by the maximum tensile stress in concrete structural members, resulting in an unnecessary fiber addition in compressed zones. However, if the right amount of fibers could be regulated and added to concrete in real time at the pump outlet, a future vision could be to design and produce a structure by using FEM-controlled equipment. The signals from calculation results could be transmitted to a concrete casting system for addition of a necessary amount of fibers to take care of the actual tensile stresses in the right position in the structure. The casting location could be determined by using a GPS for positioning the pump outlet for targeting the casting location horizontally and a laser vertically. The addition of fibers to concrete at the outlet of a concrete pump and proportioning them there according to the actual needs of the stress situation in a structure, given by a FEM analysis in real time, is a future challenge. The FEM analysis has to be based on material properties of fiber-only-reinforced concrete. This means that the resistance and stiffness of different-strength concrete members with a varying fiber content has to be determined in tests and conveyed to the FEM analysis. The FEM analysis has to be completed before the casting and controlled. Then it can be used as the base for adding a correct amount of fibers to concrete in every part of the structure. Thus, a system for introducing a correct amount of fibers into concrete has to be developed. The fibers have to be added at the outlet of concrete pump. Maybe a system to shotcrete concrete with electronically controlled fiber

  9. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites tailored for multifunctionality by filler incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungjin

    This dissertation provides multifunctional carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for vibration damping, thermal conduction and thermoelectricity. Specifically, (i) it has strengthened and stiffened carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites by the incorporation of halloysite nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and silicon carbide whiskers, (ii) it has improved mechanical energy dissipation using carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites with filler incorporation, (iii) it has increased the through-thickness thermal conductivity of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composite by curing pressure increase and filler incorporation, and (iv) it has enhanced the thermoelectric behavior of carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites. Low-cost natural halloysite nanotubes (0.1 microm diameter) were effective for strengthening and stiffening continuous fiber polymer-matrix composites, as shown for crossply carbon fiber (5 microm diameter, ˜59 vol.%) epoxy-matrix composites under flexure, giving 17% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 21% decrease in ductility. They were less effective than expensive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (0.02 microm diameter), which gave 25% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 14% decrease in ductility. However, they were more effective than expensive silicon carbide whiskers (1 microm diameter), which gave 15% increase in strength, 9% increase in modulus and 20% decrease in ductility. Each filler, at ˜2 vol.%, was incorporated in the composite at every interlaminar interface by fiber prepreg surface modification. The flexural strength increase due to halloysite nanotubes incorporation related to the interlaminar shear strength increase. The measured values of the composite modulus agreed roughly with the calculated values based on the Rule of Mixtures. Continuous carbon fiber composites with enhanced vibration damping under flexure are provided by incorporation of fillers between the laminae

  10. Adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbonaceous adsorbents: a comparative study on granular activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-08-15

    Adsorption of three aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) by four types of carbonaceous adsorbents [a granular activated carbon (HD4000), an activated carbon fiber (ACF10), two single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT, SWNT-HT), and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)] with different structural characteristics but similar surface polarities was examined in aqueous solutions. Isotherm results demonstrated the importance of molecular sieving and micropore effects in the adsorption of AOCs by carbonaceous porous adsorbents. In the absence of the molecular sieving effect, a linear relationship was found between the adsorption capacities of AOCs and the surface areas of adsorbents, independent of the type of adsorbent. On the other hand, the pore volume occupancies of the adsorbents followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT, indicating that the availability of adsorption site was related to the pore size distributions of the adsorbents. ACF10 and HD4000 with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption affinities to low molecular weight AOCs than SWNT and MWNT with higher mesopore and macropore volumes. Due to their larger pore sizes, SWNTs and MWNTs are expected to be more efficient in adsorption of large size molecules. Removal of surface oxygen-containing functional groups from the SWNT enhanced adsorption of AOCs.

  11. Formation of sensitive/active phases in metal and polymer-based structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes new concepts the author has proposed and demonstrated to realize metal and polymer based sensitive and/or active structural material systems suitable for smart structures. Most of the developments have been done by simple and innovative methods without using sophisticated and expensive sensors and actuators. The following topics are mainly examined: (1) embedding optical fiber in aluminum matrix to use as sensors; (2) forming optical interference and loss type strain sensors in epoxy matrix simply by embedding and breaking notched optical fiber in it; (3) forming a multifunctional sensor in aluminum matrix for temperature and strain monitoring by embedding an oxidized nickel fiber; (4) fabricating multifunctional composites by using conventional structural materials - i) an active laminate of CFRP/aluminum of which unidirectional actuation is realized by electrical resistance heating of carbon fiber in the CFRP layer and its curvature change can be monitored using optical fiber multiply fractured in the CFRP layer, and ii) a multifunctional aluminum-matrix composite where oxidized titanium fiber is embedded for sensing temperature and strain, generation of heat for actuation.

  12. Field applications of a carbon fiber sheet material for strengthening reinforced concrete structure

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Kliger, H.S.; Yoshizawa, Hiroyuki

    1996-12-31

    Forca Tow Sheet is now being introduced into the USA as a viable alternative to conventional concrete strengthen techniques. This carbon fiber shoot material is externally bonded to reinforced concrete and masonry structures and serves to strengthen existing conditions. Based on the growing use of Tow Sheet in the Japanese market die US infrastructure market is beginning to apply this technology on a number of diverse repair projects. This paper describes actual field applications on industrial and public structures in the US and Japan. Also included are the results of one yen of monitoring of die Japanese structure.

  13. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections.

  14. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  15. Immobilization of BiOX (X = Cl, Br) on activated carbon fibers as recycled photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zaiyong; Huang, Baibiao; Lou, Zaizhu; Wang, Zeyan; Meng, Xiaodong; Liu, Yuanyuan; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Dai, Ying

    2014-06-14

    BiOX have been grown on the surface of activated carbon fibers (ACF) as recycled photocatalysts. The analysis results illustrate that electrostatic adsorption plays an important role in the formation of BiOX/ACF composites. The photocatalytic experimental results indicate that BiOX/ACF show excellent cyclic properties and stable performance.

  16. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  17. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  18. Fiber optic system for deflection and damage detection in morphing wing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheerer, M.; Djinovic, Z.; Schüller, M.

    2013-04-01

    Within the EC Clean Sky - Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft initiative concepts for actuating morphing wing structures are under development. In order for developing a complete integrated system including the actuation, the structure to be actuated and the closed loop control unit a hybrid deflection and damage monitoring system is required. The aim of the project "FOS3D" is to develop and validate a fiber optic sensing system based on low-coherence interferometry for simultaneous deflection and damage monitoring. The proposed system uses several distributed and multiplexed fiber optic Michelson interferometers to monitor the strain distribution over the actuated part. In addition the same sensor principle will be used to acquire and locate the acoustic emission signals originated from the onset and growth of defects like impact damages, cracks and delamination's. Within this paper the authors present the concept, analyses and first experimental results of the mentioned system.

  19. Magnetic field sensing based on magnetic-fluid-clad multimode-singlemode-multimode fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiali; Pu, Shengli; Dong, Shaohua; Luo, Longfeng

    2014-10-14

    Magnetic field sensing based on magnetic-fluid-clad multimode-singlemode- multimode fiber structures is proposed and experimentalized. The structures are fabricated out using fiber fusion splicing techniques. The sensing principle is based on the interference between the core mode and cladding modes. Two interference dips are observed in our spectral range. Experimental results indicate that the magnetic field sensing sensitivities of 215 pm/mT and 0.5742 dB/mT are obtained for interference dip around 1595 nm. For interference dip around 1565 nm, the sensitivities are 60.5 pm/mT and 0.4821 dB/mT. The response of temperature is also investigated. The temperature sensitivity for the dip around 1595 nm is obtained to be 9.93 pm/°C.

  20. Active vortex generator deployed on demand by size independent actuation of shape memory alloy wires integrated in fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübler, M.; Nissle, S.; Gurka, M.; Wassenaar, J.

    2016-04-01

    Static vortex generators (VGs) are installed on different aircraft types. They generate vortices and interfuse the slow boundary layer with the fast moving air above. Due to this energizing, a flow separation of the boundary layer can be suppressed at high angles of attack. However the VGs cause a permanently increased drag over the whole flight cycle reducing the cruise efficiency. This drawback is currently limiting the use of VGs. New active VGs, deployed only on demand at low speed, can help to overcome this contradiction. Active hybrid structures, combining the actuation of shape memory alloys (SMA) with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) on the materials level, provide an actuation principle with high lightweight potential and minimum space requirements. Being one of the first applications of active hybrid structures from SMA and FRP, these active vortex generators help to demonstrate the advantages of this new technology. A new design approach and experimental results of active VGs are presented based on the application of unique design tools and advanced manufacturing approaches for these active hybrid structures. The experimental investigation of the actuation focuses on the deflection potential and the dynamic response. Benchmark performance data such as a weight of 1.5g and a maximum thickness of only 1.8mm per vortex generator finally ensure a simple integration in the wing structure.

  1. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  2. Analyses of space environment effects on active fiber optic links orbited aboard the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Monarski, T. W.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Padden, R. J.; Chapman, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 'Preliminary Analysis of WL Experiment no. 701, Space Environment Effects on Operating Fiber Optic Systems,' is correlated with space simulated post retrieval terrestrial studies performed on the M0004 experiment. Temperature cycling measurements were performed on the active optical data links for the purpose of assessing link signal to noise ratio and bit error rate performance some 69 months following the experiment deployment in low Earth orbit. The early results indicate a high correlation between pre-orbit, orbit, and post-orbit functionality of the first known and longest space demonstration of operating fiber optic systems.

  3. Identification and synthesis of novel biomaterials based on spider structural silk fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Yang; Gnesa, Eric; Tang, Simon; Jeffery, Felicia; Geurts, Paul; Zhao, Liang; Franz, Andreas; Vierra, Craig

    2011-11-01

    The diversity in function and mechanical behavior of spider silks, and the ability to produce these silks recombinantly, have tremendous potential in creating a new class of biomimetic materials. Here we investigate the structural and mechanical properties of pyriform silks from the golden orb-weaver, Nephila clavipes. Nanoscale indentation measurements using atomic force microscopy on natural pyriform silk suggests that this biomaterial has high toughness that may be suitable for dissipating high amounts of mechanical energy. We also observed the occurrence of highly organized nanocrystals within the pyriform silk fibers that may contribute to the remarkable energy dissipation capability of these silks. It has been demonstrated that poly-(Gly-Ala) and poly-Ala stretches within the internal block repeat modules of dragline silk fibroins form nanocrystals, and these nanocrystalline structures may be responsible for the high extensibility of the dragline silks. In contrast, amino acid sequence analysis shows that PySp2 does not contain the same motifs. In the absence of poly-(Gly-Ala) and poly-Ala repeats, we hypothesized that PySp2 contains new protein motifs sufficient to polymerize into functional structures. To investigate the functional contributions of these novel motifs during pyriform fiber formation, we expressed different recombinant PySp2 fibroins with various segments spanning its block repeat units. We demonstrate that PySp2 recombinant proteins with the Pro-rich sub-block domain (PXP motifs, where X= sub-set of the amino acids A, L, or R) and/or the Ser + Gln + Ala-rich sub-block domain (QQSSVAQS motifs) are sufficient for artificial fiber formation. Moreover, we show that recombinant PySp2 proteins that contain a single block repeat unit can self-assemble into foam-like nanostructures. Collectively, our findings support the use of PySp2 recombinant proteins for a wide range of biomimetic materials with morphologies ranging from fibers to porous

  4. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for electrical-resistance-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daojun

    This dissertation has advanced the science and technology of electrical-resistance-based sensing of strain/stress and damage using continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for aircraft structures. In particular, it has extended the technology of self-sensing of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composites from uniaxial longitudinal loading and flexural loading to uniaxial through-thickness loading and has extended the technology from structural composite self-sensing to the use of the composite (specifically a one-lamina composite) as an attached sensor. Through-thickness compression is encountered in the joining of composite components by fastening. Uniaxial through-thickness compression results in strain-induced reversible decreases in the through-thickness and longitudinal volume resistivities, due to increase in the fiber-fiber contact in the through-thickness direction, and minor-damage-induced irreversible changes in these resistivities. The Poisson effect plays a minor role. The effects in the longitudinal resistivity are small compared to those in the through-thickness direction, but longitudinal resistance measurement is more amenable to practical implementation in structures than through-thickness resistance measurement. The irreversible effects are associated with an increase in the through-thickness resistivity and a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. The through-thickness gage factor is up to 5.1 and decreases with increasing compressive strain above 0.2%. The reversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per through-thickness strain is up to 4.0 and decreases with increasing compressive strain. The irreversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per unit through-thickness strain is around -1.1 and is independent of the strain. The sensing is feasible by measuring the resistance away from the stressed region, though the effectiveness is less than that at the stressed region. A one

  5. A Novel Optical Fiber Sensor for Steel Corrosion in Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Christopher K.Y.; Wan, Kai Tai; Chen, Liquan

    2008-01-01

    Steel corrosion resulting from the penetration of chloride ions or carbon dioxide is a major cause of degradation for reinforced concrete structures,. The objective of the present investigation was to develop a low-cost sensor for steel corrosion, which is based on a very simple physical principle. The flat end of a cut optical fiber is coated with an iron thin film using the ion sputtering technique. Light is then sent into a fiber embedded in concrete and the reflected signal is monitored. Initially, most of the light is reflected by the iron layer. When corrosion occurs to remove the iron layer, a significant portion of the light power will leave the fiber at its exposed end, and the reflected power is greatly reduced. Monitoring of the reflected signal is hence an effective way to assess if the concrete environment at the location of the fiber tip may induce steel corrosion or not. In this paper, first the principle of the corrosion sensor and its fabrication are described. The sensing principle is then verified by experimental results. Sensor packaging for practical installation will be presented and the performance of the packaged sensors is assessed by additional experiments. PMID:27879805

  6. Distributed fiber optical HC leakage and pH sensing techniques for implementation into smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerck, Jochen M.; Vogel, Bernhard H.; Roth, Siegmar; Ebrahimi, Sasan; Kraemer, Karl

    2004-07-01

    Interaction of target molecules with the evanescent wave of light guided in optical fibers is among the most promising sensing schemes for building up smart chemical sensor technologies. If the technique of optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) is combined with silicone-clad quartz glass fibers distributed chemical sensing is possible. Hydrocarbon (HC) detection and location is done by automated identification of the position of the corresponding step drop (light loss) in the backscatter signal induced by local refractive index increase in the silicone cladding due to a penetrating HC compound. A commercially available mini-OTDR was adapted to sensing fibers of up to nearly 2-kilometer length and location of typical HC fuels could be demonstrated. The instrument is applicable for fuel leakage monitoring in large technical installations such as tanks or pipelines with spatial resolution down to 1 m. A similar technique using measurements in the Vis spectral range is being developed for health monitoring of large structures, e.g., for early detection of corrosion caused by water ingress and pH changes in reinforced concrete. Here, a pH indicator dye and a phase transfer reagent are immobilized in the originally hydrophobic fiber cladding, leading to a pH induced absorption increase and a step drop signal in the backscatter curve. The configuration of the distributed sensing cables, the instrumental setups, and examples for HC and pH sensing are presented.

  7. Physico-chemical studies of hardened cement paste structure with micro-reinforcing fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The results of physico-chemical studies of modified hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers are given in this article. The goal was to study the reasons of the increase of strength properties of modified hardened cement paste by the method of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. It is shown that the use of mineral fibers in the production of cement based material has positive effect on its properties. The study found out that the increase in the strength of the hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers is due to the increase of the rate of hydration of cement without a significant change in the phase composition in comparison with hardened cement paste without additive. The results of microstructure investigation (of control samples and samples of the reinforced hardened cement paste) have shown that introduction of mineral fibers in the amount of 0.1-2 % by weight of cement provides the structure of the homogeneous microporous material with uniform distribution of the crystalline phase provided by densely packed hydrates.

  8. Physico-chemical studies of hardened cement paste structure with micro-reinforcing fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Steshenko, Aleksei Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-15

    The results of physico-chemical studies of modified hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers are given in this article. The goal was to study the reasons of the increase of strength properties of modified hardened cement paste by the method of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. It is shown that the use of mineral fibers in the production of cement based material has positive effect on its properties. The study found out that the increase in the strength of the hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers is due to the increase of the rate of hydration of cement without a significant change in the phase composition in comparison with hardened cement paste without additive. The results of microstructure investigation (of control samples and samples of the reinforced hardened cement paste) have shown that introduction of mineral fibers in the amount of 0.1-2 % by weight of cement provides the structure of the homogeneous microporous material with uniform distribution of the crystalline phase provided by densely packed hydrates.

  9. A Novel Optical Fiber Sensor for Steel Corrosion in Concrete Structures.

    PubMed

    Leung, Christopher K Y; Wan, Kai Tai; Chen, Liquan

    2008-03-20

    Steel corrosion resulting from the penetration of chloride ions or carbon dioxide is a major cause of degradation for reinforced concrete structures,. The objective of the present investigation was to develop a low-cost sensor for steel corrosion, which is based on a very simple physical principle. The flat end of a cut optical fiber is coated with an iron thin film using the ion sputtering technique. Light is then sent into a fiber embedded in concrete and the reflected signal is monitored. Initially, most of the light is reflected by the iron layer. When corrosion occurs to remove the iron layer, a significant portion of the light power will leave the fiber at its exposed end, and the reflected power is greatly reduced. Monitoring of the reflected signal is hence an effective way to assess if the concrete environment at the location of the fiber tip may induce steel corrosion or not. In this paper, first the principle of the corrosion sensor and its fabrication are described. The sensing principle is then verified by experimental results. Sensor packaging for practical installation will be presented and the performance of the packaged sensors is assessed by additional experiments.

  10. Roles of electric field and fiber structure in cardiac electric stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Knisley, S B; Trayanova, N; Aguel, F

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated roles of the variation of extracellular voltage gradient (VG) over space and cardiac fibers in production of transmembrane voltage changes (DeltaV(m)) during shocks. Eleven isolated rabbit hearts were arterially perfused with solution containing V(m)-sensitive fluorescent dye (di-4-ANEPPS). The epicardium received shocks from symmetrical or asymmetrical electrodes to produce nominally uniform or nonuniform VGs. Extracellular electric field and DeltaV(m) produced by shocks in the absolute refractory period were measured with electrodes and a laser scanner and were simulated with a bidomain computer model that incorporated the anterior left ventricular epicardial fiber field. Measurements and simulations showed that fibers distorted extracellular voltages and influenced the DeltaV(m). For both uniform and nonuniform shocks, DeltaV(m) depended primarily on second spatial derivatives of extracellular voltages, whereas the VGs played a smaller role. Thus, 1) fiber structure influences the extracellular electric field and the distribution of DeltaV(m); 2) the DeltaV(m) depend on second spatial derivatives of extracellular voltage. PMID:10465752

  11. A Fiber Optic Doppler Sensor and Its Application in Debonding Detection for Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Meng, Guang; Ohsawa, Isamu; Shirai, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Debonding is one of the most important damage forms in fiber-reinforced composite structures. This work was devoted to the debonding damage detection of lap splice joints in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures, which is based on guided ultrasonic wave signals captured by using fiber optic Doppler (FOD) sensor with spiral shape. Interferometers based on two types of laser sources, namely the He-Ne laser and the infrared semiconductor laser, are proposed and compared in this study for the purpose of measuring Doppler frequency shift of the FOD sensor. Locations of the FOD sensors are optimized based on mechanical characteristics of lap splice joint. The FOD sensors are subsequently used to detect the guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the CFRP structures. By taking advantage of signal processing approaches, features of the guided wave signals can be revealed. The results demonstrate that debonding in the lap splice joint results in arrival time delay of the first package in the guided wave signals, which can be the characteristic for debonding damage inspection and damage extent estimation. PMID:22219698

  12. A fiber optic Doppler sensor and its application in debonding detection for composite structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Meng, Guang; Ohsawa, Isamu; Shirai, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Debonding is one of the most important damage forms in fiber-reinforced composite structures. This work was devoted to the debonding damage detection of lap splice joints in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures, which is based on guided ultrasonic wave signals captured by using fiber optic Doppler (FOD) sensor with spiral shape. Interferometers based on two types of laser sources, namely the He-Ne laser and the infrared semiconductor laser, are proposed and compared in this study for the purpose of measuring Doppler frequency shift of the FOD sensor. Locations of the FOD sensors are optimized based on mechanical characteristics of lap splice joint. The FOD sensors are subsequently used to detect the guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the CFRP structures. By taking advantage of signal processing approaches, features of the guided wave signals can be revealed. The results demonstrate that debonding in the lap splice joint results in arrival time delay of the first package in the guided wave signals, which can be the characteristic for debonding damage inspection and damage extent estimation.

  13. Evaluation of precision estimates for fiber-dimensional and electrical hygrometers for water activity determinations.

    PubMed

    Stroup, W H; Peeler, J T; Smith, K

    1987-01-01

    The precision of instruments used in 3 collaborative studies conducted within the Food and Drug Administration over a 4-year period (1981, 1982, 1984) for water activity (aw) determinations according to the official AOAC method is evaluated. Calibration responses of the instruments were tested for linearity over the aw range from 0.75 to 0.97. Average absolute percent difference between predicted and assigned aw values for the linear model ranged from 0.3 to 0.7% for a fiber-dimensional hygrometer (Abbeon) and 3 electrical hygrometers (Beckman, Rotronics, and Weather Measure). The calibration responses for another electrical hygrometer (Hygrodynamics) were nonlinear. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer yielded mean aw values and precision estimates that did not differ significantly from those obtained with the electrical hygrometers for (NH4)2SO4slush, KNO3 slush, sweetened condensed milk, pancake syrup, and cheese spread. However, the mean aw value for a soy sauce was 0.838 for the electrical hygrometers compared with 0.911 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer was affected by a volatile component(s) in the soy sauce that caused an erroneously high aw value. Pooled estimates of reproducibility (Sx) in the 3 studies were 0.008 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer and 0.010 for the electrical hygrometers; these values were not significantly different from those reported in the study that verified the current official AOAC method.

  14. Particle size reduction effectively enhances the cholesterol-lowering activities of carrot insoluble fiber and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sze-Yuan; Chien, Po-Jung; Chau, Chi-Fai

    2008-11-26

    This study investigated and compared the effects of particle size reduction on the cholesterol-lowering activities of carrot insoluble fiber-rich fraction (IFF) and plant cellulose. Our results demonstrated that micronization treatment effectively pulverized the particle sizes of these insoluble fibers to different microsizes. Feeding the micronized insoluble fibers, particularly the micronized carrot IFF, significantly (p < 0.05) improved their abilities in lowering the concentrations of serum triglyceride (18.6-20.0%), serum total cholesterol (15.5-19.5%), and liver lipids (16.7-20.3%) to different extents by means of enhancing (p < 0.05) the excretion of lipids (124-131%), cholesterol (120-135%), and bile acids (130-141%) in feces. These results suggested that particle size was one of the crucial factors in affecting the characteristics and physiological functions of insoluble fibers. Therefore, particle size reduction by micronization might offer the industry an opportunity to improve the physiological functions of insoluble fibers, particularly the carrot IFF, in health food applications.

  15. The Mode of Transverse Spread of Contraction Initiated by Local Activation in Single Crayfish Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Ochi, Rikuo

    1967-01-01

    Isolated single crayfish muscle fibers were locally activated by applying negative current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fiber surface. The contraction initiated by a moderate depolarization spread inwards in a graded manner according to the magnitude and duration of depolarization. Increase of the depolarized area increased the distance of the inward spread for a given amount of depolarization. If a large area of the surface membrane was depolarized with a large pipette for a sufficiently long time, the contraction spread not only inwards, but further transversely passing through the center of the fiber. Successive brief depolarizations given at an appropriate interval could produce contraction more effectively for a given amount of total current than did a prolonged depolarization. On the other hand, the contraction initiated by a strong negative current was observed to spread around the whole perimeter but not through the center of the fiber. Each type of local contraction always spread along the striation pattern and not longitudinally. Possible mechanisms of these responses are discussed in connection with the transverse tubular system of the muscle fibers. PMID:19873574

  16. Structurally colored carbon fibers with controlled optical properties prepared by a fast and continuous electrophoretic deposition method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifu; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang

    2013-08-07

    Structurally colored fiber was fabricated by an electrophoretic deposition method under a circinate electric field. These fibers exhibit structural color, based on the external field-assembly of charged PMMA microspheres on the surface of the electroconductive carbon fiber, with reflectance spectra stretch-tunable in the 430-608 nm, which are determined by the lattice constants of the photonic crystals. Also, the influence of applied voltage, deposition time and electroconductivity on the number of deposited layers and efficiency were studied. In addition, we further developed a horizontal and continuous process to fabricate a long range structurally colored fiber. And the method is a drastic acceleration in comparison with the gravity sedimentation technique that needs weeks or even months, and it would be fast and facile for the further study of structural color on the surface of the fiber. The process may be used to simulate the conventional fiber coloration process. Such elastically tuned structurally colored fibers are of interest for many applications.

  17. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  18. Tuning bio-inspired skin-core structure of nascent fiber via interplay of polymer phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Huanhuan; Zha, Liyun; Hu, Zuming; Ma, Yu; Yu, Muhuo; Chen, Lei; Hu, Wenbing

    2014-08-07

    The properties of polymer fibers are determined by their inner structures. We performed dynamic Monte Carlo simulations of early-stage solidification in the fluid filaments of stretched polymer solutions after extrusion into a coagulation bath upon fiber spinning. We observed that the radial temperature gradient dominates polymer crystallization to form an oriented crystalline skin (from single to multiple layers), while the radial non-solvent influx dominates phase separation to form a concentrated but less oriented core. The skin-core structure offers fibers a balanced performance between strength and toughness similar to plant stems, which can be tuned by the interplay of phase transitions. Our molecular-level observations facilitate a systematic understanding of the microscopic mechanism of fiber-spinning, which will pave a way towards making excellent polymer fibers.

  19. Preparation of active 3D film patches via aligned fiber electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Chuan; Zheng, Hongxia; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-03-01

    The design, preparation and application of three-dimensional (3D) printed structures have gained appreciable interest in recent times, particularly for drug dosage development. In this study, the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique was developed to fabricate aligned-fiber antibiotic (tetracycline hydrochloride, TE-HCL) patches using polycaprolactone (PCL), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and their composite system (PVP-PCL). Drug loaded 3D patches possessed perfectly aligned fibers giving rise to fibrous strut orientation, variable inter-strut pore size and controlled film width (via layering). The effect of operating parameters on fiber deposition and alignment were explored, and the impact of the film structure, composition and drug loading was evaluated. FTIR demonstrated successful TE-HCL encapsulation in aligned fibers. Patches prepared using PVP and TE-HCL displayed enhanced hydrophobicity. Tensile tests exhibited changes to mechanical properties arising from additive effects. Release of antibiotic from PCL-PVP dosage forms was shown over 5 days and was slower compared to pure PCL or PVP. The printed patch void size also influenced antibiotic release behavior. The EHDA printing technique provides an exciting opportunity to tailor dosage forms in a single-step with minimal excipients and operations. These developments are crucial to meet demands where dosage forms cannot be manufactured rapidly or when a personalized approach is required.

  20. Preparation of active 3D film patches via aligned fiber electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Chuan; Zheng, Hongxia; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-01-01

    The design, preparation and application of three-dimensional (3D) printed structures have gained appreciable interest in recent times, particularly for drug dosage development. In this study, the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique was developed to fabricate aligned-fiber antibiotic (tetracycline hydrochloride, TE-HCL) patches using polycaprolactone (PCL), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and their composite system (PVP-PCL). Drug loaded 3D patches possessed perfectly aligned fibers giving rise to fibrous strut orientation, variable inter-strut pore size and controlled film width (via layering). The effect of operating parameters on fiber deposition and alignment were explored, and the impact of the film structure, composition and drug loading was evaluated. FTIR demonstrated successful TE-HCL encapsulation in aligned fibers. Patches prepared using PVP and TE-HCL displayed enhanced hydrophobicity. Tensile tests exhibited changes to mechanical properties arising from additive effects. Release of antibiotic from PCL-PVP dosage forms was shown over 5 days and was slower compared to pure PCL or PVP. The printed patch void size also influenced antibiotic release behavior. The EHDA printing technique provides an exciting opportunity to tailor dosage forms in a single-step with minimal excipients and operations. These developments are crucial to meet demands where dosage forms cannot be manufactured rapidly or when a personalized approach is required. PMID:28272513

  1. Preparation of active 3D film patches via aligned fiber electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Chuan; Zheng, Hongxia; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-03-08

    The design, preparation and application of three-dimensional (3D) printed structures have gained appreciable interest in recent times, particularly for drug dosage development. In this study, the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique was developed to fabricate aligned-fiber antibiotic (tetracycline hydrochloride, TE-HCL) patches using polycaprolactone (PCL), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and their composite system (PVP-PCL). Drug loaded 3D patches possessed perfectly aligned fibers giving rise to fibrous strut orientation, variable inter-strut pore size and controlled film width (via layering). The effect of operating parameters on fiber deposition and alignment were explored, and the impact of the film structure, composition and drug loading was evaluated. FTIR demonstrated successful TE-HCL encapsulation in aligned fibers. Patches prepared using PVP and TE-HCL displayed enhanced hydrophobicity. Tensile tests exhibited changes to mechanical properties arising from additive effects. Release of antibiotic from PCL-PVP dosage forms was shown over 5 days and was slower compared to pure PCL or PVP. The printed patch void size also influenced antibiotic release behavior. The EHDA printing technique provides an exciting opportunity to tailor dosage forms in a single-step with minimal excipients and operations. These developments are crucial to meet demands where dosage forms cannot be manufactured rapidly or when a personalized approach is required.

  2. Adsorption properties and photocatalytic activity of TiO2/activated carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Song, Shuangping; Shi, Zhongliang

    2014-06-01

    Photocatalysts of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and TiO2/activated carbon fiber (TiO2/ACF) composite were prepared by sol-gel method, followed by calcining the pure TiO2 sols and the TiO2/ACF sols at 500°C for 2 h in a N2 atmosphere, respectively. These photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption property of TiO2/ACF composite using methylene blue as adsorbate. The adsorption data obtained from different batch experiments were analyzed using pseudo-second-order kinetic model, the experimental data can be adequately described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The photodecomposition behavior of TiO2/ACF was investigated in aqueous solution using methylene blue as target pollutant. It was found that methylene blue could be removed rapidly from water by TiO2/ACF, the photocatalytic decomposition was obviously improved when the photocatalyst was used. Kinetics analysis revealed that the photocatalytic decomposition reaction can be described well by a first-order rate equation.

  3. Proposal and analysis of two-cavity Fabry-Perot structures based on fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Feng, Suchun; Jian, Shuisheng

    2009-03-01

    An all-fiber two-cavity Fabry-Perot (FP) configuration based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is proposed. The characteristics of transmission spectra for the two-cavity FP structure are theoretically analyzed and comprehensively modeled. The explicit expression of the transmission coefficient for the structures is derived. The general conditions for the lengths of two cavities and reflectivities of FBGs are presented to produce the single resonant transmission peak at the central wavelength in the FBG stop band. Based on the theoretical analysis, the transmission spectra of symmetric and asymmetric two-cavity FP structures are simulated, and the simulation results are discussed and explained qualitatively. The design guidelines of the device, including the choices of cavity lengths, grating lengths, and index modulation depths, are concluded. The results show that when the increasing of the cavity length of a single-cavity FP structure results in multiple resonant peaks in the stop band, the two-cavity FP structures of the same length can inhibit the secondary resonant peaks and keep the main peak without degrading the performance through appropriately designing the cavity lengths and FBGs. Finally, the fabrication error tolerances of the structures, including inaccurate cavity lengths and reflectivities of FBGs, are calculated and discussed.

  4. An investigation into the performance of macro-fiber composites for sensing and structural vibration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodano, Henry A.; Park, Gyuhae; Inman, Daniel J.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration suppression and structural health monitoring. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fiber composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. The recently developed MFC actuator provides these advantages and can be used in structural vibration applications. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed that an MFC could be used as a sensor and actuator to find modal parameters of an inflatable structure. This sensor and actuator combination has also been used to reduce vibration in an inflated object. Once the sensing capability was identified, we developed a self-sensing circuit for an MFC. Our experimental results clearly indicate that this strategy can suppress structural vibration, while reducing the number of system components. Finally, the MFC has been implemented as impedance sensor for structural health monitoring (e.g. a of bolted joint connection). The experimental results presented in this paper show the potential of MFC for use in the dynamics and control of flexible structures.

  5. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Fiber Structure Extraction Technique Using Autopsy Specimens of Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hirai, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Ebara, Masaaki; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2005-06-01

    It is very important to diagnose liver cirrhosis noninvasively and correctly. In our previous studies, we proposed a processing technique to detect changes in liver tissue in vivo. In this paper, we propose the evaluation of the relationship between liver disease and echo information using autopsy specimens of a human liver in vitro. It is possible to verify the function of a processing parameter clearly and to compare the processing result and the actual human liver tissue structure by in vitro experiment. In the results of our processing technique, information that did not obey a Rayleigh distribution from the echo signal of the autopsy liver specimens was extracted depending on changes in a particular processing parameter. The fiber tissue structure of the same specimen was extracted from a number of histological images of stained tissue. We constructed 3D structures using the information extracted from the echo signal and the fiber structure of the stained tissue and compared the two. By comparing the 3D structures, it is possible to evaluate the relationship between the information that does not obey a Rayleigh distribution of the echo signal and the fibrosis structure.

  6. Solid-Phase Extraction of Sulfur Mustard Metabolites Using an Activated Carbon Fiber Sorbent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    A novel solid-phase extraction method using activated carbon fiber (ACF) was developed and validated. ACF has a vast network of pores of varying sizes and microporous structures that result in rapid adsorption and selective extraction of sulfur mustard metabolites according to the pH of eluting solvents. ACF could not only selectively extract thiodiglycol and 1-methylsulfinyl-2-[2-(methylthio)-ethylsulfonyl]ethane eluting a 9:1 ratio of dichloromethane to acetone, and 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethane] and 1,1'-sulfonylbis- [2-S-(N-acetylcysteinyl)ethane] eluting 3% hydrogen chloride in methanol, but could also eliminate most interference without loss of analytes during the loading and washing steps. A sample preparation method has been optimized for the extraction of sulfur mustard metabolites from human urine using an ACF sorbent. The newly developed extraction method was applied to the trace analysis of metabolites of sulfur mustard in human urine matrices in a confidence-building exercise for the analysis of biomedical samples provided by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

  7. Fully switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser based interrogator system for remote and versatile fiber optic sensors multiplexing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo Acha, M.; DeMiguel-Soto, V.; Ortigosa, A.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2014-05-01

    A novel interrogation system for multiple fiber optic sensor technologies and based on a fully-switchable multiwavelength fiber laser (MWFL) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The MWFL can generate any wavelength combination with a minimum emission line distance up to 50 GHz fitting the ITU grid specifications. On the other hand, as proof of concept sensor network, two different networks were multiplexed by using a remote powered by light fiber optic switch. They are based on two different sensor technologies. One of them based on PCF intensity sensors and multiplexed by using an 8 port WDM and the other one based on wavelength temperature/strain FBG sensors.

  8. Structural analysis of the B-doped mesophase pitch-based graphite fibers by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, M.; Kim, C.; Karaki, T.; Tamaki, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Matthews, M. J.; Brown, S. D. M.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1998-10-01

    Milled B-doped mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers (mMPCF's) prepared from a melt-blown petroleum mesophase pitch precursor material have been developed for enhanced Li uptake capacity in Li ion batteries. Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the structure of graphitized and B-doped mMPCF's using 632.8-nm HeNe laser excitation. The B-doped mMPCF's show a strong Raman peak near 1330 cm-1, a well-defined peak at 1620 cm-1, and the disappearance of the second-order 2660 cm-1 band. Furthermore, it is shown that the E2g2 graphite Raman band at 1580 cm-1 is shifted to 1590 cm-1 due to B doping. The appearance of a new weak Raman band in the B-doped mMPCF's near 1320 cm-1 is closely related to the B-C stretching mode in the graphite lattice. These results are associated with the breakdown of the k=0 selection rules by a local distortion of the graphite lattice due to substitutional boron doping. On the basis of the integrated intensity ratio R of the disorder-induced line near 1330 cm-1 to the Raman line near 1590 cm-1 after 2.66 at. % boron doping, it is suggested that the substitutional boron in the mMPCF's is homogeneously distributed within the graphene layer in the fiber form. The crystallite domain size La parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis on the surface of the fiber is estimated to be about 60 Å, which could correspond to the distance between boron atoms substituted for C atoms in a graphene layer of the fibers.

  9. Distribution and fine structure of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Senba, E; Tohyama, M

    1989-07-03

    Distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRPI) nerve fibers and their fine structure were examined in the skin of rat foot pads using immunocytochemistry. The CGRPI fibers formed bundles in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Two types of single-stranded CGRPI fibers were seen to leave the fiber bundles: one was located along the blood vessels or around the eccrine sweat glands, while the other entered the epidermis directly or through the Meissner's corpuscles in the dermal papillae. CGRPI fibers in the epidermis were distributed widely and were occasionally associated with Merkel cells. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that CGRPI fibers located around blood vessels, sweat glands, epidermal keratinocytes and Merkel cells, or in the Meissner's corpuscles did not form typical synaptic contacts with underlying cells, despite being varicose and filled with vesicles resembling synaptic ones. These findings suggested that the CGRP is released non-synaptically from these terminals to influence diffusely the organs surrounding the terminals. These cutaneous fibers seemed to originate from CGRPI neurons (both small type B cells and large type A cells) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), because injection of fast blue dye into the cutaneous nerve resulted in labeling of these CGRPI cells in the DRG and excision of the L3-L6 DRG resulted in the non-detection of cutaneous CGRPI fibers in the foot pads. Analysis of the composition of CGRPI fibers found in the rat skin has revealed that these are mostly unmyelinated. C-type fibers with some of them being thin myelinated fibers. This was true even of CGRPI fibers at the proximal end of peripheral neurites of the DRG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with a structured multi-component glass core for four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Tombelaine, Vincent; Labruyère, Alexis; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Reichel, Volker; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Jamier, Raphaël; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2009-08-31

    We report about a new type of nonlinear photonic crystal fibers allowing broadband four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation. The microstructured optical fiber has a structured core consisting of a rod of highly nonlinear glass material inserted in a silica tube. This particular structure enables four wave mixing processes with very large frequency detuning (>135 THz), which permitted the generation of a wide supercontinuum spectrum extending over 1650 nm after 2.15 m of propagation length. The comparison with results obtained from germanium-doped holey fibers confirms the important role of the rod material properties regarding nonlinear process and dispersion.

  11. All-optical noise reduction of fiber laser via intracavity SOA structure.

    PubMed

    Ying, Kang; Chen, Dijun; Pan, Zhengqing; Zhang, Xi; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2016-10-10

    We have designed a unique intracavity semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) structure to suppress the relative intensity noise (RIN) for a fiber DFB laser. By exploiting the gain saturation effect of the SOA, a maximum noise suppression of 30 dB around the relaxation oscillation frequency is achieved, and the whole resonance relaxation oscillation peak completely disappears. Moreover, via a specially designed intracavity SOA structure, the optical intensity inside the SOA will be in a balanced state via the oscillation in the laser cavity, and the frequency noise of the laser will not be degraded with the SOA.

  12. Comparison of toluene adsorption among granular activated carbon and different types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Crawford, Shaun A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling, light weight, and decreasing cost. ACF may offer the potential for short-term respiratory protection for first responders and emergency personnel. This study compares the critical bed depths and adsorption capacities for toluene among GAC and ACF of different forms and surface areas. GAC and ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were challenged in stainless steel chambers with a constant concentration of 500 ppm toluene via conditioned air at 25°C, 50% RH, and constant airflow (7 L/min). Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Surface areas of each adsorbent were determined using a physisorption analyzer. Results showed that the critical bed depth of GAC is 275% higher than the average of ACFC but is 55% lower than the average of ACFF. Adsorption capacity of GAC (with a nominal surface area of 1800 m(2)/g) at 50% breakthrough is 25% higher than the average of ACF with surface area of 1000 m(2)/g, while the rest of ACF with surface area of 1500 m(2)/g and higher have 40% higher adsorption capacities than GAC. ACFC with higher surface area has the smallest critical bed depth and highest adsorption capacity, which makes it a good adsorbent for thinner and lighter respirators. We concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection considering its higher adsorption capacity and lower critical bed depth in addition to its advantages over GAC, particularly for ACF with higher surface area.

  13. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO CHOPPED-FIBER AUTOMOTIVE STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M.B.

    2003-10-06

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on composite materials consisting of polyurethane reinforced with E-glass. Current focus of the project is on composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers. The primary purpose of this report is to provide the individual specimen test date. Basic mechanical property testing and results for two chopped-fiber composite materials, one reinforced with glass- and the other with carbon fiber are provided. Both materials use the same polyurethane matrix. Preforms for both materials were produced using the P4 process. Behavioral trends, effects of temperature and environment, and corresponding design knockdown factors are established for both materials. Effects of prior short-time loads and of prior thermal cycling are discussed.

  14. The multifunctional wound dressing with core-shell structured fibers prepared by coaxial electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qilin; Xu, Feiyang; Xu, Xingjian; Geng, Xue; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Aiying; Feng, Zengguo

    2016-06-01

    The non-woven wound dressing with core-shell structured fibers was prepared by coaxial electrospinning. The polycaprolactone (PCL) was electrospun as the fiber's core to provide mechanical strength whereas collagen was fabricated into the shell in order to utilize its good biocompatibility. Simultaneously, the silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as anti-bacterial agent were loaded in the shell whereas the vitamin A palmitate (VA) as healing-promoting drug was encapsulated in the core. Resulting from the fiber's core-shell structure, the VA released from the core and Ag-NPs present in the shell can endow the dressing both heal-promoting and anti-bacteria ability simultaneously, which can greatly enhance the dressing's clinical therapeutic effect. The dressing can maintain high swelling ratio of 190% for 3 d indicating its potential application as wet dressing. Furthermore, the dressing's anti-bacteria ability against Staphylococcus aureus was proved by in vitro anti-bacteria test. The in vitro drug release test showed the sustainable release of VA within 72 h, while the cell attachment showed L929 cells can well attach on the dressing indicating its good biocompatibility. In conclusion, the fabricated nanofibrous dressing possesses multiple functions to benefit wound healing and shows promising potential for clinical application.

  15. Single-longitudinal-mode erbium-doped fiber laser with the fiber-Bragg-grating-based asymmetric two-cavity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Feng, Suchun; Tan, Zhongwei; Ning, Tigang; Jian, Shuisheng

    2009-03-01

    We present a simple and stable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber linear-type laser. It consists of three FBGs directly written in a photosensitive erbium-doped fiber (PEDF) to form asymmetric two cavities with different cavity lengths, which can effectively increase the longitudinal mode spacing and suppress mode hopping, experimentally compared with symmetric two cavities and single-cavity structures. The stable SLM operation is conveniently achieved without accurate control of cavity length, and the laser linewidth of less than 5 kHz is acquired.

  16. Carbon fiber/Co9S8 nanotube arrays hybrid structures for flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenxi; Chen, Chang; Ye, Meidan; Lv, Miaoqiang; Lin, Changjian

    2014-04-07

    Recently, hybrid carbon materials and inorganic nanocrystals have received an intensive amount of attention and have opened up an exciting new field in the design and fabrication of high-performance catalysts. Here we present a novel kind of hybrid counter electrode (CE) consisting of a carbon fiber (CF) and Co9S8 nanotube arrays (NTs) for fiber-shaped flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). The growth mechanisms of Co(CO3)0.35Cl0.20(OH)1.10 nanowire arrays (NWs) on the CFs were discussed, and the catalytic activity of the CF, Pt and Co9S8/CF hybrid structure (Co9S8@CF) were elucidated systematically as well. An absolute energy conversion efficiency of 3.79% has been demonstrated under 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5 illumination by using Co9S8@CF as a CE. This work not only demonstrates an innovative approach for growing cobalt sulfide NTs on flexible substrates that can be applied in flexible devices for energy harvesting and storage, but also provides a kind of hybrid structure and high-efficiency CE for QDSSCs.

  17. Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-22

    The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 Å in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure is about 150 Å long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  18. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  19. Structural features of various kinds of carbon fibers as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Denghua; Lu, Chunxiang; Du, Sujun; Wu, Gangping; Yang, Yu; Wang, Lina

    2016-11-01

    The structural features of polyacrylonitrile and pitch-based carbon fibers were analyzed from a comprehensive point of view by X-ray measurements and related techniques. The results indicated that the undulating graphite ribbon with embedded microvoid was the main structural unit for graphitic fibers. The void's parameters for these fibers could be obtained directly by small-angle X-ray scattering following the classic method deduced based on the typical two-phase system (i.e., Porod's law, Guinier's law and Debye's law). The non-graphitic fibers, however, were composed of two-dimensional turbostratic crystallites in the aggregation of microfibril and thus had a quasi two-phase structure (microfibril, interfibrillar amorphous structure and microvoid embedded within the microfibril). The extended Debye or Beaucage model in this case should be applied in order to obtain the structural parameters. It also revealed that the quasi two-phase system would complete its transformation to two-phase system during high-temperature graphitization. Therefore, the degree of graphitization was speculated to be the essential indicator distinguishing graphitic fibers from non-graphitic ones and would be helpful in understanding the transformation of structural features during the graphitization of carbon fibers.

  20. Evolution of the health of concrete structures by electrically conductive GFRP (glass fiber reinforced plastic) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Soon-Gi

    2002-02-01

    The function and performance of self-diagnostic composites embedded in concrete blocks and piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurement. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced into glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites to provide electrical conductivity. The CPGFRP composite displays generally good performance in various bending tests of concrete block and piles compared to the CFGFRP composite. The electrical resistance of the CPGFRP composite increases remarkably at small strains in response to microcrack formation at about 200 μm strain, and can be used to detect smaller deformations before crack formation. The CPGFRP composite shows continuous change in resistance up to a large strain level just before the final fracture for concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. It is concluded that self-diagnostic composites can be used to predict damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  1. Reliability and accuracy of embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors for strain monitoring in advanced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sante, Raffaella; Donati, Lorenzo; Troiani, Enrico; Proli, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    This work investigated issues for an efficient and reliable embedding and use of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors for strain monitoring of composite structures with particular regard to the manufacturing process of components in the nautical field by means of the vacuum bag technique in autoclave. CFRP material laminates with embedded FBGs were produced and the effect of the curing process parameters on the light transmission characteristics of the optical fibers was initially investigated. Two different types of coating, namely polyimide and acrylate, were tested by measuring the light attenuation by an Optical Time Domain Reflectometer. Tensile specimens were subsequently extracted from the laminas and instrumented also with a surface-mounted conventional electrical strain gage (SG). Comparison between the FBG and SG measurements during static tensile tests allowed the evaluation of the strain monitoring capability of the FBGs, in particular of their sensitivity (i.e., gage factor) when embedded.

  2. Fiber-optic Bragg grating sensors for structural health monitoring at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Wolfgang; Latka, Ines; Habisreuther, Tobias; Lingertat, Johann

    2007-04-01

    While conventional resistance strain gages show increasing cross-sensitivities to temperature and magnetic field with decreasing temperature down to liquid helium, it has been found that fiber optic Bragg grating strain sensors show negligible thermo-optic and magneto-optic effects in cryogenic environment and allow, therefore, reliable strain measurements. These specific application advantages of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors at low temperatures, together with the electrical isolation and low electro-magnetic interference, low thermal conductivity to a large number of multiplexed sensors, make them attractive for structural health monitoring of super-conductive magnets, e.g., for super-conductive motors, magnetic levitation transport, nuclear fusion reactors, or for measurement of material parameters at low temperature, and, if using special sensor substrates, also for temperature measurements and hot spot detection on superconductors.