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Sample records for active structural fiber

  1. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  2. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  3. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalovs, A.; Barkanov, E.; Gluhihs, S.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  4. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  5. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  6. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  7. Structure evolution and optimization in the fabrication of PVA-based activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Juan; Feng, Hui-Min; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2008-05-01

    The structure and composition evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers during the fabrication of activated carbon fibers (ACF) by a newly developed method were systematically elucidated. The pore structure of the fibers was significantly influenced by the carbonization and activation conditions. The elemental composition and chemical structure evolution of the fibers during the heat treatment processes were evaluated by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Crystal structure evolution of the fibers during the heat treatment processes was elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Based on these understandings, the process conditions were optimized using an L(9)(3)(4) orthogonal array design matrix. Appropriate process parameters for the fabrication of PVA-ACFs were established as carbonizing the dehydrated fiber at 300 degrees C for 60 min, and then lifting the temperature to 900 degrees C with a heating speed of 10 degrees C/min in an inert atmosphere, thereafter keeping the fiber at 900 degrees C for 60 min in an oxidizing atmosphere. PMID:18261741

  8. Standardization in fiber-optic sensing for structural safety: activities in the ISHMII and IEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, K.; Daum, W.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are increasingly established in the sensor market. Their advantages have unquestionably been verified by numerous demonstrations to enhance the operational performance of aged structures or to monitor the structural behavior of safety-relevant structures or their components. However, there are some barriers in use due to a lack of extensive standardization of fiber-optic sensors. This leads very often to restraints in the user's community. The paper shows the status in international standardization of fiber-optic sensors as well as current activities in leading institutions such as IEC and ISHMII and others with the purpose of providing relevant standards for a broader use of selected fiber-optic sensor technologies.

  9. Micromechanical analysis of constitutive properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kenny; Dai, Qingli

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be very important in the application of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. The PSF is fabricated by coating the piezoceramic onto the silicon carbide core fiber with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process to overcome the fragile nature of the monolithic piezoelectric materials. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The PSF laminate transducer has electrical inputs/outputs that are delivered through a separate etched interdigital electrode layer. This study analyzed the electromechanical properties with the generalized dilute scheme for active PSF composite laminate by considering multiinclusions. The well-known Mori-Tanaka approach was used to evaluate the concentration tensor in the multi-inclusion micromechanics model. To accurately predict the transverse properties, the extended role of mixtures were applied by considering the inclusions' geometry and shape. The micromechanical finite element modeling was also conducted with representative volume element (RVE) to compare with the micromechanics analysis on the electromechanical properties. The micromechanics analysis and finite element micromechanical modeling were conducted with varied fiber geometry dimensions and volume fractions. These comparison studies indicate the combined micromechanics models with the generalized dilute scheme can effectively predict the electro-elastic properties of multi-inclusion PSF composites.

  10. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  11. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface. PMID:16475362

  12. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E.; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S.; Maksimov, Georgy V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the “axon-SC” interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+—influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization. PMID:27455410

  13. Micromechanical analysis and finite element modeling of electromechanical properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qingli; Ng, Kenny

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the combined micromechanics analysis and finite element modeling of the electromechanical properties of piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites. The active piezoelectric materials are widely used due to their high stiffness, voltage-dependent actuation capability, and broadband electro-mechanical interactions. However, the fragile nature of piezoceramics limits their sensing and actuating applications. In this study, the active PSF composites were made by deploying the longitudinally poled PSFs into a polymer matrix. The PSF itself consists a silicon carbide (SiC) or carbon core fiber as reinforcement to the fragile piezoceramic shell. To predict the electromechanical properties of PSF composites, the micromechanics analysis was firstly conducted with the dilute approximation model and the Mori-Tanaka approach. The extended Rule of Mixtures was also applied to accurately predict the transverse properties by considering the effects of microstructure including inclusion sizes and geometries. The piezoelectric finite element (FE) modeling was developed with the ABAQUS software to predict the detailed mechanical and electrical field distribution within a representative volume element (RVE) of PSF composites. The simulated energy or deformation under imposed specific boundary conditions was used to calculate each individual property with constitutive laws. The comparison between micromechanical analysis and finite element modeling indicates the combination of the dilute approximation model, the Mori-Tanaka approach and the extended Rule of Mixtures can favorably predict the electromechanical properties of three-phase PSF composites.

  14. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Carbon-Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites am produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity far use in gas separations. Carbon fiber composites are prepared at ORNL, usually in plate or tubular form, by vacuum molding from water slurries containing phenolic resin and chopped isotropic petroleum pitch fibers. The composites are activated at the CAER in steam or CO{sub 2} using samples of dimensions up to 1.5 x 4 x 12 cm that are cut from the original plates. One of the objectives is to produce uniformly activated composites, which is especially critical when attempting to active large monoliths. It has been found that there are appreciable variations in the density and permeability of the as-formed composites that must relate to the forming technique. These variations are expected to exert some influence on the rate and extent of reaction and surface area development. In attempting to uniformly activate the composites, two reactor configurations have been investigated. In the more successful arrangement, steam ''is introduced at several points along the length of the composite. A reduction in steam partial pressure from 95vol% to 44vol% significantly improved the uniformity of surface area distribution. Activation with CO{sub 2} was still better, which is attributed to the much slower reaction rate than with steam. Measurements of composite dimensions have shown that there is an overall shrinkage during activation. A direct correlation is found between dimensional shrinkage and burnoff, and is similar for a and steam activation. The causes of the shrinkage are not yet clear. At

  15. Pitch-based activated carbon fibers: The effect of precursor composition on pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekinalp, Halil Levent

    Although researchers have previously investigated the effect of precursor differences on the final properties of activated carbon fibers (ACFs), those precursors were not well-characterized. In particular, detailed information about their molecular composition and anisotropy was not available. In this study, seven oligomeric fractions, each of well-defined composition and molecular weight (mol wt) distribution, were isolated from a commercially produced isotropic petroleum pitch (i.e., Marathon M-50) and used for the production of ACFs. Four of these precursors of varying oligomeric composition were fully isotropic and three contained different levels of mesophase, so that the effects of molecular composition and molecular order were successfully isolated from each other. After the precursors were melt-spun into fibers and stabilized, they were processed by so-called "direct activation", whereby carbonization and activation occurred simultaneously. Separate carbonization tests were also carried out in order to separate out the effects of carbonization vs. activation. Carbonization weight loss was found to be higher for fibers prepared from lower average mol wt (480--550 Da) precursors. The presence of mesophase per se did not affect weight loss during carbonization. On the other hand, activation weight loss (˜28 percent) was found to be essentially independent of precursor mol wt for all isotropic fibers. (Activation weight loss for mesophase-containing fibers was much lower.) The micropore volume of the ACFs was found to increase with decreasing precursor mol wt. However, the ratio of pores smaller than 7 A (i.e., the desired pore size for hydrogen storage) to the total pore volume (3.9--30 A) was found to be essentially constant for all isotropic precursors, suggesting that a similar activation mechanism occurred for all of these materials, with both new pore formation and pore widening proceeding at similar rates. For mesophase-containing precursors, on the

  16. Robust, Brillouin Active Embedded Fiber-Is-The-Sensor System in Smart Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Chung

    1996-01-01

    Extensive review of our proposed sensing scheme, based mainly on the forward Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering (GAWBS) with backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (sBs) as an auxiliary scheme for system fault tolerance has been completed during this project period. This preliminary study is conducted for a number of reasons. The most significant reasons lie in the essential capability of the system to measure temperature and pressure. These two measurands have been proposed to be sensed by sBs in our proposal. Temperature and pressure/strain are important measurands in structural monitoring, so that the effectiveness of sensing by sBs needs to be further examined. It has been pointed out initially that sBs shift will be dependent on temperature and pressure/strain simultaneously. The shift versus temperature or strain is linear. Now, the question is how can these two measurands be separated when sBs is used to sense an environment, in which both temperature and strain are changing simultaneously. Typical sBs shift plotted versus strain and varying temperature is shown in Fig. 1. As is clear, a fiber initially stressed will relax with rising temperature. This is verified by a displacement to the right with rising temperature of the sBs shift vs strain curves in the figure. A way to circumvent this ambiguity is by employing two fibers, one pre-stressed and the other is a free fiber. The latter will measure temperature and subtracting data in the latter fiber from those of the former will give us net strain readings. This is a laborious approach, since it involves the use of two identical fibers, and this is hard to accomplish, especially when many sensors are needed. Additional multiplexing of the data stream for data subtraction becomes a necessity.

  17. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.

  18. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    A.B. Thien

    2006-03-01

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage to the actual

  19. Mechanochromic Fibers with Structural Color.

    PubMed

    Li, Houpu; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-21

    Responsive photonic crystals have been widely developed to realize tunable structural colors by manipulating the flow of light. Among them, mechanochromic photonic crystals attract increasing attention due to the easy operation, high safety and broad applications. Recently, mechanochromic photonic crystal fibers were proposed to satisfy the booming wearable smart textile market. In this Concept, the fundamental mechanism, fabrication, and recent progress on mechanochromic photonic crystals, especially in fiber shape, are summarized to represent a new direction in sensing and displaying. PMID:26420744

  20. Activation and micropore structure determination of carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves. Topical report, 30 March 1994--14 April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, You Qing

    1995-05-19

    Progress in developing novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are activated using steam or CO{sub 2}, in order to produce uniform activation through the material and to control the pore structure and adsorptive properties. There is an overall shrinkage during activation, which is directly correlated with burnoff; burnoff above 40% results in fracture. Burnoffs higher than 10% does not produce any benefit for separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures. Five samples of CFCMS have been prepared for testing as molecular sieves; all have relatively narrow pore size distributions with average pore diameters around 6A.

  1. Fiber networks amplify active stress.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P; Lenz, Martin

    2016-03-15

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  2. Structural characterization and photocatalytic activity of hollow binary ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} oxide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Baochao; Yuan Rusheng Fu Xianzhi

    2009-03-15

    The formation of hollow binary ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} oxide fibers using mixed precursor solutions was achieved by activated carbon fibers templating technique combined with solvothermal process. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis, and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The binary oxide system shows the anatase-type TiO{sub 2} and tetragonal phase of ZrO{sub 2}, and the introduction of ZrO{sub 2} notably inhibits the growth of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites. Although calcined at 575 deg. C, all hollow ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} fibers exhibit higher surface areas (>113 m{sup 2}/g) than pure TiO{sub 2} hollow fibers. The Pyridine adsorption on ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} sample indicates the presence of stronger surface acid sites. Such properties bring about that the binary oxide system possesses higher efficiency and durable activity stability for photodegradation of gaseous ethylene and trichloromethane than P25 TiO{sub 2}. In addition, the macroscopic felt form for the resulting materials is more beneficial for practical applications than traditional catalysts forms. - Graphical abstract: The final ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} products composed of hollow fibers are in the form of felt on the centimeter scale and possess certain strength and flexibleness. Moreover, they exhibit excellent efficiency and durable activity stability for photodegradation of gaseous ethylene and trichloromethane, reaching about 136% and 387% of the P25 activity after 10 h, respectively.

  3. Composite fiber structures for catalysts and electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrion, Christopher J.; Cahela, Donald R.; Ahn, Soonho; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently envisioned a process wherein fibers of various metals in the 0.5 to 15 micron diameter range are slurried in concert with cellulose fibers and various other materials in the form of particulates and/or fibers. The resulting slurry is cast via a wet-lay process into a sheet and dried to produce a free-standing sheet of 'composite paper.' When the 'preform' sheet is sintered in hydrogen, the bulk of the cellulose is removed with the secondary fibers and/or particulates being entrapped by the sinter-locked network provided by the metal fibers. The resulting material is unique, in that it allows the intimate contacting and combination of heretofore mutually exclusive materials and properties. Moreover, due to the ease of paper manufacture and processing, the resulting materials are relatively inexpensive and can be fabricated into a wide range of three-dimensional structures. Also, because cellulose is both a binder and a pore-former, structures combining high levels of active surface area and high void volume (i.e., low pressure drop) can be prepared as freestanding flow through monoliths.

  4. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Level Contributes to Structural Integrity and Component Production of Elastic Fibers in the Aorta.

    PubMed

    Tai, Haw-Chih; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chen, Ju-Yi; Lai, Chao-Han; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Teng, Shih-Hua; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Alice Y W; Jiang, Meei-Jyh; Li, Yi-Heng; Wu, Hua-Lin; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Loss of integrity and massive disruption of elastic fibers are key features of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) has been shown to attenuate AAA through inhibition of inflammation and proteolytic degradation. However, its involvement in elastogenesis during AAA remains unclear. PPARγ was highly expressed in human AAA within all vascular cells, including inflammatory cells and fibroblasts. In the aortas of transgenic mice expressing PPARγ at 25% normal levels (Pparg(C) (/-) mice), we observed the fragmentation of elastic fibers and reduced expression of vital elastic fiber components of elastin and fibulin-5. These were not observed in mice with 50% normal PPARγ expression (Pparg(+/-) mice). Infusion of a moderate dose of angiotensin II (500 ng/kg per minute) did not induce AAA but Pparg(+/-) aorta developed flattened elastic lamellae, whereas Pparg(C/-) aorta showed severe destruction of elastic fibers. After infusion of angiotensin II at 1000 ng/kg per minute, 73% of Pparg(C/-) mice developed atypical suprarenal aortic aneurysms: superior mesenteric arteries were dilated with extensive collagen deposition in adventitia and infiltrations of inflammatory cells. Although matrix metalloproteinase inhibition by doxycycline somewhat attenuated the dilation of aneurysm, it did not reduce the incidence nor elastic lamella deterioration in angiotensin II-infused Pparg(C/-) mice. Furthermore, PPARγ antagonism downregulated elastin and fibulin-5 in fibroblasts, but not in vascular smooth muscle cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated PPARγ binding in the genomic sequence of fibulin-5 in fibroblasts. Our results underscore the importance of PPARγ in AAA development though orchestrating proper elastogenesis and preserving elastic fiber integrity. PMID:27045031

  6. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  8. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  9. High temperature structural fibers: Status and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The key to high temperature structural composites is the selection and incorporation of continuous fiber reinforcement with optimum mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Critical fiber property needs are high strength, high stiffness, and retention of these properties during composite fabrication and use. However, unlike polymeric composites where all three requirements are easily achieved with a variety of commercially available carbon-based fibers, structural fibers with sufficient stiffness and strength retention for high temperature metal, intermetallic, and ceramic composites are not available. The objective here is to discuss in a general manner the thermomechanical stability problem for current high performance fibers which are based on silicon and alumina compositions. This is accomplished by presenting relevant fiber property data with a brief discussion of potential underlying mechanisms. From this general overview, some possible materials engineering approaches are suggested which may lead to minimization and/or elimination of this critical stability problem for current high temperature fibers.

  10. Fiber optical beam shaping using polymeric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Queirós, R. B.; Guerreiro, A.; Ecoffet, C.; Soppera, O.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2014-05-01

    A method to control the output intensity profile of optical fibers is presented. Using guided wave photopolymerization in multimode structures the fabrication with modal assisted shaping of polymeric micro lenses is demonstrated. Results showing that a given linear polarized mode can be selectively excited controlling the intensity distribution at the fiber tip are presented. This pattern is then reproduced in the polymeric micro structure fabricated at the fiber tip thus modulating its output intensity distribution. Such structures can therefore be used to obtain at the fiber tip predetermined intensity patterns for attaining optical trapping or patterned illumination.

  11. Fiber optic smart structures for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric

    Fiber optic smart structures as applied to aerospace platforms are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on advantages of these structures which include weight saving for equivalent performance, immunity to electromagnetic interference, the ability to multiplex a number of fiber optic sensors along a single line, the inherent high bandwidth of fiber optic sensors and the data links supporting them, the ability to perform in extremely hostile environments at high temperatures, vibration, and shock loadings. It is concluded that fiber optic smart structures have a considerable potential to enhance the value of future aircraft and spacecraft through improved reliability, maintainability, and flight performance augmentation.

  12. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

    1993-11-16

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic. 5 figures.

  13. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  14. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  15. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  16. Active "itch fibers" in chronic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Hilliges, M; Schmidt, R; Ørstavik, K; Vahlquist, C; Weidner, C; Handwerker, H O; Torebjörk, H E

    2003-08-26

    An itch-specific neuronal pathway was recently discovered in healthy humans and animals. Here the authors report that activity in this specific pathway coincides with itch under pathophysiologic conditions in a patient with chronic pruritus. Microneurographic recordings from the symptomatic area revealed spontaneous activity in six single C-fiber afferents that had the characteristic features of "itch fibers." Itch may be caused by activity in a specific subpopulation of C-fiber afferents. PMID:12939442

  17. Polarization-maintaining amplifier based on 3C fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokidani, Jun; Ito, Rumi; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Shin, Sumida; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2015-03-01

    Chirally-Coupled-Core (3C) fiber structure can preserve a single mode quality and even a linear polarization for a large core size. A principal advantage of fiber laser is its compatibility with monolithic integration and robust system. But so far, devices such as a combiner using the 3C fibers have not been reported. Here we report the first demonstration of such monolithic amplifier structure which contains an active fiber and a combiner based on 3C fibers. A single-stage amplifier is seeded by an EO Q-switched micro-laser and pumped by two high power fiber pigtailed 976-nm laser diodes via an in-house fabricated (2 + 1) × 1 pump signal combiner. The active fiber is based on a 3-m-long, 3C Yb-doped fiber (33 μm/250 μm core/cladding diameter with 0.06/0.46 NA). The amplifier demonstrates scaling up to 30W average power and 150 kW peak power in 0.3mJ, 2ns pulses. The beam profiles and beam qualities were characterized as its output power was varied up to 30W. The beam profile was maintained at a high beam quality of around M2=1.2. The spectral properties of the 3C fiber were also characterized as its output peak power was varied.

  18. Ventricular fiber optimization utilizing the branching structure.

    PubMed

    Washio, Takumi; Yoneda, Kazunori; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Kariya, Taro; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm that optimizes the ventricular fiber structure of the human heart. A number of histological studies and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging analyses have revealed that the myocardial fiber forms a right-handed helix at the endocardium. However, the fiber formation changes its orientation as a function of transmural depth, becoming a left-handed helix at the epicardium. To determine how nature can construct such a structure, which obtains surprising pumping performance, we introduce macroscopic modeling of the branching structure of cardiac myocytes in our finite element ventricular model and utilize this in an optimization process. We put a set of multidirectional fibers around a central fiber orientation at each point of the ventricle walls and simulate heartbeats by generating contraction forces along each of these directions. We examine two optimization processes using the workloads or impulses measured in these directions to update the central fiber orientation. Both processes improve the pumping performance towards an optimal value within several tens of heartbeats, starting from an almost-flat fiber orientation. However, compared with the workload optimization, the impulse optimization produces better agreement with experimental studies on transmural changes of fiber helix angle, streamline patterns of characteristic helical structures, and temporal changes in strain. Furthermore, the impulse optimization is robust under geometrical changes of the heart and tends to homogenize various mechanical factors such as the stretch and stretch rate along the fiber orientation, the contraction force, and energy consumption. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26453026

  19. Design considerations for fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the design methodology for designing structural components from fiber composites is presented. In particular, the need for new conceptual structural designs for the future is discussed and the evolution of conceptual design is illustrated. Sources of design data, analysis and design procedures, and the basic components of structural fiber composites are cited and described. Examples of tradeoff studies and optimum designs are discussed and a simple structure is described in some detail.

  20. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites.

  1. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  2. Advanced fiber placement of composite fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hercules/NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program will demonstrate the low cost potential of the automated fiber placement process. The Hercules fiber placement machine was developed for cost effective production of composite aircraft structures. The process uses a low cost prepreg tow material form and achieves equivalent laminate properties to structures fabricated with prepreg tape layup. Fiber placement demonstrations planned for the Hercules/NASA program include fabrication of stiffened test panels which represent crown, keel, and window belt segments of a typical transport aircraft fuselage.

  3. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  4. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Structural health monitoring system/method using electroactive polymer fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Carnell, Lisa A. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for monitoring the structural health of a structure of interest by coupling one or more electroactive polymer fibers to the structure and monitoring the electroactive responses of the polymer fiber(s). Load changes that are experienced by the structure cause changes in the baseline responses of the polymer fiber(s). A system for monitoring the structural health of the structure is also provided.

  6. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  7. Multicomponent glass fiber optic integrated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Szarniak, Przemyslaw; Franczyk, Marcin; Stepien, Ryszard; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    A range of integrated fiber optic structures - lightguides, image guides, multicapillary arrays, microstructured (photonic) fibers - manufactured in the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) is described. All these structures are made of multicomponent glasses (a part of them melted in ITME). They can be manufactured in similar multistep process that involves drawing glass or lightguide rods and tubes preparing glass performs, stacking a bundle with rods and (or) tubes, drawing multifiber or multicapillary performs. Structure formation, technological process, characterization and applications of different integrated structures are presented.

  8. Dynamic Sensing Performance of a Point-Wise Fiber Bragg Grating Displacement Measurement System Integrated in an Active Structural Control System

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Liao, Heng-Tseng; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system which can measure the transient response of out-of-plane point-wise displacement responses is set up on a smart cantilever beam and the feasibility of its use as a feedback sensor in an active structural control system is studied experimentally. An FBG filter is employed in the proposed fiber sensing system to dynamically demodulate the responses obtained by the FBG displacement sensor with high sensitivity. For comparison, a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is utilized simultaneously to verify displacement detection ability of the FBG sensing system. An optical full-field measurement technique called amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI) is used to provide full-field vibration mode shapes and resonant frequencies. To verify the dynamic demodulation performance of the FBG filter, a traditional FBG strain sensor calibrated with a strain gauge is first employed to measure the dynamic strain of impact-induced vibrations. Then, system identification of the smart cantilever beam is performed by FBG strain and displacement sensors. Finally, by employing a velocity feedback control algorithm, the feasibility of integrating the proposed FBG displacement sensing system in a collocated feedback system is investigated and excellent dynamic feedback performance is demonstrated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the FBG sensor is capable of performing dynamic displacement feedback and/or strain measurements with high sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22247683

  9. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF COMPOSITE LAMINATES WITH EMBEDDED PIEZOELECTRIC FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Puthillath, Padma K.; Blackshire, James L.

    2009-03-03

    The actuation of ultrasonic guided waves in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer plate from embedded metal core piezoelectric fibers is studied for structural health monitoring applications. A linear array of fibers embedded at the midplane can generate guided waves transverse to the fiber direction. Finite element simulations show that a significant source influence is associated with the small diameter piezoelectric fibers.

  10. Acoustical properties of nonwoven fiber network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascan, Mevlut

    Sound insulation is one of the most important issues for the automotive and building industries. Because they are porous fibrous structures, textile materials can be used as sound insulating and sound absorbing materials. Very high-density materials such as steel can insulate sound very effectively but these rigid materials reflect most of the sound back to the environment, causing sound pollution. Additionally, because high-density, rigid materials are also heavy and high cost, they cannot be used for sound insulation for the automotive and building industries. Nonwoven materials are more suitable for these industries, and they can also absorb sound in order to decrease sound pollution in the environment. Therefore, nonwoven materials are one of the most important materials for sound insulation and absorption applications materials. Insulation and absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics depend on fiber geometry and fiber arrangement within the fabric structure. Because of their complex structure, it is very difficult to define the microstructure of nonwovens. The structure of nonwovens only has fibers and voids that are filled by air. Because of the complexity of fiber-void geometry, there is still not a very accurate theory or model that defines the structural arrangement. A considerable amount of modeling has been reported in literature [1--19], but most models are not accurate due to the assumptions made. Voids that are covered by fibers are called pores in nonwoven structures and their geometry is very important, especially for the absorption properties of nonwovens. In order to define the sound absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics, individual pore structure and the number of pores per unit thickness of the fabric should be determined. In this research, instead of trying to define pores, the properties of the fibers are investigated and the number of fibers per volume of fabric is taken as a parameter in the theory. Then the effect of the nonwoven

  11. Fiber Optic Smart Structures And Skins Conference II Fiber Optics Smart Structures Program At Utias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measures, Raymond M.

    1990-02-01

    Structurally integrated arrays of fiber optic sensors could serve as an effective nervous system for future Smart Structures. The structural integrity of such structures would be monitored throughout their life making obsolete the catastropic failures that sometimes plague aircraft, trains, cars......today. In addition the strain, deformation, vibration and temperature state of these structures could also be monitored. Our research program is directed at both the development and application of this new technology. We have built and carefully characterized a localized, all-fiber, dual wavelength polarimetric fiber optic sensor. We have also developed a localized, all-fiber, Michelson fiber optic sensor that has measured the strain within a thermoplastic and detected the acoustic emission associated with delamination within a composite. It has also been used as the basis of an optical strain rosette . We have demonstrated that embedded optical fibers do not reduce the strength or damage resistance of composites but can detect load-induced growth of damage. Within the past week we have completed the first fabrication of an aircraft composite leading edge with a built' in fiber optic damage detection system.

  12. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  13. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  14. Twisted and tubular silica structures by anionic surfactant fibers encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Chekini, Mahshid; Guénée, Laure; Marchionni, Valentina; Sharma, Manish; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Organic molecules imprinting can be used for introducing specific properties and functionalities such as chirality to mesoporous materials. Particularly organic self-assemblies can work as a scaffold for templating inorganic materials such as silica. During recent years chiral imprinting of anionic surfactant for fabrication of twisted rod-like silica structures assisted by co-structuring directing agent were thoroughly investigated. The organic self-assemblies of anionic surfactants can also be used for introducing other shapes in rod-like silica structures. Here we report the formation of amphiphilic N-miristoyl-l-alanine self-assemblies in aqueous solution upon stirring and at presence of l-arginine. These anionic surfactant self-assemblies form fibers that grow by increasing the stirring duration. The fibers were studied using transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and vibrational circular dichroism. Addition of silica precursor 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethylene and co-structuring directing agent N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride at different stages of fibers' growth leads to formation of different silica structures. By controlling stirring duration, we obtained twisted tubular silica structures as a result of fibers encapsulation. We decorated these structures with gold nanoparticles by different methods and measured their optical activity. PMID:27267039

  15. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  16. Long discontinuous fiber composite structure: Forming and structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.; Santare, M. H.; Otoole, B. J.; Beaussart, A. J.; Deheer, D. C.; Okine, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several new approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising new approaches is the conversion of planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. In the present study, the authors have established a framework which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. The initial study focuses upon the establishment of micromechanics models for prediction of the effective anisotropic viscosities of the oriented fiber assembly in a viscous matrix. Next, the developed constitutive relation is employed through an analogy with incompressible elasticity to exercise the finite element technique for determination of local fiber orientation and laminate thickness after forming. Results are presented for the stretch bending of a curved beam from an arbitrary composite laminate and the bulging of a clamped sheet. Structural analyses are conducted to determine the effect of microstructure on the performance of curved beams manufactured from long discontinuous fiber composites. For the purposes of this study, several curved beams with ideal and non-ideal microstructures are compared for response under pure bending. Material parameters are determined from a separate microstructural analysis.

  17. Aircraft fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a sought after concept that is expected to advance military maintenance programs, increase platform operational safety and reduce its life cycle cost. Such concept is further considered to constitute a major building block of any Integrated Health Management (IHM) capability. Since 65% to 80% of military assets' Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is devoted to operations and support (O&S), the aerospace industry and military sectors continue to look for opportunities to exploit SHM systems, capability and tools. Over the past several years, countless SHM concepts and technologies have emerged. Among those, fiber optic based systems were identified of significant potential. This paper introduces the elements of an SHM system and investigates key issues impeding the commercial implementation of fiber optic based SHM capability. In particular, this paper presents an experimental study of short gauge, intrinsic, spectrometric-based in-fiber Bragg grating sensors, for potential use as a component of an SHM system. Fiber optic Bragg grating sensors are evaluated against resistance strain gauges for strain monitoring, sensitivity, accuracy, reliability, and fatigue durability. Strain field disturbance is also investigated by "embedding" the sensors under a photoelastic coating in order to illustrate sensor intrusiveness in an embedded configuration.

  18. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  19. Optical fiber methods for the NDE of smart skins and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Bennett, K. D.; May, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The recent use of optical fiber waveguides as sensors in and on materials and structures is briefly reviewed. Recent progress in the application of fiber optic sensors for composite cure monitoring, in-service static and dynamic materials evaluation, and material degradation determination are outlined. The integration of sensors, actuators, and control system electronics for achieving active material and structural response is described.

  20. Structural tailoring of select fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    A multidisciplinary design process for aerospace propulsion composite structures was formalized and embedded into computer codes. These computer codes are streamlined to obtain tailored designs for select composite structures. The codes available are briefly described with sample cases to illustrate their applications. The sample cases include aircraft engine blades, propfans (turboprops), flat, and cylindrical panels. Typical results illustrate that the use of these codes enable the designer to obtain designs which meet all the design requirements with maximum benefits in efficiency, noise, weight or thermal distortions.

  1. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  2. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  3. Flexible filamentous virus structure from fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Gerald; Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah; McCullough, Ian; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Ghabrial, Said

    2008-10-24

    Fiber diffraction data have been obtained from Narcissus mosaic virus, a potexvirus from the family Flexiviridae, and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a potyvirus from the family Potyviridae. Analysis of the data in conjunction with cryo-electron microscopy data allowed us to determine the symmetry of the viruses and to make reconstructions of SMV at 19 {angstrom} resolution and of another potexvirus, papaya mosaic virus, at 18 {angstrom} resolution. These data include the first well-ordered data ever obtained for the potyviruses and the best-ordered data from the potexviruses, and offer the promise of eventual high resolution structure determinations.

  4. Geometries and applications of active fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglmayr, Josef

    2001-10-01

    Active fiber bundles (FBs) are aimed to model photonic switching and processing in 3-D without the restrictions of the photonic technology. The 2-D photonic architectures are assumed to be implemented by networks of directional couplers (DCs) and Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs), respectively. For the implementation several crucial problems are expected: (1) proper operation of the spatial couplers/switches (nonblocking interconnections) and (2) coupling in the interstage interconnection section mainly caused by parallel and crossing fibers/waveguides (WGs). For the design of proper operating switches (refinement of couplers) the application of decoupling concepts of modern control theory is proposed. The final goal is to translate the refined couplers into integrated photonic architectures rather than into additional lightwave circuits (LWCs) which simply would increase the coupling. The decoupling concepts are reviewed. The paper is an attempt to prepare for applying well-known system engineering concepts to the upcoming technology of photonics.

  5. Designing the Structure of Carbon Fibers for Optimal Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Vautard, Frederic; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber manufacturing follows generic processing steps: formation of thermoplastic fibers, stabilization, and carbonization. The final structures and end properties of the carbon fiber can differ significantly depending on the precursor chemistry and the associated processing sciences. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and mesophase pitch are the predominant precursors used in the production of carbon fibers. PAN-based carbon fibers consist of nanocrystalline graphitic domains typically 1.5 5 nm in size surrounded by amorphous carbon; in contrast, pitch-based carbon fibers are 10 50 nm crystallites with the graphitic (002) planes mostly aligned parallel to the fiber axis. It has been seen that the skin core structure of PAN-based carbon fibers plays a significant role in their mechanical properties. Designing a more homogenous carbon fiber microstructure by controlling the starting polymer and process parameters results in a different set of tensile strengths and elastic moduli. In this study the microstructural defect distribution (0.1 200 nm), measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, was shown to be directly related to the tensile strength of the carbon fibers. Here the formation of carbon structures from various polymer precursors is reviewed. Such a comprehensive understanding offers the opportunity to design carbon fiber microstructures with improved properties and to ultimately create new types of carbon fibers from alternative precursors at reduced cost.

  6. Optical fiber smart structures applied to secure containers

    SciTech Connect

    Sliva, P.; Gordon, N.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Simmon, K.L.; Anheier, N.C.

    1994-07-01

    A prototype secure container was prepared that uses continually monitored optical fiber as the smart structure. A small ({approx}7.6 cm {times} 10.2 cm {times} 12.7 cm), matchbox-shaped container consisting of an inner drawer within an outer shell was fabricated from polymer resin. The optical fiber was sandwiched between additional non-optical, strength-promoting fibers and embedded into the polymer. The additional non-optical fiber provides strength to the container, protects the optical fiber from damage, hides the fiber and acts as a decoy. The optical fiber was wound with a winding density such that a high probability of fiber damage would be expected if the container was penetrated.

  7. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings in Er3+ fiber for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Navarro, M. G.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Ceballos-Herrera, D. E.; Escamilla-Ambrosio, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work presents preliminary results on wavelength sensitivity due to mechanically induced long period fiber grating (LPFG) on both standard single-mode and Er-doped fibers. The work presents and compares results for both types of fibers under different torsion conditions. In order to apply the torsion one of the fiber ends is fixed while torsion is applied on the other end. A LPFG whose period is 503μm is used to press on the fiber after the torsion, this will allow for micro curvatures to be formed on the fiber, which will in turn generate a periodical index perturbation on it. Here, it was noted that the rejection band shifts to shorter wavelengths for Er-doped fibers. It was detected that for torsion of 6 turns applied to 10cm doped fiber the wavelength peaks can shift up to 25nm, which is longer than similar results reported on standard fibers. Therefore, by using Er-doped fibers this technique will give more sensitive and accurate results on the real conditions of the structure under study. These results can be employed for sensing applications, especially for small to medium size structures, being these structures mechanical, civil or aeronautical. Theoretical calculations and simulations are employed for experimental results validation.

  8. Infrared Fibers for Use in Space-Based Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared optical fibers are finding a number of applications including laser surgery, remote sensing, and nuclear radiation resistant links. Utilizing these fibers in space-based structures is another application, which can be exploited. Acoustic and thermal sensing are two areas in which these fibers could be utilized. In particular, fibers could be embedded in IM7/8552 toughened epoxy and incorporated into space structures both external and internal. ZBLAN optical fibers are a candidate, which have been studied extensively over the past 20 years for terrestrial applications. For the past seven years the effects of gravity on the crystallization behavior of ZBLAN optical fiber has been studied. It has been found that ZBLAN crystallization is suppressed in microgravity. This lack of crystallization leads to a fiber with better transmission characteristics than its terrestrial counterpart.

  9. Combined electromechanical impedance and fiber optic diagnosis of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlavin, Jon; Zagrai, Andrei; Clemens, Rebecca; Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joey; Moslehi, Behzad; Patel, Ronak; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Faridian, Fereydoun

    2014-03-01

    Electromechanical impedance is a popular diagnostic method for assessing structural conditions at high frequencies. It has been utilized, and shown utility, in aeronautic, space, naval, civil, mechanical, and other types of structures. By contrast, fiber optic sensing initially found its niche in static strain measurement and low frequency structural dynamic testing. Any low frequency limitations of the fiber optic sensing, however, are mainly governed by its hardware elements. As hardware improves, so does the bandwidth (frequency range * number of sensors) provided by the appropriate enabling fiber optic sensor interrogation system. In this contribution we demonstrate simultaneous high frequency measurements using fiber optic and electromechanical impedance structural health monitoring technologies. A laboratory specimen imitating an aircraft wing structure, incorporating surfaces with adjustable boundary conditions, was instrumented with piezoelectric and fiber optic sensors. Experiments were conducted at different structural boundary conditions associated with deterioration of structural health. High frequency dynamic responses were collected at multiple locations on a laboratory wing specimen and conclusions were drawn about correspondence between structural damage and dynamic signatures as well as correlation between electromechanical impedance and fiber optic sensors spectra. Theoretical investigation of the effect of boundary conditions on electromechanical impedance spectra is presented and connection to low frequency structural dynamics is suggested. It is envisioned that acquisition of high frequency structural dynamic responses with multiple fiber optic sensors may open new diagnostic capabilities for fiber optic sensing technologies.

  10. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings on single mode tapered optical fiber for structure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Navarro, María. G.; Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Álvarez-Chávez, José A.; Velázquez-González, Jesús S.; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando; Escamilla-Ambrosio, Ponciano J.

    2015-08-01

    The modal characteristics of tapered single mode optical fibers and its strain sensing characteristics by using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings are presented in this work. Both Long Period Fiber Gratings (LPFG) and fiber tapers are fiber devices that couple light from the core fiber into the fiber cladding modes. The mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one flat and the other grooved. For this experiment the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computer numerical control machine. The manufacturing of the tapered fiber is accomplished by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner and stretching the fiber, which protective coating has been removed. Then, a polymer-tube-package is added in order to make the sensor sufficiently stiff for the tests. The mechanical induced LPFG is accomplished by putting the tapered fiber in between the two plates, so the taper acquires the form of the grooved plate slots. Using a laser beam the transmission spectrum showed a large peak transmission attenuation of around -20 dB. The resultant attenuation peak wavelength in the transmission spectrum shifts with changes in tension showing a strain sensitivity of 2pm/μɛ. This reveals an improvement on the sensitivity for structure monitoring applications compared with the use of a standard optical fiber. In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory and numerical simulation analysis are also included.

  11. Hierarchical Fiber Structures Made by Electrospinning Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneker, Darrell H.

    2009-03-01

    A filter for water purification that is very thin, with small interstices and high surface area per unit mass, can be made with nanofibers. The mechanical strength of a very thin sheet of nanofibers is not great enough to withstand the pressure drop of the fluid flowing through. If the sheet of nanofibers is made thicker, the strength will increase, but the flow will be reduced to an impractical level. An optimized filter can be made with nanometer scale structures supported on micron scale structures, which are in turn supported on millimeter scale structures. This leads to a durable hierarchical structure to optimize the filtration efficiency with a minimum amount of material. Buckling coils,ootnotetextTao Han, Darrell H Reneker, Alexander L. Yarin, Polymer, Volume 48, issue 20 (September 21, 2007), p. 6064-6076. electrical bending coilsootnotetextDarrell H. Reneker and Alexander L. Yarin, Polymer, Volume 49, Issue 10 (2008) Pages 2387-2425, DOI:10.1016/j.polymer.2008.02.002. Feature Article. and pendulum coilsootnotetextT. Han, D.H. Reneker, A.L. Yarin, Polymer, Volume 49, (2008) Pages 2160-2169, doi:10.1016/jpolymer.2008.01.0487878. spanning dimensions from a few microns to a few centimeters can be collected from a single jet by controlling the position and motion of a collector. Attractive routes to the design and construction of hierarchical structures for filtration are based on nanofibers supported on small coils that are in turn supported on larger coils, which are supported on even larger overlapping coils. ``Such top-down'' hierarchical structures are easy to make by electrospinning. In one example, a thin hierarchical structure was made, with a high surface area and small interstices, having an open area of over 50%, with the thinnest fibers supported at least every 15 microns.

  12. A Comparison of the Mechanical and Structural Properties of Fibrin Fibers with Other Protein Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Guthold, M.; Liu, W.; Sparks, E. A.; Jawerth, L. M.; Peng, L.; Falvo, M.; Superfine, R.; Hantgan, R. R.; Lord, S. T.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years a great deal of progress has been made in studying the mechanical and structural properties of biological protein fibers. Here, we compare and review the stiffness (Young's modulus, E) and breaking strain (also called rupture strain or extensibility, εmax) of numerous biological protein fibers in light of the recently reported mechanical properties of fibrin fibers. Emphasis is also placed on the structural features and molecular mechanisms that endow biological protein fibers with their respective mechanical properties. Generally, stiff biological protein fibers have a Young's modulus on the order of a few Gigapascal and are not very extensible (εmax < 20%). They also display a very regular arrangement of their monomeric units. Soft biological protein fibers have a Young's modulus on the order of a few Megapascal and are very extensible (εmax > 100%). These soft, extensible fibers employ a variety of molecular mechanisms, such as extending amorphous regions or unfolding protein domains, to accommodate large strains. We conclude our review by proposing a novel model of how fibrin fibers might achieve their extremely large extensibility, despite the regular arrangement of the monomeric fibrin units within a fiber. We propose that fibrin fibers accommodate large strains by two major mechanisms: (1) an α-helix to β-strand conversion of the coiled coils; (2) a partial unfolding of the globular C-terminal domain of the γ-chain. PMID:17952642

  13. Structure and growth process of vapor-grown carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koyama, T.; Endo, M.

    1983-01-01

    The structure, effect of heat, and growth process of vapor-grown carbon fibers are investigated. The growth process of the carbon fibers could be divided into three stages; nucleation, elongation, and thickening processes. Also, a multi-layered structure can be produced as well as graphitization.

  14. Structural basis of collagen fiber degradation by cathepsin K

    PubMed Central

    Aguda, Adeleke H.; Panwar, Preety; Du, Xin; Nguyen, Nham T.; Brayer, Gary D.; Brömme, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin K is the major collagenolytic protease in bone that facilitates physiological as well as pathological bone degradation. Despite its key role in bone remodeling and for being a highly sought-after drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis, the mechanism of collagen fiber degradation by cathepsin K remained elusive. Here, we report the structure of a collagenolytically active cathepsin K protein dimer. Cathepsin K is organized into elongated C-shaped protease dimers that reveal a putative collagen-binding interface aided by glycosaminoglycans. Molecular modeling of collagen binding to the dimer indicates the participation of nonactive site amino acid residues, Q21 and Q92, in collagen unfolding. Mutations at these sites as well as perturbation of the dimer protein–protein interface completely inhibit cathepsin-K–mediated fiber degradation without affecting the hydrolysis of gelatin or synthetic peptide. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the specific binding of cathepsin K at the edge of the fibrillar gap region of collagen fibers, which suggest initial cleavage events at the N- and C-terminal ends of tropocollagen molecules. Edman degradation analysis of collagen fiber degradation products revealed those initial cleavage sites. We propose that one cathepsin K molecule binds to collagen-bound glycosaminoglycans at the gap region and recruits a second protease molecule that provides an unfolding and cleavage mechanism for triple helical collagen. Removal of collagen-associated glycosaminoglycans prevents cathepsin K binding and subsequently fiber hydrolysis. Cathepsin K dimer and glycosaminoglycan binding sites represent novel targeting sites for the development of nonactive site-directed second-generation inhibitors of this important drug target. PMID:25422423

  15. Manufacturing of Smart Structures Using Fiber Placement Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matthew M.; Glowasky, Robert A.; McIlroy, Bruce E.; Story, Todd A.

    1996-01-01

    Smart structures research and development, with the ultimate aim of rapid commercial and military production of these structures, are at the forefront of the Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost-Effective Structures (SPICES) program. As part of this ARPA-sponsored program, MDA-E is using fiber placement processes to manufacture integrated smart structure systems. These systems comprise advanced composite structures with embedded fiber optic sensors, shape memory alloys, piezoelectric actuators, and miniature accelerometers. Cost-effective approaches and solutions to smart material synthesis in the fiber-placement process, based upon integrated product development, are discussed herein.

  16. Crystal Structure of Enteric Adenovirus Serotype 41 Short Fiber Head

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Human enteric adenoviruses of species F contain two fibers in the same virion, a long fiber which binds to coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and a short fiber of unknown function. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the short fiber head of human adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41). The short fiber head has the characteristic fold of other known fiber heads but has three unusual features. First, it has much shorter loops between the beta-strands. Second, one of the usually well-ordered beta-strands on the distal face of the fiber head is highly disordered and this same region is sensitive to digestion with pepsin, an enzyme occurring naturally in the intestinal tract, the physiological environment of Ad41. Third, the AB loop has a deletion giving it a distinct conformation incompatible with CAR binding. PMID:16254343

  17. Effect of Fiber Surface Structure on Interfacial Reaction between Carbon Fiber and Aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuang-Chih; Matsugi, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Gen; Yanagisawa, Osamu

    Surface structure of carbon fiber and interfacial reaction between fiber and aluminium in carbon fiber reinforced aluminium composites were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Low and high graphitized carbon fiber reinforced pure aluminium composites were prepared by ultrasonic liquid infiltration. Vapor grown carbon nano fiber (VGCF) reinforced pure aluminium composites were prepared by hot-pressing. Heteroatoms, which existed abundantly in the surface of low graphitized carbon fiber, caused carbon lamellar structure in the fiber surface pronounced curvature. VGCF surface structure appeared regular and linear graphitic lamellae. Low graphitized fiber reinforced pure aluminium composites revealed serious interfacial reaction produced crystalline aluminium carbides (Al4C3), compared to composites reinforced by high graphitized fiber. On the other hand, Al4C3 crystalline reactants were not found at the interface of VGCF reinforced pure aluminium composites, but formation of interlayer was observed. In order to promote Al4C3 growth, carbon fiber reinforced composites were heat-treated at 573K and 873K for 1.8ks. Al4C3 interfacial phases in low and high graphitized fiber reinforced aluminium composites grew with the rise in the temperature. The heat-treatment resulted in the formation of non-crystalline Al4C3 interlayer by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis of electron microscopy. At high temperature, Al4C3 was not grew and increased merely at the interface between carbon fiber and pure aluminium matrix, and moreover, the formation of new Al4C3 crystal occurred in this interlayer.

  18. Dispersion-tailored active-fiber solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tartwijk, Guido H. M.; Essiambre, René-Jean; Agrawal, Govind P.

    1996-12-01

    We show analytically that tailoring the fiber dispersion appropriately can cause optical solitons to propagate unperturbed, without emission of dispersive waves, in a distributed-gain fiber amplifier with a nonuniform gain profile. We apply our scheme to a bidirectionally pumped fiber amplifier and discuss the importance of higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects for short solitons.

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced composites: their structural and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jingquan; Yang, Dehua

    2010-07-01

    More and more astronomical telescopes use carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRP). CFRP has high stiffness, high strength, and low thermal expansion. However, they are not isotropic in performance. Their properties are direction dependent. This paper discusses, in detail, the structural and thermal properties of carbon fiber structure members, such as tubes, plates, and honeycomb sandwich structures. Comparisons are provided both from the structural point of view and from the thermal point of view.

  20. Study of oil sorption behavior of filled and structured fiber assemblies made from polypropylene, kapok and milkweed fibers.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, R S; Das, Dipayan; Karan, C Praba

    2011-02-15

    This article reports on oil sorption behavior of fiber assemblies made up of single natural and synthetic fibers as well as blend of natural and synthetic fibers when tested with high density oil and diesel oil. A series of filled fiber assemblies were prepared from 100% polypropylene, kapok, and milkweed fibers and another series of bonded structured fiber assemblies were prepared from a 70/30 blend of kapok and polypropylene fibers and a 70/30 blend of milkweed and polypropylene fibers. It was observed that the porosity of the fiber assemblies played a very important role in determining its oil sorption capacity. The polypropylene fiber assembly exhibited the highest sorption capacity (g/g) followed by the kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies at porosity <0.98. At higher porosities (above 0.98), polypropylene filled fiber assembly has poor sorption capacity due to large sized inter fiber pore. The kapok and milkweed fibers have intra fiber porosities of 0.81 and 0.83, respectively. All the fiber assemblies showed higher oil sorption capacity with the high density oil as compared to the diesel oil. As the kapok and milkweed fiber have low cellulose content, hence their slow degradation is an advantage in fresh and marine water applications. The good sorption capacity of kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies along with their bio-degradable nature offer great scope for structuring them into fiber assemblies with large porosity and uniform pores to have efficient oil sorbents. PMID:21146290

  1. Optical fiber sensors for materials and structures characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, D. K.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The final technical report on Optical Fiber Sensors for Materials and Structures Characterization, covering the period August 1990 through August 1991 is presented. Research programs in the following technical areas are described; sapphire optical fiber sensors; vibration analysis using two-mode elliptical core fibers and sensors; extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer development; and coatings for fluorescent-based sensor. Research progress in each of these areas was substantial, as evidenced by the technical publications which are included as appendices.

  2. Fiber: composition, structures, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Sims, Ian M; Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    Kiwifruit dietary fiber consists of cell-wall polysaccharides that are typical of the cell walls of many dicotyledonous fruits, being composed of pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and cellulose. The kiwifruit pectic polysaccharides consist of homo- and rhamnogalacturonans with various neutral, (arabino)-galactan side chains, while the hemicelluloses are mostly xyloglucan and xylan. The proportions of pectic polysaccharide, hemicellulose, and cellulose in both green 'Hayward' and 'Zespri® Gold' are similar and are little affected by in vitro exposure to gastric and small intestinal digestion. The hydration properties of the kiwifruit-swelling and water retention capacity-are also unaffected by foregut digestion, indicating that the functional properties of kiwifruit fiber survive in the foregut. However, in the hindgut, kiwifruit fiber is fermented, but whole kiwifruit consumed in association with slowly fermented fiber leads to distal displacement of fermentation, indicating that hindgut benefits of kiwifruit may result from its interaction with other dietary sources of fiber. PMID:23394983

  3. Structural response of fiber composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A fiber composite airfoil, typical for high-tip speed compressor applications, is subjected to load conditions anticipated to be encountered in such applications, and its structural response is theoretically investigated. The analysis method used consists of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors and coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, centrifugal, and combinations of these. The various responses investigated include root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. Also, the core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design (core plies not highly stressed) and appears to be sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for such an analysis, and to provide quantitative data of the various responses which can be helpful in designing such composite blades.

  4. Structural monitoring of filamentary composites using embedded fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cashon, John L.; Lehner, David L.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring overall integrity of structural components made of filamentary composites, by embedding optical fibers between lamina of a composite beam, is investigated using a beam constructed of Kevlar/epoxy cloth with embedded optical fibers aligned with the longitudinal axis of the beam. Phase changes were monitored in three different optical fibers as the composite beam was subjected to pure bending, and the strain response of the fibers was compared to the strain gage readings taken at the surface, showing a strong correlation between the phase change and the applied deformation.

  5. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  6. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-06-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  7. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  8. Crack monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinlei; Bao, Tengfei; Chen, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Optical fibers have been widely used in structural health monitoring. Traditional silica fibers are easy to break in field applications due to their brittleness. Thus, silica fibers are proposed to be replaced by plastic optical fibers (POFs) in crack monitoring in this study. Moreover, considering the uncertainty of crack propagation direction in composite materials, the influence of the angles between fibers and cracks on the monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers is studied. A POF sensing device was designed and the relationship between light intensity loss and crack width under different fiber/crack angles was first measured through the device. Then, three-point bend tests were conducted on concrete beams. POFs were glued to the bottom surfaces of the beams and light intensity loss with crack width was measured. Experimental results showed that light intensity loss in plastic optical fibers increased with crack width increase. Therefore, application of plastic optical fibers in crack monitoring is feasible. Moreover, the results also showed that the sensitivity of the POF crack sensor decreased with the increase of angles between fibers and cracks.

  9. The fiber-optic imaging and manipulation of neural activity during animal behavior.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Murayama, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress with optogenetic probes for imaging and manipulating neural activity has further increased the relevance of fiber-optic systems for neural circuitry research. Optical fibers, which bi-directionally transmit light between separate sites (even at a distance of several meters), can be used for either optical imaging or manipulating neural activity relevant to behavioral circuitry mechanisms. The method's flexibility and the specifications of the light structure are well suited for following the behavior of freely moving animals. Furthermore, thin optical fibers allow researchers to monitor neural activity from not only the cortical surface but also deep brain regions, including the hippocampus and amygdala. Such regions are difficult to target with two-photon microscopes. Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity with an optical fiber has the advantage of being selective for both cell-types and projections as compared to conventional electrophysiological brain tissue stimulation. It is difficult to extract any data regarding changes in neural activity solely from a fiber-optic manipulation device; however, the readout of data is made possible by combining manipulation with electrophysiological recording, or the simultaneous application of optical imaging and manipulation using a bundle-fiber. The present review introduces recent progress in fiber-optic imaging and manipulation methods, while also discussing fiber-optic system designs that are suitable for a given experimental protocol. PMID:26427958

  10. Micromechanical analysis of damping performance of piezoelectric structural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qingli; Ng, Kenny

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be of particular importance in various civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. This study firstly conducted the micromechanical finite element analysis to predict the elastic properties and piezoelectrical coupling parameters of a special type of an active PSF composite laminate. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The passive damping performance of these active composites was studied under the cyclic force loadings with different frequencies. It was found that the passive electric-mechanical coupling behavior can absorb limited dynamic energy and delay the structure responses with minimum viscoelastic damping. The actuating function of piezoelectric materials was then applied to reduce the dynamic mechanical deformation. The step voltage inputs were imposed to the interdigital electrodes of PSF laminate transducer along the poled direction. The cyclic pressure loading was applied transversely to the composite laminate. The electromechnical interaction with the 1-3 coupling parameter generated the transverse expansion, which can reduce the cyclic deformation evenly by shifting the response waves. This study shows the promise in using this type of active composites as actuators to improve stability of the structure dynamic.

  11. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  12. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  13. Structure and organization of chromatin fiber in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohong; Zhu, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized hierarchically into chromatin structures by histones. Despite extensive research for over 30 years, not only the fundamental structure of the 30-nm chromatin fiber is being debated, but the actual existence of such fiber remains hotly contested. In this review, we focus on the most recent progress in elucidating the structure of the 30-nm fiber upon in vitro reconstitution, and its possible organization inside the nucleus. In addition, we discuss the roles of linker histone H1 as well as the importance of specific nucleosome-nucleosome interactions in the formation of the 30-nm fiber. Finally, we discuss the involvement of structural variations and epigenetic mechanisms available for the regulation of this chromatin form. PMID:25913782

  14. Polymer optical fiber grating as water activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the water content within a product has long been required in the chemical processing, agriculture, food storage, paper manufacturing, semiconductor, pharmaceutical and fuel industries. The limitations of water content measurement as an indicator of safety and quality are attributed to differences in the strength with which water associates with other components in the product. Water activity indicates how tightly water is "bound," structurally or chemically, in products. Water absorption introduces changes in the volume and refractive index of poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA. Therefore for a grating made in PMMA based optical fiber, its wavelength is an indicator of water absorption and PMMA thus can be used as a water activity sensor. In this work we have investigated the performance of a PMMA based optical fiber grating as a water activity sensor in sugar solution, saline solution and Jet A-1 aviation fuel. Samples of sugar solution with sugar concentration from 0 to 8%, saline solution with concentration from 0 to 22%, and dried (10ppm), ambient (39ppm) and wet (68ppm) aviation fuels were used in experiments. The corresponding water activities are measured as 1.0 to 0.99 for sugar solution, 1.0 to 0.86 for saline solution, and 0.15, 0.57 and 1.0 for the aviation fuel samples. The water content in the measured samples ranges from 100% (pure water) to 10 ppm (dried aviation fuel). The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits good sensitivity and consistent response, and Bragg wavelength shifts as large as 3.4 nm when the sensor is transferred from dry fuel to wet fuel.

  15. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  16. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  17. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  18. Active radiation hardening technology for fiber-optic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Suo, Xinxin; Yang, Mingwei

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated an active radiation hardening technology for fiber optic source developed for high performance fiber optic gyroscope. The radiation characteristic of erbium-doped fiber was studied experimentally. The radiation induced attenuation (RIA) at 980nm pump light was identified to be the main reason for the degradation and there was photo-bleaching effect in EDF too. A variable parameters control technology was proposed and taken to keep the 980nm and 1550nm light energy stable and high stability and radiation-resistance fiber source with gauss profile spectrum was realized .The source can stand against more than 50 krad (Si) total radiation dose.

  19. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  20. Electrical activation of artificial muscles containing polyacrylonitrile gel fibers.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, H B; Gebhart, N; Kim, K J; Shahinpoor, M

    2000-01-01

    Gel fibers made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are known to elongate and contract when immersed in caustic and acidic solutions, respectively. The amount of contraction for these pH-activated fibers is 50% or greater, and the strength of these fibers is shown to be comparable to that of human muscle. Despite these attributes, the need of strong acids and bases for actuation has limited the use of PAN gel fibers as linear actuators or artificial muscles. Increasing the conductivity by depositing platinum on the fibers or combining the fibers with graphite fibers has allowed for electrical activation of artificial muscles containing gel fibers when placed in an electrochemical cell. The electrolysis of water in such a cell produces hydrogen ions at an artificial muscle anode, thus locally decreasing the pH and causing the muscle to contract. Reversing the electric field allows the PAN muscle to elongate. A greater than 40% contraction in artificial muscle length in less than 10 min is observed when it is placed as an electrode in a 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution and connected to a 10 V power supply. These results indicate potential in developing electrically activated PAN muscles and linear actuators, which would be much more applicable than chemically activated muscles. PMID:11710194

  1. Fiber grating systems used to measure strain in cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric; Corona-Bittick, Kelli; Slattery, Kerry T.; Dorr, Donald J.; Crowe, C. Robert; Vandiver, Terry L.; Evans, Robert N.

    1997-07-01

    Fiber optic grating systems are described that have been used to measure strain in cylindrical structures. The applications of these systems to a composite utility pole and to a composite missile body are described. Composite utility poles have significant advantages with respect to wooden utility poles that include superior strength and uniformity; light weight for ease of deployment; the ability to be recycled, reducing hazardous waste associated with chemically treated wooden poles; and compatibility with embedded fiber optic sensors, allowing structural loads to be monitored. Tests conducted of fiber optic grating sensors in combination with an overcoupled coupler demodulation system to support structural testing of a 22-ft composite pole are reported. Monitoring strain in composite missile bodies has the potential to improve the quality of manufactured parts, support performance testing, and enhance safety during long periods of storage. Strain measurements made with fiber optic grating and electrical strain gauges are described.

  2. Porous texture evolution in Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, S; Denoyel, R; Rouquerol, J; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2002-08-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in depth, paying special attention to the choice of the reference material. The activated carbon fibers studied possess an essentially homogeneous microporous texture, which suggests that these materials may be applied in gas separation, either directly or with additional CVD treatment. PMID:16290775

  3. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  4. Parametric Modeling of the Mouse Left Ventricular Myocardial Fiber Structure.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Samer S; Gomez, Arnold David; Morgan, James L; Hsu, Edward W

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has greatly facilitated detailed quantifications of myocardial structures. However, structural patterns, such as the distinctive transmural rotation of the fibers, remain incompletely described. To investigate the validity and practicality of pattern-based analysis, 3D DTI was performed on 13 fixed mouse hearts and fiber angles in the left ventricle were transformed and fitted to parametric expressions constructed from elementary functions of the prolate spheroidal spatial variables. It was found that, on average, the myocardial fiber helix angle could be represented to 6.5° accuracy by the equivalence of a product of 10th-order polynomials of the radial and longitudinal variables, and 17th-order Fourier series of the circumferential variable. Similarly, the fiber imbrication angle could be described by 10th-order polynomials and 24th-order Fourier series, to 5.6° accuracy. The representations, while relatively concise, did not adversely affect the information commonly derived from DTI datasets including the whole-ventricle mean fiber helix angle transmural span and atlases constructed for the group. The unique ability of parametric models for predicting the 3D myocardial fiber structure from finite number of 2D slices was also demonstrated. These findings strongly support the principle of parametric modeling for characterizing myocardial structures in the mouse and beyond. PMID:26942586

  5. Lessons learned in embedding fiber sensors into large civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, Timothy P.; Huston, Dryver R.; Fuhr, Peter L.

    1993-03-01

    Fiber optic cables have long since held the promise of providing low cost, widespread sensing capabilities. The use of fiber optic sensors within a large civil structure could allow for multiple sensing capabilities providing information as to the health of a structure. The Stafford Emerging Technologies Research Complex is a five-story, 65,000 square foot building currently under the final phases of construction on the campus of the University of Vermont. Over the course of the eight months approximately seventy fiber optic sensors have been installed within the concrete frame work of the building. The intrinsic and extrinsic fiber sensors are comprised of various types of singlemode and multimode cables. Since this project is the first major installation of it's kind, very little was known as to what techniques should be implemented to maximize fiber survivability. While installing the sensor network at the Stafford building site many lessons have been learned that would aid in future fiber installations. The techniques developed while installing fiber optic sensors are presented.

  6. Narrowband random lasing in a Bismuth-doped active fiber.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Ivan A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Skvortsov, Mikhail I; Podivilov, Evgeniy V; Melkumov, Mikhail A; Babin, Sergey A; Dianov, Evgeny M

    2016-01-01

    Random fiber lasers operating via the Rayleigh scattering (RS) feedback attract now a great deal of attention as they generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam with the efficiency and performance comparable and even exceeding those of fiber lasers with conventional cavities. Similar to other random lasers, both amplification and random scattering are distributed here along the laser medium being usually represented by a kilometers-long passive fiber with Raman gain. However, it is hardly possible to utilize normal gain in conventional active fibers as they are usually short and RS is negligible. Here we report on the first demonstration of the RS-based random lasing in an active fiber. This became possible due to the implementation of a new Bi-doped fiber with an increased amplification length and RS coefficient. The realized Bi-fiber random laser generates in a specific spectral region (1.42 μm) exhibiting unique features, in particular, a much narrower linewidth than that in conventional cavity of the same length, in agreement with the developed theory. Lasers of this type have a great potential for applications as Bi-doped fibers with different host compositions enable laser operation in an extremely broad range of wavelengths, 1.15-1.78 μm. PMID:27435232

  7. Narrowband random lasing in a Bismuth-doped active fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, Ivan A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Skvortsov, Mikhail I.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.; Melkumov, Mikhail A.; Babin, Sergey A.; Dianov, Evgeny M.

    2016-01-01

    Random fiber lasers operating via the Rayleigh scattering (RS) feedback attract now a great deal of attention as they generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam with the efficiency and performance comparable and even exceeding those of fiber lasers with conventional cavities. Similar to other random lasers, both amplification and random scattering are distributed here along the laser medium being usually represented by a kilometers-long passive fiber with Raman gain. However, it is hardly possible to utilize normal gain in conventional active fibers as they are usually short and RS is negligible. Here we report on the first demonstration of the RS-based random lasing in an active fiber. This became possible due to the implementation of a new Bi-doped fiber with an increased amplification length and RS coefficient. The realized Bi-fiber random laser generates in a specific spectral region (1.42 μm) exhibiting unique features, in particular, a much narrower linewidth than that in conventional cavity of the same length, in agreement with the developed theory. Lasers of this type have a great potential for applications as Bi-doped fibers with different host compositions enable laser operation in an extremely broad range of wavelengths, 1.15–1.78 μm. PMID:27435232

  8. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Illarramendi, María Asunción; Villatoro, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel. PMID:26134107

  9. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Illarramendi, María Asunción; Villatoro, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel. PMID:26134107

  10. Ultrashort pulse propagation in multiple-grating fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, L R; Benjamin, S D; Smith, P W; Sipe, J E; Juma, S

    1997-03-15

    We propose a multiple-grating fiber structure that decomposes an ultrashort broadband optical pulse simultaneously in both wavelength and time. As an initial demonstration, we used a transform-limited 1-ps Gaussian pulse centered at 1.55 mu;m as the ultrashort broadband input into a three-grating fiber structure and generated three output pulses separated in wavelength and time with good correlation between experimental results and simulations. This device structure can be used to generate a multiwavelength train of pulses for use in wavelength-division-multiplexed systems or to implement frequency-domain encoding of coherent pulses for optical code-division multiple access. PMID:18183215

  11. Intestinal morphology and enzymatic activity in newly weaned pigs fed contrasting fiber concentrations and fiber properties.

    PubMed

    Hedemann, M S; Eskildsen, M; Laerke, H N; Pedersen, C; Lindberg, J E; Laurinen, P; Knudsen, K E Bach

    2006-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of fiber source and concentration on morphological characteristics, mucin staining pattern, and mucosal enzyme activities in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. The experiment included 50 pigs from 10 litters weaned at 4 wk of age (BW 8.6 +/- 1.4 kg) and divided into 5 treatment groups. Diets containing fiber of various physico-chemical properties and concentrations were formulated to contain 73, 104, or 145 g of dietary fiber/kg of DM. The diets were based on raw wheat and barley flours. Pectin and barley hulls, representing soluble and insoluble fiber sources, respectively, were used to increase the fiber concentration. The pigs were fed the experimental diets for 9 d, and then the pigs were euthanized and the entire gastrointestinal tract was removed. Tissue samples were taken from the mid and distal small intestine and from the mid colon. Inclusion of pectin in the diets significantly decreased (P < 0.001) ADFI and ADG compared with pigs fed no pectin. The villi and the crypts were shorter in pigs fed pectin-containing diets, but the villous height/crypt depth ratio was unaltered. Pectin significantly decreased the area of mucins in the crypts of the small intestine, indicating that the pigs fed the pectin-containing diet would probably be more susceptible to pathogenic bacteria, although this cannot be separated from the impact on ADFI. The lectin-binding pattern of the intestinal mucosa was unaffected by diet. The activity of lactase and maltase was increased in pigs fed diets with high fiber content, whereas sucrase activity was increased in pigs fed the pectin-containing diets. The activity of the peptidases, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, was increased when feeding high fiber diets, whereas the activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase remained unaffected by the experimental diets. In conclusion, the reduced feed intake observed with the pectin-containing diets could explain the

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration τ=300  fs, a wavelength λ=1025  nm, and a peak fluence F=4  J/cm². It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers. PMID:26670499

  13. Rational design of fiber forming supramolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Wang, Benjamin K; Kanahara, Satoko M

    2016-05-01

    Recent strides in the development of multifunctional synthetic biomimetic materials through the self-assembly of multi-domain peptides and proteins over the past decade have been realized. Such engineered systems have wide-ranging application in bioengineering and medicine. This review focuses on fundamental fiber forming α-helical coiled-coil peptides, peptide amphiphiles, and amyloid-based self-assembling peptides; followed by higher order collagen- and elastin-mimetic peptides with an emphasis on chemical / biological characterization and biomimicry. PMID:27022140

  14. Biological glass fibers: Correlation between optical and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Sundar, Vikram C.; Yablon, Andrew D.; Weaver, James C.; Chen, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Biological systems have, through the course of time, evolved unique solutions for complex optical problems. These solutions are often achieved through a sophisticated control of fine structural features. Here we present a detailed study of the optical properties of basalia spicules from the glass sponge Euplectella aspergillum and reconcile them with structural characteristics. We show these biosilica fibers to have a distinctive layered design with specific compositional variations in the glass/organic composite and a corresponding nonuniform refractive index profile with a high-index core and a low-index cladding. The spicules can function as single-mode, few-mode, or multimode fibers, with spines serving as illumination points along the spicule shaft. The presence of a lens-like structure at the end of the fiber increases its light-collecting efficiency. Although free-space coupling experiments emphasize the similarity of these spicules to commercial optical fibers, the absence of any birefringence, the presence of technologically inaccessible dopants in the fibers, and their improved mechanical properties highlight the advantages of the low-temperature synthesis used by biology to construct these remarkable structures. PMID:14993612

  15. Performance of integrated active fiber composites in fiber reinforced epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, M.; Kornmann, X.; Huber, C.; Barbezat, M.; Brunner, A. J.

    2006-02-01

    Active fiber composite (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) has been integrated into orthotropic glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates to characterize the performance of AFC as a smart material component in laminated materials. Monotonic cyclic tensile loading was performed on integrated specimens at different strain levels. The AFC output was monitored to determine the effect of applied strain level on the AFC performance. It was found that the AFC sensitivity degraded beyond strains of 0.20% and approached a minimum at 0.50% strain. The degradation in the AFC performance appears to be attributed to the dominating effect of PZT fiber fragmentation during testing, as opposed to depolarization. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was used to detect damage in laminates during testing and was correlated with crack evidence from microscopy observations during testing to characterize damage evolution in response to strain levels.

  16. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-04-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability.

  17. Novel composite fiber structures to provide drug/protein delivery for medical implants and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of bioresorbable composite (core/shell) fiber structures loaded with bioactive agents was developed and studied. These unique polymeric structures are designed to combine good mechanical properties with a desired controlled release profile, in order to serve as scaffolds for tissue regeneration applications and as basic elements of medical implants. These core/shell fiber structures were formed by "coating" core polymer fibers with drug/protein-containing poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous structures. The shell preparation ("coating") was performed by the freeze-drying of water-in-oil emulsions. Both water soluble and water insoluble agents can be incorporated in these structures and their activity is preserved, since the fiber fabrication requires neither high temperatures nor harsh solvents in the vicinity of the bioactive agents. Examples for release profiles of protein (horseradish peroxidase) and drug (paclitaxel) are presented. We have demonstrated that appropriate selection of the emulsion's parameters can yield a variety of new core/shell fiber structures with desirable drug/protein release behavior. This will lead to the engineering of new implants and scaffolds, and will advance the field of tissue regeneration and medical implants. PMID:16956799

  18. Graphite fiber reinforced structure for supporting machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Kovach, Louis; Hurst, John S.

    1978-01-01

    Machine tools utilized in precision machine operations require tool support structures which exhibit minimal deflection, thermal expansion and vibration characteristics. The tool support structure of the present invention is a graphite fiber reinforced composite in which layers of the graphite fibers or yarn are disposed in a 0/90.degree. pattern and bonded together with an epoxy resin. The finished composite possesses a low coefficient of thermal expansion and a substantially greater elastic modulus, stiffness-to-weight ratio, and damping factor than a conventional steel tool support utilized in similar machining operations.

  19. Optical fiber sensor for measurement of concrete structure stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Barreto da Silva, R.

    1994-09-01

    In this work we describe an optical sensor to determine the stress applied at a concrete structure. The optical sensor is a monomode fiber optic, that is embedded in the concrete. The principle of these sensors is based on photoelastic effect, that produces a birefringence in the optical fiber and induces a rotation on the polarization angle of the guided polarized light. The photoelastic effect is produced due to a controlled applied charge in the center of the concrete structure. The shift of polarization is analyzed by a polaroid analyzer.

  20. Preparation, characterization and electronic structures of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.Y.; Liu, X.T.; Qin, W.W.; Liu, X.S.; Cai, N.N.; Wang, X.Q.; Lin, X.J.; Zhang, G.H.; Xu, D.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mesoporous Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers were prepared on a large scale by sol–gel method. • Fe-doping greatly enhance the visible-light photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} fibers. • First-principle study the effects of different replaced sites on the absorption edge and band gap. - Abstract: Mesoporous and nanostructured Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers were fabricated on a large scale by sol–gel method combined with the polyorganotitanium as the precursor and ferric nitrate as dopant. The prepared fibers were characterized by XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms and UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution under UV and visible-light irradiation. Compared with different types of photocatalysts, the 0.5%Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers exhibit super photocatalytic activity. This is ascribed to the fact that the Fe-doping induces the shift of the absorption edge into the visible-light range with the narrowing of the band gap and reduces the recombination of the photo-generated electrons and holes. Furthermore, first-principle study for their electronic structures was carried out to confirm the effects of different replaced lattice sites on the red shift of the absorption edge and the changes of the band gap of the Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} fibers.

  1. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers - Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  2. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers: Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  3. Tooth structural health monitoring with a fiber optic microbend sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishen, A.; Rafique, A.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to monitor structural response in intact teeth and teeth with structural loss using a noninvasive fiber optic microbend (FOMB) sensor. In this study a miniature fiber optic microbend sensor is fabricated and tested on intact tooth specimens, tooth specimens in which one-third crown structure was removed, tooth specimens in which access cavity was prepared and tooth specimens in which access cavity and root canal were prepared. The microbend sensor displayed a direct relationship between the applied load and the output light intensity. The rate of change in light intensity with increase in loads corresponded with the structural response of the tooth. This experiment highlights the potential of FOMB sensor technology to quantitatively monitor tooth structural loss during post endodontic restorations.

  4. Ceramic Fiber Structures for Cryogenic Load-Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This invention is intended for use as a load-bearing device under cryogenic temperatures and/or abrasive conditions (i.e., during missions to the Moon). The innovation consists of small-diameter, ceramic fibers that are woven or braided into devices like ropes, belts, tracks, or cables. The fibers can be formed from a variety of ceramic materials like silicon carbide, carbon, aluminosilicate, or aluminum oxide. The fiber architecture of the weave or braid is determined by both the fiber properties and the mechanical requirements of the application. A variety of weave or braid architectures is possible for this application. Thickness of load-bearing devices can be achieved by using either a 3D woven structure, or a layered, 2D structure. For the prototype device, a belt approximately 0.10 in. (0.25 cm) thick, and 3.0 in. (7.6 cm) wide was formed by layering and stitching a 2D aluminosilicate fiber weave.

  5. Structure of Oriented PLA/Graphene Nanocomposite Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qian; Pyda, Marek; Mao, Bin; Simona Cozza, Erika; Monticelli, Orietta; Cebe, Peggy

    2012-02-01

    Highly-aligned polylactic acid (PLA)/graphene nanocomposite fibers were successfully electrospun. Through a combination of thermal analysis and X-ray scattering, the phase structure, molecular orientation, and fiber shrinkage of the oriented PLA fibers were investigated to evaluate the molecular chain confinement. Calorimetric studies were performed to identify the molecular origin of the post-Tg exothermic peak. We found that the shrinkage of the oriented amorphous polymer serves as a precursor for the cold crystallization revealed by the post-Tg exotherm. Using real-time 2-D wide angle X-ray scattering and molecular retraction tests, we further quantified the orientation level and the oriented amorphous fraction in the as-spun amorphous fibers, and investigated the subsequent formation of oriented crystals during heating under ``frozen-in'' tension. The preferentially oriented amorphous region that possesses a degree of medium-range order has high similarity with the concept of the rigid amorphous phase that has been widely studied in thermal analysis area, and a new phase structure model was established. Graphene filler has a significant influence on molecular orientation, crystallization behavior, and electrical conductivity of PLA fibers.

  6. Ecological Structure Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Structure Activity Relationships, v1.00a, February 2009
    ECOSAR (Ecological Structure Activity Relationships) is a personal computer software program that is used to estimate the toxicity of chemicals used in industry and discharged into water. The program predicts...

  7. Designing highly structured polycaprolactone fibers using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Farrokh; Kurteshi, Diamant; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2016-08-01

    Microfibers are becoming increasingly important for biomedical applications such as regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. We have used a microfluidic approach to create polycaprolactone (PCL) microfibers in a controlled manner. Through the variations of the sheath fluid flow rate and PCL concentration in the core solution, the morphology of the microfibers and their cross-sections can be tuned. The microfibers were made using PCL concentrations of 2%, 5%, and 8% in the core fluid with a wide range of sheath-to-core flow rate ratios from 120:5µL/min to 10:5µL/min, respectively. The results revealed that the mechanical properties of the PCL microfibers made using microfluidic approach were significantly improved compared to the PCL microfibers made by other fiber fabrication methods. Additionally, it was demonstrated that by decreasing the flow rate ratio and increasing the PCL concentration, the size of the microfiber could be increased. Varying the sheath-to-core flow rate ratios from 40:5 to 10:5, the tensile stress at break, the tensile strain at break, and the Young׳s modulus were enhanced from 24.51MPa to 77.07MPa, 567% to 1420%, and 247.25MPa to 539.70MPa, respectively. The porosity and roughness of microfiber decreased when the PCL concentration increased from 2% to 8%, whereas changing the flow rate ratio did not have considerable impact on the microfiber roughness. PMID:27136089

  8. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  9. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  10. Structural Study of Hole Assisted Fibers Considering Optical Parallel Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashima, Norio

    2011-12-01

    Hole-assisted fibers (HAFs) in a fiber ribbon have been studied for high-speed parallel transmission systems. This paper describes the influence of hole-structure variations on the group delay variation caused by stress, the mode field diameter (MFD), and the higher order mode characteristics. Calculations are made using the previously proposed calculation method with finite element method (FEM). We discuss the effectiveness and limitation of the previously proposed parameter based on the calculations.

  11. Thermostructural tailoring of fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant area of interest in design of complex structures involves the study of multidisciplined problems. The coordination of several different intricate areas of study to obtain a particular design of a structure is a new and pressing area of research. In the past, each discipline would perform its task consecutively using the appropriate inputs from the other disciplines. This process usually required several time-consuming iterations to obtain a satisfactory design. The alternative pursued here is combining various participating disciplines and specified design requirements into a formal structural computer code. The main focus of this research is to develop a multidiscipline structural tailoring method for select composite structures and to demonstrate its application to specific areas. The development of an integrated computer program involves the coupling of three independent computer programs using an excutive module. This module will be the foundation for integrating a structural optimizer, a composites analyzer and a thermal analyzer. With the completion of the executive module, the first step was taken toward the evolution of multidiscipline software in the field of composite mechanics. Through the use of an array of cases involving a variety of objective functions/constraints and thermal-mechanical load conditions, it became evident that simple composite structures can be designed to a combined loads environment.

  12. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  13. High speed fiber grating sensors for structural monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of selected applications of high speed structural monitoring using fiber grating sensors. Rapid and effective diagnostic capabilities are necessary to respond to changes in structural integrity that may affect safety. In the case of aerospace structures operating at high velocity rapid response has the potential to mitigate catastrophic failure. Similar safety issues apply to civil structures where timely decisions are critical to operations of bridges, dams and buildings. Rapid responses for oil and gas, medical and environmental monitoring applications are also highly important. A great deal of progress has been made in improving the quality and capabilities of high speed fiber grating sensor systems. Some of these systems will be discussed.

  14. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  15. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Builtup Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    The damage progression and fracture of builtup composite structures was evaluated by using computational simulation to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel subjected to a bending load. The damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression, and propagation to structural collapse were simulated. An integrated computer code (CODSTRAN) was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of builtup composite structures under mechanical loading. Results showed that damage initiation and progression have a significant effect on the structural response. Also investigated was the influence of different types of bending load on the damage initiation, propagation, and final fracture of the builtup composite panel.

  16. Designing for fiber composite structural durability in hygrothermomechanical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is described which can be used to design/analyze fiber composite structures subjected to complex hygrothermomechanical environments. This methodology includes composite mechanics and advanced structural analysis methods (finite element). Select examples are described to illustrate the application of the available methodology. The examples include: (1) composite progressive fracture; (2) composite design for high cycle fatigue combined with hot-wet conditions; and (3) general laminate design.

  17. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  18. Response of fiber reinforced sandwich structures subjected to explosive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Perotti, Luigi E.; El Sayed, Tamer; Deiterding, Ralf; Ortiz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The capability to numerically simulate the response of sandwich structures to explosive loading constitutes a powerful tool to analyze and optimize their design by investigating the influence of different parameters. In order to achieve this objective, the necessary models for foam core and fiber reinforced materials in finite kinematics have been developed together with a finite element scheme which includes C1 finite elements for shells and cohesive elements able to capture the fracture propagation in composite fiber reinforced materials. This computational capability has been used to investigate the response of fiber reinforced sandwich shells to explosive loading. Based on the dissipated fracture energy resulting from these simulations, a factorial design has been carried out to assess the effect of different parameters on the sandwich shell response creating a tool for its optimization.

  19. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  20. Optical fiber sensors and signal processing for intelligent structure monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert; Claus, R. O.; Lindner, D. K.; Thomas, Daniel; Cox, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The analytic and experimental performance of optical fiber sensors for the control of vibration of large aerospace and other structures are investigated. In particular, model domain optical fiber sensor systems, are being studied due to their apparent potential as distributed, low mass sensors of vibration over appropriate ranges of both low frequency and low amplitude displacements. Progress during the past three months is outlined. Progress since September is divided into work in the areas of experimental hardware development, analytical analysis, control design and sensor development. During the next six months, tests of a prototype closed-loop control system for a beam are planned which will demonstrate the solution of several optical fiber instrumentation device problems, the performance of the control system theory which incorporates the model of the modal domain sensor, and the potential for distributed control which this sensor approach offers.

  1. Structural health monitoring using smart optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Heddwyn; Everall, Lorna A.; Gallon, Andrew M.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the potential of a smart monitoring system, incorporating optical fiber sensing techniques, to provide important structural information to designers and users alike. This technology has application in all areas including aerospace, civil, maritime and automotive engineering. In order to demonstrate the capability of the sensing system it has been installed in a 35 m free-standing carbon fiber yacht mast, where a complete optical network of strain and temperature sensors were embedded into a composite mast and boom during lay-up. The system was able to monitor the behavior of the composite rig through a range of handling conditions and the resulting strain information could be used by engineers to improve the structural design process. The optical strain sensor system comprises of three main components: the sensor network, the opto-electronic data acquisition unit (OFSSS) and the external PC which acts as a data log and display. Embedded fiber optic sensors have wide ranging application for structural load monitoring. Due to their small size, optical fiber sensors can be readily embedded into composite materials. Other advantages include their immediate multiplexing capability and immunity to electromagnetic interference. The capability of this system has been demonstrated within the maritime environment, but can be adapted for any application.

  2. Application of smart optical fiber sensors for structural load monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Heddwyn; Everall, Lorna A.; Gallon, Andrew M.

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes a smart monitoring system, incorporating optical fiber sensing techniques, capable of providing important structural information to designers and users alike. This technology has wide industrial and commercial application in areas including aerospace, civil, maritime and automotive engineering. In order to demonstrate the capability of the sensing system it has been installed in a 35m free-standing carbon fiber yacht mast, where a complete optical network of strain and temperature sensors were embedded into a composite mast and boom during lay-up. The system was able to monitor the behavior of the composite rig through a range of handling conditions. The resulting strain information can be used by engineers to improve the structural design process. Embedded fiber optic sensors have wide ranging application for structural load monitoring. Due to their small size, optical fiber sensors can be readily embedded into composite materials. Other advantages include their immediate multiplexing capability and immunity to electro-magnetic interference. The capability of this system has been demonstrated within the maritime and industrial environment, but can be adapted for any application.

  3. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  4. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  5. Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

    2009-08-01

    A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a strength closely associated to a specified structure damage state is used for bonding zigzagged configured optic fibers on the surfaces of the structure. Sensing the local deformation of the structure, the epoxy modulates the signal change within the optic fiber in response to the damage state of the structure. A monotonic loading test is conducted on a steel specimen installed with the proposed sensing system using selected epoxy that will crack at the designated strain level, which indicates the damage of the steel structure. Then, using the selected epoxy, a varying degree of cyclic loading amplitudes, which is associated with different damage states, is applied on a second specimen. The test results show that the specimen's damage can be identified by the optic sensors, and its maximum local deformation can be recorded by the sensing system; moreover, the damage evolution can also be identified. PMID:19649054

  6. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  7. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals. PMID:26504642

  8. Cross-stiffened continuous fiber structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewen, John R.; Suarez, Jim A.

    1993-01-01

    Under NASA's Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications (NCWFA) program, Contract NAS1-18784, Grumman is evaluating the structural efficiency of graphite/epoxy cross-stiffened panel elements fabricated using innovative textile preforms and cost effective Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Resin Film Infusion (RFI) processes. Two three-dimensional woven preform assembly concepts have been defined for application to a representative window belt design typically found in a commercial transport airframe. The 3D woven architecture for each of these concepts is different; one is vertically woven in the plane of the window belt geometry and the other is loom woven in a compressed state similar to an unfolded eggcrate. The feasibility of both designs has been demonstrated in the fabrication of small test element assemblies. These elements and the final window belt assemblies will be structurally tested, and results compared.

  9. Structured Pd-Au/Cu-fiber catalyst for gas-phase hydrogenolysis of dimethyl oxalate to ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Han, Lupeng; Zhao, Guofeng; Chai, Ruijuan; Zhang, Qiaofei; Liu, Ye; Lu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Galvanic co-deposition of 0.5 wt% Au and 0.1 wt% Pd on a microfibrous-structure using 8 μm Cu-fibers delivers a Pd-Au/Cu-fiber catalyst, which is highly active, selective and stable for the hydrogenolysis of dimethyl oxalate to ethylene glycol. Au and Pd synergistically promote the hydrogenolysis activity of Cu(+) sites, while Au also critically stabilizes Cu(+) sites to prevent deep reductive deactivation. PMID:26040855

  10. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  11. Adsorption of SOx and NOx in activated viscose fibers.

    PubMed

    Plens, Ana Carolina O; Monaro, Daniel L G; Coutinho, Aparecido R

    2015-01-01

    SOx and NOx are emissions resulting from combustion processes and are the main agents that contribute to the formation of acid rain, which causes harm to humans and the environment. Several techniques for removing these pollutants are applied in i.e. oil refineries, thermoelectric that use petroleum oils and vehicular pollution. Among these, highlight the adsorption of contaminants by the usage of activated carbon fibers and activated carbon, which are characterized by high surface area and uniform distribution of pores, providing appropriate conditions for application in processes of removing environmental contaminants. In the present work, activated viscose fibers (AVF) were prepared and applied in adsorption experiments of NO and SO2. The materials produced showed high values of surface area, with a predominance of micro pores with diameters in the range of 1.0 nm. The AVF had satisfactory performance in the removal of contaminants and are compatible with other synthetic fibers. Thus, the formation of active sites of carbon provides contaminants adsorption, demonstrating that carbon fibers cloth can be applied for the removal of pollutants. PMID:25993357

  12. Hierarchical fiber-optic delamination detection system for carbon fiber reinforced plastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Banshoya, Hidehiko; Shingo, Ii; Takeda, Nobuo

    2012-10-01

    This study develops a delamination detection system by extending our previous approach for monitoring surface cracks in a large-scale composite structure. In the new system, numerous thin glass capillaries are embedded into a composite structure, and internal pressure in the built-in capillary sensors, based on comparative vacuum monitoring (CVM), is maintained as a vacuum. When delamination is induced, the capillary sensors located within the delaminated area are breached, and atmospheric air flows into the capillaries. The consequent pressure change within the capillaries is then converted into axial strain in a surface-mounted optical fiber through a transducing mechanism, which is connected to the capillaries. By monitoring the strain distribution along the optical fiber, it is possible to identify a transducing mechanism in which the pressure change occurred and thus to specify the location of the delamination. This study begins by establishing a novel sensor embedding/extracting method. The airflow characteristic in the capillary sensors is then comprehensively evaluated, determining the basic performance of the new system. The proposed detection technique is validated by taking a step-by-step approach, and finally the hierarchical fiber-optic delamination detection system is demonstrated. A further advance to be combined with a self-healing concept is also discussed.

  13. Effect of polymer viscosities on the fiber structure and membrane properties of polypropylene/polyethylene bicomponent hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Satoshi; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Polypropylene (PP) / Polyethylene (PE) bicomponent microporous hollow fiber membranes were prepared through the bicomponent melt spinning and drawing processes. Fibers of hollow shape were firstly prepared through the melt spinning process by introducing the air into the core part of the fiber cross-section. Annealing and drawing processes were applied to thus prepared fibers to furnish the membrane properties to the fibers. In this study, high and low molecular weight PP, HMwPP and LMwPP, were used. Viscosity of HMwPP was higher than that of PE, while viscosity of LMwPP was lower than that of PE. In the case of LMwPP/PE fibers, birefringence of PE component increased with take-up velocity and birefringence of LMwPP component was lower than that of PE component at all attainable take-up velocities. In HMwPP/PE fibers, birefringence of both components increased with take-up velocity at low take-up velocities. Birefringence of HMwPP component increased continuously with further increase of take-up velocity, however that of PE component decreased significantly at the take-up velocity higher than 1 km/min. In this region, birefringence of HMwPP component in HMwPP/PE bicomponent hollow fibers was much higher than that of LMwPP component in LMwPP/PE hollow fibers. Hollow fiber membrane which was prepared by annealing and drawing of HMwPP/PE hollow fibers showed 10 times higher air transmission rate than that of LMwPP/PE fibers. In addition, air transmission rate increased with an increase in the HMwPP composition. These results indicate that the structure of PP component in the as-spun fiber undertake a crucial role on membrane properties in PP/PE bicomponent hollow fiber membrane.

  14. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of B, Ce Co-doped TiO2 hollow fibers photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingping; Sun, Xiaogang; Xing, Jun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2014-07-01

    A series of B, Ce co-doped TiO2 (B, Ce-TiO2) photocatalytic materials with a hollow fiber structure were successfully prepared by template method using boric acid, ammonium ceric nitrate and tetrabutyltitanate as precursors and cotton fibers as template, followed by calcination at 500°C in an N2 atmosphere for 2 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) were employed to characterize the morphology, crystal structure, surface structure, and optical absorption properties of the samples. The photocatalytic performance of the samples was studied by photodegradation phenol in water under UV light irradiation. The results showed that the TiO2 fiber materials have hollow structures, and the fiber structure materials showed better photocatalytic properties for the degradation of phenol than pure TiO2 under UV light. In the experiment condition, the photocatalytic activity of B, Ce co-doped TiO2 fibers was optimal of all the prepared samples. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of B, Ce co-doped TiO2 fiber photocatalyst was also confirmed, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 fibers remained above 90% of that of the fresh sample after being used four times. The material was easily removed by centrifugal separation from the medium. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants.

  15. Damage detection in bridges through fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, J. D.; Phares, B. M.; Wipf, T. J.; Wood, D. L.

    2006-10-01

    A fiber optic structural health monitoring (SHM) system was developed and deployed by the Iowa State University (ISU) Bridge Engineering Center (BEC) to detect gradual or sudden damage in fracture-critical bridges (FCBs). The SHM system is trained with measured performance data, which are collected by fiber optic strain sensors to identify typical bridge behavior when subjected to ambient traffic loads. Structural responses deviating from the trained behavior are considered to be signs of structural damage or degradation and are identified through analytical procedures similar to control chart analyses used in statistical process control (SPC). The demonstration FCB SHM system was installed on the US Highway 30 bridge near Ames, IA, and utilizes 40 fiber bragg grating (FBG) sensors to continuously monitor the bridge response when subjected to ambient traffic loads. After the data is collected and processed, weekly evaluation reports are developed that summarize the continuous monitoring results. Through use of the evaluation reports, the bridge owner is able to identify and estimate the location and severity of the damage. The information presented herein includes an overview of the SHM components, results from laboratory and field validation testing on the system components, and samples of the reduced and analyzed data.

  16. Subpicosecond solitons in an actively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. J.; Haus, H. A.; Ippen, E. P.

    1996-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for a study of the stability regime of an actively mode-locked polarization-maintaining fiber ring laser used as a memory. Observations indicate that the pulse widths in the memory can be reduced (by soliton effects) by a factor of approximately 4.4 below the pulse widths predicted by standard active mode-locking theory. Stability regions for the solitons are mapped and compared with theoretical predictions.

  17. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  18. X-ray tomography for structural analysis of microstructured and multimaterial optical fibers and preforms.

    PubMed

    Sandoghchi, S R; Jasion, G T; Wheeler, N V; Jain, S; Lian, Z; Wooler, J P; Boardman, R P; Baddela, N; Chen, Y; Hayes, J; Fokoua, E Numkam; Bradley, T; Gray, D R; Mousavi, S M; Petrovich, M; Poletti, F; Richardson, D J

    2014-10-20

    Specialty optical fibers, in particular microstructured and multi-material optical fibers, have complex geometry in terms of structure and/or material composition. Their fabrication, although rapidly developing, is still at a very early stage of development compared with conventional optical fibers. Structural characterization of these fibers during every step of their multi-stage fabrication process is paramount to optimize the fiber-drawing process. The complexity of these fibers restricts the use of conventional refractometry and microscopy techniques to determine their structural and material composition. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first nondestructive structural and material investigation of specialty optical fibers using X-ray computed tomography (CT) methods, not achievable using other techniques. Recent advances in X-ray CT techniques allow the examination of optical fibers and their preforms with sub-micron resolution while preserving the specimen for onward processing and use. In this work, we study some of the most challenging specialty optical fibers and their preforms. We analyze a hollow core photonic band gap fiber and its preforms, and bond quality at the joint between two fusion-spliced hollow core fibers. Additionally, we studied a multi-element optical fiber and a metal incorporated dual suspended-core optical fiber. The application of X-ray CT can be extended to almost all optical fiber types, preforms and devices. PMID:25401650

  19. Innovative design of composite structures: Use of curvilinear fiber format to improve structural efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    To increase the effectiveness and efficiency of fiber-reinforced materials, the use of fibers in a curvilinear rather than the traditional straightline format is explored. The capacity of a laminated square plate with a central circular hole loaded in tension is investigated. The orientation of the fibers is chosen so that the fibers in a particular layer are aligned with the principle stress directions in that layer. Finite elements and an iteration scheme are used to find the fiber orientation. A noninteracting maximum strain criterion is used to predict load capacity. The load capacities of several plates with different curvilinear fibers format are compared with the capacities of more conventional straightline format designs. It is found that the most practical curvilinear design sandwiches a group of fibers in a curvilinear format between a pair of +/-45 degree layers. This design has a 60% greater load capacity than a conventional quasi-isotropic design with the same number of layers. The +/-45 degree layers are necessary to prevent matrix cracking in the curvilinear layers due to stresses perpendicular to the fibers in those layers. Greater efficiencies are achievable with composite structures than now realized.

  20. Integration of thin films with fiber micro-structures for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilin

    2013-06-01

    The combination of fiber optics with micro-structure technologies and sensitive thin films offers great potential for the realization of novel sensor concepts. Minitured optical fiber sensors with thin films as sensitive elements could open new fields for optical fiber sensor applications. Thin films work as sensitive elements and transducer to get response and feedback from environments, optical fiber here are employed to signal carrier. This paper reviews some works on the integration of thin films with fiber micro-structures for sensing application, which are currently conducted at the National Engineering Laboratory for Fiber Optic Sensing Technologies, Wuhan University of Technology.

  1. Fiber composite analysis and design. Volume 2: Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.W.

    1998-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed a significant increase in the understanding and utilization of fibrous composite materials. There has also been a much larger increase in the amount of published literature in this field. This book builds upon existing literature to present a review of the available capability for composite structural design and analysis. The aim is to provide guidance for one who seeks to become familiar with the tools required for designing with fibrous composites. Thus, the book identifies the key concepts associated with the use of these unique materials. This second volume addresses the design and analysis of structural configurations for the practical and efficient utilization of fiber composite materials.

  2. Growing market acceptance for fiber optic solutions in civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graver, Thomas; Inaudi, Daniele; Doornink, Justin

    2004-12-01

    Owners must manage and ensure the safety of their civil structures even as use of many structures extends well beyond their design lifetime. Traditionally, most structures rely on strict maintenance procedures, visual inspections, and very few sensors. But maintenance is very expensive, visual inspections can miss critical problems, and conventional sensors can fail in harsh environments. Can fiber-optic sensing (FOS) address these issues? This is not a new question, but there are some new answers. This paper highlights several structures where FOS is used, and describes the associated successes and challenges for each application. Many successes are coupled to improved FOS tools: better sensor packages, simpler and less expensive instrumentation, improved installation techniques, and more efficient data analysis tools. Examples of each are provided. Particular attention is given to the economics of instrumenting civil structures - when and how it pays. Conclusions include recommendations for future developments that will further accelerate FOS acceptance and use.

  3. Use of nondestructive inspection and fiber optic sensing for damage characterization in carbon fiber fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidigk, Stephen; Le, Jacqui; Roach, Dennis; Duvall, Randy; Rice, Tom

    2014-04-01

    To investigate a variety of nondestructive inspection technologies and assess impact damage characteristics in carbon fiber aircraft structure, the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center, operated by Sandia National Labs, fabricated and impact tested two full-scale composite fuselage sections. The panels are representative of structure seen on advanced composite transport category aircraft and measured approximately 56"x76". The structural components consisted of a 16 ply skin, co-cured hat-section stringers, fastened shear ties and frames. The material used to fabricate the panels was T800 unidirectional pre-preg (BMS 8-276) and was processed in an autoclave. Simulated hail impact testing was conducted on the panels using a high velocity gas gun with 2.4" diameter ice balls in collaboration with the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Damage was mapped onto the surface of the panels using conventional, hand deployed ultrasonic inspection techniques, as well as more advanced ultrasonic and resonance scanning techniques. In addition to the simulated hail impact testing performed on the panels, 2" diameter steel tip impacts were used to produce representative impact damage which can occur during ground maintenance operations. The extent of impact damage ranges from less than 1 in2 to 55 in2 of interply delamination in the 16 ply skin. Substructure damage on the panels includes shear tie cracking and stringer flange disbonding. It was demonstrated that the fiber optic distributed strain sensing system is capable of detecting impact damage when bonded to the backside of the fuselage.

  4. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  5. Early efforts to initiate the field of fiber optic smart structures at McDonnell Douglas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric

    1998-07-01

    McDonnell Douglas began efforts on fiber optic sensor technology in 1977 that resulted directly in the development of a technology base that was used in the mid 1980s to implement fiber optic nervous systems that later would be termed fiber optic smart structures. This paper overviews some of the early history associated with this program as well as a story of how the field of fiber optic smart structures got its name.

  6. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  7. Active Q-switching of a fiber laser using a modulated fiber Fabry-Perot filter and a fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Manuel, Rodolfo; Kaboko, J. J. M.; Shlyagin, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple and robust actively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber ring cavity laser. The Q-switching is based on dynamic spectral overlapping of two filters, namely a fiber Bragg grating-based filter and a fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter. Using 3.5 m of erbium-doped fiber and a pump power of only 60 mW, Q-switched pulses with a peak power of 9.7 W and a pulse duration of 500 ns were obtained. A pulse repetition rate can be continuously varied from a single shot to a few KHz.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring with Fiber Bragg Grating and Piezo Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J.; Faridian, Ferey; Moslehi, Behzad; Sotoudeh, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is one of the most important tools available for the maintenance, safety, and integrity of aerospace structural systems. Lightweight, electromagnetic-interference- immune, fiber-optic sensor-based SHM will play an increasing role in more secure air transportation systems. Manufacturers and maintenance personnel have pressing needs for significantly improving safety and reliability while providing for lower inspection and maintenance costs. Undetected or untreated damage may grow and lead to catastrophic structural failure. Damage can originate from the strain/stress history of the material, imperfections of domain boundaries in metals, delamination in multi-layer materials, or the impact of machine tools in the manufacturing process. Damage can likewise develop during service life from wear and tear, or under extraordinary circumstances such as with unusual forces, temperature cycling, or impact of flying objects. Monitoring and early detection are key to preventing a catastrophic failure of structures, especially when these are expected to perform near their limit conditions.

  9. Numerical simulation of actuation behavior of active fiber composites in helicopter rotor blade application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Seung Hoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Seung Jo

    2004-07-01

    Smart structures incorporating active materials have been designed and analyzed to improve aerospace vehicle performance and its vibration/noise characteristics. Helicopter integral blade actuation is one example of those efforts using embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuators. To design and analyze such integrally-actuated blades, beam approach based on homogenization methodology has been traditionally used. Using this approach, the global behavior of the structures is predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. For example, the failure analysis of the individual active fibers requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Microscopic approach for the analysis of integrally-actuated structures is established in this paper. Piezoelectric fibers and matrices are modeled individually and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements is adopted. Due to huge size of the resulting finite element meshes, high performance computing technology is required in its solution process. The present methodology is quoted as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the smart structure. As an initial validation effort, present analytical results are correlated with the experiments from a small-scaled integrally-actuated blade, Active Twist Rotor (ATR). Through DNS, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix can be analyzed.

  10. Performance characterization of active fiber-composite actuators for helicopter rotor blade applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh K.; Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    2002-07-01

    The primary objective of this work was to characterize the performance of the Active Fiber Composite (AFC) actuator material system for the Boeing Active Material Rotor (AMR) blade application. The AFCs were a new structural actuator system consisting of piezoceramic fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix and sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes to orient the driving electric field in the fiber direction to use the primary piezoelectric effect. These actuators were integrated directly into the blade spar laminate as active plies within the composite structure to perform structural actuation for vibration control in helicopters. Therefore, it was necessary to conduct extensive electromechanical material characterization to evaluate AFCs both as actuators and as structural components of the rotor blade. The characterization tests designed to extract important electromechanical properties under simulated blade operating conditions included stress-strain tests, free strain tests and actuation under tensile load tests. This paper presents the test results as well as the comprehensive testing process developed to evaluate the relevant AFC material properties. The results from this comprehensive performance characterization of the AFC material system supported the design and operation of the Boeing AMR blade scheduled for hover and forward flight wind tunnel tests.

  11. Composite fiber structures with antiproliferative agents exhibit advantageous drug delivery and cell growth inhibition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kraitzer, Amir; Kloog, Yoel; Haklai, Roni; Zilberman, Meital

    2011-01-01

    Composite core/shell fiber structures loaded with the antiproliferative drugs paclitaxel or farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS) were developed and studied. The latter is a specific nontoxic Ras inhibitor with a mild hydrophobic nature, which can also be used for local cancer treatment and stent applications. The fibers were composed of a dense polyglyconate core and a porous drug-loaded poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic acid) shell, prepared using freeze drying of inverted emulsions. Our study focused on the release profile of the antiproliferative drugs from the fibers, the shell morphology and its degradation and erosion. The postfabrication antiproliferative effect of the drugs was tested in a cell culture. The process parameters were found to affect the drug-release profile via two routes: (1) direct, through water uptake and swelling of the structure leading to FTS release, or through degradation of the host polymer leading to paclitaxel release at a later stage; (2) indirect effect of the microstructure on the release profile. The fabrication process did not reduce the pharmacological activity of either paclitaxel or FTS. FTS-eluting composite fibers proved to effectively induce growth inhibition or cell death by a gradient effect and dose-dependent manner. The combined effect of the targeted mechanism of FTS as a Ras inhibitor together with the localized and controlled release characteristics of the fiber is an advantageous antiproliferative quality. It is therefore suggested that our drug-eluting fibers may be used in biomedical applications that require short release (restenosis) or prolonged release (cancer therapy). PMID:20623695

  12. Antioxidative activity of animal and vegetable dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobutaka; Fujimura, Ayako; Nagai, Takeshi; Mizumoto, Iwao; Itami, Toshiaki; Hatate, Hideo; Nozawa, Takashi; Kato, Norihisa; Nomoto, Tateo; Yoda, Binkoh

    2004-01-01

    Some dietary fibers originated from insects such as silkworm (Sericin) and others along with constituents of several representative seaweeds such as wakame Undaria pinnatifida; hijiki Hizikia fusifome; and kombu Laminaria japonica, were found to have fairly large reaction rates determined by quenching experiments of emission spectra in the near-infrared region lambdamax 1270 nm for singlet oxygen 1O2, Cypridina luminescence method for superoxide, and peroxide value (POV) for autoxidation. The determined reaction rates are between 10(3)-10(5) (g/L)(-1) s(-1) for the insect and the plant dietary fibers; the larger ones are as large as that of ascorbic acid, 1.93 x 10(4) (g/L)(-1) s(-1) for singlet oxygen. Most of these seaweed constituents also showed antioxidative activity against autoxidation and superoxide as well as their immunological enhancing activity. These results suggest a possibility that dietary fibers that are supposed to prevent the large-intestine cancer by their physical properties may prevent the cancer, at least in parts, by their chemical, antioxidative activity. PMID:15630221

  13. The Effect of Heat on Structural Characteristics and Water Absorption Behavior of Agave Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Dip

    2008-04-01

    The structural characteristics and water absorptions behavior agave fibers were investigated over a range of temperature by using XRD, IR, TG and gravimetric methods. Three distinct thermal processes were observed during heating the fiber in the temperature range 310-760 K in air, oxygen and nitrogen invariably. The cellulose structures of the fibers were unaffected on heating up to 450 K. The samples showed thermal decomposition processes beyond 500 K. Fibers displayed a two-stage diffusion behavior. The structural parameters and kinetic of water absorption of the fibers at specific temperatures were analyzed.

  14. A robust all-fiber active Q-switched 1-µm Yb3+ fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintov, Yoav; Goldring, Sharone; Pearl, Shaul; Lebiush, Eyal; Sfez, Bruno; Malka, Dror; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-09-01

    An all-fiber active Q-switched Yb3+-doped fiber laser at 1 µm is presented. The laser is composed of a ring resonator with an embedded all-fiber Q-switch element, based on a null coupler with an attached piezoelectric transducer (PZT). The PZT is used as an acoustic actuator, for inducing longitudinal acoustic disturbance along the null coupler and causing light coupling between the null coupler's ports. A stable operation is achieved with an overall average output power of up to 275 mW at various pulse repetition rates (PRR), ranging from 10 to 35 kHz and typical pulse energy of 15 μJ. In addition, a self-monitoring method is implemented by an embedded microcontroller, in order to maintain stable Q-switch performance, in changing environmental conditions. An average power of 8.5 W and pulse energy of 420 μJ at a PRR of 20 kHz are demonstrated in a master oscillator power amplifier containing the Q-switched laser, followed by a power amplifier.

  15. Smart aircraft composite structures with embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Nobuo; Minakuchi, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This talk describes the embedded optical fiber sensor systems for smart aircraft composite structures. First, a summary of the current Japanese national project on structural integrity diagnosis of aircraft composite structures is described with special emphasis on the use of embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors including FBG sensors. Then, some examples of life-cycle monitoring of aircraft composite structures are presented using embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors for low-cost and reliable manufacturing merits.

  16. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  17. Wavelength-switchable fiber laser based on few-mode fiber filter with core-offset structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yanhui; Kang, Zexin; Sun, Jiang; Ma, Lin; Jin, Wenxing; Lian, Yudong; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-07-01

    We propose a wavelength-switchable erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on the few-mode fiber filter with core-offset structure. The filter is constructed by splicing a section of few-mode fiber with two segments of single mode fiber. Meanwhile, the excited modes are effectively selected by controlling the core-offset splicing carefully. The novel filter is based on the interference between fundamental mode and LP11 mode. The single-, dual-, triple- and quad-wavelength fiber laser is accomplished by adjusting the states of polarization controller at room temperature. The principle of operation is mainly based on the saturated spectral hole-burning effect and the balance between the gain and loss in the cavity.

  18. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of the active fiber heating under condition of high-power lasing generation.

    PubMed

    Ryabushkin, O A; Shaidullin, R I; Zaytsev, I A

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for the precise temperature measurement of active fibers in high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers is introduced. This method allows the determination of active fiber longitudinal temperature distribution at different optical pump powers. PMID:25927761

  19. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in composite structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The gains in structural efficiency are investigated that can be achieved by aligning the fibers in some or all of the layers in a laminate with the principal stress directions in those layers. The name curvilinear fiber format is given to this idea. The problem studied is a plate with a central circular hole subjected to a uniaxial tensile load. An iteration scheme is used to find the fiber directions at each point in the laminate. Two failure criteria are used to evaluate the tensile load capacity of the plates with a curvilinear format, and for comparison, counterpart plates with a conventional straightline fiber format. The curvilinear designs for improved tensile capacity are then checked for buckling resistance. It is concluded that gains in efficiency can be realized with the curvilinear format.

  20. Novel optical-fiber structure as a tension sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapa, J.; Siska, P.; Vasinek, V.; Vanda, J.

    2009-05-01

    The key idea of research in hybrid optical fibers is motivated by the demand of fibers, which could be used as a medium for telecommunication transmission and as an optical sensor at the same time. Every optical fiber sensor on the market has unappropriate properties for telecommunication transmission. And, on the other hand, the convenient fibers used for transmission are designed to be insensitive to the external influences. We have designed a fiber with refractive index profile which preserves the telecommunication properties of the single-mode fibers and at the same time it enables to use this fiber as a sensor on another wavelength. Principle of this sensor is based on redistribution of the optical power between individual guided modes. This article shows some results from experiments on hybrid fibers in sensoric regime. Telecommunication properties were verified by the reflectometric method. It has shown that the fiber has attenuation camparable with commonly used single-mode fibers.

  1. Spectral structure and stability studies on microstructure-fiber continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xun; Kimmel, Mark; Zeek, Erik; Shreenath, Aparna P.; Trebino, Rick P.; Windeler, Robert S.

    2003-07-01

    Although previous direct measurements of the microstructure-fiber continuum have all showed a smooth and stable spectrum, our cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (XFROG) full-intensity-and-phase characterization of the continuum pulse, utilizing sum-frequency-generation with a pre-characterized reference pulse and the angle-dithered-crystal technique, indicates that fine-scale spectral structure exists on a single-shot basis, contrary to previous observations. In particular, deep and fine oscillations are found in the retrieved spectrum, and the retrieved trace contains a "measles" pattern, whereas the measured trace and the independently-measured spectrum are rather smooth. The discrepancy is shown to be the result of unstable single-shot spectral structure. Although the XFROG measurement is not able to directly measure the single-shot fine structure in the trace, the redundancy of information in FROG traces enables the retrieval algorithm to correctly recognize the existence of the spectral fine structure, and restore the structure in the retrieved trace and spectrum. Numerical simulations have supported our hypothesis, and we directly observed the fine spectral structure in single-shot measurements of the continuum spectrum and the structure was seen to be highly unstable, the continuum spectrum appearing smooth only when many shots are averaged. Despite the structure and instability in the continuum spectrum, coherence experiments also reveal that the spectral phase is rather stable, being able to produce well-defined spectral fringes across the entire continuum bandwidth.

  2. Fiber-Optic Sensor And Smart Structures Research At Florida Institute Of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Barry G.; Alavie, A. Tino; Ham, Fredric M.; Franke, Jorge E.; Thursby, Michael H.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental issues being investigated by Florida Institute of Technology (F.I.T.) to implement the technology of smart structural systems for DoD, NASA, and commercial applications. Embedded sensors and actuators controlled by processors can provide a modification of the mechanical characteristics of composite structures to produce smart structures1-3. Recent advances in material science have spurred the development and use of composite materials in a wide range of applications from rotocraft blades and advanced tactical fighter aircraft to undersea and aerospace structures. Along with the advantages of an increased strength-to-weight ratio, the use of these materials has raised a number of questions related to understanding their failure mechanisms. Also, being able to predict structural failures far enough in advance to prevent them and to provide real-time structural health and damage monitoring has become a realistic possibility. Unfortunately, conventional sensors, actuators, and digital processors, although highly developed and well proven for other systems, may not be best suited for most smart structure applications. Our research has concentrated on few-mode and polarimetric single-fiber strain sensors4-7 and optically activated shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators controlled by artificial neural processors. We have constructed and characterized both few-mode and polarimetric sensors for a variety of fiber types, including standard single-mode, high-birefringence polarization preserving, and low-birefringence polarization insensitive fibers. We have investigated signal processing techniques for these sensors and have demonstrated active phase tracking for the high- and low-birefringence polarimetric sensors through the incorporation into the system of an electrooptic modulator designed and fabricated at F.I.T.. We have also started the design and testing of neural network architectures for processing the sensor signal outputs to

  3. Nucleosomal arrays self-assemble into supramolecular globular structures lacking 30-nm fibers.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Rogge, Ryan; Tamura, Sachiko; Joti, Yasumasa; Hikima, Takaaki; Szerlong, Heather; Krause, Christine; Herman, Jake; Seidel, Erik; DeLuca, Jennifer; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-17

    The existence of a 30-nm fiber as a basic folding unit for DNA packaging has remained a topic of active discussion. Here, we characterize the supramolecular structures formed by reversible Mg(2+)-dependent self-association of linear 12-mer nucleosomal arrays using microscopy and physicochemical approaches. These reconstituted chromatin structures, which we call "oligomers", are globular throughout all stages of cooperative assembly and range in size from ~50 nm to a maximum diameter of ~1,000 nm. The nucleosomal arrays were packaged within the oligomers as interdigitated 10-nm fibers, rather than folded 30-nm structures. Linker DNA was freely accessible to micrococcal nuclease, although the oligomers remained partially intact after linker DNA digestion. The organization of chromosomal fibers in human nuclei in situ was stabilized by 1 mM MgCl2, but became disrupted in the absence of MgCl2, conditions that also dissociated the oligomers in vitro These results indicate that a 10-nm array of nucleosomes has the intrinsic ability to self-assemble into large chromatin globules stabilized by nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, and suggest that the oligomers are a good in vitro model for investigating the structure and organization of interphase chromosomes. PMID:27072995

  4. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs. PMID:17157493

  5. The structural integrity of affordable thick-section fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S

    1999-06-01

    The Long-Term Research Objectives are to advance the understanding of the mechanics of polymers and polymer composites; develop predictive capabilities as well as experimental characterization and validation tools for the mechanical behavior of these materials; and further develop our knowledge of structure-mechanical property relationships for this class of materials. The approach used was to develop novel experimental tools and use them to characterize the multiaxial failure and fatigue behavior of materials for thick-section fiber composite structures. These tools include capabilities for applying well-defined biaxial and triaxial stress states. These experiments are carefully chosen to provide results that can be used for discriminating evaluation of predictive failure models.

  6. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are complicated over that of ground structures by their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must blend low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. In addition, fabrication considerations including penetrations and joints play a major role. The EMI shielding properties are calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compared to preliminary experimental results and to shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding properties alone.

  7. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are more complicated than those for ground structures because of their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must combine low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. EMI shielding characteristics were calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compare to preliminary experimental results for these materials and to the characteristics of shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that effective EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding characteristics alone.

  8. Material characterization of active fiber composites for integral twist-actuated rotor blade application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh K.; Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    2004-10-01

    The primary objective of this work was to perform material characterization of the active fiber composite (AFC) actuator system for the Boeing active material rotor (AMR) blade application. The purpose of the AMR was to demonstrate active vibration control in helicopters through integral twist-actuation of the blade. The AFCs were a new structural actuator system consisting of piezoceramic fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix and sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes to enhance actuation performance. These conformable actuators were integrated directly into the blade spar laminate as active plies within the composite structure to perform structural control. Therefore, extensive electromechanical material characterization was required to evaluate AFCs both as actuators and as structural components of the blade. The characterization tests designed to extract important electromechanical properties under simulated blade operating conditions included nominal actuation tests, stress-strain tests and actuation under tensile load tests. This paper presents the test results as well as the comprehensive testing procedure developed to evaluate the relevant properties of the AFCs for structural application. The material characterization tests provided an invaluable insight into the behavior of the AFCs under various electromechanical conditions. The results from this comprehensive material characterization of the AFC actuator system supported the design and operation of the AMR blades scheduled for wind tunnel tests.

  9. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  10. Making Plant-Support Structures From Waste Plant Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Robert C.; < oscjmocl. < attjew K/; {ertzbprm. A,amda; Ej (e. Cjad); Hunt, John

    2006-01-01

    Environmentally benign, biodegradable structures for supporting growing plants can be made in a process based on recycling of such waste plant fiber materials as wheat straw or of such derivative materials as paper and cardboard. Examples of structures that can be made in this way include plant plugs, pots, planter-lining mats, plant fences, and root and shoot barriers. No chemical binders are used in the process. First, the plant material is chopped into smaller particles. The particles are leached with water or steam to remove material that can inhibit plant growth, yielding a fibrous slurry. If the desired structures are plugs or sheets, then the slurry is formed into the desired shapes in a pulp molding subprocess. If the desired structures are root and shoot barriers, pots, or fences, then the slurry is compression-molded to the desired shapes in a heated press. The processed materials in these structures have properties similar to those of commercial pressboard, but unlike pressboard, these materials contain no additives. These structures have been found to withstand one growth cycle, even when wet

  11. Passive and Active Vibration Control With Piezoelectric Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vigier, Yves; Agbossou, Amen; Richard, Claude

    2002-07-01

    The possibility of dissipating mechanical energy with piezoelectric fiber composites (PFC) is investigated. The techniques for manufacturing an active beam with integrated (PFC) are presented and applied to a cantilevered beam experiment. We evaluated experimentally the performances of the active beam in passive energy dissipation. Three vibration cases were analysed: electrodes of the PFCs are (i) in open circuit, (ii) short circuit and (iii) shunted with electrical impedance designed to dissipate the electrical energy, which has been converted from the beam mechanical energy by the PFCs. Then we presented numerical models to analyze the vibration of active beams connect to electrical impedance. The proposed models point out with an accurate order of magnitude the change in vibration amplitude of the analysed beam. Hence we validate experimentally and numerically the concept of vibration control with PFCs and point out some new contributions of PFCs in active or passive damping. (authors)

  12. Holographic fiber bundle system for patterned optogenetic activation of large-scale neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Farah, Nairouz; Levinsky, Alexandra; Brosh, Inbar; Kahn, Itamar; Shoham, Shy

    2015-10-01

    Optogenetic perturbation has become a fundamental tool in controlling activity in neurons. Used to control activity in cell cultures, slice preparations, anesthetized and awake behaving animals, optical control of cell-type specific activity enables the interrogation of complex systems. A remaining challenge in developing optical control tools is the ability to produce defined light patterns such that power-efficient, precise control of neuronal populations is obtained. Here, we describe a system for patterned stimulation that enables the generation of structured activity in neurons by transmitting optical patterns from computer-generated holograms through an optical fiber bundle. The system couples the optical system to versatile fiber bundle configurations, including coherent or incoherent bundles composed of hundreds of up to several meters long fibers. We describe the components of the system, a method for calibration, and a detailed power efficiency and spatial specificity quantification. Next, we use the system to precisely control single-cell activity as measured by extracellular electrophysiological recordings in ChR2-expressing cortical cell cultures. The described system complements recent descriptions of optical control systems, presenting a system suitable for high-resolution spatiotemporal optical control of wide-area neural networks in vitro and in vivo, yielding a tool for precise neural system interrogation. PMID:26793741

  13. Fifty-ps Raman fiber laser with hybrid active-passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A G; Kharenko, D S; Podivilov, E V; Babin, S A

    2016-07-25

    Actively mode locked Raman lasing in a ring PM-fiber cavity pumped by a linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser is studied. At co-propagating pumping, a stochastic pulse with duration defined by the AOM switching time (~15 ns) is generated with the round-trip period. At counter-propagating pumping, one or several sub-ns pulses (within the AOM switching envelope) are formed. It has been found that the formation of such stable multi-pulse structure is defined by the single-pulse energy limit (~20 nJ) set by the second-order Raman generation. Adding a NPE-based saturable absorber in the actively mode locked cavity, results in sufficient shortening of the generated pulses both in single- and multi-pulse regimes (down to 50 ps). A model is developed adequately describing the regimes. PMID:27464081

  14. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  15. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  16. Effect of hindlimb unweighting on single soleus fiber maximal shortening velocity and ATPase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, K. S.; Fitts, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of hindlimb unweighting (HU) for 1 to 3 wks on the shortening velocity of a soleus fiber, its ATPase content, and the relative contents of the slow and fast myosin was investigated by measuring fiber force, V(0), ATPase activity, and myosin content in SDS protein profiles of a single rat soleus fiber suspended between a motor arm and a transducer. It was found that HU induces a progressive increase in fiber V(0) that is likely caused, at least in part, by an increase in the fiber's myofibrillar ATPase activity. The HU-induced increases in V(0) and ATPase were associated with the presence of a greater percentage of fast type IIa fibers. However, a large population of fibers after 1, 2, and 3 wks of HU showed increases in V(0) and ATPase but displayed the same myosin protein profile on SDS gels as control fibers.

  17. A bioinspired study on the interlaminar shear resistance of helicoidal fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Ribbans, Brian; Li, Yujie; Tan, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Helicoidal fibril structures are identified in many natural animals and plants. This research uses an integrated experimental and modeling approach to study the interlaminar shear resistance of bioinspired helicoidal fiber structures. First, helicoidal fiber-reinforced polymeric composites were created using 3D printed fiber cores and polymeric matrices, including plain, ring and helix reinforced helicoidal specimens. Then, monotonic torsional tests were performed to characterize the composite failure under interlaminar shear stresses, and fractographic characterization was conducted to elucidate corresponding fracture mechanisms in each specimen type. Finally, finite element modeling was performed to explore the critical factors on the interlaminar shear resistance of helicoidal fiber structures. The results showed that fiber-matrix modulus ratios and pitch angles of helix reinforcements played important roles on the interlaminar shear resistance of helicoidal fiber structures. PMID:26655461

  18. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  19. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and ...

  20. Active structural waveguide for sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Karol; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    In the article a microstructural active optical fiber for sensing application was presented. Construction consists of three hexagonal rings and a core made of SiO2 - Al2O3 - Sb2O3 glass co-doped with 1Yb2O3/0.1Tm2O3 [mol%]. Developed optical fiber is characterized by upconversion luminescence (λp=980nm) at 480nm (Tm3+: 1G4→3H6) and 650 nm (Tm3+ : 1G4→3F4). Population of thulium levels was attained in result of the Yb 3+→Tm3+ upconversion energy transfer. Sensing application of elaborated active photonic structure was presented on the example of aqueous fluorescein solution. Fabricated microstructural optical fiber enables to measure of the fluorescein solutions with the concentration of (0.25 - 5.42)·10-4 [mol%]. Sensitivity of the elaborated measurement setup is 1.51·104 [1/mol%].

  1. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Automotive Structural Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Battiste, R.L.; Corum, J.M.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1999-11-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design criteria for a chopped-glass-fiber reinforced polymeric composite for automotive structural applications. The criteria closely follow the framework of an earlier criteria document for a continuous-strand-mat (CSM) glass-fiber reference composite. Together these design criteria demonstrate a framework that can be adapted for future random-glass-fiber composites for automotive structural applications.

  2. Temperature and refractive index sensing characteristics of an MZI-based multimode fiber-dispersion compensation fiber-multimode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Shen; Zhang, Jing; Rong, Qiangzhou; Liang, Lei; Xu, Qinfang; Xiang, Guanghua; Feng, Dingyi; Du, Yanying; Feng, Zhongyao; Qiao, Xueguang; Hu, Manli

    2012-12-01

    We proposed an optical fiber sensor with simple multimode fiber (MMF)-dispersion compensation fiber (DCF)-multimode fiber structure based on Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) and researched its temperature and refractive index (RI) sensing characteristics. The sensing principle is based on the interference between core and cladding modes of DCF due to the large core diameter mismatch. Spectral analyses demonstrate that the transmission spectrum is mainly formed by the interference between the dominant excited cladding mode and core modes. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor has high temperature sensitivity of 0.118 nm/°C in the range of 20-250 °C and RI sensitivity of 66.32 nm/RIU within the linear sensing range of 1.33-1.39 RIU. Therefore, the characteristics of compact size, low cost, easy fabrication, high sensitivities, and good anti-interference ability make this sensor have extensive application prospects.

  3. STEM Imaging of Single Pd Atoms in Activated Carbon Fibers Considered for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Klaus; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Contescu, Cristian I; Pennycook, Stephen J; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to demonstrate the feasibility of imaging individual Pd atoms that are highly dispersed throughout the volume of activated carbon fibers. Simultaneous acquisition of high-angle annular dark-field and bright-field images allows correlation of the location of single Pd atoms with microstructural features of the carbon host material. Sub-Angstrom imaging conditions revealed that 18 wt% of the total Pd content is dispersed as single Pd atoms in three re-occurring local structural arrangements. The identified structural configurations may represent effective storage sites for molecular hydrogen through Kubas complex formation as discussed in detail in the preceding article.

  4. The influence of poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate on the structural, physical, and biological properties of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Sanami, Mohammad; Sweeney, India; Shtein, Zvi; Meirovich, Sigal; Sorushanova, Anna; Mullen, Anne Maria; Miraftab, Mohsen; Shoseyov, Oded; O'Dowd, Colm; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2016-07-01

    Various chemical, natural, or synthetic in origin, crosslinking methods have been proposed over the years to stabilise collagen fibers. However, an optimal method has yet to be identified. Herein, we ventured to assess the potential of 4-star poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate, as opposed to glutaraldehyde (GTA), genipin and carbodiimide, on the structural, physical and biological properties of collagen fibers. The 4-star poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate induced an intermedium surface smoothness, denaturation temperature and swelling. The 4-star poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate fibers had significantly higher stress at break values than the carbodiimide fibers, but significantly lower than the GTA and genipin fibers. With respect to strain at break, no significant difference was observed among the crosslinking treatments. The 4-star poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate fibers exhibited significantly higher cell metabolic activity and DNA concentration that all other crosslinking treatments, promoted consistently cellular elongation along the longitudinal fiber axis and by day 7 they were completely covered by cells. Collectively, this work clearly demonstrates the potential of 4-star poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate as collagen crosslinker. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 914-922, 2016. PMID:25952265

  5. Photoacoustic shock wave emission and cavitation from structured optical fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Wan, Yin Chi; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Fiber optics are used in medicine to deliver laser pulses for microsurgery. Upon absorption of a high-power laser pulse, a thermoelastic wave is emitted from the fiber tip. If a flat cleaved fiber is used, the photoacoustic field comprises a planar compressive shock wave and a tensile diffraction wave from the tip edge. Here we demonstrate that by modifying the geometry of a fiber tip, multiple shock waves can be generated from a single laser pulse. Flat cleaved fibers generate tension only along the fiber axis and with one compression-tension cycle from a laser pulse; however, structured fiber tips cause significant tension both along and off-axis, and generate multiple pressure cycles from a single laser pulse. Fast flash photography reveals that diffraction waves from the edges of the tip structures overlap and generate enough tension to form cavitation clouds. We numerically solve the linear wave equation to model the acoustic transients of structured fiber tips and achieve good agreement with pressure measurements from a fiber optic hydrophone. Multiple shock wave emission from a single laser pulse introduces structured fiber tips as a candidate to deliver histotripsy effects via a surgical catheter for micro-scale ablation of soft tissue.

  6. Modulation of C-nociceptive Activities by Inputs from Myelinated Fibers.

    PubMed

    Wan-Ru, Duan; Yi-Kuan, Xie

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of neuropathic pain caused by demyelination, a rapid-onset, completed but reversible demyelination of peripheral A-fibers and neuropathic pain behaviors in adult rats by single injection of cobra venom into the sciatic nerve, was created. Microfilament recording revealed that cobra venom selectively blocked A-fibers, but not C-fibers. Selective blockade of A-fibers may result from A-fiber demyelination at the site of venom injection as demonstrated by microscope examination. Neuropathic pain behaviors including inflammatory response appeared almost immediately after venom injection and lasted about 3 weeks. Electrophysiological studies indicated that venom injection induced loss of conduction in A-fibers, increased sensitivity of C-polymodal nociceptors to innocuous stimuli, and triggered spontaneous activity from peripheral and central terminals of C-fiber nociceptors. Neurogenic inflammatory responses were also observed in the affected skin via Evans blue extravasation experiments. Both antidromic C-fiber spontaneous activity and neurogenic inflammation were substantially decreased by continuous A-fiber threshold electric stimuli applied proximally to the venom injection site. The data suggest that normal activity of peripheral A-fibers may produce inhibitory modulation of C-polymodal nociceptors. Removal of inhibition to C-fiber polymodal nociceptors following demyelination of A-fibers may result in pain and neurogenic inflammation in the affected receptive field. PMID:26900061

  7. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2003-01-01

    coupled into the optical fiber sensor, a reflection peak will be obtained centered around a wavelength called Bragg-wavelength. The Bragg-wavelength depends on the refractive index and the period of the grating, which both change due to mechanical and thermal strain applied to the sensor. The shift in the Bragg-wavelength is directly proportional to the strain. Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  8. Process and Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures with Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors and Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keulen, Casey James

    Advanced composite materials are becoming increasingly more valuable in a plethora of engineering applications due to properties such as tailorability, low specific strength and stiffness and resistance to fatigue and corrosion. Compared to more traditional metallic and ceramic materials, advanced composites such as carbon, aramid or glass reinforced plastic are relatively new and still require research to optimize their capabilities. Three areas that composites stand to benefit from improvement are processing, damage detection and life prediction. Fiber optic sensors and piezoelectric transducers show great potential for advances in these areas. This dissertation presents the research performed on improving the efficiency of advanced composite materials through the use of embedded fiber optic sensors and surface mounted piezoelectric transducers. Embedded fiber optic sensors are used to detect the presence of resin during the injection stage of resin transfer molding, monitor the degree of cure and predict the remaining useful life while in service. A sophisticated resin transfer molding apparatus was developed with the ability of embedding fiber optics into the composite and a glass viewing window so that resin flow sensors could be verified visually. A novel technique for embedding optical fiber into both 2- and 3-D structures was developed. A theoretical model to predict the remaining useful life was developed and a systematic test program was conducted to verify this model. A network of piezoelectric transducers was bonded to a composite panel in order to develop a structural health monitoring algorithm capable of detecting and locating damage in a composite structure. A network configuration was introduced that allows for a modular expansion of the system to accommodate larger structures and an algorithm based on damage progression history was developed to implement the network. The details and results of this research are contained in four manuscripts that

  9. Embedded intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors in cement concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki S.; Yoo, Jae-Wook; Kim, Seung Kwan; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    1996-05-01

    Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors were embedded to the tensile side of the 20 cm by 20 cm by 150 cm cement concrete structures. The sensors were attached to the reinforcing steels and then, the cement concretes were applied. It took 30 days for curing the specimens. After that, the specimens were tested with 4-point bending method by a universal testing machine. Strains were measured and recorded by the strain gauges embedded near optical fiber sensors. Output data of fiber sensor showed good linearity to the strain data from the strain gauges up to 2000 microstrain. The optical fiber sensors showed good response after yielding of the structure while embedded metal film strain gauges did not show any response. We also investigated the behavior of the optical fiber sensor when the specimens were broken down. In conclusion, the optical fiber sensors can be used as elements of health monitoring systems for cement concrete infra-structures.

  10. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  11. Structure and mechanical properties of wet-spun fibers made from natural cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Isogai, Akira; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2011-03-14

    Cellulose nanofibers were prepared by TEMPO-mediated oxidation of wood pulp and tunicate cellulose. The cellulose nanofiber suspension in water was spun into an acetone coagulation bath. The spinning rate was varied from 0.1 to 100 m/min to align the nanofibers to the spun fibers. The fibers spun from the wood nanofibers had a hollow structure at spinning rates of >10 m/min, whereas the fibers spun from tunicate nanofibers were porous. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the wood and tunicate nanofibers were aligned to the fiber direction of the spun fibers at higher spinning rates. The wood spun fibers at 100 m/min had a Young's modulus of 23.6 GPa, tensile strength of 321 MPa, and elongation at break of 2.2%. The Young's modulus of the wood spun fibers increased with an increase in the spinning rate because of the nanofiber orientation effect. PMID:21302950

  12. Mechanical Properties, Surface Structure, and Morphology of Carbon Fibers Pre-heated for Liquid Aluminum Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachold, Franziska S.; Kozera, Rafal; Singer, Robert F.; Boczkowska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    To efficiently produce carbon fiber-reinforced aluminum on a large scale, we developed a special high-pressure die casting process. Pre-heating of the fibers is crucial for successful infiltration. In this paper, the influence of heating carried out in industrial conditions on the mechanical properties of the fibers was investigated. Therefore, polyacrylonitrile-based high-tensile carbon fiber textiles were heated by infrared emitters in an argon-rich atmosphere to temperatures between 450 and 1400 °C. Single fiber tensile tests revealed a decrease in tensile strength and strain at fracture. Young's modulus was not affected. Scanning electron microscopy identified cavities on the fiber surface as the reason for the decrease in mechanical properties. They were caused by the attack of atmospheric oxygen. The atomic structure of the fibers did not change at any temperature, as x-ray diffraction confirmed. Based on these data, the pre-heating for the casting process can be optimized.

  13. Optically heated fiber Bragg grating in active fibers for low temperature sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lin; Jin, Long; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2013-09-01

    Optically heated fiber Bragg gratings due to the absorption over the fiber core in rare-earth doped fibers are experimentally demonstrated. Bragg wavelength variations with pump power are measured for different fibers. We found that the Er/Yb-codoped fiber presents the strongest thermal effect, due to the high absorption. A maximum wavelength shift of 1.34 nm can be obtained when the 980 nm pump power is 358 mW under room temperature, suggesting the fiber is heated up to over 100 °C. Furthermore, the thermal effect is enhanced by pumping the surrounding air to close to vacuum. A wavelength shift of 1.69 nm is attained, due to the weakened ability of heat transfer at the silica-air interface. The optical heating presents a very short response time and can found applications in low temperature circumstances.

  14. A novel Michelson Fabry-Perot hybrid interference sensor based on the micro-structured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaxun; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Zhihai; Wei, Yong; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Xinghua; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel Michelson Fabry-Perot hybrid fiber interference sensor. By integrating a Michelson interferometer in a two-core fiber and a Fabry-Perot interferometer in a micro silica-capillary, we produce the Michelson Fabry-Perot hybrid interference sensor. Owing to the structure characteristic of the micro-structured fiber, this hybrid fiber interference sensor can achieve the measurement of the axial strain and radial bending simultaneously. The measurement sensitivity of the axial train is 0.015 nm/με and the measurement sensitivity of the radial bending is 1.393 nm/m-1.

  15. Optical fiber load sensor based on a semi-auxetic structure: a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenato, Luca; Pasuto, Alessandro; Galtarossa, Andrea; Palmieri, Luca

    2016-05-01

    In this work a quasi-distributed optical fiber load sensor based on a semi-auxetic structure is presented. By concatenating sections with positive Poisson's ratio to sections with negative one it is possible to precisely encode the distributed load into a strain exerted on a fiber. The sensor is described and a simple proof of concept is built and tested. The fiber is interrogated by means of optical frequency domain reflectometry. The proposed sensor represents just one example of the potential applications of auxetic and semi-auxetic structures and materials in optical fiber sensors development.

  16. Biobased Nano Porous Active Carbon Fibers for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuxiang; Peng, Lele; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Guangjie; Chen, Jonathan Y; Yu, Guihua

    2016-06-22

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structure have been prepared from wood sawdust using the KOH activation method. A study was conducted to examine the influence of the activation parameters (temperature, alkali/carbon ratio, and time) on the morphology and structure of the as-prepared ACFs developed in the process of pore generation and evolution. Activation temperature was very essential for the formation of utramicropores (<0.6 nm), which greatly contributed to the electric double layer capacitance. The significance of metallic potassium vapor evolved when the temperature was above 800 °C, since the generation of 0.8- and 1.1 nm micropores cannot be ignored. When the the KOH/fiber ratio was increased and the activation time was prolonged, to some extent, the micropores were enlarged to small mesopores within 2-5 nm. The sample with the optimal condition exhibited the highest specific capacitance (225 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1)). Its ability to retain capacitance corresponding to 10 A g(-1) and 6 M KOH was 85.3%, demonstrating a good rate capability. With 10 000 charge-discharge cycles at 3 A g(-1), the supercapacitor kept 94.2% capacity, showing outstanding electrochemical performance as promising electrode material. PMID:27220422

  17. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds. PMID:21216098

  18. Thermal activation of regenerated fiber Bragg grating in few mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Man-Hong; Gunawardena, Dinusha S.; Lim, Kok-Sing; Machavaram, Venkata R.; Lee, Say-Hoe; Chong, Wu-Yi; Lee, Yen-Sian; Ahmad, Harith

    2016-03-01

    This work demonstrated for the first time, the thermal regeneration of two and four modes graded index fiber Bragg gratings using high temperature tube furnace. During the regeneration process, the seed grating is erased and a new grating with lower index contrast is formed. The thermal calibration shows that the temperature sensitivity of regenerated grating is slightly higher for fiber with larger core. On the other hand, the regeneration temperature is lower for fiber with smaller core. The temperature sustainability up to 900 °C is observed for the produced regenerated gratings in few mode fibers.

  19. Structural characterization of nanotube fibers by x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Launois, P; Marucci, A; Vigolo, B; Bernier, P; Derré, A; Poulin, P

    2001-06-01

    Nanotube fibers with diameters ranging between 10 and 100 microns were produced by a simple spinning process. These fibers were studied by x-ray scattering--a technique that allows good visualization of the composition as well as the alignment of the constituents. The fibers were found to be composed of bundles of single wall carbon nanotubes, poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer chains, graphitic objects, and Ni-based particles. The nanotubes and poly(vinyl alcohol) chains were preferentially oriented along the fiber axis. PMID:12914040

  20. Probing the Twisted Structure of Sickle Hemoglobin Fibers via Particle Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Li, Xuejin; Vekilov, Peter G; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-05-10

    Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) is the primary pathogenic event of sickle cell disease. For insight into the nature of the HbS polymer fiber formation, we develop a particle model-resembling a coarse-grained molecular model-constructed to match the intermolecular contacts between HbS molecules. We demonstrate that the particle model predicts the formation of HbS polymer fibers by attachment of monomers to rough fiber ends and the growth rate increases linearly with HbS concentration. We show that the characteristic 14-molecule fiber cross section is preserved during growth. We also correlate the asymmetry of the contact sites on the HbS molecular surface with the structure of the polymer fiber composed of seven helically twisted double strands. Finally, we show that the same asymmetry mediates the mechanical and structural properties of the HbS polymer fiber. PMID:27166816

  1. Structural Evolution of Silicon Oxynitride Fiber Reinforced Boron Nitride Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunrong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Xie, Zhengfang; Shao, Changwei

    2016-02-01

    The structural evolution of a silicon oxynitride fiber reinforced boron nitride matrix (Si-N-Of/BN) wave-transparent composite at high temperatures was investigated. When heat treated at 1600 °C, the composite retained a favorable bending strength of 55.3 MPa while partially crystallizing to Si2N2O and h-BN from the as-received amorphous structure. The Si-N-O fibers still performed as effective reinforcements despite the presence of small pores due to fiber decomposition. Upon heat treatment at 1800 °C, the Si-N-O fibers already lost their reinforcing function and rough hollow microstructure formed within the fibers because of the accelerated decomposition. Further heating to 2000 °C led to the complete decomposition of the reinforcing fibers and only h-BN particles survived. The crystallization and decomposition behaviors of the composite at high temperatures are discussed.

  2. Hybrid encapsulation structures based on β-carotene-loaded nanoliposomes within electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Zômpero, Rafael Henrique; López-Rubio, Amparo; de Pinho, Samantha Cristina; Lagaron, José María; de la Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid encapsulation structures based on β-carotene-loaded nanoliposomes incorporated within the polymeric ultrathin fibers produced through electrospinning were developed to improve the photostability of the antioxidant. These novel materials were intended to incorporate β-carotene into water-based food formulations, overcoming the existing limitations associated with its hydrophobic character. Initially, both empty and antioxidant-loaded nanoliposomes were developed and incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions. The changes in the solution properties were evaluated to determine their effects on the electrospinning processing. The mixed polymer solutions were subsequently electrospun to produce hybrid nanoliposome-loaded ultrathin fibers. FTIR analysis confirmed the presence of phospholipid molecules inside the electrospun fibers. These ultrathin fibers were evaluated regarding their morphology, diameter, internal β-carotene distribution and stability against UV irradiation. Liposomal release studies from the electrospun fibers were also undertaken, confirming the presence of the liposomal structures after dissolving the electrospun fibers in water. PMID:25819464

  3. Distributed fiber optic sensors embedded in technical textiles for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebber, Katerina; Lenke, Philipp; Liehr, Sascha; Noether, Nils; Wendt, Mario; Wosniok, Aleksander

    2010-09-01

    Technical textiles with embedded distributed fiber optic sensors have been developed for the purposes of structural health monitoring in geotechnical and civil engineering. The distributed fiber optic sensors are based on Brillouin scattering in silica optical fibers and OTDR in polymer optical fibers. Such "smart" technical textiles can be used for reinforcement of geotechnical and masonry structures and the embedded fiber optic sensors can provide information about the condition of the structures and detect the presence of any damages and destructions in real time. Thus, structural health monitoring of critical geotechnical and civil infrastructures can be realized. The paper highlights the results achieved in this innovative field in the framework of several German and European projects.

  4. Load effect on an SMS fiber structure embedded in a high-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspita, Ika; Rahmah, Fitri; Hatta, Agus M.; Koentjoro, Sekartedjo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a load effect on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure embedded in a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was investigated numerically and experimentally. It was modelled that the applied load induces a longitudinal strain on the HDPE and accordingly affects the SMS fiber structure's parameters. It was calculated the output power of the SMS fiber structure using a graded index multimode fiber (MMF) due to the applied strain from 0 to 4000 N. The experimental result shows that for the MMF length of 105 mm, the output power has monotonically increasing for an applied load range from 1700 to 4000 N with a sensitivity of 1.18 x 10-3 dBm/N. This configuration of SMS fiber structure embedded in the HDPE is potential for a load sensor.

  5. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  6. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  7. [Biologically active food supplements as sources of flavonoids, tannins and dietary fibers].

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, O V; Berketova, L V

    2011-01-01

    The content of some biologically active substances such as bioflavonoids, tannins and dietary fiber in various type of biologically active additive was analyzed. The results are shown that the content of bioflavonoids ranger from 26.0 to 3970.0 mg%, tannins--from 1.19 to 857.0 mg%, insoluble dietary fiber--from 4.56 to 67.89% and soluble dietary fiber from 1.0 to 66.8%. PMID:22238949

  8. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  9. Self-centering fiber alignment structures for high-precision field installable single-mode fiber connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Vervaeke, Michael; Berghmans, Francis; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    There is a steady increase in the demand for internet bandwidth, primarily driven by cloud services and high-definition video streaming. Europe's Digital Agenda states the ambitious objective that by 2020 all Europeans should have access to internet at speeds of 30Mb/s or above, with 50% or more of households subscribing to connections of 100Mb/s. Today however, internet access in Europe is mainly based on the first generation of broadband, meaning internet accessed over legacy telephone copper and TV cable networks. In recent years, Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH) networks have been adopted as a replacement of traditional electrical connections for the `last mile' transmission of information at bandwidths over 1Gb/s. However, FTTH penetration is still very low (< 5%) in most major Western economies. The main reason for this is the high deployment cost of FTTH networks. Indeed, the success and adoption of optical access networks critically depend on the quality and reliability of connections between optical fibers. In particular a further reduction of insertion loss of field- installable connectors must be achieved without a significant increase in component cost. This requires precise alignment of fibers that can differ in terms of ellipticity, eccentricity or diameter and seems hardly achievable using today's widespread ferrule-based alignment systems. In this paper, we present a field-installable connector based on deflectable/compressible spring structures, providing a self-centering functionality for the fiber. This way, it can accommodate for possible fiber cladding diameter variations (the tolerance on the cladding diameter of G.652 fiber is typically +/-0.7μm). The mechanical properties of the cantilever are derived through an analytical approximation and a mathematical model of the spring constant, and finite element-based simulations are carried out to find the maximum first principal stress as well as the stress distribution distribution in the fiber alignment

  10. Fiber Optics Deliver Real-Time Structural Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    To alter the shape of aircraft wings during flight, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center worked on a fiber optic sensor system with Austin-based 4DSP LLC. The company has since commercialized a new fiber optic system for monitoring applications in health and medicine, oil and gas, and transportation, increasing company revenues by 60 percent.

  11. Structural Coloration of Colloidal Fiber by Photonic Band Gap and Resonant Mie Scattering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Ning; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-07-01

    Because structural color is fadeless and dye-free, structurally colored materials have attracted great attention in a wide variety of research fields. In this work, we report the use of a novel structural coloration strategy applied to the fabrication of colorful colloidal fibers. The nanostructured fibers with tunable structural colors were massively produced by colloidal electrospinning. Experimental results and theoretical modeling reveal that the homogeneous and noniridescent structural colors of the electrospun fibers are caused by two phenomena: reflection due to the band gap of photonic structure and Mie scattering of the colloidal spheres. Our unprecedented findings show promise in paving way for the development of revolutionary dye-free technology for the coloration of various fibers. PMID:26066732

  12. Conductivity-based strain monitoring and damage characterization of fiber reinforced cementitious structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2005-05-01

    In recent years, a new class of cementitious composite has been proposed for the design and construction of durable civil structures. Termed engineered cementitious composites (ECC), ECC utilizes a low volume fraction of short fibers (polymer, steel, carbon) within a cementitious matrix resulting in a composite that strain hardens when loaded in tension. By refining the mechanical properties of the fiber-cement interface, the material exhibits high tolerance to damage. This study explores the electrical properties of ECC materials to monitor their performance and health when employed in the construction of civil structures. In particular, the conductivity of ECC changes in proportion to strain indicating that the material is piezoresistive. In this paper, the piezoresistive properties of various ECC composites are thoroughly explored. To measure the electrical resistance of ECC structures in the field, a low-cost wireless active sensing unit is proposed. The wireless active sensing unit is capable of applying DC and AC voltage signals to ECC elements while simultaneously measuring their corresponding voltages away from the signal input. By locally processing the corresponding input-output electrical signals recorded by the wireless active sensing units, the magnitude of strain in ECC elements can be calculated. In addition to measuring strain, the study seeks to correlate changes in ECC electrical properties to the magnitude of crack damage witnessed in tested specimens. A large number of ECC specimens are tested in the laboratory including a large-scale ECC bridge pier laterally loaded under cyclically repeated drift reversals. The novel self-sensing properties of ECC exploited by a wireless monitoring system hold tremendous promise for the advancement of structural health monitoring of ECC structures.

  13. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships. PMID:26091619

  14. Nanoimprint of a 3D structure on an optical fiber for light wavefront manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Koshelev, Alexander; Allen, Frances I.; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Wong, Edward; Lum, Paul; Munechika, Keiko; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Integration of complex photonic structures onto optical fiber facets enables powerful platforms with unprecedented optical functionalities. Conventional nanofabrication technologies, however, do not permit viable integration of complex photonic devices onto optical fibers owing to their low throughput and high cost. In this paper we report the fabrication of a three-dimensional structure achieved by direct nanoimprint lithography on the facet of an optical fiber. Nanoimprint processes and tools were specifically developed to enable a high lithographic accuracy and coaxial alignment of the optical device with respect to the fiber core. To demonstrate the capability of this new approach, a 3D beam splitter has been designed, imprinted and optically characterized. Scanning electron microscopy and optical measurements confirmed the good lithographic capabilities of the proposed approach as well as the desired optical performance of the imprinted structure. The inexpensive solution presented here should enable advancements in areas such as integrated optics and sensing, achieving enhanced portability and versatility of fiber optic components.

  15. Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure Using Optical Fiber Sensing Technology: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X. W.; Su, Y. H.; Han, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  16. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  17. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konka, Hari P.; Wahab, M. A.; Lian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension-tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT sensors

  18. Structural response of a fiber composite compressor fan blade airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was performed to determine the structural response of a fiber composite airfoil typical of those encountered in high-tip speed compressor fan blades when subjected to load conditions anticipated in such applications. The analysis method consisted of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, and centrifugal. Root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions were investigated. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. The core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design and is sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for the analysis, and to provide quantitative data associated with the various responses which can be helpful in designing composite blades.

  19. Active stiffness modulation of fins using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancharala, Ashok K.; Philen, Michael K.

    2013-04-01

    Studies on the role of body flexibility in propulsion suggest that fish have the ability to control or modulate the stiffness of the fin for optimized propulsive performance. Fins with certain stiffness might be efficient for a particular set of operating parameters but may be inefficient for other parameters. Therefore active stiffness modulation of a fin can improve the propulsive performance for a range of operating conditions. This paper discusses the preliminary experimental work on the open loop active deformation control of heaving flexible fins using Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs). The effect of important parameters such as oscillation frequency, flexibility of the fin, applied voltage and the phase difference between applied voltage and heaving on propulsive performance are studied and reported. The results indicate that propulsive performance can be improved by active control of the fins. The mean thrust improved by 30- 38% for the fins used in the experiments. The phase difference of ~90° is found to be optimal for maximized propulsive performance for the parameters considered in the study. Furthermore, there exists an optimal voltage magnitude at which the propulsive performance is a maximum for the range of operating conditions.

  20. Structural, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of electrospun poly(lactic acid)/polyaniline blend fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conducting electrospun fiber mats based on PLA and PAni blends were obtained with average diameter values between 87 and 1,006 nm with PAni quantities from 0 to 5.6 wt.-%. Structural characteristics of fiber mats were compared to cast films with the same amount of PAni and studied by SEM, SAXS, and ...

  1. Relation between the synthesis conditions and the fine structure of fiber carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyumentsev, V. A.; Fazlitdinova, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    The fine structure of carbon fibers synthesized under various technological conditions is studied. It is found that the material of the fibers is heterogeneous and its component composition is determined by thermomechanical treatment conditions and the presence of a boron addition and depends on the angle of coherent-domain orientation φ with respect to the fiber axis. The detected dependences of the component composition of the fibers on the heat-treatment temperature and time and the angle of coherent-domain orientation with respect to the fiber axis suggest that the transition of the carbon material of the fibers into a more equilibrium state is likely to proceed through a number of metastable states.

  2. Active Fibers: Matching Deformable Tract Templates to Diffusion Tensor Images

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, Ilya; Shattuck, David W.; Stein, Jason L.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable quantitative analysis of white matter connectivity in the brain is an open problem in neuroimaging, with common solutions requiring tools for fiber tracking, tractography segmentation and estimation of intersubject correspondence. This paper proposes a novel, template matching approach to the problem. In the proposed method, a deformable fiber-bundle model is aligned directly with the subject tensor field, skipping the fiber tracking step. Furthermore, the use of a common template eliminates the need for tractography segmentation and defines intersubject shape correspondence. The method is validated using phantom DTI data and applications are presented, including automatic fiber-bundle reconstruction and tract-based morphometry. PMID:19457360

  3. Numerical simulation of fibrous biomaterials with randomly distributed fiber network structure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Stanciulescu, Ilinca

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a computational framework to simulate the mechanical behavior of fibrous biomaterials with randomly distributed fiber networks. A random walk algorithm is implemented to generate the synthetic fiber network in 2D used in simulations. The embedded fiber approach is then adopted to model the fibers as embedded truss elements in the ground matrix, which is essentially equivalent to the affine fiber kinematics. The fiber-matrix interaction is partially considered in the sense that the two material components deform together, but no relative movement is considered. A variational approach is carried out to derive the element residual and stiffness matrices for finite element method (FEM), in which material and geometric nonlinearities are both included. Using a data structure proposed to record the network geometric information, the fiber network is directly incorporated into the FEM simulation without significantly increasing the computational cost. A mesh sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the influence of mesh size on various simulation results. The proposed method can be easily combined with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to include the influence of the stochastic nature of the network and capture the material behavior in an average sense. The computational framework proposed in this work goes midway between homogenizing the fiber network into the surrounding matrix and accounting for the fully coupled fiber-matrix interaction at the segment length scale, and can be used to study the connection between the microscopic structure and the macro-mechanical behavior of fibrous biomaterials with a reasonable computational cost. PMID:26342926

  4. Strict dual-mode large-mode-area fiber with multicore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wenxing; Ren, Guobin; Jian, Wei; Jiang, Youchao; Wu, Yue; Yang, Yuguang; Shen, Ya; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new kind of quasi-37-cores fiber structure consisting of 15 conventional cores and 22 air-hole cores. Strict dual-mode condition is systematically analyzed about three structure parameters, core-to-core pitch, relative core diameter, and difference of refractive index between core and cladding. Large effective area about 1910.98 μm2 with low bending loss less than 10-3 dB / m is achieved while keeping strict dual-mode. This structured fiber has a great potential in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

  5. Coating process of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors for SHM applications in metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro, E.; Grandal, T.; Asensio, A.; Rodriguez, F.

    2014-05-01

    Embedded fiber optic sensors into composites have been studied for a long time, but embedding a fiber sensor into metallic structure is beginning to study. Recently, this has raised interest due to embedded FBG in the metallic structure provide capabilities for controlling parameters of the structural health status and also information about their own process of deterioration. In this paper we study three different techniques for coating a FBG sensor: physical vapour deposition (PVD), electroless deposition and electroplating. This paper describes the experimental procedure for coating metallic fiber optic sensors and the optical characterization.

  6. Novel bioresorbabale composite fiber structures loaded with proteins for tissue regeneration applications: microstructure and protein release.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yair; Zilberman, Meital

    2006-12-15

    Novel bioresorbable core/shell composite fiber structures loaded with proteins were developed and studied. These unique polymeric structures are designed to combine good mechanical properties with a desired controlled protein-release profile, to serve as scaffolds for tissue regeneration applications. Core/shell fiber structures were formed by "coating" poly(L-lactic acid) fibers with protein-containing poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous structures. Shell preparation (coating) was performed by the freeze-drying of water in oil emulsions. The present study focused on the effect of the emulsion's formulation on the porous shell structure and on the resulting cumulative protein release from the composite fibers for 90 days. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as the protein source. The release profiles usually exhibited an initial burst effect, accompanied by a decrease in release rate with time, as is typical for diffusion-controlled systems. The HRP content and the emulsion's organic:aqueous phase ratio exhibited significant effects on both the shell microstructure and the HRP release profile from the composite fibers, whereas the polymer content of the emulsion's organic phase only affected these fiber characteristics in certain cases. Proper selection of the emulsion's parameters can yield core/shell fiber structures with the desired protein release behavior and other useful physical properties. PMID:16883584

  7. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  8. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  9. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  10. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  11. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  12. Structural Fluctuations of the Chromatin Fiber within Topologically Associating Domains.

    PubMed

    Tiana, Guido; Amitai, Assaf; Pollex, Tim; Piolot, Tristan; Holcman, David; Heard, Edith; Giorgetti, Luca

    2016-03-29

    Experiments based on chromosome conformation capture have shown that mammalian genomes are partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), within which the chromatin fiber preferentially interacts. TADs may provide three-dimensional scaffolds allowing genes to contact their appropriate distal regulatory DNA sequences (e.g., enhancers) and thus to be properly regulated. Understanding the cell-to-cell and temporal variability of the chromatin fiber within TADs, and what determines them, is thus of great importance to better understand transcriptional regulation. We recently described an equilibrium polymer model that can accurately predict cell-to-cell variation of chromosome conformation within single TADs, from chromosome conformation capture-based data. Here we further analyze the conformational and energetic properties of our model. We show that the chromatin fiber within TADs can easily fluctuate between several conformational states, which are hierarchically organized and are not separated by important free energy barriers, and that this is facilitated by the fact that the chromatin fiber within TADs is close to the onset of the coil-globule transition. We further show that in this dynamic state the properties of the chromatin fiber, and its contact probabilities in particular, are determined in a nontrivial manner not only by site-specific interactions between strongly interacting loci along the fiber, but also by nonlocal correlations between pairs of contacts. Finally, we use live-cell experiments to measure the dynamics of the chromatin fiber in mouse embryonic stem cells, in combination with dynamical simulations, and predict that conformational changes within one TAD are likely to occur on timescales that are much shorter than the duration of one cell cycle. This suggests that genes and their regulatory elements may come together and disassociate several times during a cell cycle. These results have important implications for transcriptional

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Ultra-fine Fiber Nonwoven Fabrics Produced by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogushi, Yukiko; Sasaki, Naokazu; Imashiro, Yasuo; Minagawa, Mie; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    Electrospinning is based on an electrohydrodynamic process, and it is a straightforward and versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers from several nanometers to several tens of micrometers in diameter. One major advantage of electrospinning is the one-step forming of nonwoven fibrous fabrics. In the present study, we prepared ultra-fine fiber nonwoven fabrics from 13 kinds of commercial polymers (e.g., PLA, PA, PU, Cellulose, PVDC, and PS) by electrospinning and tested their antimicrobial activity. Most of ultra-fine fiber nonwoven fabrics showed excellent antimicrobial activity. Our experimental results showed that there is close correlation between fiber diameter of nonwoven fabrics and their antimicrobial activity: the nonwoven fabrics with average fiber diameter of smaller than 800 nm showed better antimicrobial activity.

  14. Power-compensated displacement sensing based on single mode-multimode fiber Bragg grating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, An; Wu, Zhishen; Huang, Huang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, power-compensated displacement sensing is proposed and investigated experimentally based on single mode-multimode fiber Bragg grating (FBG) structure, which is fabricated by a single mode fiber and an FBG written on 105/125 μm graded-index multimode fiber (MMF). Experimental results verify that the reflected peak power of multiple wavelengths in single mode-multimode fiber Bragg grating structure shows different response to displacement induced bending of transmitting multimode fiber as the result of multimode interference (MMI). By employing different bending responses between multiple wavelengths of multimode FBG, ratiometric detection based high sensitive displacement measurement can be achieved, which provides a simple and practical method for displacement sensing and meanwhile a potential solution for multi-parameter measurement.

  15. Energy storage on ultrahigh surface area activated carbon fibers derived from PMIA.

    PubMed

    Castro-Muñiz, Alberto; Suárez-García, Fabián; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D; Kyotani, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    High-performance carbon materials for energy storage applications have been obtained by using poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide), PMIA, as a precursor through the chemical activation of the carbonized aramid fiber by using KOH. The yield of the process of activation was remarkably high (25-40 wt%), resulting in activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with ultrahigh surface areas, over 3000 m(2) g(-1) , and pore volumes exceeding 1.50 cm(3) g(-1) , keeping intact the fibrous morphology. The porous structure and the surface chemical properties could easily be controlled through the conditions of activation. The PMIA-derived ACFs were tested in two types of energy storage applications. At -196 °C and 1 bar, H2 uptake values of approximately 3 t% were obtained, which, in combination with the textural properties, rendered it a good candidate for H2 adsorption at high pressure and temperature. The performance of the ACFs as electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors was also investigated. Specific capacitance values between 297 and 531 g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) were obtained in aqueous electrolyte (1 H2 SO4 ), showing different behaviors depending on the surface chemical properties. PMID:23843334

  16. Instrumentation by distributed optical fiber sensors of a new ballastless track structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Gueguen, Ivan; Cailliau, Joël

    2013-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. With its service life of at least 60 years, they require little maintenance and hence they offer great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. A new ballastless track structure has been designed to be circulated up to 300km/h, with a target life of 100 years. It is an interoperable way on concrete slabs that are cast-in-place and slip formed. This structure has been built and tested at the scale one in our laboratory. Indeed, ten millions cyclic loads were applied at 2.5Hz to evaluate the fatigue behaviour under selected mechanical and thermal conditions. To monitor the thermo-mechanical behavior of this new structure and to verify the numerical simulations used for its design, a lot of sensors have been embedded. In particularly, we have tested an optical fiber as distributed sensors to measure strain distribution in the railway model. This sensor can also be used to detect, localize and monitor cracks in concrete slabs. The optical fiber sensing technique ("Rayleigh technique") used in this experimentation has a centimetric spatial resolution which allows to measure complex strain profiles unlike electrical strain gauges which only give local information. Firstly, optical cables used as sensors have been successfully embedded and attached to the reinforcing steel bars in the structure. We have noted that they are resistant enough to resist concrete pouring and working activities. Secondly, strains measured by conventional strain gauges has confirmed the quality of the strain profiles measurements obtained by optical fiber sensors. Moreover, we have found a good agreement between experimental profiles measurements and those obtained by numerical simulations. Early

  17. Damage evaluation and analysis of composite pressure vessels using fiber Bragg gratings to determine structural health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortyl, Nicholas E.

    2005-11-01

    The application of MEMS and nanotechnology (MNT) to the field of structural health monitoring (SHM) is a fairly recent development. The recent change in this focus for MNT has been driven by the need to expand the applications for much of the technologies that were developed in the late 1990s. In addition, many companies desire to expand beyond their target high volume market segments of automotive, wireless communications, and computer peripherals, since these market segments were not as lucrative as first predicted. Most of the aerospace structural health monitoring developmental activity has been sponsored by agencies of the U.S. Government, which serves to pace the examination of these newer technologies to some degree. With that said, efforts are underway by companies such as Acellent Technologies and Blue Road Research to explore various MNT structural health monitoring approaches. The MNT under test include embedded piezoelectric sensors, MEMS accelerometers, time domain region sensors, and topical and embedded single and multi-axis fiber optic Bragg grating sensors. The promise of MNT for the SHM market segment is very enticing. The many wireless communication developments and miniaturization developments of the past five years is very attractive to the SHM community, especially those that are able to reduce the cost and complexity of integration. The main challenge for the community is one of selective integration. That is, certain pieces may be appropriate for SHM systems and certain pieces may not be. The better companies will chose wisely and put forth an approach that can be seamlessly integrated into the larger structure. For over a decade, Blue Road Research has been developing technologies aimed at structural health monitoring of both composite and non-composite parts, through the use of single and multiaxis fiber optic Bragg grating sensors. These sensors are 80 to 120 microns in diameter making them smaller than the diameter of a human hair

  18. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  19. Optical fiber sensor layer embedded in smart composite material and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiao Wen; Liang, Da Kai; Li, Dongsheng

    2006-10-01

    A composite structure health monitoring system with optical fiber sensors is an important development in smart materials and structures. But it is difficult to embed a network of distributed optical fiber sensors in a smart composite structure, and the most effective method would be integrating the network of sensors with the polyimide film as a layer, called the optical fiber sensor layer, and then embedding the layer with optical fiber sensors in the composite material. This paper introduces three methods of making a distributed optical fiber sensor layer with polyimide. The first is to sandwich optical fiber sensors in two polyimide films. The second is to deposit the network of sensors in polyimide solution, and dry the polyimide solution. The last is to build thin-film optical waveguides and optical sensors by using fluorinated polyimide, which is expected to have high integration and high reliability. Some tests indicate that there is a little influence on the mechanical performance of the structure; however, optical fiber sensor built-in polyimide films work very well.

  20. Structural design for birefringent holey fiber with a beat length insensitive to wavelength.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Qiang; Shi, Zhi-Dong; Li, Ming-Jia; Chen, Hua

    2009-09-01

    By combination of two defect structures with positive and negative birefringence, we design a holey fiber with a beat length that is less sensitive to wavelength. The influence of different structural parameters on birefringence of holey fiber is calculated by the finite-difference beam propagation method. A stable beat length can be achieved at some given wavelength window by adjusting the parameters. An almost uniform beat length with a greater than 180 nm bandwidth at 1310 and 1550 nm wavelength windows is obtained, which is useful for the design and fabrication of fiber-optic wave plates with a wide band. PMID:19724314

  1. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Jackson, K.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as bonded on the surface of cylindrical structures fabricated out of such composites. Structural properties of such composites is investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and longitudinal and hoop strain on the surface is measured.

  2. μ-COMPUTED Tomography for Micro-Structure Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (cfrp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoessel, R.; Guenther, T.; Dierig, T.; Schladitz, K.; Godehardt, M.; Kessling, P.-M.; Fuchs, T.

    2011-06-01

    Non-destructive testing is of major importance for quality assurance of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) in aerospace industry. It is of interest to obtain information of the 3D inner micro-structure of CFRP. A promising option is the usage of μ-CT inspection. State-of-the art software tools are used to characterize the 3D inner micro-structure and to gather knowledge about porosity, cracks, and fiber orientation.

  3. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  4. Using modalmetric fiber optic sensors to monitor the activity of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, M.; Uzięblo-Zyczkowska, B.; Dziuda, L.; Różanowski, K.

    2011-03-01

    The paper presents the concept of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor system for human psychophysical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes intensity of propagated light to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an multimode fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled by the singlemode optical fiber to detector. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use. We present the laboratory test of comparing their results with the known methods like EKG. addition, the article describes the work on integrated system to human psychophysiology activity monitoring. That system including a EMFIT, microwave, fiber optic and capacitive sensors.

  5. Climbing Fiber Regulation of Spontaneous Purkinje Cell Activity and Cerebellum-Dependent Blink Responses123

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been known for a long time that GABAergic Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as their target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei, are spontaneously active. The cerebellar output will, therefore, depend on how input is integrated into this spontaneous activity. It has been shown that input from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive controls the spontaneous activity in Purkinje cells. While blocking climbing fiber input to the Purkinje cells causes a dramatic increase in the firing rate, increased climbing fiber activity results in reduced Purkinje cell activity. However, the exact calibration of this regulation has not been examined systematically. Here we examine the relation between climbing fiber stimulation frequency and Purkinje cell activity in unanesthetized decerebrated ferrets. The results revealed a gradual suppression of Purkinje cell activity, starting at climbing fiber stimulation frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz. At 4 Hz, Purkinje cells were completely silenced. This effect lasted an average of 2 min after the stimulation rate was reduced to a lower level. We also examined the effect of sustained climbing fiber stimulation on overt behavior. Specifically, we analyzed conditioned blink responses, which are known to be dependent on the cerebellum, while stimulating the climbing fibers at different frequencies. In accordance with the neurophysiological data, the conditioned blink responses were suppressed at stimulation frequencies of ≥4 Hz. PMID:26839917

  6. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  7. New Fiber Reinforced Waterless Concrete for Extraterrestrial Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H.; Tucker, D.; Ethridge, E.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction mate: iii an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water For the purpose of this paper it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, brick and beam elements. Glass fibers produced from regolith were used as a reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of the sulfur concrete. Glass fibers and glass rebar were produced by melting the lunar regolith simulant. Lunar regolith stimulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline 46100 high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600G. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The viability of sulfur concrete as a construction material for extraterrestrial application is presented. The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced sulfur concrete were investigated.

  8. Activities report in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    A stiffened plate macro-element; a macro-element of elastic pipe filled with liquid; modeling of the structural fuzzy in medium frequency computations; unsteady aerodynamic forces on jet engine air intakes; prediction of buffeting vibrations from unsteady pressure measurements taken in a wind tunnel; aeroelastic behavior of fan blades in the unstarted supersonic domain; wind tunnel study of a helicopter blade stall control; computer-controlled generator of turbulence in a wind tunnel; atmospheric turbulence statistics; adaptation of Neuber's theory to viscoplastic stress concentration; computation of a jet engine disk/flange assembly; and analysis of the damage done to a perforated composite plate under biaxial monotonic and cyclic loading are described.

  9. The effect of dietary fiber on human pancreatic enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dunaif, G; Schneeman, B O

    1981-06-01

    Human pancreatic juice was used as a source of amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. The human pancreatic juice was incubated with one of several dietary fibers, including alfalfa, oat bran, pectin. Solka Floc, wheat bran, and xylan. In addition, the human pancreatic juice was incubated without any fiber, which was used as the control. Incubation with Solka Floc (cellulose) and xylan (a hemicellulose) resulted in a substantial loss of activity in all enzymes assayed. Wheat bran and oat bran decreased amylase and chymotrypsin activity, while alfalfa decreased trypsin and chymotrypsin activity. Incubation with pectin significantly increased amylase and chymotrypsin activity. The mechanism by which sources of dietary fiber can alter enzyme activity is currently unknown. This effect of a dietary component on the activity of human pancreatic enzymes emphasizes the need to investigate further the effects of dietary fiber on digestion and absorption in the small intestine to understand fully its effects on metabolism. PMID:6165234

  10. Spatial distribution and antitumor activities after intratumoral injection of fragmented fibers with loaded hydroxycamptothecin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiaojun; Luo, Xiaoming; Chen, Maohua; Lu, Jinfu; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    There was only a small percentage of drug delivered to tumors after systemic administration, and solid tumors also have many barriers to prevent drug penetration within tumors. In the current study, intratumoral injection of drug-loaded fiber fragments was proposed to overcome these barriers, allowing drug accumulation at the target site to realize the therapeutic efficacy. Fragmented fibers with hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) loaded were constructed by cryocutting of aligned electrospun fibers, and the fiber lengths of 5 (FF-5), 20 (FF-20), and 50μm (FF-50) could be easily controlled by adjusting the slice thickness. Fragmented fibers were homogeneously dispersed into 2% sodium alginate solution, and could be smoothly injected through 26G1/2 syringe needles. FF-5, FF-20 and FF-50 fiber fragments indicated similar release profiles except a lower burst release from FF-50. In vitro viability tests showed that FF-5 and FF-20 fiber fragments caused higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis rates than FF-50. After intratumoral injection into murine H22 subcutaneous tumors, fragmented fibers with longer lengths indicated a higher accumulation into tumors and a better retention at the injection site, but showed less apparent diffusion within tumor tissues. In addition to the elimination of invasive surgery, HCPT-loaded fiber fragments showed superior in vivo antitumor activities and fewer side effects than intratumoral implantation of drug-loaded fiber mats. Compared with FF-5 and FF-50, FF-20 fiber fragments indicated optimal spatial distribution of HCPT within tumors and achieved the most significant effects on the animal survival, tumor growth inhibition and tumor cell apoptosis induction. It is suggested that the intratumoral injection of drug-loaded fiber fragments provided an efficient strategy to improve patient compliance, allow the retention of fragmented fibers and spatial distribution of drugs within tumor tissues to achieve a low systemic toxicity and an optimal

  11. Hole-pin joining structure with fiber-round-hole distribution of lobster cuticle and biomimetic study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Fan, Jinghong; Gou, Jihua; Lin, Shiyun

    2014-12-01

    Observations of the cuticle of the Boston Spiny Lobster using scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that it is a natural biocomposite consisting of chitin fibers and sclerotic-protein matrix with hierarchical and helicoidal structure. The SEM images also indicate that there is a hole-pin joining structure in the cuticle. In this joining structure, the chitin fibers in the neighborhood of the joining holes continuously round the holes to form a fiber-round-hole distribution. The maximum pullout force of the fibers in the fiber-round-hole distribution, which is closely related to the fracture toughness of the cuticle, is investigated and compared with that of the fibers in non-fiber-round-hole distribution based on their representative models. It is revealed that the maximum pullout force of the fibers in the fiber-round-hole distribution is significantly larger than that of the fibers in the non-fiber-round-hole distribution, and that a larger diameter of the hole results in a larger difference in the maximum pullout forces of the fibers between the two kinds of the fiber distributions. Inspired by the fiber-round-hole distribution found in the cuticle, composite specimens with the fiber-round-hole distribution were fabricated with a special mold and process to mirror the fiber-round-hole distribution. The fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite specimens is tested and compared with that of the conventional composite specimens with the non-fiber-round-hole distribution. It is demonstrated that the fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite specimens with the fiber-round-hole distribution is significantly larger than that of the conventional composite specimens with the non-fiber-round-hole distribution. PMID:25241280

  12. Molecular structure and properties of wool fiber surface-grafted with nano-antibacterial materials.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mei; Liu, Xuguang; Dai, Jinming; Hou, Wensheng; Wei, Liqiao; Xu, Bingshe

    2012-02-01

    Wool fiber was modified by ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and functionalized by grafting antibacterial agent. The structure and properties of antibacterial wool fiber were discussed in detail. The secondary structure changes and crystal structure were analyzed based on Fourier Transformation Raman Spectrometry (FTR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the disordered degree of UV-treated sample was increased and the antibacterial sample became more oriented. Compared with parent wool fiber, the antibacterial wool fiber was improved in mechanical property. The force, tensile strength and elongation were increased by 18%, 16%, and 7%, respectively. Also, the anti-shrinkage performance was increased because of the decrease in the directional frictional effect (DFE). PMID:22074883

  13. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  14. Optical fiber sensors and signal processing for intelligent structure monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Daniel; Cox, Dave; Lindner, D. K.; Claus, R. O.

    1989-01-01

    Few mode optical fibers have been shown to produce predictable interference patterns when placed under strain. The use is described of a modal domain sensor in a vibration control experiment. An optical fiber is bonded along the length of a flexible beam. Output from the modal domain sensor is used to suppress vibrations induced in the beam. A distributed effect model for the modal domain sensor is developed. This model is combined with the beam and actuator dynamics to produce a system suitable for control design. Computer simulations predict open and closed loop dynamic responses. An experimental apparatus is described and experimental results are presented.

  15. Direct core structuring of microstructured optical fibers using focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; André, Ricardo M; Perrella, Christopher; Dellith, Jan; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2016-01-11

    We demonstrate the use of focused ion beam milling to machine optical structures directly into the core of microstructured optical fibers. The particular fiber used was exposed-core microstructured optical fiber, which allowed direct access to the optically guiding core. Two different designs of Fabry-Perot cavity were fabricated and optically characterized. The first cavity was formed by completely removing a section of the fiber core, while the second cavity consisted of a shallow slot milled into the core, leaving the majority of the core intact. This work highlights the possibility of machining complex optical devices directly onto the core of microstructured optical fibers using focused ion beam milling for applications including environmental, chemical, and biological sensing. PMID:26832268

  16. Correlation between the Mechanical Properties and Structural Characteristics of Different Fiber Posts Systems.

    PubMed

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Rodrigues, Renata Borges; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cezar; Lourenço, Correr-Sobrinho; Soares, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength and flexural modulus of different fiber-reinforcement composite (FRC) posts and determine the correlation between mechanical properties and structural characteristics. Eleven brands of fiber posts were analyzed (n=10): Exacto Cônico (Angelus), DT Light SL (VDW), RelyX Fiber Post (3M-Espe), Glassix Radiopaque (Nordim), Para Post Fiber White (Coltène), FRC Postec Plus (Ivoclar), Aestheti-Plus Post (Bisco), Superpost Cônico Estriado (Superdont), Superpost Ultrafine (Superdont), Reforpost (Angelus), and White Post DC (FGM). The posts were loaded in three-point bending test to calculate the flexural strength and flexural modulus using a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL) at 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Scott-Knot test (p<0.05). The cross-sections of the posts were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Correlation between the mechanical properties and each of the structural variables was calculated by Pearson's correlation coefficients (p<0.05). The flexural strength values ranged from 493 to 835 MPa and were directly correlated with the fiber/matrix ratio (p=0.011). The flexural modulus ranged from 4500 to 8824 MPa and was inversely correlated with the number of fibers per mm2 of post (p<0.001). It was concluded that the structural characteristics significantly affected the properties of the FRC posts. The structural characteristic and mechanical properties of fiber glass posts are manufacture-dependent. A linear correlation between flexural strength and fiber/matrix ratio, as well as the flexural modulus and the amount of fiber was found. PMID:27007345

  17. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  18. Investigation of Carbon-Polymer Structures with Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myers, G.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several Bragg-grating sensors fabricated within the same optical fiber are buried within multiple-ply carbon-epoxy planar and cylindrical structures. Effect of different orientation of fiber-sensors with respect to carbon fibers in the composite structure is investigated. This is done for both fabric and uni-tape material samples. Response of planar structures to axial and transverse strain up to 1 millistrain is investigated with distributed Bragg-grating sensors. Material properties like Young's Modulus and Poisson ratio is measured. A comparison is made between response measured by sensors in different ply-layers and those bonded on the surface. The results from buried fiber- sensors do not completely agree with surface bonded conventional strain gauges. A plausible explanation is given for observed differences. The planar structures are subjected to impacts with energies up to 10 ft-lb. Effect of this impact on the material stiffness is also investigated with buried fiber-optic Bragg sensors. The strain response of such optical sensors is also measured for cylindrical carbon-epoxy composite structures. The sensors are buried within the walls of the cylinder as well as surface bonded in both the axial as well as hoop directions. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 1500 psi. This is done at both room temperature as well as cryogenic temperatures. The recorded response is compared with that from a conventional strain gauge.

  19. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-02-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2-3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  20. Analytical (mathematical) predictive modeling in fiber optics structural analysis (FOSA): review and extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, Ephraim

    2015-03-01

    An updated version of the paper with revised references has been published The review part of the paper addresses analytical (mathematical) modeling in structural analysis in fiber optics engineering, mostly fiber optics interconnects, and deals with optical fibers subjected to thermal and/or mechanical loading (stresses) in bending, tension, compression, or to the combinations of such loadings. Attributes and significance of predictive modeling are indicated and discussed. The review is based mostly on the author's research conducted at Bell Laboratories, Physical Sciences and Engineering Research Division, Murray Hill, NJ, USA, during his tenure with this company, and, to a lesser extent, on his recent work in the field. The addressed structures include, but are not limited to, optical fibers of finite length: bare fibers; jacketed and dual-coated fibers; fibers experiencing thermal loading; fibers soldered into ferrules or adhesively bonded into capillaries; as well as the roles of geometric and material non-linearity; dynamic response to shocks and vibrations; and possible applications of nano-materials in new generations of coating and cladding systems. The extension part is concerned with a novel, fruitful and challenging directionprobabilistic design for reliability (PDfR) of opto-electronic and photonic products, including optical fibers and interconnects. The rationale behind the PDfR concept is that there is no such thing as zero probability of failure, that the difference between a highly reliable product and an insufficiently reliable product is "merely" in the level of the never zero probability of its failure and that when the operational performance of the product is imperative, the ability to predict, quantify, assure and, if possible and appropriate, even specify its reliability is highly desirable. Accordingly, the objective of the PDfR effort is to quantify the likelihood of an operational failure of a material, device or a system, including the

  1. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  2. Active Q switching of a fiber laser with a microsphere resonator.

    PubMed

    Kieu, Khanh; Mansuripur, Masud

    2006-12-15

    We propose and demonstrate an active Q-switched fiber laser using a high-Q microsphere resonator as the Q-switching element. The laser cavity consists of an Er-doped fiber as the gain medium, a glass microsphere reflector (coupled through a fiber taper) at one end of the cavity, and a fiber Bragg grating reflector at the other end. The reflectivity of the microsphere is modulated by changing the gap between the microsphere and the fiber taper. Active Q switching is realized by oscillating the microsphere in and out of contact with the taper. Using this novel technique, we have obtained giant pulses (maximum peak power approximately 102 W, duration approximately 160 ns) at a low pump-power threshold (approximately 3 mW). PMID:17130905

  3. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:23680063

  4. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  5. Influences of air calcination and steam activation on microstructure and photocatalytic activity of continuous TiO{sub 2} fibers

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yang; Zhang, Shiying; Xu, Difa

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effects of air calcination and steam activation on TiO{sub 2} fibers were studied. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by degradation of formaldehyde. ► Steam activation promoted the anatase–rutile phase transformation. ► Steam activation decreased grain size and increased special surface area. ► Steam activation improved photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} fibers. -- Abstract: Effects of air calcination and steam activation, on phase transformation, microstructure and photocatalytic activity of continuous TiO{sub 2} fibers prepared by sol–gel method were studied. The fibers were characterized by XRD, SEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of formaldehyde. Results showed that 100% rutile fibers heat-treated in air and steam were obtained at 800 °C and 600 °C, respectively. The anatase grain sizes and special surface areas of the fibers heat-treated at 500 °C in air and steam were 31.6 nm, 22.7 nm, 26.7 m{sup 2}/g and 32.3 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The degradation rates of formaldehyde over the fibers heat-treated at 500 °C in air and steam were 92.3% and 98.6% after 14 h under UV irradiation, respectively. Compared with the air calcination, the steam activation promoted the anatase–rutile phase transformation, reduced the grain size, increased the special surface area, and improved photocatalytic activity of continuous TiO{sub 2} fibers.

  6. Structure and properties of electrospun polymer fibers and applications in biomedical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Cheryl L.

    2006-04-01

    Increased interest in nanotechnology has revived a fiber processing technique invented back in the 1930's. Electrospinning produces nanometer to micron size fibers that are not otherwise achievable using conventional fiber spinning methods. Due to small fiber diameters, high surface area, tailorable surface morphology, and the creation of an interconnected fibrous network, electrospun fibers have found use in a variety of applications. However, a multitude of parameters directly affect the electrospinning process thus requiring a fundamental understanding of how various parameters affect the process and resulting fiber properties. Accordingly, the focus of this dissertation is to provide insight on how solution characteristics and processing parameters directly affect the electrospinning process, and then apply this knowledge to create electrospun membranes for biomedical applications. These fundamental studies provided insight on how to control the electrospinning process; this knowledge was then utilized to electrospin fibrous membranes for biomedical applications. One aspect of this work focused on incorporating low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) into electrospun fibers. Heparin is known for its ability to bind growth factors and thus it plays an integral role in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. The goal of this work was to fabricate functionalized electrospun fibers to produce a biologically active matrix that would allow for the binding and delivery of growth factors for possible drug delivery applications. The electrospinning process was also utilized to fabricate native polymers such as collagen and gelatin into fiber form. The collagen and gelatin fibers were 2--6 mum in diameter and required crosslinking to stabilize the fibers. Crosslinking and sterilization protocols were investigated to optimize the conditions needed to produce collagen and gelatin electrospun membranes to be used in bone regeneration applications. (Abstract shortened

  7. Effect of Hindlimb Unweighting on Single Soleus Fiber Maximal Shortening Velocity and ATPase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. S.; Fitts, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    This study characterizes the time course of change in single soleus muscle fiber size and function elicited by hindlimb un weighting (HU) and analyzes the extent to which varying durations of HU altered maximal velocity of shortening (V(sub o)), myofibrillar adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase), and relative content of slow and fast myosin in individual soleus fibers. After 1, 2, or 3 weeks of HU, soleus muscle bundles were prepared and stored in skinning solution at -20 C. Single fibers were isolated and mounted between a motor arm and a transducer, and fiber force, V(sub o), and ATPase activity were measured. Fiber myosin content was determined by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After 1, 2, and 3 weeks of HU, soleus fibers exhibited a progressive reduction in fiber diameter (16, 22, and 42%, respectively) and peak force (42, 48, and 7%, respectively). Peak specific tension was significantly reduced after 1 week of HU (18%) and showed no further change in 2-3 weeks of HU. During 1 and 3 wk of HU, fiber V(sub o) and ATPase showed a significant increase. By 3 week, V(sub o) had increased from 1.32 +/- 0.04 to 2.94 +/- 0.17 fiber lengths/s and fiber ATPase from 291 +/- 16 to 1064 +/- 128 micro-M min(sub -1) mm(sub -3). The percent fibers expressing fast myosin heavy chain increased from 4% to 29% by 3 week of HU, and V(sub o) and ATPase activity within a fiber were highly correlated. However, a large population of fibers after 1, 2, and 3 weeks of HU showed increases in V(sub o) and ATPase but displayed the same myosin protein profile on SDS gels as control fibers. The mechanism eliciting increased fiber V(sub o) and ATPase activity was not obvious but may have been due to increases in fast myosin that went undetected on SDS gels and/or other factors unrelated to the myosin filament.

  8. Self-diagnosis of structures strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. S.; Yang, C. Q.; Harada, T.; Ye, L. P.

    2005-06-01

    The correlation of mechanical and electrical properties of concrete beams strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (HCFRP) sheets is studied in this paper. Two types of concrete beams, with and without reinforcing bars, are strengthened with externally bonded HCFRP sheets, which have a self-structural health monitoring function due to the electrical conduction and piezoresistivity of carbon fibers. Parameters investigated include the volume fractions and types of carbon fibers. According to the investigation, it is found that the hybridization of uniaxial HCFRP sheets with several different types of carbon fibers is a viable method for enhancing the mechanical properties and obtaining a built-in damage detection function for concrete structures. The changes in electrical resistance during low strain ranges before the rupture of carbon fibers are generally smaller than 1%. Nevertheless, after the gradual ruptures of carbon fibers, the electrical resistance increases remarkably with the strain in a step-wise manner. For the specimens without reinforcing bars, the electrical behaviors are not stable, especially during the low strain ranges. However, the electrical behaviors of the specimens with reinforcing bars are relatively stable, and the whole range of self-sensing function of the HCFRP-strengthened RC structures has realized the conceptual design of the HCFRP sensing models and is confirmed by the experimental investigations. The relationships between the strain/load and the change in electrical resistance show the potential self-monitoring capacity of HCFRP reinforcements used for strengthening concrete structures.

  9. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  10. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Bailey, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  11. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1998-04-28

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2,000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2,400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  12. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1999-02-16

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  13. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Bailey, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphite at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  14. Modeling of a structural coloration of a photonic-crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotsky, A. B.; Bel'skaya, O. A.; Sotskaya, L. I.

    2015-05-01

    Using a method that is based on the application of the Green's theorem and the addition theorem of Graph's cylinder functions, we have obtained a solution of a two-dimensional problem on lateral light diffraction by a photonic-crystal fiber that is formed by a finite number of parallel air channels in a bounded slab. We have investigated scattering cross-section spectra of hexagonally symmetric photonic-crystal fibers. It has been found that these fibers may have a structural coloration, which changes upon their extension.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of high photocatalytic activity and stable Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers for photocatalytic degradation of black liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Long, Qiyi; Yin, Chao

    2014-11-01

    The TiO2 fiber was prepared by using cotton fiber as a template, and then Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were synthesized via in situ Ag3PO4 particles onto the surface of TiO2 fiber. Their structure and physical properties were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), specific surface analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectra and photoluminescence spectra (PL). SEM analysis indicated that the well-defined surface morphology of natural cotton fiber was mostly preserved in TiO2 and Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers. Compared with TiO2 fiber, the absorbance wavelengths of Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were apparently red shifted and the PL intensities revealed a significant decrease. By using the photocatalytic degradation of black liquor as a model reaction, the visible light and ultraviolet light catalytic efficiencies of TiO2, Ag3PO4 and Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were evaluated. The reaction results showed that Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers had stronger photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability in repeated and long-term applications. Therefore, the prepared Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers could act as an efficient catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of black liquor, which suggested their promising applications. It was proposed that the •OH radicals played the leading role in the photocatalytic degradation of the black liquor by Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers system.

  16. Circuit models for Salisbury screens made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials have many useful structural material properties. The electromagnetic perfor- mance of these materials is of great interest for future applications. The work presented in this paper deals with the construction of Salisbury screen microwave absorbers made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sand- wich structures. Specifically, absorbers centered at 7.25 GHz and 12.56 GHz are investigated. Circuit models are created to match the measured performance of the carbon fiber Salisbury screens using a genetic algorithm to extract lumped element circuit values. The screens presented in this paper utilize unidirectional carbon fiber sheets in place of the resistive sheet utilized in the classic Salisbury screen. The theory, models, prototypes, and measurements of these absorbers are discussed.

  17. Structural health monitoring of composite-based UAVs using simultaneous fiber optic interrogation by static Rayleigh-based distributed sensing and dynamic fiber Bragg grating point sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, Moshe; Sovran, Ido; Bergman, Arik; Motil, Avi; Shapira, Osher; Ben-Simon, Uri; Kressel, Iddo

    2015-09-01

    Embedded fiber-optic strain sensing networks for airworthy assessment of operational Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are presented. Sensing is based on in-flight fiber Bragg grating technology, as well as on on-ground Rayleigh backscattering distributed strain sensing. While the in-flight instrumentation monitors loads, looking for excessive values, the Rayleigh-based technique is used for high spatial resolution strain distribution along the UAV wings, under prescribed loading. Consistency of measurements over time indicates structural integrity. Simultaneous strain measurements using both distributed Rayleigh and fiber Bragg gratings, on the same fiber, promises to combine high spatial resolution, though practically static measurements with dynamic, though discrete ones.

  18. Mechanical and structural properties underlying contraction of skeletal muscle fibers after partial 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S; Tsaturyan, A; Bershitskaya, O; Mashanov, G; Brown, P; Webb, M; Ferenczi, M A

    1996-01-01

    We show prolonged contraction of permeabilized muscle fibers of the frog during which structural order, as judged from low-angle x-ray diffraction, was preserved by means of partial cross-linking of the fibers using the zero-length cross-linker 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide. Ten to twenty percent of the myosin cross-bridges were cross-linked, allowing the remaining 80-90% to cycle and generate force. These fibers displayed a well-preserved sarcomeric order and mechanical characteristics similar to those of intact muscle fibers. The intensity of the brightest meridional reflection at 14.5 nm, resulting from the projection of cross-bridges evenly spaced along the myofilament length, decreased by 60% as a relaxed fiber was deprived of ATP and entered the rigor state. Upon activation of a rigorized fiber by the addition of ATP, the intensity of this reflection returned to 97% of the relaxed value, suggesting that the overall orientation of cross-bridges in the active muscle was more perpendicular to the filament axis than in rigor. Following a small-amplitude length step applied to the active fibers, the reflection intensity decreased for both releases and stretches. In rigor, however, a small stretch increased the amplitude of the reflection by 35%. These findings show the close link between cross-bridge orientation and tension changes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:8874020

  19. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Christensen, Richard M.; Toland, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  20. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  1. Nanowire-in-microtube structured core/shell fibers via multifluidic coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyan; Wang, Nü; Di, Jiancheng; Zhao, Yong; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2010-07-01

    A multifluidic coaxial electrospinning approach is reported here to fabricate core/shell ultrathin fibers with a novel nanowire-in-microtube structure from more optional fluid pairs than routine coaxial electrospinning. The advantage of this approach lies in the fact that it introduces an extra middle fluid between the core and shell fluids of traditional coaxial electrospinning, which can work as an effective spacer to decrease the interaction of the other two fluids. Under the protection of a proper middle fluid, more fluid pairs, even mutually miscible fluids, can be operated to generate "sandwich"-structured ultrathin fibers with a sharp boundary between the core and shell materials. It thereby largely extends the scope of optional materials. Selectively removing the middle layer of the as-prepared fibers results in an interesting nanowire-in-microtube structure. Either homogeneous or heterogeneous fibers with well-tailored sandwich structures have been successfully fabricated. This method is an important extension of traditional co-electrospinning that affords a more universal avenue to preparing core/shell fibers; moreover, the special hollow cavity structure may introduce some extra properties into the conventional core/shell structure, which may find potential applications such as optical applications, microelectronics, and others. PMID:20337483

  2. Free radical activity of industrial fibers: role of iron in oxidative stress and activation of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, P S; Brown, D M; Beswick, P H; MacNee, W; Rahman, I; Donaldson, K

    1997-01-01

    We studied asbestos, vitreous fiber (MMVF10), and refractory ceramic fiber (RCF1) from the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers' Association fiber repository regarding the following: free radical damage to plasmid DNA, iron release, ability to deplete glutathione (GSH), and activate redox-sensitive transcription factors in macrophages. Asbestos had much more free radical activity than any of the man-made vitreous fibers. More Fe3+ was released than Fe2+ and more of both was released at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.2. Release of iron from the different fibers was generally not a good correlate of ability to cause free radical injury to the plasmid DNA. All fiber types caused some degree of oxidative stress, as revealed by depletion of intracellular GSH. Amosite asbestos upregulated nuclear binding of activator protein 1 transcription factor to a greater level than MMVF10 and RCF1; long-fiber amosite was the only fiber to enhance activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B). The use of cysteine methyl ester and buthionine sulfoximine to modulate GSH suggested that GSH homeostasis was important in leading to activation of transcription factors. We conclude that the intrinsic free radical activity is the major determinant of transcription factor activation and therefore gene expression in alveolar macrophages. Although this was not related to iron release or ability to deplete macrophage GSH at 4 hr, GSH does play a role in activation of NF kappa B. Images Figure 1. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:9400744

  3. Surface Characterization of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites and Aluminum Alloys After Laser Interference Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles D.; Daniel, Claus

    2016-07-01

    The increasing use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (1) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (2) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (3) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg—T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0°/90° plaques were used. The effects of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot were investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology. It was found that an effective resin ablation and a low density of broken fibers for CFPC specimens was attained using laser fluences of 1-2 J/cm2 and number of 2-4 pulses per spot. A relatively large area of periodic line structures due to energy interference were formed on the aluminum surface at laser fluences of 12 J/cm2 and number of 4-6 pulses per spot.

  4. Structure and properties of novel regenerated cellulose fibers prepared in NaOH complex solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wencong; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Faxue; Yu, Jianyong; Lin, Jinyou

    2013-10-15

    Novel spinning solution, prepared by dissolving hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) owning a low molar substitution (MS) into NaOH/urea/thiouea aqueous solution with a specific weight ratio of 8:8:6.5, was employed to fabricate a new type of regenerated fibers by wet-spun method. The structure and properties of the resultant HEC fibers were characterized by (13)C NMR, FTIR, synchrotron WAXS, SEM, and tensile tester. The results showed that HEC fibers exhibited structure identical with HEC because of the physical dissolution and coagulation processes, but quite different from native cellulose due to partial breakage of hydrogen bonds and crystal transformation from cellulose I to cellulose II during cellulose modification. The resultant HEC fibers with relatively dense and homogenous structure displayed good moisture related properties and stayed stable in alkali solution with low concentration. Moreover, the novel fibers owned good dry mechanical properties in spit of their slightly poor wet mechanical properties comparable to viscose rayon, showing great potential in substituting the traditional viscose fibers. PMID:23987444

  5. Surface Characterization of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites and Aluminum Alloys After Laser Interference Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles D.; Daniel, Claus

    2016-05-01

    The increasing use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (1) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (2) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (3) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg—T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0°/90° plaques were used. The effects of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot were investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology. It was found that an effective resin ablation and a low density of broken fibers for CFPC specimens was attained using laser fluences of 1-2 J/cm2 and number of 2-4 pulses per spot. A relatively large area of periodic line structures due to energy interference were formed on the aluminum surface at laser fluences of 12 J/cm2 and number of 4-6 pulses per spot.

  6. Optical fiber sensor having a sol-gel fiber core and a method of making

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Jindal, Rajeev; Winstead, Christopher; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-06-06

    A simple, economic wet chemical procedure is described for making sol-gel fibers. The sol-gel fibers made from this process are transparent to ultraviolet, visible and near infrared light. Light can be guided in these fibers by using an organic polymer as a fiber cladding. Alternatively, air can be used as a low refractive index medium. The sol-gel fibers have a micro pore structure which allows molecules to diffuse into the fiber core from the surrounding environment. Chemical and biochemical reagents can be doped into the fiber core. The sol-gel fiber can be used as a transducer for constructing an optical fiber sensor. The optical fiber sensor having an active sol-gel fiber core is more sensitive than conventional evanescent wave absorption based optical fiber sensors.

  7. Nonlinear analysis for high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. M.S. Thesis; [turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A unique upward-integrated top-down-structured approach is presented for nonlinear analysis of high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. Based on this approach, a special purpose computer code was developed (nonlinear COBSTRAN) which is specifically tailored for the nonlinear analysis of tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy (TFRS) composite turbine blade/vane components of gas turbine engines. Special features of this computational capability include accounting of; micro- and macro-heterogeneity, nonlinear (stess-temperature-time dependent) and anisotropic material behavior, and fiber degradation. A demonstration problem is presented to mainfest the utility of the upward-integrated top-down-structured approach, in general, and to illustrate the present capability represented by the nonlinear COBSTRAN code. Preliminary results indicate that nonlinear COBSTRAN provides the means for relating the local nonlinear and anisotropic material behavior of the composite constituents to the global response of the turbine blade/vane structure.

  8. Investigation on spectral response of micro-cavity structure by symmetrical tapered fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang; Yan, Xiaojun; Li, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a micro-cavity structure made of symmetrical tapered fiber tips. The waist of a conventional fiber taper fabricated from heating and stretching technique is symmetrically cleaved, and the aligned fiber tips with air gap constitute a Fabry-Perot micro-cavity due to the reflection at the tip facet. The spectral responses of such micro-cavity structure have been investigated both in beam propagation models and experiments. The multibeam interference in the micro-cavity and the impact of the waist diameter and cavity length on the spectral response has been successfully demonstrated. And a micro-cavity structure with 45 μm waist diameter was experimentally achieved, the measured spectra agree well with the simulation ones, indicating that the spectral response of the micro-cavity structure is contributed by both the multibeam interference and the Fabry-Perot micro-cavity.

  9. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  10. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor.

    PubMed

    John, M Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines th e specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-waveabsorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity. PMID:12477126

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON FIBER EMISSIONS FROM CURRENT AND PROJECTED ACTIVITIES FOR THE MANUFACTURE AND DISPOSAL OF CARBON FIBER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composite materials formed by impregnating a carbon or graphite fiber mat with plastic binders are being used increasingly in military, aerospace, sports and automotive applications. Carbon fibers are formed primarily from synthetic fibers carbonized in the absence of oxygen. Pos...

  12. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  13. A hybrid piezoelectric/fiber optic diagnostic system for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin; Kumar, Amrita; Zhang, Chang; Gonzalez, Ignacio F.; Guo, Guangping; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2005-06-01

    A hybrid piezoelectric/fiber optic diagnostic system has been developed for quick non-destructive evaluation and long term health monitoring of aerospace vehicles and structures. The hybrid diagnostic system uses piezoelectric actuators to input a controlled excitation to the structure and fiber optic sensors to capture the corresponding structural response. The system consists of three major parts: a diagnostic layer with a network of piezoelectric elements and fiber gratings to offer a simple and efficient way to integrate a large network of transducers onto a structure; diagnostic hardware consisting of an arbitrary waveform generator and a high speed fiber grating demodulation unit together with a high speed data acquisition card to provide actuation input, data collection, and information processing; and diagnostic software to determine the condition of the structure. This paper presents key development issues related to the manufacturing of the hybrid piezoelectric/fiber optic diagnostic layer and integration of a highly portable diagnostic hardware. Validation and proof testing of this integrated diagnostic system are also presented.

  14. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions. PMID:23379418

  15. Photogrammetric Verification of Fiber Optic Shape Sensors on Flexible Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jason P.; Rogge, Matthew D.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-core fiber (MCF) optic shape sensing offers the possibility of providing in-flight shape measurements of highly flexible aerospace structures and control surfaces for such purposes as gust load alleviation, flutter suppression, general flight control and structural health monitoring. Photogrammetric measurements of surface mounted MCF shape sensing cable can be used to quantify the MCF installation path and verify measurement methods.

  16. Investigation of an integrated fiber laser sensor system in ultrasonic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji

    2016-03-01

    Various optical fiber sensors have been utilized in structural health monitoring (SHM) to detect strain, temperature, and the ultrasonic guided wave, which is the main measurand discussed in this study. By leveraging existing ultrasonic optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technique, we proposed a novel sensing concept in which the ultrasonic-induced Bragg wavelength shift was demodulated by an erbium fiber laser (EFL). The ultrasonic sensor and light source, i.e., an FBG and EFL, were seamlessly integrated into a fiber laser sensor system, in which the output power change directly represents the ultrasonic signal. In addition to discussing the theory behind the sensor, we focused on the applications and actual performance of the sensor, including sensitivity, bandwidth, and robustness, in practical ultrasonic SHM. We were able to constantly detect ultrasonic signals in the range of 25 °C-85 °C or simultaneously detect static measurands (temperature or strain) and ultrasonic signals by changing the position of the FBG where it is attached. Because of the diverse structures of the EFL and FBG, we created, investigated, and compared three sensing systems with different properties and advantages to find their most suitable applications and fully explore their maximum potential. In addition, the experimental results from these novel optical fiber sensors were compared to those from a conventional broadband PZT sensor. The results showed that the new sensor has some unique advantages, such as self-adjustable ultrasonic detection.

  17. Innovative design of composite structures: Design, manufacturing, and testing of plates utilizing curvilinear fiber trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rust, R. J.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As a means of improving structural design, the concept of fabricating flat plates containing holes by incorporating curvilinear fiber trajectories to transmit loads around the hole is studied. In the present discussion this concept is viewed from a structural level, where access holes, windows, doors, and other openings are of significant size. This is opposed to holes sized for mechanical fasteners. Instead of cutting the important load-bearing fibers at the hole edge, as a conventional straightline design does, the curvilinear design preserves the load-bearing fibers by orienting them in smooth trajectories around the holes, their loading not ending abruptly at the hole edge. Though the concept of curvilinear fiber trajectories has been studied before, attempts to manufacture and test such plates have been limited. This report describes a cooperative effort between Cincinnati Milacron Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University to design, manufacture, and test plates using the curvilinear fiber trajectory concept. The paper discusses details of the plate design, details of the manufacturing, and a summary of results from testing the plates with inplane compressive buckling loads and tensile loads. Comparisons between the curvilinear and conventional straightline fiber designs based on measurements and observation are made. Failure modes, failure loads, strains, deflections, and other key responses are compared.

  18. [The hydrothermal contraction of collagen fibers as a method of its structure investigation].

    PubMed

    Kukhareva, L V

    2009-01-01

    The hydrothermal contraction of collagen fibers, that is sharp decrease of the fiber length in the narrow temperature range during their heating in water, is a typical example of phase transition which is analogous to melting. General thermodynamic consideration of the melting of oriented polymer fibers was carried out by Gee (1947) and Flory (1956). Flory derived and equilibrium dependence of force on temperature considering the melted polymer as an ideal rubber. We proposed an experimental method for quantitative investigation of this process including estimation of two critical parameters, which are the critical tension and the critical temperature. The necessary condition for the critical parameters estimation is the prior cross-linking of the fiber. We studied theoretically and by experiment the influence of different factors on these critical parameters. We demonstrated the critical tension of hydrothermal collagen contraction to be an important characteristic making possible the estimation of native collagen structure retaining and molecular orientation's degree. The critical tension value was used do advantage for the collagen structure characteristic in some mammoth fossils skin, in bovine skin in the process of leather manufacture and in artificial collagen fibers. The initial temperature of hydrothermal collagen contraction, what is known as shrinkage temperature using widely for the collagen tannage estimation, was shown to be dependent on the occurrence of non-collagenous sheath on native collagen fibers. PMID:19435280

  19. Active and passive coherent beam combining of thulium-doped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Haotong; Han, Kai; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2010-11-01

    Thulium-doped fiber laser (TFL), which emitted near 2 μm laser beam, has become the latest revolution in highpower fiber laser technology. Further increasing the output power will face great challenges induced by nonlinear effects; coherent beam combining of TFL can increase laser output power while simultaneously maintaining beam quality. In this manuscript, we will present our detailed investigation on coherent beam combining of TFLs. Three different approaches, i.e., interferometric array, mutual injection locking and active phasing based on multi-dithering technique, are employed. In the interferometric array scheme, coherent combining is realized by using an intracavity fiber coupler in an all-fiber laser array configuration. Efficient coherent combining can be achieved by providing sufficient loss discrimination. High combining efficiency of 85% for two fiber laser has been obtained. In mutual injection locking scheme, mutual coherence between the two fiber lasers is established by means of mutual coupling through two 3dB couplers. High combining efficiency of 99% for two fiber laser has been obtained, and the fringe contrast of the intensity pattern at the receiving plane is as high as 93%. In active phasing scheme, when the phase control system is in the closed loop, the fringe contrast of far-field intensity pattern is improved by more than 75 % from 10 % in open loop, and the residual phase error is less than λ/20.

  20. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  1. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Pichot, V.; Albouy, P. A.; Launois, P.; Badaire, S.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.

    2006-12-15

    We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young's modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

  2. Fatigue-loaded fiber optic strain gauges performance in reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten J.; Nasta, Manish H.; Claus, Richard O.; Masri, Sami F.

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the performance of short gage length optical fiber sensors embedded in a reinforced concrete specimen for the quantitative measurement of periodic strain. We report the use of practical, short gage length relative and absolute strain sensors for the measurement of strain in a reinforced concrete specimen. Both types of fiber sensors were attached to steel reinforcement rods prior to filling with concrete, and were collocated with conventional foil strain gages to allow direct comparison of output signals. The relative fiber sensors were of the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric type operating at a wavelength of 1300 nm and the absolute strain sensors used wavelength information to measure absolute strain. The results of this work show that such optical fiber elements may be considered for long term quantitative evaluation of civil structure components.

  3. Investigation on a compact in-line multimode-single-mode-multimode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bin; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhi-bo; Feng, Suchun; Bai, Yunlong; Xu, Yao; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-06-01

    We carried out a detailed investigation on a compact in-line multimode single-mode multimode (MSM) fiber structure. Both theoretical modal and experimental setup were established to demonstrate the transmission characteristics and the corresponding responses of the applied strain and temperature. The proposed structure simply involves a section of the single-mode fiber (SMF) spliced to two sections of multimode fiber (MMF) and lead-in and lead-out SMFs. The excited environment-sensitive cladding modes together with the fundamental mode in the central SMF form a typical Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). We analyzed the transmission characteristics of the different length of the middle SMF and the MMF in detail. In the experiment, we obtained the extinction ratio of the MSM fiber structure based MZI comb spectrum which was up to 20 dB, and sensitivities of 0.7096 pm/με (0-2000 με) and 44.12 pm/°C (10-70 °C), which proved the potential sensing applications of the proposed fiber structure.

  4. An Intrinsic Fiber-Optic Sensor for Structure Lightning Current Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel. G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    An intrinsic optical-fiber sensor based on Faraday Effect is developed that is highly suitable for measuring lightning current on aircraft, towers and complex structures. Originally developed specifically for aircraft installations, it is light-weight, non-conducting, structure conforming, and is immune to electromagnetic interference, hysteresis and saturation. It can measure total current down to DC. When used on lightning towers, the sensor can help validate other sensors and lightning detection network measurements. Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Thus, the magnetic field strength can be determined from the light polarization change. By forming closed fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation yields the total current enclosed. A broadband, dual-detector, reflective polarimetric scheme allows measurement of both DC component and AC waveforms with a 60 dB dynamic range. Two systems were built that are similar in design but with slightly different sensitivities. The 1310nm laser system can measure 300 A - 300 kA, and has a 15m long sensing fiber. It was used in laboratory testing, including measuring current on an aluminum structure simulating an aircraft fuselage or a lightning tower. High current capabilities were demonstrated up to 200 kA at a lightning test facility. The 1550nm laser system can measure 400 A - 400 kA and has a 25m fiber length. Used in field measurements, excellent results were achieved in the summer of 2012 measuring rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT), Camp Blanding, Florida. In both systems increased sensitivity can be achieved with multiple fiber loops. The fiber optic sensor provides many unique capabilities not currently possible with traditional sensors. It represents an important new tool for lightning current measurement where low weight

  5. Quantum entanglement distribution with 810 nm photons through active telecommunication fibers.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Catherine; Meyer-Scott, Evan; Erven, Chris; Jennewein, Thomas

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate the distribution of polarization-entangled photons for the purpose of quantum key distribution (QKD) along active telecom fibers. Entangled photon pairs of 810 nm wavelength generated by a Sagnac interferometer source were coupled into standard telecom single mode fibers. The fibers were either dark or carrying a standardized 1550 nm ethernet signals (1000BASE-ZX) with a nominal speed of 1 GBps from regular media converter devices, without any requirements on the optical power or spectrum transmitted. Our system demonstrates a QKD network covering 6 km in distance with a central service provider for classical and quantum data. PMID:21997067

  6. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE APPLICATION OF HIGH STRENGTH FIBER REINFORCED MORTAR TO PRESTRESSED CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurada, Michihiro; Mori, Takuya; Ohyama, Hiroaki; Seki, Hiroshi

    In order to study the application of high strength fiber reinforced mortar which has design compressive strength 120N/mm2 to prestressed concrete structures, the authors carried out material tests, bending tests and shear tests of prestressed concrete beam specimens. From the material tests, we obtained material properties for the design of prestressed concrete structures such as compressive strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus, coefficient of creep, dry shrinkage and so on. The results of the bending tests and the shear tests of prestressed concrete beam specimen shows that experimental flexural strength and shear strength of prestressed concrete beam using high strength fiber reinforced mortar exceeds strength calculated by traditional design method. It is confirmed that high strength fiber reinforced mortar can be applied to prestressed concrete structures.

  7. Tuning the conductivity and inner structure of electrospun fibers to promote cardiomyocyte elongation and synchronous beating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaowen; Lu, Jinfu; Xu, Guisen; Wei, Jiaojun; Zhang, Zhibin; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-12-01

    The key to addressing the challenges facing cardiac tissue engineering is the integration of physical, chemical, and electrical cues into scaffolds. Aligned and conductive scaffolds have been fabricated as synthetic microenvironments to improve the function of cardiomyocytes. However, up to now, the influence of conductive capability and inner structure of fibrous scaffolds have not been determined on the cardiomyocyte morphologies and beating patterns. In the current study, highly aligned fibers were fabricated with loaded up to 6% of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to modulate the electrical conductivity, while blend and coaxial electrospinning were utilized to create a bulk distribution of CNTs in fiber matrices and a spatial embedment in fiber cores, respectively. Conductive networks were formed in the fibrous scaffolds after the inoculation of over 3% CNTs, and the increase in the conductivity could maintain the cell viabilities, induce the cell elongation, enhance the production of sarcomeric α-actinin and troponin I, and promote the synchronous beating of cardiomyocytes. Although the conductivity of blend fibers is slightly higher than that of coaxial fibers with the same CNT loadings, the lower exposures to CNTs resulted in higher cell viability, elongation, extracellular matrix secretion and beating rates for cardiomyocytes on coaxial fibers. Taken altogether, core-sheath fibers with loaded 5% of CNTs in the fiber cores facilitated the cardiomyocyte growth with a production of organized contractile proteins and a pulsation frequency close to that of the atrium. It is suggested that electrospun scaffolds that couple conductivity and fibrous structure considerations may provide optimal stimuli to foster cell morphology and functions for myocardial regeneration or establishment of in vitro cardiomyocyte culture platform for drug screening. PMID:27612781

  8. Production of continuous piezoelectric ceramic fibers for smart materials and active control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Jonathan D.; Weitz, Gregory E.; Luke, John E.; Cass, Richard B.; Jadidian, Bahram; Bhargava, Parag; Safari, Ahmad

    1997-05-01

    Advanced Cerametrics Inc. has conceived of and developed the Viscous-Suspension-Spinning Process (VSSP) to produce continuous fine filaments of nearly any powdered ceramic materials. VSSP lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fiber tows with 100 and 790 filaments have been spun in continuous lengths exceeding 1700 meters. Sintered PZT filaments typically are 10 - 25 microns in diameter and have moderate flexibility. Prior to carrier burnout and sintering, VSSP PZT fibers can be formed into 2D and 3D shapes using conventional textile and composite forming processes. While the extension of PZT is on the order of 20 microns per linear inch, a woven, wound or braided structure can contain very long lengths of PZT fiber and generate comparatively large output strokes from relatively small volumes. These structures are intended for applications such as bipolar actuators for fiber optic assembly and repair, vibration and noise damping for aircraft, rotorcraft, automobiles and home applications, vibration generators and ultrasonic transducers for medical and industrial imaging. Fiber and component cost savings over current technologies, such as the `dice-and-fill' method for transducer production, and the range of unique structures possible with continuous VSSP PZT fiber are discussed. Recent results have yielded 1-3 type composites (25 vol% PZT) with d33 equals 340 pC/N, K equals 470, and g33 equals 80 mV/N, kt equals 0.54, kp equals 0.19, dh equals 50.1pC/N and gh equals 13 mV/N.

  9. Effect of flying activity on capillary-fiber geometry in pigeon flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Costello, O; Agey, P J; Logemann, R B; Florez-Duquet, M; Bernstein, M H

    1994-02-01

    The effect of flying activity on capillary density and geometry was investigated in pectoralis muscle of 4 wild-caught (W) pigeons (BW 233-348 g) perfusion-fixed in situ and processed for electron microscopy. Morphometric analysis revealed both differences and similarities with similar sampling sites (superficial and deep in central area of right or left pectoralis major muscle, approximately midway along cranio-caudal and lateral axis) in sedentary (S) pigeons. Differences were the greater fractional cross-sectional area of aerobic fibers (W, 82 +/- 2%; S, 63 +/- 6%; p = 0.006) and the greater volume density of mitochondria per volume of fiber (W, 22.0 +/- 1.3%; S, 15.7 +/- 1.7%; p = 0.011) in wild-caught pigeons. While glycolytic fibers were significantly narrower in W, the size of the majority of fibers comprising the muscles, i.e. aerobic fibers, was similar in the two groups. Other similarities were found in capillary-to-fiber ratio (W, 2.0 +/- 0.2; S, 2.1 +/- 0.2) and in the degree of orientation of capillaries in the two groups. In addition, both capillary density at a given fractional cross-sectional area of aerobic fibers and capillary length per fiber volume at a given mitochondrial volume density were similar in the two groups, indicating a proportional increase in capillarity and muscle aerobic capacity in W compared with S. Comparison of capillary numbers around aerobic fibers at a given mitochondrial volume per microns length of fiber showed no difference between W and S groups nor with previous data in muscles with wide differences in fiber size and mitochondrial density such as rat soleus, bat muscles and hummingbird flight muscles. This supported the notion of a tight correlation between capillary numbers around individual fibers and mitochondrial volume per unit length of fiber in aerobic muscles. It also supported the idea that it is the number of capillaries around the fibers rather than diffusion distance which determines O2 flux rates in

  10. Synchronization of active/passive mode-locked erbium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaechele, Walter; Haus, Joseph W.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Teegarden, Kenneth J.

    1997-07-01

    Injection seeding of a passively mode-locked fiber laser by an actively mode-locked fiber laser source is described. The passively mode-locked laser employs a multiple quantum well saturable absorber to establish pulsed operation. Mode-locked synchronized operation was maintained with average injection powers as low as 1.3 mW. Stable synchronized pulses were observed with pulse widths as narrow as 10 ps.

  11. Coherent combining of fiber-laser-pumped frequency converters using all fiber electro-optic modulator for active phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Canat, G.; Le Gouët, J.; Goular, D.; Lombard, L.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) by active phase control could be useful for power scaling fiber-laser-pumped optical frequency converters like OPOs. However, a phase modulator operating at the frequency-converted wavelength is needed, which is non standard component. Fortunately, nonlinear conversion processes rely on a phase-matching condition correlating, not only the wave vectors of the coupled waves, but also their phases. This paper demonstrates that, using this phase correlation for indirect control of the phase, coherent combining of optical frequency converters is feasible using standard all-fibered electro-optic modulators. For the sake of demonstration, this new technique is experimentally applied twice for continuous wave second-harmonic-generator (SHG) combination: i) combining 2 SHG of 1.55-μm erbium-doped fiber amplifiers in PPLN crystals generating 775-nm beams; ii) combining 2 SHG of 1.064-μm ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers in LBO crystals generating 532-nm beams. Excellent CBC efficiency is achieved on the harmonic waves in both these experiments, with λ/20 and λ/30 residual phase error respectively. In the second experiment, I/Q phase detection is added on fundamental and harmonic waves to measure their phase variations simultaneously. These measurements confirm the theoretical expectations and formulae of correlation between the phases of the fundamental and harmonic waves. Unexpectedly, in both experiments, when harmonic waves are phase-locked, a residual phase difference remains between the fundamen tal waves. Measurements of the spectrum of these residual phase differences locate them above 50 Hz, revealing that they most probably originate in fast-varying optical path differences induced by turbulence and acoustic-waves on the experimental breadboard.

  12. Importance of enzyme purity and activity in the measurement of total dietary fiber and dietary fiber components.

    PubMed

    McCleary, B V; McCleary, B V

    2000-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of the activity and purity of enzymes in the assay of total dietary fiber (AOAC Method 985.29) and specific dietary fiber components: resistant starch, fructan, and beta-glucan. In the measurement of total dietary fiber content of resistant starch samples, the concentration of alpha-amylase is critical; however, variations in the level of amyloglucosidase have little effect. Contamination of amyloglucosidase preparations with cellulase can result in significant underestimation of dietary fiber values for samples containing beta-glucan. Pure beta-glucan and cellulase purified from Aspergillus niger amyloglucosidase preparations were used to determine acceptable critical levels of contamination. Sucrose, which interferes with the measurement of inulin and fructooligosaccharides in plant materials and food products, must be removed by hydrolysis of the sucrose to glucose and fructose with a specific enzyme (sucrase) followed by borohydride reduction of the free sugars. Unlike invertase, sucrase has no action on low degree of polymerization (DP) fructooligosaccharides, such as kestose or kestotetraose. Fructan is hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose by the combined action of highly purified exo- and endo-inulinases, and these sugars are measured by the p-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide reducing sugar method. Specific measurement of beta-glucan in cereal flour and food extracts requires the use of highly purified endo-1,3:1,4 beta-glucanase and A. niger beta-glucosidase. Beta-glucosidase from almonds does not completely hydrolyze mixed linkage beta-glucooligosaccharides from barley or oat beta-glucan. Contamination of these enzymes with starch, maltosaccharide, or sucrose-hydrolyzing enzymes results in production of free glucose from a source other than beta-glucan, and thus an overestimation of beta-glucan content. The glucose oxidase and peroxidase used in the glucose determination reagent must be essentially devoid of catalase and alpha

  13. The role of multi-level structure for the improved photocatalytic performance of TiO2 fiber nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bitao; Xin, Junlian; Li, Jianjiao; Zheng, Tao; Wang, Qizhao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    A TiO2 multi-structured fiber nanomaterial was prepared via a template-assisted two-step method, and the effect of the pH value of the precursor solution on the structure of TiO2 nanofibers was mainly investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue solution was used as the model reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic property of the as-prepared TiO2 nanomaterials. Results indicated that the pH value of the precursor solution obviously influenced the formation and microstructure and photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 fiber nanomaterials. The multi-structured fiber nanomaterial showed better photocatalytic property. It was considered that high efficiencies of reactant molecules adsorption, light absorption, and separation of photogenerated e -- h + pairs played crucial roles for enhancing its photocatalytic property. In particular, the need of better understanding the relation of the light absorption and charge transport to the nanostructure has to be pointed out in this paper.

  14. Scattering loss analysis and structure optimization of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingming; Wu, Rong; Sun, Kang; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    Effects of core structure in 7 cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) on scattering loss are analyzed by means of investigating normalized interface field intensity. Fibers with different core wall thickness, core radius and rounding corner of air hole are simulated. Results show that with thick core wall and expanded core radius, scattering loss could be greatly reduced. The scattering loss of the HC-PBGFs in the wavelength range of 1.5-1.56 μm could be decreased by about 50 % of the present level with optimized core structure design.

  15. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The development of structurally efficient, metal-lined, glass-fiber composite pressure vessels. Both the current state-of-the-art and current problems are discussed along with fracture mechanics considerations for the metal liner. The design concepts used for metal-lined, glass-fiber, composite pressure vessels are described and the structural characteristics of the composite designs are compared with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. Results of a current program to evaluate flaw growth and fracture characteristics of the metal liners are reviewed and the impact of these results on composite pressure vessel designs is discussed.

  16. Prismatic sealed nickel-cadmium batteries utilizing fiber structured electrodes. I - New advances in cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschka, Friedrich; Benczur-Urmossy, Gabor; Anderman, Menahem

    Prismatic sealed Ni/Cd cells of fiber structured electrodes offer the potential to fully recharge a battery in a uniquely short time. It was demonstrated that the cells show excellent cycle life. The design is not restricted to 20 Ah rated capacity. Cells of 50 Ah have been built and tested in an electric hybrid vehicle. A specially designed ultra high-power cell of 45 Ah rated capacity for APU cranking in commerical aircraft supplies 50 percent more peak power than vented Ni/Cd sintered plate aircraft cells. The fiber structured sealed FNC-RECOM cell will not require any maintenance.

  17. Porphyrin-doped solgel-lined structured optical fibers for local and remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Huyang, George; Canning, John; Åslund, Mattias L; Naqshbandi, Masood; Gibson, Brant; Petermann, Ingemar; Stocks, Danial; Crossley, Maxwell J

    2011-06-01

    We constructed a type of sensor by depositing a solgel layer within the interior holes of a silica-structured fiber and, subsequently, coating this with an acid-responsive porphyrin. Protonation of the porphyrin by an acidic gas (HCl in this case), is detected by a large change in the visible spectrum. Compared to previous work on a liquid-core sensor in a structured optical fiber, the signal-to-noise ratio of this gas sensor shows a reduced signal strength, but the detection rate is increased about fortyfold. PMID:21633420

  18. Fiber Optic Sensor Components and Systems for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, R.

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of the funded research effort has been the development of discrete and distributed fiber sensors and fiber optic centered opto-electronic networks for the intelligent monitoring of phenomena in various aerospace structures related to NASA Marshall specific applications. In particular, we have proposed and have been developing technologies that we believe to be readily transferrable and which involve new fabrication techniques. The associated sensors developed can be incorporated into the matrix or on the surfaces of structures for the purpose of sensing stress, strain, temperature-both low and high, pressure field variations, phase changes, and the presence of various chemical constituents.

  19. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in structural design of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charette, R. F.; Hyer, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    The influence is investigated of a curvilinear fiber format on load carrying capacity of a layered fiber reinforced plate with a centrally located hole. A curvilinear fiber format is descriptive of layers in a laminate having fibers which are aligned with the principal stress directions in those layers. Laminates of five curvilinear fiber format designs and four straightline fiber format designs are considered. A quasi-isotropic laminate having a straightline fiber format is used to define a baseline design for comparison with the other laminate designs. Four different plate geometries are considered and differentiated by two values of hole diameter/plate width equal to 1/6 and 1/3, and two values of plate length/plate width equal to 2 and 1. With the plates under uniaxial tensile loading on two opposing edges, alignment of fibers in the curvilinear layers with the principal stress directions is determined analytically by an iteration procedure. In-plane tensile load capacity is computed for all of the laminate designs using a finite element analysis method. A maximum strain failure criterion and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion are applied to determine failure loads and failure modes. Resistance to buckling of the laminate designs to uniaxial compressive loading is analyzed using the commercial code Engineering Analysis Language. Results indicate that the curvilinear fiber format laminates have higher in-plane tensile load capacity and comparable buckling resistance relative to the straightline fiber format laminates.

  20. [Measurement of steel corrosion in concrete structures by analyzing long-period fiber grating spectrum character].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Liang, Da-Kai; Zhou, Bing

    2008-11-01

    The consideration on the durability of concrete structures with reinforcement corrosion has become a most urgent problem. A new technique to measure the corrosion of steel in concrete structures was proposed in the present paper. It is based on the microbending characteristic of long period optical grating (LPFG). The temperature spectum character and curvature spectrum character of long period optical fiber grating were studied first. It was shown that the transmission spectrum of long period optical fiber grating shifted right and the transmission of the resonance wavelength was invariable when the temperature increased, while the transmission spectrum of long period optical fiber grating became shallow when the curvature increased, the transmission of the resonance wavelength would increase and it was linear with the curvature. On the basis of the characteristic, a notch shaped pedestal was designed and a long period optical fiber grating was laid on the steel surface. With this method the radial expansion of the steel resulting from the steel corrosion would translate into the curvature of the long period optical fiber grating. The curvature of long period optical fiber grating could be obtained by analyzing the change of spectrum, and then the steel corrosion depth could be measured. This method is simple and immediate and is independent of the variety in temperature, strain and refractive index owing to the inimitable spectrum characteristic of long period optical fiber grating. From the experiment it was found that the precision of the corrosion depth was better than 1.2 microm, and the corrosion depth of 3 mm could be achieved. This measurement could be used to monitor the early to metaphase corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete structures. PMID:19271513

  1. SMS fiber structure with a multimode fiber graded index type for a temperature measurement using an intensity-based interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufarrikha, Ainun; Hatta, Agus M.; Koentjoro, Sekartedjo

    2015-01-01

    Temperature sensing based on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure with a graded index multimode fiber (GI-MMF) type using an intensity-based interrogation has been investigated numerically and experimentally. The effect of temperature on the SMS fiber structure with the MMF-GI type was modeled using a modal propagation analysis (MPA). The SMS fiber structures for temperature sensor was fabricated and tested with the MMF length of 57 mm. It is demonstrated experimentally, and supported with numerical results, that the sensor showed a sensitivity of 0.063 dB/°C with a temperature measurement range of 175-325°C. This sensor offers simple configuration and low cost of fabrication for the temperature measurement applications.

  2. [Impact of modification of the fiber surface of chrysotile on its biological activity].

    PubMed

    Pylev, L N; Smirnova, O V; Vasil'eva, L A; Vezentsev, A I; Gudkova, E A; Naumova, L N; Neĭman, S M

    2007-01-01

    Samples of commercial chrysotile-asbestos and asbestos cement, which were equal in number, were prepared. The content of fibers, up to 80 microm in length, was 87.4 and 85.0% in the first and second samples, respectively. Chemical analysis confirmed that there were cement components onto the surface of fibrils in the second sample. Onto the surface of native asbestos fibers, there were considerable distribution bands of active centers in the range of pH values of 5, 6.4, and 7.3; their largest number was at pH 6.4. Asbestos cement fibers had a band at pH 7.3, i.e. there was displacement towards the neutral region. Thus, their capacity for oxidative processes is likely to be lower than that in the fibers from the first sample. The mutagenic activity of the commercial chrysotile, examined in the micronucleus test, was substantially higher (p < 0.01) than that in the asbestos cement sample wherein it did not differ from that seen in the control experiment (saline solution). Mutagenicity was not found in cement and asbestos cement dust (2-3% of fibers) either. It is probable that the absence of mutagenicity in the cement-coated asbestos fibers may be attributable to a considerable reduction in their potencies for the formation of active radicals (oxygen, lipid peroxidation, and others). PMID:17526242

  3. The effect of processing conditions on microstructure of Pd-containing activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianxian; Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Tekinalp, Halil; Bhat, Vinay V; Baker, Frederick S; Thies, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    Palladium-doped activated carbon fibers are being evaluated as candidate materials for enhanced hydrogen storage at near ambient conditions. Pd-doped fibers were spun using a Pd salt mixed with an isotropic pitch precursor. Experimental techniques such as in-situ X-ray analysis, thermogravimetric studies, scanning transmission electron microscopy and gas adsorption were employed to understand how processing conditions for the production of Pd-doped activated carbon fibers affect the microstructure, pore development, and dispersion of metal particles throughout the fibers. The results showed that PdO phase is present in the stabilized fibers and that this oxide phase is stable up to about 250 aC. The oxide phase transforms into Pd metal with increasing heat treatment temperature, going through the formation of an intermediate carbide phase. Sintering of Pd particles was observed with heat treatment at temperatures over 750 aC. It was also found that pore development during physical activation with CO2 was not significantly affected by the presence of Pd particles within the fibers.

  4. The mode of transverse spread of contraction initiated by local activation in single frog muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sugi, H; Ochi, R

    1967-10-01

    Isolated single frog muscle fibers were locally activated by applying negative current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fiber surface. In contrast to the graded inward spread of contraction initiated by a moderate depolarization, the contraction in response to a strong negative current was observed to spread transversely around the whole perimeter but not through the center of the fiber. This response was elicited only with pipettes of more than 6 micro diameter. The response was still present if the sodium of the Ringer solution was replaced by choline, or the chloride was replaced by nitrate or propionate. The duration of the response appeared to be independent of the duration of stimulating current in fresh fibers, while the contraction lasted as long as the current went on in deteriorated fibers. The contraction was first initiated at the area of fiber surface covered by the pipette, and spread around the perimeter of the fiber with a velocity of 0.8-6 cm/sec. Possible mechanisms of the response are discussed in connection with the properties of the transverse tubular system, the possibility of some self-propagating process along the walls of the tubules being suggested. PMID:6064146

  5. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  6. Structural analysis of Gossypium hirsutum fibers grown under greenhouse and hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Natalio, Filipe; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Friedrich, Norman; Köck, Margret; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Paris, Oskar; Paschke, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Cotton is the one of the world's most important crops. Like any other crop, cotton growth/development and fiber quality is highly dependent on environmental factors. Increasing global weather instability has been negatively impacting its economy. Cotton is a crop that exerts an intensive pressure over natural resources (land and water) and demands an overuse of pesticides. Thus, the search for alternative cotton culture methods that are pesticide-free (biocotton) and enable customized standard fiber quality should be encouraged. Here we describe a culture of Gossypium hirsutum ("Upland" Cotton) utilizing a greenhouse and hydroponics in which the fibers are morphological similar to conventional cultures and structurally fit into the classical two-phase cellulose I model with 4.19nm crystalline domains surrounded by amorphous regions. These fibers exhibit a single crystalline form of cellulose I-Iß, monoclinic unit cell. Fiber quality bulk analysis shows an improved length, strength, whiteness when compared with soil-based cultures. Finally, we show that our fibers can be spun, used for production of non-woven fabrics and indigo-vat stained demonstrating its potential in industrial and commercial applications. PMID:26965558

  7. Bio-composites of cassava starch-green coconut fiber: part II-Structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Lomelí-Ramírez, María Guadalupe; Kestur, Satyanarayana G; Manríquez-González, Ricardo; Iwakiri, Setsuo; de Muniz, Graciela Bolzon; Flores-Sahagun, Thais Sydenstricker

    2014-02-15

    Development of any new material requires its complete characterization to find potential applications. In that direction, preparation of bio-composites of cassava starch containing up to 30 wt.% green coconut fibers from Brazil by thermal molding process was reported earlier. Their characterization regarding physical and tensile properties of both untreated and treated matrices and their composites were also reported. Structural studies through FTIR and XRD and thermal stability of the above mentioned composites are presented in this paper. FT-IR studies revealed decomposition of components in the matrix; the starch was neither chemically affected nor modified by either glycerol or the amount of fiber. XRD studies indicated increasing crystallinity of the composites with increasing amount of fiber content. Thermal studies through TGA/DTA showed improvement of thermal stability with increasing amount of fiber incorporation, while DMTA showed increasing storage modulus, higher glass transition temperature and lower damping with increasing fiber content. Improved interfacial bonding between the matrix and fibers could be the cause for the above results. PMID:24507321

  8. Optical Sensing using Fiber Bragg Gratings for Monitoring Structural Damage in Composite Over-Wrapped Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Composite Over-Wrap Vessels are widely used in the aerospace community. They are made of thin-walled bottles that are over wrapped with high strength fibers embedded in a matrix material. There is a strong drive to reduce the weight of space borne vehicles and thus pushes designers to adopt COPVs that are over wrapped with graphite fibers embedded in its epoxy matrix. Unfortunately, this same fiber-matrix configuration is more susceptible to impact damage than others and to make matters worse; there is a regime where impacts that damage the over wrap leave no visible scar on the COPV surface. In this paper FBG sensors are presented as a means of monitoring and detecting these types of damage. The FBG sensors are surface mounted to the COPVs and optically interrogated to explore the structural properties of these composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in the composite matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 4500 psi. A Fiber Optic Demodulation System built by Blue Road Research, is used for interrogation of the Bragg gratings.

  9. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  10. Soleus Fiber Force and Maximal Shortening Velocity After Non-Weight Bearing with Intermittent Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Bangart, Jill J.; Karhanek, Miloslav; Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of intermittent weight bearing (IWB) as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing (NWB)-induced alterations in soleus type 1 fiber force (in mN), tension (P(sub o); force per fiber cross-sectional area in kN/sq m), and maximal unloaded shortening velocity (V(sub o), in fiber lengths/s). Adult rats were assigned to one of the following groups: normal weight bearing (WB), 14 days of hindlimb NWB (NWB group), and 14 days of hindlimb NWB with IWB treatments (IWB group). The IWB treatment consisted of four 10-min periods of standing WB each day. Single, chemically permeabilized soleus fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor and were studied at maximal Ca(2+) activation, after which type 1 fiber myosin heavy-chain composition was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. NWB resulted in a loss in relative soleus mass (-45%), with type 1 fibers displaying reductions in diameter (-28%) and peak isometric force (-55%) and an increase in V(sub o) (+33%). In addition, NWB induced a 16% reduction in type 1 fiber P., a 41% reduction in type 1 fiber peak elastic modulus [E(sub o), defined as ((delta)force/(delta)length x (fiber length/fiber cross-sectional area] and a significant increase in the P(sub o)/E(sub o) ratio. In contrast to NWB, IWB reduced the loss of relative soleus mass (by 22%) and attenuated alterations in type 1 fiber diameter (by 36%), peak force (by 29%), and V(sub o)(by 48%) but had no significant effect on P(sub o), E(sub o) or P(sub o)/E(sub o). These results indicate that a modest restoration of WB activity during 14 days of NWB is sufficient to attenuate type 1 fiber atrophy and to partially restore type 1 peak isometric force and V(sub o) to WB levels. However, the NWB-induced reductions in P(sub o) and E(sub o) which we hypothesize to be due to a decline in the number and stiffness of cross bridges, respectively, are considerably less responsive to this

  11. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  12. An all fiber-optic multi-parameter structure health monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chennan; Yu, Zhihao; Wang, Anbo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present an all fiber-optics based multi-parameter structure health monitoring system, which is able to monitor strain, temperature, crack and thickness of metal structures. This system is composed of two optical fibers, one for laser-acoustic excitation and the other for acoustic detection. A nano-second 1064 nm pulse laser was used for acoustic excitation and a 2 mm fiber Bragg grating was used to detect the acoustic vibration. The feasibility of this system was demonstrated on an aluminum test piece by the monitoring of the temperature, strain and thickness changes, as well as the appearance of an artificial crack. The multiplexing capability of this system was also preliminarily demonstrated. PMID:27607635

  13. Determination of Cellulose Fiber Structure Using IR Reflectance Spectroscopy of Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and non-destructive method for analyzing the structure of cellulose fibers using IR reflectance spectroscopy from a paper surface was developed and verified for correctness. IR absorption and reflectance spectra of standard paper samples of known composition (sheets made of four fibers of different origin without additives and with additives of kaolin and chalk) were analyzed. Good correlations between these two spectral methods were found for the studied samples. Calibration curves were useful for assessing the structure of cellulose samples from XVIth century historical paper. Data on the degree of cellulose ordering that were obtained from the paper reflectance spectra indicated that the studied sheets consisted mainly of flax fibers with added cotton. This agreed fully with the historical fact that the studied samples were rag papers.

  14. Intracore fiber bragg gratings for strain measurement in embedded composite structures.

    PubMed

    Murukeshan, V M; Chan, P Y; Ong, L S; Asundi, A

    2001-01-01

    An intracore Bragg grating written on a photosensitive fiber core is used for strain measurement in composite specimens under load. The strain information is directly related to the absolute change in the Bragg-reflected wavelength. Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors (fibers with intracore gratings) are thus sensitive to strain that is caused by changes in temperature as well as to load-induced changes. Thus these sensors can be made to be independent of source intensity variations and losses. FBG sensors used for load-induced strain sensing in composite structures and the effects of temperature on them are discussed. A detailed account of the use of such embedded structures as self-monitoring nondestructive testing devices is given. PMID:18356985

  15. Effects of hemicellulose removal on cellulose fiber structure and recycling characteristics of eucalyptus pulp.

    PubMed

    Wan, JinQuan; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Qing

    2010-06-01

    Eucalyptus pulp fibers with large differences in cellulose and hemicellulose proportions but similar lignin contents were produced by partial removal of the hemicellulose and studied using Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS (13)C NMR) in combination with spectral fitting, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). There were remarkable differences in both cellulose fibril structure, pore structure and cellulose supermolecular structure between the samples. CP/MAS (13)C NMR combined with spectral fitting demonstrated an increase in average fibril aggregate size (17.9-22.2 nm) with decreasing hemicellulose content. AFM observations revealed that when the hemicellulose content decreased from 27.62% to 19.80%, the average diameters of pores decreased by 12.53%, but increased by 13.55% when the hemicellulose content decreased from 19.80% to 9.09%. XRD and FTIR analysis indicated that cellulose crystallinity increased with decreasing hemicellulose content. The low and high hemicellulose-containing pulps had very different recycling characteristics, which may be explained by the changes observed at cellulose fiber structure level. Fibrils appear to aggregate and form a more compact structure when the hemicellulose is removed, which was caused by a coalescence of the cellulose microfibrils. The removal of hemicellulose had disadvantageous influence on the accessibility of fibers and enhanced fiber flattening during drying, leading to increased sheet density and increased hornification. PMID:20181478

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of Cotton-made Activated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ka Lok

    Activated carbon (AC) is an important functional material due to its outstanding adsorption ability. Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has many advantages over other types of AC: It mainly possesses micropores and has large surface area. Its fibrous structure assures fast intraparticle adsorption kinetics. Finally, it can be made into felt and fabric forms, which would not hinder gas flow and could be easily recollected after use. However, ACF is expensive due to the lack of low cost precursor so its application is restricted. This work aims to use low cost cotton fiber as an ACF precursor. In this work, ACF was successfully synthesized by using raw cotton via ZnCl2 activation. The effects of the sintering temperature during activation, the ZnCl2 concentration during infiltration and the post-treatment after activation on our samples were studied. Our ACF products were characterized via various methods. It was found that our samples retained the fibrous structure of cotton. They contained trace of carbon-oxygen surface groups and were mainly composed of micropores. Their BET surface area (SBET) and pore volume (Vpore) were up to ˜2050 m2/g and 1 cm3/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm of our samples in the Methylene blue (MB) adsorption were studied. The adsorption was very fast and almost reached equilibrium after an hour. Because of their high SBET, the saturated MB capacity in our ACF was found to be 597 mg/g and higher than other commercial AC. The effect of solution pH value on MB adsorption capacity was studied. We found that the basic condition favored MB adsorption while acidic condition lowered the adsorption ability. Adsorption kinetics, saturated adsorption volume (Vads) and desorption process of moisture, ethanol vapor, methanol vapor and acetone vapor by our samples were also evaluated. The adsorption of methanol vapor, ethanol vapor and acetone vapor reached equilibrium within 10 minutes. Our sample also adsorbed moisture

  17. Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites for Both Strengthening and Health Monitoring of Structures

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the “wet process”, which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring. PMID:25954955

  18. Carbon fiber epoxy composites for both strengthening and health monitoring of structures.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the "wet process", which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring. PMID:25954955

  19. Multimaterial Acoustic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocat, Noemie

    The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications well beyond optical transmission. Fiber reflectors, thermal detectors, photodetectors, chemical sensors, surface-emitting fiber lasers, fiber diodes, and other functional fiber devices have been demonstrated with this approach. Yet, throughout this development and indeed the development of fibers in general, a key premise has remained unchanged : that fibers are essentially static devices incapable of controllably changing their properties at high frequencies. Unique opportunities would arise if a rapid, electrically-driven mechanism for changing fiber properties existed. A wide spectrum of hitherto passive fiber devices could at once become active with applications spanning electronics, mechanics, acoustics, and optics, with the benefits of large surface-area, structural robustness, and mechanical flexibility. This thesis addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with the realization of electromechanical transduction in fibers through the integration of internal piezoelectric and electrostrictive domains. The fundamental challenges related to the fabrication of piezoelectric devices in fiber form are analyzed from a materials perspective, and candidate materials and geometries are selected that are compatible with the thermal drawing process. The first realization of a thermally drawn piezoelectric fiber device is reported and its piezoelectric response is established over a wide range of frequencies. The acoustic properties of piezoelectric fiber devices are characterized and related to their mechanical and geometric properties. Collective effects in multi-fiber constructs are discussed and demonstrated by the realization of a linear phased array of piezoelectric fibers capable of acoustic beam steering. High strain actuation

  20. Antimicrobial activity of electrospun poly(butylenes succinate) fiber mats containing PVP-capped silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ligang; Wang, Pingli; Zhao, Zhiguo; Ji, Junhui

    2013-12-01

    In this study, biodegradable poly(butylenes succinate) (PBS) fiber mats containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by the electrospinning process. Small AgNPs (<10 nm) were simply synthesized using polyvinylpyrrolidone as the capping agent as well as the reductant. The morphology of the PBS-AgNPs fiber mats and the distribution of the AgNPs were well characterized by TEM and SEM. The release of Ag from the PBS fiber mats was quantitively determined by ICP. The PBS fiber mats with 0.29 % AgNPs content showed strong antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli with the efficacy as high as 99 %. The effective bactericidal activity on E. coli was demonstrated for a short contacting time with the PBS-AgNPs fiber mats. In addition, the long-term release performance of Ag from the fiber mats can keep inhibiting the bacterial growth in the mats over a long period of time. PMID:24013858

  1. Structural health monitoring of wind turbine blade using fiber Bragg grating sensors and fiber optic rotary joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Ni, Y. Q.; Ye, X. W.; Yang, H. X.; Zhu, S.

    2012-04-01

    Wind energy utilization as a reliable energy source has become a large industry in the last 20 years. Nowadays, wind turbines can generate megawatts of power and have rotor diameters that are on the order of 100 meters in diameter. One of the key components in a wind turbine is the blade which could be damaged by moisture absorption, fatigue, wind gusts or lighting strikes. The wind turbine blades should be routinely monitored to improve safety, minimize downtime, lower the risk of sudden breakdowns and associated huge maintenance and logistics costs, and provide reliable power generation. In this paper, a real-time wind turbine blade monitoring system using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors with the fiber optic rotary joint (FORJ) is proposed, and applied to monitor the structural responses of a 600 W small scale wind turbine. The feasibility and effectiveness of the FORJ is validated by continuously transmitting the optical signals between the FBG interrogator at the stationary side and the FBG sensors on the rotating part. A comparison study between the measured data from the proposed system and those from an IMote2-based wireless strain measurement system is conducted.

  2. Two structurally discrete GH7-cellobiohydrolases compete for the same cellulosic substrate fiber

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose consisting of arrays of linear beta-1,4 linked glucans, is the most abundant carbon-containing polymer present in biomass. Recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose towards enzymatic degradation is widely reported and is the result of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds within and among the linear glucans. Cellobiohydrolases are enzymes that attack crystalline cellulose. Here we report on two forms of glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases common to all Aspergillii that attack Avicel, cotton cellulose and other forms of crystalline cellulose. Results Cellobiohydrolases Cbh1 and CelD have similar catalytic domains but only Cbh1 contains a carbohydrate-binding domain (CBD) that binds to cellulose. Structural superpositioning of Cbh1 and CelD on the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A 3-dimensional structure, identifies the typical tunnel-like catalytic active site while Cbh1 shows an additional loop that partially obstructs the substrate-fitting channel. CelD does not have a CBD and shows a four amino acid residue deletion on the tunnel-obstructing loop providing a continuous opening in the absence of a CBD. Cbh1 and CelD are catalytically functional and while specific activity against Avicel is 7.7 and 0.5 U.mg prot-1, respectively specific activity on pNPC is virtually identical. Cbh1 is slightly more stable to thermal inactivation compared to CelD and is much less sensitive to glucose inhibition suggesting that an open tunnel configuration, or absence of a CBD, alters the way the catalytic domain interacts with the substrate. Cbh1 and CelD enzyme mixtures on crystalline cellulosic substrates show a strong combinatorial effort response for mixtures where Cbh1 is present in 2:1 or 4:1 molar excess. When CelD was overrepresented the combinatorial effort could only be partially overcome. CelD appears to bind and hydrolyze only loose cellulosic chains while Cbh1 is capable of opening new cellulosic substrate molecules away from the cellulosic

  3. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  4. Study of Structural Morphology of Hemp Fiber from the Micro to the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bei; Sain, Mohini; Oksman, Kristiina

    2007-03-01

    The focus of this work has been to study how high pressure defibrillation and chemical purification affect the hemp fiber morphology from micro to nanoscale. Microscopy techniques, chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the structure and properties of the prepared micro and nanofibers. Microscopy studies showed that the used individualization processes lead to a unique morphology of interconnected web-like structure of hemp fibers. The nanofibers are bundles of cellulose fibers of widths ranging between 30 and 100 nm and estimated lengths of several micrometers. The chemical analysis showed that selective chemical treatments increased the α-cellulose content of hemp nanofibers from 75 to 94%. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study showed that the pectins were partially removed during the individualization treatments. X-ray analysis showed that the relative crystallinity of the studied fibers increased after each stage of chemical and mechanical treatments. It was also observed that the hemp nanofibers had an increased crystallinity of 71 from 57% of untreated hemp fibers.

  5. Surface characterization of carbon fiber polymer composites and aluminum alloys after laser interference structuring

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles David; Daniel, Claus

    2016-05-03

    Here, the increasing use of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (a) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (b) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (c) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg - T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques weremore » used. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot was investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on surface morphology.« less

  6. A novel structure photonic crystal fiber based on bismuth-oxide for optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cang; Yuan, Jinhui; Yu, Chongxiu

    2010-11-01

    The heavy metal oxide glasses containing bismuth such as bismuth sesquioxide show unique high refractive index. In addition, the bismuth-oxide based glass does not include toxic elements such as Pb, As, Se, Te, and exhibits well chemical, mechanical and thermal stability. Hence, it is used to fabricate high nonlinear fiber for nonlinear optical application. Although the bismuth-oxide based high nonlinear fiber can be fusion-spliced to conventional silica fibers and have above advantages, yet it suffers from large group velocity dispersion because of material chromatic dispersion which restricts its utility. In regard to this, the micro-structure was introduced to adjust the dispersion of bismuth-oxide high nonlinear fiber in the 1550nm wave-band. In this paper, a hexagonal solid-core micro-structure is developed to balance its dispersion and nonlinearity. Our simulation and calculation results show that the bismuth-oxide based photonic crystal fiber has near zero dispersion around 1550nm where the optical parametric amplification suitable wavelength is. Its dispersion slop in the communication wavelength range is also relatively flat. Moreover, both nonlinear coefficient and model filed distribution were simulated, respectively.

  7. Modulation of protein release from biodegradable core-shell structured fibers prepared by coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongliang; Hu, Yingqian; Zhao, Pengcheng; Li, Yan; Zhu, Kangjie

    2006-10-01

    Biodegradable core-shell structured fibers with poly(epsilon-caprolactone) as shell and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-containing dextran as core were prepared by coaxial electrospinning for incorporation and controlled release of proteins. BSA loading percent in the fibers and its release rate could be conveniently varied by the feed rate of the inner dope during electrospinning. With the increase in the feed rate of the inner dope, there was an associated increase in the loading percent and accelerated release of BSA. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was added to the shell section of the fibers to further finely modulate the release behavior of BSA. It was revealed that the release rate of BSA increased with the PEG percent in the shell section. By varying the feed rate of the inner dope and PEG content, most of BSA could be released from the core-shell structured fibers within the period of time ranging from 1 week to more than 1 month. The effect of the feed rate of the inner dope and addition of PEG into the shell section on the fiber morphology was also examined by scanning electron microscope. PMID:16544305

  8. MoXy fiber with active cooling cap for bovine prostate vaporization with high power 200W 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Steven Y.; Kang, Hyun Wook; Pirzadeh, Homa; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    A novel MoXyTM fiber delivery device with Active Cooling Cap (ACCTM) is designed to transmit up to 180W of 532 nm laser light to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Under such high power tissue ablation, effective cooling is key to maintaining fiber power transmission and ensuring the reliability of the fiber delivery device To handle high power and reduce fiber degradation, the MoXy fiber features a larger core size (750 micrometer) and an internal fluid channel to ensure better cooling of the fiber tip to prevent the cap from burning, detaching, or shattering during the BPH treatment. The internal cooling channel was created with a metal cap and tubing that surrounds the optical fiber. In this study MoXy fibers were used to investigate the effect of power levels of 120 and 200 W on in-vitro bovine prostate ablation using a 532 nm XPSTM laser system. For procedures requiring more than 100 kJ, the MoXy fiber at 200W removed tissue at twice the rate of the current HPS fiber at 120W. The fiber maintained a constant tissue vaporization rate during the entire tissue ablation process. The coagulation at 200W was about 20% thicker than at 120W. In conclusion, the new fibers at 200W doubled the tissue removal rate, maintained vaporization efficiency throughout delivery of 400kJ energy, and induced similar coagulation to the existing HPS fiber at 120W.

  9. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuday, Eric C; Olree, Kenneth S; Horch, Kenneth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation. PMID:16863593

  10. Embedded fiber optic sensors for monitoring processing, quality and structural health of resin transfer molded components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keulen, C.; Rocha, B.; Yildiz, M.; Suleman, A.

    2011-07-01

    Due to their small size and flexibility fiber optics can be embedded into composite materials with little negative effect on strength and reliability of the host material. Fiber optic sensors such as Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) or Etched Fiber Sensors (EFS) can be used to detect a number of relevant parameters such as flow, degree of cure, quality and structural health throughout the life of a composite component. With a detection algorithm these embedded sensors can be used to detect damage in real time while the component remains in service. This paper presents the research being conducted on the use of fiber optic sensors for process and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of Resin Transfer Molded (RTM) composite structures. Fiber optic sensors are used at all life stages of an RTM composite panel. A laboratory scale RTM apparatus was developed with the capability of visually monitoring the resin filling process. A technique for embedding fiber optic sensors with this apparatus has also been developed. Both FBGs and EFSs have been embedded in composite panels using the apparatus. EFSs to monitor the fabrication process, specifically resin flow have been embedded and shown to be capable of detecting the presence of resin at various locations as it is injected into the mold. Simultaneously these sensors were multiplexed on the same fiber with FBGs, which have the ability to measure strain. Since multiple sensors can be multiplexed on a single fiber the number of ingress/egress locations required per sensor can be significantly reduced. To characterize the FBGs for strain detection tensile test specimens with embedded FBG sensors have been produced. These specimens have been instrumented with a resistive strain gauge for benchmarking. Both specimens and embedded sensors were characterized through tensile testing. Furthermore FBGs have been embedded into composite panels in a manner that is conducive to detection of Lamb waves generated with a centrally located PZT

  11. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0/ +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code, CODSTRAN, was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  12. FLPP NGL Structural Subsystems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaredson, D.; Ramusat, G.; Appel, S.; Cardone, T.; Persson, J.; Baiocco, P.; Lavelle, F.; Bouilly, Th.

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP) is the basis for new paradigms, investigating the key elements, logic and roadmaps to prepare the development of the safe, reliable and low cost next European Launch Vehicle (LV) for access to space (dubbed NGL - Next Generation LV), with an initial operational capability mid-next decade. In addition to carry cargo to conventional GTO or SSO, the European NGL has to be flexible enough to cope with new pioneering institutional missions as well as the evolving commercial payloads market. This achievement is broached studying three main areas relevant to ELVs: System concepts, Propulsion and Core Technology During the preliminary design activity, a number of design alternatives concerning NGL main structural subsystems have been investigated. Technology is one of the ways to meet the NGL challenges to either improve the performances or to reduce the cost or both. The relevant requirements allow to steer a ‘top-down’ approach for their conception and to propose the most effective technologies. Furthermore, all these technology developments represent a significant ‘bottom-up’ approach investment and concern a large range of activities. The structural subsystems portfolio of the FLPP ‘Core Technology’ activity encompasses major cutting-edge challenges for maturation of the various subsystems leading to reduce overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic propellants, significantly reducing fabrication and operations cost, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of concurrent engineering methods will allow developments of performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost yielding to safe, low-risk technical approaches for a future development. Potential ability of these advanced structural LV technologies to satisfy the system requirements of the NGL and their current

  13. FBG and FOPS for local and global structural health monitoring on a single fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Muneesh; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Ching, Wei Wen; Asundi, A.

    2015-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and fiber optic polarimetric sensors (FOPS) have been widely researched and implemented for structural health monitoring (SHM). FBG essentially provides localized strain information, while FOPS gives a global indication of the structural health of materials. An FBG written on the polarization maintaining (PM) fiber can thus be used for both global structural monitoring and local strain sensing. However each sensor has to be used with its own hardware and processing. For gratings written on PM fibers two Bragg reflections, corresponding to two modes of polarization, are observed. While both Bragg wavelengths shift under longitudinal strain in unison, their relative peak amplitude does not change. In this paper, a novel concept is proposed which makes the peak amplitudes responsive to the longitudinal strain. This relative amplitude of both the peaks is used for the first time to determine the state of polarization (SOP) with no additional optical systems. With this additional information on SOP, PM-FBGs can be used for both, local and global SHM simultaneously. Further, a new design has been proposed which gives improved information on the damaged location in beam structures. This can be further extended to other complex geometries.

  14. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Materials Using Distributed Fiber Bragg Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kual, Raj; Taylor, Scott; Jackson, Kurt V.; Myers, George; Wang, Y.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health monitoring of polymer matrix composite materials using fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is accomplished using a tunable IR (infrared) laser via transmission mode. Results are presented from experiments of composite structures with FBG's embedded at various orientations, and surface measurements of various cryogenic composite vessels.

  15. A state-of-the-art assessment of active structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A state-of-the-art assessment of active structures with emphasis towards the applications in aeronautics and space is presented. It is felt that since this technology area is growing at such a rapid pace in many different disciplines, it is not feasible to cover all of the current research but only the relevant work as relates to aeronautics and space. Research in smart actuation materials, smart sensors, and control of smart/intelligent structures is covered. In smart actuation materials, piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, shape memory, electrorheological, and electrostrictive materials are covered. For sensory materials, fiber optics, dielectric loss, and piezoelectric sensors are examined. Applications of embedded sensors and smart sensors are discussed.

  16. A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstrynge, E.; Pfeiffer, H.; Wevers, M.

    2014-06-01

    The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system.

  17. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train. PMID:19756079

  18. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  19. Study on the preparation and structural performance of polyaniline/PP conductive fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Lijiu

    2007-07-01

    Polyaniline/PP conductive fiber was obtained by in-situ adsorption polymerization. In this work, we discussed the influence of these reaction factors such as adulteration acid concentration, oxidizer concentration, polyaniline monomer content and reaction time to the polymerization and conduct property. In the meanwhile, surface handling with plasma have also been compared for examining the change of polymerization and conduct property. FT-IR spectra analysis and the physic mechanical properties have been used to investigate the structure and properties of conductive fibers. The result shows that with this method of polymerization the conductive property is superior and the conductivity can be reached by 4.5KΩ.

  20. Development and Ground-Test Validation of Fiber Optic Sensor Attachment Techniques for Hot Structures Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony; Hudson, Larry D.; Richards, W. Lance

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Optic Strain Measurements: a) Successfully attached silica fiber optic sensors to both metallics and composites; b) Accomplished valid EFPI strain measurements to 1850 F; c) Successfully attached EFPI sensors to large scale hot-structures; and d) Attached and thermally validated FBG bond and epsilon(sub app). Future Development a) Improve characterization of sensors on C-C and C-SiC substrates; b) Apply application to other composites such as SiC-SiC; c) Assist development of interferometer based Sapphire sensor currently being conducted under a Phase II SBIR; and d) Complete combined thermal/mechanical testing of FBG on composite substrates in controlled laboratory environment.

  1. NDE of Fiber Reinforced Foam Composite Structures for Future Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, james; Roth, Don; Hopkins, Dale

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the complexities of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber reinforced foam composite structures to be used for aerospace vehicles in the future.Various views of fiber reinforced foam materials are shown and described. Conventional methods of NDE for composites are reviewed such as Micro-computed X-Ray Tomography, Thermography, Shearography, and Phased Array Ultrasonics (PAUT). These meth0ods appear to work well on the face sheet and face sheet ot core bond, they do not provide adequate coverage for the webs. There is a need for additional methods that will examine the webs and web to foam core bond.

  2. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design concepts used for metal-lined glass-fiber composite pressure vessels are described, comparing the structural characteristics of the composite designs with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. The discussion centers around two distinctly different design concepts, which provide the basis for defining metal lined composite vessels as either (1) thin-metal lined, or (2) glass fiber reinforced (GFR). Both concepts are described and associated development problems are identified and discussed. Relevant fabrication and testing experience from a series of NASA-Lewis Research Center development efforts is presented.

  3. Improving Osteogenesis Activity on BMP-2-Immobilized PCL Fibers Modified by the γ-Ray Irradiation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Yong; Jeong, Won Jae; Park, Kyeongsoon; Kim, Hak-Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the ability of BMP-2-immobilized polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers modified using the γ-ray irradiation technique to induce the osteogenic differentiation of MG-63 cells. Poly acrylic acid (AAc) was grafted onto the PCL fibers by the γ-ray irradiation technique. BMP-2 was then subsequently immobilized onto the AAc-PCL fibers (BMP-2/AAc-PCL). PCL and surface-modified PCL fibers was characterized by evaluation with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle. The biological activity of the PCL and surface-modified PCL fibers were characterized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and the mRNA expression of osteocalcin and osteopontin in MG-63 cells. Successfully grafted AAc and PCL fibers with immobilized BMP-2 were confirmed by XPS results. The results of the contact angle showed that BMP-2/AAc-PCL fibers have more hydrophilic properties in comparison to PCL fibers. The ALP activity, calcium deposition, and gene expressions of MG-63 cells grown on BMP-2/AAc-PCL fibers showed greatly induced osteogenic differentiation in comparison to the PCL fibers. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that BMP-2/AAc-PCL fibers have the potential to effectively induce the osteogenic differentiation of MG-63 cells. PMID:26090397

  4. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction. PMID:24020801

  5. Simplified design procedures for fiber composite structural components/joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified step-by-step design procedures are summarized, which are suitable for the preliminary design of composite structural components such as panels (laminates) and composite built-up structures (box beams). Similar procedures are also summarized for the preliminary design of composite bolted and adhesively bonded joints. The summary is presented in terms of sample design cases complemented with typical results. Guidelines are provided which can be used in the design selection process of composite structural components/joints. Also, procedures to account for cyclic loads, hygrothermal effects and lamination residual stresses are included.

  6. Mechanical properties of high performance fibers vis-a-vis applications in flexible structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Varunesh

    Some of the critical properties of high performance organic fibers and fiber assemblies have been addressed vis-a-vis their applications in flexible structural composites. These include: tensile properties; mechanical properties under complex modes of deformation; creep at high tensile loads; changes in physical properties due to thermo-mechanical/chemical treatments used in manufacturing of reinforced rubber goods. The axial elastic modulus of fibers and tautly twisted filament assemblies of high performance organic polymers have been measured along with their crystalline orientation distributions. Based on well established procedures in continuum mechanics of axially symmetric structures, a quantitative relationship has been derived to relate the axial elastic modulus to the second and fourth moment of average crystalline orientation distribution. The latter was determined by X-ray diffraction measurements with yarns. This model, valid for single-phase materials, has been found to provide an excellent fit of data from twisted yams of aromatic polyamide and highly ordered polyethylene fibers, with a wide range of overall crystalline orientation distributions. An important property of concern in engineering applications of polymeric filament assemblies of high performance organic fibers is creep. In this study, creep deformation data of gel-spun Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylne (UHMWPE) SpectraRTM 1000 yams have been fitted to a model obtained through an empirical mechanical analog of the viscoelastic process. The non-linear viscoelastic model composed of stress-dependent non-linear mechanical analogs qualitatively predicted the creep response to a series of step-loads applied on the UHMWPE yarns. To understand the mechanical properties of high performance organic fibers under combined bending and extension, a simple pin-test procedure has been employed to characterize fibers and twisted yarns. The results obtained from the test have been interpreted with

  7. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/-45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code CODSTRAN was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression to have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  8. On the structure of nonlinear constitutive equations for fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, Stefan

    1992-01-01

    The structure of constitutive equations for nonlinear multiaxial behavior of transversely isotropic fiber reinforced metal matrix composites subject to proportional loading was investigated. Results from an experimental program were combined with numerical simulations of the composite behavior for complex stress to reveal the full structure of the equations. It was found that the nonlinear response can be described by a quadratic flow-potential, based on the polynomial stress invariants, together with a hardening rule that is dominated by two different hardening mechanisms.

  9. Load tracking and structural health monitoring of unmanned aerial vehicles using optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Balter, J.; Gud's, P.; Kressel, I.; Tur, M.; Gali, S.; Pillai, A. C. R.; Hari Prasad, M.; Yadav, A. Kumar; Gupta, Nitesh; Sathya, Sakthi; Sundaram, Ramesh

    2011-08-01

    An airborne, high resolution, load tracking and structural health monitoring system for unmanned aerial vehicles is presented. The system is based on embedded optical fiber Bragg sensors interrogated in real time during flight at 2.5 kHz. By analyzing the recorded vibration signature it is now possible to identify and trace the dynamic response of an airborne structure and track its loads.

  10. Load tracking and structural health monitoring of unmanned aerial vehicles using optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Balter, J.; Gud'S, P.; Kressel, I.; Tur, M.; Gali, S.; Pillai, A. C. R.; Hari Prasad, M.; Yadav, A. Kumar; Gupta, Nitesh; Sathya, Sakthi; Sundaram, Ramesh

    2010-12-01

    An airborne, high resolution, load tracking and structural health monitoring system for unmanned aerial vehicles is presented. The system is based on embedded optical fiber Bragg sensors interrogated in real time during flight at 2.5 kHz. By analyzing the recorded vibration signature it is now possible to identify and trace the dynamic response of an airborne structure and track its loads.

  11. Computation of macro-fiber composite integrated thin-walled smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.; Chen, M.; Bai, J.; Li, J.

    2016-07-01

    Due to high flexibility, reliability, and strong actuation forces, piezo fiber based composite smart material, macro-fiber composite (MFC), is increasingly applied in various fields for vibration suppression, shape control, and health monitoring. The complexity arrangement of MFC materials makes them difficult in numerical simulations. This paper develops a linear electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model for composite laminated thin-walled smart structures bonded with MFC patches considering arbitrary piezo fiber orientation. Two types of MFCs are considered, namely, MFC-d31 in which the d 31 effect dominates the actuation forces, and MFC-d33 which mainly uses the d 33 effect. The proposed FE model is validated by static analysis of an MFC bonded smart plate.

  12. Flexural retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures using Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Ignacio

    An experimental study will be carried out to determine the suitability of Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates (GNFRP) manufactured with hemp fibers, with the purpose of using them as structural materials for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Four identical RC beams, 96 inches long, are tested for the investigation, three control beams and one test beam. The first three beams are used as references; one unreinforced, one with one layer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), one with two layers of CFRP, and one with n layers of the proposed, environmental-friendly, GNFRP plates. The goal is to determine the number of GNFRP layers needed to match the strength reached with one layer of CFRP and once matched, assess if the system is less expensive than CFRP strengthening, if this is the case, this strengthening system could be an alternative to the currently used, expensive CFRP systems.

  13. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X. Y.; Huang, J.; Xiao, H.; Yang, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode-multimode-single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4-96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing.

  14. Cladding-mode obtained by core-offset structure and applied in fiber Bragg grating sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinpu; Peng, Wei; Liu, Yun; Li, Hong; Jing, Zhenguo; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Xinlei; Yao, Wenjuan; Wang, Yanjie; Liang, Yuzhang

    2011-12-01

    Comparing to core-modes of optical fibers, some cladding-modes are more sensitive to the surroundings which are very valuable to sensing application; recently, a novel type of FBG sensor with core-offset structure attracts more and more interests. Normally, the forward core-mode is not only reflected and coupled to the backward core mode by the Fiber Bragg Grating in the step-type photosensitive single mode fiber, but also coupled to the backward cladding-modes and the radiation modes, eventually they will leak or be absorbed by the high refraction index coating layer. These backward cladding-modes can also be used for sensing analysis. In this paper, we propose and develop a core-offset structure to obtain the backward core-mode and backward cladding-modes by using the wavelength shift of the backward core-mode and the power of the backward cladding-modes in Fiber Bragg Grating sensor, and the power of the backward cladding-modes are independent from temperature variation. We develop a mode coupling sensor model between the forward core-mode and the backward cladding-modes, and demonstrate two coupling methods in the core-offset structure experimentally. The sensor is fabricated and demonstrated for refractive index monitoring. Some specific works are under investigation now, more analysis and fabrication will be done to improve this cladding-mode based sensor design for applicable sensing technology.

  15. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  16. Cracking assessment in concrete structures by distributed optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Gerardo; Casas, Joan R.; Villaba, Sergi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a method to obtain crack initiation, location and width in concrete structures subjected to bending and instrumented with an optical backscattered reflectometer (OBR) system is proposed. Continuous strain data with high spatial resolution and accuracy are the main advantages of the OBR system. These characteristics make this structural health monitoring technique a useful tool in early damage detection in important structural problems. In the specific case of reinforced concrete structures, which exhibit cracks even in-service loading, the possibility to obtain strain data with high spatial resolution is a main issue. In this way, this information is of paramount importance concerning the durability and long performance and management of concrete structures. The proposed method is based on the results of a test up to failure carried out on a reinforced concrete slab. Using test data and different crack modeling criteria in concrete structures, simple nonlinear finite element models were elaborated to validate its use in the localization and appraisal of the crack width in the testing slab.

  17. Long term structural health monitoring by distributed fiber-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichetti, G.; Minardo, A.; Testa, G.; Bernini, R.

    2012-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems allow to detect unusual structural behaviors that indicate a malfunction in the structure, which is an unhealthy structural condition. Depending on the complexity level of the SHM system, it can even perform the diagnosis and the prognosis steps, supplying the required information to carry out the most suitable actuation. While standard SHM systems are based on the use of point sensors (e.g., strain gauges, crackmeters, tiltmeters, etc.), there is an increasing interest towards the use of distributed optical fiber sensors, in which the whole structure is monitored by use of a single optical fiber. In particular, distributed optical fiber sensors based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) permit to detect the strain in a fully distributed manner, with a spatial resolution in the meter or submeter range, and a sensing length that can reach tens of km. These features, which have no performance equivalent among the traditional electronic sensors, are to be considered extremely valuable. When the sensors are opportunely installed on the most significant structural members, this system can lead to the comprehension of the real static behaviour of the structure rather than merely measuring the punctual strain level on one of its members. In addition, the sensor required by Brillouin technology is an inexpensive, telecom-grade optical fiber that shares most of the typical advantages of other fiber-optic sensors, such as high resistance to moisture and corrosion, immunity to electromagnetic fields and potential for long-term monitoring. In this work, we report the result of a test campaign performed on a concrete bridge. In particular, the tests were performed by an portable prototype based on Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Analysis (BOTDA) [1,2]. This type of analysis makes use of a pulsed laser light and a frequency-shifted continuous-wave (CW) laser light, launched simultaneously at the two opposite ends of an optical fiber

  18. A novel method of embedding distributed optical fiber sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J. H.; Jin, W. L.; He, Y.; Cleland, D. J.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    A distributed optical fiber sensor based on Brillouin scattering (BOTDR or BOTDA) can measure and monitor strain and temperature generated along optical fiber. Because it can measure in real-time with high precision and stability, it is quite suitable for health monitoring of large-scale civil infrastructures. However, the main challenge of applying it to structural health monitoring is to ensure it is robust and can be repaired by adopting a suitable embedding method. In this paper, a novel method based on air-blowing and vacuum grouting techniques for embedding long-distance optical fiber sensors was developed. This method had no interference with normal concrete construction during its installation, and it could easily replace the long-distance embedded optical fiber sensor (LEOFS). Two stages of static loading tests were applied to investigate the performance of the LEOFS. The precision and the repeatability of the LEOFS were studied through an overloading test. The durability and the stability of the LEOFS were confirmed by a corrosion test. The strains of the LEOFS were used to evaluate the reinforcing effect of carbon fiber reinforced polymer and thereby the health state of the beams.

  19. Physical Determinants of Fibrinolysis in Single Fibrin Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Tim; Wulfe, Steven D.; Superfine, Richard; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Falvo, Michael R.; Hudson, Nathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural backbone of blood clots; fibrinolysis is the process in which plasmin digests fibrin fibers, effectively regulating the size and duration of a clot. To understand blood clot dissolution, the influence of clot structure and fiber properties must be separated from the effects of enzyme kinetics and perfusion rates into clots. Using an inverted optical microscope and fluorescently-labeled fibers suspended between micropatterned ridges, we have directly measured the lysis of individual fibrin fibers. We found that during lysis 64 ± 6% of fibers were transected at one point, but 29 ± 3% of fibers increase in length rather than dissolving or being transected. Thrombin and plasmin dose-response experiments showed that the elongation behavior was independent of plasmin concentration, but was instead dependent on the concentration of thrombin used during fiber polymerization, which correlated inversely with fiber diameter. Thinner fibers were more likely to lyse, while fibers greater than 200 ± 30 nm in diameter were more likely to elongate. Because lysis rates were greatly reduced in elongated fibers, we hypothesize that plasmin activity depends on fiber strain. Using polymer physics- and continuum mechanics-based mathematical models, we show that fibers polymerize in a strained state and that thicker fibers lose their prestrain more rapidly than thinner fibers during lysis, which may explain why thick fibers elongate and thin fibers lyse. These results highlight how subtle differences in the diameter and prestrain of fibers could lead to dramatically different lytic susceptibilities. PMID:25714359

  20. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  1. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  2. Review structure of silk by raman spectromicroscopy: from the spinning glands to the fibers.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Paquet-Mercier, François; Rioux-Dubé, Jean-François; Pézolet, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has long been proved to be a useful tool to study the conformation of protein-based materials such as silk. Thanks to recent developments, linearly polarized Raman spectromicroscopy has appeared very efficient to characterize the molecular structure of native single silk fibers and spinning dopes because it can provide information relative to the protein secondary structure, molecular orientation, and amino acid composition. This review will describe recent advances in the study of the structure of silk by Raman spectromicroscopy. A particular emphasis is put on the spider dragline and silkworm cocoon threads, other fibers spun by orb-weaving spiders, the spinning dope contained in their silk glands and the effect of mechanical deformation. Taken together, the results of the literature show that Raman spectromicroscopy is particularly efficient to investigate all aspects of silk structure and production. The data provided can lead to a better understanding of the structure of the silk dope, transformations occurring during the spinning process, and structure and mechanical properties of native fibers. PMID:21882171

  3. Solution structure of eggcase silk protein and its implications for silk fiber formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi; Huang, Weidong; Zhang, Jingfeng; Fan, Jing-Song; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    Spider silks are renowned for their excellent mechanical properties and biomimetic and industrial potentials. They are formed from the natural refolding of water-soluble fibroins with α-helical and random coil structures in silk glands into insoluble fibers with mainly β-structures. The structures of the fibroins at atomic resolution and silk formation mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we report the 3D structures of individual domains of a ≈366-kDa eggcase silk protein that consists of 20 identical type 1 repetitive domains, one type 2 repetitive domain, and conserved nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. The structures of the individual domains in solution were determined by using NMR techniques. The domain interactions were investigated by NMR and dynamic light-scattering techniques. The formation of micelles and macroscopic fibers from the domains was examined by electron microscopy. We find that either of the terminal domains covalently linked with at least one repetitive domain spontaneously forms micelle-like structures and can be further transformed into fibers at ≥37 °C and a protein concentration of >0.1 wt%. Our biophysical and biochemical experiments indicate that the less hydrophilic terminal domains initiate the assembly of the proteins and form the outer layer of the micelles whereas the more hydrophilic repetitive domains are embedded inside to ensure the formation of the micelle-like structures that are the essential intermediates in silk formation. Our results establish the roles of individual silk protein domains in fiber formation and provide the basis for designing miniature fibroins for producing artificial silks. PMID:19458259

  4. COMPSIZE - PRELIMINARY DESIGN METHOD FOR FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastlake, C. N.

    1994-01-01

    The Composite Structure Preliminary Sizing program, COMPSIZE, is an analytical tool which structural designers can use when doing approximate stress analysis to select or verify preliminary sizing choices for composite structural members. It is useful in the beginning stages of design concept definition, when it is helpful to have quick and convenient approximate stress analysis tools available so that a wide variety of structural configurations can be sketched out and checked for feasibility. At this stage of the design process the stress/strain analysis does not need to be particularly accurate because any configurations tentatively defined as feasible will later be analyzed in detail by stress analysis specialists. The emphasis is on fast, user-friendly methods so that rough but technically sound evaluation of a broad variety of conceptual designs can be accomplished. Analysis equations used are, in most cases, widely known basic structural analysis methods. All the equations used in this program assume elastic deformation only. The default material selection is intermediate strength graphite/epoxy laid up in a quasi-isotropic laminate. A general flat laminate analysis subroutine is included for analyzing arbitrary laminates. However, COMPSIZE should be sufficient for most users to presume a quasi-isotropic layup and use the familiar basic structural analysis methods for isotropic materials, after estimating an appropriate elastic modulus. Homogeneous materials can be analyzed as simplified cases. The COMPSIZE program is written in IBM BASICA. The program format is interactive. It was designed on an IBM Personal Computer operating under DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 128K. It has been implemented on an IBM compatible with GW-BASIC under DOS 3.2. COMPSIZE was developed in 1985.

  5. Efficient Nondestructive Evaluation of Prototype Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermography inspection is an optic based technology that can reduce the time and cost required to inspect propellant tanks or aero structures fabricated from composite materials. Usually areas identified as suspect in the thermography inspection are examined with ultrasonic methods to better define depth, orientation and the nature of the anomaly. This combination of nondestructive evaluation techniques results in a rapid and comprehensive inspection of composite structures. Examples of application of this inspection philosophy to prototype will be presented. Methods organizing the inspection and evaluating the results will be considered.

  6. Extended chromatin and DNA fibers from active plant nuclei for high-resolution FISH.

    PubMed

    Lavania, U C; Yamamoto, M; Mukai, Y

    2003-10-01

    The conventional protocol for isolation of cell wall free nuclei for release of DNA fibers for plants involves mechanical removal of the cell wall and separation of debris by sieve filtration. The mechanical grinding pressure applied during the process leaves only the more tolerant G(1) nuclei intact, and all other states of active nuclei that may be present in the target tissues (e.g., leaf) are simply crushed/disrupted during the isolation process. Here we describe an alternative enzymatic protocol for isolation of nuclei from root tip tissue. Cell wall free nuclei at a given stage of cell cycle, free of any cell debris, could be realized in suspension that are fit for preparation of extended fibers suitable for fiber FISH applications. The protocol utilizes selective harvest of active nuclei from root tip tissue in liquid suspension under the influence of cell wall-degrading enzymes, and provides opportunities to target cell cycle-specific nuclei from interphase through division phase for the release of extended DNA fibers. Availability of cell cycle-specific fibers may have added value in transcriptional analysis, DNA:RNA hybridization, visualization of DNA replication and replication forks, and improved FISH efficiency. PMID:14500692

  7. Rebar corrosion monitoring in concrete structure under salt water enviroment using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuheng; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; He, Pan; Yan, Jinlin

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is critical for the durability and safety of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion sensors based on fiber optic have proved to exhibit meaningful benefits compared with the conventional electric ones. In recent years, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been used as a new kind of sensing element in an attempt to directly monitor the corrosion in concrete structure due to its remarkable advantages. In this paper, we present a novel kind of FBG based rebar corrosion monitoring sensor. The rebar corrosion is detected by volume expansion of the corroded rebar by transferring it to the axial strain of FBG when concrete structure is soaked in salt water. An accelerated salt water corrosion test was performed. The experiment results showed the corrosion can be monitored effectively and the corrosion rate is obtained by volume loss rate of rebar.

  8. Research, development and application of noncombustible Beta fiber structures. [for Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. J.; Cobb, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Beta fiber was selected as the primary material for flexible fibrous structures used in spacecraft and crew systems applications in the Apollo program because it was noncombustible in a 100 percent oxygen atmosphere up to 16.5 psia. It met NASA criteria for outgassing, toxicity, odor, and crew comfort, and possessed sufficient durability to last through the mission. Topics discussed include: study of spacecraft applications; design of Beta fiber textile structures to meet the requirements; selection of surface treatments (finishes, coatings, and printing systems) to impart the required durability and special functional use to the textile structures; development of sewing and fabrication techniques; and testing and evaluation programs, and development of production sources.

  9. Temperature cross-sensitivity characteristics of singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiang; Liu, Tiegen; Han, Qun; Chen, Yaofei; Li, Lin; Yao, X. Steve

    2015-01-01

    The temperature cross-sensitivity characteristics of a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure packaged by a shell are studied both theoretically and experimentally. By theoretical investigation, we found that the temperature sensitivity of a SMS structure is mainly determined by the thermo-optic effect (TOE) of the cladding of the multimode fiber (MMF). Meanwhile, the TOE of the MMF core, thermal expansion effects (TEEs) of the MMF core, and the packaging material also influence the ultimate sensitivity, and the magnitude of their effects depends on the refractive index of the MMF cladding. Among them, the TEE of the packaging material, inducing an axial strain, is considered to be the second main factor. A temperature sensor based on a packaged SMS structure is designed and investigated to experimentally verify the theoretical findings. The experimentally measured temperature sensitivity of the sensor is -453.4 pm/°C, which agrees well with the theoretical prediction.

  10. Long-range displacement sensor based on SMS fiber structure and OTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifin, A.; Hatta, A. M.; Sekartedjo; Muntini, M. S.; Rubiyanto, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a long-range displacement measurement method by using a single-multi-single mode (SMS) fiber structure, attached to a flexible plate between two permanent poles and the optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR)-based interrogator. The SMS fiber structure sensors are prepared with two different configurations, i.e. straight and sinusoidal configurations. It is demonstrated that the displacement sensor can perform a displacement measurement with a range from 0 mm to 150 mm with a resolution of 0.159 mm. The sinusoidal configuration provides a better sensitivity than the straight configuration. The proposed sensor offers a low cost, and it can be implemented for quasi-distributed displacement measurement which is suitable for civil structure monitoring.

  11. High-temperature measurement using Cu-plating fiber Bragg grating for metal smart structure applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tianying; Jia, Lei; Sui, Qingmei; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2014-03-01

    High-temperature experiments for electroless Cu-plating Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) indicate that Cu-plating FBG can measure high-temperature up to (even beyond) 300°C and it has high linearity, accuracy and repeatability. We can control Cu-plating FBG's temperature sensitivity by controlling plating layer's thickness. Temperature sensitivity of FBG with Cu-plating can be improved by more than three times with no less than 300μmthick coating by electroless and electrical Cu-plating. Such FBG can be soldered onto metal structures to get good bonding with the structure. As a result, such fiber sensors can get good protection, and high-temperature monitoring of smart structure is obtained.

  12. Reconstruction and Visualization of Fiber and Laminar Structure inthe Normal Human Heart from Ex Vivo DTMRI Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-12-18

    Background - The human heart is composed of a helicalnetwork of muscle fibers. These fibers are organized to form sheets thatare separated by cleavage surfaces. This complex structure of fibers andsheets is responsible for the orthotropic mechanical properties ofcardiac muscle. The understanding of the configuration of the 3D fiberand sheet structure is important for modeling the mechanical andelectrical properties of the heart and changes in this configuration maybe of significant importance to understand the remodeling aftermyocardial infarction.Methods - Anisotropic least square filteringfollowed by fiber and sheet tracking techniques were applied to DiffusionTensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DTMRI) data of the excised humanheart. The fiber configuration was visualized by using thin tubes toincrease 3-dimensional visual perception of the complex structure. Thesheet structures were reconstructed from the DTMRI data, obtainingsurfaces that span the wall from the endo- to the epicardium. Allvisualizations were performed using the high-quality ray-tracing softwarePOV-Ray. Results - The fibers are shown to lie in sheets that haveconcave or convex transmural structure which correspond to histologicalstudies published in the literature. The fiber angles varied depending onthe position between the epi- and endocardium. The sheets had a complexstructure that depended on the location within the myocardium. In theapex region the sheets had more curvature. Conclusions - A high-qualityvisualization algorithm applied to demonstrated high quality DTMRI datais able to elicit the comprehension of the complex 3 dimensionalstructure of the fibers and sheets in the heart.

  13. Automatic detection of impact damage in carbon fiber composites using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2013-05-01

    Accidental impacts can severely reduce the structural strength and stability of composite materials, which can lead to severe consequences due to the degradation of the mechanical properties of components designed to perform for decades. Because accidental impacts are difficult to avoid, robust and reliable inspection methods to detect impact damage are required. Many methods have been proposed recently. However, most of them require an experienced technician to analyze the data, which leads to a significant decrease in manufacturing productivity. This work proposes a method to automatically detect impact damage in carbon fiber composites using active thermography. The proposed system detects defects caused by impact damage in the infrared images without human intervention. Impact damage detection is performed using a robust method based on an active thermographic inspection. Thermographic data is preprocessed to improve signal-to-noise ratio and to remove non-uniform background caused by non-uniform heating. Then, peaks and edges are identified and clustered, and regions corresponding to impact damage are detected. The proposed procedure has been applied to three specimens that contain 6 and 12 plies, different types of cores, and damage caused by energies from 6 J to 50 J. All defects are detected correctly.

  14. Distributed fiber-optic sensing system with OFDR and its applications to structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Uzawa, K.; Igawa, H.; Omichi, K.; Machijima, Y.

    2009-07-01

    In the field of fiber-optic sensing technology, distributed sensors that return a value of the measurand as a function of linear position along an optical fiber are regarded as a promising sensor which can be applied to structural health monitoring (SHM). We have developed a distributed strain sensing technique using long gauge fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). FBGs functioning as mirrors with wavelengthselective reflectivity have been used as strain or temperature sensors. OFDR is a technique designed to measure backreflections from optical fiber networks and components. In our system, we use a longer gauge FBG whose length is ordinarily more than 100 mm and we can measure strain at an arbitrary position along the FBG. Therefore, we can obtain continuous strain data along the FBG. Furthermore, since the spatial resolution in strain measurements is less than 1 mm, it enables us to measure the strain distribution of stress concentrated area, such as welded and bonded joints, precisely. In this paper, we describe the principle of the distributed sensing technique based on OFDR and the applications to strain monitoring of a bonded joint and a wing box structure.

  15. Structural health monitoring for insulation panels of LNG carriers using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung Hyun; Son, Young Joo; Kang, Sung Won; Lee, Jae Myung; Na, Sung Soo

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate dynamic failure initiation and failure modes of insulation panels of LNG carriers. Insulation panels of LNG cargo tanks may include mechanical failures such as cracks as well as delaminations within the layers due to impact sloshing loads and fatigue loadings, and these failures cause a significant decrease of structural integrity. In this study, a structural health monitoring system, employing fiber optic sensors is developed for monitoring various failures that can occur in LNG insulation panels. Fiber optic sensors have the advantage of being embedded inside of insulation panels. The signal of embedded fiber optic sensors is used to calculate the strain of insulation panels and is processed by digital filtering to identify damage initiations. It has been observed that the presence of defects and delaminations produce noticeable changes in the strain measurement in a predictable manner. In addition, fiber optic sensors are used to measure static and dynamic strain variations of insulation panels with and without damage. It is expected that this study will be used as a fundamental study for the safety assessment of the LNG insulation panels.

  16. A glass-coated tungsten microelectrode enclosing optical fibers for optogenetic exploration in primate deep brain structures.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Keita; Ohashi, Yohei; Tsubota, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Daigo; Hirabayashi, Toshiyuki; Yaguchi, Masae; Matsuyama, Makoto; Sekine, Takeru; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2012-10-15

    The optogenetic approach to primate brain circuitry has unparalleled potential for uncovering genetically and temporally resolved neuronal mechanisms of higher brain functions. In order to optogenetically investigate the large and complex primate brain, an optical-/electrical probe, or "optrode", must be inserted deeply, which requires the optrode to be not only long and stiff, but also sharp and smooth to reduce possible tissue damage. This study presents a tungsten microelectrode-based optrode that encloses optical fibers within its insulation glass. Optical fibers and a tungsten wire were tightly bound to each other and integrally coated with a smooth, thin layer of glass. This design satisfied the structural requirements for use in deep brain structures. The performance of the optrode was then examined in the thalamus of the rat and macaque monkeys which were injected with lentiviral vectors carrying the channelrhodopsin-2-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) transgene. With fluorescence measurements via the optical fiber, ChR2-EYFP expression was detected clearly in vivo, which was confirmed by histological analysis in the rat. With photostimulation and extracellular recording, photo-responsive single-unit activities were isolated in the monkeys. The depth distribution of these units and the peak of the EYFP fluorescence profile overlapped consistently with each other. Thus, by developing a new probe, optogenetic methodology was successfully applied to a primate subcortical structure. This smooth glass-coated optrode is a promising tool for chronic in vivo experiments with various research targets including deep brain structures in behaving monkeys. PMID:22971353

  17. Structured material combined HMO-silica fibers: preparation, optical and mechanical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, K.; Kobelke, J.; Litzkendorf, D.; Schwuchow, A.; Lindner, F.; Kirchhof, J.; Bartelt, H.; Auguste, J.-L.; Humbert, G.; Blondy, J.-M.

    2011-03-01

    We report about preparation technique and characterization of structured fibers composed of HMO core glasses and silica cladding. Two processes as material preparation techniques have been developed based on glasses prepared by melting of SAL (e.g. 70SiO2-20Al2O3-10La2O3) glasses and the reactive powder sintering (REPUSIL) method. The melted glasses have been characterized by dilatometrical methods to find Tg values of 827-875°C and expansion coefficients between 4.3 and 7.0×10-6 K-1. The latter is one order of magnitude higher than the expansion coefficient of pure silica glass. Structured fibers (SAL core, silica cladding) were fabricated following the Rod-in-Tube (RIT) and Granulate-in-Tube (GIT) process. The HMO glasses were chosen due du their high lanthanum content and the expected high nonlinearity, suitable for nonlinear applications (e.g. supercontinuum sources). The partial substitution of lanthanum by other rare earth elements (e.g. Ytterbium) allows the preparation of fibers with extremely high rare earth concentration up to 5 mol% Yb2O3. The concentration of alumina in the HMO glasses as "solubilizer" for lanthanide was adjusted to about 20 mol%. So we overcame the concentration limits of rare earth doping of MCVD (maximum ca. 2 mol% RE2O3). Nevertheless, the investigated HMO glasses show their limits by integration in structured silica based fibers: Optical losses are typically in the dB/m range, best value of this work is about 600 dB/km. The mechanical stability of fibers is influenced by mechanical strain caused by the high thermal expansion of the core material and the lower network bonding stability of the HMO glasses, but partially compensated by the silica cladding.

  18. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  19. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  20. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  1. Immobilization of BiOX (X = Cl, Br) on activated carbon fibers as recycled photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zaiyong; Huang, Baibiao; Lou, Zaizhu; Wang, Zeyan; Meng, Xiaodong; Liu, Yuanyuan; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Dai, Ying

    2014-06-14

    BiOX have been grown on the surface of activated carbon fibers (ACF) as recycled photocatalysts. The analysis results illustrate that electrostatic adsorption plays an important role in the formation of BiOX/ACF composites. The photocatalytic experimental results indicate that BiOX/ACF show excellent cyclic properties and stable performance. PMID:24769810

  2. Effects of soluble dietary fibers on lipid metabolism and activities of intestinal disaccharidases in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y S; Cho, S H; Kim, H J; Lee, H J

    1998-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of indigestible dextrin and polydextrose, soluble dietary fibers with low molecular weight, on lipid metabolism and disaccharidase activities of intestinal mucosa in rats fed a high sucrose diet. Their effects were compared with those of well-known soluble fibers, pectin, and guar gum, and also with an insoluble fiber, cellulose. Dietary fibers added to diets at the 5% (w/w) level were alpha-cellulose, pectin, guar gum, indigestible dextrin, and polydextrose. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to test diets for 6 weeks. Body weight gain was the lowest in rats fed guar gum, the highest in rats fed cellulose, and in-between in rats fed other diets. Although guar gum, pectin, and indigestible feeding dextrin had lower plasma lipid values than cellulose feeding did, the differences were statistically insignificant. Liver triglyceride of the guar gum-fed group was about a third that of the cellulose-fed group, but although those of rats fed polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, and pectin were lower than that of cellulose, the differences were insignificant. Liver cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations were similar among groups. Daily fecal excretion of total lipid, cholesterol, and bile acids were highest in rats fed guar gum, followed by pectin-fed and cellulose-fed rats, and the lowest in rats fed indigestible dextrin and polydextrose. Jejunal sucrase activity was low in the order of guar-gum, polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, pectin, and cellulose. The results indicate that the hypolipidemic effect of soluble dietary fibers would be lessened with reduction in molecular weight, but that the lower sucrase activity by soluble fibers with low molecular weight might be beneficial for hypoglycemic effect. PMID:9919480

  3. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  4. Theoretical study of mode evolution in active long tapered multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-08-22

    A concise and effective model based on coupled mode theory to describe mode evolution in long tapered active fiber is presented in this manuscript. The mode coupling due to variation of core radius and slight perturbation have been analyzed and local gain with transverse spatial hole burning (TSHB) effect, loss and curvature have been taken into consideration in our model. On the base of this model, the mode evolution behaviors under different factors have been numerically investigated. Our model and results can provide instructive suggestions when designing long tapered fiber based laser and amplifiers. PMID:27557225

  5. Analyses of space environment effects on active fiber optic links orbited aboard the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Monarski, T. W.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Padden, R. J.; Chapman, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 'Preliminary Analysis of WL Experiment no. 701, Space Environment Effects on Operating Fiber Optic Systems,' is correlated with space simulated post retrieval terrestrial studies performed on the M0004 experiment. Temperature cycling measurements were performed on the active optical data links for the purpose of assessing link signal to noise ratio and bit error rate performance some 69 months following the experiment deployment in low Earth orbit. The early results indicate a high correlation between pre-orbit, orbit, and post-orbit functionality of the first known and longest space demonstration of operating fiber optic systems.

  6. Defect tolerance of pressurized fiber composite shell structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsis, P.K.; Chamis, C.C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-12-31

    Progressive damage and fracture of pressurized graphite/epoxy thin composite shells are evaluated via computational simulation. An integrated computer code that scales up constituent micromechanics level material properties to the structure level and accounts for all possible failure modes is used for the simulation of composite degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulation. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of thin walled composite cylindrical shells are examined. A procedure is outlined regarding the use of this type of information for setting quality acceptance criteria, design allowables, damage tolerance, and retirement-for-cause criteria.

  7. Recent progress in Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study of compositional, structural, and physical attributes of developmental cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are natural plant products and their end-use qualities depend on their stages of development. In general, the quantity of natural fiber cellulose I (ß 1'4 linked glucose residues) increases rapidly, thus it leads to compositional, structural, and physical attribute variations among the...

  8. Structural, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of electrospun fibers of poly(lactic acid)/polyaniline blend.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conducting electrospun fiber mats based on PLA and PAni blends were obtained with average diameter values between 87 and 1 006nm with PAni quantities from 0 to 5.6 wt.-%. Structural characteristics of fiber mats were compared to cast films with the same amount of PAni and studied by SEM, SAXS, and A...

  9. Structured variability in Purkinje cell activity during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Britton A.; Lubenov, Evgueniy V.; Siapas, Athanassios G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a prominent vertebrate brain structure that is critically involved in sensorimotor function. During locomotion, cerebellar Purkinje cells are rhythmically active, shaping descending signals and coordinating commands from higher brain areas with the step cycle. However, the variation in this activity across steps has not been studied, and its statistical structure, afferent mechanisms, and relationship to behavior remain unknown. Here, using multi-electrode recordings in freely moving rats, we show that behavioral variables systematically influence the shape of the step-locked firing rate. This effect depends strongly on the phase of the step cycle and reveals a functional clustering of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, we find a pronounced disassociation between patterns of variability driven by the parallel and climbing fibers. These results suggest that Purkinje cell activity not only represents step phase within each cycle, but is also shaped by behavior across steps, facilitating control of movement under dynamic conditions. PMID:26291165

  10. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites tailored for multifunctionality by filler incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungjin

    This dissertation provides multifunctional carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for vibration damping, thermal conduction and thermoelectricity. Specifically, (i) it has strengthened and stiffened carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites by the incorporation of halloysite nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and silicon carbide whiskers, (ii) it has improved mechanical energy dissipation using carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites with filler incorporation, (iii) it has increased the through-thickness thermal conductivity of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composite by curing pressure increase and filler incorporation, and (iv) it has enhanced the thermoelectric behavior of carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites. Low-cost natural halloysite nanotubes (0.1 microm diameter) were effective for strengthening and stiffening continuous fiber polymer-matrix composites, as shown for crossply carbon fiber (5 microm diameter, ˜59 vol.%) epoxy-matrix composites under flexure, giving 17% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 21% decrease in ductility. They were less effective than expensive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (0.02 microm diameter), which gave 25% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 14% decrease in ductility. However, they were more effective than expensive silicon carbide whiskers (1 microm diameter), which gave 15% increase in strength, 9% increase in modulus and 20% decrease in ductility. Each filler, at ˜2 vol.%, was incorporated in the composite at every interlaminar interface by fiber prepreg surface modification. The flexural strength increase due to halloysite nanotubes incorporation related to the interlaminar shear strength increase. The measured values of the composite modulus agreed roughly with the calculated values based on the Rule of Mixtures. Continuous carbon fiber composites with enhanced vibration damping under flexure are provided by incorporation of fillers between the laminae

  11. Application of smart BFRP bars with distributed fiber optic sensors into concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Zhao, Lihua; Song, Shiwei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the self-sensing and mechanical properties of concrete structures strengthened with a novel type of smart basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars were experimentally studied, wherein the sensing element is Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber sensing technique. First, one of the smart bars was applied to strengthen a 2m concrete beam under a 4-points static loading manner in the laboratory. During the experiment, the bar can measure the inner strain changes and monitor the randomly distributed cracks well. With the distributed strain information along the bar, the distributed deformation of the beam can be calculated, and the structural health can be monitored and evaluated as well. Then, two smart bars with a length of about 70m were embedded into a concrete airfield pavement reinforced by long BFRP bars. In the field test, all the optical fiber sensors in the smart bars survived the whole concrete casting process and worked well. From the measured data, the concrete cracks along the pavement length can be easily monitored. The experimental results also confirmed that the bars can strengthen the structures especially after the yielding of steel bars. All the results confirm that this new type of smart BFRP bars show not only good sensing performance but also mechanical performance in the concrete structures.

  12. Effects of different fluorination routes on aramid fiber surface structures and interlaminar shear strength of its composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Dai, Yunyang; Wang, Xu; Huang, Jieyang; Yao, Jin; Yang, Jin; Liu, Xiangyang

    2013-04-01

    Poly-p-phenylene-benzimidazole-terephthalamide (PBIA) fiber was surface modified by direct fluorination under three different routes. The fiber was dried under vacuum to remove physisorbed water trapped on it and then fluorinated by the fluorine and oxygen gases or by the fluorine gas only. Results show that the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) value of these two kinds of fluorinated fiber reinforced epoxy resin was 43.9 MPa and 51.0 MPa, which was improved about 14.0% and 32.5% compared with that of the virgin fiber (38.5 MPa), respectively. In the third route, the fiber was fluorinated by the fluorine and oxygen gases without removing physisorbed water, and the ILSS value decreased for nearly 31.2%, i.e. from 38.5 MPa to 26.5 MPa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that oxygen-containing and fluorine-containing chemical groups were introduced onto the fiber surface after fluorination, providing a stronger chemical bonding to polymeric matrices. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) indicated that the surface morphology of the fluorinated PBIA fiber varied with the different fluorination routes. A mass of compact micro groove structures was formed by the route that the fiber was dried to remove physisorbed water and then fluorinated with fluorine gas only. And these structures would markedly improve the ILSS of the composites. But, a mass of unstable flake surface structures was formed by the route that the fiber was fluorinated with the fluorine and oxygen gases without removing physisorbed water. And these structures would be the weak interface between the fiber and matrix and decrease the ILSS, even a lot of polar chemical groups were bonded onto the fiber surface as well.

  13. Relation between the charge efficiency of activated carbon fiber and its desalination performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Ming; Wang, Lei; Kang, Feiyu

    2012-03-20

    Four types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different specific surface areas (SSA) were used as electrode materials for water desalination using capacitive deionization (CDI). The carbon fibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and N(2) adsorption at 77 K, and the CDI process was investigated by studying the salt adsorption, charge transfer, and also the charge efficiency of the electric double layers that are formed within the micropores inside the carbon electrodes. It is found that the physical adsorption capacity of NaCl by the ACFs increases with increasing Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the fibers. However, the two ACF materials with the highest BET surface area have the lowest electrosorptive capability. Experiments indicate that the charge efficiency of the double layers is a key property of the ACF-based electrodes because the ACF material which has the maximum charge efficiency also shows the highest salt adsorption capacity for CDI. PMID:22372914

  14. Combined excitation-emission spectroscopy of bismuth active centers in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Firstov, S V; Khopin, V F; Bufetov, I A; Firstova, E G; Guryanov, A N; Dianov, E M

    2011-09-26

    For the first time, 3-dimensional luminescence spectra (luminescence intensity as a function of the excitation and emission wavelengths) have been obtained for bismuth-doped optical fibers of various compositions in a wide spectral range (450-1700 nm). The bismuth-doped fibers investigated have the following core compositions: SiO(2), GeO(2), Al-doped SiO(2), and P-doped SiO(2). The measurements are performed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Based on the experimental results, the positions of the low-lying energy-levels of the IR bismuth active centers in SiO(2)- and GeO(2)-core fibers have been determined. Similarity of the energy-level schemes for the two core compositions has been revealed. PMID:21996896

  15. Evaluation of precision estimates for fiber-dimensional and electrical hygrometers for water activity determinations.

    PubMed

    Stroup, W H; Peeler, J T; Smith, K

    1987-01-01

    The precision of instruments used in 3 collaborative studies conducted within the Food and Drug Administration over a 4-year period (1981, 1982, 1984) for water activity (aw) determinations according to the official AOAC method is evaluated. Calibration responses of the instruments were tested for linearity over the aw range from 0.75 to 0.97. Average absolute percent difference between predicted and assigned aw values for the linear model ranged from 0.3 to 0.7% for a fiber-dimensional hygrometer (Abbeon) and 3 electrical hygrometers (Beckman, Rotronics, and Weather Measure). The calibration responses for another electrical hygrometer (Hygrodynamics) were nonlinear. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer yielded mean aw values and precision estimates that did not differ significantly from those obtained with the electrical hygrometers for (NH4)2SO4slush, KNO3 slush, sweetened condensed milk, pancake syrup, and cheese spread. However, the mean aw value for a soy sauce was 0.838 for the electrical hygrometers compared with 0.911 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer was affected by a volatile component(s) in the soy sauce that caused an erroneously high aw value. Pooled estimates of reproducibility (Sx) in the 3 studies were 0.008 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer and 0.010 for the electrical hygrometers; these values were not significantly different from those reported in the study that verified the current official AOAC method. PMID:3436906

  16. Analytical development of single crystal Macro Fiber Composite actuators for active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Sang; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2005-08-01

    A Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) is a piezoelectric fiber composite which has an interdigitated electrode, rectangular cross-section and unidirectional polycrystalline piezoceramic (PZT) fibers embedded in the polymer matrix. A MFC actuator has much higher actuation performance and flexibility than a monolithic piezoceramic actuator. Moreover, the single crystal piezoelectric material exhibits much higher induced strain levels, energy density and coupling than those of polycrystalline piezoceramic materials. Thus, the performance of an MFC can be improved by using single crystal piezoelectric fiber instead of polycrystalline piezoceramic fiber. This study investigates the analytical modeling, material properties and actuation performance of an MFC using single crystal piezoelectric material (single crystal MFC). For single crystal MFC, the mechanical properties are calculated by the classical lamination theory, and the uniform fields model (UFM) is adopted to predict piezoelectric strain constants. In addition, the actuation performance of the single crystal MFC with the active twist rotor blade is studied. The material properties and actuation performance of single crystal MFC are compared with those of standard MFC.

  17. [A female infant of mitochondrial myopathy with findings of active necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibers].

    PubMed

    Nagaura, T; Sumi, K; Nonaka, I

    1990-04-01

    An 8 year-old female infant with the clinical and pathological characteristics of both progressive muscular dystrophy and mitochondrial myopathy was described. Her maternal cousin had clinical and pathological findings of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Since the patient had markedly elevated serum CK and calf muscle hypertrophy, her muscle was biopsied and she was diagnosed as having female DMD at the age of 5 years. She had generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and alternate hemiconvulsions for recent 4 years which brought her our hospital. On admission, she had mild generalized muscle atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limbs. The lactate and pyruvate levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, but with no metabolic acidosis. Serum CK was elevated to 4464 IU/L. Brain CT and MRI showed the expanding arachnoid cyst in the left middle fossa of cranium. In the biopsied left biceps crachii muscle, in addition to numerous ragged-red fibers, there were active muscular fiber necrosis and regeneration and interstitial fibrosis similar to those seen in progressive muscular dystrophy. Biochemically, no decrease or defect in the respiratory chain enzymes was detected. On electron microscopy, a large number of fibers contained aggregates of giant mitochondria with proliferated complicated cristae. Scattered throughout were necrotic muscle fibers filled with phagocytes and regenerating fibers. This patient had the diagnostic features of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. We supposed that the patient provided very interesting evidences to study the relationship between mitochondrial myopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. PMID:2387114

  18. Internal structure of sponge glass fiber revealed by ptychographic nanotomography.

    PubMed

    Birkbak, Mie E; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Holler, Mirko; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Sponge glass spicules have solicited great interest due to their mechanical and optical properties. Herein we use ptychographic nanotomography to obtain detailed insights into the internal structure of an anchor spicule from the Venus flower basket. The obtained dataset has 90nm resolution in 3D and provides quantitative determination of the electron density. The data reveal significant variations in electron density across the spicule. The central organic filament is found to be slightly but significantly displaced from the spicule central axis. Analysis of the electron density affords an estimate of a protein volume fraction in the organic filament of about 70%. In the highly mineralized part of the spicule, the electron density is seen to display circular symmetry and be neigh independent of position along the spicule long axis. Variations in the electron density beyond those included in current models of spicule mechanics are observed. PMID:26853498

  19. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: On selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Sacré, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V; Guan, Yun; Anderson, William S

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed a (simple) simulation test bed of electrical neurostimulation of myelinated nerve fibers with underlying sensory activity. This paper reports our findings so far. Interactions between stimulation-evoked and underlying activities are mainly due to collisions of action potentials and losses of excitability due to the refractory period following an action potential. In addition, intuitively, the reliability of sensory activity decreases as the stimulation frequency increases. This first step opens the door to a better understanding of pain transmission and its modulation by neurostimulation therapies. PMID:26737344

  20. Magnetic Field Sensing Based on Magnetic-Fluid-Clad Multimode-Singlemode-Multimode Fiber Structures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiali; Pu, Shengli; Dong, Shaohua; Luo, Longfeng

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field sensing based on magnetic-fluid-clad multimode-singlemode-multimode fiber structures is proposed and experimentalized. The structures are fabricated out using fiber fusion splicing techniques. The sensing principle is based on the interference between the core mode and cladding modes. Two interference dips are observed in our spectral range. Experimental results indicate that the magnetic field sensing sensitivities of 215 pm/mT and 0.5742 dB/mT are obtained for interference dip around 1595 nm. For interference dip around 1565 nm, the sensitivities are 60.5 pm/mT and 0.4821 dB/mT. The response of temperature is also investigated. The temperature sensitivity for the dip around 1595 nm is obtained to be 9.93 pm/°C. PMID:25317761

  1. On the Hodge structure of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Washington

    2012-08-01

    The Hodge numbers of generic elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds over toric base surfaces fill out the "shield" structure previously identified by Kreuzer and Skarke. The connectivity structure of these spaces and bounds on the Hodge numbers are illuminated by considerations from F-theory and the minimal model program. In particular, there is a rigorous bound on the Hodge number h 21 ≤ 491 for any elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefold. The threefolds with the largest known Hodge numbers are associated with a sequence of blow-ups of toric bases beginning with the Hirzebruch surface {{F}_{{12}}} and ending with the toric base for the F-theory model with largest known gauge group.

  2. Comparison of strain sensitivity of bare and structure-integrated fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebid, Solomija Y.; Hofmann, Detlef; Basedau, Frank; Daum, Werner

    2003-07-01

    For the last decade sensor architectures with embedded fibers found their application in large structure monitoring and proved their capability to replace existing techniques for monitoring of linear strain, temporary or permanent none-uniform strain and load, temperature, vibrations, bending, or complex strain-temperature, vibrations-temperature influences, etc. Such sensor architectures, called smart structures, use different sensing mechanisms, in one of which - fiber Bragg grating (FBG) - is applied as a sensitive element. Because of high sensitivity, absolute measurement ability, possibility to work reliable in adverse environment, such as electromagnetic fields, radiation, extreme temperature, and quick response time, FBGs are object of numerous research of leading laboratories worldwide. Some problems are still remaining in this field, although there have been some ways found to solve part of them. This paper discusses some aspects of different fixing mechanisms of FBG and provides evaluation and comparison of methods of FBG integration in sensor housing or in sensor architecture.

  3. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  4. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for electrical-resistance-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daojun

    This dissertation has advanced the science and technology of electrical-resistance-based sensing of strain/stress and damage using continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for aircraft structures. In particular, it has extended the technology of self-sensing of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composites from uniaxial longitudinal loading and flexural loading to uniaxial through-thickness loading and has extended the technology from structural composite self-sensing to the use of the composite (specifically a one-lamina composite) as an attached sensor. Through-thickness compression is encountered in the joining of composite components by fastening. Uniaxial through-thickness compression results in strain-induced reversible decreases in the through-thickness and longitudinal volume resistivities, due to increase in the fiber-fiber contact in the through-thickness direction, and minor-damage-induced irreversible changes in these resistivities. The Poisson effect plays a minor role. The effects in the longitudinal resistivity are small compared to those in the through-thickness direction, but longitudinal resistance measurement is more amenable to practical implementation in structures than through-thickness resistance measurement. The irreversible effects are associated with an increase in the through-thickness resistivity and a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. The through-thickness gage factor is up to 5.1 and decreases with increasing compressive strain above 0.2%. The reversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per through-thickness strain is up to 4.0 and decreases with increasing compressive strain. The irreversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per unit through-thickness strain is around -1.1 and is independent of the strain. The sensing is feasible by measuring the resistance away from the stressed region, though the effectiveness is less than that at the stressed region. A one

  5. Adsorption properties and photocatalytic activity of TiO2/activated carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Song, Shuangping; Shi, Zhongliang

    2014-06-01

    Photocatalysts of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and TiO2/activated carbon fiber (TiO2/ACF) composite were prepared by sol-gel method, followed by calcining the pure TiO2 sols and the TiO2/ACF sols at 500°C for 2 h in a N2 atmosphere, respectively. These photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption property of TiO2/ACF composite using methylene blue as adsorbate. The adsorption data obtained from different batch experiments were analyzed using pseudo-second-order kinetic model, the experimental data can be adequately described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The photodecomposition behavior of TiO2/ACF was investigated in aqueous solution using methylene blue as target pollutant. It was found that methylene blue could be removed rapidly from water by TiO2/ACF, the photocatalytic decomposition was obviously improved when the photocatalyst was used. Kinetics analysis revealed that the photocatalytic decomposition reaction can be described well by a first-order rate equation.

  6. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, M.; Safdari, M.; Boroujeni, A. Y.; Razavi, Z.; Case, S. W.; Dahmen, K.; Garmestani, H.; Al-Haik, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT-carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1-60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface.

  7. A Novel Optical Fiber Sensor for Steel Corrosion in Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Christopher K.Y.; Wan, Kai Tai; Chen, Liquan

    2008-01-01

    Steel corrosion resulting from the penetration of chloride ions or carbon dioxide is a major cause of degradation for reinforced concrete structures,. The objective of the present investigation was to develop a low-cost sensor for steel corrosion, which is based on a very simple physical principle. The flat end of a cut optical fiber is coated with an iron thin film using the ion sputtering technique. Light is then sent into a fiber embedded in concrete and the reflected signal is monitored. Initially, most of the light is reflected by the iron layer. When corrosion occurs to remove the iron layer, a significant portion of the light power will leave the fiber at its exposed end, and the reflected power is greatly reduced. Monitoring of the reflected signal is hence an effective way to assess if the concrete environment at the location of the fiber tip may induce steel corrosion or not. In this paper, first the principle of the corrosion sensor and its fabrication are described. The sensing principle is then verified by experimental results. Sensor packaging for practical installation will be presented and the performance of the packaged sensors is assessed by additional experiments.

  8. [INVITED] A miniaturized optical fiber microphone with concentric nanorings grating and microsprings structured diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Xie, Zhenwei; Zhang, Mile; Cui, Hailin; He, Jingsuo; Feng, Shengfei; Wang, Xinke; Sun, Wenfeng; Ye, Jiasheng; Han, Peng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A miniaturized optical fiber microphone (OFM) is created by fabricating a concentric nanorings grating and microsprings structured half spherical diaphragm on the end facet of a single-mode fiber (SMF). The diaphragm is fabricated via the method of two-photon 3D lithography. The thin nanorings grating patterned diaphragm is actually a resonant grating-waveguide. It exhibits high reflectivity when resonance is excited. A microlens is fabricated at the core of the fiber, which is used to diverge the output light to make it be normally incident onto the diaphragm, then reflected back to the fiber. The intensities of the reflected back light will be changed if the resonant conditions of the resonant grating-waveguide are broken due to the sound pressure induced geometrical changes of the configuration. This makes such device be an acoustic sensor. The microsprings are designed to improve the sensitivity to the sound pressure. Acoustic inspections show that this OFM can detect the weak sound in air with frequency band from 400 to 2000 Hz.

  9. Distributed fiber optical HC leakage and pH sensing techniques for implementation into smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerck, Jochen M.; Vogel, Bernhard H.; Roth, Siegmar; Ebrahimi, Sasan; Kraemer, Karl

    2004-07-01

    Interaction of target molecules with the evanescent wave of light guided in optical fibers is among the most promising sensing schemes for building up smart chemical sensor technologies. If the technique of optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) is combined with silicone-clad quartz glass fibers distributed chemical sensing is possible. Hydrocarbon (HC) detection and location is done by automated identification of the position of the corresponding step drop (light loss) in the backscatter signal induced by local refractive index increase in the silicone cladding due to a penetrating HC compound. A commercially available mini-OTDR was adapted to sensing fibers of up to nearly 2-kilometer length and location of typical HC fuels could be demonstrated. The instrument is applicable for fuel leakage monitoring in large technical installations such as tanks or pipelines with spatial resolution down to 1 m. A similar technique using measurements in the Vis spectral range is being developed for health monitoring of large structures, e.g., for early detection of corrosion caused by water ingress and pH changes in reinforced concrete. Here, a pH indicator dye and a phase transfer reagent are immobilized in the originally hydrophobic fiber cladding, leading to a pH induced absorption increase and a step drop signal in the backscatter curve. The configuration of the distributed sensing cables, the instrumental setups, and examples for HC and pH sensing are presented.

  10. Physico-chemical studies of hardened cement paste structure with micro-reinforcing fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The results of physico-chemical studies of modified hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers are given in this article. The goal was to study the reasons of the increase of strength properties of modified hardened cement paste by the method of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. It is shown that the use of mineral fibers in the production of cement based material has positive effect on its properties. The study found out that the increase in the strength of the hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers is due to the increase of the rate of hydration of cement without a significant change in the phase composition in comparison with hardened cement paste without additive. The results of microstructure investigation (of control samples and samples of the reinforced hardened cement paste) have shown that introduction of mineral fibers in the amount of 0.1-2 % by weight of cement provides the structure of the homogeneous microporous material with uniform distribution of the crystalline phase provided by densely packed hydrates.

  11. A mathematical model for predicting controlled release of bioactive agents from composite fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Sofer, Moran

    2007-03-01

    A mathematical model for predicting bioactive agent release profiles from core/shell fiber structures was developed and studied. These new composite fibers, which combine good mechanical properties with desired protein release profiles, are designed for use in tissue regeneration and other biomedical applications. These fibers are composed of an inner dense polymeric core surrounded by a porous bioresorbable shell, which encapsulates the bioactive agent molecules. The model is based on Fick's second law of diffusion, and on two major assumptions: (a) first-order degradation kinetics of the porous shell, and (b) a nonconstant diffusion coefficient for the bioactive agent, which increases with time because of degradation of the host polymer. Three factors are evaluated and included in this model: a porosity factor, a tortuosity factor, and a polymer concentration factor. Our study indicates that the model correlates well with in vitro release results, exhibiting a mean error of less than 2.2% for most studied cases. In this study, the model was used for predicting protein release profiles from fibers with shells of various initial molecular weights and for predicting the release of proteins with various molecular weights. This new model exhibits a potential for simulating fibrous systems for a wide variety of biomedical applications. PMID:17072845

  12. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  13. Structural health monitoring by using fiber-optic distributed strain sensors with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we review our researches on the topics of the structural health monitoring (SHM) with the fiber-optic distributed strain sensor. Highly-dense information on strains in a structure can be useful to identify some kind of existing damages or applied loads in implementation of SHM. The fiber-optic distributed sensors developed by the authors have been applied to the damage detection of a single-lap joint and load identification of a beam simply supported. We confirmed that the applicability of the distributed sensor to SHM could be improved as making the spatial resolution higher. In addition, we showed that the simulation technique considering both structural and optical effects seamlessly in strain measurement could be powerful tools to evaluate the performance of a sensing system and design it for SHM. Finally, the technique for simultaneous distributed strain and temperature measurement using the PANDA-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is shown in this paper, because problems caused by the cross-sensitivity toward strain and temperature would be always inevitable in strain measurement for SHM.

  14. A fiber optic Doppler sensor and its application in debonding detection for composite structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Meng, Guang; Ohsawa, Isamu; Shirai, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Debonding is one of the most important damage forms in fiber-reinforced composite structures. This work was devoted to the debonding damage detection of lap splice joints in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures, which is based on guided ultrasonic wave signals captured by using fiber optic Doppler (FOD) sensor with spiral shape. Interferometers based on two types of laser sources, namely the He-Ne laser and the infrared semiconductor laser, are proposed and compared in this study for the purpose of measuring Doppler frequency shift of the FOD sensor. Locations of the FOD sensors are optimized based on mechanical characteristics of lap splice joint. The FOD sensors are subsequently used to detect the guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the CFRP structures. By taking advantage of signal processing approaches, features of the guided wave signals can be revealed. The results demonstrate that debonding in the lap splice joint results in arrival time delay of the first package in the guided wave signals, which can be the characteristic for debonding damage inspection and damage extent estimation. PMID:22219698

  15. A Fiber Optic Doppler Sensor and Its Application in Debonding Detection for Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Meng, Guang; Ohsawa, Isamu; Shirai, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Debonding is one of the most important damage forms in fiber-reinforced composite structures. This work was devoted to the debonding damage detection of lap splice joints in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures, which is based on guided ultrasonic wave signals captured by using fiber optic Doppler (FOD) sensor with spiral shape. Interferometers based on two types of laser sources, namely the He-Ne laser and the infrared semiconductor laser, are proposed and compared in this study for the purpose of measuring Doppler frequency shift of the FOD sensor. Locations of the FOD sensors are optimized based on mechanical characteristics of lap splice joint. The FOD sensors are subsequently used to detect the guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the CFRP structures. By taking advantage of signal processing approaches, features of the guided wave signals can be revealed. The results demonstrate that debonding in the lap splice joint results in arrival time delay of the first package in the guided wave signals, which can be the characteristic for debonding damage inspection and damage extent estimation. PMID:22219698

  16. Evaluation of enzyme activity and fiber content of soybean cotyledon fiber and distiller's dried grains with solubles by solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengli; Lio, JunYi; Wang, Tong

    2012-05-01

    To increase the value of coproducts from corn ethanol fermentation and soybean aqueous processing, distiller's dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and soybean cotyledon fiber were used as the substrates for solid state fermentation (SSF) to improve feed digestibility. Aspergillus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei, and Phanerochaete chrysosporium were chosen as they produce desirable enzymes and are widely used in SSF for feed. The results showed that the cellulase and xylanase activities were significantly increased after 7 days of fermentation, and cellulose and hemicellulose degradation was also greatly increased. When soybean fiber was used as SSF substrate, the maximum activities of the cellulase and xylanase were 10.3 and 84.2 IU/g substrate (dry weight basis) after SSF treatment, respectively. However, the enzyme activities were relatively low in DDGS, and the growth of the three fungi was poor. The fungi grew better when soybean cotyledon fiber was added to DDGS, and cellulase and xylanase activity increased with the increase of soybean fiber content. Porosity was identified as an important factor for SSF because the addition of inert soybean hull alone improved the fungi growth significantly. These data suggest that the nutritional value of DDGS and soybean cotyledon fiber as monogastric animal feed could be greatly enhanced by SSF treatment. PMID:22528656

  17. Length-dependent Ca2+ activation in skeletal muscle fibers from mammalians.

    PubMed

    Rassier, Dilson E; Minozzo, Fábio C

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypotheses that 1) a decrease in activation of skeletal muscles at short sarcomere lengths (SLs) is caused by an inhibition of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and 2) the decrease in Ca(2+) would be caused by an inhibition of action potential conduction from the periphery to the core of the fibers. Intact, single fibers dissected from the flexor digitorum brevis from mice were activated at different SLs, and intracellular Ca(2+) was imaged with confocal microscopy. Force decreased at SLs shorter than 2.1 μm, while Ca(2+) concentration decreased at SLs below 1.9 μm. The concentration of Ca(2+) at short SL was lower at the core than at the peripheries of the fiber. When the external concentration of Na(+) was decreased in the experimental media, impairing action potential conduction, Ca(2+) gradients were observed in all SLs. When caffeine was used in the experimental media, the gradients of Ca(2+) were abolished. We concluded that there is an inhibition of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) at short SLs, which results from a decreased conduction of action potential from the periphery to the core of the fibers. PMID:27225655

  18. Physical properties and structure of aquatic silk fiber from Stenopsyche marmorata.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Masuhiro; Khan, Md Majibur Rahman; Inoue, Eiso; Kimura, Goro; Hun, Jin Young; Mishima, Mitsuharu; Hirabayashi, Kimio

    2010-01-01

    To study the properties and structure of aquatic silk, nest-spinning hydropsychid caddisfly (Stenopsyche marmorata) larva were collected from a Japanese river and the silk glands were removed from the larva by dissecting and dried on the glass plate at room temperature. The silk fibers were obtained by removing fibrous materials, which the aquatic insects spun at the bottom of glass container and the microstructure and physical properties of aquatic silk protein fibres and their solid silk protein gland were evaluated. Silk fiber produced by the caddisfly larvae is composed of two filament embedded in a layer of glue. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements suggested the existence of binary structure containing random coil conformation and additional minor beta-molecular structure. Differential scanning calorimetry results are characterized by two broad endothermic transitions, at 230 degrees C and 320 degrees C, which corresponds to the decomposition of silk glue and silk fiber from caddis fly, respectively. The storage modulus (E') remained almost unchanged and nearly constant at above 60 degrees C until about 214 degrees C, where it began to show a sharp drop. A prominent relaxation peak appeared in the imaginary part of the modulus (loss peak at 230 degrees C), in response to the strong motional transitions exhibited by the silk fiber at this temperature. There was significant difference of tensile strength of single solid silk protein gland in dry and wet state. The results obtained are quite promising as a basis for possible future biotechnological and adhesive applications of aquatic silk. PMID:19828120

  19. High frequency capacitively coupled RF plasma discharge effects on the order/disorder structure of PAN-based carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Ümmugül E.; Bilikmen, Sinan; Akbar, Demiral

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution confocal Raman microscopy was used to investigate the effects of nitrogen plasma on unsized high strength (HS) PAN-based carbon fiber surfaces. The fibers were treated by a high frequency (40.68 MHz) capacitively coupled single RF-PECVD reactor under different processing conditions (exposure times, RF powers and gas pressures). It was found that the order/disorder structure of the treated carbon fiber changed with different processing conditions. At low pressures, the degree of disordered structure increased with HF-RF power and process time. However, at high pressures, high-order structure () was observed and almost no observable structural effects appeared at long treatment time. Also, the first-order Raman-band peaks (D and G) of the treated carbon fibers shifted. And, FWHM (), intensity () and D-band relative integrated intensity () ratios increased with ordering whereas they decreased with disordering.

  20. Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Matthew J; Willis, Matthew S; Kumar, Pankaj; Holdsworth, John L; Bezuidenhout, Henco; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the detection and subsequent utilization of leaked light from bends in a silica optical fiber using organic photovoltaic detectors. The optic power lost by single mode and multimode silica optical fibers was calibrated for bend radii between 1 and 7 mm for 532 and 633 nm light, exhibiting excellent agreement with previous theoretical solutions. The spatial location of maximum power leakage on the exterior of the fiber was found to exist in the same plane as the fiber, with a 10° offset from the normal. Two different organic photovoltaic detectors fabricated using a poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct donor-acceptor blend cast from chloroform and chlorobenzene were fabricated to detect the leaked light. The two detectors exhibited different photovoltaic performances, predominantly due to different active layer thicknesses. Both devices showed sensitivity to leakage light, exhibiting voltages between 200 and 300 mV in response to leaked light from the fiber. The temporal responses of the devices were observed to differ, with a rise time from 10% to 90% of maximum voltage of 1430 μs for the chlorobenzene device, and a corresponding rise time of 490 μs for the higher performing chloroform device. The two OPVs were used to simultaneously detect leaked light from induced bends in the optical fiber, with the differing temporal profiles employed to create a unique time-correlated detection signal with enhanced security. The delay between detection of each OPV voltage could be systematically varied, allowing for either a programmable and secure single detection signal or triggering of multiple events with variable time resolution. The results reported in this study present exciting avenues toward the deployment of this simple and noninvasive optical detection system in a range of different applications. PMID:26891938

  1. Recent results on structural control of an active precision structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Fanson, J. L.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent results in structural control of an active precision truss structure at JPL. The goal is to develop practical control methodology and to apply to active truss structures intended for high precision space-based optics applications. The active structure considered incorporates piezoelectric active members which apply control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. Two approaches to structural control system design were investigated. The first approach uses only noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The second approach is essentially the same as the first one except that a viscous damper was used in place of a truss member on the structure to improve the dampings of selected flexible modes. The corresponding experimental closed-loop results are presented in this paper.

  2. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Fiber Structure Extraction Technique Using Autopsy Specimens of Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hirai, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Ebara, Masaaki; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2005-06-01

    It is very important to diagnose liver cirrhosis noninvasively and correctly. In our previous studies, we proposed a processing technique to detect changes in liver tissue in vivo. In this paper, we propose the evaluation of the relationship between liver disease and echo information using autopsy specimens of a human liver in vitro. It is possible to verify the function of a processing parameter clearly and to compare the processing result and the actual human liver tissue structure by in vitro experiment. In the results of our processing technique, information that did not obey a Rayleigh distribution from the echo signal of the autopsy liver specimens was extracted depending on changes in a particular processing parameter. The fiber tissue structure of the same specimen was extracted from a number of histological images of stained tissue. We constructed 3D structures using the information extracted from the echo signal and the fiber structure of the stained tissue and compared the two. By comparing the 3D structures, it is possible to evaluate the relationship between the information that does not obey a Rayleigh distribution of the echo signal and the fibrosis structure.

  3. On the use of a compact optical fiber sensor system in aircraft structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Rocha, Bruno; Sun, Zhigang

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been identified as an area of significant potential for advanced aircraft maintenance programs that ensure continued airworthiness, enhanced operational safety and reduced life cycle cost. Several sensors and sensory systems have been developed for the implementation of such health monitoring capability. Among a wide range of developed technologies, fiber optic sensor technology, in particular fiber Bragg grating based emerged as one of the most promising for aircraft structural applications. This paper is set to explore the suitability of using a new Fiber Bragg Grating sensor (FBG) system developed for operation in two modes, low and high speed sensing modes, respectively. The suitability of the system for potential use in aircraft load monitoring and damage detection applications has been demonstrated. Results from FBG sensor system were in good agreement with results from conventional resistive strain gauges, validating this capability for load monitoring. For damage detection, the FBG sensor system was able to detect acoustic waves generated 52 inches (1.32 m) away. The initial results, obtained in a full stale experimentation, demonstrate the potential of using FBG sensors for both load monitoring and damage detection in aircraft environment.

  4. The multifunctional wound dressing with core-shell structured fibers prepared by coaxial electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qilin; Xu, Feiyang; Xu, Xingjian; Geng, Xue; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Aiying; Feng, Zengguo

    2016-04-01

    The non-woven wound dressing with core-shell structured fibers was prepared by coaxial electrospinning. The polycaprolactone (PCL) was electrospun as the fiber's core to provide mechanical strength whereas collagen was fabricated into the shell in order to utilize its good biocompatibility. Simultaneously, the silver nanoparticles (Ag- NPs) as anti-bacterial agent were loaded in the shell whereas the vitamin A palmitate (VA) as healing-promoting drug was encapsulated in the core. Resulting from the fiber's core-shell structure, the VA released from the core and Ag-NPs present in the shell can endow the dressing both heal-promoting and anti-bacteria ability simultaneously, which can greatly enhance the dressing's clinical therapeutic effect. The dressing can maintain high swelling ratio of 190% for 3 d indicating its potential application as wet dressing. Furthermore, the dressing's anti-bacteria ability against Staphylococcus aureus was proved by in vitro anti-bacteria test. The in vitro drug release test showed the sustainable release of VA within 72 h, while the cell attachment showed L929 cells can well attach on the dressing indicating its good biocompatibility. In conclusion, the fabricated nanofibrous dressing possesses multiple functions to benefit wound healing and shows promising potential for clinical application.

  5. The multifunctional wound dressing with core-shell structured fibers prepared by coaxial electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qilin; Xu, Feiyang; Xu, Xingjian; Geng, Xue; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Aiying; Feng, Zengguo

    2016-06-01

    The non-woven wound dressing with core-shell structured fibers was prepared by coaxial electrospinning. The polycaprolactone (PCL) was electrospun as the fiber's core to provide mechanical strength whereas collagen was fabricated into the shell in order to utilize its good biocompatibility. Simultaneously, the silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as anti-bacterial agent were loaded in the shell whereas the vitamin A palmitate (VA) as healing-promoting drug was encapsulated in the core. Resulting from the fiber's core-shell structure, the VA released from the core and Ag-NPs present in the shell can endow the dressing both heal-promoting and anti-bacteria ability simultaneously, which can greatly enhance the dressing's clinical therapeutic effect. The dressing can maintain high swelling ratio of 190% for 3 d indicating its potential application as wet dressing. Furthermore, the dressing's anti-bacteria ability against Staphylococcus aureus was proved by in vitro anti-bacteria test. The in vitro drug release test showed the sustainable release of VA within 72 h, while the cell attachment showed L929 cells can well attach on the dressing indicating its good biocompatibility. In conclusion, the fabricated nanofibrous dressing possesses multiple functions to benefit wound healing and shows promising potential for clinical application.

  6. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO CHOPPED-FIBER AUTOMOTIVE STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M.B.

    2003-10-06

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on composite materials consisting of polyurethane reinforced with E-glass. Current focus of the project is on composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers. The primary purpose of this report is to provide the individual specimen test date. Basic mechanical property testing and results for two chopped-fiber composite materials, one reinforced with glass- and the other with carbon fiber are provided. Both materials use the same polyurethane matrix. Preforms for both materials were produced using the P4 process. Behavioral trends, effects of temperature and environment, and corresponding design knockdown factors are established for both materials. Effects of prior short-time loads and of prior thermal cycling are discussed.

  7. Carbon fiber/Co9S8 nanotube arrays hybrid structures for flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenxi; Chen, Chang; Ye, Meidan; Lv, Miaoqiang; Lin, Changjian

    2014-04-01

    Recently, hybrid carbon materials and inorganic nanocrystals have received an intensive amount of attention and have opened up an exciting new field in the design and fabrication of high-performance catalysts. Here we present a novel kind of hybrid counter electrode (CE) consisting of a carbon fiber (CF) and Co9S8 nanotube arrays (NTs) for fiber-shaped flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). The growth mechanisms of Co(CO3)0.35Cl0.20(OH)1.10 nanowire arrays (NWs) on the CFs were discussed, and the catalytic activity of the CF, Pt and Co9S8/CF hybrid structure (Co9S8@CF) were elucidated systematically as well. An absolute energy conversion efficiency of 3.79% has been demonstrated under 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5 illumination by using Co9S8@CF as a CE. This work not only demonstrates an innovative approach for growing cobalt sulfide NTs on flexible substrates that can be applied in flexible devices for energy harvesting and storage, but also provides a kind of hybrid structure and high-efficiency CE for QDSSCs. PMID:24562374

  8. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  9. Stable single-longitudinal-mode erbium-doped fiber laser with dual-ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Jhih-Yu; Chen, Hone-Zhang; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a stable erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser with single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) output by employing dual-ring structure. By using the multiple ring architecture, the densely spaced longitudinal modes would be suppressed and generated a SLM lasing output. In the measurement, the wavelength can be tuned in the wavelengths of 1530.0-1560.0 nm. And the measured output powers and side-mode suppression ratios (SMSRs) are between 5.2 and 14.1 dBm and 30.4 and 39.8 dB, respectively. In addition, the output stabilities of wavelength and power in proposed fiber laser have also been discussed.

  10. Distributed feedback fiber laser acoustic emission sensor for concrete structure health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Gengjie; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a highly-sensitive fiber optical acoustic emission (AE) sensor and a parameter analysis method aiming at concrete structure health monitoring. Distributed feedback fiber-laser (DFB-FL), which is encapsulated to have a high acoustic sensitivity, is used for sensor unit of the AE sensor. The AE signal of concrete beam in different work stages, based on the four-point bending experiment of the concrete beam, is picked up, and the relationship between the concrete beam work stages and the AE parameter is found. The results indicate that DFB-FLAES can be used as sensitive transducers for recording acoustic events and forecasting the imminent failure of the concrete beam.

  11. Nanofilms on Hollow Core Fiber-Based Structures: An Optical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Javier; Matías, Ignacio R.; Del Villar, Ignacio; Corres, Jesús M.; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2006-05-01

    The optical characteristics of one multimode fiber (MMF)-hollow core fiber (HCF)-structure when a nanofilm is deposited on it has been theoretically and experimentally studied. The electrostatic self-assembly method has been used as the deposition technique, and the polymers chosen are polydiallyldimethylammonium and Poly R-478. Two different types of HCF have been used for the fabrication of the devices: 10/150 and 50/150 µm inner and outer diameters, respectively. Depending on several design parameters, the transmitted optical-power characteristic of the device experiences important changes that could be interesting towards development of several practical optical devices. The length and thickness of the HCF segment, the refractive index of the material deposited, the angle of the light when it reach the HCF section, and the wavelength of the light source will be analyzed.

  12. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and anti-inflammatory activity of diclofenac-bound cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Roberta; Trombino, Sonia; Ferrarelli, Teresa; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Vincenzo; Mancuso, Cesare; Picci, Nevio

    2010-07-12

    In the present work, we report on the synthesis of cellulose cotton fibers covalently linked to diclofenac moieties and the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of this new biomaterial. In spite of recent progress in experimental and clinical medicine, the problem of chronic wounds treatment is still debated. In fact, conventional methods are based on the use of ointment-soaked bandages, but several physical and biological factors contribute to making the efficacy of this method quite low. For this reason, we developed the idea to using modified cotton gauzes to prevent inflammation during wound healing. In this light, diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was covalently linked to the cellulose backbone of hydrophilic cotton fibers by a heterogeneous synthesis to produce a functionalized biopolymer with a satisfactory degree of substitution and anti-inflammatory activity. Diclofenac was directly linked to fiber microfibril hydroxylic groups using THF with thionyl chloride. The obtained biopolymer was characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to confirm ester linkages. Finally, the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in a well-established in vivo model. The results suggested that these biomaterials possess an excellent anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, so they can be efficiently employed in biomedical fields for chronic wound management to ensure a valid protection against inflammation. PMID:20536117

  14. Mechanical characterization and structural analysis of recycled fiber-reinforced-polymer resin-transfer-molded beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Eugene Wie Loon

    1999-09-01

    The present investigation was focussed on the mechanical characterization and structural analysis of resin-transfer-molded beams containing recycled fiber-reinforced polymers. The beams were structurally reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers. The reinforcing filler materials consisted entirely of recycled fiber-reinforced polymer wastes (trim and overspray). The principal resin was a 100-percent dicyclo-pentadiene unsaturated polyester specially formulated with very low viscosity for resin transfer molding. Variations of the resin transfer molding technique were employed to produce specimens for material characterization. The basic materials that constituted the structural beams, continuous-glass-fiber-reinforced, recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled unsaturated polyesters, were fully characterized in axial and transverse compression and tension, and inplane and interlaminar shear, to ascertain their strengths, ultimate strains, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios. Experimentally determined mechanical properties of the recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled materials from the present investigation were superior to those of unsaturated polyester polymer concretes and Portland cement concretes. Mechanical testing and finite element analyses of flexure (1 x 1 x 20 in) and beam (2 x 4 x 40 in) specimens were conducted. These structurally-reinforced specimens were tested and analyzed in four-point, third-point flexure to determine their ultimate loads, maximum fiber stresses and mid-span deflections. The experimentally determined load capacities of these specimens were compared to those of equivalent steel-reinforced Portland cement concrete beams computed using reinforced concrete theory. Mechanics of materials beam theory was utilized to predict the ultimate loads and mid-span deflections of the flexure and beam specimens. However, these predictions proved to be severely inadequate. Finite element (fracture propagation

  15. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  16. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K.; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A.; Velmurugan, D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  17. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  18. Structural and Functional Studies on the Interaction of Adenovirus Fiber Knobs and Desmoglein 2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Yumul, Roma; Cao, Hua; Ran, Liang; Fan, Xiaolong; Richter, Maximilian; Epstein, Forrest; Gralow, Julie; Zubieta, Chloe

    2013-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14, as well as a recently emerged strain of Ad14 (Ad14p1), use the epithelial junction protein desmoglein 2 (DSG2) as a receptor for infection. Unlike Ad interaction with CAR and CD46, structural details for Ad binding to DSG2 are still elusive. Using an approach based on Escherichia coli expression libraries of random Ad3 and Ad14p1 fiber knob mutants, we identified amino acid residues that, when mutated individually, ablated or reduced Ad knob binding to DSG2. These residues formed three clusters inside one groove at the extreme distal end of the fiber knob. The Ad3 fiber knob mutant library was also used to identify variants with increased affinity to DSG2. We found a number of mutations within or near the EF loop of the Ad3 knob that resulted in affinities to DSG2 that were several orders of magnitude higher than those to the wild-type Ad3 knob. Crystal structure analysis of one of the mutants showed that the introduced mutations make the EF loop more flexible, which might facilitate the interaction with DSG2. Our findings have practical relevance for cancer therapy. We have recently reported that an Ad3 fiber knob-containing recombinant protein (JO-1) is able to trigger opening of junctions between epithelial cancer cells which, in turn, greatly improved the intratumoral penetration and efficacy of therapeutic agents (I. Beyer, et al., Clin. Cancer Res. 18:3340–3351, 2012; I. Beyer, et al., Cancer Res. 71:7080–7090, 2011). Here, we show that affinity-enhanced versions of JO-1 are therapeutically more potent than the parental protein in a series of cancer models. PMID:23946456

  19. Modeling the Effect of Active Fiber Cooling on the Microstructure of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Q.; Peterson, Sean D.; Gupta, Nikhil; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2009-08-01

    A modified pressure infiltration process was recently developed to synthesize carbon-fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites. In the modified process, the ends of carbon fibers are extended out of the crucible to induce selective cooling. The process is found to be effective in improving the quality of composites. The present work is focused on determining the effect of the induced conductive heat transfer on the composite system through numerical methods. Due to the axisymmetry of the system, a two-dimensional (2-D) model is studied that can be expanded into three dimensions. The variables in this transient analysis include the fiber radius, fiber length, and melt superheat temperature. The results show that the composite system can be tailored to have a temperature on the fiber surface that is lower than the melt, to promote nucleation on the fiber surface. It is also observed that there is a point of inflection in the temperature profile along the particle/melt interface at which there is no temperature gradient in the radial direction. The information about the inflection point can be used to control the diffusion of solute atoms in the system. The result can be used in determining the optimum fiber volume fraction in metal matrix composite (MMC) materials to obtain the desired microstructure.

  20. Temperature and time dependence of the electro-mechanical properties of flexible active fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Atitallah, H.; Ounaies, Z.; Muliana, A.

    2016-04-01

    Active fiber composites (AFCs) are comprised of piezoelectric fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix. AFCs use interdigitated electrodes, which produce electric field lines parallel to the fiber direction, thus taking advantage of the larger d 33 piezoelectric coefficient. The polymer volume content of the AFCs is generally more than 50%; since polymers tend to have behaviors affected by their viscoelastic characteristics especially at elevated temperatures, it is necessary to understand the thermo-electro-mechanical behavior of AFCs at different loading rates. In this study, mechanical, electrical and electromechanical properties of AFCs were measured at different isothermal temperatures, namely 25 °C, 50 °C and 75 °C and at different loading rates. The measurements of all the properties of AFCs were done along the fiber direction. It was found that at higher temperatures, the modulus and tensile strength decreased for all strain rates and the strain at failure increased. The remnant polarization increased with decrease in frequency and increase in temperature; however, the coercive field decreased with temperature and was not affected by the frequency. Due to the viscoelastic behavior of the epoxy, the piezoelectric coefficient d 33 increased at higher temperature and lower frequency. It was also noted that this coefficient is dependent on the magnitude of the electric field.

  1. Characterization of wavelength-swept active mode locking fiber laser based on reflective semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Lee, Ju Han; Yung Jeong, Myung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of a wavelength-swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser are presented in both the time-region and wavelength-region. This paper shows experimentally that the linewidth of a laser spectrum and the bandwidth of the sweeping wavelength are dependent directly on the length and dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as the modulation frequency and sweeping rate under the mode-locking condition. To achieve a narrower linewidth, a longer length and higher dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as a higher order mode locking condition are required simultaneously. For a broader bandwidth, a lower order of the mode locking condition is required using a lower modulation frequency. The dynamic sweeping performance is also analyzed experimentally to determine its applicability to optical coherence tomography imaging. It is shown that the maximum sweeping rate can be improved by the increased free spectral range from the shorter length of the fiber cavity. A reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) was used to enhance the modulation and dispersion efficiency. Overall a triangular electrical signal can be used instead of the sinusoidal signal to sweep the lasing wavelength at a high sweeping rate due to the lack of mechanical restrictions in the wavelength sweeping mechanism.

  2. Adsorption of sulfur dioxide on ammonia-treated activated carbon fibers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangun, C.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Economy, J.

    2001-01-01

    A series of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and ammonia-treated ACFs prepared from phenolic fiber precursors have been studied to elucidate the role of pore size, pore volume, and pore surface chemistry on adsorption of sulfur dioxide and its catalytic conversion to sulfuric acid. As expected, the incorporation of basic functional groups into the ACFs was shown as an effective method for increasing adsorption of sulfur dioxide. The adsorption capacity for dry SO2 did not follow specific trends; however the adsorption energies calculated from the DR equation were found to increase linearly with nitrogen content for each series of ACFs. Much higher adsorption capacities were achieved for SO2 in the presence of oxygen and water due to its catalytic conversion to H2SO4. The dominant factor for increasing adsorption of SO2 from simulated flue gas for each series of fibers studied was the weight percent of basic nitrogen groups present. In addition, the adsorption energies calculated for dry SO2 were shown to be linearly related to the adsorption capacity of H2SO4 from this flue gas for all fibers. It was shown that optimization of this parameter along with the pore volume results in higher adsorption capacities for removal of SO2 from flue gases. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-average-power actively-mode-locked Tm3+ fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerle, Michael; Kieleck, Christelle; Hübner, Philipp; Świderski, Jacek; Jackson, Stuart D.; Mazé, Gwenael; Eichhorn, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Fiber lasers emitting in the 2 μm wavelength range doped with thulium ions can be used as highly efficient pump sources for nonlinear converters to generate mid-infrared radiation. For spectroscopic purposes, illumination and countermeasures, a broad mid-infrared emission spectrum is advantageous. This can be reached by supercontinuum generation in fibers, e.g. fluoride fibers, which up to now has, however, only been presented with either low average power, complex Raman-shifted 1.55 μm pump sources or multi-stage amplifier pump schemes. Here we present recent results of a new actively-mode-locked single-oscillator scheme that can provide the high-repetition rate sub-ns pump pulses needed for pumping supercontinuum generators. A thulium-doped silica fiber laser is presented that provides > 11 W of average power CW-mode-locked pulses at 38 MHz repetition rate at ~ 38 ps pulse width. Upgrading the setup to allow Q-switched mode-locked operation yields mode-locked 40 MHz pulses arranged in 60 kHz bunched Q-switch envelopes and thus increases further the available peak power. In this Q-switched mode-locked regime over 5 W of average power has been achieved.

  4. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power. PMID:21081995

  5. Active stabilization of the optical part in fiber optic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of active stabilization of the polarization and other parameters of the optical part of a two-pass fiber optic quantum cryptography has been proposed and implemented. The method allows the completely automated maintenance of the visibility of interference close to an ideal value ( V ≥ 0.99) and the reduction of the instrumental contribution to the error in primary keys (QBER) to 0.5%.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of magnetically active carbon nanofiber/iron oxide composites with hierarchical pore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panels, Jeanne E.; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Kang Yeol; Kang, Seung Yeon; Marquez, Manuel; Wiesner, Ulrich; Lak Joo, Yong

    2008-11-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution containing the iron oxide precursor iron (III) acetylacetonate (AAI) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce electrically conducting, magnetic carbon nanofiber mats with hierarchical pore structures. The morphology and material properties of the resulting multifunctional nanofiber mats including the surface area and the electric and magnetic properties were examined using various characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy images show that uniform fibers were produced with a fiber diameter of ~600 nm, and this uniform fiber morphology is maintained after graphitization with a fiber diameter of ~330 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman studies reveal that both graphite and Fe3O4 crystals are formed after thermal treatment, and graphitization can be enhanced by the presence of iron. A combination of XRD and transmission electron microscopy experiments reveals the formation of pores with graphitic nanoparticles in the walls as well as the formation of magnetite nanoparticles distributed throughout the fibers. Physisorption experiments show that the multifunctional fiber mats exhibit a high surface area (200-400 m2 g-1) and their pore size is dependent on the amount of iron added and graphitization conditions. Finally, we have demonstrated that the fibers are electrically conducting as well as magnetically active.

  7. Structural health monitoring of IACC yachts using fiber optic distributed strain sensors: a technical challenge for America's Cup 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Kimpara, Isao; Akiyoshi, Shimada; Naruse, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    In this study, we developed a health monitoring system using a fiber optic distributed strain sensor for International America's Cup Class (IACC) yachts. Most structural components of an IACC yacht consist of an aluminum honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates. In such structures, delamination, skin/core debonding and debonding between adhered members will be result in serious fracture of the structure. We equipped two IACC yachts with fiber optic strain sensors designed to measured the distributed strain using a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR) and to detect any deterioration or damage to the yacht's structures caused by such failures. And based on laboratory test results, we proposed a structural health monitoring technique for IACC yachts that involves analyzing their strain distribution. Some important information about structural conditions of the IACC yachts could be obtained from this system through the periodical strain measurements in the field.

  8. Digitally focused array ultrasonic testing technique for carbon fiber composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salchak, Y.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Sednev, D.; Lider, A.

    2016-06-01

    Composite fiber reinforced polymers are highly promising structures. At present, they are widely used in different areas such as aeronautics and nuclear industries. There is a great number of advantages of composite structures such as design flexibility, low cost per cubic inch, resistance to corrosion, lower material costs, lighter weight and improved productivity. However, composites degradation may be caused by different mechanisms such as overload, impact, overheating, creep and fatigue. Comparing to inspection of other materials some unique consideration is required for testing and analysis. Ultrasound testing is the most common method for inspection of composite structures. Digitally Focused Array Technology is considered as novel approach which enables fast and effective quantitative automatic testing. In this study new methodology of quality assurance of composite structure components based on DFA is performed.

  9. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  10. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m(3)/h to 6.5 m(3)/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement. PMID:27587096

  11. Carbon fiber-ZnO nanowire hybrid structures for flexible and adaptable strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qingliang; Mohr, Markus; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2013-11-01

    We report the flexible piezotronic strain sensors fabricated using carbon fiber-ZnO nanowire hybrid structures by a novel and reliable method. The I-V characteristic of the sensor shows high sensitivity to external strain due to the change in Schottky barrier height (SBH), which has a linear relationship with strain. This fabricated strain sensor has a quick, real-time current response under both static and dynamic mechanical loads. The change in SBH resulted from the strain-induced piezoelectric potential is investigated by band gap theory. In this work we develop a new feasible method to fabricate a flexible strain sensor within the fabric adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain.We report the flexible piezotronic strain sensors fabricated using carbon fiber-ZnO nanowire hybrid structures by a novel and reliable method. The I-V characteristic of the sensor shows high sensitivity to external strain due to the change in Schottky barrier height (SBH), which has a linear relationship with strain. This fabricated strain sensor has a quick, real-time current response under both static and dynamic mechanical loads. The change in SBH resulted from the strain-induced piezoelectric potential is investigated by band gap theory. In this work we develop a new feasible method to fabricate a flexible strain sensor within the fabric adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03536k

  12. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m3/h to 6.5 m3/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement.

  13. Development of FRP composite structural biomaterials: ultimate strength of the fiber/matrix interfacial bond in in vivo simulated environments.

    PubMed

    Latour, R A; Black, J

    1992-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are being developed as alternatives to metals for structural orthopedic implant applications. FRP composite fracture behavior and environmental interactions are distinctly different from those which occur in metals. These differences must be accounted for in the design and evaluation of implant performance. Fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength in a FRP composite is known to strongly influence fracture behavior. The interfacial bond strength of four candidate fiber/matrix combinations (carbon fiber/polycarbonate, carbon fiber/polysulfone, polyaramid fiber/polycarbonate, polyaramid fiber/polysulfone) were investigated at 37 degrees C in dry and in vivo simulated (saline, exudate) environments. Ultimate bond strength was measured by a single fiber-microdroplet pull-out test. Dry bond strengths were significantly decreased following exposure to either saline or exudate with bond strength loss being approximately equal in both the saline and exudate. Bond strength loss is attributed to the diffusion of water and/or salt ions into the sample and their interaction with interfacial bonding. Because bond degradation is dependent upon diffusion, diffusional equilibrium must be obtained in composite test samples before the full effect of the test environment upon composite mechanical behavior can be determined. PMID:1512281

  14. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors toward Structural Health Monitoring in Composite Materials: Challenges and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kinet, Damien; Mégret, Patrice; Goossen, Keith W.; Qiu, Liang; Heider, Dirk; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, smart composite materials embed miniaturized sensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) in order to mitigate the risk of failure due to an overload or to unwanted inhomogeneity resulting from the fabrication process. Optical fiber sensors, and more particularly fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, outperform traditional sensor technologies, as they are lightweight, small in size and offer convenient multiplexing capabilities with remote operation. They have thus been extensively associated to composite materials to study their behavior for further SHM purposes. This paper reviews the main challenges arising from the use of FBGs in composite materials. The focus will be made on issues related to temperature-strain discrimination, demodulation of the amplitude spectrum during and after the curing process as well as connection between the embedded optical fibers and the surroundings. The main strategies developed in each of these three topics will be summarized and compared, demonstrating the large progress that has been made in this field in the past few years. PMID:24763215

  15. Structural and Functional Small Fiber Abnormalities in the Neuropathic Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Bonyhay, Istvan; Benson, Adam; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define the neuropathology, clinical phenotype, autonomic physiology and differentiating features in individuals with neuropathic and non-neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Methods Twenty-four subjects with POTS and 10 healthy control subjects had skin biopsy analysis of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD), quantitative sensory testing (QST) and autonomic testing. Subjects completed quality of life, fatigue and disability questionnaires. Subjects were divided into neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS, defined by abnormal IENFD and abnormal small fiber and sudomotor function. Results Nine of 24 subjects had neuropathic POTS and had significantly lower resting and tilted heart rates; reduced parasympathetic function; and lower phase 4 valsalva maneuver overshoot compared with those with non-neuropathic POTS (P<0.05). Neuropathic POTS subjects also had less anxiety and depression and greater overall self-perceived health-related quality of life scores than non-neuropathic POTS subjects. A sub-group of POTS patients (cholinergic POTS) had abnormal proximal sudomotor function and symptoms that suggest gastrointestinal and genitourinary parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Conclusions and Relevance POTS subtypes may be distinguished using small fiber and autonomic structural and functional criteria. Patients with non-neuropathic POTS have greater anxiety, greater depression and lower health-related quality of life scores compared to those with neuropathic POTS. These findings suggest different pathophysiological processes underlie the postural tachycardia in neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS patients. The findings have implications for the therapeutic interventions to treat this disorder. PMID:24386408

  16. Fabrication of polystyrene fibers with tunable co-axial hollow tubing structure for oil spill cleanup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minxin; Chen, Jiafu; Chen, Bingjing; Cao, Jingjing; Hong, Min; Zhou, Chenxu; Xu, Qun

    2016-03-01

    Hollow tubing polystyrene (PS) fibers (HFs) with porous shell were successfully fabricated through co-axial electrospinning and selectively dissolving and removing polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) core of the co-axial PS/PVP fibers using C2H5OH at room temperature. The size of co-axial hollow tubing structure (CHTS) and the thickness of shell can be controlled by varying the feed rate ratio of the core solution to the shell solution. The oil-sorption results show that the oil-sorption capacity increases with the increasing of the size of CHTS in the HFs, and the HFs have higher oil-sorption capacities than the porous PS fibers (PFs) without CHTS. It is noticeable that the diesel sorption capacity (66 g/g) of the HFs is approximately 1.74 times as much as that (38 g/g) of the PFs. The motor oil sorption capacity (147 g/g) of the HFs is approximately 1.55 times as much as that (95 g/g) of the PFs. It is suggested that the HFs have a better oil-sorption performance than the PFs, especially for the low viscosity oil, which is contributed to large CHTS and high porosity.

  17. Fiber Bragg grating sensors toward structural health monitoring in composite materials: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Kinet, Damien; Mégret, Patrice; Goossen, Keith W; Qiu, Liang; Heider, Dirk; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, smart composite materials embed miniaturized sensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) in order to mitigate the risk of failure due to an overload or to unwanted inhomogeneity resulting from the fabrication process. Optical fiber sensors, and more particularly fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, outperform traditional sensor technologies, as they are lightweight, small in size and offer convenient multiplexing capabilities with remote operation. They have thus been extensively associated to composite materials to study their behavior for further SHM purposes. This paper reviews the main challenges arising from the use of FBGs in composite materials. The focus will be made on issues related to temperature-strain discrimination, demodulation of the amplitude spectrum during and after the curing process as well as connection between the embedded optical fibers and the surroundings. The main strategies developed in each of these three topics will be summarized and compared, demonstrating the large progress that has been made in this field in the past few years. PMID:24763215

  18. Activation of macrophages stimulated by the bengkoang fiber extract through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Kumalasari, Ika Dyah; Nishi, Kosuke; Putra, Agus Budiawan Naro; Sugahara, Takuya

    2014-07-25

    Bengkoang (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) is an edible root tuber containing fairly large amounts of carbohydrates and crude fibers. Our previous studies showed that the bengkoang fiber extract (BFE) stimulates activation of macrophages, leading to induction of phagocytotic activity and cytokine production. In the present study we investigated the mechanism underlying activation of murine macrophages by BFE. BFE increased production of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide by J774.1 cells. In addition BFE also facilitated the gene expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase. We examined the effect of a TLR4 inhibitor on cytokine production to investigate the membrane receptor of macrophage activation by BFE. Treatment of J774.1 cells with the TLR4 inhibitor significantly inhibited production of IL-6 and TNF-α, suggesting that TLR4 is the target membrane receptor for BFE. The main signal molecules located downstream of TLR4 such as JNK, p38, ERK, and NF-κB were activated by BFE treatment. The immunostimulatory effect of BFE was cancelled by the pectinase treatment, suggesting that the active ingredient in BFE is pectin-like molecules. Overall results suggested that BFE activates J774.1 cells via the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24770453

  19. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  20. High photocatalytic activity of immobilized TiO2 nanorods on carbonized cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Xuan, Jin; Leung, Michael K H

    2013-12-15

    In this study, TiO2 nanorods were successfully immobilized on carbon fibers by a facile pyrolysis of natural cotton in nitrogen atmosphere followed by a one-pot hydrothermal method. Carbonized cotton fibers (CCFs) and TiO2-CCFs composites were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Results implied that the band gap narrowing of TiO2 was achieved after integration of CCFs. Dye adsorption isotherm indicated that the maximum dye adsorption capacity (qm) of CCFs-1000 (13.4 mg/g) was 2 times higher than that of cotton fibers and qm of TiO2-CCFs-1000 (9.0mg/g) was 6-7 times higher than that of TiO2 nanorods. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanorods prepared with 3 mL Ti(OBu)4 showed the highest photocatalytic activity. TiO2-CCFs-1000 exhibited higher activity than TiO2 immobilized on CCFs-400, CCFs-600 and CCFs-800. Good photostability of TiO2-CCFs-1000 was found for dye degradation under visible light irradiation. The enhancement of photocatalytic dye degradation was due to the high adsorptivity of dye molecules, enhanced light adsorption and effective separation of electron-hole pairs. This work provides a low-cost and sustainable approach to immobilize nanostructured TiO2 on carbon fibers for environmental remediation. PMID:24220193