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Sample records for active submarine mud

  1. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  2. Prokaryotic community structure and diversity in the sediments of an active submarine mud volcano (Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Lykousis, Vasilios; Stefanou, Euripides G; Kormas, Konstantinos A

    2010-06-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA gene diversity at a high sediment depth resolution (every 5 cm, top 30 cm) in an active site of the Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea. A total of 242 archaeal and 374 bacterial clones were analysed, which were attributed to 38 and 205 unique phylotypes, respectively (> or = 98% similarity). Most of the archaeal phylotypes were related to ANME-1, -2 and -3 members originating from habitats where anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs, although they occurred in sediment layers with no apparent AOM (below the sulphate depletion depth). Proteobacteria were the most abundant and diverse bacterial group, with the Gammaproteobacteria dominating in most sediment layers and these were related to phylotypes involved in methane cycling. The Deltaproteobacteria included several of the sulphate-reducers related to AOM. The rest of the bacterial phylotypes belonged to 15 known phyla and three unaffiliated groups, with representatives from similar habitats. Diversity index H was in the range 0.56-1.73 and 1.47-3.82 for Archaea and Bacteria, respectively, revealing different depth patterns for the two groups. At 15 and 20 cm below the sea floor, the prokaryotic communities were highly similar, hosting AOM-specific Archaea and Bacteria. Our study revealed different dominant phyla in proximate sediment layers. PMID:20370830

  3. Gravity anomalies of the active mud diapirs off southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doo, Wen-Bin; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Lo, Chung-Liang; Chen, Song-Chuen; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Jing-Yi; Huang, Yuan-Ping; Huang, Yin-Sheng; Chiu, Shye-Donq; Ma, Yu-Fang

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure and buoyant effect of underlying sediments are generally used to account for the upward motion or formation of submarine mud volcanoes and mud diapirs. In this study, we process and interpret the gravity anomalies associated with the active mud diapirs off SW Taiwan. Geologically, the mud diapirs are just formed and are still very active, thus we can better understand the initial process of the mud diapirs formation through the gravity analysis. Our results show that the density contrasts of the submarine mud diapirs with respect to the surroundings are generally positive. Because the study area is in a tectonically compressive regime and the gas plume venting from the submarine mud volcanoes is very active, we thus infer that mechanically the mud diapirs off SW Taiwan have been formed mainly due to the tectonic compression on the underlying sediments of high pore-fluid pressure, instead of the buoyancy of the buried sediments. The overpressured sediments and fluid are compressed and pushed upwards to pierce the overlying sediments and form the more compacted mud diapirs. The relatively denser material of the mud diapirs probably constrains the flowing courses of the submarine canyons off SW Taiwan, especially for the upper reaches of the Kaoping and Fangliao submarine canyons.

  4. Daily Variations of Methane Flux from Submarine Mud Volcanoes in Southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Han; Yang, Tsanyao; Chen, Naichen; Lin, Saulwood; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2014-05-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are features that episodically emit gases, fluids, and mud onto the seafloor. Methane is the representative gas transport by mud volcanoes efficiently from deep buried sediment to the water column, and potentially to the atmosphere as a greenhouse gas. An active mud volcano, site-G96, located at the upper slope of southwest Taiwan, has plume from the top of mud volcano (360 m) direct to the sea surface. We can observe the bubbles at the sea surface. This study was conducted during cruise OR3-1693 in June 2013. To understand the activity of gas emissions of mud volcano, we utilized the 38kz echo sounder to scan back and forth over the site-G96 and obtained 53 acoustic images of plumes. Five water column samples were collected above the venting of G96 at the tidal maximum and minimum. Three gravity cores were taken at the mudflow site of G96. The results show high concentration of methane (38,522ul/l) and shallow depth of sulfate methane transition zone (~70cm) in the cored sediment profiles. The C1/(C2+C3) ratios from cored sediments are in the range of 29-392, indicating that the methane gas is mostly thermogenic in origin. Calculated areas of the plumes from echo sounder images show good correlation with the tide variations during the survey on 1st -2nd June 2013. Flux of methane from the water column to atmosphere can be estimated by diffusive exchange equation, showing that gas emission from an active mud volcano could be largely various (0.065, 3.426, 3.414, 0, 41.739umol m-2 d-1) from time to time, at least, in this study.

  5. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  6. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected. PMID:18247739

  7. Stromatactis—Origin related to submarine-cemented crusts in Paleozoic mud mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathurst, Robin G. C.

    1980-03-01

    Stromatactis, long familiar as reticulate masses of sparry calcite in Paleozoic mud mounds and more recently identified as a system of cement-filled cavities, has been studied in limestones of Ordovician age in Sweden, of Devonian age in Australia, and of Carboniferous age in England. The origin of the cavity system has been uncertain. However, many features suggest a linking of its origin to cementation of a succession of submarine crusts and the development of cavities in the intercalated, less-cemented carbonate muds. Examination of the morphology of the sediment layers between the masses of spar reveals a similarity with thin brittle sheets or crusts alternating with incoherent mud—a situation perhaps not unlike that seen today on lithoherms in the Straits of Florida.

  8. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) ( = BCRC AR10044(T) = DSM 29354(T)). PMID:25855623

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT, a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from a Submarine Mud Volcano in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the genome sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT (DSM 29354T), a strict anaerobic methanoarchaeon, which was isolated from sediments near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located offshore in southwestern Taiwan. The 2.49-Mb genome consists of 2,459 predicted genes, 3 rRNAs, 48 tRNAs, and 1 ncRNA. The sequence of this novel strain may provide more information for species delineation and the roles that this strain plays in the unique marine mud volcano habitat. PMID:27103730

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT, a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from a Submarine Mud Volcano in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Sue-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the genome sequence of ITALIC! Methanoculleus sediminisS3Fa(T)(DSM 29354(T)), a strict anaerobic methanoarchaeon, which was isolated from sediments near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located offshore in southwestern Taiwan. The 2.49-Mb genome consists of 2,459 predicted genes, 3 rRNAs, 48 tRNAs, and 1 ncRNA. The sequence of this novel strain may provide more information for species delineation and the roles that this strain plays in the unique marine mud volcano habitat. PMID:27103730

  11. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity. PMID:21382146

  12. Arsenic adsorption from aqueous solutions by activated red mud.

    PubMed

    Altundoğan, H Soner; Altundoğan, Sema; Tümen, Fikret; Bildik, Memnune

    2002-01-01

    Heat treatment and acid treatment methods have been tested on red mud to increase its arsenic adsorption capability. The results indicate that the adsorptive capacity of red mud can be increased by acid treatment. This treatment causes sodalite compounds to leach out. As(III) and As(V) adsorption characteristics of activated red mud have similar tendencies with raw red mud. Batch adsorption studies have shown that activated red mud in dosages ranging from 20 to 100 g l(-1) can be used effectively to remove arsenic from aqueous solutions. The process is pH dependent, the optimum range being 5.8-7.5 for As(III) and 1.8-3.5 for As(V). The maximum removals are 96.52% for As(V) and 87.54% for As(III) for solutions with a final pH of 7.25 and 3.50, respectively, for the initial arsenic concentration of 133.5 micromol l(-1) (10 mg l(-1)), activated red mud dosage of 20 g l(-1), contact time of 60 min and temperature of 25 degrees C. The adsorption data obtained follow a first-order rate expression and fit the Langmuir isotherm well. Isotherms have been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters. It was found that the adsorption of As(III) was exothermic, whereas As(V) adsorption was endothermic. PMID:11952183

  13. Submarine Rivers of Mud and Sand: Channels Dispersing Sediment Across the Fly River Clinoform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, C. A.; Crockett, J. S.; Ogston, A. S.; Sternberg, R. W.; Donahue, B. T.; Naar, D. F.; Goni, M. A.; Walsh, J.; Driscoll, N.

    2003-12-01

    The subaqueous delta of the Fly River has a clinoform structure prograding onto transgressive shelf deposits. The clinoform contains numerous channels, which appear to have ancestral origins. Perhaps they were subaerial stream valleys during lower stands of sea level, but they presently can be buried partially or completely by modern and late Holocene sediment deposits - especially toward shore (i.e., beneath topset deposits). Some of the larger channels extend from the topset across the foreset region, and seem to be linked to distributary channels of the Fly delta. Some extend onto the bottomset and outer shelf. Others can be recognized only in subbottom profiles. The channels can be dramatic features with steep walls rising 50 m, and can contain 20 m or more of infilled sediment. Most extant channels (i.e., still morphological depressions) appear to be active conduits for rapid transport seaward of sediment and carbon. The boundary-layer regions of the water column within channels contain high concentrations of sediment (>1 g/l) and the seabed is relatively unconsolidated and accumulating rapidly. Sedimentary structures found in the thalwegs of channels indicate graded deposits resulting from density flows, which may be shelf turbidity currents. The channelized morphology and resulting mechanisms for sediment dispersal differ from other portions of the clinoform structure in the Gulf of Papua. They also differ from modern shelf clinoforms elsewhere in the world, although they probably have ancient analogs (Cretaceous Seaway of North America).

  14. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  15. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume I (of 4): Task 1, conduct research on mud-rich submarine fans. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    The objective for this portion of the research involved conducting field studies and laboratory investigations to develop and refine models for mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysis and reservoir engineers. These research aspects have been presented in two papers as follows: (1) Bouma, A.H., {open_quotes}Review of Fine-Grained Submarine Fans and Turbidite Systems{close_quotes}; (2) Kirkova, J.T. and Lorenzo, J.M., {open_quotes}Synthetic Seismic Modeling of Measured Submarine Fans Sections, Case Study of the Tanqua Complex, Karoo, South Africa{close_quotes} The {open_quotes}Review of Fine-Grained Submarine Fans and Turbidite Systems{close_quotes} by Arnold Bouma discusses research targeted toward stimulating an increase in oil and gas recovery by developing new and improved geological understanding. The {open_quotes}Synthetic Seismic Modeling of Measured Submarine Fan Sections, Case Study of the Tanqua Complex, Karoo, South Africa{close_quotes} by J.T. Kirkova and J.M. Lorenso discusses the limitations of verticle resolution and how this affects the interpretation and characterization of submarine fan complexes.

  17. Active Submarine Hotspot Volcanism on the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.; Leser, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Heard and McDonald Islands on the Kerguelen Plateau, southern Indian Ocean, are active intraplate hotspot volcanoes. Heard Island is approximately 43 km long, and encompasses an area of approximately 368 square km. It is dominated by Big Ben, a roughly circular volcano with a base diameter of 18-20 km, and a maximum elevation of 2745 m. The McDonald Islands have an area of approximately 2.5 square km. Due to a lack of human habitation and no geoscientific monitoring, and cloud cover precluding satellite remote sensing for geoscientific purposes, the level of volcanic activity of the islands is unknown, but observers on passing ships frequently report eruptions, including molten lava, volcanic plumes, and tephra, and active fumaroles. Bathymetric, seismic reflection, magnetic, and gravity data acquired around Heard and McDonald Islands suggest that submarine magmatism affects a broad region of surrounding Kerguelen Plateau seafloor. In this region, we have identified six distinct fields of sea knolls that we interpret to be volcanic in origin. Individual fields contain from approximately 14 to approximately 140 sea knolls, and are not uniformly distributed around Heard and McDonald Islands. Given that Heard and McDonald Islands are volcanically active, it is likely that at least some of the interpreted submarine volcanoes are active and drive hydrothermal circulation.

  18. Removal of hexavalent chromium by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Li, Deliang; Ding, Ying; Li, Lingling; Chang, Zhixian; Rao, Zhengyong; Lu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solution by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was studied. The optimum operation parameters, such as CTAB concentration, pH values, contact time, and initial Cr(VI) concentration, were investigated. The best concentration of CTAB for modifying red mud was found to be 0.50% (mCTAB/VHCl,0.6 mol/L). The lower pH (<2) was found to be much more favourable for the removal of Cr(VI). Red mud activated with CTAB can greatly improve the removal ratio of Cr(VI) as high as four times than that of original red mud. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 30 min under the initial Cr(VI) concentration of 100 mg L(-1). The isotherm data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on activated red mud fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 22.20 mg g(-1) (Cr/red mud). The adsorption process could be well described using the pseudo-second-order model. The result shows that activated red mud is a promising agent for low-cost water treatment. PMID:25299348

  19. Adsorption of arsenic from water using activated neutralized red mud.

    PubMed

    Genç-Fuhrman, Hülya; Tjell, Jens Christian; McConchie, David

    2004-04-15

    In this paper activated seawater-neutralized red mud, herein referred to as activated Bauxsol (AB), is used as a novel adsorbent for removing inorganic arsenic (As) from water. The adsorption of As onto AB is studied as a function of contact time, particle size, pH, initial As concentration, AB dosage, and temperature. Kinetic data indicate that the process pseudoequilibrates in 3 and 6 h for As(V) (arsenate) and As(III) (arsenite), respectively, and follows a pseudo-first-order rate expression. Within the range tested, the optimal pH for As(V) adsorption is 4.5, and close to 100% removal can be achieved irrespective of the initial As(V) concentration. Desorption of As(V) is greatest at pH 11.6 where a maximum of 40% can be achieved. In contrast, the optimum pH for As(III) removal is 8.5, and the removal efficiency changes with the initial As(III) concentration. The adsorption data fit the Langmuir isotherm and its linearized form well, with thermodynamic data indicating the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. The FITEQL (V.4) and PHREEQC (V.2) computer programs are used to predict As(V) adsorption at various pH values (based on diffuse double layer models). The modeling results fit the experimental results very well and indicate that surface complexation modeling is useful in describing the complex AB surface during the adsorption process. This study shows that As(III) needs to be oxidized to As(V) for a favorable removal using AB and that AB can be a very efficient unconventional adsorbent for removing As(V) from water. PMID:15116850

  20. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  1. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    PubMed

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution. PMID:24631200

  2. Morphometric, acoustic and lithofacies characterization of mud volcanoes in the Eastern Mediterranean: Toward a new approach and classification to constrain the regional distribution and activity of mud volcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flore, Mary; Sébastien, Migeon; Elia, d'Acremont; Alain, Rabaute; Silvia, Ceramicola; Daniel, Praeg; Christian, Blanpied

    2015-04-01

    On continental margins, several types of seabed features recording fluid circulation within the sediment column have already been recognized, including mud volcanoes, pockmarks, carbonates pavements and/or mounds and brine lakes. They can be associated to (a) thermogenic or biogenic fluids migrating along tectonic conduits, (b) dissociation of gas hydrates, or (c) dewatering of turbidite channels and mass-transport deposits. Although fluid-escape structures have been analyzed for the last two decades using diverse and complementary data, many questions are still debated about their morphologies/architectures, origin and formation, their temporal dynamic and the impact of the geodynamical context on their location/formation. In the Eastern Mediterranean, fluid seepages and in particular mud volcanoes, were identified in three geodynamical contexts including active margins (Calabrian accretionary prism and Mediterranean ridge) and highly-sedimented passive margin (Nil deep-sea fan). In this study, we follow a new approach allowing to (1) better quantify a broad set of morphological parameters that characterize the seabed fluid-escape structures, (2) propose an advance classification of these structures, the final goal being to test whether one or several morphological types of fluid-escape structures can be characteristic of one tectonic and sedimentological setting in the Eastern Mediterranean basin. To achieve this classification based on geophysical and geological analysis (morphometry, reflectivity, seismic r and lithofacies features), we used a broad homogenous dataset at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean, including multibeam bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, 2D/3D seismic reflection, and sediment cores description and analysis. More than 500 mud volcano-like structures were identified based on one criterion or on the association of several criteria, while 40 of them were clearly proved to be mud volcanoes by coring. These structures exhibit different

  3. Zonation of North Alex Mud Volcano Highlighted by 3-D Active and Passive Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, J.; Lefeldt, M. R.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Brueckmann, W.

    2010-12-01

    The West Nile Delta forms part of the source of the large turbiditic Nile Deep Sea Fan. Since the late Miocene sediments have formed an up to 10 km thick pile, which includes about 1 - 3 km of Messinian evaporates. The sediment load of the overburden implies strong overpressures and salt-related tectonic deformation. Both are favourable for fluid migration towards the seafloor guided by the fractured margin. The western deltaic system, Rosetta branch, has formed an 80 km wide continental shelf. Here at 700 m water depth the mud volcano North Alex (NA) developed his circular bathymetric feature, which proved to be an active gas and mud-expelling structure. A 3-D high-resolution multichannel seismic survey (IFM-GEOMAR P-Cable system) was completed across the mud volcano. 3-D time migration provided a 3-D data cube with a 6.25 m grid. Vertical seismic sections did reveal a large set of faults located within the main mud volcano as well as surrounding the structure. Internal faults are mainly related to episodic mud expulsion processes and continuous gas and fluid production. Deep cutting external faults surround the structure in a half circle shape. Horizontal amplitude maps (time slices) of indicate recent activity of these faults even up to the seafloor. High gas saturation of the sediments is indicated by inverted reflection events. In the centre the gas front cuts into the seafloor reflection while it dips down with increasing radius. Only with the small grid resolution inward dipping reflections become visible, which form an upward opened concave reflector plane underlying the top gas front. The interpretation assumes an oval lens shaped body (conduit) saturated with gas at the top of the mud volcano. It provides the upper termination of the mud chimney. This separation is further supported by passive seismic observations. Distant earthquakes can stimulate long-period harmonic oscillations in mud volcanoes. Such oscillations are detectable with three

  4. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes. PMID:22458514

  5. Prokaryotic diversity of an active mud volcano in the Usu City of Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Mei; Lou, Kai; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Xiao-Long

    2012-02-01

    The Usu mud volcanoes are the largest group of terrestrial mud volcanoes in China. The volcanoes are located in a typical arid and semi-arid region, and the group consists of 36 erupting active mud volcanoes. In this study, the prokaryotic diversity and community structure in the sediment of an active mud volcano were investigated by constructing bacterial and archaeal clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 100 bacterial and 100 archaeal clones were analysed and found to comprise 11 and 7 distinct phylotypes, respectively. The bacterial phylotypes were classified into three phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria). Of these, Proteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial group, with Deltaproteobacteria dominating the sediment community, and these were affiliated with the order Desulfuromonadales. The archaeal phylotypes were all closely related to uncultivated species, and the majority of the members were related to the orders Methanosarcinales and Halobacteriales of the Euryarchaeota originating from methane hydrate bearing or alkaline sediments. The rest of the archaeal phylotypes belonged to the phylum Crenarchaeota, with representatives from similar habitats. These results suggested that a large number of novel microbial groups and potential methanogenesis may exist in this unique ecosystem. PMID:21656823

  6. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  7. Research activities on submarine landslides in gentle continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Goto, S.; Miyata, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Kitahara, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In the north Sanrikuoki Basin off Shimokita Peninsula, NE Japan, a great number of buried large slump deposits have been identified in the Pliocene and younger formations. The basin has formed in a very gentle continental slope of less than one degree in gradient and is composed of well-stratified formations which basically parallel to the present seafloor. This indicates that the slumping have also occurred in such very gentle slope angle. The slump units and their slip surfaces have very simple and clear characteristics, such as layer-parallel slip on the gentle slope, regularly imbricated internal structure, block-supported with little matrix structure, widespread dewatering structure, and low-amplitude slip surface layer. We recognize that the large slump deposits group of layer-parallel slip in this area is an appropriate target to determine 'mechanism of submarine landslides', that is one of the subjects on the new IODP science plan for 2013 and beyond. So, we started some research activities to examine the feasibility of the future scientific drilling. The slump deposits were recognized basically by 3D seismic analysis. Further detailed seismic analysis using 2D seismic data in wider area of the basin is being performed for better understanding of geologic structure of the sedimentary basin and the slump deposits. This will be good source to extract suitable locations for drill sites. Typical seismic features and some other previous studies imply that the formation fluid in this study area is strongly related to natural gas, of which condition is strongly affected by temperature. So, detailed heat flow measurements was performed in the study area in 2013. For that purpose, a long-term water temperature monitoring system was deployed on the seafloor in October, 2012. The collected water temperature variation is applied to precise correction of heat flow values. Vitrinite reflectance analysis is also being carried out using sediments samples recovered by IODP

  8. Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Helge; Lösekann, Tina; de Beer, Dirk; Elvert, Marcus; Nadalig, Thierry; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Sauter, Eberhard J; Schlüter, Michael; Klages, Michael; Foucher, Jean Paul; Boetius, Antje

    2006-10-19

    Mud volcanism is an important natural source of the greenhouse gas methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Recent investigations show that the number of active submarine mud volcanoes might be much higher than anticipated (for example, see refs 3-5), and that gas emitted from deep-sea seeps might reach the upper mixed ocean. Unfortunately, global methane emission from active submarine mud volcanoes cannot be quantified because their number and gas release are unknown. It is also unclear how efficiently methane-oxidizing microorganisms remove methane. Here we investigate the methane-emitting Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV, Barents Sea, 72 degrees N, 14 degrees 44' E; 1,250 m water depth) to provide quantitative estimates of the in situ composition, distribution and activity of methanotrophs in relation to gas emission. The HMMV hosts three key communities: aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (Methylococcales), anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) thriving below siboglinid tubeworms, and a previously undescribed clade of archaea (ANME-3) associated with bacterial mats. We found that the upward flow of sulphate- and oxygen-free mud volcano fluids restricts the availability of these electron acceptors for methane oxidation, and hence the habitat range of methanotrophs. This mechanism limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux. PMID:17051217

  9. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Wang; Guan, Xuemao

    2015-04-01

    The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP-AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM-EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na6CaAl6Si6(CO3)O24 · 2H2O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH · H2O and Na2Ca(CO3)2 were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol. PMID:25559862

  10. Diversity and activity of benthic microbial communities at the North Alex mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarow, Dorothee; Feseker, Tomas; Schmitz, Ruth; Treude, Tina

    2010-05-01

    North Alex mud volcano, located on the upper slope of the western Nile deep-sea fan, is characterized by an active seepage center transporting pore fluids, hydrocarbons and gases from deep subsurface sources to the sediment-water interface. Surface sediments feature steep temperature gradient of 8.5°C m-1. We sampled the top 40 cm of the sediments at different locations between the center and rim of the mud volcano to study the diversity, activity, and physiological characteristics of benthic microorganisms. The sediments revealed the activity of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction with a mesophilic temperature optimum. Organisms involved in the process include consortia of methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2 group) and an unknown bacterial partner. Besides methanotrophic organisms the sediments harbored a variety of other bacterial and archaeal groups - including potentially thermophilic bacteria that could be involved in sulfur cycling. This poster presentation will provide an overview of microbial activities and community compositions of North Alex mud volcano sediments.

  11. Pozzolanic behaviour of compound-activated red mud-coal gangue mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Na; Liu Xiaoming; Sun Henghu; Li Longtu

    2011-03-15

    The pozzolanic behaviour of compound-activated red mud-coal gangue has been investigated through TG, DTA, XRD, FTIR and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR. From viewpoint of reaction kinetics, it is found that the pozzolanic reaction mechanism of the compound-activated red mud-coal gangue - lime system is clearly consistent with diffusion control up to 14 days, and the reaction rate constant calculated from Jander equation decreases with the increase of CaO addition in the system. The hydration products formed in the red mud-coal gangue - lime systems at ambient temperature are essentially aluminous C-S-H and Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}.xH{sub 2}O. From TG analysis results, it is thought that the high amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the pastes of studied system is not conducive to the continual increase of non-evaporable water content of the hydration products. Of particular interest, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR proved to be an effective technique to obtain valuable information of Al{sup [4]} in C-S-H and Al{sup [6]} in Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}.xH{sub 2}O.

  12. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-01-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2–dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10−6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like 3He/4He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano. PMID:27311383

  13. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-06-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2–dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10‑6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like 3He/4He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano.

  14. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-01-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report (3)He/(4)He measurements in CO2-dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a (3)He/(4)He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the (3)He/(4)He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10(-6)), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like (3)He/(4)He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano. PMID:27311383

  15. ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal activities using barite in sulfide deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, S.; Fujiwara, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Isono, Y.; Uchida, A.; Takamasa, A.; Nakai, S.

    2012-12-01

    The temporal change of submarine hydrothermal activities has been an important issue in the aspect of the evolution of hydrothermal systems which is related with ore formation (Urabe, 1995) and biological systems sustained by the chemical species arising from hydrothermal activities (Macdonald et al., 1980). Determining the ages of the hydrothermal deposit will provide essential information on such studies. Dating methods using disequilibrium between radioisotopes such as U-Th method (e.g. You and Bickle, 1998), 226}Ra-{210Pb and 228}Ra-{228Th method (e.g. Noguchi et al., 2011) have been applied to date submarine hydrothermal deposits. ESR (electron spin resonance) dating method is commonly applied to fossil teeth, shells, and quartz of Quaternay period where the natural accumulated dose is obtained from the intensities of the ESR signals which are created by natural radiation. The natural dose is divided by the dose rate to the mineral/sample to deduce the age. Okumura et al., (2010) made the first practical application of ESR (electron spin resonance) dating technique to a sample of submarine hydrothermal barite (BaSO4) to obtain preliminary ages, where Kasuya et al. (1991) first pointed out that barite can be used for ESR dating. Knowing that ESR dating of barite is promising, in this paper, we will present how we have investigated each factor that contributes ESR dating of barite in submarine hydrothermal sulfide deposition. (1) The best ESR condition for measuring the SO3- signal in barite is with the microwave power of 1mW and modulation amplitude of 0.1mT. (2) As results of heating experiments, the signal was found to be stable for the dating age range of several thousands. (3) 226Ra replacing Ba in barite is the source of the radiation. The amount of radioactive elements in sulfide mineral surrounding barite is negligible. (4) The external radiation from the sea water is negligible even in the submarine hydrothermal area where the radiation level is much

  16. Submarine volcanic activity, ocean-acoustic waves and internal ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Fukao, Yoshio; Hibiya, Toshiyuki

    2005-12-01

    Submarine volcanic event often generates acoustic waves (T-waves) traveling over long distances through the low velocity channel (SOFAR) of the ocean. By a method of coherent stacking of T-waves from a submarine volcanic activity in northern Mariana, we found a significant semidiurnal variation of T-wave travel times. The amplitude of variation is an order of larger than those reported in the previous ocean sound transmission experiments. Ray-theoretical consideration for the numerically simulated ocean tides indicates that such large T-phase travel time variation is a consequence of large up-and-down movement of seawater around the axis of the SOFAR channel due to the M2 internal tide effectively converted from external tidal forcing. T-phases, a ubiquitous feature of the ocean acoustic noise field, can be used to infer internal tidal motion and the associated ocean mixing.

  17. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    on surface, often of plane-conical shape, rising for 5 to 400 m and more over the country (for example, mud volcano Toragay, 400 m height). The base diameter is from 100 m to 3-4 km and more. Like the magmatic ones, the mud volcanoes are crowned with crater of convex-plane or deeply-seated shape. In Azerbaijan there are all types of mud volcanoes: active, extinct, buried, submarine, island, abundantly oil seeping. According to their morphology they are defined into cone-shaped, dome-shaped, ridge-shaped, plateau-shaped. The crater shapes are also various: conical, convex-plane, shield-shaped, deeply-seated, caldera-like. The most complete morphological classification was given in "Atlas of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan" (Yakubov et al., 1971). Recently (Aliyev Ad. et al., 2003) it was proposed a quite new morphological classification of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. For the first time the mud volcanic manifestations had been defined. Volcanoes are ranged according to morphological signs, crater shape and type of activity.

  18. Molecular characterization of thioredoxin-1 and thioredoxin reductase activity in mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Hu, J H; Zhang, F Y; Jiang, K J; Fang, Y B; Wang, J; Zhao, M; Qiao, Z G; Ma, L B

    2014-01-01

    The thioredoxin (Trx) system consists of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), Trx, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). TrxR is an NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase. Trx is a ubiquitous small protein with a redox-active disulfide bridge that plays important regulatory roles in some vital metabolic reactions. In this study, a cDNA sequence (SpTrx1) showing high identity to the first Trx gene was isolated from a hepatopancreas cDNA library of the mud crab Scylla paramamosain. The full-length cDNA of SpTrx1 consisted of 672 bp and contained a complete open reading frame of 318 bp encoding a polypeptide of 105 amino acids. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SpTrx1 expression was ubiquitous in various organs of S. paramamosain, including the gill, muscle, heart, hemolymph, testis, and hepatopancreas. SpTrx1 expression was upregulated significantly after Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge: it obviously rose at 48 h and reached the highest level at 72 h. Furthermore, TrxR activity was detected in the gill, heart, muscle, hemolymph, and hepatopancreas. The relative TrxR activity in different tissues after V. parahaemolyticus injection had the same tendency in each tissue (P < 0.01) as SpTrx1 expression. The TrxR activity increased 2 h after injection, peaked at 8 h, slowly decreased from 12 to 24 h, and returned to normal levels at 48 h. The consistency of the expression between the Trx transcript and TrxR activity demonstrated that Trx was closely related to TrxR in the Trx system in S. paramamosain, suggesting that it may participate in the immune system of mud crabs. PMID:25501236

  19. Plume indications from hydrothermal activity on Kawio Barat Submarine Volcano, Sangihe Talaud Sea, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarim, S.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Wirasantosa, S.; Permana, H.; Sulistiyo, B.; Shank, T. M.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D.; Ramdhan, M.; Adi, R.; Marzuki, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Kawio Barat submarine volcano has formed in response to the active tectonic conditions in Sangihe Talaud, an area that lies in the subduction zone between the Molucca Sea Plate and Celebes Sea Plate. Submarine volcanic activity in the western Sangihe volcanic arc is controlled by the west-dipping Molucca Sea Plate as it subducts beneath the Sangihe Arc. A secondary faulting system on Kawio Barat is in a northwest - southeast direction, and creates a network of deep cracks that facilitate hydrothermal discharge in this area. Hydrothermal activity on Kawio Barat was first discovered by joint Indonesia/Australian cruises in 2003. In 2010, as part of the joint US/Indonesian INDEX-SATAL expedition, we conducted CTD casts that confirmed continuing activity. Hydrothermal plumes were detected by light -scattering (LSS) and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensors on the CTD package. LSS anomalies were found between 1600-1900 m, with delta NTU levels of 0.020-0.040. ORP anomalies coincident with the LSS anomalies indicate strong concentrations of reduced species such as H2S and Fe, confirming the hydrothermal origin of the plumes. Images of hydrothermal vents on Kawio Barat Submarine volcano, recorded by high- definition underwater cameras on the ROV “Little Hercules” operated from the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer, confirmed the presence and sources of the detected vent plumes in the northern and southwest part of the summit in 1800-1900 m depth. In southwest part of this summit chimney, drips of molten sulfur were observed in the proximity of microbal staining.

  20. Boron-rich mud volcanoes of the Black Sea region: modern analogues to ancient sea-floor tourmalinites associated with Sullivan-type Pb-Zn deposits?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Turner, R.J.W.; Ware, P.L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Large submarine mud volcanoes in the abyssal part of the Black Sea south of the Crimean Peninsula are similar in many respects to synsedimentary mud volcanoes in the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell basin. One of the Belt-Purcell mud volcanoes directly underlies the giant Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit in southeastern British Columbia. Footwall rocks to the Sullivan deposit comprise variably tourmalinized siltstone, conglomerate, and related fragmental rock; local thin pyrrhotite-rich and spessartine-quartz beds are interpreted as Fe and Fe-Mn exhalites, respectively. Analogous Fe- and Mn-rich sediments occur near the abyssal Black Sea mud volcanoes. Massive pyrite crusts and associated carbonate chimneys discovered in relatively shallow waters (~200 m depth) west of the Crimean Peninsula indicate an active sea-floor-hydrothermal system. Subaerial mud volcanoes on the Kerch and Taman Peninsulas (~100 km north of the abyssal mud volcanoes) contain saline thermal waters that locally have very high B contents (to 915 mg/L). These data suggest that tourmalinites might be forming in or near submarine Black Sea mud volcanoes, where potential may also exist for Sullivan-type Pb-Zn mineralization.

  1. Boron-rich mud volcanoes of the Black Sea region: Modern analogues to ancient sea-floor tourmalinites associated with Sullivan-type Pb-Zn deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, John F.; Turner, Robert J. W.; Ware, Paul L. G.

    1998-05-01

    Large submarine mud volcanoes in the abyssal part of the Black Sea south of the Crimean Peninsula are similar in many respects to synsedimentary mud volcanoes in the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell basin. One of the Belt-Purcell mud volcanoes directly underlies the giant Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit in southeastern British Columbia. Footwall rocks to the Sullivan deposit comprise variably tourmalinized siltstone, conglomerate, and related fragmental rock; local thin pyrrhotite-rich and spessartine-quartz beds are interpreted as Fe and Fe-Mn exhalites, respectively. Analogous Fe- and Mn-rich sediments occur near the abyssal Black Sea mud volcanoes. Massive pyrite crusts and associated carbonate chimneys discovered in relatively shallow waters (˜200 m depth) west of the Crimean Peninsula indicate an active sea-floor hydrothermal system. Subaerial mud volcanoes on the Kerch and Taman Peninsulas (˜100 km north of the abyssal mud volcanoes) contain saline thermal waters that locally have very high B contents (to 915 mg/L). These data suggest that tourmalinites might be forming in or near submarine Black Sea mud volcanoes, where potential may also exist for Sullivan-type Pb-Zn mineralization.

  2. Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of the Deep Subsurface Environment: Kumano Mud Volcano, Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, D. H.; Ijiri, A.; Morono, Y.; Orphan, V. J.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes play an important environmental role by delivering deep-sourced fluids, elements, and hydrocarbons to the seafloor. These fluxes in turn support chemosynthetic benthic communities. However, due to difficulty in accessing the deep biosphere most mud volcano samples only represent the top one to several meters below seafloor (mbsf) obtainable by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) or gravity cores. Thus, the geochemical and microbiological conditions, as well as vertical homogeneity, deep within mud volcanoes remains poorly constrained. In 2012, using the deep-sea drilling vessel Chikyu, we drilled one of the most active submarine mud volcanoes in the Kumano forearc basin of the Nankai Trough, off the Kii Peninsula of Japan (33°67.581'N, 136°56.8085'E: 1,986.7 m in water depth). Cores were obtained down to 200 mbsf. Cell counts indicate the presence of microorganisms at relatively low abundance (less than 105 cells/cm3) throughout the cored depth. Molecular analyses reveal vertical heterogeneity in the microbial community composition, including specific depth horizons harboring putative methanogenic and methanotrophic phylotypes at >100 mbsf. Geochemical profiles indicate the potential for microbial activity and rate measurements with radiotracers revealed active homoacetogenesis rates that were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than rates of homo- and acetoclastic methanogenesis. To assess active autotrophic, methanotrophic and heterotrophic populations, 13C- and 15N-amendment experiments with sediment samples collected from 15 and 115 mbsf were established and single cell stable isotope analyses with nanoSIMS are in progress. Our samples and analyses represent a unique observation of a subseafloor setting different from previously explored stratified sediments on continental margins and will allow further understanding of how submarine mud volcanoes contribute to geochemical and microbiological fluxes into the surface biosphere.

  3. Active mud volcanoes on the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Caress, D. W.; Gwiazda, R.; Melling, H.; Riedel, M.; Jin, Y. K.; Hong, J. K.; Kim, Y.-G.; Graves, D.; Sherman, A.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, L.; Villinger, H.; Kopf, A.; Johnson, S. B.; Hughes Clarke, J.; Blasco, S.; Conway, K.; Neelands, P.; Thomas, H.; Côté, M.

    2015-09-01

    Morphologic features, 600-1100 m across and elevated up to 30 m above the surrounding seafloor, interpreted to be mud volcanoes were investigated on the continental slope in the Beaufort Sea in the Canadian Arctic. Sediment cores, detailed mapping with an autonomous underwater vehicle, and exploration with a remotely operated vehicle show that these are young and actively forming features experiencing ongoing eruptions. Biogenic methane and low-chloride, sodium-bicarbonate-rich waters are extruded with warm sediment that accumulates to form cones and low-relief circular plateaus. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the ascending water indicate that a mixture of meteoric water, seawater, and water from clay dehydration has played a significant role in the evolution of these fluids. The venting methane supports extensive siboglinid tubeworms communities and forms some gas hydrates within the near seafloor. We believe that these are the first documented living chemosynthetic biological communities in the continental slope of the western Arctic Ocean.

  4. Tectonic activity and the evolution of submarine canyons: The Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micallef, Aaron; Mountjoy, Joshu; Barnes, Philip; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are Earth's most dramatic erosional features, comprising steep-walled valleys that originate in the continental shelf and slope. They play a key role in the evolution of continental margins by transferring sediments into deep water settings and are considered important biodiversity hotspots, pathways for nutrients and pollutants, and analogues of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Although comprising only one third of continental margins worldwide, active margins host more than half of global submarine canyons. We still lack of thorough understanding of the coupling between active tectonics and submarine canyon processes, which is necessary to improve the modelling of canyon evolution in active margins and derive tectonic information from canyon morphology. The objectives of this study are to: (i) understand how tectonic activity influences submarine canyon morphology, processes, and evolution in an active margin, and (2) formulate a generalised model of canyon development in response to tectonic forcing based on morphometric parameters. We fulfil these objectives by analysing high resolution geophysical data and imagery from Cook Strait Canyon system, offshore New Zealand. Using these data, we demonstrate that tectonic activity, in the form of major faults and structurally-generated tectonic ridges, leaves a clear topographic signature on submarine canyon location and morphology, in particular their dendritic and sinuous planform shapes, steep and linear longitudinal profiles, and cross-sectional asymmetry and width. We also report breaks/changes in canyon longitudinal slope gradient, relief and slope-area regression models at the intersection with faults. Tectonic activity gives rise to two types of knickpoints in the Cook Strait Canyon. The first type consists of low slope gradient, rounded and diffusive knickpoints forming as a result of short wavelength folds or fault break outs and being restored to an equilibrium profile by upstream erosion and

  5. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ≥2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge

  6. Ultra-long-range hydroacoustic observations of submarine volcanic activity at Monowai, Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, D.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Rodgers, M.; Paulatto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Monowai is an active submarine volcanic center in the Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of 5 days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic T phases. We show, using cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that the eruption is detected as far as Ascension Island, equatorial South Atlantic Ocean, where a bottom moored hydrophone array is operated as part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. Hydroacoustic phases from the volcanic center must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing and Ranging channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, a source-receiver distance of ~15,800 km. We believe this to be the furthest documented range of a naturally occurring underwater signal above 1 Hz. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and long-range, acoustic parabolic equation modeling, have implications for submarine volcano monitoring.

  7. Organic geochemical signatures controlling methane outgassing at active mud volcanoes in the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DongHun, Lee; YoungKeun, Jin; JungHyun, Kim; Heldge, Niemann; JongKu, Gal; BoHyung, Choi

    2016-04-01

    Based on the water column acoustic anomalies related to active methane (CH4) venting, numerous active Mud Volcanoes (MVs) were recently identified at ~282, ~420, and ~740 m water depths on the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea (Paull et al., 2015). While geophysical aspects such as the multibeam bathymetric mapping are thoroughly investigated, biogeochemical processes controlling outgassing CH4 at the active MVs are not well constrained. Here, we investigated three sediment cores from the active MVs and one sediment core from a non-methane influenced reference site recovered during the ARA-05C expedition with the R/V ARAON in 2014. We analyzed lipid biomarkers and their stable carbon isotopic values (δ13C) in order to determine key biogeochemical processes involved in CH4 cycling in the MV sediments. Downcore CH4 and sulphate (SO42-) concentration measurements revealed a distinct sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) at the shallow sections of the cores (15 - 45 cm below seafloor (cm bsf) at 282 m MV, 420 m MV, and 740 m MV). The most abundant diagnostic lipid biomarkers in the SMTZ were sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol (-94‰) and archaeol (-66‰) with the sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol: archaeol ratio of 1.1 to 5, indicating the presence of ANME-2 or -3. However, we also found substantial amounts of monocyclic biphytane-1 (BP-1, -118‰), which is rather indicative for ANME-1. Nevertheless, the concentration of sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol was 2-fold higher than any other archaeal lipids, suggesting a predominant ANME-2 or -3 rather than ANME-1 as a driving force for the anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) in these systems. We will further investigate the microbial community at the active MVs using nucleic acid (RNA and DNA) sequence analyses in near future. Our study provides first biogeochemical data set of the active MVs in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, which helps to better understand CH4 cycling mediated in these systems. Reference Paull, C.K., et al. (2015), Active mud

  8. Submarine glaciated landscapes of central and northern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John; Lintern, Gwyn

    2015-04-01

    Recent systematic multibeam sonar mapping and ground-truthing surveys in the fjords and coastal waters of central and northern British Columbia, Canada, provide information on glacial processes associated with the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, and also on postglacial processes that have strongly modified the glacial terrain. During the last glacial maximum, ice covered the Coast Range, except for nunataks. Convergent streamlined glacial landforms in the Strait of Georgia testify to a strong flow of ice towards the southeast, between Vancouver Island and the mainland. During ice retreat, thick deposits of acoustically stratified glaciomarine mud were deposited in glacially over deepened basins. Retreat through the Douglas Channel fjord system was punctuated by still stands, resulting in a series of submarine moraines. Postglacial processes have created a suite of landforms that mask the primary glacial terrain: 1) Fjord floors host thick deposits of acoustically transparent postglacial mud with highly variable distribution: banks up to 80-m thick are commonly adjacent to erosional zones with glaciomarine mud exposed at the seafloor; 2) In this region of high precipitation and snowpack melt, numerous cone-shaped Holocene fan deltas developed on the fjord sidewalls transport coarse sediment to the fjord floors. Larger deltas are developed at fjord heads, notably at Kitimat and Kildala; 3) Submarine slope failures in this tectonically active area have resulted in a suite of mass transport deposits on sidewalls and fjord floors. The very large submarine slope failures at Camano Sound and KitKat Inlet occurred on the steep, rear facets of large transverse moraines, and involved the failure of glaciomarine sediment that moved into deeper basins, perhaps as a retrogressive failure. The ages of these events are unknown, although the presence of postglacial mud in the slide scar at Caamano suggests that the event at that location occurred in the late glacial or early Holocene. Also

  9. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  10. Long-term explosive degassing and debris flow activity at West Mata submarine volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Matsumoto, H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Walker, S. L.; Lau, T.-K.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2015-03-01

    West Mata is a 1200 m deep submarine volcano where explosive boninite eruptions were observed in 2009. The acoustic signatures from the volcano's summit eruptive vents Hades and Prometheus were recorded with an in situ (~25 m range) hydrophone during ROV dives in May 2009 and with local (~5 km range) moored hydrophones between December 2009 and August 2011. The sensors recorded low frequency (1-40 Hz), short duration explosions consistent with magma bubble bursts from Hades, and broadband, 1-5 min duration signals associated with episodes of fragmentation degassing from Prometheus. Long-term eruptive degassing signals, recorded through May 2010, preceded a several month period of declining activity. Degassing episodes were not recorded acoustically after early 2011, although quieter effusive eruption activity may have continued. Synchronous optical measurements of turbidity made between December 2009 and April 2010 indicate that turbidity maxima resulted from occasional south flank slope failures triggered by the collapse of accumulated debris during eruption intervals.

  11. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement.

    PubMed

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4 m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO₂ from the seafloor. PMID:25384354

  12. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R.; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R.; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4 m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO2 from the seafloor.

  13. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement

    PubMed Central

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R.; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R.; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4 m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO2 from the seafloor. PMID:25384354

  14. Rapid Changes on Sediment Accumulation Rates within Submarine Canyons Caused By Bottom Trawling Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Masque, P.; Martin, J.; Paradis, S.; Juan, X.; Toro, M.; Palanques, A.

    2014-12-01

    The physical disturbance of the marine sedimentary environments by commercial bottom trawling is a matter of concern. The direct physical effects of this fishing technique include scraping and ploughing of the seabed and increases of the near-bottom water turbidity by sediment resuspension. However, the quantification of the sediment that has been resuspended by this anthropogenic activity over years and has been ultimately exported across the margin remains largely unaddressed. The analysis of sediment accumulation rates from sediment cores collected along the axes of several submarine canyons in the Catalan margin (northwestern Mediterranean) has allowed to estimate the contribution of this anthropogenic activity to the present-day sediment dynamics. 210Pb chronologies, occasionally supported by 137Cs dating, indicate a rapid increase of sediment accumulation rates since the 1970s, in coincidence with a strong impulse in the industrialization of the trawling fleets of this region. Such increase has been associated to the enhanced delivery of sediment resuspended by trawlers from the shelves and upper slope regions towards the canyon's interior, and to the rapid technical development at that time, in terms of engine power and gear size. This change has been observed in La Fonera (or Palamós) Canyon at depths greater than 1700 m, while in other canyons it is restricted to shallower regions (~1000 m in depth) closer to fishing grounds. Two sampling sites from La Fonera and Foix submarine canyons that exhibited high sediment accumulation rates (0.6-0.7 cm/y) were reoccupied several years after the first chronological analyses. These two new cores reveal a second and more rapid increase of sediment accumulation rates in both canyons occurring circa 2002 and accounting for about 2 cm/y. This second change at the beginning of the XXI century has been attributed to a preferential displacement of the trawling fleet towards slope fishing grounds surrounding submarine

  15. Distribution patters of mobile mud in the East China Sea: elucidated from particle size, radionuclides and magnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Du, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine surface sediments due to resuspension may return to water column followed by particles sedimentation on the seabed. Therefore, particulate material in estuarine and coastal environments would be typically deposited and resuspended several times before permanent accumulation or transport offshore. The suspension and mobile sediments, referred to be "mobile mud" definated by high water content(≥0.30) and no-decay 210Pbex vertical distribution, play an important role in the biogeochemical cycles in the estuarine/coastal area. In the present work, the spatial and temporal distribution of thickness, grain-size in the mobile mud of the East China Sea were conducted by May and August, 2011. Most mobile mud are distributed along the coast and north offshore, and the thick mud layer (≥2cm) is featured with fine grain size, high water content and TOC, exhibiting the activeness of mobile mud. The total amount of mobile mud in the East China Sea is ten times in comparison with annual sediment discharge from the Changjiang River. The maximum of mobile mud thickness and 7Be activity in May was distributed in the south coast, but that in August was distributed in the north coast. The mobile mud HIRM was relatively large both in May and August, but the north coast HIRM in August was larger than that in May. All these change of mobile mud thickness, nuclides and magnetic properties indicated that the mobile mud formation mechanism has the different patterns in the different region.The north coastal mobile mud formation is dominated by the Changjiang Diluted Water, and in the south is controlled by the monsoon-influenced Zhejiang-Fujian coastal current. The main source of mobile mud near the inshore is predominantly input from the Changjiang River. However, most mobile mud in the north offshore may be originally derived from the Changjiang River and old Huanghe River. Compared south offshore with thin layer of mobile mud, the north offshore mobile mud formation

  16. Hydrodynamic modeling of magmatic-hydrothermal activity at submarine arc volcanoes, with implications for ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Gillian; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.

    2014-10-01

    Subduction-related magmas have higher volatile contents than mid-ocean ridge basalts, which affects the dynamics of associated submarine hydrothermal systems. Interaction of saline magmatic fluids with convecting seawater may enhance ore metal deposition near the seafloor, making active submarine arcs a preferred modern analogue for understanding ancient massive sulfide deposits. We have constructed a quantitative hydrological model for sub-seafloor fluid flow based on observations at Brothers volcano, southern Kermadec arc, New Zealand. Numerical simulations of multi-phase hydrosaline fluid flow were performed on a two-dimensional cross-section cutting through the NW Caldera and the Upper Cone sites, two regions of active venting at the Brothers volcanic edifice, with the former hosting sulfide mineralization. Our aim is to explore the flow paths of saline magmatic fluids released from a crystallizing magma body at depth and their interaction with seawater circulating through the crust. The model includes a 3×2 km sized magma chamber emplaced at ∼2.5 km beneath the seafloor connected to the permeable cone via a ∼200 m wide feeder dike. During the simulation, a magmatic fluid was temporarily injected from the top of the cooling magma chamber into the overlying convection system, assuming hydrostatic conditions and a static permeability distribution. The simulations predict a succession of hydrologic regimes in the subsurface of Brothers volcano, which can explain some of the present-day hydrothermal observations. We find that sub-seafloor phase separation, inferred from observed vent fluid salinities, and the temperatures of venting at Brothers volcano can only be achieved by input of a saline magmatic fluid at depth, consistent with chemical and isotopic data. In general, our simulations show that the transport of heat, water, and salt from magmatic and seawater sources is partly decoupled. Expulsion of magmatic heat and volatiles occurs within the first few

  17. Mud Volcanoes - Analogs to Martian Cones and Domes (by the Thousands!)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Mud volcanoes are mounds formed by low temperature slurries of gas, liquid, sediments and rock that erupt to the surface from depths of meters to kilometers. They are common on Earth, with estimates of thousands onshore and tens of thousands offshore. Mud volcanoes occur in basins with rapidly-deposited accumulations of fine-grained sediments. Such settings are ideal for concentration and preservation of organic materials, and mud volcanoes typically occur in sedimentary basins that are rich in organic biosignatures. Domes and cones, cited as possible mud volcanoes by previous authors, are common on the northern plains of Mars. Our analysis of selected regions in southern Acidalia Planitia has revealed over 18,000 such features, and we estimate that more than 40,000 occur across the area. These domes and cones strongly resemble terrestrial mud volcanoes in size, shape, morphology, associated flow structures and geologic setting. Geologic and mineralogic arguments rule out alternative formation mechanisms involving lava, ice and impacts. We are studying terrestrial mud volcanoes from onshore and submarine locations. The largest concentration of onshore features is in Azerbaijan, near the western edge of the Caspian Sea. These features are typically hundreds of meters to several kilometers in diameter, and tens to hundreds of meters in height. Satellite images show spatial densities of 20 to 40 eruptive centers per 1000 square km. Many of the features remain active, and fresh mud flows as long as several kilometers are common. A large field of submarine mud volcanoes is located in the Gulf of Cadiz, off the Atlantic coasts of Morocco and Spain. High-resolution sonar bathymetry reveals numerous km-scale mud volcanoes, hundreds of meters in height. Seismic profiles demonstrate that the mud erupts from depths of several hundred meters. These submarine mud volcanoes are the closest morphologic analogs yet found to the features in Acidalia Planitia. We are also conducting

  18. Active sulfur cycling by diverse mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms in terrestrial mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Green-Saxena, A; Feyzullayev, A; Hubert, C R J; Kallmeyer, J; Krueger, M; Sauer, P; Schulz, H-M; Orphan, V J

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial mud volcanoes (TMVs) represent geochemically diverse habitats with varying sulfur sources and yet sulfur cycling in these environments remains largely unexplored. Here we characterized the sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and activity in four TMVs in Azerbaijan. A combination of geochemical analyses, biological rate measurements and molecular diversity surveys (targeting metabolic genes aprA and dsrA and SSU ribosomal RNA) supported the presence of active sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing guilds in all four TMVs across a range of physiochemical conditions, with diversity of these guilds being unique to each TMV. The TMVs varied in potential sulfate reduction rates (SRR) by up to four orders of magnitude with highest SRR observed in sediments where in situ sulfate concentrations were highest. Maximum temperatures at which SRR were measured was 60°C in two TMVs. Corresponding with these trends in SRR, members of the potentially thermophilic, spore-forming, Desulfotomaculum were detected in these TMVs by targeted 16S rRNA analysis. Additional sulfate-reducing bacterial lineages included members of the Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae detected by aprA and dsrA analyses and likely contributing to the mesophilic SRR measured. Phylotypes affiliated with sulfide-oxidizing Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria were abundant in aprA libraries from low sulfate TMVs, while the highest sulfate TMV harboured 16S rRNA phylotypes associated with sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria. Altogether, the biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate these unique terrestrial habitats support diverse active sulfur-cycling microorganisms reflecting the in situ geochemical environment. PMID:23116231

  19. Characterization of the circulating hemocytes in mud crab (Scylla olivacea) revealed phenoloxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Mangkalanan, Seksan; Sanguanrat, Piyachat; Utairangsri, Tanatchaporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2014-05-01

    This study focused on an isolation and characterization of the circulating hemocytes in mud crab, Scylla olivacea. Isolation of specific cell types of hemocytes from crab hemolymph was accomplished by using 60% Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Four separated bands of the hemocytes were successfully obtained. Characterization of these isolated hemocytes by light microscope using trypan blue-rose bengal staining, rose bengal-hematoxilin staining, and phase contrast revealed four distinct types of hemocyte cells. Using their specific morphology and granularity, they were identified as hyaline cell (HC), small granular cell (SGC), large granular cell (LGC) and mixed granular cell (MGC). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed more details on specific cell size, size of cytoplasmic granule, and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, and confirmed the classification. Relative abundance of these cells types in the hemolymph of an adult crab were 15.50±8.22% for HC, 55.50±7.15% for SGC, 13.50±5.28% for LGC, and 15.50±3.50% for MGC. Proteomic analysis of protein expression for each specific cell types by two-dimensional electrophoresis identified two highly abundant proteins, prophenoloxidase (ProPO) and peroxinectin in LGC. Determination of phenoloxidase (PO) activity in each isolated cell types using in vitro and in situ chemical assays confirmed the presence of PO activity only in LGC. Based on an increased PO activity of crab hemolymph during the course of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection, these results suggest that prophenoloxidase pathway was employed for host defense mechanism against WSSV and it may link to the role of large granular hemocyte. PMID:24316230

  20. Seafloor distribution and last glacial to postglacial activity of mud volcanoes on the Calabrian accretionary prism, Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceramicola, Silvia; Praeg, Daniel; Cova, Andrea; Accettella, Daniela; Zecchin, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) are abundant along the eastern Mediterranean subduction zones, recording mud breccia extrusion over long timescales (106 years), but to date relatively few have been recognised in the northern Ionian Sea on the Calabrian accretionary prism (CAP). In the present study, the seafloor distribution and recent activity of MVs is investigated across a 35,600 km2 sector of the CAP using a regional acoustic dataset (multibeam bathymetric and backscatter imagery, integrated with subbottom profiles) locally ground-truthed by sediment cores. A total of 54 MVs are identified across water depths of 150-2,750 m using up to four geophysical criteria: distinctive morphology, high backscatter, unstratified subbottom facies and, in one case, a hydroacoustic flare. Fourteen MVs are identified from 3-4 criteria, of which five have been previously proven by cores containing mud breccia beneath up to 1.6 m of hemipelagic sediments (Madonna dello Ionio MVs 1-3, Pythagoras MV and the newly named Sartori MV), while nine others are identified for the first time (Athena, Catanzaro, Cerere, Diana, Giunone, Minerva, `right foot', Venere 1 and 2). Forty other as yet unnamed MVs are inferred from 1-2 geophysical criteria (three from distinctive morphology alone). All but one possible MV lie on the inner plateau of the CAP, landwards of the Calabrian Escarpment in a zone up to 120 km wide that includes the inner pre-Messinian wedge and the fore-arc basins, where they are interpreted to record the ascent from depth of overpressured fluids that interacted with tectonic structures and with evaporitic or shale seals within the fore-arc basins. The rise of fluids may have been triggered by post-Messinian out-of-sequence tectonism that affected the entire pre-Messinian prism, but Plio-Quaternary sedimentation rates and depositional styles support the inference that significant mud volcanism has taken place only on the inner plateau. Sedimentation rates across the CAP applied to a 12

  1. Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, H.; Mazzini, A.; Akhmanov, G. G.; Aloisi, G.; Planke, S.; Sørenssen, A.; Istadi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are geologically important manifestations of vertical fluid flow and mud eruption in sedimentary basins worldwide. Their formation is predominantly ascribed to release of overpressure from clay- and organic- rich sediments, leading to impressive buildup of mud mountains in submarine and subaerial settings. Here we report data from two fieldworks on a newly born mud volcano named LUSI eruption in Eastern Java (Indonesia). The eruption site appears close to an active magmatic complex in a backarc sedimentary basin in Indonesia. Its specific location results in a high background temperature gradient that triggers mineralogical transformations and geochemical reactions at shallow depth. The eruption of 100 deg.C mud and gas that started the 29th of May 2006 flooded a large area within the Sidoarjo village in Northeast Java. Thousands of people have so far been evacuated and, since the initial eruption, the flow rate escalated from 5000 to 120,000 m3/d during the first eleven weeks. Then the erupted volume started to pulsate between almost zero and 120,000 m3/d in the period August-September, whereas it increased dramatically following swarms of earthquakes in September, before reaching almost 180,000 m3/d in December 2006. Fifteen months after the initial burst, LUSI is still vigorously erupting up to 111,000 m3/d, the average subsidence of the area reached 11 m. Seismic images show that a pre-existing structure was present before the eruption. Based on geochemical and field results, we propose a mechanism where the eruptions started following the 27th of May earthquake due to fracturing and accompanied depressurization of >100 deg.C pore fluids from > 1700 m depth released from a structure in already critical conditions. This resulted in the formation of a quasi-hydrothermal system with a geyser-like surface expression and with an activity influenced by the regional seismicity.

  2. Marvelous Mud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2011-01-01

    The author visited the Open Spaces Preschool in Whangarei, New Zealand and was surprised to see the most amazing natural preschool play. There were six preschoolers stripped down to tee shirts and underpants slipping, slopping, and sliding in the dirt spot which had now become the most lovely, silky-smooth deep-brown mud ever. Studies have…

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUD/DIRT CARRYOUT ONTO PAVED ROADS FROM CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report characterizes fugitive dust generated by vehicular traffic on paved streets and highways resulting from mud/dirt carryout from unpaved areas as a primary source of PM-10 (particles = or < 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter), and evaluates three technologies for eff...

  4. Mud volcanism as an indicator of late to neopleistocene-holocene activity of the Chilik-Kemin fault, Yli depression, Northern Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deev, E. V.; Kokh, S. N.; Sokol, E. V.; Zol'nikov, I. D.; Panov, V. S.

    2014-11-01

    It is revealed that the Altyn-Emel mud volcanic field (43°52'56″ N, 79°06'31″ E) in the Yli depression (Dzharkent trough) is structurally linked to the northeastern end of the Chilik-Kemin deep fault. The mud volcano is related to hydrocarbon-rich gases (including methane) and pressure artesian mineralized thermal waters, which uplifted to the surface along the fault zone. It is suggested that the earthquakes with M≤ 5 related both to the Chilik-Kemin fault and other seismic generating structures intensified the mud volcanic activity. In some cases, the eruptions were accompanied by the short-lived ignition of hydrocarbon gases and formation of the Na-rich paralavas. The mud volcanism of the Altyn-Emel field has been manifested during the last 15-20 k.a., and, consequently, the northeastern part of the Chilik-Kemin fault is an active structure.

  5. Monitoring and Characterizing the Geysering and Seismic Activity at the Lusi Mud Eruption Site, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Karyono; Obermann, Anne; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Abdurrokhim, Abdurrokhim; Masturyono, Masturyono; Hadi, Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi eruption began on May 29, 2006 in the northeast of Java Island, Indonesia, and to date is still active. Lusi is a newborn sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system characterized by continuous expulsion of liquefied mud and breccias and geysering activity. Lusi is located upon the Watukosek fault system, a left lateral wrench system connecting the volcanic arc and the bakarc basin. This fault system is still periodically reactivated as shown by field data. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we conducted several types of monitoring. Based on camera observations, we characterized the Lusi erupting activity by four main behaviors occurring cyclically: (1) Regular activity, which consists in the constant emission of water and mud breccias (i.e. viscous mud containing clay, silt, sand and clasts) associated with the constant expulsion of gas (mainly aqueous vapor with minor amounts of CO2 and CH4) (2) Geysering phase with intense bubbling, consisting in reduced vapor emission and more powerful bursting events that do not seem to have a regular pattern. (3) Geysering phase with intense vapor and degassing discharge and a typically dense plume that propagates up to 100 m height. (4) Quiescent phase marking the end of the geysering activity (and the observed cycle) with no gas emissions or bursts observed. To investigate the possible seismic activity beneath Lusi and the mechanisms controlling the Lusi pulsating behaviour, we deployed a network of 5 seismic stations and a HD camera around the Lusi crater. We characterize the observed types of seismic activity as tremor and volcano-tectonic events. Lusi tremor events occur in 5-10 Hz frequency band, while volcano tectonic events are abundant in the high frequencies range from 5 Hz until 25 Hz. We coupled the seismic monitoring with the images collected with the HD camera to study the correlation between the seismic tremor and the different phases of the geysering activity. Key words: Lusi

  6. Comparison of submarine gully morphologies in passive and active margin settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Shumaker, L.; Johnstone, S.; Graham, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active tectonic margins have inherently different hypsometry, due to local patterns of deformation and subsequent impacts on the style of sedimentation. One way we can analyze and compare the two settings is through observation of submarine gullies, which are small channel features that form along the continental slope as it descends to the ocean floor. By documenting the geometries of gullies that have formed on passive margins and gullies that have formed on active margins, we attempt to distinguish differences in gully morphologies in these two settings. We manually mapped over 600 gullies and interfluves from shaded relief and contour maps generated from bathymetric data across the globe, including the coast of California, the Beaufort Sea, and the Black Sea. We extrapolated and plotted elevation profiles of the gullies along their downslope distance, and compared a range of gully properties, such as length, spacing, and slope, to look at the correlations among those elements of gullies and their tectonic setting. We find that gullies forming on active margins show the greatest variability in their slopes, exhibiting both the steepest and the shallowest slopes of the dataset. The slopes of the passive margin gullies fall within the range of the active margin gully slopes, but interestingly, we note patterns in the ranges of gully steepness at different localities. These results differ from our our anticipation that active margin gullies are steeper than passive margin gullies, but suggest that gullies in all settings display a variety of morphologies. Additional mapping of active margin gullies will better determine if there are morphological differences between the two settings.

  7. Preparation of Granular Red Mud Adsorbent using Different Binders by Microwave Pore - Making and Activation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thiquynhxuan; Wang, Hanrui; Ju, Shaohua; Peng, Jinhui; Zhou, Liexing; Wang, Shixing; Yin, Shaohua; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    In this work, microwave energy is used for preparing a granular red mud (GRM) adsorbent made of red mud with different binders, such as starch, sodium silicate and cement. The effects of the preparation parameters, such as binder type, binder addition ratio, microwave heating temperature, microwave power and holding time, on the absorption property of GRM are investigated. The BET surface area, strength, pore structure, XRD and SEM of the GRM absorbent are analyzed. The results show that the microwave roasting has a good effect on pore-making of GRM, especially when using organic binder. Both the BET surface area and the strength of GRM obtained by microwave heating are significantly higher than that by conventional heating. The optimum conditions are obtained as follows: 6:100 (w/w) of starch to red mud ratio, microwave roasting with a power of 2.6 kW at 500℃ for holding time of 30 min. The BET surface area, pore volume and average pore diameter of GRM prepared at the optimum conditions are 15.58 m2/g, 0.0337 cm3/g and 3.1693 A0, respectively.

  8. White submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    While not everyone gets to live in a yellow submarine, the scientific community may get to have a decommissioned U.S. Navy nuclear submarine dedicated to it. The Sturgeon class of submarines, which scientists say are the ideal choice for the project, will be coming up for decommissioning in this next decade. So the time is ripe, scientists say. Two weeks ago, oceanographers, submarine specialists, marine biologists, and geophysicists, among others met at AGU headquarters in Washington to discuss how to get the project in the water. If all goes well, the project would be the "biggest thing that ever happened in ocean and Earth science," according to Lloyd Keigwin of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, who convened the meeting. For example, the submarine could make many types of "compelling" research possible that can not be done now by other means, such as studies in the Arctic that may have significant bearing on global change research, Keigwin says. However, the imposing hurdles that the project must overcome are as big as the opportunities it offers. Foremost, there is a question as to who will pick up the tab for such an endeavor.

  9. Making a Submarine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornacchia, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Archimedes principle and why a ship sinks when it gets a hole in it. Suggests an activity for teaching the concept of density and water displacement through the construction of a simple submarine. Includes materials and procedures for this activity. (KHR)

  10. Active submarine volcanism on the Society hotspot swell (west Pacific): A geochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Devey, C.W.; Albarede, F.; Michard, A. ); Cheminee, J.L. ); Muehe, R.; Stoffers, P. )

    1990-04-10

    The present work deals with the petrography and geochemistry of lavas dredged from five active submarine volcanoes (named Mehetia, Moua Pihaa, Rocard, Teahitia, and Cyana) from the southeast end of the Society Islands hotspot trace. Most samples are basic and alkaline. Fractionation modelling based on major and minor compatible element variations suggests that olivine and minor clinopyroxene were the major fractionating phases. Rocard and Cyana have yielded more evolved, trachy-phonolitic, glassy samples. Both basaltic and phonolitic samples are incompatible-element enriched. The trachy-phonolite patterns show middle (REE) depletion and negative Eu anomalies. The Moua Pihaa basalts have flatter patterns than the other basalts. All smaples, with the exception of a sample from Moua Pihaa which has elevated {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, fall on linear Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic arrays, suggesting two end-member mixing. The Sr isotopic variations in the samples excluding Moua Pihaa correlate positively with Rb/Nb, Pb/Ce, and SiO{sub 2} variations, idicating a component of mantle enriched by injection of material from a subducted oceanic slab. Correlation of {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr suggests that the subducted material is geochemically old. The absence of a MORB component in the Society magmatism, the small volumes of the Polynesian hotspot volcanoes, and the lack of more intense volcanic activity near the center of the Pacific Superswell, all lead to the conclusion that the latter is unlikely to be caused by a large convective plume.

  11. Distribution and characters of the mud diapirs and mud volcanoes off southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song-Chuen; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Wang, Yunshuen; Chung, San-Hsiung; Chen, Po-Chun; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Liu, Char-Shine; Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Lee, Yuan-Wei

    2014-10-01

    In order to identify the mud diapirs and mud volcanoes off SW Taiwan, we have examined ∼1500 km long MCS profiles and related marine geophysical data. Our results show ten quasi-linear mud diapirs, oriented NNE-SSW to N-S directions. Thirteen mud volcanoes are identified from the multibeam bathymetric data. These mud volcanoes generally occur on tops of the diapiric structures. Moreover, the active mud flow tracks out of mud volcanoes MV1, MV3 and MV6 are observed through the high backscatter intensity stripes on the sidescan sonar images. The heights of the cone-shaped mud volcanoes range from 65 m to 345 m, and the diameters at base from 680 m to 4100 m. These mud volcanoes have abrupt slopes between 5.3° and 13.6°, implying the mudflow is active and highly viscous. In contrast, the flat crests of mud volcanoes are due to relative lower-viscosity flows. The larger cone-shaped mud volcanoes located at deeper water depths could be related to a longer eruption history. The formation of mud diapirs and volcanoes in the study area are ascribed to the overpressure in sedimentary layers, compressional tectonic forces and gas-bearing fluids. Especially, the gas-bearing fluid plays an important role in enhancing the intrusion after the diapirism as a large amount of gas expulsions is observed. The morphology of the upper Kaoping Slope is mainly controlled by mud diapiric intrusions.

  12. Extensive and Diverse Submarine Volcanism and Hydrothermal Activity in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J.; Baker, E. T.; Lilley, M. D.; Arculus, R. J.; Crowhurst, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    The northeast Lau basin, the NE “corner” of the Tonga subduction zone, has an unusual concentration of young submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity. The area is bounded on the west by overlapping spreading centers opening at rates up to 120 mm/yr, on the north by the E-W trending Tonga trench and on the east by the Tofua arc front. From the south, the Fonualei rift spreading center (FRSC) overlaps with the southern rift of The Mangatolo triple junction spreading center (MTJSC). The northern arm of the MTJSC overlaps with the northeast Lau spreading center (NELSC). Surveys of the area with an EM300 sonar system in November 2008 show high backscatter over the 10-20 km wide neovolcanic zones of the FRSC, MTJSC and NELSC. High backscatter is also associated with: (1) a 10-km diameter, hydrothermally active, volcanic caldera/cone (Volcano “O”) lying between the NELSC and the northern Tofua arc front; (2) a rift zone extending north from volcano “O” and intersecting the NELSC near the Tonga trench; and (3) a series of volcanoes constructed along SW-NE trending crustal tears in the northernmost backarc near the east-west portion of the Tonga Trench. Two eruptions were detected in November 2008 during hydrothermal plume surveys of the area. Subsequent dives with the remotely operated vehicle Jason 2 in May 2009 revealed that the southern NELSC eruption was a short-lived, primarily effusive eruption. The second eruption was detected on the summit of the largest SW-NE trending volcano (West Mata) and was ongoing when Jason 2 arrived on site more than 6 months later. It was producing both pillow lavas and abundant volcaniclastic debris streams that have a characteristic appearance on the sonar backscatter map. There is also an unusual series of lava flows emanating from ridges and scarps between Volcano “O” and West Mata. These flows contain drained-out lava ponds up to 2 km in diameter. The apparent high level of volcanic activity in the NE Lau basin

  13. Warm Brine Lakes in Craters of Active Mud Volcanoes, Menes Caldera off NW Egypt: Evidence for Deep-Rooted Thermogenic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, S.; Mascle, J.; Foucher, J. P.; Woodside, J. M.; Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during several oceanographic expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling mud volcano morphology, the geometry of feeder channels, and the origin of emitted fluids (Dupré et al. 2014). The active Cheops and Chephren mud volcanoes are 1,500 m wide with subcircular craters at their summits, about 250 m in diameter, generally a few tens of metres deep, and filled with methane-rich muddy brines with temperatures reaching 42 °C and 57 °C respectively. Deployments of CTDs and corers with attached temperature sensors tracked these warm temperatures down to almost 0.5 km depth below the brine lake surface at the Cheops mud volcano, in a feeder channel probably only a few tens of metres wide. Thermogenic processes involve the dissolution of Messinian evaporites by warm fluids likely sourced even deeper, i.e. 1.7 and 2.6 km below the seabed at the Cheops and Chephren MVs respectively, and which ascend along listric faults. Seepage activity appears broadly persistent since the initiation of mud volcanism in the Early Pliocene, possibly accompanied by lateral migration of feeder channels.

  14. Controlled reduction of red mud waste to produce active systems for environmental applications: heterogeneous Fenton reaction and reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Costa, Regina C C; Moura, Flávia C C; Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Magalhães, Fabiano; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2010-02-01

    In this work, controlled reduction of red mud with H(2) was used to produce active systems for two different environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Mössbauer, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that at different temperatures, i.e. 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C, H(2) reduces red mud to different phases, mainly Fe(3)O(4), Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4) and Fe(0). These Fe phases are dispersed on Al, Si and Ti oxides present in the red mud and show high reactivity towards two environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Reduction with H(2) at 400 degrees C showed the best results for the oxidation of the model dye methylene blue with H(2)O(2) at neutral pH due to the presence of the composite Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4). The reduced red mud at 500-600 degrees C produced Fe(0) highly active for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous medium. Another feature of these red mud based system is that after deactivation due to extensive use they can be completely regenerated by simple treatment with H(2). PMID:20060564

  15. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946

  16. Coastal and submarine instabilities distribution in the tectonically active SW margin of the Corinth Rift (Psathopyrgos, Achaia, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simou, Eirini; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Lykousis, Vasilios; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Vassilakis, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The Corinth Rift, one of the most active rifts in the world as local extension trending NE-SW reaches the amount of 14±2 mm/yr, corresponds to one of the largest zones of seismically active normal faulting. The formation, growth and migration southwards of the prevailing fault systems, which evolve simultaneously with the intense morphogenetic processes, are overprinted in the age, facies and thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sequences constructing the south margin of the western Gulf of Corinth. The dominant fault blocks, defined by east-west trending, north dipping normal faults, are accompanied by several morphological features and anomalies, noticed in both the terrestrial and the marine environment. Our main aim has been to examine how the tectonic evolution, in combination with the attendant fierce erosional and sedimentary processes, has affected the morphology through geodynamic processes expressed as failures in the wider coastal area. High resolution multibeam bathymetry in combination with the available land surface data have contributed to submarine and subaerial morphological mapping. These have been used as a basis for the detection of all those geomorphic features that indicate instabilities probably triggered, directly or indirectly, by the ongoing active tectonic deformation. The interpretation of the combined datasets shows that the southwestern margin of the Corinth Rift towards Psathopyrgos fault zone is characterized by intense coastal relief and a narrow, almost absent, continental shelf, which passes abruptly to steep submarine slopes. These steep slope values denote the effects of the most recent brittle deformation and are related to coastal and submarine instabilities and failures. High uplift rates and rapid sedimentation, indicative of the regional high-energy terrestrial and submarine environment, are subsequently balanced by the transportation of the seafloor currents, especially where slope gradients decrease, disintegrating the

  17. Genesis and geometry of the Meiklejohn Peak lime mud-mound, Bare Mountain Quadrangle, Nevada, USA: Ordovician limestone with submarine frost heave structures—a possible response to gas clathrate hydrate evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Federico F.

    2001-12-01

    During the Early Middle Ordovician (Early Whiterockian) the Meiklejohn Peak lime mud-mound, a large whaleback or dolphin back dome, grew on a carbonate ramp tens to hundreds of kilometres offshore. This ramp extended from the northwest margin of Laurentia into the open waters of the ancestral Pacific Ocean to the north. The mound developed in an outer ramp environment, in relatively deep and cold water. A steep northern margin with a slope that exceeds 55° characterizes the mound. This margin is split by a 14-m long vertical fracture that separates a zone of slumped, drag-folded and brecciated rocks from the main mass of the mound. Failure along this fracture occurred subcutaneously, as highlighted by covering beds that are folded next to the mound. Brecciated blocks and clasts contain zebra and stromatactis structures indicating that these rocks and structures were lithified early in the history of the mound. The southern end of the mound is less steep and is characterized by large, echinodermal grainstone cross-beds. These deposits are part of a large, subaqueous dune that grew northwards and preceded the main development of the mound. Southward dipping and downlapping layers of mud-mound mudstone and wackestone overlie the dune. These muddy limestone layers are cut in several places by injection dykes and are pierced, near the contact with the underlying dune, by a 25-m long pipe filled with rotated nodular and brecciated mud-mound clasts. This long pipe extends to the edge of the mound and appears to have been a conduit where fluidized materials that came from the mound's interior were vented. The interior of the mound is typified by light grey limestone with zebra bands and stromatactis structures. Both structures represent former cavity systems that are filled with fibrous and bladed calcite and pelleted and laminated geopetal mudstone. Spar bands of zebra limestone often extend for several metres and appear to have been unsupported over these distances

  18. Submarine weathering of silicate minerals and the extent of pore water freshening at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Schmidt, Mark; Geersen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate how submarine weathering processes may affect the water balance of sediments at convergent plate margins, six sediment cores were retrieved off Central Chile at water depth between ˜800 and 4000 m. The sediment solid phase was analyzed for its major element composition and the pore fluids were analyzed for dissolved sulfate, sulfide, total alkalinity, major cations, chloride, bromide, iodide, hydrocarbons as well as the carbon isotopic composition of methane. Because of negligible weathering on land, surface sediments off Central Chile are rich in reactive silicate minerals and have a bulk composition similar to volcanic rocks in the adjacent Andes. Deep-sourced fluxes of alkalinity, cations and chloride indicate that silicate minerals are subject to weathering in the forearc during burial. Comparison of deep-sourced signals with data from nearby Ocean Drilling Program Sites reveals two different types of weathering processes: In shallow (tens of meters), methanic sediments of slope basins with high organic carbon burial rates, reactive silicate minerals undergo incongruent dissolution through reaction with CO2 from methanogenesis. At greater burial depth (hundreds of meters), silicate weathering is dominated by authigenic smectite formation. This process is accompanied by uptake of water into the clay interlayers thus leading to elevated salinities in the surrounding pore water. Deep-seated smectite formation is more widespread than shallow silicate dissolution, as it is independent from the availability of CO2 from methanogenesis. Although solute transport is not focused enough to form cold seeps in the proper sense, tectonically induced, diffuse fluid flow transfers the deep-seated signal of smectite formation into the shallow sediments. The temperature-controlled conversion of smectite to illite is considered the most important dehydration process in marine forearc environments (depth of kilometers). However, in agreement with other

  19. Shallow water submarine hydrothermal activity - A case study in the assessment of ocean acidification and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yoshida, K.; Hagiwara, T.; Nagao, K.; Kusakabe, M.; Wang, B.; Chen, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Most natural Shallow Water submarine Hydrothermal activates (SWH) along coastlines are related to hydrothermal eruptions involving heating of groundwater with the volcanic gas. These SWHs supply nutrients such as phosphorus and micro nutrients like iron to the euphotic zone, contributing to the overall natural fertility and primary productivity of coastal waters. However, SWHs also have a negative effect, dispersing toxic materials such as mercury and arsenic, and affecting the acidification of the surrounding waters. In this study, we evaluate the impact of "iron supply" and "ocean acidification" on the primary production in a coastal marine environment, at a SWH area discovered off Gueshandao Island, northeast Taiwan. In the past three years, expeditions were conducted and observations made around this SWH site. Divers, small boats and a research vessel (R/V OR1, Ocean University National Taiwan) were used to survey successively larger areas around the site. Some of the results obtained are as follows. Hydrothermal vents are located in a hilly terrain rich with hot spring water with gas erupting intermittently. There are two types of vents, roughly divided by color, yellow hot spring water with higher temperature >110 degC ejected from sulfur chimneys of various sizes, and colorless water with lower temperature ~80 degC ejected directly from the crevices of the andesitic bedrock. Natural sulfur solidifying in the mouth of a small chimney was captured by a video camera, and explosions were also observed at intervals of a few minutes. Sediment, sand and particles of sulfur were deposited on the sides to a radius of about 50 m condensing around the chimney. The bottom type changes from sand/particles to outcrop/rock away from the vents. Moreover, gas samples were collected from the vents; the ratios of gas concentrations (N2/Ar) and isotopic composition of noble gas (3He/4He) suggest that these volcanic gases are mantle-derived. Hydrothermal fluid with high p

  20. Recent turbidity current activity in sediment-starved submarine canyons (Northwestern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Bourgault, Daniel; Neumeier, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are known to be main conduits for the transport of sediments to deep-sea basins, mostly by turbidity currents. Turbidity currents flowing in submarine canyons are mostly triggered by hyperpycnal flows, small to large slope failures and advection of shelf sediment offshore. In these contexts, sediment supply is necessary to maintain canyon activity over time. In 2007, a high-resolution mapping of small-scale submarine canyons offshore Pointe-des-Monts (NW Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada) revealed a series of incisions characterized by the presence of numerous confined crescentic bedforms. The repeat mapping of the canyons in 2012 and 2015 revealed that the bedforms migrated upslope, indicating that they are cyclic steps produced by supercritical flows. Surprisingly, the comparison of multibeam surveys did not show any evidence of slope failures that could have triggered the turbidity currents responsible for recent bedform migration. Additionally, the rocky shores and coastal shelf do not supply sediments to these canyons, thus excluding turbidity current triggers such as advection of shelf sediments or hyperpycnal flows. In this context, we suggest that hydrodynamic processes are responsible for suspending in-situ sediments, which then may flow as turbidity currents when density of the water-sediment mixture is high enough. ADCPs deployed for 3,5 months during the summer of 2015 revealed along-canyon currents following tidal cycles with speeds up to 0.4 m/s, which were not strong enough to produce bedform migration. Therefore, the currents responsible for bedforms occur during infrequent events or during winter conditions, which both require longer instrument time-series to be observed.

  1. Active tectonic morphology and submarine deformation of the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba from analyses of multibeam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Gideon; Niemi, Tina M.; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Sade, Ronnie A.; Hall, John K.; Hartman, Gal; Akawi, Emad; Abueladas, Abdelrahmem; Al-Ruzouq, Rami

    2010-12-01

    A high-resolution marine geophysical study was conducted during October-November 2006 in the northern Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat, providing the first multibeam imaging of the seafloor across the entire gulf head spanning both Israeli and Jordanian territorial waters. Analyses of the seafloor morphology show that the gulf head can be subdivided into the Eilat and Aqaba subbasins separated by the north-south-trending Ayla high. The Aqaba submarine basin appears starved of sediment supply, apparently causing erosion and a landward retreat of the shelf edge. Along the eastern border of this subbasin, the shelf is largely absent and its margin is influenced by the Aqaba Fault zone that forms a steep slope partially covered by sedimentary fan deltas from the adjacent ephemeral drainages. The Eilat subbasin, west of the Ayla high, receives a large amount of sediment derived from the extensive drainage basins of the Arava Valley (Wadi ’Arabah) and Yutim River to the north-northeast. These sediments and those entering from canyons on the south-western border of this subbasin are transported to the deep basin by turbidity currents and gravity slides, forming the Arava submarine fan. Large detached blocks and collapsed walls of submarine canyons and the western gulf margin indicate that mass wasting may be triggered by seismic activity. Seafloor lineaments defined by slope gradient analyses suggest that the Eilat Canyon and the boundaries of the Ayla high align along north- to northwest-striking fault systems—the Evrona Fault zone to the west and the Ayla Fault zone to the east. The shelf-slope break that lies along the 100 m isobath in the Eilat subbasin, and shallower (70-80 m isobaths) in the Aqaba subbasin, is offset by approx. 150 m along the eastern edge of the Ayla high. This offset might be the result of horizontal and vertical movements along what we call the Ayla Fault on the east side of the structure. Remnants of two marine terraces at 100 m and approx. 150 m water

  2. Active tectonic morphology and submarine deformation of the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba from analyses of multibeam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Gideon; Niemi, Tina; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Sade, Ronnie; Hall, John; Hartman, Gal; Akawi, Emad; Abueladas, Abed; Al-Ruzouq, Rami

    2010-05-01

    A high-resolution marine geophysical study was conducted during October-November 2006 in the northern Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat (gulf head). The gulf head can be subdivided into the Eilat and Aqaba subbasins separated by the north-south-trending Ayla high. The Aqaba submarine basin appears starved of sediment supply, apparently causing erosion and a landward retreat of the shelf edge. Along the eastern border of this subbasin, the shelf is largely absent and its margin is influenced by the Aqaba fault zone that forms a steep slope partially covered by sedimentary fan deltas from the adjacent ephemeral drainages. The Eilat subbasin, west of the Ayla high, receives a large amount of sediment derived from the extensive drainage basins of the Arava Valley (Wadi 'Arabah) and Yutim River to the north-northeast. These sediments and those entering from canyons on the south-western border of this subbasin are transported to the deep basin by turbidity currents and gravity slides, forming the Arava submarine fan. Large detached blocks and collapsed walls of submarine canyons and the western gulf margin indicate that mass wasting may be triggered by seismic activity. Seafloor lineaments defined by slope gradient analyses suggest that the Eilat Canyon and the boundaries of the Ayla high align along north- to northwest-striking fault systems—the Evrona Fault Zone to the west and the Ayla Fault Zone to the east. The shelf-slope break that lies along the 100 m isobath in the Eilat subbasin, and shallower (70-80 m isobaths) in the Aqaba subbasin, is offset by approx. 150 m along the eastern edge of the Ayla high. This offset might be the result of horizontal and vertical movements along what we call the Ayla Fault on the east side of the structure. Remnants of two marine terraces at 100 m and approx. 150 m water depths line the southwest margin of the gulf. These terraces are truncated by faulting along their northern end. Fossil coral reefs, which have a similar

  3. Active Volcanic and Hydrothermal Processes at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano: Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, W. W.; de Ronde, C.; Dower, J.; Evans, L.; Hein, J.; Juniper, K.; Lebon, G.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S.; Metaxas, A.; Nakamura, K.; Resing, J. E.; Roe, K.; Stern, R.; Tunnicliffe, V.

    2004-12-01

    Dives with the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS in March/April 2004 documented a volcanic eruption at NW Rota-1, a submarine volcano of basaltic composition located at 14\\deg 36.0'N, 144\\deg 46.5'E lying 65 km northwest of Rota Island in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The site was chosen as a dive target because of the of the high concentrations of H2S and alunite in the hydrothermal plume overlying its summit in February 2003. The summit of the volcano is composed of curvilinear volcanic ridge oriented NW-SE bounded by NE-SW trending normal faults. Lavas collected on the upper part of the edifice are primitive to moderately fractionated basalts (Mg# = 51-66). The eruptive activity is occurring within a small crater (Brimstone Pit) located on the upper south flank of the volcano at 550 m, about 30 m below the summit. The crater is approximately 15 m wide and at least 20 meters deep. The ROPOS's cameras observed billowing clouds of sulfur-rich fluid rising out of the crater, punctuated by frequent bursts of several minutes duration that entrained glassy volcanic ejecta up to at least 2 cm in diameter. ROPOS recorded a temperature of 38\\degC within the plume. The volcanic activity had substantial temporal variability on the scale of minutes. ROPOS was sometimes completely enveloped by the plume while on the rim of the crater, and its surfaces were coated with large sulfur droplets. Black glassy fragments were entrained in the plume up to least 50 m above the crater and deposits of this material were on ledges and tops of outcrops up to several hundred meters from Brimstone Pit. The pit crater fluids have an extremely high content of particulate sulfur and extremely acidic, with pH around 2.0. This strongly implicates magmatic degassing of SO2 and disproportionation into elemental S and sulfuric acid. Diffuse venting of clear fluids was also present on the summit of the volcano, with temperatures exceeding 100\\degC in volcaniclastic sands

  4. Intermediate products of sulfur disproportional reaction and their physical role in effusive to explosive submarine volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takano, B.; Butterfield, D. A.; Resing, J.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Recent direct observations of submarine volcanic activity in the Mariana Arc are giving us a chance to examine the role of volcanic gas in submarine volcanic conduits. Unlike subaerial volcanoes, where hydrogeologic conditions have different character from place to place, the overlying water mass above submarine volcanoes gives a uniform hydrographic setting. Currently, the places where we can directly observe submarine volcanic activity are located deeper than 400 m, which raises the boiling point of seawater to over 240 deg C. This situation allows us to examine the interaction of volcanic gases with ambient seawater at a shorter distance from the magma source than at subaerial volcanic settings. Arc volcano settings give us longer and more frequent opportunities to make observations and provide a more diverse range of submarine volcanism than ridge settings. Among the three major components of volcanic gases (i.e., H2O, CO2 and SO2), water follows a two phase boundary below the critical temperature after volatile components leave from the magmatic source. Milky sulfur sol bearing hydrothermal fluid is commonly observed throughout Mariana active sites. Most of the sulfur sol (colloidal elemental sulfur and polysulfides) might be formed by disproportional reaction of sulfur dioxide with seawater when water vapor shrinks to liquid water. The reaction creates not only sulfur sol but also various types of sulfite, which affects the pH of seawater. We detected short-lived sulfite species in the water column above several active Mariana volcanoes such as NW Rota-1, Daikoku and Nikko by on-board HPLC. Because most observations are made on the liquid phase side of H2O boundary, it is very hard to get data to investigate the physical and chemical sulfur sol forming process occurring on the vapor phase side or at the critical state (i.e., near the magma source process). Carbon dioxide behaves as a gas at a wide range of pressures and temperatures and carries heat and

  5. Mud volcanoes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    The term mud volcano is applied to a variety of landforms having in common a formation by extrusion of mud from beneath the ground. Although mud is the principal solid material that issues from a mud volcano, there are many examples where clasts up to boulder size are found, sometimes thrown high into the air during an eruption. Other characteristics of mud volcanoes (on Earth) are discussed. The possible presence of mud volcanoes, which are common and widespread on Earth, on Mars is considered.

  6. Using IMS hydrophone data for detecting submarine volcanic activity: Insights from Monowai, 26°S Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony B.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Rodgers, Mel; Paulatto, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Only little is known on active volcanism in the ocean. As eruptions are attenuated by seawater and fallout does not regularly reach the sea surface, eruption rates and mechanisms are poorly understood. Estimations on the number of active volcanoes across the modern seas range from hundreds to thousands, but only very few active sites are known. Monowai is a submarine volcanic centre in the northern Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of five days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic tertiary waves ('T-phases'), recorded at three broadband seismic stations in the region. We show, using windowed cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that T-phases associated with this eruption are detected as far as Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, where two bottom-moored hydrophone arrays are operated as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). We observe a high incidence of T-phase arrivals during the time of the eruption, with the angle of arrival stabilizing at the geodesic azimuth between the IMS arrays and Monowai. T-phases from the volcanic centre must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans and over a total geodesic range of approximately 15,800 km, one of the longest source-receiver distances of any naturally occurring underwater signal ever observed. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and two dimensional, long-range, parabolic equation modelling, highlight the exceptional capabilities of the hydroacoustic waveform component of the IMS for remotely detecting episodes of submarine volcanic activity. Using Monowai and the hydrophone arrays at Ascension Island as a natural laboratory, we investigate the long-term eruptive record of a submarine volcano from

  7. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  8. Hanging canyons of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada: Fault-control on submarine canyon geomorphology along active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter T.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.; Greene, H. Gary

    2014-06-01

    Faulting commonly influences the geomorphology of submarine canyons that occur on active continental margins. Here, we examine the geomorphology of canyons located on the continental margin off Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, that are truncated on the mid-slope (1200-1400 m water depth) by the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone (QCFZ). The QCFZ is an oblique strike-slip fault zone that has rates of lateral motion of around 50-60 mm/yr and a small convergent component equal to about 3 mm/yr. Slow subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone has accreted a prism of marine sediment against the lower slope (1500-3500 m water depth), forming the Queen Charlotte Terrace, which blocks the mouths of submarine canyons formed on the upper slope (200-1400 m water depth). Consequently, canyons along this margin are short (4-8 km in length), closely spaced (around 800 m), and terminate uniformly along the 1400 m isobath, coinciding with the primary fault trend of the QCFZ. Vertical displacement along the fault has resulted in hanging canyons occurring locally. The Haida Gwaii canyons are compared and contrasted with the Sur Canyon system, located to the south of Monterey Bay, California, on a transform margin, which is not blocked by any accretionary prism, and where canyons thus extend to 4000 m depth, across the full breadth of the slope.

  9. Mud volcanoes of the Orinoco Delta, Eastern Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aslan, A.; Warne, A.G.; White, W.A.; Guevara, E.H.; Smyth, R.C.; Raney, J.A.; Gibeaut, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Mud volcanoes along the northwest margin of the Orinoco Delta are part of a regional belt of soft sediment deformation and diapirism that formed in response to rapid foredeep sedimentation and subsequent tectonic compression along the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. Field studies of five mud volcanoes show that such structures consist of a central mound covered by active and inactive vents. Inactive vents and mud flows are densely vegetated, whereas active vents are sparsely vegetated. Four out of the five mud volcanoes studied are currently active. Orinoco mud flows consist of mud and clayey silt matrix surrounding lithic clasts of varying composition. Preliminary analysis suggests that the mud volcano sediment is derived from underlying Miocene and Pliocene strata. Hydrocarbon seeps are associated with several of the active mud volcanoes. Orinoco mud volcanoes overlie the crest of a mud-diapir-cored anticline located along the axis of the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. Faulting along the flank of the Pedernales mud volcano suggests that fluidized sediment and hydrocarbons migrate to the surface along faults produced by tensional stresses along the crest of the anticline. Orinoco mud volcanoes highlight the proximity of this major delta to an active plate margin and the importance of tectonic influences on its development. Evaluation of the Orinoco Delta mud volcanoes and those elsewhere indicates that these features are important indicators of compressional tectonism along deformation fronts of plate margins. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Teaching Ecological Interactions with Mud Dauber Nests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of mud dauber wasp nests in laboratory activities in ecology and behavior and life science classes. Provides students with an opportunity to develop and practice basic skills including dissection, identification, observation, measurement, and communication. Discusses the life of mud daubers, obtaining and storing nests,…

  11. Development and experimental verification of a robust active noise control system for a diesel engine in submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, D.; Jukkert, S.; Hövelmann, N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental validation of an ANC (active noise control)-system designed for a particular application in the exhaust line of a submarine. Thereby, tonal components of the exhaust noise in the frequency band from 75 Hz to 120 Hz are reduced by more than 30 dB. The ANC-system is based on the feedforward leaky FxLMS-algorithm. The observability of the sound pressure in standing wave field is ensured by using two error microphones. The noninvasive online plant identification method is used to increase the robustness of the controller. Online plant identification is extended by a time-varying convergence gain to improve the performance in the presence of slight error in the frequency of the reference signal.

  12. Unusual seismic activity in 2011 and 2013 at the submarine volcano Rocard, Society hot spot (French Polynesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talandier, Jacques; Hyvernaud, Olivier; Maury, René C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two seismic events that occurred on 27 May 2011 and 29 April 2013 at the Rocard submarine volcano which overlies the Society hot spot. The Polynesian Seismic Network recorded for the first time unusual associated short- and long-period signals, with perfectly monochromatic (0.0589 Hz) Rayleigh wave trains of long period and duration. None of the numerous observations of long-period (10-30 s) signals previously associated with volcanic activity in Japan, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Antarctica, and the Hawaiian Islands have the characteristics we observed at Rocard. We propose a tentative model for these unusual and rather enigmatic signals, in which the movement of lava excited the resonance of a shallow open conduit under a high hydrostatic pressure of ~400 bars.

  13. High-Temperature Hydrothermal Vent Field of Kolumbo Submarine Volcano, Aegean Sea: Site of Active Kuroko-Type Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Alexandri, M.; Vougioukalakis, G.; Croff, K.; Roman, C.; Sakellariou, D.; Anagnostou, C.; Rousakis, G.; Ioakim, C.; Gogou, A.; Ballas, D.; Misaridis, T.; Nomikou, P.

    2006-12-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano is located 7 km north-east of the island of Santorini in the Hellenic arc (Greece), and comprises one of about twenty submarine cones in a NE-trending rift zone. Kolumbo erupted explosively in 1649-50AD, causing 70 fatalities on Santorini. Kolumbo's crater is 1700 m in diameter, with a crater rim at 10 m below sea level and crater floor at depth of 505 m. Recent marine geological investigations, using ROVs, reveal a very active high-temperature hydrothermal vent field in the northeastern part of the Kolumbo crater floor, about 25,000 m2. Vent chimneys up to 4 m high are vigorously emitting colorless gas plumes up to 10 m high in the water column. Temperatures up to 220oC are recorded in vent fluids. Some vents are in crater- like depressions, containing debris from collapsed extinct chimneys. The entire crater floor of Kolumbo is mantled by a reddish-orange bacterial mat, and bacterial filaments of a variety of colors cling to chimneys in dense clusters. Glassy tunicates and anemones are common in lower-temperature environments on the crater floor. Most chimneys show a high porosity, with a central conduit surrounded by an open and very permeable framework of sulfides and sulfates, aiding fluid flow through the chimney walls. In the sulfate-rich samples, blades of euhedral barite and anhydrite crystals coat the outside of the chimney wall, and layers of barite alternate with sulfide in the interior. The dominant sulfides are pyrite, sphalerite, wurtzite, marcasite and galena. Crusts on extinct and lower-temperature chimneys are composed of amorphous silica, goethite and halite. Sulfur isotope composition of sulfates is virtually at sea water values, whereas the sulfides are more depleted. Elevated levels of copper, gold and silver are observed in bulk composition of chimney samples. Both the structural setting, character of the vent field and sulfide/sulfate mineralogy and geochemistry indicate on-going Kuroko-type mineralization in the

  14. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine landsliding represents aside submarine earthquakes major natural hazard to coastal and sea-floor infrastructure as well as to coastal communities due to their ability to generate large-scale tsunamis with their socio-economic consequences. The investigation of submarine landslides, their conditions and trigger mechanisms, recurrence rates and potential impact remains an important task for the evaluation of risks in coastal management and offshore industrial activities. In the light of a changing globe with warming oceans and rising sea-level accompanied by increasing human population along coasts and enhanced near- and offshore activities, slope stability issues gain more importance than ever before. The Arctic exhibits the most rapid and drastic changes and is predicted to change even faster. Aside rising air temperatures, enhanced inflow of less cooled Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean reduces sea-ice cover and warms the surroundings. Slope stability is challenged considering large areas of permafrost and hydrates. The Hinlopen/Yermak Megaslide (HYM) north of Svalbard is the first and so far only reported large-scale submarine landslide in the Arctic Ocean. The HYM exhibits the highest headwalls that have been found on siliciclastic margins. With more than 10.000 square kilometer areal extent and app. 2.400 cubic kilometer of involved sedimentary material, it is one of the largest exposed submarine slides worldwide. Geometry and age put this slide in a special position in discussing submarine slope stability on glaciated continental margins. The HYM occurred 30 ka ago, when the global sea-level dropped by app. 50 m within less than one millennium due to rapid onset of global glaciation. It probably caused a tsunami with circum-Arctic impact and wave heights exceeding 130 meters. The HYM affected the slope stability field in its neighbourhood by removal of support. Post-megaslide slope instability as expressed in creeping and smaller-scaled slides are

  15. Continuous, Long-term, Cyclic, Varied Eruptive Activity Observed at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Dziak, R. P.; Baker, E. T.; Cashman, K. V.; Embley, R. W.; Ferrini, V.; de Ronde, C. E.; Butterfield, D. A.; Deardorff, N.; Haxel, J. H.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M. J.; Walker, S. L.; Bobbitt, A. M.; Merle, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is a conical, basaltic-andesite submarine volcano in the Mariana arc with a summit depth of 520 m. Eruptive activity was first witnessed here during remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives in 2004, and was also observed during all four subsequent ROV expeditions in 2005, 2006, and 2009. Cyclic explosive bursts were documented by a portable hydrophone during the 2006 ROV dives. More recently, a year of instrumental monitoring data from a moored hydrophone and plume sensor show that the volcano was continuously active from February 2008 to February 2009, and that the cyclic character of the eruptions occurred with variable intensity and periodicity. The 2008-2009 hydrophone record includes explosive bursts every 1-2 minutes, with high acoustic amplitudes in the first half of the year and lower more variable amplitudes in the second half. In contrast, the moored turbidity sensor recorded major eruptive plumes on a time scale of every few days to weeks, and at approximately the same frequency throughout the year. This apparent disparity may be explained by the most recent ROV and portable hydrophone observations at NW Rota-1 in April 2009, which confirmed continuous and diverse eruptive activity with cyclicity over several time scales, from minutes to days. Visual observations at the eruptive vent provided new insight into the process of very slow lava extrusion on the seafloor. During slow extrusion (at rates of 1-2 m3/hr), lava spines rose in the eruptive vent, then gradually disintegrated into angular blocks as they cooled and were shoved aside by the next lava to emerge. Freshly erupted lava blocks periodically tumbled down the sides of a growing cone (40-m high and 300-m wide) that had been constructed by this process since the last visit in 2006. Thus auto-brecciation during slow lava extrusion underwater produces primary deposits that could easily be mistaken as secondary, and can construct substantial landforms on submarine arc volcanoes. Even during

  16. Holocene sedimentary activity in a non-terrestrially coupled submarine canyon: Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, J. J.; Micallef, A.; Stevens, C. L.; Stirling, M. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Cook Strait Canyon system, located between the North and South islands of New Zealand, is a large (1800 km2), multi-branching, shelf-indenting canyon on an active subduction margin. The canyon comes within 1 km of the coast, but does not intercept fluvial or littoral sediment systems and is therefore defined as a non-terrestrially coupled system. Sediment transport associated with a strong tidal stream, and seafloor disturbance related to numerous high-activity faults, is known from previous studies. Little is known, however, about the rates of sedimentary activity in the canyon and the processes driving it. A substantial dataset of EM300 multibeam bathymetry, gravity cores, 3.5 kHz seismic reflection profiles, camera and video transects and current meter data have been collected across the region between 2002 and 2011. The canyon system therefore provides an excellent study area for understanding sediment transport in a non-coupled submarine canyon system. Analysis of the data reveals a two-staged sediment transport system where: (1) oceanographic (tidal) processes mobilise sediment from the continental shelf and transport it to depocentres in the upper-central canyons, and (2) tectonic (earthquake) processes remobilise sediment that is transported through the lower canyon to the deep ocean. Tidal boundary-layer currents within the canyon reach velocities up to 0.53 m/s and are capable of mobilising fine sand in the central reach of the upper canyons. The velocity is higher at the canyon rim and capable of mobilising coarse sand. Sediment depocentres resulting from this tidally forced sediment transport have a well formed geomorphology within the mid-upper canyon arms of Cook Strait and Nicholson Canyons. Pseudo-static stability modelling, supported by sediment core analysis, indicates that sediment accumulated in the upper canyons fails during seismic events approximately every 100 years. The 100 year return period ground shaking-level (peak ground

  17. Soil gas radon and volcanic activity at El Hierro (Canary Islands) before and after the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos, J.; Padilla, G.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padron, E.; Perez, N.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Nolasco, D.; Dionis, S.; Rodriguez, F.; Calvo, D.; Hernandez, I.

    2012-12-01

    El Hierro is the youngest and southernmost island of the Canarian archipelago and represents the summit of a volcanic shield elevating from the surrounding seafloor at depth of 4000 m to up to 1501 m above sea level. The island is believed to be near the present hotspot location in the Canaries with the oldest subaerial rocks dated at 1.12 Ma. The subaerial parts of the El Hierro rift zones (NE, NW and S Ridges) are characterized by tightly aligned dyke complexes with clusters of cinder cones as their surface expressions. Since July 16, 2011, an anomalous seismicity at El Hierro Island was recorded by IGN seismic network. Volcanic tremor started at 05:15 hours on October 10, followed on the afternoon of October 12 by a green discolouration of seawater, strong bubbling and degassing indicating the initial stage of submarine volcanic eruption at approximately 2 km off the coast of La Restinga, El Hierro. Soil gas 222Rn and 220Rn activities were continuously measured during the period of the recent volcanic unrest occurred at El Hierro, at two different geochemical stations, HIE02 and HIE03. Significant increases in soil 222Rn activity and 222Rn/220Rn ratio from the soil were observed at both stations prior the submarine eruption off the coast of El Hierro, showing the highest increases before the eruption onset and the occurrence of the strongest seismic event (M=4.6). A statistical analysis showed that the long-term trend of the filtered data corresponded closely to the seismic energy released during the volcanic unrest. The observed increases of 222Rn are related to the rock fracturing processes (seismic activity) and the magmatic CO2 outflow increase, as observed in HIE03 station. Under these results, we find that continuous soil radon studies are important for evaluating the volcanic activity of El Hierro and they demonstrate the potential of applying continuous monitoring of soil radon to improve and optimize the detection of early warning signals of future

  18. Dynamics of an Array of Hydraulic Jumps in an Active Submarine Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Sumner, E. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Darby, S. E.; Wynn, R. B.; Ozsoy, E.; Tezcan, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic jumps, or bores, are formed when a flow rapidly thickens and slows down, passing from a Froude number defined super to subcritical state. Such transitional behaviour occurs as a flow responds to changes in bed slope or channel geometry. Hydraulic jumps are thought to be ubiquitous features formed in submarine channelized flows, as well as in river channels. Here, for the first time, we present integrated velocity and density measurements across an array of hydraulic jumps. The velocity data were collected using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP)), and the density data were collected using a Conductivity, Temperature Depth (CTD) probe. The hydraulic jumps were generated by scour features, in a channelized, density stratified flow exiting the Bosphorus Strait onto the continental shelf region in South West Black Sea. It is observed that with stratification of the flow the dilute upper layer completely bypasses any forcing arising from the changing bed slope, whilst the denser lower layer responds by generating an internal hydraulic jump. Such flow behaviour is distinct to that observed in open-channel systems, where flows are rarely sufficiently stratified to generate internal hydraulic jumps. This direct field evidence supports previous experimental and theoretical analysis of hydraulic jumps in stratified shear flow. However, the field data raise several fundamental physical questions relating to the mechanics of internal hydraulic jumps. Firstly, it is observed that surface rollers, resulting in upstream flow velocity, are consistently found hundreds of metres before the slope break initiating the hydraulic jump. Secondly it is observed that the Froude criticality of the upper dilute layer is inversely related to that of the lower layer. Thirdly, it is noted that with a bypassing upper flow layer, sediment transport dynamics of coarse versus fine grained sediment past the slope break will be

  19. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25627249

  20. The Probable Whole of Slope Submarine Landslides of Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubble, T.

    2015-12-01

    A research cruise aboard the RV Southern Surveyor (SS2013-V01) conducted in January 2013 offshore east Australia collected regional bathymetric data for the seabed of the continental margin of southern Queensland for the seabed bounded by Noosa Heads in the south and Indian Head, Fraser Island in the north. This newly mapped area presents a particularly steep portion of continental slope (5o to 10 o) that presents numerous submarine landslides, including two 'whole-of-slope' features (The Wide Bay Canyon, and Inskip Slides. The slope is also dissected by three large submarine canyons offshore northern Fraser Island, Wide Bay and Noosa Heads (i.e. the Fraser Canyons, the Wide Bay Canyon and the Noosa Canyon). Dredge and core samples were collected from slide scars in the northern, central and southern areas of the bathymetric survey area. The initial examination of the area's bathymetry, the core and dredge sample sedimentology, and determination of biostratigraphic ages for these sediment samples indicates that the larger, submarine slides present in this study area have probably been shed from the slope since the late Pliocene and that canyon incision is currently active on this portion of the slope. In one case, canyon incision is partly responsible for generating slides due to undercutting and removal of the toe of the slope. Slope sediments are dominantly comprised of hemipelagic muds but the presence of massive coarse sands and graded sands in some cores above erosion surfaces that cut into slope mud units is interpreted to indicate that areas of the southern Queensland continental slope are probably subjected to abrasion by grain-flows and turbidites comprised of shelf-derived sands and upper slope sediment. The results from this voyage confirms and extends previous work on the southeastern Australian continental margin that indicates that sediment transport from the shelf to deep water on this margin is dominated by gravity mass transport and that the margin

  1. Characterization and expression analysis of the prophenoloxidase activating factor from the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Jiang, K J; Zhang, F Y; Song, W; Zhao, M; Wei, H Q; Meng, Y Y; Ma, L B

    2015-01-01

    Prophenoloxidase activating factors (PPAFs) are a group of clip domain serine proteinases that can convert prophenoloxidase (pro-PO) to the active form of phenoloxidase (PO), causing melanization of pathogens. Here, two full-length PPAF cDNAs from Scylla paramamosain (SpPPAF1 and SpPPAF2) were cloned and characterized. The full-length SpPPAF1 cDNA was 1677 bp in length, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 52 bp, an open reading frame (ORF) of 1131 bp coding for a polypeptide of 376 amino acids, and a 3'-UTR of 494 bp. The full-length SpPPAF2 cDNA was 1808 bp in length, including a 5'-UTR of 88 bp, an ORF of 1125 bp coding for a polypeptide of 374 amino acids, and a 3'-UTR of 595 bp. The estimated molecular weight of SpPPAF1 and SpPPAF2 was 38.43 and 38.56 kDa with an isoelectric point of 7.54 and 7.14, respectively. Both SpPPAF1 and SpPPAF2 proteins consisted of a signal peptide, a characteristic structure of clip domain, and a carboxyl-terminal trypsin-like serine protease domain. Expression analysis by qRT-PCR showed that SpPPAF1 mRNA was mainly expressed in the gill, testis, and hemocytes, and SpPPAF2 mRNA was mainly expressed in hemocytes. In addition, SpPPAF1 and SpPPAF2 mRNA was expressed in a time-dependent manner after Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge. The results showed that expression of both SpPPAF1 and SpPPAF2 was related to the bacterial challenge but the expression patterns differed. These findings suggest that SpPPAF is a serine proteinase and may be involved in the pro-PO activation pathway of the crab innate immune system. PMID:26345816

  2. Submarine laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConathy, D. R.

    The Department of the Navy and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) are sponsoring a joint study to investigate the use of blue-green laser technology to comunicate with submarines at operating depths. Two approaches are under investigation - one in which the laser itself is space-based, and the other in which the laser is ground-based with its beam redirected to the earth's surface by an orbiting mirror. This paper discusses these two approaches, and presents a brief history of activities which led to the current studies.

  3. Eustatic and structural control of submarine-fan sedimentation, Conception fan, Santa Barbara basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Thor, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    Eustatic sea level lows provide an opportunity for submarine-fan development; topography and structure, however, can control depositional-sequence geometry. Analysis of high-resolution seismic data provides a basis to evaluate to the evolution and geometry of the Pleistocene-Holocene Conception fan. The fan formed in the restricted, tectonically active Santo Barbara basin. It consists of 4 vertically stacked depositional sequences, each bounded by nondepositional unconformities. The unconformities are defined by seismic-sequence boundaries and were formed during sea-level falls that are related to Pleistocene glacioeustatic changes. Each depositional sequence consists of lowstand, sandrich facies (fan channel, levee, and lobe) topped by highstand, mud-rich facies. The geometry of the depositional sequences tends to be rectilinear, not arcuate, because lateral progradation is restricted by topographically high structures. The modern fan surface and the Holocene depositional sequence provide a good analog for the older, underlying depositional sequences. The fan surface is characterized by 4 main channels, 2 of which head into submarine canyons incised into the shelf. Submarine canyons that fed the other 2 channels are now filled and have no topographic expression. In addition, numerous partially buried channel segments occur in the interchannel areas. The Holocene depositional sequence consists of lenticular and sheet-drape deposits interpreted to be channel, levee, and lobe facies. The facies geometry suggests that Mutti's topographic compensation, channel migration, and avulsion were typical processes on Conception fan.

  4. Predicting mud toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bleler, R. )

    1991-10-01

    Acute toxicity of drilling muds is measured in the U.S. by the mysid shrimp test. Drilling muds that fail the test cannot be discharged into the Gulf of Mexico, and such muds and their cuttings must be brought onshore for disposal. Discharge of water-based muds that pass the test is permitted in most instances. Because of the economic implications associated with hauling cuttings and fluids, a model that predicts test results on the basis of mud composition is clearly desirable. This paper focuses on the modeling of mysid shrimp test data. European laboratories use different test species and procedures. It seems plausible to expect, however, that the line of reasoning used here could apply to the modeling of aquatic data on other test species once a sufficient quantity of such data becomes available.

  5. Increasing sediment accumulation rates in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon axis and their relationship with bottom trawling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Martín, J.; Masqué, P.; Palanques, A.

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies conducted in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean) found that trawling activities along the canyon flanks cause resuspension and transport of sediments toward the canyon axis. 210Pb chronology supported by 137Cs dating applied to a sediment core collected at 1750 m in 2002 suggested a doubling of the sediment accumulation rate since the 1970s, coincident with the rapid industrialization of the local trawling fleet. The same canyon area has been revisited a decade later, and new data are consistent with a sedimentary regime shift during the 1970s and also suggest that the accumulation rate during the last decade could be greater than expected, approaching ~2.4 cm yr-1 (compared to ~0.25 cm yr-1 pre-1970s). These results support the hypothesis that commercial bottom trawling can substantially affect sediment dynamics and budgets on continental margins, eventually initiating the formation of anthropogenic depocenters in submarine canyon environments.

  6. Enrichment of heavy metals in the inner shelf mud of the East China Sea and its indication to human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Fan, Dejiang; Li, Weiran; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Xilin; Liu, Ming; Guo, Zhigang

    2014-11-01

    The Yangtze River Basin, which has a population of 0.4 billion and an economic output accounting for 50% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), is one of the most developed regions in China. With dramatic developments in the economy, large quantities of pollutants have entered the Yangtze River and have eventually been discharged into the East China Sea (ECS), and then most of them were preserved in the inner shelf coastal mud areas of the ECS. The inner shelf costal mud areas of the ECS, with sedimentation rate ranging from 0.8 cm/a to 1.2 cm/a, are an ideal place to obtain the high-resolution heavy metal record. In this work, two sediment cores collected in the inner shelf of the coastal mud areas of the ECS in 2009 were used to reconstruct historical records of anthropogenic heavy metal input from the Yangtze River Basin. The temporal distribution of enrichment factors (EFs) is in good accordance with social development of Yangtze River Basin. Before the 1930s, the EFs of Pb and Zn are considered as the background level of study area, according to the agricultural country of China in that time. The much higher EFs of Pb and Zn from the 1930s to 1980s were associated with significant improvement of industry of the Yangtze River Basin. After 1983, the dramatical incensement of EFs of Pb and Zn responded to the remarkable economic development of the Yangtze River Basin. Of particular interest, the construction of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) in 2003 possibly induced a significant increase in the heavy metal levels in the coastal ECS, and the ban on leaded gasoline in China induced a remarkable decrease in Pb levels. Although heavy metal levels have increased since the 1930s, the coastal mud area of the ECS remains under low ecological risk.

  7. Utilization of red mud in cement production: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na

    2011-10-01

    Red mud is a solid waste residue of the digestion of bauxite ores with caustic soda for alumina production. Its disposal remains a worldwide issue in terms of environmental concerns. During the past decades, extensive work has been done by a lot of researchers to develop various economic ways for the utilization of red mud. One of the economic ways is using red mud in cement production, which is also an efficient method for large-scale recycling of red mud. This paper provides a review on the utilization of red mud in cement production, and it clearly points out three directions for the use of red mud in cement production, namely the preparation of cement clinkers, production of composite cements as well as alkali-activated cements. In the present paper, the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of red mud are summarized, and the current progresses on these three directions are reviewed in detail. PMID:21930526

  8. Submarine explosive activity and ocean noise generation at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc: constraints from hydroacoustic T-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Submarine volcanic activity is difficult to detect, because eruptions at depth are strongly attenuated by seawater. With increasing depth the ambient water pressure increases and limits the expansion of gas and steam such that volcanic eruptions tend to be less violent and less explosive with depth. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of water causes rapid cooling of ejected products and hence erupted magma cools much more quickly than during subaerial eruptions. Therefore, reports on submarine volcanism are restricted to those sites where erupted products - like the presence of pumice rafts, gas bubbling on the sea surface, and local seawater colour changes - reach the sea surface. However, eruptions cause sound waves that travel over far distances through the Sound-Fixing-And-Ranging (SOFAR) channel, so called T-waves. Seismic networks in French Polynesia recorded T-waves since the 1980's that originated at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc, and were attributed to episodic growth and collapse events. Repeated swath-mapping campaigns conducted between 1998 and 2011 confirm that Monowai volcano is a highly dynamic volcano. In July of 2007 a network of ocean-bottom-seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones was deployed and recovered at the end of January 2008. The instruments were located just to the east of Monowai between latitude 25°45'S and 27°30'S. The 23 OBS were placed over the fore-arc and on the incoming subducting plate to obtain local seismicity associated with plate bending and coupling of the subduction megathrust. However, we recognized additional non-seismic sleuths in the recordings. Events were best seen in 1 Hz high-pass filtered hydrophone records and were identified as T-waves. The term T-wave is generally used for waves travelling through the SOFAR channel over large distances. In our case, however, they were also detected on station down to ~8000 m, suggesting that waves on the sea-bed station were direct waves caused by explosive

  9. Imaging mud fluid conduits of the Gunshuiping mud volcano with Electric Resistivity Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ling-Rong; Lin, Ting-Li; Chang, Ping-Yu

    2016-04-01

    We conducted the resistivity survey at the Gunshuiping mud volcano and produced a 3D model in order to delineate the mud-fluid conduits in the mud volcano system. The Gunshuiping mud volcano is located in a 175-m × 90-m plateau in Southwest of Taiwan. There are three main mud-volcano craters: craters 1, 2 and 3. Crater 3 is active and the others are inactive. We conducted thirteen survey lines using the Wenner configuration to obtain the resistivity profile images. The lengths of the lines are about 155 m and 60 m, which can resolve the resistivity image down to 30 m and 10 m in depth, respectively. The results appeared that there is a vertical structure under the crater 3, and we suggest that it is the mud-fluid conduit. There is a chamber at depth between 3 and 14 m, and we interpret it is the temporary storage of mud fluid during the erupting process. Beneath the craters 1 and 2, there is a near-surface, horizontal conduit connecting the craters 1 and 2. At depth between 15 and 25 m, the vertical conduit beneath the crater 3 and the horizontal conduit beneath the craters 1 and 2 are connected. The resistivity images clearly delineate the conduit underneath the craters and suggest that the crater 3 is the main erupting conduit, which is consistent with the surface features, in the Gunshuiping mud volcano system.

  10. Warm brine lakes in craters of active mud volcanoes, Menes caldera off NW Egypt: evidence for deep-rooted thermogenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Mascle, Jean; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Harmegnies, François; Woodside, John; Pierre, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during the 2000 Fanil, 2004 Mimes and 2007 Medeco2 expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling MV morphology, the geometry of feeder channels, and the origin of emitted fluids. The active Cheops and Chephren MVs are 1,500 m wide with subcircular craters at their summits, about 250 m in diameter, generally a few tens of metres deep, and filled with methane-rich muddy brines with temperatures reaching 42 °C and 57 °C respectively. Deployments of CTDs and corers with attached temperature sensors tracked these warm temperatures down to almost 0.5 km depth below the brine lake surface at the Cheops MV, in a feeder channel probably only a few tens of metres wide. Thermogenic processes involve the dissolution of Messinian evaporites by warm fluids likely sourced even deeper, i.e. 1.7 and 2.6 km below the seabed at the Cheops and Chephren MVs respectively, and which ascend along listric faults. Seepage activity appears broadly persistent since the initiation of mud volcanism in the Early Pliocene, possibly accompanied by lateral migration of feeder channels.

  11. Radioactivity of peat mud used in therapy.

    PubMed

    Karpińska, Maria; Mnich, Krystian; Kapała, Jacek; Bielawska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Grzegorz; Mnich, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the contents of natural and artificial isotopes in peat mud and to estimate the radiation dose absorbed via skin in patients during standard peat mud treatment. The analysis included 37 samples collected from 8 spas in Poland. The measurements of isotope concentration activity were conducted with the use of gamma spectrometry methods. The skin dose in a standard peat mud bath therapy is approximately 300 nSv. The effective dose of such therapy is considered to be 22 nSv. The doses absorbed during peat mud therapy are 5 orders of magnitude lower than effective annual dose absorbed from the natural radiation background by a statistical Pole (3.5 mSv). Neither therapeutic nor harmful effect is probable in case of such a small dose of ionising radiation. PMID:26675542

  12. Throttling mud choke apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1983-03-22

    Mud choke apparatus is disclosed, and the preferred embodiment has the form of a hollow, tubular body receiving a mud flow introduced from a lateral port, the flow being directed through an axial passage and past a valve seat. The valve seat is a replaceable, hardened metal liner and is formed with a gradual taper so that the mud flows from the large end through the tapered, smaller end. Thereafter, it flows out of the body through an axial opening. The flow of mud is throttled by a tapered, hardened plug serving as a valve element which is received into the valve seat. A hydraulic cylinder and piston with a connecting rod move the plug. The plug has a surrounding, perpendicular shoulder which seals and seats against a shoulder on the insert to fully close the throttling valve apparatus. Flow is choked by inserting the tapered plug with controlled clearance into the tapered valve seat.

  13. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Web Visualization that Simulates Making an ROV Dive to an Active Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Several years ago we created an exciting and engaging multimedia exhibit for the Hatfield Marine Science Center that lets visitors simulate making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. The public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. We are now completing a revision to the project that will make this engaging virtual exploration accessible to a much larger audience. With minor modifications we will be able to put the exhibit onto the world wide web so that any person with internet access can view and learn about exciting volcanic and hydrothermal activity at Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The modifications address some cosmetic and logistic ISSUES confronted in the museum environment, but will mainly involve compressing video clips so they can be delivered more efficiently over the internet. The web version, like the museum version, will allow users to choose from 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the computer mouse. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are

  14. Paint-Stirrer Submarine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn; Hardy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a unique and challenging laboratory exercise called, the paint-stir-stick submarine, that keeps the students enthralled. The paint-stir-stick submarine fits beautifully with the National Science Education Standards Physical Science Content Standard B, and with the California state science standards for physical…

  15. Submarine cable route survey

    SciTech Connect

    Herrouin, G.; Scuiller, T.

    1995-12-31

    The growth of telecommunication market is very significant. From the beginning of the nineties, more and more the use of optical fiber submarine cables is privileged to that of satellites. These submarine telecommunication highways require accurate surveys in order to select the optimum route and determine the cable characteristics. Advanced technology tools used for these surveys are presented along with their implementation.

  16. Vailulu’u Seamount, Samoa: Life and death on an active submarine volcano

    PubMed Central

    Staudigel, Hubert; Hart, Stanley R.; Pile, Adele; Bailey, Bradley E.; Baker, Edward T.; Brooke, Sandra; Connelly, Douglas P.; Haucke, Lisa; German, Christopher R.; Hudson, Ian; Jones, Daniel; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Konter, Jasper; Lee, Ray; Pietsch, Theodore W.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Zierenberg, Robert; Young, Craig M.

    2006-01-01

    Submersible exploration of the Samoan hotspot revealed a new, 300-m-tall, volcanic cone, named Nafanua, in the summit crater of Vailulu’u seamount. Nafanua grew from the 1,000-m-deep crater floor in <4 years and could reach the sea surface within decades. Vents fill Vailulu’u crater with a thick suspension of particulates and apparently toxic fluids that mix with seawater entering from the crater breaches. Low-temperature vents form Fe oxide chimneys in many locations and up to 1-m-thick layers of hydrothermal Fe floc on Nafanua. High-temperature (81°C) hydrothermal vents in the northern moat (945-m water depth) produce acidic fluids (pH 2.7) with rising droplets of (probably) liquid CO2. The Nafanua summit vent area is inhabited by a thriving population of eels (Dysommina rugosa) that feed on midwater shrimp probably concentrated by anticyclonic currents at the volcano summit and rim. The moat and crater floor around the new volcano are littered with dead metazoans that apparently died from exposure to hydrothermal emissions. Acid-tolerant polychaetes (Polynoidae) live in this environment, apparently feeding on bacteria from decaying fish carcasses. Vailulu’u is an unpredictable and very active underwater volcano presenting a potential long-term volcanic hazard. Although eels thrive in hydrothermal vents at the summit of Nafanua, venting elsewhere in the crater causes mass mortality. Paradoxically, the same anticyclonic currents that deliver food to the eels may also concentrate a wide variety of nektonic animals in a death trap of toxic hydrothermal fluids. PMID:16614067

  17. Hydrothermal activity and carbon-dioxide discharge at Shrub and upper Klawasi mud volcanoes, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, Michael L.; Werner, Cindy; McGimsey, Robert G.; Evans, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Shrub mud volcano, one of three mud volcanoes of the Klawasi group in the Copper River Basin, Alaska, has been discharging warm mud and water and CO2?rich gas since 1996. A field visit to Shrub in June 1999 found the general level of hot-spring discharge to be similar, but somewhat more widespread, than in the previous two years. Evidence of recent animal and vegetation deaths from CO2 exposure were confined to localized areas around various gas and fluid vents. Maximum fluid temperatures in each of three main discharge areas, ranging from 48-54?C, were equal to or higher than those measured in the two previous years; such temperatures are significantly higher than those observed intermittently over the past 30 years. At Upper Klawasi mud volcano, measured temperatures of 23-26?C and estimated rates of gas and water discharge in the summit crater lake were also similar to those observed in the previous two years. Gas discharging at Shrub and Upper Klawasi is composed of over 98% CO2 and minor amounts of meteoric gases (N2, O2, Ar) and gases partly of deeper origin (CH4 and He). The rate of CO2 discharge from spring vents and pools at Shrub is estimated to be ~10 metric tonnes per day. This discharge, together with measured concentrations of bicarbonate, suggest that a total CO2 upflow from depth of 20-40 metric tonnes per day at Shrub.Measurements were made of diffuse degassing rates from soil at one ~300 m2 area near the summit of Shrub that included vegetation kill suggestive of high CO2 concentrations in the root zone. Most of measured gas flow rates in this area were significantly higher than background values, and a CO2 concentration of 26 percent was measured at a depth of 10 cm where the gas flow rate was highest. Although additional measurements of diffuse gas flow were made elsewhere at Shrub, no other areas of vegetation kill related to diffuse degassing and high soil-gas CO2 concentrations could be seen from the air.Chemical and isotopic compositions of

  18. Hg Isotopic Compositions of Chimneys and Pelagic Sediments at Active Submarine Hydrothermal Field in the Okinawa Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Marumo, K.; Tomiyasu, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Komuro, K.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed and highly toxic pollutant in the environment. It is known that a submarine hydrothermal activity is one of the natural processes to emit Hg to marine environment. In order to estimate the degree to which the Hg found in the marine environment is from anthropogenic versus natural sources, it is important to characterize the Hg from the hydrothermal vents. Samples of chimneys and a ~20 cm sediment core, collected by a deep-sea remotely operated vehicle, from Iheya North hydrothermal field in Okinawa Trough, Japan, were analyzed for Hg concentrations and Hg isotopic compositions. Total Hg concentrations of chimneys range between 8.2 and 16.9 mg/kg, whereas seafloor sediment total Hg concentrations are from 3.8 to 34.8 mg/kg. Approximately 0.4 to 1.1 μg/kg of monomethyl Hg (MMHg) was detected in the top 6 cm sediment cores. Hg isotopic compositions (δ202Hg) of chimneys are between -0.30 and -0.96 ‰, whereas δ202Hg values of sediment samples range from -0.85 to -1.60 ‰. Neither chimneys nor sediment samples exhibit the significant mass independent fractionations in Hg isotopes (Δ201Hg > ± 0.10). The chimney δ202Hg values are slightly higher than the δ202Hg values of sediments. This may indicate that the heavier Hg isotopes tend to be incorporated with mercury-bearing sulfides in chimneys, and the lighter isotopes tend to be remained in the hydrothermal fluid and distributed in the surrounding sediments. Also, the sediment samples from the upper portion of cores demonstrate approximately 0.4 - 0.5 ‰ lower δ202Hg values than those from the lower part. This isotopic fractionation may be resulted from a demethylated process of MMHg by microbes. Several studies have previously demonstrated the rapid demethylation of MMHg by microbes in Hg-contaminated aquatic sediments, and range of the isotopic fractionation is similar to that of the experimentally determined isotopic fractionation of MMHg by bacterial reduction

  19. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  20. Field applications of PHPA muds

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaster, A.G. ); Guild, G.J. Exploration Co., London ); Hanni, G.L. ); Schmidt, D.D. )

    1992-09-01

    Mud systems with partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer (PHPA) are used worldwide and have proved effective and versatile for inhibiting troublesome shale formations. This paper reports that the authors made significant changes in the generally recommended compositions for these systems and developed a systematic approach to applying them. The most significant changes are the constant maintenance of 1.0 lbm/bbl (2.9 kg/m{sup 3}) PHPA (active) on the basis of materials balance and the supplemental addition of PHPA to account for its loss and degradation, tightly controlled fluid loss, and selective use of seawater and NaCl for inhibition.

  1. MUD and Self Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kwan Min

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical framework for analyzing the effect of MUD (Multi-User Dungeons) playing on users' self-efficacy by applying Bandura's social learning theory, and introduces three types of self-efficacy: computer self-efficacy; social self-efficacy; and generalized self-efficacy. Considers successful performance, vicarious experience,…

  2. Optimization of NaOH Molarity, LUSI Mud/Alkaline Activator, and Na2SiO3/NaOH Ratio to Produce Lightweight Aggregate-Based Geopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Razak, Rafiza; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Hardjito, Djwantoro; Yahya, Zarina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical function and characterization of an artificial lightweight geopolymer aggregate (ALGA) using LUSI (Sidoarjo mud) and alkaline activator as source materials. LUSI stands for LU-Lumpur and SI-Sidoarjo, meaning mud from Sidoarjo which erupted near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia on 27 May 2006. The effect of NaOH molarity, LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to the ALGA are investigated at a sintering temperature of 950 °C. The results show that the optimum NaOH molarity found in this study is 12 M due to the highest strength (lowest AIV value) of 15.79% with lower water absorption and specific gravity. The optimum LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio of 1.7 and the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.4 gives the highest strength with AIV value of 15.42% with specific gravity of 1.10 g/cm3 and water absorption of 4.7%. The major synthesized crystalline phases were identified as sodalite, quartz and albite. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image showed more complete geopolymer matrix which contributes to highest strength of ALGA produced. PMID:26006238

  3. Optimization of NaOH Molarity, LUSI Mud/Alkaline Activator, and Na2SiO3/NaOH Ratio to Produce Lightweight Aggregate-Based Geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Hardjito, Djwantoro; Yahya, Zarina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical function and characterization of an artificial lightweight geopolymer aggregate (ALGA) using LUSI (Sidoarjo mud) and alkaline activator as source materials. LUSI stands for LU-Lumpur and SI-Sidoarjo, meaning mud from Sidoarjo which erupted near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia on 27 May 2006. The effect of NaOH molarity, LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to the ALGA are investigated at a sintering temperature of 950 °C. The results show that the optimum NaOH molarity found in this study is 12 M due to the highest strength (lowest AIV value) of 15.79% with lower water absorption and specific gravity. The optimum LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio of 1.7 and the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.4 gives the highest strength with AIV value of 15.42% with specific gravity of 1.10 g/cm3 and water absorption of 4.7%. The major synthesized crystalline phases were identified as sodalite, quartz and albite. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image showed more complete geopolymer matrix which contributes to highest strength of ALGA produced. PMID:26006238

  4. Diversity and abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea.

    PubMed

    Lösekann, Tina; Knittel, Katrin; Nadalig, Thierry; Fuchs, Bernhard; Niemann, Helge; Boetius, Antje; Amann, Rudolf

    2007-05-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are formed by expulsions of mud, fluids, and gases from deeply buried subsurface sources. They are highly reduced benthic habitats and often associated with intensive methane seepage. In this study, the microbial diversity and community structure in methane-rich sediments of the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV) were investigated by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In the active volcano center, which has a diameter of about 500 m, the main methane-consuming process was bacterial aerobic oxidation. In this zone, aerobic methanotrophs belonging to three bacterial clades closely affiliated with Methylobacter and Methylophaga species accounted for 56%+/-8% of total cells. In sediments below Beggiatoa mats encircling the center of the HMMV, methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-3 clade dominated the zone of anaerobic methane oxidation. ANME-3 archaea form cell aggregates mostly associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfobulbus (DBB) branch. These ANME-3/DBB aggregates were highly abundant and accounted for up to 94%+/-2% of total microbial biomass at 2 to 3 cm below the surface. ANME-3/DBB aggregates could be further enriched by flow cytometry to identify their phylogenetic relationships. At the outer rim of the mud volcano, the seafloor was colonized by tubeworms (Siboglinidae, formerly known as Pogonophora). Here, both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers were found, however, in lower abundances. The level of microbial diversity at this site was higher than that at the central and Beggiatoa species-covered part of the HMMV. Analysis of methyl-coenzyme M-reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes showed a strong dominance of a novel lineage, mcrA group f, which could be assigned to ANME-3 archaea. Our results further support the hypothesis of Niemann et al. (54), that high methane availability and different fluid flow regimens at the HMMV provide distinct niches for aerobic and

  5. Red mud characterization using nuclear analytical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Matjacic, L.; Valkovic, V.

    2011-07-01

    Red mud is a toxic waste left as a byproduct in aluminum production Bayer process. Since it contains significant concentrations of other chemical elements interesting for industry, including REE, it is also potential secondary ore source. Recent events in some countries have shown that red mud presents a serious environmental hazard if not properly stored. The subject of our study is the red mud from an ex-aluminum plant in Obrovac, Croatia, left from processing of bauxite mined during late 70's and early 80's at the eastern Adriatic coast and since than stored in open concrete basins for more than 30 years. We have used energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis (both tube and radioactive source excitation), fast neutron activation analysis and passive gamma spectrometry to identify a number of elements present in the red mud, their concentration levels and radioactivity in the red mud. The high concentrations of Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe have been measured. Chemical elements Sc, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Br, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Pb, Th and U were found in lower concentrations. No significant levels of radioactivity have been measured. (authors)

  6. In situ observations of wave-supported fluid-mud generation and deposition on an active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Richard P.; Ogston, Andrea S.

    2015-11-01

    Wave-supported fluid muds (WSFM) are a type of gravity flow that can rapidly transport sediment across continental margins. They occur when wave-induced bed stress maintains suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC) >10 g L-1, and sediment-induced stratification near the top of the wave boundary layer limits upward diffusion of sediment. Observations from near-bed instrumentation are used to evaluate the conditions under which WSFMs form on the continental shelf offshore of the Waipaoa River, NZ. An event in July 2010 featured >130 h of energetic ocean conditions, and water discharge >1900 m3 s-1. A calibrated acoustic backscatter sensor at the midshelf measured near-bed SSC >50 g L-1, with a strong lutocline occurring >15 cm above the predicted wave-current boundary layer, resulting in ~5 cm deposition. A velocity anomaly occurred during this time, with offshore-directed currents faster at 1 m above bed (mab) than at 3.5 mab. Using these observations, we empirically solve a simple buoyancy-drag force balance to estimate the gravity-driven velocity of the WSFM, which is always <0.03 m s-1. Extending the force balance across a shelf transect suggests that WSFM-carried sediment can reach the shelf edge in 50-240 h. Spatial and temporal patterns of deposition predicted by the gradient of modeled sediment flux correlate well with seabed observations on the Waipaoa shelf reported in Walsh et al. (2014). This study highlights the importance of WSFMs for cross-shelf sediment transport, despite relatively slow gravity-driven velocities and the infrequency with which they occur.

  7. Submarine Landslides: What we Know and Where we are Going!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscardelli, L. G.; Mountjoy, J. J.; Micallef, A.; Strasser, M.; Vanneste, M.; Chaytor, J. D.; Mosher, D.; Krastel, S.; Lo Iacono, C.; Yamada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine landslides and other gravity-induced movements can disrupt very large areas of continental margins resulting in long-term seafloor morphologic change and multi-scale mass transport deposits (MTDs). Potential consequences of submarine landslides include damage to seabed infrastructure, offshore facilities, as well as generation or enhancement of tsunamis. MTDs are common on the modern seafloor and within the stratigraphic record. Slides, slumps and debris flows can be constituents of MTDs and can co-occur in the same event or depositional unit. Recent research indicates that relationships exist between MTD geological setting, causal mechanisms, and geometries. Quantitative data analysis suggests that MTD morphometric parameters can be used to link these three parameters. Despite many advances in this field, it still remains unclear how to definitively identify pre-conditioning factors and triggers of submarine landslides in modern slopes, and how submarine landslides evolve after initiation. In addition, new questions regarding the interaction between submarine landslides and active marine processes, such as bottom currents and fluid flow, have emerged.One of the mandates of the S4SLIDE (IGCP-640) project, a joint endeavor of UNESCO and IGCP that represents the broad field of submarine landslide research, is to facilitate interactions at an international level among scientists, industry and government representatives to advance our knowledge on a number of outstanding science questions: (i) What is the nature of the interaction between current-controlled sedimentation and submarine landslides? (ii) What role do transient turbulent-laminar flows play in the formation of submarine landslides? (iii) Do climatic variations control the occurrence of submarine landslides? (iv) What is the economic significance of submarine landslides? (v) Do we understand the hazards that submarine landslides pose to the environment and to humans? This presentation will cover

  8. An actinomycete isolate from solitary wasp mud nest having strong antibacterial activity and kills the Candida cells due to the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Naik, Bindu; Gusain, Omprakash; Bisht, Gajraj S.

    2014-01-01

    An actinomycetes strain designated as MN 2(6) was isolated from the solitary wasp mud nest. The isolate was identified using polyphasic taxonomy. It produced the extensive branched brown substrate and white aerial hyphae that changed into grayish black. The aerial mycelia produced the spiral spore chains with rugose spore surface. The growth was observed between temperature range of 27–37°C, pH 8–10 and below salt concentration of 6% (w/v). The comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic relationship showed that strain MN 2(6) lies in clade with Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T, Streptomyces sporocinereus NBRC 100766T and Streptomyces demainii NRRL B-1478T with which it shares a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.3%. The strain MN 2(6) can be differentiated from type strains based on phenotypic characteristics. The strain MN 2(6) showed most promising activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, acid-fast bacilli and Candida species suggesting broad-spectrum characteristics of the active metabolite. Evaluation of anti-candidal activity of the metabolite of strain MN 2(6) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed changed external morphology of yeast. It kills the Candida cells due to the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss. However, further studies are required to elucidate the structure of the active metabolite produced by the isolate MN 2(6). PMID:25191320

  9. Drilling mud dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P. A.; Brase, I. E.

    1985-05-21

    Dispersants useful in aqueous drilling mud formulations employed in the drilling of subterranean wells where high temperature and high pressure environments are encountered are disclosed. The dispersants, when used in amounts of about 0.1 to 25 ppb provide muds containing colloidal material suspended in an aqueous medium with improved high temperature and high pressure stability. The dispersants are water soluble sulfonated vinyl toluene-maleic anhydride copolymers which have a molar ratio of vinyl toluene to maleic anhydride of about 1:1 to less than about 2:1, a molecular weight of 1,000 to 25,000 and at least about 0.7 sulfonic acid groups per vinyl toluene unit.

  10. Mud Volcanoes from the Beaufort Sea to the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Dallimore, S.; Melling, H.; Liu, C. S.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.

    2015-12-01

    The detailed morphology of five submarine mud volcanoes were surveyed using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) developed at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Mud volcanoes are constructional features built by extrusion of gas, subsurface fluids and fine-grained sediment. Two surveys covering four submarine mud volcanoes were conducted on the CCGS Sir Wilfred Laurier in the Beaufort Sea in the Canadian Arctic. A survey of one mud volcano was conducted on the Taiwanese Ocean Research V in the South China Sea, SE of Taiwan. The AUV carried a multibeam sonar, a 1-6 kHz chirp sub-bottom profiler, and a110 kHz sidescan, and obtained overlapping multibeam bathymetric coverage at a vertical resolution of 0.15 m with a horizontal footprint of 0.9 m and chirp seismic-reflection profiles with a vertical resolution of 0.11 m. Mud volcanoes were either flat topped or conical. The conical mud volcano off Taiwan had a diameter of ~2 km and 10° side slopes; the conical feature in the Beaufort Sea had a diameter of ~1.5 km and 4° side slopes. The sides of the conical mud volcanoes were smooth, suggesting they were formed by sediment flows that emanate from a vent on their crests. The flanks of the conical mud volcanoes characteristically had very low acoustic reflectivity, but one single high reflectivity trail from the crest of the Beaufort Sea mud volcano indicates a recent flow. Three mud volcanoes in the Beaufort Sea formed circular, flat-topped plateaus that are up to ~1.1 km in diameter and elevated up to 30 m from the surrounding seafloor. The fine scale morphology and reflectivity on these plateaus show low relief, concentric, and ovoid circles that appear to be mud boils probably associated with eruptive events of varying ages at shifting vent sites. The different mud volcano shapes are attributed to variations in the viscosity of the erupting sediment slurries and may represent a sequential morphology, which is altered by shifts in venting position over

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2008-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, located in Areas 2, 3, 4, 12, and 15 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 234 is comprised of the following 12 corrective action sites: •02-09-48, Area 2 Mud Plant #1 •02-09-49, Area 2 Mud Plant #2 •02-99-05, Mud Spill •03-09-02, Mud Dump Trenches •04-44-02, Mud Spill •04-99-02, Mud Spill •12-09-01, Mud Pit •12-09-04, Mud Pit •12-09-08, Mud Pit •12-30-14, Cellar •12-99-07, Mud Dump •15-09-01, Mud Pit The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 234 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. •If contaminants of concern are present, determine their extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 234 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs.

  12. Submarine sand ridges and sand waves in the eastern part of the China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziyin; Li, Shoujun; Shang, Jihong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Liang, Yuyang

    2016-04-01

    Integrated with multi-beam and single-beam echo sounding data, as well as historical bathymetric data, submarine bathymetric maps of the eastern part of the China Sea, including the Bohai Sea, Huanghai Sea, and East China Sea, are constructed to systematically study submarine sand ridges and sand waves in the eastern part of the China Sea, combined with high-resolution seismic, sub-bottom profile and borehole data. Submarine sand ridges are extraordinarily developed in the eastern part of the China Sea, and 7 sand ridge areas can be divided from north to south, that is, the Laotieshan Channel sand ridge area in the Bohai Sea, the Korea Bay sand ridge area in the southern Huanghai Sea, the sand ridge area in the eastern Huanghai islands and the Huanghai Troughs, the Jianggang sand ridge area in the western Huanghai Sea, the sand ridge area in the East China Sea shelf, and the sand ridge and sand wave area in the Taiwan Strait and Taiwan Banks. The distribution area of the sand ridges and sand waves covers more than 450,000 km2, wherein ~10,000 km2 in the Bohai Bay, ~200,000 km2 in the Huanghai Sea, ~200,000 km2 in the East China Sea shelf, and ~40,000 km2 in the Taiwan Strait and Taiwan Banks, respectively. The great mass of sand ridges are distributed within water depth of 5-160 m, with a total length of over 160 km and a main width of 5-10 km. The inner structure of the sand ridges presents features of high-angle inclined beddings, with main lithology of sands, sand-mud alternations partly visible, and a small number of mud cores. Dating results indicate that the sand ridges in the eastern part of the China Sea are mainly developed in the Holocene. Sea-level variation dominates the sand ridge evolution in the eastern part of the China Sea since the LGM, and the sand ridges developed in the area of < 60m water depth are appeared in bad activity, meanwhile sand ridges with good activity are still developed in large scale.

  13. Multi-Sensor Mud Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2010-01-01

    Robust mud detection is a critical perception requirement for Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) autonomous offroad navigation. A military UGV stuck in a mud body during a mission may have to be sacrificed or rescued, both of which are unattractive options. There are several characteristics of mud that may be detectable with appropriate UGV-mounted sensors. For example, mud only occurs on the ground surface, is cooler than surrounding dry soil during the daytime under nominal weather conditions, is generally darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and is highly polarized. However, none of these cues are definitive on their own. Dry soil also occurs on the ground surface, shadows, snow, ice, and water can also be cooler than surrounding dry soil, shadows are also darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and cars, water, and some vegetation are also highly polarized. Shadows, snow, ice, water, cars, and vegetation can all be disambiguated from mud by using a suite of sensors that span multiple bands in the electromagnetic spectrum. Because there are military operations when it is imperative for UGV's to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, passive sensors are desirable. JPL has developed a daytime mud detection capability using multiple passive imaging sensors. Cues for mud from multiple passive imaging sensors are fused into a single mud detection image using a rule base, and the resultant mud detection is localized in a terrain map using range data generated from a stereo pair of color cameras.

  14. Mud Volcanoes, Geodynamics and Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Panahi, Behrouz

    The purpose of the book is to link together knowledge obtained in the observation of mud volcanism and local seismicity. Geological, Seismological, Geophysical and Geochemical parameters are considered. The book represents the modern state of the art after many decades of observations. The book fills an editorial gap and improves knowledge in the fields of natural risks and energy resources. Mud volcanism occurs both onshore and offshore in many places of the world. Mud volcanic phenomena have been to date described by local monographs or by articles published in scientific journals and no books were published on topics highlighting the link between mud volcanism, geodynamics and seismicity.

  15. Submarine fans in a sequence stratigraphic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posamentier, H.W.; Erskine, R.D.; Mitchum, R.M.; Vail, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Submarine fans are fan- or cone-shaped turbiditic deposits formed in upper bathyal or deeper water depths. Within a sequence stratigraphic framework, these basin-floor turbidites can occur during lowstand-fan or lowstand-wedge systems tract time. During lowstand fan time, streams are rejuvenated and depocenters shift from the coastal plain to the upper slope, causing retrogradational slope failure and canyon formation. The sediment delivered here bypasses the canyon and continues down the slope as a succession of gravity flows and is deposited as fan-shaped turbiditic deposits at the base of the slope. Seismic and outcrop evidence suggest that these sand-prone deposits are abruptly introduced into the basin and are generally characterized by subtle external mounding and internal bidirectionally down lapping seismic reflections where seismically resolvable. Deep-water sediment deposited during this interval has no coeval shelf equivalent. During lowstand wedge time, streams cease down cutting and valleys which have been freshly incised begin to fill. Because coarse sediment will preferentially be deposited within these incised valleys, the sand-to-mud ratio delivered to the upper slope will be decreased and, consequently, there is an inherent difference between submarine fans deposited at this time and those deposited during lowstand fan time. Deposition during lowstand wedge time is characterized seismically by slope front fill or wedge-shaped geometries down lapping the earlier submarine fan (i.e., deposited during lowstand fan time). These shale-prone deposits are largely comprised of thinner-bedded turbidites as well as the occasional leveed channel.

  16. The Mud Center: Recapturing Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Becky J.; Bullard, Julie A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a Montana child development center's creation of an area in which children could enjoy messy, creative, sensory experiences playing with mud and a wide variety of outdoor props. Discusses how mud play contributed to young children's emerging interests and provided opportunities for expressing creativity, enhancing fine motor skills, and…

  17. Geomorphic process fingerprints in submarine canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel S.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Twichell, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Submarine canyons are common features of continental margins worldwide. They are conduits that funnel vast quantities of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. Though it is known that submarine canyons form primarily from erosion induced by submarine sediment flows, we currently lack quantitative, empirically based expressions that describe the morphology of submarine canyon networks. Multibeam bathymetry data along the entire passive US Atlantic margin (USAM) and along the active central California margin near Monterey Bay provide an opportunity to examine the fine-scale morphology of 171 slope-sourced canyons. Log–log regression analyses of canyon thalweg gradient (S) versus up-canyon catchment area (A) are used to examine linkages between morphological domains and the generation and evolution of submarine sediment flows. For example, canyon reaches of the upper continental slope are characterized by steep, linear and/or convex longitudinal profiles, whereas reaches farther down canyon have distinctly concave longitudinal profiles. The transition between these geomorphic domains is inferred to represent the downslope transformation of debris flows into erosive, canyon-flushing turbidity flows. Over geologic timescales this process appears to leave behind a predictable geomorphic fingerprint that is dependent on the catchment area of the canyon head. Catchment area, in turn, may be a proxy for the volume of sediment released during geomorphically significant failures along the upper continental slope. Focused studies of slope-sourced submarine canyons may provide new insights into the relationships between fine-scale canyon morphology and down-canyon changes in sediment flow dynamics.

  18. Discovery of an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc: volcanic structure and potential hazards of Oomurodashi Volcano (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Nichols, A. R.; Hirahara, Y.; Carey, R.; McIntosh, I. M.; Masaki, Y.; Kondo, R.; Miyairi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Oomurodashi is a bathymetric high located ~20 km south of Izu-Oshima, an active volcanic island of the northern Izu-Bonin Arc. Using the 200 m bathymetric contour to define its summit dimensions, the diameter of Oomurodashi is ~20 km. Oomurodashi has been regarded as inactive, largely because it has a vast flat-topped summit at 100 - 150 meters below sea level (mbsl). During cruise NT07-15 of R/V Natsushima in 2007, we conducted a dive survey in a small crater, Oomuro Hole, located in the center of the flat-topped summit, using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin. The only heat flow measurement conducted on the floor of Oomuro Hole during the dive recorded an extremely high value of 4,200 mW/m2. Furthermore, ROV observations revealed that the southwestern wall of Oomuro Hole consists of fresh rhyolitic lavas. These findings suggest that Oomurodashi is in fact an active silicic submarine volcano. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted detailed geological and geophysical ROV Hyper-Dolphin (cruise NT12-19). In addition to further ROV surveys, we carried out single-channel seismic (SCS) surveys across Oomurodashi in order to examine the shallow structures beneath the current edifice. The ROV surveys revealed numerous active hydrothermal vents on the floor of Oomuro Hole, at ~200 mbsl, with maximum water temperature measured at the hydrothermal vents reaching 194°C. We also conducted a much more detailed set of heat flow measurements across the floor of Oomuro Hole, detecting very high heat flows of up to 29,000 mW/m2. ROV observations revealed that the area surrounding Oomuro Hole on the flat-topped summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with minimum biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s). These findings strongly indicate that Oomurodashi is an active silicic submarine volcano, with recent eruption(s) occurring from Oomuro Hole. Since the summit of Oomurodashi is in shallow water, it

  19. Antilipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) of mud crab Scylla paramamosain: molecular cloning, genomic organization and the antimicrobial activity of its synthetic LPS binding domain.

    PubMed

    Imjongjirak, Chanprapa; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Sittipraneed, Siriporn

    2007-05-01

    Antilipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are small basic proteins that can bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and have broad spectrum antimicrobial activities. In this study, we describe the isolation of the full-length cDNA encoding for ALF peptide (ALFSp) of mud crab, Scylla paramamosain by sequencing a hemocyte cDNA library and using the rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) method. A full-length ALFSp cDNA of 614 bp contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 372 bp, encoding 123 amino acid protein with 26 residues signal sequence. The calculated molecular mass of the mature protein is 11.18 kDa. The highly two conserve cysteine residues and putative LPS binding domain were observed in ALFSp peptide. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed that ALFSp shared high identity with other known ALFs and had an overall similarity of 65, 64, 63, 61 and 59% to those of Fenneropenaeus chinensis, Litopenaeus vannamei, Marsupenaeus japonicus, Limulus polyphemus, and Tachypleus tridentatus, respectively. A neighbour-joining tree showed a clear differentiation of each species and also indicated that ALF from S. paramamosain, Carcinus maenas and Callinectes sapidus are closely related phylogenetically. The genomic DNA sequence of ALFSp gene consists of 1075 bp containing three exons and two introns. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that ALFSp was abundantly expressed in hemocytes, intestine, and muscle but not in eyestalk. The synthetic ALFSp peptide containing putative LPS binding domain revealed a strong antimicrobial activity against several bacteria especially on the growth of Gram-positive bacteria, Micrococcus luteus and Gram-negative bacteria, Vibrio harveyi suggested that ALFSp could play an essential role in defense mechanism in S. paramamosain. PMID:17368541

  20. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  1. Methane-related authigenic carbonates of eastern Mediterranean Sea mud volcanoes and their possible relation to gas hydrate destabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Giovanni; Pierre, Catherine; Rouchy, Jean-Marie; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Woodside, John; Medinaut Scientific Party

    2000-12-01

    Nautile submersible investigations of mud volcanoes and brine seep areas of the eastern Mediterranean Sea during the MEDINAUT cruise in November 1998 discovered extensive areas of authigenic carbonate crusts associated with methane emissions. Carbonate crusts form pavements, round slabs and circular mounds on the central, most active parts of mud volcanoes and in a fault-related valley where brines have accumulated to form a submarine brine lake. Authigenic carbonate nodules have been recovered from the same areas during the MEDINETH cruise in July 1999. Large 13C depletions of authigenic calcite, aragonite and dolomite indicate methane as a major carbon source for the carbonate. Crust pavements are formed when methane from a freshly emplaced, methane-charged mud flow is oxidised at the seafloor. In this environment, where bottom waters provide the sulphate and magnesium, aragonite is favoured versus calcite and accounts for the majority of the methane-related authigenic carbonates. Calcite, when present, contains significant amounts of Mg 2+ (high-Mg calcite), and possibly other divalent ions in its crystal lattice. In areas of brine seep and accumulation, dolomitic nodules are present at shallow depth in the sediment. The 18O enrichment of the authigenic carbonates (up to 4‰ greater than calculated values for carbonates precipitating from modern eastern Mediterranean bottom waters) is interpreted as due to precipitation from 18O-rich fluids rather than as a temperature effect. The source of the 18O-rich fluids may be multiple and possibly includes the destabilisation of gas hydrates present at shallow subbottom depth, and the seepage of relic Messinian brines.

  2. Seafloor characterization and benthic megafaunal distribution of an active submarine canyon and surrounding sectors: The case of Gioia Canyon (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Martorelli, Eleonora; Dominguez-Carrió, Carlos; Gili, Josep Maria; Chiocci, Francesco Latino

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we used multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, high-resolution seismic profiles, ROV video images and sediment samples to identify the principal morpho-sedimentary features and related megabenthic communities along the upper reach of the Gioia Canyon (depth < 600 m) and the surrounding shelf and slope areas. Interpretation of the multidisciplinary dataset was undertaken to evaluate the relationships between seafloor characteristics and faunal distribution along a submarine canyon in an active tectonic setting. The results from this study indicate that physical disturbance on the seafloor at the canyon head and surrounding shelf, related to high sedimentation rates and occasional turbidite flows, may limit the variability of megabenthic communities. Evidence of diffuse trawl marks over soft sedimentary bottoms indicates anthropogenic impact due to fishing activities, which could explain low abundances of megabenthic species observed locally. The canyon margins and flanks along the continental slope host octocorals Funiculina quadrangularis and Isidella elongata, species that are indicative of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VMEs) and relevant in terms of sustainable management priorities. At the Palmi Ridge, the occurrence of outcropping rocks and bottom currents related to the presence of Levantine Intermediate Waters, provide conditions for the development of hard-bottom assemblages, including the black coral Antipathella subpinnata and deep-sea sponges fields.

  3. Smart mud and sensitive enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1993-04-19

    Environmental legislation is increasingly preventing use of oil base mud. Most recently, Marathon Oil U.K. Ltd. won a U.K. production license that specified oil base mud cannot be used on the license blocks. The goal is to protect sea-birds. Unfortunately, water base mud, the green' alternative, does not have a performance to match oil base mud. But an Aberdeen chemist thinks he has found the answer with Smart Mud, an emulsion drilling mud that becomes water soluble as soon as it hits the sea. Smart Mud passed the laboratory test stage and is ready for field trials this year. Another researcher is using enzymes and organisms to detect gases that are hard to monitor and cause problems for the oil and gas industry: phenol vapors, methane, and sulfur and nitrous oxides. The methane sensor, for example, uses methanotrophic organisms. They metabolize methane, producing chemicals that can be detected by electrochemical sensors, which relay signals to instruments. Enzymes perform a similar task for phenol and oxide detection. The main problem is to keep the biosensors alive and detect their by-products, while maintaining contact with the toxic gases. To do this, the team invented a polymer matrix in which the biosensors can live.

  4. Climate, Ice, and Mud: investigating the relationship between glacier activity and sediment flux using varved lake sediments, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. J.; Miller, G. H.; Geirsdottir, A.; Flowers, G. E.; Bjornsson, H.

    2012-12-01

    The worldwide retreat of many glaciers during the 21st century is expected to have profound impacts on local and regional hydrologic cycles. Associated with the forecasted reductions in global ice volume are changes in meltwater runoff and sediment transport in glacially fed drainage systems. Alpine glaciers and small ice caps are particularly sensitive to climate change because their dimensions can respond quickly to changes in glacier mass balance. Records of past glacier fluctuations are important sources of paleoclimate data and also provide a context for current and future changes to glacier hydrologic systems. Annually laminated (varved) sediments from proglacial lake Hvítárvatn, central Iceland, offer a continuous archive of Langjökull ice cap (~925 km2) activity through the late Holocene. A multi-proxy record from this site indicates that Langjökull's size was more variable during the past millennium than during any other multi-centennial interval of the Holocene. Ice growth culminated in the Little Ice Age (LIA), when Langjökull advanced into Hvítárvatn and reached its maximum aerial extent of the past 10 ka. At present, roughly one-third of the ice cap's discharge flows into the lake catchment, constituting ~70% of the total inflow, and lake sedimentation rates are governed by the production and delivery of glacially eroded clastic material transported to the lake by four primary meltwater streams. Glacier fluctuations of the past 1 ka are reconstructed from physical proxies contained in sediment cores retrieved from six locations throughout the main basin. Total sediment yield and distribution during this period are calculated from sediment accumulation rates and from > 100 km of seismic reflection profiles. A tephra-constrained varve chronology provides high chronologic control, with a maximum age uncertainty of ± 10 years. Low and constant sedimentation rates characterize the 11th and 12th centuries, reflecting minimal glacier activity during

  5. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  6. [Functional status of submariners after short-time submarine raid in the sea].

    PubMed

    Kalmanov, A S; Pisarev, A A; Khankevich, Yu R; Bloshchinskii, I A; Valskii, A V

    2015-10-01

    Short-time sea submarine raids (from a few days to a few weeks), performed during one working cycle, negatively influence on the functional state of the submariners organism. Upon returning to the point of basing the crew involved in the maintenance of the material and performs preparations for further access to the sea. Due to the high workload and lack of time personnel are not held in any correctional and rehabilitation activities, and therefore the time for the next release in the sea functional condition and functional reserves of the body does not have time to fully recover. The transfer of the submarine crew and referral to medical and psychological rehabilitation assumed only after the end of the operating cycle after the crew the task of further voyage. Based on the assessment of the functional systems of the submarine after a short voyage concluded on the need to develop a set of remedial measures for the recovery of submarine crews during inter-cruise period. PMID:26827506

  7. Mud Pit Identification Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (September 2001, Rev. No. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    2001-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection completed the Mud Pit Strategy, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (DOE/NV, 2001) to document a systematic process for identifying and categorizing potentially contaminated mud pits located on the NTS, and systematically evaluating them for inclusion in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The objectives of this report are to summarize the process used to define the six mud pit categories, identify mud pits, discuss the mud pits that do not meet FFACO entry criteria, identify mud pits for proposed FFACO entry, and describe the general mud pit distribution. Underground nuclear testing conducted since 1951 at the NTS has produced mud pits that were used for the transfer and collection of drilling mud, rock cuttings, and drilling fluids. This report documents the execution of the strategy document by examining the identification process and documenting these results. For clarification purposes, this document uses the term ''entry'' to indicate inclusion of mud pits into the FFACO and ''exclusion'' to indicate those mud pits which do not meet the ''entry'' criteria defined in this report. Based on this criteria, 257 mud pits identified that have been proposed for FFACO entry were found in 14 separate areas of the NTS. Each of the 257 mud pits proposed for FFACO entry will need to be located in the field, photographed, and documented during future Industrial Sites Project, Preliminary Assessment activities. If the field review determines that a mud pit was misidentified or improperly categorized, the appropriate FFACO modification request will be submitted for review and approval.

  8. A potential submarine landslide tsunami in South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Switzer, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine earthquakes and submarine landslides are two main sources of tsunamis. Tsunami hazard modeling in the South China Sea has been primarily concerned with the potential large submarine earthquakes in the Manila trench. In contrast, evaluating the regional risk posed by tsunamis generated from submarine landslide is a new endeavor. At offshore south central Vietnam, bathymetric and seismic surveys show evidence of potentially tsunamigenic submarine landslides although their ages remain uncertain. We model two hypothetical submarine landslide events at a potential site on the heavily sediment laden, seismically active, steep continental slope offshore southeast Vietnam. Water level rises along the coast of Vietnam are presented for the potential scenarios, which indicate that the southeast coastal areas of Vietnam are at considerable risk of tsunami generated offshore submarine landslides. Key references: Kusnowidjaja Megawati, Felicia Shaw, Kerry Sieh, Zhenhua Huang, Tso-Ren Wu, Y. Lin, Soon Keat Tan and Tso-Chien Pan.(2009). Tsunami hazard from the subduction megathrust of the South China Sea, Part I, Source characterization and the resulting tsunami, Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 36(1), pp. 13-20. Enet, F., Grilli, S.T. and Watts, P. (2003). Laboratory experiments for tsunami generated by underwater landslides: comparison with numerical modeling, In: Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Offshore and Polar Engineering, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, pp. 372-379.

  9. Authigenic carbonates related to active seepage of methane-rich hot brines at the Cheops mud volcano, Menes caldera (Nile deep-sea fan, eastern Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Catherine; Bayon, Germain; Blanc-Valleron, Marie-Madeleine; Mascle, Jean; Dupré, Stéphanie

    2014-06-01

    On the passive margin of the Nile deep-sea fan, the active Cheops mud volcano (MV; ca. 1,500 m diameter, ~20-30 m above seafloor, 3,010-3,020 m water depth) comprises a crater lake with hot (up to ca. 42 °C) methane-rich muddy brines in places overflowing down the MV flanks. During the Medeco2 cruise in fall 2007, ROV dives enabled detailed sampling of the brine fluid, bottom lake sediments at ca. 450 m lake depth, sub-surface sediments from the MV flanks, and carbonate crusts at the MV foot. Based on mineralogical, elemental and stable isotope analyses, this study aims at exploring the origin of the brine fluid and the key biogeochemical processes controlling the formation of these deep-sea authigenic carbonates. In addition to their patchy occurrence in crusts outcropping at the seafloor, authigenic carbonates occur as small concretions disseminated within sub-seafloor sediments, as well as in the bottom sediments and muddy brine of the crater lake. Aragonite and Mg-calcite dominate in the carbonate crusts and in sub-seafloor concretions at the MV foot, whereas Mg-calcite, dolomite and ankerite dominate in the muddy brine lake and in sub-seafloor concretions near the crater rim. The carbonate crusts and sub-seafloor concretions at the MV foot precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with bottom seawater temperature; their low δ13C values (-42.6 to -24.5‰) indicate that anaerobic oxidation of methane was the main driver of carbonate precipitation. By contrast, carbonates from the muddy lake brine, bottom lake concretions and crater rim concretions display much higher δ13C (up to -5.2‰) and low δ18O values (down to -2.8‰); this is consistent with their formation in warm fluids of deep origin characterized by 13C-rich CO2 and, as confirmed by independent evidence, slightly higher heavy rare earth element signatures, the main driver of carbonate precipitation being methanogenesis. Moreover, the benthic activity within the seafloor sediment enhances aerobic

  10. Expulsion of Barium and Methane at Mud Volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, D. G.; Dickens, G. R.; Snyder, G. T.; Gilhooly, W. P.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes and cold-seeps along continental margins transfer methane from gas-charged marine sediments to the water column. Such methane venting is dynamic and may provide an important and variable supply of carbon to the ocean and atmosphere through time. Barite mounds and chimneys have been found around some modern mud volcanoes and seeps, and similar structures can be identified in the geological record (e.g., bedded barite deposits). These observations suggest that expelled methane-rich fluids are greatly enriched in dissolved barium. However, there are very few analyses of barium concentrations in these systems. Here, we examine the dissolved barium of pore fluids from a series of shallow piston cores across two submarine mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico. Dissolved barium concentrations at 1.5 m below the seafloor at the Garden Bank volcano range from 18200 μ M at the center of the feature to 0.56 μ M on its flanks approximately 1 km away. Similarly, dissolved barium concentrations at the Mississippi Canyon volcano range from 15600 μ M to 0.50 μ M. Thus, the concentrations in the cores of the mud volcanoes are nominally 5 orders of magnitude greater than in mean ocean water ( ˜0.1 μ M). Anaerobic oxidation of upward flowing methane consumes sulfate, which leads to the dissolution of barite and release of barium to pore fluids. Because this mechanism alone cannot explain the extreme concentrations in the mud volcanoes, a deep source of barium may exist in the Gulf of Mexico strata. Our current work is focused on quantifying the fluxes and sedimentary fate of expelled barium at these locations. However, even if a large fraction of the barium precipitates adjacent to the sites of methane venting, fluid expulsion at mud volcanoes must significantly impact the barium cycle in the Gulf of Mexico. Conceivably, submarine mud volcanoes and cold-seeps along continental margins are a major source of barium to the deep ocean, a concept that has

  11. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  12. Effects of mud supply on large-scale estuarine morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten; van Kessel, Thijs; Wongsoredjo, Samor; Bergsma, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Sandy river estuaries have great economic and ecologic values, but a better understanding is required about the effect of mud on large-scale morphodynamics to optimise maintenance strategies. Very few studies actually include sand-mud interaction effects on morphodynamics on decadal and centennial timescales due to model limitations and lack of spatially and temporally dense data of mud in the bed. Here we study effects of cohesive sediment supply on equilibrium estuary shape, bar-channel patterns and dynamics, during formation from idealised initial conditions over a time scale of centuries and millennia. On the basis of related modelling and experimentation of river and delta patterns we hypothesise that mud will settle into mud flats flanking the estuary that resist erosion and thus self-confine and narrow the estuary and reduce braiding index and channel-bar mobility. We applied the process-based numerical model Delft3D in depth-averaged mode starting from idealised convergent estuaries. Mixed sediment was modelled with an active layer and storage module with fluxes predicted by the Partheniades-Krone relations for the cohesive regime, and Engelund-Hansen for the non-cohesive regime depending on the fraction of mud. This was subjected to a range of different mud inputs from the river or from the sea and a range of river discharge and tidal amplitudes. Our modelling results show that mud is predominantly stored in mudflats on the sides of the estuary. Higher mud concentration at the river inflow leads to narrower and shorter estuaries. Channels within the estuary also become narrower due to increased cohesion in the channel banks. This trend is confirmed in preliminary experiments. However, channels do not increase in depth; this is in contrast with what is observed in rivers and we do not yet fully understand this. Migration rates of channels and bars and bar splitting and merging also reduce with increasing mud concentration. For higher discharge channel

  13. Flushing submarine canyons.

    PubMed

    Canals, Miquel; Puig, Pere; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Heussner, Serge; Palanques, Albert; Fabres, Joan

    2006-11-16

    The continental slope is a steep, narrow fringe separating the coastal zone from the deep ocean. During low sea-level stands, slides and dense, sediment-laden flows erode the outer continental shelf and the continental slope, leading to the formation of submarine canyons that funnel large volumes of sediment and organic matter from shallow regions to the deep ocean(1). During high sea-level stands, such as at present, these canyons still experience occasional sediment gravity flows(2-5), which are usually thought to be triggered by sediment failure or river flooding. Here we present observations from a submarine canyon on the Gulf of Lions margin, in the northwest Mediterranean Sea, that demonstrate that these flows can also be triggered by dense shelf water cascading (DSWC)-a type of current that is driven solely by seawater density contrast. Our results show that DSWC can transport large amounts of water and sediment, reshape submarine canyon floors and rapidly affect the deep-sea environment. This cascading is seasonal, resulting from the formation of dense water by cooling and/or evaporation, and occurs on both high- and low-latitude continental margins(6-8). DSWC may therefore transport large amounts of sediment and organic matter to the deep ocean. Furthermore, changes in the frequency and intensity of DSWC driven by future climate change may have a significant impact on the supply of organic matter to deep-sea ecosystems and on the amount of carbon stored on continental margins and in ocean basins. PMID:17108962

  14. Current submarine atmosphere control technology.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, W

    1998-01-01

    Air purification in submarines was introduced towards the end of World War II and was limited to the use of soda lime for the removal of carbon dioxide and oxygen candles for the regeneration of oxygen. The next major advances came with the advent of nuclear-powered submarines. These included the development of regenerative and, sometimes, energy-intensive processes for comprehensive atmosphere revitalization. With the present development of conventional submarines using air-independent propulsion there is a requirement for air purification similar to that of the nuclear-powered submarines but it is constrained by limited power and space. Some progress has been made in the development of new technology and the adoption of air purification equipment used in the nuclear-powered submarines for this application. PMID:11876194

  15. Mid-Cretaceous submarine fans of the southwest Bredasdorp basin, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C. )

    1991-03-01

    Mid-Cretaceous lowstand systems tracts, containing varying thicknesses of sandstone, have been identified in the E-G subbasin, south-central Bredasdorp basin, offshore South Africa. These lowstand tracts overlie a type 1 unconformity of Albian age, related to erosion of submarine channels into the lower continental slope. Five boreholes drilled in this area to date were located either at the break of continental slope on this unconformity or slightly distal thereto. Four wells were designed primarily to test Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rift-fill sequences beneath the drift onset (Gondwanaland breakup) unconformity. The fifth borehole tested mid-Cretaceous lowstand sandstones, following reappraisal of their reservoir quality and hydrocarbon shows, based on the earlier boreholes. Gamma-ray log motifs together with seismic interpretations, petrographic evidence from cores, and sidewall cores and cuttings permit the interpretation of various subenvironments, from proximal feeder channel to distal supra-fan lobe settings of a deep-marine fan or fans. It is proposed that these fans represent the first phase of sedimentation on the Albian type 1 unconformity surface during conditions of falling sea level. Sediment, possibly eroded from highstand fan deltas or shelf sands on a partially exposed shelf to the south, was transported down erosional submarine channels. A proximal source and high gradients favored the high sand:mud ratio encountered in these wells. Local tectonic activity of short duration along faults parallel to the Agulhas fracture zone may have contributed to gradient steepening. Latest drilling results have upgraded similar plays distal to erosional channels in the immediate area.

  16. Structure and paleoearthquake records of active submarine faults, Cook Strait, New Zealand: Implications for fault interactions, stress loading, and seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondard, Nicolas; Barnes, Philip M.

    2010-12-01

    A new interpretation of active faulting in central Cook Strait, New Zealand, reveals tectonic structures associated with the spatial transition from subduction to continental transform faulting. Marine seismic reflection profiles and multibeam bathymetric data indicate that there are no throughgoing crustal faults connecting the North Island Dextral Fault Belt and the Marlborough Fault System in South Island. The major faults terminate offshore, associated with 5-20 km wide step-overs and a change in regional fault strike. This structure implies that propagation of strike-slip earthquake ruptures across the strait is not probable. Faulted sedimentary sequences in the Wairau Basin (Marlborough shelf), correlated to glacioeustatic sea level cycles, provide a stratigraphic framework for fault analysis. A high-resolution study of the postglacial (<20 ka) vertical displacement history of the Cloudy and Vernon faults reveals up to six and five paleoearthquakes since 18 ka, respectively. These long-timescale records indicate variable recurrence intervals and possibly variable stress drop, thus conforming to the variable slip model of earthquake behavior. Integration of these data with other submarine and terrestrial paleoearthquake records indicates the presence of clustered earthquake sequences involving multiple faults. Different sequences do not always involve the same faults. It appears that earthquake clustering is driven by fault interactions that lead to specific loading conditions favoring the triggering of earthquakes on major faults in relatively short time intervals. Present-day regional Coulomb stress distribution has been calculated in two scenarios considered to represent minimum and maximum loading conditions. The models, incorporating secular tectonic loading and stress changes associated with major crustal earthquakes, indicate high stress loading in a large part of central Cook Strait. These conditions may favor the triggering of future damaging

  17. Active mud volcanoes on the upper slope of the western Nile deep-sea fan—first results from the P362/2 cruise of R/V Poseidon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, Tomas; Brown, Kevin R.; Blanchet, Cecile; Scholz, Florian; Nuzzo, Marianne; Reitz, Anja; Schmidt, Mark; Hensen, Christian

    2010-06-01

    In February 2008, cruise P362/2 was undertaken aboard R/V Poseidon to the Giza and North Alex mud volcanoes (MVs) on the upper slope of the western Nile deep-sea fan. Emitted fluids were strongly depleted in chloride and rich in hydrocarbons, predominantly of thermogenic origin. In-situ sediment temperature measurements indicate extremely high and moderate levels of activity for the North Alex MV and Giza MV, respectively, and suggest rapid changes from dormant to active stages. Both the physical properties of core sediments (e.g., color and magnetic susceptibility), and their assemblages of micro- and nannofossils point to different sources for the two mud volcanoes. Biostratigraphic dating suggests source depths of 2,100-2,450 mbsf for the Giza MV and 1,150-1,550 mbsf for the North Alex MV. Very high temperatures of up to 70°C in shallow sediments at the North Alex MV can be explained only if the fluid source were warmer and deeper than the sediment source.

  18. An underwater landslide or slump on an active submarine fault - a possible source of a devastating tsunami?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-12-01

    A Mw 7.7 earthquake and subsequent large-scale tsunami occurred on 17th July 2006 off the southern coast of Java Island, Indonesia. A maximum of 7.7 m inundation height was recorded in Pangandaran on the southern coast of Java, according to the field survey just after the tsunami (Tsuji et al., 2006). However, since there are few residents who noticed the earthquake tremors, the earthquake may possibility be so-called "tsunami earthquake". The aftershocks from July to September occurred on the fore-arc area and their CMT solution suggests the predominant north-south tensile stress. R/V MIRAI passed the aftershock area in 2004 and 2005 with continuous multibeam bathymetric survey. The processed topographic map shows a lot of amphitheatres with the scale of 8-20 km along the fault scarps. Convexity landforms are located below the footwall of the amphitheatres, apparently the relics of an underwater landslide, and their relative elevation exceeds 1000 m in maximum. This area is characterised by the southeastern extension of Mentawai Fault and its associated minor faults ranging from the Sumatra fore-arc area. The observed amphitheatres and relics of underwater landslides are located along the active faults. Considering that the tsunami wave height distribution is concentrated on a specific narrow area compared with the scale of the mainshock, the mainshock possibly triggered underwater landslides on these amphitheatres and the slides generated a large-scale tsunami. The Ryukyu district was attacked by a M7-class earthquake followed by a devastating tsunami in 1771. 'The East Ishigaki Fault,' one of the across-arc active normal faults in this area was studied precisely by multibeam echo sounding. The study revealed a slump on the segmented active fault. The slump itself may generate a tsunami with the wave height of several meters and might cause the 1771 tsunami together with the faulting itself. Some recent geohazards also show that a landslide or a slump is

  19. Cardiometabolic Health in Submariners Returning from a 3-Month Patrol

    PubMed Central

    Gasier, Heath G.; Young, Colin R.; Gaffney-Stomberg, Erin; McAdams, Douglas C.; Lutz, Laura J.; McClung, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Confined space, limited exercise equipment, rotating shift work and reduced sleep may affect cardiometabolic health in submariners. To test this hypothesis, 53 male U.S. Submariners (20–39 years) were studied before and after a 3-month routine submarine patrol. Measures included anthropometrics, dietary and physical activity, biomarkers of cardiometabolic health, energy and appetite regulation, and inflammation. Before deployment, 62% of submariners had a body fat % (BF%) ≥ 25% (obesity), and of this group, 30% met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. In obese volunteers, insulin, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), leptin, the leptin/adiponectin ratio, and pro-inflammatory chemokines growth-related oncogene and macrophage-derived chemokine were significantly higher compared to non-obese submariners. Following the patrol, a significant mean reduction in body mass (5%) and fat-mass (11%) occurred in the obese group as a result of reduced energy intake (~2000 kJ) during the patrol; and, independent of group, modest improvements in serum lipids and a mean reduction in interferon γ-induced protein 10 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 were observed. Since 43% of the submariners remained obese, and 18% continued to meet the criteria for metabolic syndrome following the patrol, the magnitude of weight loss was insufficient to completely abolish metabolic dysfunction. Submergence up to 3-months, however, does not appear to be the cause of obesity, which is similar to that of the general population. PMID:26867201

  20. Cardiometabolic Health in Submariners Returning from a 3-Month Patrol.

    PubMed

    Gasier, Heath G; Young, Colin R; Gaffney-Stomberg, Erin; McAdams, Douglas C; Lutz, Laura J; McClung, James P

    2016-02-01

    Confined space, limited exercise equipment, rotating shift work and reduced sleep may affect cardiometabolic health in submariners. To test this hypothesis, 53 male U.S. Submariners (20-39 years) were studied before and after a 3-month routine submarine patrol. Measures included anthropometrics, dietary and physical activity, biomarkers of cardiometabolic health, energy and appetite regulation, and inflammation. Before deployment, 62% of submariners had a body fat % (BF%) ≥ 25% (obesity), and of this group, 30% met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. In obese volunteers, insulin, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), leptin, the leptin/adiponectin ratio, and pro-inflammatory chemokines growth-related oncogene and macrophage-derived chemokine were significantly higher compared to non-obese submariners. Following the patrol, a significant mean reduction in body mass (5%) and fat-mass (11%) occurred in the obese group as a result of reduced energy intake (~2000 kJ) during the patrol; and, independent of group, modest improvements in serum lipids and a mean reduction in interferon γ-induced protein 10 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 were observed. Since 43% of the submariners remained obese, and 18% continued to meet the criteria for metabolic syndrome following the patrol, the magnitude of weight loss was insufficient to completely abolish metabolic dysfunction. Submergence up to 3-months, however, does not appear to be the cause of obesity, which is similar to that of the general population. PMID:26867201

  1. Marine-to-lacustrine transition, mud volcanism, and slope instability in an active tectonic setting: the MIS 5 to 4 transition in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grall, Céline; Henry, Pierre; Kendé, Julia; Namık Çaǧatay, M.; Kadir Eriş, K.; Paillès, Christine; Sorlien, Christopher; Shillington, Donna; McHugh, Cecilia; Steckler, Michael; Çifçi, Günay; Géli, Louis

    2016-04-01

    In the Sea of Marmara, glacio-eustatic cycles set the tempo of a complex history of disconnection and reconnection with the Black Sea and with the global ocean through the Mediterranean Sea. As a result, the sedimentary record consists of alternating high stand marine sediments and lowstand sea or lake sediments. The Sea of Marmara is also an active transtensional basin along the Northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault (NNAF), which accommodates most (~3/4) of the 21-27 mm/a dextral slip between Eurasia and Anatolia. This peculiar setting makes the Sea of Marmara an exceptional site to study the interplay of paleo-environmental factors and seismotectonic processes. Notably, Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) crossing the faults provide offset markers although their age remains uncertain. A high resolution seismic stratigraphic model has been proposed for 100 ka glacial cycles, based on onlap sequences within basins, and paleo-deltas at shorelines. The sedimentation rate in basins decreases during episodes of sea-level rise and reach maximum values during low stands. Remarkably, seismic reflector sequences display nearly identical character for locations with similar sedimentation rate. The uppermost sequence boundary reflector (Red-H1) has been recently cored at several locations during MARSITECRUISE (Ifremer R/V Pourquoi Pas?, Oct-Nov. 2014), enabled us to correlate high resolution seismic data with core data. The Red-H1 reflector is regionally characterized by a high amplitude and a reverse polarity. Correlations between seismic data and piston core logs indicate that the reverse polarity of this reflector may be explained by a negative density contrast between lacustrine sediments above and a greenish sapropellic layer of several meters thickness below. On shelves, Red-H1 is on top of the low stand wedge. On slopes and topographic highs, Red-H1 appears as an erosional surface laterally correlative with an onlapping unit in basins and is frequently overlain by

  2. Products of Submarine Fountains and Bubble-burst Eruptive Activity at 1200 m on West Mata Volcano, Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Keller, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    An eruption was observed and sampled at West Mata Volcano using ROV JASON II for 5 days in May 2009 during the NSF-NOAA eruption response cruise to this region of suspected volcanic activity. Activity was focused near the summit at the Prometheus and Hades vents. Prometheus erupted almost exclusively as low-level fountains. Activity at Hades cycled between vigorous degassing, low fountains, and bubble-bursts, building up and partially collapsing a small spatter/scoria cone and feeding short sheet-like and pillow flows. Fire fountains at Prometheus produced mostly small primary pyroclasts that include Pele's hair and fluidal fragments of highly vesicular volcanic glass. These fragments have mostly shattered and broken surfaces, although smooth spatter-like surfaces also occur. As activity wanes, glow in the vent fades, and denser, sometimes altered volcanic clasts are incorporated into the eruption. The latter are likely from the conduit walls and/or vent-rim ejecta, drawn back into the vent by inrushing seawater that replaces water entrained in the rising volcanic plume. Repeated recycling of previously erupted materials eventually produces rounded clasts resembling beach cobbles and pitted surfaces on broken phenocrysts of pyroxene and olivine. We estimate that roughly 33% of near vent ejecta are recycled. Our best sample of this ejecta type was deposited in the drawer of the JASON II ROV during a particularly large explosion that occurred during plume sampling immediately above the vent. Elemental sulfur spherules up to 5 mm in diameter are common in ejecta from both vents and occur inside some of the lava fragments Hades activity included dramatic bubble-bursts unlike anything previously observed under water. The lava bubbles, sometimes occurring in rapid-fire sequence, collapsed in the water-column, producing fragments that are quenched in less than a second to form Pele's hair, limu o Pele, spatter-like lava blobs, and scoria. All are highly vesicular

  3. Deep-Sea Magnetics on Active and Fossil Hydrothermal Sites: a Tool to Detect and Characterize Submarine Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Szitkar, F.; Fouquet, Y.; Choi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Since the first discoveries of hydrothermal sites at mid-ocean ridges in the 70s, international efforts in the deep seafloor exploration have unravelled a wide variety of hydrothermal sites in terms of geological settings, physical parameters, and biological communities as well. Such efforts, coordinated in the InterRidge program since 1992, are becoming even more important when the increasing need in metals for developing economies makes the exploitation of metal sulfides accumulated at deep-sea hydrothermal sites a realistic target. The usual method to find hydrothermal sites is to detect the associated chemical plumes enriched in manganese, methane, hydrogen, helium 3, in the water column. How efficient it has been proven, such a method is limited to the search for active hydrothermal vents. Active vents, however, are not the best places for mining the seafloor, because (1) they host massive sulfides deposits in the making and may not represent the largest accumulation; (2) they are still very hot and would rapidly damage the mining tools; and, last but not the least, (3) they host fragile and precious ecosystem that could be dramatically affected by mining operations. Methods to find fossil hydrothermal sites (i.e. colder and devoid of specific ecosystems) include systematic rock sampling - a very tedious endeavour - and high resolution, near seafloor geophysical surveys. Existing magnetic surveys on basalt-hosted, peridotite-hosted and sediment-hosted sites revealed different types of signatures, which reflect the magnetizations of the host rock and the ore deposit, among others. Basalt-hosted sites exhibit negative magnetic anomalies, i.e. a deficit of magnetization, due to thermal demagnetization and hydrothermal alteration of the highly magnetic basalt, whereas both peridotite-hosted and sediment-hosted sites show positive anomalies, i.e. an excess of magnetization, clearly associated with the ore deposit. Results from recent cruises Serpentine (R

  4. Sonic images of submarine landscape evolution on an active convergent margin, Poverty re-entrant, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Orpin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Seabed bathymetric and backscatter images were collected using a Simrad EM300 multibeam from the Poverty indentation off Gisborne, on the active convergent margin of the New Zealand East Coast. The 1,500 km square Poverty indentation is a major depression of continental margin extending from a re-entrant in the deformation front at the Hikurangi Trough, which coincides with the mouth of the Poverty Canyon. The indentation outlines a triangular, enclosed depression, bounded along its landward flank by a high scarp incised by more than a dozen regularly-spaced, V-shaped, upper slope gullies that cut into the shelf break. The indentation has been partly in-filled by debris flow and avalanche deposits, which range from a few hundred metres to more than 25 km down-slope. At some places, cracks and scarps in the slopes indicate incipient avalanches. The indentation has been simultaneously eroded by a canyon system that exhibits many of the complexities of incised river systems onshore, including offset, capture and slump dams. At the mouth of the Poverty Canyon, scour holes are visible where hydraulic jumps have eroded the sea floor. A new canyon system appears to be in the process of forming a separate northern route to the Hikurangi Trough. On the lower slope, slumping seaward of a bulge indicates collapse in the wake of a small, subducting seamount. There is little evidence of sediment escaping the slope to form fan deposits along the Hikurangi Trough. These data are currently being used to assist in the structural and stratigraphic analysis of the margin. The high-resolution maps produced prompt a thorough re-interpretation of the Late Pleistocene "landscape evolution" of the Poverty indentation and highlight the complex interaction of tectonics and deformation with sea floor morphology along active plate boundaries in general.

  5. Mud volcanoes: Indicators of stress orientation and tectonic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco

    2012-11-01

    This study examines the use of specific mud volcano features (i.e., elongated calderas, aligned vents and elongated volcanoes) as potential indicators of tectonic stress orientation. The stress indicator principles, widely recognised for magmatic systems, have been discussed and applied to mud volcano settings such as in the Northern Apennines and the Azerbaijan Greater Caucasus, as well as in other instances where the analysis was fully based on a remote sensing study. The results of these applications are promising, the obtained maximum horizontal stress (SH) directions generally showing a good correlation with those determined in the upper crust by classical methods (i.e., earthquake focal mechanism solutions, well bore breakouts). Therefore, stress information from mud volcanoes could be used as a proxy for stress orientation (1) where stress data is lacking, (2) where settings are inaccessible (i.e., underwater or the surface of planets), or simply (3) as supplementary stress indicators. This study also pays special attention to structural elements that may control fluid expulsion at various length scales, and pathways that should have spawned the mud volcanoes and controlled their paroxysmal events and eruptions. Different types of sub-planar brittle elements have been found to focus fluid flow rising up-through fold cores, where the vertical zonation of stresses may take part in this process by creating distinctive feeder fracture/fault sets. On a regional scale, mud volcanoes in active fold-and-thrust belts may occur over wider areas, such as the prolific mud volcanism in Azerbaijan, or may cluster along discrete structures like the steep Pede-Apennine thrust in the Northern Apennines, where the generation of overpressures is expected to establish a positive feedback loop allowing for fault movement and mud volcanism.

  6. Submarine ramp facies model for delta-fed, sand-rich turbidite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, P.L.; Dickinson, W.R.

    1985-06-01

    Some sandy turbidite successions contain facies that differ in significant ways from those predicted by the canyonfed submarine fan depositional model. The key differences are the absence of a master slope channel or canyon through which sediment is transported to the basin, and the lack of facies segregation into distinct channel and overbank or interchannel facies associations within the turbidite sequence. These types of sequences can be better described using a delta-fed submarine ramp depositional model. The primary components of this model are: a sandy deltaic system that has prograded to the shelf-slope break; an abbreviated section of mud-rich slope deposits traversed by multiple shallow channels that transport sand from the delta front to the deeper basin; very sandy proximal ramp deposits composed dominantly of laterally continuous sheets of Facies B turbidites; and less sandy distal ramp deposits characterized by an increase in the abundance of Facies C and D turbidites. Ramp turbidites characteristically display statistically random patterns of bed thickness. Submarine ramp development requires rapid sediment accumulation (>800 ft or 250 m/m.y.) in turbidite basins of shallow to moderate depth where deltaic progradation is rapid enough to mask the structural relief along basin margins. The delta-fed submarine ramp facies model may be useful in describing short-lived sandy depositonal episodes in some rapidly aggrading and prograding basinal sequences. As such, they represent one member in a spectrum of submarine fan depositional styles.

  7. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mud flats. 230.42 Section 230.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.42 Mud flats. (a) Mud...

  8. The use of rotational invariants for the interpretation of marine CSEM data with a case study from the North Alex mud volcano, West Nile Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölz, Sebastian; Swidinsky, Andrei; Sommer, Malte; Jegen, Marion; Bialas, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Submarine mud volcanos at the seafloor are surface expressions of fluid flow systems within the seafloor. Since the electrical resistivity of the seafloor is mainly determined by the amount and characteristics of fluids contained within the sediment's pore space, electromagnetic methods offer a promising approach to gain insight into a mud volcano's internal resistivity structure. To investigate this structure, we conducted a controlled source electromagnetic experiment, which was novel in the sense that the source was deployed and operated with a remotely operated vehicle, which allowed for a flexible placement of the transmitter dipole with two polarization directions at each transmitter location. For the interpretation of the experiment, we have adapted the concept of rotational invariants from land-based electromagnetics to the marine case by considering the source normalized tensor of horizontal electric field components. We analyse the sensitivity of these rotational invariants in terms of 1-D models and measurement geometries and associated measurement errors, which resemble the experiment at the mud volcano. The analysis shows that any combination of rotational invariants has an improved parameter resolution as compared to the sensitivity of the pure radial or azimuthal component alone. For the data set, which was acquired at the `North Alex' mud volcano, we interpret rotational invariants in terms of 1-D inversions on a common midpoint grid. The resulting resistivity models show a general increase of resistivities with depth. The most prominent feature in the stitched 1-D sections is a lens-shaped interface, which can similarly be found in a section from seismic reflection data. Beneath this interface bulk resistivities frequently fall in a range between 2.0 and 2.5 Ωm towards the maximum penetration depths. We interpret the lens-shaped interface as the surface of a collapse structure, which was formed at the end of a phase of activity of an older mud

  9. Active Submarine Volcanoes and Electro-Optical Sensor Networks: The Potential of Capturing and Quantifying an Entire Eruptive Sequence at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Proskurowski, G.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The NE Pacific Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is designed to provide unprecedented electrical power and bandwidth to the base and summit of Axial Seamount. The scientific community is engaged in identifying a host of existing and innovative observation and measurement techniques that utilize the high-power and bandwidth infrastructure and its real-time transmission capabilities. The cable, mooring, and sensor arrays will enable the first quantitative documentation of myriad processes leading up to, during, and following a submarine volcanic event. Currently planned RSN instrument arrays will provide important and concurrent spatial and temporal constraints on earthquake activity, melt migration, hydrothermal venting behavior and chemistry, ambient currents, microbial community structure, high-definition (HD) still images and HD video streaming from the vents, and water-column chemistry in the overlying ocean. Anticipated, but not yet funded, additions will include AUVs and gliders that continually document the spatial-temporal variations in the water column above the volcano and the distal zones. When an eruption appears imminent the frequency of sampling will be increased remotely, and the potential of repurposing the tracking capabilities of the mobile sensing platforms will be adapted to the spatial indicators of likely eruption activity. As the eruption begins mobile platforms will fully define the geometry, temperature, and chemical-microbial character of the volcanic plume as it rises into the thoroughly documented control volume above the volcano. Via the Internet the scientific community will be able to witness and direct adaptive sampling in response to changing conditions of plume formation. A major goal will be to document the eruptive volume and link the eruption duration to the volume of erupted magma. For the first time, it will be possible to begin to quantify the time-integrated output of an underwater

  10. Late Quaternary reef growth history of Les Saintes submarine plateau: a key to constrain active faulting kinematics in Guadeloupe (FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Feuillet, N.; Deplus, C.; Cabioch, G.; Tapponnier, P.; LeBrun, J.; Bazin, S.; Beauducel, F.; Boudon, G.; Le Friant, A.; De Min, L.; Melezan, D.

    2012-12-01

    hazard. Joint analysis of the aftershocks sequence and the fault map provide a good image of the fault system recent activity. Finally, we deduced fault kinematics with respect to Holocene reef demise timing, and obtained a mean slip rate of several tenth of mm/yr on each fault, comparable to the slip rate of the near active Morne-Piton fault. Thus, the fault system could generate a Mw 6 earthquake every 250 yrs.

  11. Submarine lithification of carbonate sediments.

    PubMed

    Milliman, J D

    1966-08-26

    Recrystallized planktonic limestones from two guyots in the North Atlantic are in oxygen-isotopic equilibrium with their present ambient waters, suggesting submarine lithifica tion and recrystallization. The early stages of submarine lithification of carbonates may involve precipitation of, and replacement by, magnesium-rich calcite; with time this may invert to magnesium-poor calcite. This type of lithification probably requires very low rates of sediment accumulation. PMID:17837254

  12. Controls on plan-form evolution of submarine channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, J.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Vertically aggrading sinuous channels constitute a basic building block of modern submarine fans and the greater continental slope. Interpretation of seismically imaged channels reveals a significant diversity in internal architecture, as well as important similarities and differences in the evolution of submarine channels relative to better studied rivers. Many submarine channel cross sections possess a 'gull wing' shape. Successive stacking of such channels demonstrates that systematic bank erosion is not required in order for lateral migration to occur. The lateral shift of such aggrading channels, however, is expected to be much less dynamic than in the case of terrestrial rivers. Recent high-resolution 3D seismic data from offshore Angola and an upstream segment of the Bengal Submarine Fan show intensely meandering channels that experience considerable lateral shifting during periods of active migration within submarine valleys. The cross sections of the actively migrating channels are similar to meandering river channels characterized by an outer cut-bank and inner-bank accretion. In submarine channels, the orientation of the secondary flow can be river-like or river-reverse depending on the channel gradient, cross sectional shape, and the adaptation length of the channel bend. In river channels, a single circulation cell commonly occupies the entire channel relief, redistributing the bed-load sediment across the channel, and influencing the thread of high velocity and thus the plan-form evolution of the channel. In submarine environments, the height of the circulation cell will be significantly smaller than channel relief, thus leading to development of lower relief point bars from bed-load transport. Nevertheless these "underfit" bars may play an important role in plan-form evolution of submarine channels. In rivers and submarine channels, the inclined surface accretion can be constructed via pure bed-load, suspended-load, or a combination of both transport

  13. Depositional framework and genesis of Wilcox Submarine Canyon systems, Northwest Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, W.F.; Dinqus, W.F.; Paige, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Wilcox (late Paleocene-early Eocene) slope systems of the Texas coastal plain contain two families of paleosubmarine canyons that exhibit distinctly different characteristics and stratigraphic settings: Yoakum and Lavaca type canyons occur as widely separated features within the generally retrogradational middle Wilcox interval. Four such canyons exhibit high length to width ratios, extend far updip of the contemporaneous shelf edge, were excavated deeply into paralic and coastal-plain deposits, and were filled primarily by mud. Fills consist of a lower onlapping unit and capping progradational deposits that are genetically related to deposition of the upper Wilcox fluvial-deltaic sequence. Significantly, the canyon fills correlate with widespread transgressive marine mudstones (the Yoakum shale-Sabinetown Formation and ''Big Shale''). In contrast, Lavaca-type canyons form a system of erosional features created along the rapidly prograding, unstable lower Wilcox continental margin. Comparative analysis of the two canyon system suggests a general process model for submarine canyon formation on prograding basin margins. Key elements are depositional loading of the continental margin creating instability, initiation of a large-scale slump, family of slumps, or listric bedding-plane fault creating a depression or indentation in the margin, and headward and lateral expansion of the depression by slumping and density-underflow erosion. Extent of canyon evolution varies according to time and submerged space available for maturation; short, broad canyons form on narrow shelves of actively prograding margins, and elongate mature canyons form in retrogradational or transgressive settings.

  14. Assessing submarine gas hydrate at active seeps on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, using controlled source electromagnetic data with constraints from seismic, geochemistry, and heatflow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalenberg, K.; Haeckel, M.; Pecher, I. A.; Toulmin, S. J.; Hamdan, L. J.; Netzeband, G.; Wood, W.; Poort, J.; Jegen, M. D.; Coffin, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical resistivity is one of the key properties useful for evaluating submarine gas hydrate deposits. Gas hydrates are electrically insulating in contrast to the conductive pore fluid. Where they form in sufficient quantities the bulk resistivity of the sub-seafloor is elevated. CSEM data were collected in 2007 as part of the German - International “New Vents” project on R/V Sonne, cruise SO191, at three target areas on the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand. The margin is characterized by widespread bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), seep structures, and active methane and fluid venting indicating the potential for gas hydrate formation. Opouawe Bank is one of the ridge and basin systems on the accretionary wedge and is located off the Wairarapa coast at water depths of 1000-1100 m. The first observed seep sites (North Tower, South Tower, Pukeko, Takahe, and Tui) were identified from individual gas flares in hydro-acoustic data and video observations during voyages on R/V Tangaroa. Seismic reflection data collected during SO191 subsequently identified more than 25 new seep structures. Two intersecting CSEM profiles have been surveyed across North Tower, South Tower, and Takahe. 1-D inversion of the data reveals anomalously high resistivities at North Tower and South Tower, moderately elevated resistivities at Takahe, and normal background resistivities away from the seeps. The high resistivities are attributed to gas hydrate layers at intermediate depths beneath the seeps. At South Tower the hydrate concentration could be possibly as much as 25% of the total sediment volume within a 50m thick layer. This conforms with geochemical pore water analyses which show a trend of increased methane flux towards South Tower. At Takahe, gas pockets and patchy gas hydrate, as well as sediment heterogeneities and carbonates, or temperature driven upward fluid flow indicated by the observed higher heat flow at this site may explain the resistivity pattern

  15. Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Takeyoshi; Yoshii, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Kohzo

    2007-02-02

    Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility.

  16. Dive! Dive! An Introduction to the History and Technology of Submarines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This resource guide for science and social studies classes explores the world of U.S. Navy submarines and other submersibles. The guide consists of background information on the history and development of submarines and a list of cross-curricular activities to challenge, educate, and entertain students. Students learn the inherent challenges that…

  17. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon Mud Volcano (Nile Deep Sea Fan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, J.; Lichtschlag, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; de Beer, D.; Feseker, T.; Pop Ristova, P.; de Lange, G.; Boetius, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Amon mud volcano (MV), located at 1250 m water depth on the Nile Deep Sea Fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amon MV center in the presence of sulphate and hydrocarbons in the seeping subsurface fluids. By comparing spatial and temporal patterns of in situ biogeochemical fluxes, temperature gradients, pore water composition and microbial activities over three years, we investigated why the activity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders can be low despite high energy supplies. We found that the central dome of the Amon MV, as well as a lateral mud flow at its base, showed signs of recent exposure of hot subsurface muds lacking active hydrocarbon degrading communities. In these highly disturbed areas, anaerobic degradation of methane was less than 2% of the methane flux. Rather high oxygen consumption rates compared to low sulphide production suggest a faster development of more rapidly growing aerobic hydrocarbon degraders in highly disturbed areas. In contrast, the more stabilized muds surrounding the central gas and fluid conduits hosted active anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities. Furthermore, within three years, cell numbers and hydrocarbon degrading activity increased at the gas-seeping sites. The low microbial activity in the hydrocarbon-vented areas of Amon mud volcano is thus a consequence of kinetic limitations by heat and mud expulsion, whereas most of the outer mud volcano area is limited by hydrocarbon transport.

  18. High-resolution Geophysical Mapping of Submarine Glacial Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Todd, B. J.; Dowdeswell, E. K.; Hogan, K. A.; Mayer, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial landforms are generated from the activity of glaciers and display spatial dimensions ranging from below one meter up to tens of kilometers. Glacial landforms are used as diagnostic features of past activity of ice sheets and glaciers; they are specifically important in the field of palaeoglaciology. Mapping of submarine glacial landforms is largely dependent on geophysical survey methods capable of imaging the seafloor and sub-bottom through the water column. Full "global" seafloor mapping coverage, equivalent to what exists for land elevation, is to-date only achieved by the powerful method of deriving bathymetry from altimeters on satellites like GEOSAT and ERS-1. The lateral resolution of satellite derived bathymetry is, however, limited by the footprint of the satellite and the need to average out local wave and wind effects resulting in values of around 15 km. Consequently, mapping submarine glacial landforms requires for the most part higher resolution than is achievable by satellite derived bathymetry. The most widely-used methods for mapping submarine glacial landforms are based on echo-sounding principles. This presentation shows how the evolution of marine geophysical mapping techniques, in particular the advent of side-scan and multibeam bathymetric sonars, has made it possible to study submarine glacial landforms in unprecedented detail. Examples are shown from the Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient, which will be published in late 2015 in the Memoir Series of the Geological Society of London.

  19. Fluid flow and mud volcanism in the Eastern Mediterranean incipient collision zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitter, T. A. C.; Woodside, J. M.; Mascle, J.

    2003-04-01

    Fluid venting activity, either coupled with mud volcanism or along deep active faults or both, has been investigated in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, mainly in two areas associated with the incipient collision process between Africa and Eurasia. Mud volcanoes are abundant on the crestal part of the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary prism, in association with thrusts, back-thrusts and transcurrent features. They are also found in the Anaximander Mountains/Florence Rise area, to the west of Cyprus, where a wrench system accommodates the pre-collisional deformation. Combined swath multibeam bathymetry and imagery, seismic profiling (ANAXIPROBE survey, 1995 and PRISMED II survey, 1998) and O.R.E.Tech sidescan sonar data (MEDINETH survey, 1999) indicate the genetic relationship between mud volcanoes and tectonics, particularly potential influence of strike-slip faulting. The in situ observations of mud volcanoes (MEDINAUT survey, 1998) have revealed common characteristics at cold seeps, such as carbonate crust constructions and specific chemosynthetic-based fauna. Ground-truth of the sonar data shows that the geophysical signature of mud volcanoes may be related to spatial and temporal evolution of mud volcanism activity, because the seafloor characteristics (surface of the mud flows, distribution and nature of the crusts) and the degree of colonization by benthic fauna vary with the intensity and age of the fluid seepage. Moreover, clay mineralogy studies on the mud matrix samples give insights into the depositional environment, age, and depth of the lithological unit from which the mud breccia is extruded. The shallow signature of the mud reservoir tends to indicate that the overpressured fluids originate from deeper strata than the solid phase of the expelled material.

  20. The effects of drilling muds on marine invertebrate larvae and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.T.; Barnett, A.M.; Krause, P.R.

    1997-06-01

    A series of laboratory experiments tested the effects of drilling muds from an active platform off southern California on larvae and adults of marine invertebrates. Red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) were used to determine effects of drilling muds on fertilization, early development, survivorship, and settlement, and experiments on adult brown cup corals (Paracyathus stearnsii) tested effects on adult survivorship, viability, and tissue loss. Exposures to drilling muds did not have an effect on abalone fertilization or early development. However, several exposures to drilling muds resulted in weak, but significant, positive effects of drilling muds on settlement of competent larvae. In contrast, settlement of red abalone larvae on natural coralline algal crusts decreased with increasing concentrations of drilling muds. This suggests that drilling muds affect either the abalone`s ability to detect natural settlement inducers, or they affect the inducer itself. Exposure of brown cup corals to concentrations of drilling muds adversely impacted their survivorship and viability. These effects were likely caused by increased tissue mortality of the coral polyps.

  1. Global classification of spectrum of submarine fan types

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    There is a pressing need for a schema in which they can arrange the variety of fan forms, both modern and ancient. Such schemes have been generated for the delta depositional form, the beach form, and to some extent for aeolian, fluvial, and glacial deposits. Work by several workers has demonstrated that three necessary dimensions define the variety of submarine fan morphological responses: (1) fan size, (2) sediment supply rate, and (3) the proportion of sand and mud in that supply. These three dimensions form a space within which all submarine fans can be fitted and within which four subspaces can be defined on the basis of order-of-magnitude changes in all three dimensions. Fan morphologies in the less than 10 km scale are simple cones or lobes (suprafan lobes); those of the order of 10 to 100 km may have both lobe and leveed channel components; those in the size range from 100 to 1000 km tend to be dominated by channel systems and are probably composites of smaller fans analogous to crevasse splay systems in very large deltas. Fans larger than about 1000 km are few in number (giant fans) and are dominated by large-scale channels. Megaturbidites are probably limited to systems of the third zone by the constraints of sediment supply and receiving area.

  2. Seismic expression of Late Quaternary Banda submarine canyon and fan offshore northern Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles obtained throughout the inner California continental borderland offshore northwestern Baja California, Mexico, show the presence of numerous modern submarine canyons and associated fans. One set of these, the Banda submarine canyon/fan, is of relatively recent origin, as demonstrated by onlap of the basal fan sediments against an acoustically transparent, presumably hemipelagic deposit. Late Quaternary sedimentation rates inferred from isotopically dated piston core samples place the age of the postulated hemipelagic unit at approximately 650,000 years ago. The Banda submarine canyon heads within the Bahia Todos Santo and passes through a narrow gorge between Punta Banda and Islas Todos Santos. It is proposed that this submarine canyon and fan system formed entirely during late Quaternary time, following the breach of the Punta Banda ridge during a late Pleistocene high sea level stand. The presence of an ancient, buried channel exiting to the north out of Bahia Todos Santos probably marks the head of an earlier submarine canyon which acted as the conduit of clastic sediments from Valle Maneadero to the deep borderland basins. The now active Banda submarine canyon pirated the supply of terrigenous clastics from this older canyon. The active Agua Blanca fault zone cuts across the head of Banda submarine canyon, suggesting that tectonic movements may have played a role in the development of the Banda submarine canyon and fan system.

  3. Giant submarine canyons: is size any clue to their importance in the rock record?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, William R.; Carlson, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    Submarine canyons are the most important conduits for funneling sediment from continents to oceans. Submarine canyons, however, are zones of sediment bypassing, and little sediment accumulates in the canyon until it ceases to be an active conduit. To understand the potential importance in the rock record of any given submarine canyon, it is necessary to understand sediment-transport processes in, as well as knowledge of, deep-sea turbidite and related deposits that moved through the canyons. There is no straightforward correlation between the final volume of the sedimentary deposits and size o fthe associated submarine canyons. Comparison of selected modern submarine canyons together with their deposits emphasizes the wide range of scale differences between canyons and their impact on the rock record. Three of the largest submarine canyons in the world are incised into the Beringian (North American) margin of the Bering Sea. Zhemchug Canyon has the largest cross-section at the shelf break and greatest volume of incision of slope and shelf. The Bering Canyon, which is farther south in the Bering Sea, is first in length and total area. In contrast, the largest submarine fans-e.g., Bengal, Indus, and Amazon-have substantially smaller, delta-front submarine canyons that feed them; their submarine drainage areas are one-third to less than one-tenth the area of Bering Canyon. some very large deep-sea channells and tubidite deposits are not even associated with a significant submarine canyon; examples include Horizon Channel in the northeast Pacific and Laurentian Fan Valley in the North Atlantic. Available data suggest that the size of turbidity currents (as determined by volume of sediment transported to the basins) is also not a reliable indicator of submarine canyon size.

  4. Characterization of a deep-sea microbial mat from an active cold seep at the Milano mud volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Heijs, Sander K; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Forney, Larry J

    2005-09-01

    A white, filamentous microbial mat at the Milano mud volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea was sampled during the Medinaut cruise of the R/V Nadir in 1998. The composition of the mat community was characterized using a combination of phylogenetic and lipid biomarker methods. The mat sample was filtered through 0.2 and 5-microm filters to coarsely separate unicellular and filamentous bacteria. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from the total community DNA from these fractions showed that similar archaeal populations were present in both fractions. However, the bacterial populations in the fractions differed from one another, and were more diverse than the archaeal ones. Lipid analysis showed that bacteria were the dominant members of the mat microbial community and the relatively low delta(13)C carbon isotope values of bulk bacterial lipids suggested the occurrence of methane- and sulfide-based chemo(auto)trophy. Consistent with this, the bacterial populations in the fractions were related to Alpha-, Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria, most of which were chemoautotrophic bacteria that utilize hydrogen sulfide (or reduced sulfur compounds) and/or methane. The most common archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were related to those of previously identified Archaea capable of anaerobic methane oxidation. Although the filamentous organisms observed in the mat were not conclusively identified, our results indicated that the Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea microbial mat community might be sustained on a combination of methane- and sulfide-driven chemotrophy. PMID:16329971

  5. Electrodewatering of Bayer muds - Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baglin, E.G.; McIntosh, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted by the Bureau of Mines to determine the feasibility of using electrokinetic densification to dewater Bayer process red mud, magnetic black and prepared by pressure digestion of red mud in the presence of ferrous sulfate, and magnetic black mud formed by simulated Bayer digestion of Jamaican bauxite with added ferrours sulfate. Tests showed that the solids content of presettled muds could be increased from 25 pct to approximately 40 to 48 pct by gravity draining followed by electrodewatering for approximately 48 h. Electrodewatering may not be practical because of increased reagent and processing costs and because the muds must be thoroughly wasted prior to electrodwatering to remove dissolved ions and decrease mud conductivities.

  6. Saltwater and hard water bentonite mud

    SciTech Connect

    Pabley, A. S.

    1985-02-19

    A seawater/saltwater or hard water bentonite mud for use in drilling, and process for preparing same, comprising sequentially adding to seawater, to saltwater of a chloride concentration up to saturation, or hard water: a caustic agent; a filtration control agent; and bentonite. The resultant drilling mud meets API standards for viscosity and water loss, and is stable after aging and at tempertures in excess of 100/sup 0/ c. In another embodiment, the additives are premixed as dry ingredients and hydrated with seawater, saltwater or hard water. Unlike other bentonite drilling muds, the muds of this invention require no fresh water in their preparation, which makes them particularly useful at off-shore and remote on-shore drilling locations. The muds of this invention using bentonite further require less clay than known saltwater muds made with attapulgite, and provides superior filtration control, viscosity and stability.

  7. Preliminary results from Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 - NE Lau: First explorations of hydrothermally active volcanoes across the supra-subduction zone and a return to the West Mata eruption site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, J.; Embley, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    Several expeditions in the past few years have shown that the NE Lau basin has one of the densest concentrations of volcanically and hydrothermally active volcanoes on the planet. In 2008 two active submarine volcanic eruptions were discovered during a one week period and subsequent dives with the Jason remotely operated vehicle at one of the sites (West Mata) revealed an active boninite eruption taking place at 1200 m depth. Two dives at the other revealed evidence for recent eruption along the NE Lau Spreading Center. Several more expeditions in 2010-11 discovered additional evidence about the extent and types of hydrothermal activity in this area. Data from CTDO (conductivity, temperature, depth, optical) vertical casts, tow-yos, and towed camera deployments revealed more than 15 hydrothermal sites at water depths from ~800 to 2700 m that include sites from the magmatic arc, the "rear arc," and the back arc spreading centers. These sites range from high temperature black smoker sulfide-producing systems to those dominated by magmatic degassing. Dives by remotely operated vehicle (Quest 4000) in September 2012 will explore these sites and return samples for chemical, biological and geologic studies. One of the dives will be a return visit to West Mata volcano, the site of the deepest submarine eruption yet observed (in 2009). Recent multibeam data reveal large changes in West Mata's summit, suggesting that the nature of the eruption and the location of the erupting vents may have changed. In addition to the preliminary results from the science team, we will also discuss our use and experience with continuous live video transmission (through the High Definition video camera on the Quest 4000) back to shore via satellite and through the internet. Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 Science Team: Bradley Tebo, Bill Chadwick, Ed Baker, Ken Rubin, Susan Merle, Timothy Shank, Sharon Walker, Andra Bobbitt, Nathan Buck, David Butterfield, Eric Olson, John Lupton, Richard Arculus

  8. In-situ inventory of gas and gas hydrates in deposits of the Hâkon Mosby mud volcano, SW Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, T.; Feseker, T.; Kasten, S.; Fischer, D.; Abegg, F.; Hohnberg, H.-J.; Bohrmann, G.

    2009-04-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are an important source and reservoir of methane and other low-molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHC). Consequently, mud volcanoes located within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) are known to host shallow buried gas hydrates in high density. However, gas hydrate inventories in shallow mud volcano deposits are strongly affected by changes in local physico-chemical conditions due to episodic volcanic activity and response by fixation or release of abundant portions of LMWHC. We determined the in situ gas inventories in shallow deposits of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano (HMMV, SW Barents Sea) in approx. 1,250 m water depth by quantitative degassing of pressure cores recovered with our Dynamic Autoclave Piston Corer. As recognized during previous studies of the HMMV, a concentric arrangement of geochemical parameters and topographic features allow for the distinction of three geomorphological units (I, II, III). During our cruise in summer 2008 we recovered pressure cores (up to 2.65 m below seafloor, b.s.f.) from all the three units and volumetric gas-sediment (wet) ratios ranged between 2.6 in a core taken at the northwestern outer rim (Unit III), and 25.2 obtained for a core in the northeastern section (Unit II). Gas sub-samples collected during degassing of pressure cores belonging to the three units showed C1/C2+ ratios >1,000 suggestive of a predominantly microbial LMWHC origin. Hydrate stability calculations based on LMWHC distributions, pore water salinities and bottom water temperatures suggest that structure I hydrates are the most stable crystallographic hydrate structure at the HMMV. Pore water chloride and sulfate profiles combined with in situ temperature data were used to delineate local boundaries of hydrate accumulations in each of the three geomorphologic units. Subsequently, gas volumes in pressure cores were referred to core segments comprising gas hydrates, and hydrate concentrations were calculated. Low gas hydrate

  9. Origin of Izu-Bonin forearc submarine canyons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Kantaro ); Yoshida, Haruko )

    1990-06-01

    Submarine canyons on the Izu-Bonin forearc are morphologically divided from north to south into four types based on their morphology, long profiles, and seismic profiles: Mikura, Aogashima, Sofu, and Chichijima types, respectively. These types of canyons are genetically different from each other. Mikura group is formed by the faults related to bending of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate. Aogashima type genetically relates to the activity of large submarine calderas that supply large amounts of volcaniclastic material to the consequent forearc slope. The third, Sofu group, is thought to be formed by the large-scale mega mass wasting in relation to the recent movement of the Sofugan tectonic line. The last, Chichijima group, is formed by collision of the Uyeda Ridge and the Ogasawara Plateau on the subducting Pacific Plate with Bonin Arc. Long profiles of four types of submarine canyons also support this.

  10. Seasonal influence over serum and urine metabolic markers in submariners during prolonged patrols

    PubMed Central

    Holy, Xavier; Bégot, Laurent; Renault, Sylvie; Butigieg, Xavier; André, Catherine; Bonneau, Dominique; Savourey, Gustave; Collombet, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of earlier publications, we have consistently dedicated our investigations to eliciting the effects of both seasonal vitamin D deficiency and submarine-induced hypercapnia on serum parameters for acid–base balance and bone metabolism in submariners over a 2-month winter (WP) or summer (SP) patrols. The latest findings reported herein, contribute further evidence with regard to overall physiological regulations in the same submariner populations that underwent past scrutiny. Hence, urine and blood samples were collected in WP and SP submariners at control prepatrol time as well as on submarine patrol days 20, 41, and 58. Several urine and serum metabolic markers were quantified, namely, deoxypyridinoline (DPD), lactate, albumin, creatinine, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and ionized sodium (Na+) or potassium (K+), with a view to assessing bone, muscle, liver, or kidney metabolisms. We evidenced bone metabolism alteration (urine DPD, calcium, and phosphorus) previously recorded in submarine crewmembers under prolonged patrols. We also highlighted transitory modifications in liver metabolism (serum albumin) occurring within the first 20 days of submersion. We further evidenced changes in submariners’ renal physiology (serum creatinine) throughout the entire patrol time span. Measurements of ionic homeostasis (serum Na+ and K+) displayed potential seasonal impact over active ionic pumps in submariners. Finally, there is some evidence that submersion provides beneficial conditions prone to fend off seasonal lactic acidosis (serum lactate) detected in WP submariners. PMID:26265754

  11. The Crati Submarine Fan, Ionian Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchi, F.R.; Colella, A.; Gabbianelli, G.; Rossi, S.; Normark, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Crati Fan is located in the tectonically active submerged extension of the Apennines chain and foretrough. The small fan system is growing in a relatively shallow (200 to 450 m), elongate nearshore basin receiving abundant input from the Crati River. The fan is characterized by a short, steep, channelized section (inner or upper fan) and a smooth, slightly bulging distal section (outer or lower fan). The numerous subparallel channels head in the shelf or littoral zone and do not form branching distributary patterns. Sand and mud depositional lobes of the outer fan stretch over more than 60% of fan length. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  12. On sonobuoy placement for submarine tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouritzin, Michael A.; Ballantyne, David J.; Kim, Hyukjoon; Hu, Yaozhong

    2005-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and tracking an unknown number of submarines in a body of water using a known number of moving sonobuoys. Indeed, we suppose there are N submarines collectively maneuvering as a weakly interacting stochastic dynamical system, where N is a random number, and we need to detect and track these submarines using M moving sonobuoys. These sonobuoys can only detect the superposition of all submarines through corrupted and delayed sonobuoy samples of the noise emitted from the collection of submarines. The signals from the sonobuoys are transmitted to a central base to analyze, where it is required to estimated how many submarines there are as well as their locations, headings, and velocities. The delays induced by the propagation of the submarine noise through the water mean that novel historical filtering methods need to be developed. We summarize these developments within and give initial results on a simplified example.

  13. The key to Understand Submarine Canyon Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baztan, J.; Berne, S.; Olivet, J.; Rabineau, M.; Aslanian, D.

    2004-12-01

    Submarine canyons are the preferential path of sediment transfer from the shelf to the deep sea, they are the key to understand the source-to-sink sedimentation and, in consequence, the shelf, slope and rise evolution. Pioneer works on submarine canyons described and proposed hypothesis to explain the formation and evolution of them. However, submarine canyons remain a matter of speculation. Our work in the Gulf of Lions (Mediterranean Sea) is based on swath bathymetry data together with sub-bottom profiles, high resolution seismic reflection profiles and cores. These data allow a detailed morphologic and stratigraphic study from the shelf to the rise through time, from 2.600.000 yrs to present. We show that two main erosive features, of very different dimensions, constitute the canyons: the axial incision and the canyon's major valley. The axial incision is interpreted as an erosive path related to the passage of hyperpycnal turbidity currents, generated up-slope by river connection. In the Gulf of Lions such currents are most likely to have formed during each Glacial Maxima (with a cyclicity of 100.000 years for the last 900.000 years and 40.000 years between 900.000 and 2.600.000 years) as both proximity of the shoreline (due to the lowstand of sea level) and high detrital sediment supply (due to glacial abrasion upstream) increased the flow of sediments delivered to the canyon heads. The axial incisions observed at the sea floor and fossil incisions observed on seismic lines, are related to equivalent conditions. The axial incision activity has a key influence on canyon evolution, it triggers mass wasting that affect the canyon's major valley (head and flanks) allowing the progressive widening and deepening of the canyon. Consequently the canyon's major valley (typically bounded by flanks of more than 700 meters in height) is the result of the axial incision activity through successive lowering of sea level. In summary: our cross-disciplinary approach

  14. Mud Volcanism in the South East Caspian, Gorgon Plane, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Poludetkina, E. N.; Mehrabi, B.; Krueger, M.; Inguaggiato, S.; Etiope, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although numerous studies have been completed on the Western Caspian side (e.g. mainly Azerbaijan), very little is known about the hydrocarbon plumbing system of the deepest and southernmost basin. This region has great potentials for hydrocarbon exploration and the study of mud volcanoes located here represents the opportunity to access to an open window to better understand the stratigraphy and the mechanisms ongoing at great depth as well as the origin and signature of the seeping fluids. Three so far unexplored mud volcano structures (Sofikam, Gharniarigh, and Naftliche) have been mapped and sampled in the Golestan region in the south eastern Caspian Sea. All the structures have negative morphology (i.e. "pockmark like") with caldera collapse. A multidisciplinary workflow of analyses is being conducted including gas and water geochemistry, incubation of microbial colonies, petrography of the seeping mud and erupted mud breccia clasts. Sofikam consists of 5 distinct pools up to 4-5 m in diameter that forms an E-W oriented alignment. All of the pools display vigorous seepage of fluids and are either water- or denser mud-dominated. Gharniarigh is a large mud volcano up to ~600 m in diameter with a bulging island in the internal part of the crater where eroded gryphons ridges witness a palaeo vigorous activity. The outskirts of the "island" are almost entirely flooded with water and/or covered with salt crusts in the summer. Here are distributed several small water and gas seeps. Naftliche (~400 m wide) is filled with water with a main seep in the centre of the lake. Preliminary gas geochemistry indicates the seepage of methane-dominated gas in all structures with additional small portions of ethane and propane as well as iC4 in Gharniarigh and Naftliche. All samples collected for microbial colonies incubation reveal strong activity with CO2 production under aerobic and anaerobic conditions as well as production of biogenic methane. In particular, samples from

  15. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  16. High temperature drilling mud composition

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, W.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a composition having improved rheological properties and improved stability at high temperatures and pressure for use in a water-based drilling mud comprising a high-yield bentonite, a low-yield bentonite and leonardite, wherein the weight ratio of the high-yield bentonite to the low-yield bentonites in the range of about 10:1 to about 1:1, and the leonardite is present in the amount of about 0.1% to 1.0% by total dry weight of the composition.

  17. Hydroacoustic, infrasonic and seismic monitoring of the submarine eruptive activity and sub-aerial plume generation at South Sarigan, May 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David N.; Evers, Läslo G.; Fee, David; Matoza, Robin S.; Snellen, Mirjam; Smets, Pieter; Simons, Dick

    2013-05-01

    Explosive submarine volcanic processes are poorly understood, due to the difficulties associated with both direct observation and continuous monitoring. In this study hydroacoustic, infrasound, and seismic signals recorded during the May 2010 submarine eruption of South Sarigan seamount, Marianas Arc, are used to construct a detailed event chronology. The signals were recorded on stations of the International Monitoring System, which is a component of the verification measures for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Numerical hydroacoustic and infrasound propagation modelling confirms that viable propagation paths from the source to receivers exist, and provide traveltimes allowing signals recorded on the different technologies to be associated. The eruption occurred in three stages, separated by three-hour periods of quiescence. 1) A 46 h period during which broadband impulsive hydroacoustic signals were generated in clusters lasting between 2 and 13 min. 95% of the 7602 identified events could be classified into 4 groups based on their waveform similarity. The time interval between clusters decreased steadily from 80 to 25 min during this period. 2) A five-hour period of 10 Hz hydroacoustic tremor, interspersed with large-amplitude, broadband signals. Associated infrasound signals were also recorded at this time. 3) An hour-long period of transient broadband events culminated in two large-amplitude hydroacoustic events and one broadband infrasound signal. A speculative interpretation, consistent with the data, suggests that during phase (1) transitions between endogenous dome growth and phreatomagmatic explosions occurred with the magma ascent rate accelerating throughout the period; during phase (2) continuous venting of fragmented magma occurred, and was powerful enough to breach the sea surface. During the climactic phase (3) discrete powerful explosions occurred, and sufficient seawater was vaporised to produce the contemporaneous 12 km altitude steam

  18. Slag/mud mixtures improve cementing operations in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Peiyan; Huang, B.

    1996-12-23

    The use of blast furnace slag, which is inexpensive and widely available throughout China, can with proper activators and retarders, solidify mud into an excellent cementing material. The use of slag-mix has been somewhat controversial. Some experts claim slag-mix is the most important progress to date in mud-to-cement conversion and has become another choice for cementing practices.They also believed there were no fundamental limitations to its application downhole, and conceivably the material could be used for any well cemented. Other experts have different points of view and thought it might have limits for oil field use. In their studies, the basic mud had to be diluted by 60% or more with water before the blast furnace slag (BFS) was added. Their slag slurries showed a high incidence of cracking and apparent brittle nature, bad settling stability, and volume shrinkage. To date, the Chinese National petroleum Corp. (CNPC) has used mud solidification by slag successfully on 22 cementing jobs in the Sichun, Changqing, Jidong, and Shengli oil fields.The major purpose of these investigations was to determine the application of slag-mix technology to various cementing operations.

  19. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  20. Kelly mud saver valve sub

    SciTech Connect

    Reddoch, J.A.

    1986-12-02

    A mud saver valve is described for preventing drilling mud from escaping from a kelly when a drill string is broken below the kelly, the valve comprising: a tubular valve body having first and second ends, the first end being provided with means for attachment in fluid communicating relationship with the kelly, the second end being provided with means for attachment to the drill string; an annular seat fixed in the interior of the valve body adjacent its first end; a tubular closure member within the valve body. The closure member is provided with a selectively closed seating end for seating in valve closing engagement with the annular seat, an open non-seating end in fluid communicating relationship with the drill string, and an annular expansion in the outer diameter of the closure member adjacent the seating end; a top and bottom spacer ring disposed in sliding relationship around the tubular closure member intermediate the annular expansion and the non-seating end of the closure member. The spacer ring and annular expansion cooperatively define an annular chamber around the closure member; and a helical spring disposed around the closure member towards the annular seat.

  1. 30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 2 JUNE 1930. SUBMARINE TRAINING TANK - STEELWORK 98% COMPLETE; BRICKWORK 95% COMPLETE, PIPING 10% IN PLACE. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  2. Factors controlling mud accumulation in the Heuksan mud belt off southwestern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae Soo; Ha, Hun Jun; Chun, Seung Soo

    2015-12-01

    The Heuksan mud belt (hereafter HMB) is 20~50 km wide, ~200 km long, and ~50 m thick, having accumulated in the course of the Holocene transgression on the tide-dominated epicontinental shelf southwest of Korea. The internal architecture of the HMB is characterized by offshore prograding clinoforms. Of particular interest are the depositional processes responsible for this anomalously thick mud accumulation within a relatively short period of time. Tidal currents are important in the dispersal of mud in the HMB, although these alone cannot explain such an enormous mud deposit. In order to understand the formative processes of the HMB, a detailed sedimentary facies analysis, including high-resolution grain-size measurements, has been conducted on more than 30 short cores and three long drill cores recovered from the mud belt. Five major mud facies were identified. Of these, mud sequences showing a thickening-thinning trend of alternating silt and clay laminae suggestive of a tidal origin occur dominantly at inner to mid shelf locations. By contrast, internally structureless muds with sharp bases and no bioturbation, which are interpreted of representing fluid-mud deposits, are widespread at mid to outer shelf locations. Wave-generated mud ripples and storm beds on the inner shelf suggest that storm waves in winter resuspend previously deposited mud to form near-bed fluid-mud suspensions with resulting gravity-driven mud transport across the low-gradient outer shelf. This previously not recognized process is probably a major factor controlling depositional processes on the giant mud belt, enabling rapid accumulation and offshore progradation even during transgression, i.e., at times of sea-level rise.

  3. Valorisation of waste ilmenite mud in the manufacture of sulphur polymer cement.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Manuel; Gázquez, Manuel Jesús; García-Díaz, Irene; Alguacil, Francisco J; López, Félix A; Bolívar, Juan Pedro

    2013-10-15

    This paper reports the preparation of sulphur polymer cements (SPCs) incorporating waste ilmenite mud for use in concrete construction works. The ilmenite mud raw material and the mud-containing SPCs (IMC-SPCs) were characterised physico-chemically and radiologically. The optimal IMC-SPC mixture had a sulphur/mud ratio (w/w) of 1.05 (mud dose 20 wt%); this cement showed the greatest compressive strength (64 MPa) and the lowest water absorption coefficient (0.4 g cm(-2) at 28 days). Since ilmenite mud is enriched in natural radionuclides, such as radium isotopes (2.0·10(3) Bq kg(-1)(228)Ra and 5.0·10(2) Bq kg(-1)(226)Ra), the IMC-SPCs were subjected to leaching experiments, which showed their environmental impact to be negligible. The activity concentration indices for the different radionuclides in the IMC-SPCs containing 10% and 20% ilmenite mud met the demands of international standards for materials used in the construction of non-residential buildings. PMID:23845955

  4. Geochemical characterization of the Nirano Mud Volcano Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Cantucci, Barbara; Ricci, Tullio; Conventi, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    Mud volcanoes, among fluid venting structures, are the most important phenomena related to natural seepage from the Earth's surface. The occurrence of mud volcanoes is controlled by several factors, such as tectonic activity and continuous hydrocarbon accumulation in a reservoir. Mud volcanoes in Italy occur along the external compressive margin of the Apennine chain. These mud volcanoes are usually small and unspectacular, when compared to other world examples. They rarely exhibit the periodic explosions, which is often related to important seismic activity. The Nirano Mud Volcano Field (NMVF) is located in the western sector of the Modena Apennine margin (Italy), which belongs to the Northern Apennines. The NMVF occurs over the crest of a thrust anticline associated with the main Pede-Apennine thrust and represents a good example of an onshore relationship between a mud volcano caldera structure and active thrust deformation, even if the fluid pathways are still not well understood at depth. The mud volcanoes are distributed along an area of about 10 ha, inside of the wider Natural Reserve, and are situated at the bottom of a wide sub-circular depression. The NMVF is currently formed by four main vents composed of a number of individual active cones (or gryphons) defining structural alignments trending ENE-WSW. A geochemical soil gas survey of 230 CO2 and CH4 fluxes and 150 CO2, CH4, Rn, He, H2 concentration measurements has been carried out inside the NMVF. Moreover, the fluid emissions from 4 active cones located in different sectors of NMVF have been sampled for chemical and isotopical analysis of water and free gas. The distribution of pathfinder elements as 222Rn, He e H2 has been studied in order to identify potential faults and/or fractures related to preferential migration pathways and the possible interactions between reservoir and surface. Soil gas data highlight two zones characterized by higher values, localized in the WSW and ENE of the NMVF area. In

  5. Mineralized microbes from Giggenbach submarine volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Renaut, Robin W.

    2008-08-01

    The Giggenbach submarine volcano, which forms part of the Kermadec active arc front, is located ˜780 km NNE of the North Island of New Zealand. Samples collected from chimneys associated with seafloor hydrothermal vents on this volcano, at a depth of 160-180 m, contain silicified microbes and microbes entombed in reticular Fe-rich precipitates. The mineralized biota includes filamentous, rod-shaped, and rare coccoid microbes. In the absence of organic carbon for rDNA analysis or preserved cells, the taxonomic affinity of these microbes, in terms of extant taxa, remains questionable because of their architectural simplicity and the paucity of taxonomically significant features. The three-dimensional preservation of the microbes indicates rapid mineralization with a steady supply of supersaturated fluids to the nucleation sites present on the surfaces of the microbes. The mineralization styles evident in the microbes from the Giggenbach submarine volcano are similar to those associated with mineralized microbes found in terrestrial hot spring deposits in New Zealand, Iceland, Yellowstone, and Kenya. These similarities exist even though the microbes are probably different and the fluids become supersaturated with respect to opal-A by different mechanisms. For ancient rocks it means that interpretations of the depositional settings cannot be based solely on the silicified microbes or their style of silicification.

  6. Argon geochronology of Kilauea's early submarine history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.T.; Lanphere, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Submarine alkalic and transitional basalts collected by submersible along Kilauea volcano's south flank represent early eruptive products from Earth's most active volcano. Strongly alkalic basalt fragments sampled from volcaniclastic deposits below the mid-slope Hilina Bench yield 40Ar/39Ar ages from 212 ?? 38 to 280 ?? 20 ka. These ages are similar to high-precision 234 ?? 9 and 239 ?? 10 ka phlogopite ages from nephelinite clasts in the same deposits. Above the mid-slope bench, two intact alkalic to transitional pillow lava sequences protrude through the younger sediment apron. Samples collected from a weakly alkalic basalt section yield 138 ?? 30 to 166 ?? 26 ka ages and others from a transitional basalt section yield 138 ?? 115 and 228 ?? 114 ka ages. The ages are incompatible with previous unspiked K-Ar studies from samples in deep drill holes along the east rift of Kilauea. The submarine birth of Kilauea volcano is estimated at <300 ka. If the weakly alkalic sequence we dated is representative of the volcano as a whole, the transition from alkalic to tholeiitic basalt compositions is dated at ??? 150 ka. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. INFLUENCE OF DRILLING MUDS ON THE PRIMARY CHEMOSENSORY NEURONS IN WALKING LEGS OF THE LOBSTER, 'HOMARUS AMERICANUS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of whole drilling muds on the normal activity of walking leg chemosensory neurons were examined using extracellular neurophysiological recording techniques. Exposure of legs for 3-5 min to 10-mg/L drilling mud suspended in sea water altered responses to food odors of ...

  8. Sedimentological and geochemical record of submarine mine tailing footprint in Repparfjorden (Northern Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternal, Beata; Junttila, Juho; Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Skirbekk, Kari; Forwick, Matthias; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge on understanding the physical, chemical and biological processes dominating in marine system affected by submarine tailings disposal (STD) remains limited and further knowledge to make reliable long-term predictions of future environmental impacts is needed. One way of contributing to this is by investigation of marine environments already affected by the tailings discharge in the past. We present preliminary results from a multidisciplinary study of marine sediments from Repparfjorden in northern Norway, a fjord that was influenced by the deposition of tailings from a copper mine during the 1970's. The study is a part of the competence cluster Environmental Waste Management (EWMA) that as one of its important aims has advancing the knowledge of spreading of mine-tailing related contaminants. Here we give particular attention to the reconstruction of sedimentation style, rate of sediment accumulation, as well as potential sediment transport paths (contaminants dispersion). Seventeen short cores (up to 21 cm long) were retrieved from sites covering the entire area of Repparfjorden. The cores were sliced into 1-cm intervals that are and will be analysed for grain-size, concentration of heavy metals and total organic carbon content of bulk sediment. Sediment chronologies are and will be derived using 210Pb and 137Cs dating techniques. An approximately 7-cm thick interval which is different from present fjord sedimentation was observed below c. 10 cm depth in three of the cores retrieved from the area of tailings deposition in the 1970's. Sediments of this discrete depth interval are mainly composed of mud or sandy mud with bimodal grain-size distribution (first mode: medium silt fraction; second mode: very coarse silt). They are characterised by very high Cu concentrations (>250 mg/kg). Preliminary measurements of the 210Pb activity indicate an increase in sediment accumulation rate during the deposition of this interval. Therefore, we interpret it to be

  9. 34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION OF BLISTERS IN 1959, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  10. Russian nuclear-powered submarine decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bukharin, O.; Handler, J.

    1995-11-01

    Russia is facing technical, economic and organizational difficulties in dismantling its oversized and unsafe fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The inability of Russia to deal effectively with the submarine decommissioning crisis increases the risk of environmental disaster and may hamper the implementation of the START I and START II treaties. This paper discusses the nuclear fleet support infrastructure, the problems of submarine decommissioning, and recommends international cooperation in addressing these problems.

  11. Saga is largest commercial submarine ever

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The long-range autonomous submarine, Saga, went nuclear last year with an agreement between the French and two Canadian companies. The agreement to convert the prototype from Swedish Stirling closed-cycle combustion engines to a nuclear power supply will make Saga the first non-defense nuclear submarine. With an external hull displacement of 500 tons, Saga will be the largest commercial submarine ever built.

  12. Submarine landslides around the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastel, Sebastian; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobs, Colin L.; Rihm, Roland; Le Bas, Timothy P.; AlibéS, BáRbara

    2001-01-01

    The morphology and structure of the submarine flanks of the Canary Islands were mapped using the GLORIA long-range side-scan sonar system, bathymetric multibeam systems, and sediment echosounders. Twelve young (<2 Ma) giant landslides have been identified on the submarine flanks of the Canary Islands up to now. Older landslide events are long buried under a thick sediment cover due to high sedimentation rates around the Canary Islands. Most slides were found on the flanks of the youngest and most active islands of La Palma, El Hierro, and Tenerife, but young giant landslides were also identified on the flanks of the older (15-20 Ma) but still active eastern islands. Large-scale mass wasting is an important process during all periods of major magmatic activity. The long-lived volcanic constructive history of the islands of the Canary Archipelago is balanced by a correspondingly long history of destruction, resulting in a higher landslide frequency for the Canary Islands compared to the Hawaiian Islands, where giant landslides only occur late in the period of active shield growth. The lower stability of the flanks of the Canaries is probably due to the much steeper slopes of the islands, a result of the abundance of highly evolved intrusive and extrusive rocks. Another reason for the enhanced slope instability is the abundance of pyroclastic deposits on Canary Islands resulting from frequent explosive eruptions due to the elevated volatile contents in the highly alkalic magmas. Dike-induced rifting is most likely the main trigger mechanism for destabilization of the flanks. Flank collapses are a major geological hazard for the Canary Islands due to the sector collapses themselves as well as triggering of tsunamis. In at least one case, a giant lateral blast occurred when an active magmatic or hydrothermal system became unroofed during flank collapse.

  13. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions. PMID:17256074

  14. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Mud Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, N. A.; Testik, F. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid mud bottom gravity currents are simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, ANSYS-Fluent. In this study, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-fluid method is selected since this method treats all phases in a multiphase system as interpenetrated continua. There are three different phases in the computational model constructed for this study: water, fluid mud, and air. Water and fluid mud are defined as two miscible fluids and the mass and momentum transfers between these two phases are taken into account. Fluid mud, which is a dense suspension of clay particles and water, is defined as a single-phase non-Newtonian fluid via user-defined-functions. These functions define the physical characteristics (density, viscosity, etc.) of the fluid mud and these characteristics vary with changing suspension concentration due to mass transfer between the fluid mud and the water phase. Results of this two-dimensional numerical model are verified with data obtained from experiments conducted in a laboratory flume with a lock-release set-up. Numerical simulations are currently being conducted to elucidate turbulent entrainment of ambient water into fluid mud gravity currents. This study is motivated by coastal dredge disposal operations.

  15. Influence of seismicity on the Lusi mud eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael; Tingay, Mark; Davies, Richard J.

    2015-09-01

    Earthquakes trigger the eruption of mud and magmatic volcanoes and influence ongoing eruptive activity. One mechanism that could trigger an eruption is clay liquefaction. Here we model the propagation of seismic waves beneath the Lusi mud eruption (East Java, Indonesia) using available seismic velocity and density models to assess the effect of subsurface structure on the amplification of incident seismic waves. We find that using an updated subsurface density and velocity structure, there is no significant amplification of incident seismic energy in the Upper Kalibeng Formation, the source of the erupting solids. Hence, the hypothesis that the Lusi eruption was triggered by clay liquefaction appears unlikely to be correct. Independent constraints from gas chemistry as well as analyses of drilling activities at the nearby Banjar-Panji 1 gas exploration well and an analysis of the effects of other earthquakes all favor a drilling trigger.

  16. Submarine thermal springs on the Galapagos Rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corliss, J.B.; Dymond, J.; Gordon, L.I.; Edmond, J.M.; Von Herzen, R. P.; Ballard, Richard D.; Green, K.; Williams, D.; Bainbridge, A.; Crane, K.; Van Andel, T. H.

    1979-01-01

    The submarine hydrothermal activity on and near the Galápagos Rift has been explored with the aid of the deep submersible Alvin. Analyses of water samples from hydrothermal vents reveal that hydrothermal activity provides significant or dominant sources and sinks for several components of seawater; studies of conductive and convective heat transfer suggest that two-thirds of the heat lost from new oceanic lithosphere at the Galápagos Rift in the first million years may be vented from thermal springs, predominantly along the axial ridge within the rift valley. The vent areas are populated by animal communities. They appear to utilize chemosynthesis by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to derive their entire energy supply from reactions between the seawater and the rocks at high temperatures, rather than photosynthesis

  17. Submarine thermal sprirngs on the galapagos rift.

    PubMed

    Corliss, J B; Dymond, J; Gordon, L I; Edmond, J M; von Herzen, R P; Ballard, R D; Green, K; Williams, D; Bainbridge, A; Crane, K; van Andel, T H

    1979-03-16

    The submarine hydrothermal activity on and near the Galápagos Rift has been explored with the aid of the deep submersible Alvin. Analyses of water samples from hydrothermal vents reveal that hydrothermal activity provides significant or dominant sources and sinks for several components of seawater; studies of conductive and convective heat transfer suggest that two-thirds of the heat lost from new oceanic lithosphere at the Galápagos Rift in the first million years may be vented from thermal springs, predominantly along the axial ridge within the rift valley. The vent areas are populated by animal communities. They appear to utilize chemosynthesis by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to derive their entire energy supply from reactions between the seawater and the rocks at high temperatures, rather than photosynthesis. PMID:17776033

  18. Shallow Submarine Hydrothermal Systems in the Aeolian Volcanic Arc, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Thomas; Petersen, Sven; Lackschewitz, Klas; Hügler, Michael; Hannington, Mark D.; Gemmell, J. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    The majority of known high-temperature hydrothermal vents occur at mid-ocean ridges and back-arc spreading centers, typically at water depths from 2000 to 4000 meters. Compared with 30 years of hydrothermal research along spreading centers in the deep parts of the ocean, exploration of the approximately 700 submarine arc volcanoes is relatively recent [de Ronde et al., 2003]. At these submarine arc volcanoes, active hydrothermal vents are located at unexpectedly shallow water depth (95% at <1600-meter depth), which has important consequences for the style of venting, the nature of associated mineral deposits, and the local biological communities. As part of an ongoing multinational research effort to study shallow submarine volcanic arcs, two hydrothermal systems in the submerged part of the Aeolian arc have been investigated in detail during research cruises by R/V Poseidon (July 2006) and R/V Meteor (August 2007). Comprehensive seafloor video surveys were conducted using a remotely operated vehicle, and drilling to a depth of 5 meters was carried out using a lander-type submersible drill. This research has resulted in the first detailed, three-dimensional documentation of shallow submarine hydrothermal systems on arc volcanoes.

  19. Overview of the 1995 NATO ARW on nuclear submarine decommissioning and related problems

    SciTech Connect

    LeSage, L.G.

    1997-10-01

    The NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Nuclear Submarine Decommissioning and Related Problems was held in Moscow June 19--22, 1995. It was preceded by a visit to the Zvezdotchka Shipyard at Severodvinsk, a repair and maintenance yard for Russian nuclear submarines, for a subgroup of the workshop attendees. Most of the material in this paper is drawn directly form the workshop proceedings. Slightly less than 500 nuclear ships and submarines (the vast majority are submarines) have been constructed by the countries with nuclear navies. This includes approximately 250 by Russia, 195 by the United States, 23 by the United Kingdom, 11 by France and 6 by China. By the year 2000 it is expected that approximately one-half of these nuclear vessels will be removed from service and in various states of decommissioning. A newspaper account in June 1997 indicated that 156 Russian nuclear submarines had been removed from service. In August 1996 it was reported that 55 reactor compartment sections from US nuclear submarines were already in long-term storage at Hanford. Overall the dismantlement of nuclear submarines and the processing, storage and disposal of nuclear fuel, activated components and section of the hulls, and the liquid and solid radioactive and hazardous wastes is an enormous problem. This problem has been exacerbated by the accelerated decommissioning schedule associated with treaty obligations.

  20. Measuring currents in submarine canyons: technological and scientific progress in the past 30 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The development and application of acoustic and optical technologies and of accurate positioning systems in the past 30 years have opened new frontiers in the submarine canyon research communities. This paper reviews several key advancements in both technology and science in the field of currents in submarine canyons since the1979 publication of Currents in Submarine Canyons and Other Sea Valleys by Francis Shepard and colleagues. Precise placements of high-resolution, high-frequency instruments have not only allowed researchers to collect new data that are essential for advancing and generalizing theories governing the canyon currents, but have also revealed new natural phenomena that challenge the understandings of the theorists and experimenters in their predictions of submarine canyon flow fields. Baroclinic motions at tidal frequencies, found to be intensified both up canyon and toward the canyon floor, dominate the flow field and control the sediment transport processes in submarine canyons. Turbidity currents are found to frequently occur in active submarine canyons such as Monterey Canyon. These turbidity currents have maximum speeds of nearly 200 cm/s, much smaller than the speeds of turbidity currents in geological time, but still very destructive. In addition to traditional Eulerian measurements, Lagrangian flow data are essential in quantifying water and sediment transport in submarine canyons. A concerted experiment with multiple monitoring stations along the canyon axis and on nearby shelves is required to characterize the storm-trigger mechanism for turbidity currents.

  1. Mud Volcanoes as Exploration Targets on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.

    2010-01-01

    Tens of thousands of high-albedo mounds occur across the southern part of the Acidalia impact basin on Mars. These structures have geologic, physical, mineralogic, and morphologic characteristics consistent with an origin from a sedimentary process similar to terrestrial mud volcanism. The potential for mud volcanism in the Northern Plains of Mars has been recognized for some time, with candidate mud volcanoes reported from Utopia, Isidis, northern Borealis, Scandia, and the Chryse-Acidalia region. We have proposed that the profusion of mounds in Acidalia is a consequence of this basin's unique geologic setting as the depocenter for the tune fraction of sediments delivered by the outflow channels from the highlands.

  2. Episodic Deep Fluid Expulsion at Mud Volcanoes in the Kumano Forearc Basin, SE Offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschmidt, S.; Kopf, A.

    2014-12-01

    from a reservoir within the older part of the accretionary prism, but that mud volcanic activity is less frequent than major earthquakes. Future models will focus on source depth and temperature, and might elucidate the prerequisites for fluid migration and its role in seismogenesis at the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

  3. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  4. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  5. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  6. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  7. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  8. Water-retentive and anti-inflammatory properties of organic and inorganic substances from Korean sea mud.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmi; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Shin, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-03-01

    Sea mud has been popularly used as an effective base in cosmetic preparations although its biologically-active materials and mechanisms on skin have not yet been fully determined. We isolated humic substances as the major organic substance of the sea mud from a tidal flat in Korea, and investigated their water-retentive properties. Among the three isolated humic substances, humic acid (HA) showed the highest water retentive property (approximately 50 % mass increase from water uptake). Based on the observations that mud pack therapy has been traditionally used to soothe UV-irradiated skin, we examined the antiinflammatory property of the sea mud on UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) by measuring PGE2 levels produced by keratinocytes in the presence of either the total water or methanol extracts of the mud. The water extract showed higher inhibition of PGE2 production from HaCaT cells (30% inhibition) than the methanol extract at 200 ppm (microg/g). We further fractionated the water extract to determine the major components responsible for its anti-inflammatory effect. It was found that the minerals in the mud inhibited PGE2 production by 83 % at 200 ppm, which is comparable with the inhibitory effect of 1 microM indomethacin. No mud extract showed cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. The mineral compositions of the mineral extract were determined by ICP-MS, revealing that the sea mud consisted of more than 19 different mineral components, rich in Na+, Mg2+, and Zn2+. These results imply that the anti-inflammatory effect of the sea mud is largely due to the minerals in the mud. Our research suggests the potential use of the organic and inorganic substances from the sea mud in various skin products as safe biological substances for skin protective purposes. PMID:20420315

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Laura A. Pastor

    2005-04-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 357 is comprised of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the NTS (Figure 1-1). The NTS is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 357 consists of 11 CASs that are mud pits located in Areas 7, 8, and 10. The mud pits were associated with drilling activities conducted on the NTS in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing. The remaining three CASs are boxes and pipes associated with Building 1-31.2el, lead bricks, and a waste dump. These CAS are located in Areas 1, 4, and 25, respectively. The following CASs are shown on Figure 1-1: CAS 07-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-01, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-06, Mud Pit, Stains, Material; CAS 01-99-01, Boxes, Pipes; CAS 04-26-03, Lead Bricks; and CAS 25-15-01, Waste Dump. The purpose of the corrective action activities was to obtain analytical data that supports the closure of CAU 357. Environmental samples were collected during the investigation to determine whether contaminants exist and if detected, their extent. The investigation and sampling strategy was designed to target locations and media most likely to be contaminated (biased sampling). A general site conceptual model was developed for each CAS to support and guide the investigation as outlined in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2003b). This CR

  10. Design of tailing dam using red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Subrat; Sahoo, Tapaswini; Das, Sarat

    2013-06-01

    Red mud, waste industrial product from aluminum industries produced approximately 75 million tonnes every year with less than half of this is used. Storage of this unutilized red mud takes vast tracts of usable land and pollutes, land, air and water. Construction of high embankments, under passes, flyovers, tailing dams uses vast tract of natural resources (top soil) is also matter of concern as its takes thousands of years to form the natural soil. This paper discusses use of red mud for construction of tailing dam based on laboratory findings and finite element analysis. The geotechnical properties such as plasticity, compaction, permeability, shear strength characteristics and dispersion of red mud are presented. Stability and seepage analysis of tailing dams as per finite element analysis using the above geotechnical parameters is presented.

  11. Treatment of a mud pit by bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Avdalović, Jelena; Đurić, Aleksandra; Miletić, Srdjan; Ilić, Mila; Milić, Jelena; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2016-08-01

    The mud generated from oil and natural gas drilling, presents a considerable ecological problem. There are still insufficient remedies for the removal and minimization of these very stable emulsions. Existing technologies that are in use, more or less successfully, treat about 20% of generated waste drilling mud, while the rest is temporarily deposited in so-called mud pits. This study investigated in situ bioremediation of a mud pit. The bioremediation technology used in this case was based on the use of naturally occurring microorganisms, isolated from the contaminated site, which were capable of using the contaminating substances as nutrients. The bioremediation was stimulated through repeated inoculation with a zymogenous microbial consortium, along with mixing, watering and biostimulation. Application of these bioremediation techniques reduced the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons from 32.2 to 1.5 g kg(-1) (95% degradation) during six months of treatment. PMID:27354013

  12. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extremely low tides and inundated at high tides with the water table at or near the surface of the substrate. The substrate of mud flats contains organic material and particles smaller in size than sand. They...

  13. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extremely low tides and inundated at high tides with the water table at or near the surface of the substrate... dewater the mud flat or disrupt periodic inundation, resulting in an increase in the rate of erosion...

  14. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extremely low tides and inundated at high tides with the water table at or near the surface of the substrate... dewater the mud flat or disrupt periodic inundation, resulting in an increase in the rate of erosion...

  15. Isotopic composition of gases from mud volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Valysaev, B.M.; Erokhin, V.E.; Grinchenko, Y.I.; Prokhorov, V.S.; Titkov, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    A study has been made of the isotopic composition of the carbon in methane and carbon dioxide, as well as hydrogen in the methane, in the gases of mud volcanoes, for all main mud volcano areas in the USSR. The isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in methane shows that the gases resemble those of oil and gas deposits, while carbon dioxide of these volcanoes has a heavier isotopic composition with a greater presence of ''ultraheavy'' carbon dioxide. By the chemical and isotopic composition of gases, Azerbaidzhan and South Sakhalin types of mud volcano gases have been identified, as well as Bulganak subtypes and Akhtala and Kobystan varieties. Correlations are seen between the isotopic composition of gases and the geological build of mud volcano areas.

  16. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  17. A submarine perspective of the Honolulu Volcanics, Oahu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; McIntosh, William C.; Cousens, Brian L.; Davis, Alicé S.; Reynolds, Jennifer R.

    2006-03-01

    Lavas and volcaniclastic deposits were observed and collected from 4 submarine cones that are part of the Honolulu Volcanics on Oahu, Hawaii. The locations of these and a few additional, but unsampled, vents demonstrate that nearly all the vents are located on or very close to the shoreline of Oahu, with the most distal vent just 12 km offshore. The clastic samples and outcrops range from coarse breccias to cross-bedded ash deposits and show that explosive volcanism at depths between about 350 and 590 m depth played a part in forming these volcanic cones. The eruptive styles appear to be dominantly effusive to strombolian at greater depths, but apparently include violent phreatomagmatic explosive activity at the shallower sites along the submarine southwest extension of the Koko Rift. The compositions of the recovered samples are broadly similar to the strongly alkalic subaerial Honolulu Volcanics lavas, but the submarine lavas, erupted further from the Koolau caldera, have slightly more radiogenic Sr isotopic ratios, and trace element patterns that are distinct from either the subaerial Honolulu Volcanics or the submarine North Arch lavas. These patterns are characterized by moderate to strong positive Sr and P anomalies, and moderate to strong negative Cs, Rb, U, Th, Zr, and Hf anomalies. Most samples have strong negative K and moderate negative Ti anomalies, as do all subaerial Honolulu Volcanics and North Arch samples, but one group of samples from the Koko Rift lack this chemical signature. The data are consistent with more garnet in the source region for the off-shore samples than for either the on-shore Honolulu Volcanics lavas. New Ar-Ar ages show that eruptions at the submarine vents and Diamond Head occurred between about 0.5 Ma and 0.1 Ma, with the youngest ages from the Koko Rift. These ages are in general agreement with most published ages for the formation and suggest that some much younger ages reported previously from the Koko Rift are probably

  18. Integrated geophysical and petrological characterization of mud volcanoes at the Morrocan Atlantic margin - linking morphology to fluid flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depreiter, D.; van Rensbergen, P.; Poort, J.; de Boever, E.; Swennen, R.; Henriet, J.

    2005-12-01

    Detailed geophysical, geochemical and petrological data over a cluster of large mud volcanoes at the Moroccan North Atlantic margin document the activity of sea floor mud volcanoes in relation to its morphology and structural setting. Mud volcanoes are often long-lived systems; their changing morphology bears witness of the evolution of fluid flow expulsion. The El Arraiche mud volcano field is a cluster of 9 mud volcanoes. It was discovered in 2002 at the Morrocan Atlantic margin in water depths from 200 m to 700 m. The largest mud volcano in the field is 255 m high and 5.4 km wide. Marine surveys between 2002 and 2005 yielded detailed geophysical, geochemical, sedimentological, and petrological data. The geophysical data include multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution seismics, deep-tow sub bottom profiles and side-scan sonar mosaics. Video imagery lines, video guided grab samples, dredge samples, gravity cores, and box cores were collected for groundtruthing purposes. Petrological and geochemical analysis of authigenic carbonates provided a record of hydrocarbon sources, fluid characteristics, processes of mixing and the mode of venting. The El Arraiche mud volcanoes cluster around two subparallel anticlines and are associated active extensional faults. Extruded rock clasts and regional seismic data locate the El Arraiche field over a Late Miocene to Pliocene extensional basin. The onset of mud volcanic activity is estimated at about 2.4 Ma and probably roots in the Cretacous to Miocene accretionary wedge. Stacked outflows are visible up to a depth of about 500 m below the sea floor. Stratigraphic correlation of the outflow lenses over the entire mud volcano field indicate that although large outflow events are not synchronized between the individual mud volcanoes, eruptions occurred more frequently during periods of active extensive tectonics. The morphology of the sea floor mud volcanoes is the result of a combination of extrusive and intrusive processes

  19. Dynamic filtration of invert-emulsion muds

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, D.; Sharma, M.M. )

    1993-09-01

    Dynamic-filtration experiments conducted on oil-based muds show that the dynamic-filtration rate is much higher than API filtration rates. The use of water-wet solids results in very poor-quality external mudcakes and high fluid-loss rates. Better external mudcakes are formed by mixing equal parts organophilic clay and mud. Filtration-loss-control additives (asphalt mineral pitches) do not reduce the equilibrium filtration rate, but do reduce spurt loss and limit solids invasion. In brine-saturated rocks, the invasion rate for oil-based muds is significantly smaller than for water-based muds because capillary pressure prevents the oil phase from entering the core in oil-based muds. Oil-based mudcakes are softer and more shear-sensitive than water-based mudcakes. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs indicate that oil-based mudcakes consist of individual water droplets coated with clay particles. This cake structure gives rise to the low permeability and shear sensitivity of oil-based muds.

  20. Reference PMHS Sled Tests to Assess Submarining.

    PubMed

    Uriot, Jérôme; Potier, Pascal; Baudrit, Pascal; Trosseille, Xavier; Petit, Philippe; Richard, Olivier; Compigne, Sabine; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Douard, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Sled tests focused on pelvis behavior and submarining can be found in the literature. However, they were performed either with rigid seats or with commercial seats. The objective of this study was to get reference tests to assess the submarining ability of dummies in more realistic conditions than on rigid seat, but still in a repeatable and reproducible setup. For this purpose, a semi-rigid seat was developed, which mimics the behavior of real seats, although it is made of rigid plates and springs that are easy to reproduce and simulate with an FE model. In total, eight PMHS sled tests were performed on this semirigid seat to get data in two different configurations: first in a front seat configuration that was designed to prevent submarining, then in a rear seat configuration with adjusted spring stiffness to generate submarining. All subjects sustained extensive rib fractures from the shoulder belt loading. No pelvis fractures and no submarining were observed in the front seat configuration, but two subjects sustained lumbar vertebrae fractures. In the rear seat configuration, all subjects sustained pelvic fractures and demonstrated submarining. Corridors were constructed for the external forces and the PMHS kinematics. They are provided in this paper as new reference tests to assess the biofidelity of human surrogates in different configurations that either result in submarining or do not. In future, it is intended to analyze further seat and restraint system configurations to be able to define a submarining predictor. PMID:26660745

  1. Sedimentary facies in submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, E.; Paull, C. K.; Gwiazda, R.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; McGann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine canyons are the major conduits by which sediment, pollutants and nutrients are transported from the continental shelf out into the deep sea. The sedimentary facies within these canyons are remarkably poorly understood because it has proven difficult to accurately sample these heterogeneous and bathymetrically complex environments using traditional ship-based coring techniques. This study exploits a suite of over 100 precisely located vibracores collected using remotely operated vehicles in ten canyons along the northern Californian margin, enabling better understanding of the facies that exist within submarine canyons, their distribution, and the processes responsible for their formation. The dataset reveals three major facies types within the submarine canyons: extremely poorly sorted, coarse-grained sands and gravels with complex and indistinct internal grading patterns and abundant floating clasts; classical normally graded thin bedded turbidites; and a variety of fine-grained muddy deposits. Not all facies are observed within individual canyons, in particular coarse-grained deposits occur exclusively in canyons where the canyon head cuts up to the modern day beach, whereas finer grained deposits have a more complex distribution that relates to processes of sediment redistribution on the shelf. Pairs of cores collected within 30 meters elevation of one another reveal that the coarse-grained chaotic deposits are restricted to the basal canyon floor, with finer-grained deposits at higher elevations on the canyon walls. The remarkable heterogeneity of the facies within these sediment cores illustrate that distinctive processes operate locally within the canyon. In the authors' experience the canyon floor facies represent an unusual facies rarely observed in ancient outcrops, which potentially results from the poor preservation of ancient coarse-grained canyon deposits in the geological record.

  2. Currents in monterey submarine canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Flow fields of mean, subtidal, and tidal frequencies between 250 and 3300 m water depths in Monterey Submarine Canyon are examined using current measurements obtained in three yearlong field experiments. Spatial variations in flow fields are mainly controlled by the topography (shape and width) of the canyon. The mean currents flow upcanyon in the offshore reaches (>1000 m) and downcanyon in the shallow reaches (100-m amplitude isotherm oscillations and associated high-speed rectilinear currents. The 15-day spring-neap cycle and a ???3-day??? band are the two prominent frequencies in subtidal flow field. Neither of them seems directly correlated with the spring-neap cycle of the sea level.

  3. Fluidization of mud in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; Chappell, John; Ridd, Peter; Vertessy, Rob

    1988-03-01

    The South Alligator River, located in the Northern Territory, Australia, is a macrotidal estuary with suspended sediment concentration values reaching 10 g 1-1 In September 1986, in the dry season, the estuary was well mixed in temperature and salinity. While the vertical gradients in suspended sediment concentration were small at flood tides, for most of the ebb tide duration a lutocline separated a clear upper layer from an extremely turbid bottom layer, both layers being of comparable thickness. The tidal evolution of the suspended sediment concentration is consistent with that computed by a numerical model based on the equation of conservation of mass of suspended sediment. In this model, sediment is entrained from the bottom and mixed vertically upward by eddy diffusion, but through a Richardson number dependence, sediment-induced buoyancy effects inhibit vertical mixing. The final depth of the turbid layer can be readily estimated analytically as a result of a balance between the rate of kinetic energy input and the buoyancy flux determined by the particle fall velocity. The presence of a lutocline helps form mud banks on the inner side of a meander.

  4. DInSAR Analysis Reveals Bulging of Azerbaijan Mud Volcano Edifices Before an Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Mud volcanism consists in the surface extrusion of gases, saline waters and mud breccias, which produce conical edifices of various sizes with morphology similar to that of magmatic volcanoes. In this work, DInSAR technique has been used to investigate the ground deformation related to the activity of Azerbaijan mud volcanoes during the period October 2003-November 2005. This work focuses on two important deformation events at the Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara-Zira mud volcanoes. The ground deformations at mud volcanoes are generally originated by fluid pressure and volume variations in the reservoir. The observed deformation pattern is characterized by pre-eruptive inflation that reaches a cumulative value of up to 20 cm at Ayaz-Akhtarma in about two years. Similar pre-eruptive bulging has been observed at magmatic volcanoes, where uplift is typically associated with magma intrusion. We conclude that mud and magmatic volcanoes display some similarities in the behavior of ground deformation during pre-eruptive stages.

  5. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon mud volcano (Nile deep-sea fan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, J.; Lichtschlag, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; de Beer, D.; Feseker, T.; Pop Ristova, P.; de Lange, G.; Boetius, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Amon mud volcano (MV), located at 1250 m water depth on the Nile deep-sea fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amon MV center in the presence of sulfate and hydrocarbons in the seeping subsurface fluids. By comparing spatial and temporal patterns of in situ biogeochemical fluxes, temperature gradients, pore water composition, and microbial activities over 3 yr, we investigated why the activity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders can be low despite high energy supplies. We found that the central dome of the Amon MV, as well as a lateral mud flow at its base, showed signs of recent exposure of hot subsurface muds lacking active hydrocarbon degrading communities. In these highly disturbed areas, anaerobic degradation of methane was less than 2% of the methane flux. Rather high oxygen consumption rates compared to low sulfide production suggest a faster development of more rapidly growing aerobic hydrocarbon degraders in highly disturbed areas. In contrast, the more stabilized muds surrounding the central gas and fluid conduits hosted active anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities. The low microbial activity in the hydrocarbon-vented areas of Amon MV is thus a consequence of kinetic limitations by heat and mud expulsion, whereas most of the outer MV area is limited by hydrocarbon transport.

  6. 3-D Seismic Images of Mud Volcano North Alex, West-Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, J.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Gehrmann, R.; Sommer, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mud volcanoes within shelf areas are the bathymetric expression of mobilized overpressured sediments causing a feature of possible instability within the slope. Such a scene is given in the West-Nile Delta offshore Alexandria, Egypt at 700 m water depth. The West Nile Delta forms part of the source of the large turbiditic Nile Deep Sea Fan. Since the late Miocene sediments have formed an up to 10 km thick pile, which includes about 1 - 3 km of Messinian evaporates. The sediment load of the overburden implies strong overpressures and salt-related tectonic deformation. Both are favourable for fluid migration towards the seafloor guided by the fractured margin. Deep-cutting channel systems like the Rosetta channel characterize the continental slope. Bathymetric expressions of slides and numerous mud volcanoes in the area are expressions of active processes, which contribute to the ongoing modification of the slope. The western deltaic system, Rosetta branch, has formed an 80 km wide continental shelf. Here at 700 m water depth the mud volcano North Alex developed his circular bathymetric feature, which proved to be an active gas and mud-expelling structure. A grid of 2-D seismic profiles did reveal a large set of faults located within the main mud volcano as well as surrounding the structure. Internal faults are mainly related to episodic mud expulsion processes and continuous gas and fluid production. Deep cutting external faults surround the structure in a half circle shape. They can be tracked up to the seafloor indicating ongoing tectonic activity of the slope area. A recently build 3-D acquisition system suitable for mid-size research vessels was applied to collect an active seismic cube of the mud volcano. Based on the P-Cable design 11 parallel streamers (each 12.5 m long with 1.5 m group interval) were used to record shots of a single 210 cinch GI airgun. After stacking a 3D time migration within the cube provided final signal to noise reduction and filled

  7. Microbial methane turnover at mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H.; Duarte, J.; Hensen, C.; Omoregie, E.; Magalhães, V. H.; Elvert, M.; Pinheiro, L. M.; Kopf, A.; Boetius, A.

    2006-11-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz is a tectonically active area of the European continental margin and characterised by a high abundance of mud volcanoes, diapirs, pockmarks and carbonate chimneys. During the R/V SONNE expedition "GAP-Gibraltar Arc Processes (SO-175)" in December 2003, several mud volcanoes were surveyed for gas seepage and associated microbial methane turnover. Pore water analyses and methane oxidation measurements on sediment cores recovered from the centres of the mud volcanoes Captain Arutyunov, Bonjardim, Ginsburg, Gemini and a newly discovered, mud volcano-like structure called "No Name" show that thermogenic methane and associated higher hydrocarbons rising from deeper sediment strata are completely consumed within the seabed. The presence of a distinct sulphate-methane transition zone (SMT) overlapping with high sulphide concentrations suggests that methane oxidation is mediated under anaerobic conditions with sulphate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and sulphate reduction (SR) rates show maxima at the SMT, which was found between 20 and 200 cm below seafloor at the different mud volcanoes. In comparison to other methane seeps, AOM activity (<383 mmol m -2 year -1) and diffusive methane fluxes (<321 mmol m -2 year -1) in mud volcano sediments of the Gulf of Cadiz are low to mid range. Corresponding lipid biomarker and 16S rDNA clone library analysis give evidence that AOM is mediated by a mixed community of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and associated sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) in the studied mud volcanoes. Little is known about the variability of methane fluxes in this environment. Carbonate crusts littering the seafloor of mud volcanoes in the northern part of the Gulf of Cadiz had strongly 13C-depleted lipid signatures indicative of higher seepage activities in the past. However, actual seafloor video observations showed only scarce traces of methane seepage and associated biological processes at the seafloor. No

  8. Are reefs and mud mounds really so different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Rachel

    2001-12-01

    Although both 'ecologic reefs' and mud mounds are demonstrably rigid, framework reefs, they are still considered to be distinct in terms of their dominant processes of formation and preferred environmental settings. This distinction has rested largely upon the assumption that ecologic reefs are dominated by skeletal metazoans growing in shallow waters, in contrast to the complex autochthonous micrite-supported cavity systems that characterise deep-water mud mounds, now considered to represent either organomineralic deposits (where carbonate precipitation has taken place in association with nonliving organic substrates to form 'automicrite') or various types of microbialite (where carbonate forms as a direct result of the physiological activity or decay of benthic microorganisms). Yet, such autochthonous micrite is increasingly recognised as an important component of many ancient shallow ecologic reefs as well as some modern coral reefs, and indeed may contribute locally up to 80% of the reef rock. These observations raise doubts as to the validity of current fabric-based definitions used to distinguish between mud mounds and ecologic reefs. Whether the autochthonous micrite in mud mounds proves to be dominated by either automicrite or microbialite, both require particular environmental conditions for their formation. Automicrites form where surplus organic matter from metazoans has degraded to release quantities of acidic amino acids with a significant ability to bind Ca 2+ , and microbialite formation also often requires either unusual marine chemistries or ecological conditions. Such conditions might include changes in terrigenous influx, ground water seepage, local anoxia, and increases in the pH of interstitial reef waters or in nutrient concentration.

  9. The Sirente crater, Italy: Impact versus mud volcano origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, Francesco

    2006-03-01

    The Sirente crater is a circular structure with a diameter of ˜80 m. The rim deposit is an inverse-graded, matrix-supported breccia. Sedimentological features of the rim deposit suggest that the crater is not related to an explosion or violent mechanical displacement. The structure and texture of the deposit exhibit a primary sedimentary character. The rim deposits do not contain artifacts and do not show evidence of reworking. A multistage formation is reconstructed for the rim growth and associated deposits. The geometry and sedimentology of the deposits indicate that they were produced by the extrusion and accumulation of mudflow deposits. The dominant ejection mechanism was low mud fountains and the transport medium was water. Petrographic and geochemical evidence does not indicate any physical or cryptic trace of an extraterrestrial body. The most realistic agent that explains the observed effects is a rapid local emission of mud and/or water. Geological processes capable of producing these features include piping sinkholes or, more probably, "caldera"-type mud volcanoes, which may result from underground water-table perturbation and/or decompression of deep CO2/hydrocarbon gas reservoirs due to tectonic deformation or faulting activity during a seismic event. In both cases, the name "crater" for this geological form may be maintained, but there is no compelling evidence for an impact origin. In this paper, the scientific literature on the Sirente crater is reconsidered in the light of new morphological, sedimentological, geochemical, and archaeological data. A new mechanism is proposed involving mud-fountaining.

  10. Nitrogen biogeochemistry of submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroeger, K.D.; Charette, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of the seepage zone in transport, chemical speciation, and attenuation of nitrogen loads carried by submarine groundwater discharge, we collected nearshore groundwater samples (n = 328) and examined the distribution and isotopic signature (??15N) of nitrate and ammonium. In addition, we estimated nutrient fluxes from terrestrial and marine groundwater sources. We discuss our results in the context of three aquifer zones: a fresh groundwater zone, a shallow salinity transition zone (STZ), and a deep STZ. Groundwater plumes containing nitrate and ammonium occurred in the freshwater zone, whereas the deep STZ carried almost exclusively ammonium. The distributions of redox-cycled elements were consistent with theoretical thermodynamic stability of chemical species, with sharp interfaces between water masses of distinct oxidation : reduction potential, suggesting that microbial transformations of nitrogen were rapid relative to dispersive mixing. In limited locations in which overlap occurs between distribution of nitrate with that of ammonium and dissolved Fe2+, changes in concentration and in ??15N suggest loss of all species. Concurrent removal of NO 3- and NH4+, both in freshwater and the deep STZ, might occur through a range of mechanisms, including heterotrophic or autotrophic denitrification, coupled nitrfication : denitrification, anammox, or Mn oxidation of NH4+. Loss of nitrogen was not apparent in the shallow STZ, perhaps because of short water residence time. Despite organic C-poor conditions, the nearshore aquifer and subterranean estuary are biogeochemically active zones, where attenuation of N loads can occur. Extent of attenuation is controlled by the degree of mixing of biogeochemically dissimilar water masses, highlighting the critical role of hydrogeology in N biogeochemistry. Mixing is related in part to thinning of the freshwater lens before discharge and to dispersion at the fresh : saline groundwater interface, features

  11. Hydrocarbon seepage and its sources at mud volcanoes of the Kumano forearc basin, Nankai Trough subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, Thomas; Geprägs, Patrizia; Hammerschmidt, Sebastian; Wintersteller, Paul; Wei, Jiangong; Fleischmann, Timo; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Kopf, Achim J.

    2014-06-01

    submarine mud volcanoes (MV) in the Kumano forearc basin within the Nankai Trough subduction zone were investigated for hydrocarbon origins and fluid dynamics. Gas hydrates diagnostic for methane concentrations exceeding solubilities were recovered from MVs 2, 4, 5, and 10. Molecular ratios (C1/C2 < 250) and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C-CH4 >-40‰ V-PDB) indicate that hydrate-bound hydrocarbons (HCs) at MVs 2, 4, and 10 are derived from thermal cracking of organic matter. Considering thermal gradients at the nearby IODP Sites C0009 and C0002, the likely formation depth of such HCs ranges between 2300 and 4300 m below seafloor (mbsf). With respect to basin sediment thickness and the minimum distance to the top of the plate boundary thrust we propose that the majority of HCs fueling the MVs is derived from sediments of the Cretaceous to Tertiary Shimanto belt below Pliocene/Pleistocene to recent basin sediments. Considering their sizes and appearances hydrates are suggested to be relicts of higher MV activity in the past, although the sporadic presence of vesicomyid clams at MV 2 showed that fluid migration is sufficient to nourish chemosynthesis-based organisms in places. Distributions of dissolved methane at MVs 3, 4, 5, and 8 pointed at fluid supply through one or few MV conduits and effective methane oxidation in the immediate subsurface. The aged nature of the hydrates suggests that the major portion of methane immediately below the top of the methane-containing sediment interval is fueled by current hydrate dissolution rather than active migration from greater depth.

  12. 29. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION AT POINT JUST ABOVE THE SUBMARINE SECTION AT THE 110-FOOT LEVEL 1929-1930 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  13. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  14. 32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. OCTOBER 3, 1932. COMPLETION OF ERECTION OF STEELWORK FOR ELEVATOR. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  15. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  16. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  17. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  18. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine... submarines....

  19. Mud Volcanism and Fluid Venting In The Eastern Mediterranean Sea: Observations From Sidescan Sonar and Submersible Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitter, T. A. C.; Huguen, C.; Woodside, J. M.; Mascle, J.; Scientific Party, Medineth/Medinaut

    Mud volcanoes in the eastern Mediterranean Sea have been identified by their distinctive acoustic signature as well as their morphology and sedimentology. They appear as circular regions of high backscatter believed to be caused principally by the clast content of the mud flows forming the mud volcano. Both the MEDINAUT and MEDINETH expeditions, conducted in 1998 and 1999 over two mud fields, the Olimpi field and the Anaximander Mountains area, in Eastern Mediterranean Sea, studied mud volcanism using a multidisciplinary approach in order to determine the relationships between the activity of the mud volcanoes (importance of degassing, associated fauna) and their geophysical signature. Mud volcanoes in Eastern Mediterranean Sea vary from conical and dome-shaped reliefs from 500m to 2km wide and 100 to 200m high to large "mud pie" types up to 6km wide. Sidescan sonar records give a very high resolution of the acoustic response, enabling to distinguish several mud flows, often flowing along tectonic lineations. A clear relationship between the occurrence of mud volcanism and cold seeps and both thrust and transcurrent faulting has been observed in both mud fields, although the tectonic settings vary from purely compressional to a more transpressional stress field. The faults are inferred to provide pathways for over- pressured fluids, and secondary faulting (transcurrent and extensional faults) may facilitate mud ascension. On the basis of sidescan sonar interpretation, other typical features have been inferred such as main feeder channels, eruptive cone centers, or brine pools. The in situ observations have been used to characterize the seafloor over numerous mud volcanoes and ground-truth the sonar data. They reveal an abundance of fluid seeps, mainly methane and methane-rich brines, as well as associated specific fauna such as tube worms, clams and chemosynthetic bacteria, and specific diagenetic phenomenon i.e. carbonate crusts. Video observations proved that

  20. Results of study of deep underground structure of mud volcanoes in North-Western Caucasus by means of geological and geophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobissevitch, A. L.; Gorbatikov, A. V.; Ovsuychenko, A. N.; Sobissevitch, L. E.; Stepanova, M. Yu.; Morev, B. A.

    2009-04-01

    Results of complementary geological and geophysical studies of mud volcanic phenomena in North-Western Caucasus (Taman mud volcanic province) are presented. New technology for passive subsurface sounding of the Earth's crust has been originally developed at the Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences. Patented since 2005, this technology represents the new kind of seismic survey based on specific features of propagation of the Rayleigh waves. It uses natural background microseismic noise as a sounding signal. By using the method of low-frequency microseismic sounding in the course of field works carried out in 2006 - 2008, there have been obtained three vertical cross-sections for the two mud volcanoes down to the depth of 25 km. For the two different mud volcanoes their deep subsurface structure has been revealed and discussed. The Gora Karabetova mud volcano is one of the most active mud volcanoes in the Taman peninsula with primarily explosive behaviour while the Shugo mud volcano's activity pattern is different, explosive events are rare and both types of phenomena may be explained by the configuration of their feeding systems, tectonic position and deep pathways of migration of fluids. Complementary interpretation of raw data sets delivered form geophysical and geological surveys allows considering principal differences of origin and mechanisms of mud volcanic activity for the Shugo and the Gora Karabetova mud volcanoes.

  1. Global estimates of fresh submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijendijk, Elco; Gleeson, Tom; Moosdorf, Nils

    2016-04-01

    Fresh submarine groundwater discharge, the flow of fresh groundwater to oceans, may be a significant contributor to the water and chemical budgets of the world's oceans. We present new estimates of the flux of fresh groundwater to the world's oceans. We couple density-dependent numerical simulations of generic models of coastal basins with geospatial databases of hydrogeological parameters and topography to resolve the rate of terrestrially-derived submarine groundwater discharge globally. We compare the model results to a new global compilation of submarine groundwater discharge observations. The results show that terrestrially-derived SGD is highly sensitive to permeability. In most watersheds only a small fraction of groundwater recharge contributes to submarine groundwater discharge, with most recharge instead contributing to terrestrial discharge in the form of baseflow or evapotranspiration. Fresh submarine groundwater discharge is only significant in watersheds that contain highly permeable sediments, such as coarse-grained siliciclastic sediments, karstic carbonates or volcanic deposits. Our estimates of global submarine groundwater discharge are much lower than most previous estimates. However, many tropical and volcanic islands are hotspots of submarine groundwater discharge and solute fluxes towards the oceans. The comparison of model results and data highlights the spatial variability of SGD and the difficulty of scaling up observations.

  2. Flocculation settling characteristics of mud: sand mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Andrew J.; Baugh, John V.; Spearman, Jeremy R.; Whitehouse, Richard J. S.

    2010-04-01

    When natural muds become mixed with sandy sediments in estuaries, it has a direct effect on the flocculation process and resultant sediment transport regime. Much research has been completed on the erosion and consolidation of mud/sand mixtures, but very little is known quantitatively about how mixed sediments interact whilst in suspension, particularly in terms of flocculation. This paper presents the settling velocity findings from a recent laboratory study which examined the flocculation dynamics for three different mud/sand mixtures at different concentrations (0.2-5 g.l-1) and turbulent shear stresses (0.06-0.9 Pa) in a mini-annular flume. The low intrusive video-based Laboratory Spectral Flocculation Characteristics instrument was used to determine floc/aggregate properties (e.g., size, settling velocity, density and mass) for each population. Settling data was assessed in terms of macrofloc (>160 μm) and microfloc (<160 μm) settling parameters: Wsmacro and Wsmicro, respectively. For pure muds, the macroflocs are regarded as the most dominant contributors to the total depositional flux. The parameterised settling data indicates that by adding more sand to a mud/sand mixture, the fall velocity of the macrofloc fraction slows and the settling velocity of microflocs quickens. Generally, a mainly sandy suspension comprising 25% mud and 75% sand (25M:75S), will produce resultant Wsmacro which are slower than Wsmicro. The quickest Wsmicro appears to consistently occur at a higher level of turbulent shear stress (τ ˜ 0.6 Pa) than both the macrofloc and microfloc fractions from suspensions of pure natural muds. Flocculation within a more cohesively dominant muddy-sand suspension (i.e., 75M:25S) produced macroflocs which fell at similar speeds (±10%) to pure mud suspensions at both low (200 mg l-1) and intermediate (1 g l-1) concentrations at all shear stress increments. Also, low sand content suspensions produced Wsmacro values that were faster than the Wsmicro

  3. How new biopolymers can improve muds

    SciTech Connect

    Dino, D.; Lindblad, D.E.; Moorhouse, R. )

    1993-11-01

    Xantham gum was introduced as a drilling-fluid component in the mid-1960s, but its use has risen noticeably since 1970, as prevalence of inhibitive polymeric drilling fluids has increased. Xanthan is known for its ability to build viscosity in both fresh water and salt solutions, its exceptional shear-thinning properties, and its tolerance to pH, all without environmental problems. Although biopolymers like xanthan typically represent only 0.25--1.5 lb/bbl of a drilling fluid, they are critical in building rheology, from spudding to the special demands of angled drilling and well completion. They add properties to muds which expand their use across a variety of formations and over a wide temperature range. Beyond xanthan, another useful class of biopolymers are the guar gums. Just as muds incorporating xanthan have been in the mainstay in rheology building over the years for many muds, fluids incorporating guar have long been the backbone of fracturing fluids. Guar and its derivatives are extremely versatile as rheology modifiers, particularly when used in conjunction with xanthans. In fact, xanthan/guar combinations have already been enhancing the effectiveness of muds at drill sites in the US. This paper reviews the performance of mixed xantham/guar additives to obtain an even better mud control system.

  4. Submarine Cables for Ocean/Climate Monitoring and Disaster Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueti, Cristina; Barnes, Chris; Meldrum, David

    2013-04-01

    A joint initiative between International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO is examining novel uses for submarine telecommunication cables. The initiative addresses two main issues: the need for sustained climate-quality data from the sparsely observed deep oceans, and the desire to increase the reliability and integrity of the global tsunami warning networks. In the latter case, a significant proportion of the network suffers from failure and vandalism of the sea-surface telemetry buoys that relay the tsunami signals from the sea-bed sensor package: incorporating the sensors within a submarine cable repeater is an obvious way of increasing system reliability. At the present time, plans are well advanced to launch a pilot project with the active involvement of cable industry players.

  5. The giant submarine alika debris slide, Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Normark, W.R.; Moore, J.G.; Wilson, J.B.; Gutmacher, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A 4000-km2 area of submarine slump and slide deposits along the W flank of Mauna Loa volcano has been mapped with GLORIA side-scan sonar images, seismic reflection profiles, and new bathymetry. The youngest deposits are 2 debris avalanche lobes that travelled from their breakaway area near the present shoreline as much as 100 km into the Hawaiian Deep at water depths of 4800 m. The 2 lobes partly overlap and together are designated the Alika slide. They were derived from the same source area and probably formed in rapid succession. Slumping on Mauna Loa has been most intense adjacent to the large arcuate bend in its SW rift zone, as the rift zone migrated westward away from the growing Kilauea volcano. Slumping events were probably triggered by seismic activity accompanying dike injection along the rift zone. Such massive slumps, landslides and distal submarine turbidity flows appear to be widespread on the flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes.-from Authors

  6. Characterization of the Spatial and Temporal Variations of Submarine Groundwater Discharge Using Electrical Resistivity and Seepage Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Josephine Miryam Kalyanie

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) encompasses all fluids crossing the sediment/ocean interface, regardless of their origin, composition or driving forces. SGD provides a pathway for terrestrial contaminants that can significantly impact coastal ecosystems. Overexploitation of groundwater resources can decrease SGD which favors seawater intrusion at depth. Understanding SGD is therefore crucial for water quality and resource management. Quantifying SGD is challenging due to its diffuse and heterogeneous nature, in addition to significant spatio-temporal variations at multiple scales. In this thesis, an integrated approach combining electrical resistivity (ER) surveys, conductivity and temperature point measurements, seepage rates using manual and ultrasonic seepage meters, and pore fluid salinities was used to characterize SGD spatio-temporal variations and their implications for contaminant transport at several locations on Long Island, NY. The influence of surficial sediments on SGD distribution was investigated in Stony Brook Harbor. A low-permeability mud layer, actively depositing in the harbor, limits SGD at the shoreline, prevents mixing with seawater and channels a significant volume of freshwater offshore. SGD measured at locations without mud is high and indicates significant mixing between porewater and seawater. A 2D steady-state density-difference numerical model of the harbor was developed using SEAWAT and was validated by our field observations. Temporal variations of SGD due to semi-diurnal tidal forcing were studied in West Neck Bay, Shelter Island, using a 12-hr time-lapse ER survey together with continuous salinity and seepage measurements in the intertidal zone. The observed dynamic patterns of groundwater flux and salinity distribution disagree with published standard transient state numerical models, suggesting the need for developing more specific models of non-homogeneous anisotropic aquifers. SGD distribution and composition were

  7. Geomorphologic Features and Age Estimation of Submarine Landslides in the Southwestern Colombian Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idarraga Garcia, J.; Vargas-Jimenez, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    We analyzed ~17000 km2 of high-resolution-bathymetric data in the southwestern Caribbean Sea of Colombia between the La Aguja Submarine Canyon (LASC) and the Gulf of Urabá. The data allowed us to identify and describe submarine landslides and to calculate their ages based on scarp dating by using numerical solutions of the diffusion equation. The ages are presented in terms of the constant k of diffusivity due to the absence of well constrained values for submarine environments. In the northeastern sector of the study area we differentiated 31 submarine failures associated with the LASC flanks, between 1200 and 3285 m depth, with escarpments slopes ranging between 6.1° and 36.8°; estimated ages suggest ranges between ~407 and ~103.5 k (m2). Triggering mechanisms of these landslides are close related to the occurrence of earthquakes originated in the convergence zone of the Santa Marta and Oca fault systems, and to the flanks instabilities product of the mud diapirism phenomena that is present in the area. In the central sector of the study zone, the continental margin is dominated by the presence of the Magdalena Submarine Fan (MSF). Here, most of the submarine failures are disintegrative (i.e. with no obvious deposit near or at the base of the scar) and all are related to a system of canyons belonging to the Magdalena turbidite system and to an abrupt slope break at the border of the continental shelf. Scarp dating suggests a wide range of ages fluctuating between ~207.1 and ~146427.8 k (m2). Landslides at southernmost sector of the study zone are mainly associated to anticline-related ridges of the Sinú Accretionary Prism. These ridges are structural highs cut by channels and canyons, and are associated with slopes of 10°-25°. In many cases, the failures are disintegrative and it is probable that the associated landslide deposits are buried by subsequent sediments related to broad fans forming in the mouth of channels and canyons. Additionally, some

  8. Mud bath dermatitis due to cinnamon oil.

    PubMed

    García-Abujeta, José Luis; de Larramendi, Carlos Hernando; Berna, José Pomares; Palomino, Elena Muñoz

    2005-04-01

    A case of long-lasting, extensive eczematous and bullous dermatitis affecting exposed areas (arms and legs), beginning within 24 hr after having a mud bath with cinnamon essential oil in a spa, in a 74-year-old woman, is reported. Patch tests with the GEIDC standard battery and the dental battery (including clove essence and eugenol), cinnamon essence and its components were carried out 5 years later. Fragrance mix, cinnamon essence, eugenol, cinnamic alcohol and cinnamic aldehyde yielded a positive result. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cinnamon dermatitis after a mud bath. PMID:15860002

  9. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  10. Personality characteristics of successful Navy submarine personnel.

    PubMed

    Moes, G S; Lall, R; Johnson, W B

    1996-04-01

    This study evaluated the personality characteristics of senior enlisted and occupationally successful Navy submarine personnel. One hundred subjects completed the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP). Results indicated that the traits of detachment, propriety, and workaholism were most descriptive of the sample. Thirty-seven percent met SNAP criteria for a personality disorder, typically antisocial, obsessive-compulsive, or avoidant. The results are discussed in terms of adaptation to environmental demands aboard submarines. Suggestions for further research are offered. PMID:8935516

  11. Submarine landslides: processes, triggers and hazard prediction.

    PubMed

    Masson, D G; Harbitz, C B; Wynn, R B; Pedersen, G; Løvholt, F

    2006-08-15

    Huge landslides, mobilizing hundreds to thousands of km(3) of sediment and rock are ubiquitous in submarine settings ranging from the steepest volcanic island slopes to the gentlest muddy slopes of submarine deltas. Here, we summarize current knowledge of such landslides and the problems of assessing their hazard potential. The major hazards related to submarine landslides include destruction of seabed infrastructure, collapse of coastal areas into the sea and landslide-generated tsunamis. Most submarine slopes are inherently stable. Elevated pore pressures (leading to decreased frictional resistance to sliding) and specific weak layers within stratified sequences appear to be the key factors influencing landslide occurrence. Elevated pore pressures can result from normal depositional processes or from transient processes such as earthquake shaking; historical evidence suggests that the majority of large submarine landslides are triggered by earthquakes. Because of their tsunamigenic potential, ocean-island flank collapses and rockslides in fjords have been identified as the most dangerous of all landslide related hazards. Published models of ocean-island landslides mainly examine 'worst-case scenarios' that have a low probability of occurrence. Areas prone to submarine landsliding are relatively easy to identify, but we are still some way from being able to forecast individual events with precision. Monitoring of critical areas where landslides might be imminent and modelling landslide consequences so that appropriate mitigation strategies can be developed would appear to be areas where advances on current practice are possible. PMID:16844646

  12. Submarine Volcanic Eruptions and Potential Analogs for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Mouginismark, P. J.; Fryer, P.; Gaddis, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an analysis program to better understand the diversity of volcanic processes on the terrestrial planets, an investigation of the volcanic landforms which exist on the Earth's ocean floor was initiated. In part, this analysis is focused toward gaining a better understanding of submarine volcanic landforms in their own right, but also it is hoped that these features may show similarities to volcanic landforms on Venus, due to the high ambient water (Earth) and atmospheric (Venus) pressures. A series of numerical modelling experiments was performed to investigate the relative importance of such attributes as water pressure and temperature on the eruption process, and to determine the rate of cooling and emplacement of lava flows in the submarine environment. Investigations to date show that the confining water pressure and the buoyancy effects of the surrounding water significantly affect the styles of volcanism on the ocean floor. In the case of Venusian volcanism, confining pressures will not be as great as that found at the ocean's abyssal plains, but nevertheless the general trend toward reducing magma vesiculation will hold true for Venus as well as the ocean floor. Furthermore, other analogs may also be found between submarine volcanism and Venusian activity.

  13. The effects of the Yogyakarta earthquake at LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, M.; Saenger, E. H.; Fuchs, F.; Miller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    The M6.3 Yogyakarta earthquake shook Central Java on May 27th, 2006. Forty seven hours later, hot mud outburst at the surface near Sidoarjo, approximately 250 km from the earthquake epicentre. The mud eruption continued and originated LUSI, the youngest mud volcanic system on earth. Since the beginning of the eruption, approximately 30,000 people lost their homes and 13 people died due to the mud flooding. The causes that initiated the eruption are still debated and are based on different geological observations. The earthquake-triggering hypothesis is supported by the evidence that at the time of the earthquake ongoing drilling operations experienced a loss of the drilling mud downhole. In addition, the eruption of the mud began only 47 hours after the Yogyakarta earthquake and the mud reached the surface at different locations aligned along the Watukosek fault, a strike-slip fault upon which LUSI resides. Moreover, the Yogyakarta earthquake also affected the volcanic activity of Mt. Semeru, located as far as Lusi from the epicentre of the earthquake. However, the drilling-triggering hypothesis points out that the earthquake was too far from LUSI for inducing relevant stress changes at depth and highlight how upwelling fluids that reached the surface first emerged only 200 m far from the drilling rig that was operative at the time. Hence, was LUSI triggered by the earthquake or by drilling operations? We conducted a seismic wave propagation study on a geological model based on vp, vs, and density values for the different lithologies and seismic profiles of the crust beneath LUSI. Our analysis shows compelling evidence for the effects produced by the passage of seismic waves through the geological formations and highlights the importance of the overall geological structure that focused and reflected incoming seismic energy.

  14. Hidden values in bauxite residue (red mud): Recovery of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Current iron recovery techniques using red mud are depicted. • Advantages and disadvantages exist in different recovering processes. • Economic and environmental friendly integrated usage of red mud is promising. - Abstract: Bauxite residue (red mud) is a hazardous waste generated from alumina refining industries. Unless managed properly, red mud poses significant risks to the local environment due to its extreme alkalinity and its potential impacts on surface and ground water quality. The ever-increasing generation of red mud poses significant challenges to the aluminium industries from management perspectives given the low proportion that are currently being utilized beneficially. Red mud, in most cases, contains elevated concentrations of iron in addition to aluminium, titanium, sodium and valuable rare earth elements. Given the scarcity of iron supply globally, the iron content of red mud has attracted increasing research interest. This paper presents a critical overview of the current techniques employed for iron recovery from red mud. Information on the recovery of other valuable metals is also reviewed to provide an insight into the full potential usage of red mud as an economic resource rather than a waste. Traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy are being investigated continuously. However, in this review several new techniques are introduced that consider the process of iron recovery from red mud. An integrated process which can achieve multiple additional values from red mud is much preferred over the single process methods. The information provided here should help to improve the future management and utilization of red mud.

  15. Teaching Ecological Concepts with Mud Dauber Nests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Robert W.; Matthews, Janice R.

    1999-01-01

    Contends that mud dauber nests--which are widely available, safe, inexpensive, and easy to use--offer a novel and highly motivating way to teach ecological concepts to life science students at many grade levels. Presents background information for teachers, details classroom-tested methods for nest dissection, provides keys to nest contents, and…

  16. "Mud" + "Blood"--A Very Colorful Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon

    1998-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a bloodred-colored solution of hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydroxide, and phenolphthalein indicator is added to a mud-colored solution of potassium permanganate, hydrated manganous chloride, and sulfuric acid. The mixture turns clear when added together. Draws parallels between the demonstration and the Old…

  17. DRILLING MUD ASSESSMENT CHEMICAL ANALYSIS REFERENCE VOLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents concentrations of specific metals and hydrocarbons in eleven drilling fluids (muds) taken from operating gas and oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. Each drilling fluid was analyzed chemically for heavy metal and hydrocarbon content in three distinct phases: (1) ...

  18. Biogeochemistry of aragonite mud and oolites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitterer, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Amino acids were determined on an analyzer similar to that described by Hare (1969) in carbonate mud samples from locations in the Bahamas, Bermuda, Persian Gulf, and Florida Bay, and in oolites from the Gulf of Suez, the Abu Dhabi coast, the Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas. A histogram, tables, and chromatograms of the results are given.

  19. Preadolescent Girls' and Boys' Virtual MUD Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sandra L.; Strouse, Gabrielle A.; Strong, Bonnie L.; Huffaker, David A.; Lai, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Same and opposite-sex pairs of preadolescents interacted twice in a MUD, a virtual domain where they created characters known as avatars and socially interacted with one another. Boys interacted primarily through rapid scene shifts and playful exchanges; girls interacted with one another through written dialogue. Opposite-sex pairs lagged behind…

  20. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mud flats. 230.42 Section 230.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on...

  1. Human-Powered Submarine Competition: World Submarine International 1996 [and] Design Technology Exhibit: A School Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibberd, John C.; Edwards, Don

    1996-01-01

    Hibbard describes the process used by students at Millersville University to build a human-powered submarine for entry in an international submarine competition. Edwards discusses the Design Technology Exhibit held at Lu Sutton Elementary School, the purpose of which was to challenge students to design a useful structure and provide them with the…

  2. Fluid Geochemistry of the Lusi Mud Volcano (east Java, Indonesia) and Implications for Eruption Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, H. E.; Vanderkluysen, L.; Clarke, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    The LUSI mud volcano near Sidoarjo in East Java, Indonesia, has been erupting mud and water since May 2006. It discharged as much as 180,000 cubic meters per day at the peak of its activity, destroyed thousands of homes, and displaced tens of thousands of people. The erupting fluid is a mixture of water, clays, and other minerals at near-boiling temperatures that is accompanied by venting of hot gases, primarily H2O vapor, CO2, and CH4. The LUSI mud volcano has exhibited variations in flow rate and pulsating-to-cyclic activity since the beginning of the eruption; however, there are few published geochemical studies of the system and our knowlege of the evolution of the fluid and mud composition is poor. The solids in the mud can be traced with some certainty to the blue-gray clays of the Upper Kalibeng formation, found 1600-1800 m beneath the LUSI main vent. However, the water content and chemical composition of the fluids are more difficult to interpret. An improved understanding of the fluid content and composition may provide insights that can help to constrain eruption mechanisms for this system. We have taken a multi-disciplinary approach to assess both the fluid provenance and erpution behaviour at this complex and evolving mud volcano. We present geochemical results for dissolved (major ions, trace elements, water isotopes and Sr isotopes) and solid-phased (elemental and mineralogical composition) components of not only the LUSI fluids but also of other regional fluid sources (hot springs, surface waters, sea water, and relict mud volcanoes). The LUSI fluids are compositionally distinct from all the other sources we've measured to date, including some of the older mud volcanoes, suggesting either that the underlying water source for LUSI is different, or that it has changed over time. Our major and trace element data suggest the water and solids in the LUSI fluid may not originate from the same geologic formation, providing indirect evidence in support of

  3. Scientific Ocean Drilling to Assess Submarine Geohazards along European Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ask, M. V.; Camerlenghi, A.; Kopf, A.; Morgan, J. K.; Ocean DrillingSeismic Hazard, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Submarine geohazards are some of the most devastating natural events in terms of lives lost and economic impact. Earthquakes pose a big threat to society and infrastructure, but the understanding of their episodic generation is incomplete. Tsunamis are known for their potential of striking coastlines world-wide. Other geohazards originating below the sea surface are equally dangerous for undersea structures and the coastal population: submarine landslides and volcanic islands collapse with little warning and devastating consequences. The European scientific community has a strong focus on geohazards along European and nearby continental margins, especially given their high population densities, and long historic and prehistoric record of hazardous events. For example, the Mediterranean is surrounded by very densely-populated coastline and is the World's leading holiday destination, receiving up 30% of global tourism. In addition, its seafloor is criss-crossed by hydrocarbon pipelines and telecommunication cables. However, the governing processes and recurrence intervals of geohazards are still poorly understood. Examples include, but are not limited to, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions along the active tectonic margins of the Mediterranean and Sea of Marmara, landslides on both active and passive margins, and tsunamites and seismites in the sedimentary record that suggest a long history of similar events. The development of geophysical networks, drilling, sampling and long-term monitoring are crucial to the understanding of earthquake, landslide, and tsunami processes, and to mitigate the associated risks in densely populated and industrialized regions such as Europe. Scientific drilling, particularly in the submarine setting, offers a unique tool to obtain drill core samples, borehole measurements and long-term observations. Hence, it is a critical technology to investigate past, present, and possible future influences of hazardous processes in this area. The

  4. Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

  5. Submarine Landslides at Santa Catalina Island, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M. R.; Francis, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Santa Catalina Island is an active tectonic block of volcanic and metamorphic rocks originally exposed during middle Miocene transtension along the evolving Pacific-North America transform plate boundary. Post-Miocene transpression created the existing large pop-up structure along the major strike-slip restraining bend of the Catalina fault that forms the southwest flank of the uplift. Prominent submerged marine terraces apparent in high-resolution bathymetric maps interrupt the steep submarine slopes in the upper ~400 meters subsea depths. Steep subaerial slopes of the island are covered by Quaternary landslides, especially at the sea cliffs and in the blueschist metamorphic rocks. The submarine slopes also show numerous landslides that range in area from a few hectares to more than three sq-km (300 hectares). Three or more landslides of recent origin exist between the nearshore and first submerged terrace along the north-facing shelf of the island's West End. One of these slides occurred during September 2005 when divers observed a remarkable change in the seafloor configuration after previous dives in the area. Near a sunken yacht at about 45-ft depth where the bottom had sloped gently into deeper water, a "sinkhole" had formed that dropped steeply to 100-ft or greater depths. Some bubbling sand was observed in the shallow water areas that may be related to the landslide process. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry acquired in 2008 by CSU Monterey Bay show this "fresh" slide and at least two other slides of varying age along the West End. The slides are each roughly 2 hectares in area and their debris aprons are spread across the first terrace at about 85-m water depth that is likely associated with the Last Glacial Maximum sealevel lowstand. Larger submarine slides exist along the steep Catalina and Catalina Ridge escarpments along the southwest flank of the island platform. A prominent slide block, exceeding 3 sq-km in area, appears to have slipped more than

  6. Induction of Fish Biomarkers by Synthetic-Based Drilling Muds

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marthe Monique; Bakhtyar, Sajida

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of chronic exposure of pink snapper (Pagrus auratus Forster), to synthetic based drilling muds (SBMs). Fish were exposed to three mud systems comprised of three different types of synthetic based fluids (SBFs): an ester (E), an isomerized olefin (IO) and linear alpha olefin (LAO). Condition factor (CF), liver somatic index (LSI), hepatic detoxification (EROD activity), biliary metabolites, DNA damage and stress proteins (HSP-70) were determined. Exposure to E caused biologically significant effects by increasing CF and LSI, and triggered biliary metabolite accumulation. While ester-based SBFs have a rapid biodegradation rate in the environment, they caused the most pronounced effects on fish health. IO induced EROD activity and biliary metabolites and LAO induced EROD activity and stress protein levels. The results demonstrate that while acute toxicity of SBMs is generally low, chronic exposure to weathering cutting piles has the potential to affect fish health. The study illustrates the advantages of the Western Australian government case-by-case approach to drilling fluid management, and highlights the importance of considering the receiving environment in the selection of SBMs. PMID:23894492

  7. Timing of occurrence of large submarine landslides on the Atlantic Ocean margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Submarine landslides are distributed unevenly both in space and time. Spatially, they occur most commonly in fjords, active river deltas, submarine canyon-fan systems, the open continental slope and on the flanks of oceanic volcanic islands. Temporally, they are influenced by the size, location, and sedimentology of migrating depocenters, changes in seafloor pressures and temperatures, variations in seismicity and volcanic activity, and changes in groundwater flow conditions. The dominant factor influencing the timing of submarine landslide occurrence is glaciation. A review of known ages of submarine landslides along the margins of the Atlantic Ocean, augmented by a few ages from other submarine locations shows a relatively even distribution of large landslides with time from the last glacial maximum until about five thousand years after the end of glaciation. During the past 5000??yr, the frequency of occurrence is less by a factor of 1.7 to 3.5 than during or shortly after the last glacial/deglaciation period. Such an association likely exists because of the formation of thick deposits of sediment on the upper continental slope during glacial periods and increased seismicity caused by isostatic readjustment during and following deglaciation. Hydrate dissociation may play a role, as suggested previously in the literature, but the connection is unclear.

  8. Tectonic control of Cretaceous gravity deposits and submarine Valleys in the subalpine basin, French western Alps

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, J.; Beaudoin, B.; Fries, G.; Parize, O.

    1988-08-01

    The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous series of the French subalpine basin is characterized by alternating limestones and marls with numerous, thick gravity-flow deposits (carbonate debris flows and slumps, siliciclastic grain flows, turbidites). These gravity deposits originate from platforms and slopes and come through the basin via several parallel canyons and submarine valleys. Some carbonate (Berriasian) and siliciclastic (Aptian) deep-sea fans are built at the canyon mouth during intense activity of the canyons and reworking of the sediments. The tectonic control of the gravity deposits is demonstrated by the position and filling of the submarine valleys all along the Cretaceous. The submarine valleys correspond systematically to the lower part of extensional tilted blocks; the gravity deposits come along the main syn-sedimentary normal faults delimiting these tilted blocks. The gravity deposits go from one tilted block to another through some synsedimentary passes which are induced by slight folding, perhaps related to an early diapirism at some nodes of extensional faults. The canyon-like valleys are due to very strong erosion when a submarine valley cuts of the higher part of a tilted block. The gravity deposits are stacked atop each other and progressively fill the valleys. Thus the cutting and filling of the submarine valleys and canyons on occasions during the Early Cretaceous are explained by a permanent synsedimentary activity. These Jurassic and Cretaceous extensional structures are later reactivated by inversion during Tertiary compressional movements.

  9. Diplomacy Through Earth Sciences: An Overview of US Geological Survey Technical Assistance Regarding the Ongoing LUSI Mud Eruption, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadevall, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2007, the US Department of State (DOS) requested assistance from the USGS to provide technical guidance and advice to the US Mission in Indonesia regarding the Lumpur Sidoarjo (LUSI) mud crisis. In May 2006, LUSI began as a mud eruption from a series of mud springs adjacent to an oil and gas exploration well being drilled near Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia. The production of mud and waters from the LUSI crater area has now continued for more than 3 years with no significant change in mud production rate (~110,000 cubic meters per day) nor in temperature of the mud (70-80 degrees C). Engineers suggest that mud production will continue at these rates for years to decades to come. Regardless of future activity at LUSI, the current mud accumulation of more than 100 million cubic meters poses a physical and environmental hazard which requires continuous monitoring and observation. The first response to the 2007 DOS request involved a site visit to Indonesia in September 2007. The result of that visit was to recommend to the Government of Indonesia (GOI) that they focus on long-term management of the mud rather than focus on the controversy as to the cause of the eruption or the debate about stopping the flow. Other recommendations from the initial 2007 technical visit included contracting for a US scientist to be co-located with engineers of the Sidoarjo Mud Management Board (BPLS) in Surabaya, East Java, to advise and consult on day-to-day developments at the site of the mud eruption. A second technical team visit by USGS scientists and an engineer from the US Army Corps of Engineers in October-November 2008 made additional recommendations on the long-term management of the mud and was followed in December by the start of a 6 month contract for the US mud adviser. From the start of activity in mid-2006 through late-2008, there was a clear sense of urgency at the US Mission in Indonesia to provide guidance and advice and included the personal intervention of

  10. Ancient sand-rich submarine fans: depositional systems, models, identification, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattern, F.

    2005-05-01

    Sand-rich submarine fans are radial or curved in plan view depending on the slope of the basin floor. They occur isolated or in coalescing systems. The fans' average lateral extent measures close to 25 km and their thickness usually less than 300 m. The thickness of outer fan sequences averages around 120 m and that of middle fan successions around 160 m. Rarely reported inner fan sequences have a maximum thickness of 80 m. The formation of sand-rich fans is closely related to tectonic activity. Their sediment is coarse-grained and compositionally immature as indicated by significant feldspar content due to close provenance and rapid transport by short rivers with a steep gradient controlled by tectonism. Tectonic activity also provides for narrow shelves making the fans relatively insensitive to sealevel changes. Formation of sand-rich fans typically occurs in restricted continental basins. The tectonic settings are highly variable. Sand-rich fans typically receive their sediment through submarine canyons which intercept sand from longshore drift and/or are fed more or less directly by regional rivers. The type of ancient fan system (radial, curved, isolated, coalescing) may be identified through paleocurrent map plots, facies map sketches, recognition of lateral thickness variations and sediment influx centers, as well as lateral bed correlations defining the minimum fan extent. Important in distinguishing different environments of ancient fans are detailed measured sections, their comparison and correlation. Channelized inner fan and middle fan deposits may be distinguished from the unchannelized outer fan successions through bed correlation tests which reflect their different stratigraphic architectures and bedding patterns. Bedding in outer fan deposits (lobes) is relatively simple, parallel, and regular. The lateral bed continuity is relatively high. Channel fills, especially those of middle fan distributary channels, display a complicated bedding pattern

  11. Submarine landslides in Society and Austral Islands, French Polynesia: Evolution with the age of the edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouard, V.; Bonneville, A.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents descriptions of numerous submarine landslides in French Polynesia. This inventory shows an evolution of the landslide type with the age of oceanic islands. Submarine active volcanoes are subject to superficial landslides of fragmental material whereas young islands exhibit marks of mass wasting corresponding to giant lateral collapses due to debris avalanche that occurred during the period of volcanic activity. Later, erosional processes generate sand-rubble flows and lead the islands to the stellate morphology known on atolls and guyots. In addition, Tupai atoll and Rurutu Island have been subject to giant slump that deeply modify their shape.

  12. Mathematical modelling of submarine landslide motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burminskij, A.

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical modelling of submarine landslide motion The paper presents a mathematical model to calculate dynamic parameters of a submarine landslide. The problem of estimation possible submarine landslides dynamic parameters and run-out distances as well as their effect on submarine structures becomes more and more actual because they can have significant impacts on infrastructure such as the rupture of submarine cables and pipelines, damage to offshore drilling platforms, cause a tsunami. In this paper a landslide is considered as a viscoplastic flow and is described by continuum mechanics equations, averaged over the flow depth. The model takes into account friction at the bottom and at the landslide-water boundary, as well as the involvement of bottom material in motion. A software was created and series of test calculations were performed. Calculations permitted to estimate the contribution of various model coefficients and initial conditions. Motion down inclined bottom was studied both for constant and variable slope angle. Examples of typical distributions of the flow velocity, thickness and density along the landslide body at different stages of motion are given.

  13. U-series dating of co-seismic gypsum and submarine paleoseismology of active faults in Northern Chile (23°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Gabriel; Palacios, Carlos; Reich, Martin; Luo, Shangde; Shen, Chuan-Chou; González, Gabriel; Wu, Yi-Chen

    2011-01-01

    The convergence of the Nazca and South American plates along the subduction margin of the central Andes results in large subduction earthquakes and tectonic activity along major fault systems. Despite its relevance, the paleoseismic record of this region is scarce, hampering our understanding about the relationship between the Andes building and earthquake occurrence. In this study, we used the U-series disequilibrium method to obtain absolute ages of paleoearthquake events associated with normal displacements along the active Mejillones and Salar del Carmen faults in the Coastal Range of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The 230Th- 234U disequilibrium ages in co-seismic gypsum salts sampled along the fault traces together with marine evidences indicate that earthquakes occurred at ca. 29.7 ± 1.7 ka, 11 ± 4 ka and 2.4 ± 0.8 ka. When coupled with paleoseismic marine and radiocarbon ( 14C) records in the nearby Mejillones Bay evidencing large dislocations along the Mejillones Fault, the geochronological dataset presented here is consistent with the notion that gypsum salts formed during large earthquakes as a result of co-seismic dilatancy pumping of saline waters along the major faults. Based on maximum observed cumulative vertical offsets in the studied faults, this phenomena could have occurred episodically at a rate in the order of 1:40 to 1:50 with respect to the very large subduction earthquakes during the latest Pleistocene-Holocene period. The results presented here reveal that the U-series disequilibrium method can be successfully applied to date the gypsum salts deposited along faults during seismic events, and therefore directly constrain the age of large paleoearthquakes in hyperarid and seismically active zones.

  14. Carbonate apron models: Alternatives to the submarine fan model for paleoenvironmental analysis and hydrocarbon exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, H.T.; Cook, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Sediment gravity flow deposition along the deep-water flanks of carbonate platforms typically does not produce submarine fans. Rather, wedge-shaped carbonate aprons develop parallel to the adjacent shelf/slope break. The major difference between submarine fans and carbonate aprons is a point source with channelized sedimentation on fans, versus a line source with sheet-flow sedimentation on aprons. Two types of carbonate aprons may develop. Along relatively gentle (< 4??) platform-margin slopes, aprons form immediately adjacent to the shallow-water platform and are referred to as carbonate slope aprons. Along relatively steep (4-15??) platform margin slopes, redeposited limestones accumulate in a base-of-slope setting, by-passing an upper slope via a multitude of small submarine canyons, and are referred to as carbonate base-of-slope aprons. Both apron types are further subdivided into inner and outer facies belts. Inner apron sediments consist of thick, mud-supported conglomerates and megabreccias (Facies F) as well as thick, coarse-grained turbidites (Facies A) interbedded with subordinate amounts of fine-grained, peri-platform ooze (Facies G). Outer apron sediments consist of thinner, grain-supported conglomerates and turbidites (Facies A) as well as classical turbidites (Facies C) with recognizable Bouma divisions, interbedded with approximately equal proportions of peri-platform ooze (Facies G). Seaward, aprons grade laterally into basinal facies of thin, base-cut-out carbonate turbidites (Facies D) that are subordinate to peri-platform oozes (Facies G). Carbonate base-of-slope aprons grade shelfward into an upper slope facies of fine-grained peri-platform ooze (Facies G) cut by numerous small canyons that are filled with coarse debris, as well as intraformational truncation surfaces which result from submarine sliding. In contrast, slope aprons grade shelfward immediately into shoal-water, platform-margin facies without an intervening by-pass slope. The two

  15. Submarine Ground Water Discharge and Fate Along the Coast of Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Hawai'i:Part 2, Spatial and Temporal Variations in Salinity, Radium-Isotope Activity, and Nutrient Concentrations in Coastal Waters, December 2003-April 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knee, Karen; Street, Joseph; Grossman, Eric E.; Paytan, Adina

    2008-01-01

    The aquatic resources of Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, including rocky shoreline, fishponds, and anchialine pools, provide habitat to numerous plant and animal species and offer recreational opportunities to local residents and tourists. A considerable amount of submarine groundwater discharge was known to occur in the park, and this discharge was suspected to influence the park's water quality. Thus, the goal of this study was to characterize spatial and temporal variations in the quality and quantity of groundwater discharge in the park. Samples were collected in December 2003, November 2005, and April 2006 from the coastal ocean, beach pits, three park observation wells, anchialine pools, fishponds, and Honokohau Harbor. The activities of two Ra isotopes commonly used as natural ground-water tracers (223Ra and 224Ra), salinity, and nutrient concentrations were measured. Fresh ground water composed a significant proportion (8-47 volume percent) of coastal-ocean water. This percentage varied widely between study sites, indicating significant spatial variation in submarine groundwater discharge at small (meter to kilometer) scales. Nitrate + nitrite, phosphate, and silica concentrations were significantly higher in nearshore coastal-ocean samples relative to samples collected 1 km or more offshore, and linear regression showed that most of this difference was due to fresh ground-water discharge. High-Ra-isotope-activity, higher-salinity springs were a secondary source of nutrients, particularly phosphate, at Honokohau Harbor and Aiopio Fishtrap. Salinity, Ra-isotope activity, and nutrient concentrations appeared to vary in response to the daily tidal cycle, although little seasonal variation was observed, indicating that submarine ground-water discharge may buffer the park's water quality against the severe seasonal changes that would occur in a system where freshwater inputs were dominated by rivers and runoff. Ra-isotope-activity ratios indicated

  16. 35. INTERIOR VIEW OF EQUIPMENT HOUSE, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. INTERIOR VIEW OF EQUIPMENT HOUSE, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, PRIOR TO ENLARGEMENT OF ROOM AND INSTALLATION OF TRIPLE-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER IN 1957 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  17. 36. VIEW OF CUPOLA, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ROVING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW OF CUPOLA, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ROVING RESCUE BELL SUSPENDED ABOVE TANK, WITH TWO-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER AT REAR, LOOKING WEST. Photo taken after installation of recompression chamber in 1956. - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  18. Reducing Unsteady Loads on a Piggyback Miniature Submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John

    2009-01-01

    A small, simple fixture has been found to be highly effective in reducing destructive unsteady hydrodynamic loads on a miniature submarine that is attached in piggyback fashion to the top of a larger, nuclear-powered, host submarine. The fixture, denoted compact ramp, can be installed with minimal structural modification, and the use of it does not entail any change in submarine operations.

  19. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light. Submarines may display, as a distinctive means of identification, an intermittent flashing amber beacon...

  20. 31. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ELEVATOR AND PASSAGEWAYS TO THE 18- AND 50-FOOT LOCKS AND CUPOLA 1932 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  1. An experimental approach to submarine canyon evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Steven Y. J.; Gerber, Thomas P.; Amblas, David

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a sandbox experiment designed to investigate how sediment gravity flows form and shape submarine canyons. In the experiment, unconfined saline gravity flows were released onto an inclined sand bed bounded on the downstream end by a movable floor that was used to increase relief during the experiment. In areas unaffected by the flows, we observed featureless, angle-of-repose submarine slopes formed by retrogressive breaching processes. In contrast, areas influenced by gravity flows cascading across the shelf break were deeply incised by submarine canyons with well-developed channel networks. Normalized canyon long profiles extracted from successive high-resolution digital elevation models collapse to a single profile when referenced to the migrating shelf-slope break, indicating self-similar growth in the relief defined by the canyon and intercanyon profiles. Although our experimental approach is simple, the resulting canyon morphology and behavior appear similar in several important respects to that observed in the field.

  2. Methane and radioactive isotopes in submarine hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: 1) methane and 2) radioactive isotopes, especially radon, in submarine hydrothermal systems. Both parts deal with the use of these gases as tracers for mapping hydrothermal vents at sea, and with their relationships to other sensitive tracers such as helium, manganese, and temperature. Hydrothermal methane was used as a real-time tracer for locating new submarine hydrothermal systems along spreading axes, discovering new hydrothermal systems at two locations in Pacific Ocean: 1) 20/sup 0/S on East Pacific Rise, and 2) Mariana Trough Back-arc Basin. Methane shows good correlations with helium-3 and temperature with similar ratios in various hydrothermal systems, 3 to 42 x 10/sup 6/ for the methane to helium-3 ratio, and 3 to 19 ..mu.. cc/kg/sup 0/C for the methane to temperature anomaly. These similar ratios from different areas provide evidence for chemical homogeneity of submarine hydrothermal waters. A good correlation between methane and manganese appears to be associated only with high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Radioisotopes in the vent waters of 21/sup 0/N high-temperature hydrothermal system have end-member concentrations of 7.5 to 40 dpm/kg for Ra-226, 360 dpm/kg for Rn 222, 62 dpm/kg for Pb-210, and 19 dpm/kg for Po-210. The radon activity for this system is one order of magnitude lower, and the Pb-210 activity is one order or magnitude higher, than those a the low temperature Galapagos system. All these observations suggest that the high radon, and low Pb-210 activity observed in Galapagos system may originate from the extensive subsurface mixing and water-rock interaction in this system (direct injection of radon and scavenging of Pb-210).

  3. Underground structure of terrestrial mud volcanoes and abnormal water pressure formation in Niigata, Central JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Shinya, T.; Miyata, Y.; Tokuyasu, S.

    2005-12-01

    Activity of mud volcano is thought to be caused by an abnormal water pressure generated in deep underground and make a serious problem for underground constructions such as railway tunnel, underground facility for radwaste and so on. It is important to investigate the underground structure of a mud volcano and the mechanism of abnormal water formation for site selection and safety assessment of such facilities. Serious trouble such as tunnel wall collapse due to the rock swelling has happened 180m deep under mud volcanoes. It took more than 10 years to excavate the section of 150 m long. 4 terrestrial mud volcanoes were found in the Tertiary sedimentary basin in Niigata, central Japan All the mud volcanoes are distributed along the rim of the topographic basin that is located at the NE-SW trending crest of mountainous area and distributed along the wing of anticline. Geological structure inside basin is heavily disturbed. The extinct mud volcano is exposed in the side-slope of newly constructed road and the internal vent structure of mud volcano can be observed. The vent is 30 m in diameter and is consisted of mud breccia and scaly network clay that is thought to be generated by hydro-fracturing and the following water-rock interaction between mudstone and groundwater. Groundwater erupted from mud volcano is highly saline with electric conductivity of 15 mS/cm and high 18 O/16 O isotope ratio of 1.2 parmillage. Also, the vitrinite reflectance is 1.5 to 1.9 % that is not expected in the sedimentary rocks exposed near ground surface. As a result, it is assumed that these erupted materials were introduced from the deep underground about 4000 m deep. CSA-MT geophysical exploration was carried out to survey the underground structure and obtained the profile of electrical resistivity from the surface to 800 m in depth. It is found that the disk-shaped low resistivity zone less than 1 m due to the high salinity content is identified in underground 600 m deep, 200 m thick

  4. Zebra mussels invade Lake Erie muds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkman, Paul Arthur; Haltuch, Melissa A.; Tichich, Emily; Garton, David W.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Gannon, John E.; Mackey, Scudder D.; Fuller, Jonathan A.; Liebenthal, Dale L.

    1998-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) originated in western Russia but have now become widespread in Europe and North America. They are widely known for their conspicuous invasion of rocks and other hard substrates in North American and European watersheds. We have found beds of zebra mussels directly colonizing sand and mud sediments each year across hundreds of square kilometres of North America's Lake Erie. This transformation of sedimentary habitats into mussel beds represents an unforeseen change in the invasive capacity of this species.

  5. Hidden values in bauxite residue (red mud): recovery of metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Bauxite residue (red mud) is a hazardous waste generated from alumina refining industries. Unless managed properly, red mud poses significant risks to the local environment due to its extreme alkalinity and its potential impacts on surface and ground water quality. The ever-increasing generation of red mud poses significant challenges to the aluminium industries from management perspectives given the low proportion that are currently being utilized beneficially. Red mud, in most cases, contains elevated concentrations of iron in addition to aluminium, titanium, sodium and valuable rare earth elements. Given the scarcity of iron supply globally, the iron content of red mud has attracted increasing research interest. This paper presents a critical overview of the current techniques employed for iron recovery from red mud. Information on the recovery of other valuable metals is also reviewed to provide an insight into the full potential usage of red mud as an economic resource rather than a waste. Traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy are being investigated continuously. However, in this review several new techniques are introduced that consider the process of iron recovery from red mud. An integrated process which can achieve multiple additional values from red mud is much preferred over the single process methods. The information provided here should help to improve the future management and utilization of red mud. PMID:25269817

  6. Shallow submarine hydrothermal activity with significant contribution of magmatic water producing talc chimneys in the Wakamiko Crater of Kagoshima Bay, southern Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Maeto, Kotaro; Akashi, Hironori; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Miyoshi, Youko; Okamura, Kei; Noguchi, Takuroh; Kuwahara, Yoshihiro; Toki, Tomohiro; Tsunogai, Urumu; Ura, Tamaki; Nakatani, Takeshi; Maki, Toshihiro; Kubokawa, Kaoru; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    Active hydrothermal venting from shallow seafloor (200-m depth) with talc chimneys has been discovered at the Wakamiko Crater floor in the Aira Caldera, southern Kyushu, Japan. The major chemical composition of the fluids suggests that the fluids are supplied from a single reservoir. The fluid is characterized by a low chloride concentration, low δD value, and a high δ18O value, suggesting that the endmember hydrothermal fluid is a mixture of seawater and andesitic water and possibly contribution of meteoric water and/or phase separation. Such noticeable magmatic input may be supported by high helium isotopic ratio (6.77 RA) of fumarolic gas discharging from the crater. Silica and alkaline geothermometers indicate that the fluid-rock interaction in the reservoir occurs in the temperature range of 230 to 250 °C. The high alkalinity and high ammonium and dissolved organic matter concentrations in the fluid indicate interaction of the fluid with organic matter in sedimentary layers. At least three hydrothermal vents have been observed in the crater. Two of these have similar cone-shaped chimneys. The chimneys have a unique mineralogy and consist dominantly of talc (kerolite and hydrated talc) with lesser amounts of carbonate (dolomite and magnesite), anhydrite, amorphous silica, and stibnite. The precipitation temperature estimated from δ18O values of talc was almost consistent with the observed fluid temperature. Geochemical modeling calculations also support the formation of talc and carbonate upon mixing of the endmember hydrothermal fluid with seawater and suggest that the talc chimneys are currently growing from venting fluid.

  7. Primary porosity and submarine diagenesis in Lower Cretaceous Coral-Rudist reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.L.; Lighty, R.G.

    1986-05-01

    Coral-rudist reefs of the Lower Cretaceous Mural limestone, southeastern Arizona, show a pronounced relationship between specific reef facies, primary porosity, and early submarine diagenesis. These large open-shelf reefs differ from the well-studied low-relief rudist buildups, and provide an alternate analog for many Cretaceous reef reservoirs. Arizona buildups have diverse corals, high depositional relief, and a well-developed facies zonation from fore reef to back reef: skeletal grainstone talus, muddy fore reef with branching and lamellar corals, massive reef crest with abundant lamellar corals and sandy matrix, protected thickets of delicate branching corals and large rudist mounds, and a wide sediment apron of well-washed coral, rudist, and benthic foraminiferal sands. These well-exposed outcrops permit a detailed facies comparison of primary interparticle porosity. Porosity as high as 40% in grainstones was occluded by later subsurface cements. Reef-framework interparticle porosity was negligible because fore-reef coral and back-reef rudist facies were infilled by muds, and high-energy reef-crest frameworks were filled by peloidal submarine cement crusts and muddy skeletal sands. These thick crusts coated lamellar corals in cryptic and open reef-crest areas, and are laminated with ripple and draped bed forms that suggest current influence. Similar peloidal crusts and laminated textures are common magnesium-calcite submarine cement features in modern reefs. By documenting specific facies control on early cementation and textural variability, patterns of late-stage subsurface diagenesis and secondary porosity may be more easily explained for Cretaceous reef reservoirs. Significant primary porosity might be retained between sands in back-reef facies and within coral skeletons.

  8. Morphology of a submarine slide, Kitimat Arm, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, David B.; Bornhold, Brian D.; Coleman, James M.; Bryant, William R.

    1982-11-01

    A digitally acquired, scale-corrected side-scan sonar survey yielded high-resolution imagery of a submarine landslide in British Columbia. The landslide, in a fjord-head setting at Kitimat, was last active in 1975 and created a wide area of deformed sea floor. The sediment failure involved shallow rotational movements on the slopes of a fjord-head delta, marginal tearing, translational sliding, compressional folding, and block gliding of fjord-bottom marine clays. The slide is shallow and elongate and appears to have been produced by failure in mobile, low-strength sediments.

  9. Submarine Explosive Eruptions: Physical Volcanology of NW Rota-1, Marianas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deardorff, N. D.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; Cashman, K. V.

    2006-12-01

    The discovery of an actively erupting submarine arc volcano is a scientific breakthrough that greatly extends our understanding of submarine volcanism. NW Rota-1, located at 14¢X40'N in the Mariana volcanic arc, is a conical basaltic andesite volcano with a summit at 517 m b.s.l, a base at 2700 m, and a diameter of 16- km. In April 2006, on the most recent cruise of the "Submarine Ring of Fire" (SROF) expeditions, violently explosive submarine eruptions were observed and sampled at the active vent, Brimstone Pit (550 m depth), through the use of JASON II remotely operated vehicle (ROV). During six dives repeated observations made at close range over a week documented a diverse and increasingly energetic range of activity that culminated in explosive bursts of glowing red lava propelled by violently expanding gases. Preliminary work shows erupted clasts to vary greatly in density (vesicularity) and crystallinity. Densities of representative larger clasts are moderately high (1700-1900 kg/m3, or ~ 30-40% vesicularity assuming a solid density of 2800 kg/m3; Fig 5b), although the more vigorous activity clearly produced some lower density (< 1000 kg/m3;> 66% vesicularity) material. Grain sizes were measured in 1.0 intervals from -5 to 3 using dry sieving techniques. The grain size distribution is approximately log normal with a mode at -1 (2 mm). Clast morphology consists of three components: (1) very glassy juveniles ranging from light to dark brown (sideromelane), often fluidal and irregularly shaped with obvious vesicle stretching, (2) phenocryst-rich blocky juveniles ranging from dark brown to black (tachylite), (3) non-juvenile lithics are equant, often rounded, ranging from light grey to dark grey and are often coated with altered material. Initial FTIR analyses show a lack of CO2 and a range of H20 from 0.3-1.15wt%, with the average approximately in equilibrium for 550 m water depth. The high vesicularity of the samples collected directly from Brimstone Pit and

  10. A model for the submarine depthkeeping team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, J. R.; Best, J. F.; Bozzi, P. J.; Kleinman, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The most difficult task the depthkeeping team must face occurs during periscope-depth operations during which they may be required to maintain a submarine several hundred feet long within a foot of ordered depth and within one-half degree of ordered pitch. The difficulty is compounded by the facts that wave generated forces are extremely high, depth and pitch signals are very noisy and submarine speed is such that overall dynamics are slow. A mathematical simulation of the depthkeeping team based on the optimal control models is described. A solution of the optimal team control problem with an output control restriction (limited display to each controller) is presented.

  11. Transporting submarine engines to power the PRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The city of Hampton was unable to supply adequate electric power to operate the PRT. Navy Captain Walter S. Diehl, Bureau of Aeronautics, acquired two 1000 hp submarine engines which were to be disposed of. BuAer 'loaned' the engines to the NACA, one of which is shown here. Next to the engine is Donald H. Wood, a mechanical engineer from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Fred Weick's assistant. Propeller Research Tunnel (PRT) engineer Donald H. Wood ponders the unlikely transfer of a submarine engine from rail car to NACA truck, May 1926. Two such diesel engines powered the PRT.

  12. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of hydrothermal alteration processes in the active, submarine, felsic-hosted PACMANUS field, Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackschewitz, K. S.; Devey, C. W.; Stoffers, P.; Botz, R.; Eisenhauer, A.; Kummetz, M.; Schmidt, M.; Singer, A.

    2004-11-01

    During ODP Leg 193, 4 sites were drilled in the active PACMANUS hydrothermal field on the crest of the felsic Pual Ridge to examine the vertical and lateral variations in mineralization and alteration patterns. We present new data on clay mineral assemblages, clay and whole rock chemistry and clay mineral strontium and oxygen isotopic compositions of altered rocks from a site of diffuse low-temperature venting (Snowcap, Site 1188) and a site of high-temperature venting (Roman Ruins, Site 1189) in order to investigate the water-rock reactions and associated elemental exchanges. The volcanic succession at Snowcap has been hydrothermally altered, producing five alteration zones: (1) chlorite ± illite-cristobalite-plagioclase alteration apparently overprinted locally by pyrophyllite bleaching at temperatures of 260-310°C; (2) chlorite ± mixed-layer clay alteration at temperatures of 230°C; (3) chlorite and illite alteration; (4) illite and chlorite ± illite mixed-layer alteration at temperatures of 250-260°C; and (5) illite ± chlorite alteration at 290-300°C. Felsic rocks recovered from two holes (1189A and 1189B) at Roman Ruins, although very close together, show differing alteration features. Hole 1189A is characterized by a uniform chlorite-illite alteration formed at ˜250°C, overprinted by quartz veining at 350°C. In contrast, four alteration zones occur in Hole 1189B: (1) illite ± chlorite alteration formed at ˜300°C; (2) chlorite ± illite alteration at 235°C; (3) chlorite ± illite and mixed layer clay alteration; and (4) chlorite ± illite alteration at 220°C. Mass balance calculations indicate that the chloritization, illitization and bleaching (silica-pyrophyllite assemblages) alteration stages are accompanied by different chemical changes relative to a calculated pristine precursor lava. The element Cr appears to have a general enrichment in the altered samples from PACMANUS. The clay concentrate data show that Cr and Cu are predominantly

  13. Origin of lipid biomarkers in mud volcanoes from the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rodríguez, C.; Stadnitskaia, A.; De Lange, G. J.; Martínez-Ruíz, F.; Comas, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2013-11-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) are the most prominent indicators of active methane/hydrocarbon venting at the seafloor on both passive and active continental margins. Their occurrence in the Western Mediterranean is patent at the West Alboran Basin, where numerous MVs develop overlaying a major sedimentary depocenter containing overpressured shales. Although some of these MVs have been studied, the detailed biogeochemistry of expelled mud so far has not been examined in detail. This work provides the first results on the composition and origin of organic matter, Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) processes and general characteristics on MV dynamics using lipid biomarkers as the main tool. Lipid biomarker analysis was performed on MV expelled material (mud breccias) and interbedded hemipelagic sediments from Perejil, Kalinin and Schneider's Heart MVs located in the northwest margin of the Alboran Sea. The n-alkane-distributions and n-alkane-derived indices (CPI and ACL), in combination with the epimerization degree of hopanes (22S/(22S + 22R)) indicate that all studied mud breccia have a similar biomarker composition consisting of mainly thermally immature organic matter with an admixture of petroleum-derived compounds. This concordant composition indicates that common source strata must feed all three studied MVs. The past or present AOM activity was established using lipid biomarkers specific for anaerobic methanotropic archaea (irregular isoprenoids and DGDs) and the depleted carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of crocetane/phytane. The presence of these lipid biomarkers, together with the low amounts of detected GDGTs, is consistent with the dominance of anaerobic methanotrophs of the ANME-2 over ANME-1, at least in mud breccia from Perejil MVs. In contrast, the scarce presence or lack of these AOM-related lipid biomarkers in sediments from Kalinin and Schneider's Heart MVs, suggest no recent active methane seepage has occurred at these sites. Moreover, the observed

  14. Evaluation of older bay mud sediment from Richmond Harbor, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-09-01

    The older, bay mud (OBM) unit predates modem man and could act as a barrier to the downward transport of contaminants from the younger bay mud (YBM) because of its hard-packed consistency. However, its chemical and biological nature have not been well characterized. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted three independent studies of OBM sediment in January 1993, January 1994, and October 1994. These studies evaluated potential chemical contamination and biological effects of OBM that could occur as a result of dredging and disposal activities. These evaluations were performed by conducting chemical analysis, solid-phase toxicity tests, suspended- particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests on the OBM sediment. If the sediment chemistry and toxicity results showed no or minimal contamination and toxicological responses, then either the OBM could be left exposed in Richmond Harbor after dredging the YBM without leaving a source of contamination, or if the project depths necessitate, the OBM would be acceptable for disposal at an appropriate disposal site.

  15. Time series analysis of discolored seawater reflectance observed by Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) at Fukutoku-Okonaba submarine volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring submarine volcanoes is not an easy task compared to land volcanoes because they are covered by seawater and located in remote areas. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool for monitoring underwater volcanic activities such as discolored seawater, floating material and volcanic plumes. Discolored seawater is a good indicator of submarine volcanic activities. Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) made extensive observations from 2006 to 2011 of the Fukutoku-Okanoba submarine volcano, which is located 1300 km south of Tokyo, and is one of the most active submarine volcanoes in Japan. The high discolored seawater brightness coincides with relatively high activity of Fukutoku-Okanoba. No discolored seawater was observed for 6 months before the 2010 Fukutoku-Okanoba submarine eruption, meaning that Fukutoku-Okanoba was quiescent before the eruption. Both high brightness and apparent color change of discolored seawater derived from AVNIR-2 mean emergence of large amount of hot spring water, implying that the submarine volcano is highly active. This study demonstrates that satellite remote sensing is an effective tool for monitoring activities of inaccessible submarine volcanoes.

  16. NASA/Navy Benchmarking Exchange (NNBE). Volume 1. Interim Report. Navy Submarine Program Safety Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Navy Benchmarking Exchange (NNBE) was undertaken to identify practices and procedures and to share lessons learned in the Navy's submarine and NASA's human space flight programs. The NNBE focus is on safety and mission assurance policies, processes, accountability, and control measures. This report is an interim summary of activity conducted through October 2002, and it coincides with completion of the first phase of a two-phase fact-finding effort.In August 2002, a team was formed, co-chaired by senior representatives from the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the NAVSEA 92Q Submarine Safety and Quality Assurance Division. The team closely examined the two elements of submarine safety (SUBSAFE) certification: (1) new design/construction (initial certification) and (2) maintenance and modernization (sustaining certification), with a focus on: (1) Management and Organization, (2) Safety Requirements (technical and administrative), (3) Implementation Processes, (4) Compliance Verification Processes, and (5) Certification Processes.

  17. Origin of fluids and eruption dynamics at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Hartnett, H. E.; Clarke, A. B.; Burton, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The LUSI mud volcano near Sidoarjo in East Java (Indonesia) has been erupting mud, water and gases since May 2006. It is the most recent manifestation of mud volcanism in the Sunda back-arc region, part of a larger cluster of a dozen mud volcanoes scattered across East Java and Madura. LUSI discharged as much as 180,000 cubic meters of mud per day at the peak of its activity, destroyed thousands of homes, and displaced tens of thousands of people. The erupted fluids are a mixture of water, clays, and other minerals at near-boiling temperatures, accompanied by the bursting of gas bubbles on average every 1-3 minutes, which trigger mud fountains ~20 m in height. We have taken a multi-disciplinary approach to assess both the fluid provenance and eruption behavior at this complex and evolving mud volcano, by using a combination of absorption infrared spectrometry of the gases, X-Ray diffraction of the solid fraction, major and trace element analyses of solids and dissolved ions in liquids, and isotopic analyses of separated water (D/H and 87Sr/86Sr). Similar analyses of other regional fluid sources (hot springs, surface waters, sea water, and relict mud volcanoes) were also carried out for comparison. From open path FTIR measurements, we determine that the gases released during explosions at LUSI consist of 98% water vapor, 1.5% carbon dioxide, and 0.5% methane, with corresponding fluxes of 2,300 t/yr of CH4, 30,000 t/yr of CO2 and 800,000 t/yr of water vapor. The methane flux is two orders of magnitude larger than estimates for any other single mud volcano on Earth. By comparing the mineral composition of solids present in the mud to rock outcrops of the local stratigraphy, the solids can be traced with some certainty to the blue-gray clays of the Upper Kalibeng formation, found 1600-1800 m beneath the LUSI main vent. However, the water content and chemical composition of the liquid phase are more difficult to interpret. The LUSI fluids are compositionally distinct

  18. Long-term flow monitoring of submarine gas emanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, K.; Faber, E.; Poggenburg, J.; Seeger, C.

    2009-04-01

    One of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study is the sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is the possibility of leaks from the reservoirs. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. Technically, however, these systems are not limited to CO2 but can be used for monitoring of any free gas emission (bubbles) on the seafloor. The basic design of the gas flow sensor system was derived from former prototypes developed for monitoring CO2 and CH4 on mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan. This design was composed of a raft floating on the surface above the gas vent to collect the bubbles. Sensors for CO2 flux and concentration and electronics for data storage and transmission were mounted on the raft, together with battery-buffered solar panels for power supply. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, which is then guided above water level through a flexible tube. Besides some technical problems (condensed water in the tube, movement of the buoys due to waves leading to biased measurement of flow rates), this setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. To allow unattended long-term monitoring in a submarine environment, such a system has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system

  19. Raman tomography of Himalayan-derived muds (Bengal Shelf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borromeo, Laura; Andò, Sergio; Aliatis, Irene; France-Lanord, Christian; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Raman mineral analysis (RaMAn) is an innovative, efficient and user-friendly technique representing the ideal tool to perform provenance analysis of silt-sized sediments, which represent most of the sediment flux in river systems and the predominant grain size in large deltas and submarine fans (Andò et al., 2011). RaMAn allows in fact the reliable recognition of detrital grains down to 5 μm in size. The Ganga-Brahmaputra estuary in Bangladesh represents the largest single entry point of detritus in the world oceans. Between 1 and 2 billion tons of sediment each year has been reaching the Bengal Sea during most of the Neogene, feeding the world largest submarine fan (Goodbred and Kuehl, 2000; Galy and France-Lanord 2001). In order to detect the compositional differences between the fluvial environment (Garzanti et al., 2010; 2011) and the deep sea (Thompson, 1974; Yokohama et al., 1990) as well as the mineralogical variability associated with hydrodynamic sorting in the delta plain and proximal shelf, we have determined the mineralogical composition of largely Himalayan-derived muds deposited on the Bengal Shelf. Mineralogical analyses were carried out separately for four grain-size classes of 4 samples: (5-10 μm, 10-15 μm, 15-32 μm, >32 μm). Each class was separated into low-density (<2.90 g/cm3) and high-density fraction (>2.90 g/cm3) by centrifuging in sodium polytungstate and recovered by partial freezing with liquid nitrogen. Accurate quantitative mineralogical data were obtained by identifying at least 100 grains on each slide. RaMAn resulted to be essential for confident mineral identification, and helped us to reveal the nature of altered and opaque grains that cannot be identified under the optical microscope. Andò S.,Vignola P., Garzanti E., (2011). Raman counting: a new method to determine provenance of silt. Rendiconti Lincei, 22, Issue 4, pp 327-347; Galy A., France-Lanord C., (2001), Higher erosion rates in the Himalaya geochemical constraints

  20. Influence of dust and mud on the optical, chemical, and mechanical properties of a pv protective glass

    PubMed Central

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami.; Ali, Haider; Khaled, Mazen M.; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Abu-Dheir, Numan; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in climate change have increased the frequency of dust storms in the Middle East. Dust storms significantly influence the performances of solar energy harvesting systems, particularly (photovoltaic) PV systems. The characteristics of the dust and the mud formed from this dust are examined using various analytical tools, including optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies, X-ray diffraction, energy spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adhesion, cohesion and frictional forces present during the removal of dry mud from the glass surface are determined using a microtribometer. Alkali and alkaline earth metal compounds in the dust dissolve in water to form a chemically active solution at the glass surface. This solution modifies the texture of the glass surface, thereby increasing the microhardness and decreasing the transmittance of the incident optical radiation. The force required to remove the dry mud from the glass surface is high due to the cohesive forces that result from the dried mud solution at the interface between the mud and the glass. The ability altering the characteristics of the glass surface could address the dust/mud-related limitations of protective surfaces and has implications for efficiency enhancements in solar energy systems. PMID:26514102

  1. Influence of dust and mud on the optical, chemical, and mechanical properties of a pv protective glass.

    PubMed

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Ali, Haider; Khaled, Mazen M; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Abu-Dheir, Numan; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in climate change have increased the frequency of dust storms in the Middle East. Dust storms significantly influence the performances of solar energy harvesting systems, particularly (photovoltaic) PV systems. The characteristics of the dust and the mud formed from this dust are examined using various analytical tools, including optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies, X-ray diffraction, energy spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adhesion, cohesion and frictional forces present during the removal of dry mud from the glass surface are determined using a microtribometer. Alkali and alkaline earth metal compounds in the dust dissolve in water to form a chemically active solution at the glass surface. This solution modifies the texture of the glass surface, thereby increasing the microhardness and decreasing the transmittance of the incident optical radiation. The force required to remove the dry mud from the glass surface is high due to the cohesive forces that result from the dried mud solution at the interface between the mud and the glass. The ability altering the characteristics of the glass surface could address the dust/mud-related limitations of protective surfaces and has implications for efficiency enhancements in solar energy systems. PMID:26514102

  2. Influence of dust and mud on the optical, chemical, and mechanical properties of a pv protective glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami.; Ali, Haider; Khaled, Mazen M.; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Abu-Dheir, Numan; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-10-01

    Recent developments in climate change have increased the frequency of dust storms in the Middle East. Dust storms significantly influence the performances of solar energy harvesting systems, particularly (photovoltaic) PV systems. The characteristics of the dust and the mud formed from this dust are examined using various analytical tools, including optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies, X-ray diffraction, energy spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adhesion, cohesion and frictional forces present during the removal of dry mud from the glass surface are determined using a microtribometer. Alkali and alkaline earth metal compounds in the dust dissolve in water to form a chemically active solution at the glass surface. This solution modifies the texture of the glass surface, thereby increasing the microhardness and decreasing the transmittance of the incident optical radiation. The force required to remove the dry mud from the glass surface is high due to the cohesive forces that result from the dried mud solution at the interface between the mud and the glass. The ability altering the characteristics of the glass surface could address the dust/mud-related limitations of protective surfaces and has implications for efficiency enhancements in solar energy systems.

  3. Mud handling improved with a constant-volume riser

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.J. )

    1990-09-24

    Marine risers currently deployed by floating drilling units incorporate a telescopic joint to accommodate vessel movement, primarily heave. This vertical telescopic movement changes the internal volume of the riser and causes fluctuations in the return-mud flow rate. Flow fluctuations make accurate measurement of the return mud difficult. The significance is that these measurements are vital for the early detection of well bore influx or downhole mud losses. Erratic mud flow also adversely affects the efficiency of the solids-removal equipment and potentially increases the risk of discharging whole mud to the environment. To overcome these adverse effects, a design for a telescopic joint is proposed (constant volume riser or CVR) in which the internal riser volume remains constant, irrespective of movement, thus permitting a uniform flow rate of mud returns.

  4. Modifying alumina red mud to support a revegetation cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xenidis, A.; Harokopou, A. D.; Mylona, E.; Brofas, G.

    2005-02-01

    Alumina red mud, a fine-textured, iron-rich, alkaline residue, is the major waste product of bauxite digestion with caustic soda to remove alumina. The high alkalinity and salinity as well as the poor nutrient status are considered to be the major constraints of red mud revegetation. This research was conducted to evaluate the ameliorating effect of gypsum, sewage sludge, ferrous sulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and calcium phosphate on alumina red mud. The effectiveness of the mixtures was evaluated by applying extraction tests and performing experiments using six plant species. Gypsum amendment significantly reduced the pH, electrical conductivity, and sodium and aluminum content of red mud. Sewage sludge application had an extended effect in improving both the soil structure and the nutrient status of the gypsum-amended red mud. Together with the gypsum and sewage sludge, calcium phosphate application into red mud enhanced plant growth and gave the most promising results.

  5. Calcification-carbonation method for red mud processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Lv, Guozhi; Xie, Liqun

    2016-10-01

    Red mud, the Bayer process residue, is generated from alumina industry and causes environmental problem. In this paper, a novel calcification-carbonation method that utilized a large amount of the Bayer process residue is proposed. Using this method, the red mud was calcified with lime to transform the silicon phase into hydrogarnet, and the alkali in red mud was recovered. Then, the resulting hydrogarnet was decomposed by CO2 carbonation, affording calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, and aluminum hydroxide. Alumina was recovered using an alkaline solution at a low temperature. The effects of the new process were analyzed by thermodynamics analysis and experiments. The extraction efficiency of the alumina and soda obtained from the red mud reached 49.4% and 96.8%, respectively. The new red mud with <0.3% alkali can be used in cement production. Using a combination of this method and cement production, the Bayer process red mud can be completely utilized. PMID:27214002

  6. Deposystem architectures and lithofacies of a submarine fan-dominated deep sea succession in an orogen: A case study from the Upper Triassic Langjiexue Group of southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chaokai; Li, Xianghui; Mattern, Frank; Mao, Guozheng; Zeng, Qinggao; Xu, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Over thirty stratigraphic sections of the Himalaya orogen Upper Triassic Langjiexue Group in southern Tibet, China, were studied to interpret the environments and lithofacies. The facies associations channel (A), lobe (B), levee-interchannel (C), and basin plain (D) with nine facies (A1-3, B1-3, and C1-3) were distinguished. They form six architectural elements: channel-interchannel, overbank-levee, crevasse-splay, outer fan-lobe, fan-fringe, and basin plain. Taking into account the facies analysis, (sub-) deposystem correlation, paleocurrent dispersal pattern, and restoration of primary stratal width, the Langjiexue Group displays the architecture of a coalescing submarine fan-dominated deep sea deposystem, measuring about 400-500 km × 600-700 km in size or even more, one of the largest pre-Cenozoic submarine fans ever reported. Subdivisionally, four fans, lacking inner fans, could have coalesced laterally within the submarine fan deposystem, and at least six submarine fan developments were vertically succeeded by mid- to outer-fan deposits with progradational to retrogradational successions. According to the range of 30-70% of sandstone content, the fan deposystem is mud- and sand-rich, suggesting a medium-far (over 400-600 km) transport of sediment from the source area.

  7. - and Syn-Eruptive Surface Movements of Azerbaijan Mud Volcanoes Detected Through Insar Analysis: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper; Aliyev, Chingiz

    2014-05-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that consists in the extrusion of mud, fragments or blocks of country rocks, saline waters and gases, mostly methane. This mechanism is typically linked to in-depth hydrocarbon traps, and it builds up a variety of conical edifices with dimension and morphology similar to those of magmatic volcanoes. Interferometry by Satellite Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques have been commonly used to monitor and investigate the ground deformation connected to the eruptive phases of magmatic volcanoes. InSAR techniques have also been employed to explore the ground deformation associated with the LUSI mud volcano in Java (Indonesia). We aim to carry out a study on the paroxysmal activities of the Azerbaijan mud volcanoes, among the largest on Earth, using similar techniques. In particular the deformations of the mud volcanic systems were analyzed through the technique of satellite differential interferometry (DInSAR), thanks to the acquisition of 16 descending and 4 ascending Envisat images, spanning about 4 years (October 2003-November 2007); these data were provided by the European Space Agency. The preliminary analysis of a set of 77 interferograms and the unwrapping process elaboration of some of them selected according to the best coherence values, allowed the detection of significant deformations in correspondence of Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara Zira Island mud volcanoes. This analysis has allowed to identify relevant ground deformations of the volcanic systems in connection with the main eruptive events in 2005 and in 2006 respectively, that are recorded by the catalogue of Azerbaijan mud volcano eruptions until 2007. The preliminary analysis of the interferograms of the Ayaz-Akhtarma and the Khara Zira mud volcanoes shows that the whole volcano edifice or part of it is subject to a ground displacement before or in coincidence with the eruption. Assuming that the movement is mainly vertical, we suppose that deformation is due to bulging of the volcanic

  8. Observations and Rock Analyses in a Kumano Mud Volcano in Nankai Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Aoike, K.; Sawada, T.; Ashi, J.; Gulick, S. P.; Flemings, P. B.; Kuramoto, S.; Saito, S.; Mikada, H.; Kinoshita, M.

    2002-12-01

    Kumano Basin is a forearc basin on the eastern Nankai Accretionary Prism off southwest Japan. Recent bathymetric survey showed existence of small knolls in the Kumano Basin. Submersible and ROV dives, sidescan sonar and deep-towed camera investigations revealed so far that at least five of the small knolls are mud volcanoes erupted on the Kumano Basin floor. In June and August, 2002, Dive 677 and 681 by submersible SHINKAI 6500 (YK02-02: R/V Yokosuka) and Dive 267 by ROV KAIKO (KR02-10: R/V Kairei) were performed in one of the mud volcanoes, Kumano Knoll No.4, which is 100 m high and 800 m in diameter at the foot of the knoll. The knoll has a plateau of about 300 m diameter on the top, which shows bumpy surface where there are waves, steps and craters of several meters in diameter. The craters imply active or dead cold seeps and are occasionally accompanied by Calyptogena colonies. The plateau is mostly covered with mud. Rock gravels and boulders were observed mainly on outer slope of the knoll. Sidescan sonar and subbottom profiler data by KAIKO system show marked contrasts in sonic reflectivity and penetration between the Kumano Knoll No.4 and the Kumano Basin floor. The high sonic reflectivity and the low penetration on the knoll indicate that main body of the knoll is composed of clastic ejecta as a mud volcano. On the Kumano Knoll No.4, the dives obtained semi-consolidated mudstone, mud breccia, and biotite arkose sandstone. Chronological analysis on nannofossil indicates the sedimentary rocks are in the late Early Miocene through the Middle Miocene. According to this age and geological information on land, it is likely that the sedimentary rocks on the knoll were originally deposited at the beginning of formation of the Kumano Basin. Porosity of these sedimentary rocks is very low (< 18 %). Some mud breccias contain calcite veins that cut the angular mud gravels. These features lead to finding processes until when the sedimentary rocks reached to the seafloor

  9. Extreme efficiency of mud volcanism in dewatering accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Achim; Klaeschen, Dirk; Mascle, Jean

    2001-07-01

    Drilling results from two mud volcanoes on the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary complex as well as bottom sampling and the wealth of geophysical data acquired recently have provided fundamental knowledge of the 3D geometry of mud extrusions. Mud volcanism is generally related to buoyancy (density inversion), and is triggered by the collision of the African and Eurasian blocks, forcing undercompacted clayey sediments to extrude along faults in the central and hinterlandward parts of the prism. Volumetric estimates of extruded mud in several well-studied areas were based on pre-stack depth-migrated seismic profiles across the entire, up to >150 km wide, prism. The resulting volumes of mud were combined with ages from mud dome drilling, so that rates of mud extrusion were obtained. Subtracting the solid rock mass from the bulk mud volume using physical property data, fluid flux as a function of mud volcanism alone has been quantified for the first time. The volume of fluid extruding with the mud is found to be variable, but reaches up to 15 km 3 fluid per km trench length and Ma along cross sections with abundant mud volcanoes. Such large fluid quantities in a region some 50-150 km behind the deformation front exceed estimates from those elsewhere (where undoubtedly the majority of the interstitial fluid is lost due to compaction). Such fluids near the backstop are likely to result predominantly from mineral dehydration and diagenetic reactions at depth, and consequently provide a window to understand deeper processes along the deep décollement. More importantly, the enormous rates with which such fluids and liquified mud escape along the out-of-sequence faults alter fluid budget calculations in subduction zones drastically.

  10. New water-based muds for tertiary shale control

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, P.I. ); Minton, R.C. )

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes laboratory and field assessments of a series of inhibitive water muds developed by BP. RCS 1 contains cationic starch to control fluid loss and to inhibit shale expansion further. RCS 2 is a highly inhibitive version of RCS 1 containing polyglycerol. RCS 3, the most inhibitive mud of the series, contains a phosphate salt and polyglycerol. Levels of inhibition appear close to those of oil-based mud.

  11. Physical and chemical properties of submarine basaltic rocks from the submarine flanks of the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yokose, H.; Lipman, P.W.; Kanamatsu, T.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate physical and chemical diversity in submarine basaltic rocks, approximately 280 deep submarine samples recovered by submersibles from the underwater flanks of the Hawaiian Islands were analyzed and compared. Based on observations from the submersibles and hand specimens, these samples were classified into three main occurrence types (lavas, coarse-grained volcaniclastic rocks, and fine-grained sediments), each with several subtypes. The whole-rock sulfur content and porosity in submarine basaltic rocks, recovered from depths greater than 2000 m, range from < 10 ppm and 2 vol.% to 2200 ppm and 47 vol.%, respectively. These wide variations cannot be due just to different ambient pressures at the collection depths, as inferred previously for submarine erupted lavas. The physical and chemical properties of the recovered samples, especially a combination of three whole-rock parameters (Fe-oxidation state, Sulfur content, and Porosity), are closely related to the occurrence type. The FSP triangular diagram is a valuable indicator of the source location of basaltic fragments deposited in deep submarine areas. This diagram can be applied to basaltic rocks such as clasts in debris-flow deposits, submarine-emplaced lava flows that may have crossed the shoreline, and slightly altered geological samples. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Seatbelt submarining injury and its prevention countermeasures: How a cantilever seat pan structure exacerbate submarining.

    PubMed

    Thorbole, Chandrashekhar K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study and a case report was to demonstrate seat belt webbing induced injury due to seatbelt submarining during the frontal motor vehicle crash. Submarining is an undesired phenomenon during a frontal crash scenario and is dependent on design features of the seat pan and seatbelt system. The lack of adequate anti-submarining features at any seating position with three-point restraint can cause abdominal solid and hollow organ injuries. This paper reports a case of submarining and factors that exacerbated this phenomenon leading to critical occupant abdominal injury. This case report and the following injury causation analysis demonstrate the shortcomings of a cantilever seat pan design in context to the occupant safety. The inadequate seat pan anti-submarining feature in association with lack of seatbelt load-limiter and Pretensioner reduces the level of occupant protection offered by the seat belt system in the rear seat. This case report shows the dangers of cantilever seat pan design and its association with increased risk of submarining causing severe abdominal injuries. PMID:26985421

  13. Seatbelt submarining injury and its prevention countermeasures: How a cantilever seat pan structure exacerbate submarining

    PubMed Central

    Thorbole, Chandrashekhar K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study and a case report was to demonstrate seat belt webbing induced injury due to seatbelt submarining during the frontal motor vehicle crash. Submarining is an undesired phenomenon during a frontal crash scenario and is dependent on design features of the seat pan and seatbelt system. The lack of adequate anti-submarining features at any seating position with three-point restraint can cause abdominal solid and hollow organ injuries. This paper reports a case of submarining and factors that exacerbated this phenomenon leading to critical occupant abdominal injury. This case report and the following injury causation analysis demonstrate the shortcomings of a cantilever seat pan design in context to the occupant safety. The inadequate seat pan anti-submarining feature in association with lack of seatbelt load-limiter and Pretensioner reduces the level of occupant protection offered by the seat belt system in the rear seat. This case report shows the dangers of cantilever seat pan design and its association with increased risk of submarining causing severe abdominal injuries. PMID:26985421

  14. Organic chemical composition of mud from the LUSI mud volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, R. J.; Campbell, P.; Lam, A.

    2009-12-01

    Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia is the site of LUSI, a terrestrial mud volcano that has been erupting since May 29, 2006. In response to a U.S. Department of State request, the U.S. Geological Survey has been assisting the Indonesian Government to describe the geological and geochemical aspects and potential health risk of the mud eruption. We report here on the organic chemical composition of the mud. Organic chemical analyses were carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy following organic extraction by microwave-assisted solvent extraction and compound fractionation by adsorption chromatography. There is a petroliferous component in the mud that is fresh, immature, and nonbiodegraded. There is a complete suite of n-alkanes with a bell-shaped pattern typical of fresh petroleum with a Cmax around C20. The alkane content ranges from 0.12 to 1.01 mg/kg dry mud. The presence of certain hopanes (i.e. 17 α,21β(H)-30-norhopane and 17α,21β(H)-hopane) is also indicative of the presence of oil. The proportions of other biomarker compounds (pristane/phytane = 2.4) and the dominance of the C27 sterane (5α(H),14α(H),17α(H)-chlolestane) suggest that oil formed under oxic conditions and has a likely coastal marine or terrigenous source. The presence of oleanane indicates a Cretaceous or younger age for the petrogenic material. These geochemical parameters are consistent with Indonesian oil derived from Tertiary marlstone source rocks that contained kerogen deposited under oxic conditions, probably the upper Miocene Klasafet Formation. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present and range in content from 0.1 to 2.2 mg/kg dry mud. The low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs, in particular, naphthalene and methyl-naphthalene are dominant except for perylene which is ubiquitous in the environment. The presence of both parent and higher homologue PAHs indicate a petrogenic rather than combustion source. PAHs are known carcinogens but toxicity data in sediments are

  15. Modification of red mud by acid treatment and its application for CO removal.

    PubMed

    Sushil, Snigdha; Batra, Vidya S

    2012-02-15

    Activated red mud (ARM) samples were tested for carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation in the temperature range of 100-500°C. Conversion of >90% was obtained for temperatures above 400°C for all samples. In order to study the effect of hydroxylated phases of iron oxide in red mud on the removal of CO, 'as-received' red mud (RM) and acid digested and re-precipitated red mud (TRM) were also tested under similar conditions. It was found that TRM was more effective in removal of CO with the 50% conversion temperature (T50) 80°C lower than the ARM samples. The samples before and after reaction were characterized by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), BET N(2) adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). It was observed that TRM had iron in an amorphous form which then converted to iron oxide after heating. The higher activity of TRM was due to its higher surface area and presence of hydroxylated phase of iron oxide. PMID:22204836

  16. Tracking hydrothermal feature changes in response to seismicity and deformation at Mud Volcano thermal area, Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefenbach, A. K.; Hurwitz, S.; Murphy, F.; Evans, W.

    2013-12-01

    The Mud Volcano thermal area in Yellowstone National Park comprises many hydrothermal features including fumaroles, mudpots, springs, and thermal pools. Observations of hydrothermal changes have been made for decades in the Mud Volcano thermal area, and include reports of significant changes (the appearance of new features, increased water levels in pools, vigor of activity, and tree mortality) following an earthquake swarm in 1978 that took place beneath the area. However, no quantitative method to map and measure surface feature changes through time has been applied. We present an analysis of aerial photographs from 1954 to present to track temporal changes in the boundaries between vegetated and thermally barren areas, as well as location, extent, color, clarity, and runoff patterns of hydrothermal features within the Mud Volcano thermal area. This study attempts to provide a detailed, long-term (>50 year) inventory of hydrothermal features and change detection at Mud Volcano thermal area that can be used to identify changes in hydrothermal activity in response to seismicity, uplift and subsidence episodes of the adjacent Sour Creek resurgent dome, or other potential causes.

  17. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps because black-smoker chimneys make tremendous subjects for magazine covers, the proposal that submarine hydrothermal systems were involved in the origin of life has caused many investigators to focus on the eye-catching hydrothermal vents. In much the same way that tourists rush to watch the spectacular eruptions of Old Faithful geyser with little regard for the hydrology of the Yellowstone basin, attention is focused on the spectacular, high-temperature hydrothermal vents to the near exclusion of the enormous underlying hydrothermal systems. Nevertheless, the magnitude and complexity of geologic structures, heat flow, and hydrologic parameters which characterize the geyser basins at Yellowstone also characterize submarine hydrothermal systems. However, in the submarine systems the scale can be considerably more vast. Like Old Faithful, submarine hydrothermal vents have a spectacular quality, but they are only one fascinating aspect of enormous geologic systems operating at seafloor spreading centers throughout all of the ocean basins. A critical study of the possible role of hydrothermal processes in the origin of life should include the full spectrum of probable environments. The goals of this chapter are to synthesize diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, assemble a description of the fundamental physical and chemical attributes of these systems, and consider the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Information about submarine hydrothermal systems comes from many directions. Measurements made directly on venting fluids provide useful, but remarkably limited, clues about processes operating at depth. The oceanic crust has been drilled to approximately 2.0 km depth providing many other pieces of information, but drilling technology has not allowed the bore holes and core samples to reach the maximum depths to which aqueous fluids circulate in oceanic crust. Such

  18. Phase 1 Final Report: Titan Submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Paul, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design of a submarine for Saturn's moon Titan was a funded NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase 1 for 2014. The proposal stated the desire to investigate what science a submarine for Titan's liquid hydrocarbon seas might accomplish and what that submarine might look like. Focusing on a flagship class science system (100 kg), it was found that a submersible platform can accomplish extensive science both above and below the surface of the Kraken Mare. Submerged science includes mapping using side-looking sonar, imaging and spectroscopy of the lake, as well as sampling of the lake's bottom and shallow shoreline. While surfaced, the submarine will not only sense weather conditions (including the interaction between the liquid and atmosphere) but also image the shoreline, as much as 2 km inland. This imaging requirement pushed the landing date to Titan's next summer period (2047) to allow for lighted conditions, as well as direct-to-Earth communication, avoiding the need for a separate relay orbiter spacecraft. Submerged and surfaced investigation are key to understanding both the hydrological cycle of Titan as well as gather hints to how life may have begun on Earth using liquid, sediment, and chemical interactions. An estimated 25 Mb of data per day would be generated by the various science packages. Most of the science packages (electronics at least) can be safely kept inside the submarine pressure vessel and warmed by the isotope power system.The baseline 90-day mission would be to sail submerged and surfaced around and through Kraken Mare investigating the shoreline and inlets to evaluate the sedimentary interaction both on the surface and then below. Depths of Kraken have yet to be sensed (Ligeia to the north is thought to be 200 m (656 ft) deep), but a maximum depth of 1,000 m (3,281 ft) for Kraken Mare was assumed for the design). The sub would spend 20 d at the interface between Kraken Mare and Ligeia Mare for clues to the drainage of

  19. Submarine landforms characteristic of glacier surges in two Spitsbergen fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottesen, D.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Benn, D. I.; Kristensen, L.; Christiansen, H. H.; Christensen, O.; Hansen, L.; Lebesbye, E.; Forwick, M.; Vorren, T. O.

    2008-08-01

    Well-preserved submarine landforms, all less than 100 years old, are imaged on high-resolution swath bathymetry obtained from Van Keulenfjorden and Rindersbukta (inner Van Mijenfjorden), Spitsbergen, Svalbard. Several tidewater glaciers in these fjords have surged in the last few hundred years. Streamlined landforms, found within the limits of known surges, are interpreted as mega-scale glacial lineations (MSGL) formed subglacially beneath actively surging ice. Large transverse ridges are terminal moraines formed by thrusting at the maximum position of glacier surges. Sediment lobes at the distal margins of terminal moraines are interpreted as glacigenic debris flows, formed either by failure of the frontal slopes of thrust moraines or from deforming sediment extruded from beneath the glacier. Sinuous ridges are eskers, formed after surge termination by the sedimentary infilling of subglacial conduits. Concordant ridges, parallel to former ice margins, are interpreted as minor push moraines, probably formed annually during winter glacier readvance. Discordant ridges, oblique to former ice margins, are interpreted as crevasse-squeeze ridges, forming when soft subglacial sediments are injected into basal crevasses. These submarine landforms have been deposited in the following sequence based on cross-cutting relationships between them, linked to stages of the surge cycle: (1) MSGL; (2a) terminal moraines and (2b) lobe-shaped debris flows; (3) isolated areas of crevasse-fill ridges; (4) eskers and (5) annual retreat ridges. A descriptive landsystem model for tidewater surge-type glaciers has been developed, whose wider applicability is emphasised by comparison with two areas in Isfjorden, Spitsbergen. The model also has a number of features in common with landsystem models for terrestrial surge-type glaciers, but is likely to be more complete since submarine landforms are particularly well preserved. The landforms discussed here may be produced and preserved in

  20. Submarine canyon and fan systems of the California Continental Borderland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Piper, D.J.W.; Romans, B.W.; Covault, J.A.; Dartnell, P.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Late Quaternary turbidite and related gravity-flow deposits have accumulated in basins of the California Borderland under a variety of conditions of sediment supply and sea-level stand. The northern basins (Santa Barbara, Santa Monica, and San Pedro) are closed and thus trap virtually all sediment supplied through submarine canyons and smaller gulley systems along the basin margins. The southern basins (Gulf of Santa Catalina and San Diego Trough) are open, and, under some conditions, turbidity currents flow from one basin to another. Seismic-reflection profiles at a variety of resolutions are used to determine the distribution of late Quaternary turbidites. Patterns of turbidite-dominated deposition during lowstand conditions of oxygen isotope stages 2 and 6 are similar within each of the basins. Chronology is provided by radiocarbon dating of sediment from two Ocean Drilling Program sites, the Mohole test-drill site, and large numbers of piston cores. High-resolution, seismic-stratigraphic frameworks developed for Santa Monica Basin and the open southern basins show rapid lateral shifts in sediment accumulation on scales that range from individual lobe elements to entire fan complexes. More than half of the submarine fans in the Borderland remain active at any given position of relative sea level. Where the continental shelf is narrow, canyons are able to cut headward during sea-level transgression and maintain sediment supply to the basins from rivers and longshore currents during highstands. Rivers with high bedload discharge transfer sediment to submarine fans during both highstand and lowstand conditions. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Stability of submarine slopes in the northern South China Sea: a numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Luan, Xiwu

    2013-01-01

    Submarine landslides occur frequently on most continental margins. They are effective mechanisms of sediment transfer but also a geological hazard to seafloor installations. In this paper, submarine slope stability is evaluated using a 2D limit equilibrium method. Considerations of slope, sediment, and triggering force on the factor of safety (FOS) were calculated in drained and undrained ( Φ=0) cases. Results show that submarine slopes are stable when the slope is <16° under static conditions and without a weak interlayer. With a weak interlayer, slopes are stable at <18° in the drained case and at <9° in the undrained case. Earthquake loading can drastically reduce the shear strength of sediment with increased pore water pressure. The slope became unstable at >13° with earthquake peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.5 g; whereas with a weak layer, a PGA of 0.2 g could trigger instability at slopes >10°, and >3° for PGA of 0.5 g. The northern slope of the South China Sea is geomorphologically stable under static conditions. However, because of the possibility of high PGA at the eastern margin of the South China Sea, submarine slides are likely on the Taiwan Bank slope and eastern part of the Dongsha slope. Therefore, submarine slides recognized in seismic profiles on the Taiwan Bank slope would be triggered by an earthquake, the most important factor for triggering submarine slides on the northern slope of the South China Sea. Considering the distribution of PGA, we consider the northern slope of the South China Sea to be stable, excluding the Taiwan Bank slope, which is tectonically active.

  2. Earthquakes of Loihi submarine volcano and the Hawaiian hot spot.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    Loihi is an active submarine volcano located 35km S of the island of Hawaii and may eventually grow to be the next and S most island in the Hawaiian chain. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory recorded two major earthquake swarms located there in 1971-1972 and 1975 which were probably associated with submarine eruptions or intrusions. The swarms were located very close to Loihi's bathymetric summit, except for earthquakes during the second stage of the 1971-1972 swarm, which occurred well onto Loihi's SW flank. The flank earthquakes appear to have been triggered by the preceding activity and possible rifting along Loihi's long axis, similar to the rift-flank relationship at Kilauea volcano. Other changes accompanied the shift in locations from Loihi's summit to its flank, including a shift from burst to continuous seismicity, a rise in maximum magnitude, a change from small earthquake clusters to a larger elongated zone, a drop in b value, and a presumed shift from concentrated volcanic stresses to a more diffuse tectonic stress on Loihi's flank. - Author

  3. Sea level controls on the textural characteristics and depositional architecture of the Hueneme and associated submarine fan systems, Santa Monica Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Piper, D.J.W.; Hiscott, R.N.

    1998-01-01

    Hueneme and Dume submarine fans in Santa Monica Basin consist of sandy channel and muddy levee facies on the upper fan. lenticular sand sheets on the middle fan. and thinly bedded turbidite and hemipelagic facies elsewhere. Fifteen widely correlatable key seismic reflections in high-resolution airgun and deep-towed boomer profiles subdivide the fan and basin deposits into time-slices that show different thickness and seismic-facies distributions, inferred to result from changes in Quaternary sea level and sediment supply. At times of low sea level, highly efficient turbidity currents generated by hyperpycnal flows or sediment failures at river deltas carry sand well out onto the middle-fan area. Thick, muddy flows formed rapidly prograding high levees mainly on the western (right-hand) side of three valleys that fed Hueneme fan at different times: the most recently active of the lowstand fan valleys. Hueneme fan valley, now heads in Hueneme Canyon. At times of high sea level, fans receive sand from submarine canyons that intercept littoral-drift cells and mixed sediment from earthquake-triggered slumps. Turbidity currents are confined to 'underfit' talweg channels in fan valleys and to steep, small, basin-margin fans like Dume fan. Mud is effectively separated from sand at high sea level and moves basinward across the shelf in plumes and in storm-generated lutite flows, contributing to a basin-floor blanket that is locally thicker than contemporary fan deposits and that onlaps older fans at the basin margin. The infilling of Santa Monica Basin has involved both fan and basin-floor aggradation accompanied by landward and basinward facies shifts. Progradation was restricted to the downslope growth of high muddy levees and the periodic basinward advance of the toe of the steeper and sandier Dume fan. Although the region is tectonically active, major sedimentation changes can be related to eustatic sea-level changes. The primary controls on facies shifts and fan growth

  4. Newly recognized submarine slide complexes in the southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. E.; Lee, H. J.; Edwards, B. D.; McGann, M.; Sliter, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    New high-resolution bathymetric and seismic-reflection surveys have imaged large (<0.5 km3) submarine landslides offshore southern California that have not been previously recognized in the Borderland. The new data show several large slides or slide complexes that include: 1) a slide complex consisting of numerous (>7) individual overlapping slides along the western margin of Santa Cruz Basin (SCB slide); 2) a series of slumps and slide scars on the slope south of San Pedro shelf (SPS slide); and 3) a slope failure along the shelf edge in northern San Diego County, termed the Del Mar slide. The SCB slide complex extends for 30 km along the western slope of Santa Cruz Basin, with debris lobes extending 5-8 km into the basin. Head scarps of some of these slides are 50-75 m high. The SPS slide complex also appears to consist of multiple slides, which roughly parallel the Palos Verdes Fault and the San Gabriel Canyon submarine channel on the shelf edge and slope south of San Pedro shelf. Slide deposits associated with this complex are only partially mapped due to limited high-resolution bathymetric coverage, but extend to the south in the area SW of Lasuen Knoll. Seismic-reflection profiles show that some of these deposits are up to 20 m thick. The Del Mar slide is located about 10 km north of La Jolla Canyon and extends about 6 km along the shelf edge. The head scarp lies along the trend of a branch of the Rose Canyon Fault Zone. Radiocarbon ages of sediment overlying this slide indicate the Del Mar slide is approximately 12-16 ka. These large slide complexes have several characteristics in common. Nearly all occur in areas of tectonic uplift. All of the complexes show evidence of recurrent slide activity, exhibiting multiple headwall scarps and debris lobes, and where available, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles of these slide areas provide evidence of older, buried mass transport deposits. Assuming typical sedimentation rates, the recurrence interval of

  5. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  6. Using Ultrasound to Measure Mud Rheological Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maa, P. Y. P. Y.; Kwon, J. I.; Park, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to predict the dynamic responses of newly consolidated cohesive sediment beds, a better understanding of the material rheological properties (bulk density, ρ, kinematic viscosity, ν, and shear modulus, G, assuming mud is a simple Voigt viscoelastic model) of these sediment beds is needed. An acoustic approach that uses a commercially available 250 kHz shear wave transducer and tone-burst waves has been developed to measure those properties. This approach uses a 86.3 mm long delay-line (DL) to separate the generated pressure and shear waves, and measures the reflected shear waves as well as the reflected pressure waves caused at the interface between the delay line and the mud to interpret these properties. By using materials (i.e., air, water, olive oil, and honey) with available rheological properties to establish a calibration relationship between the information carried by the measured reflected waves and those given material properties, the mud properties as well as thνe change of these properties during consolidation can be interpreted. Using jelly pudding as a check, a value of G ≈ 12310 N/m2 and ν ≈ 5 x 10-5 m2/s were estimated. For the consolidating kaolinite bed (with zero salinity and initial suspended sediment concentration about 420 g/cm3), the measurements show that the shear modulus developed after about 40 hours and approached a value on the order of 15000 N/m2 after about 100 hours. The initial kinematic viscosity was about 5 x 10-4 m2/s, and it decreased slowly with time and approached a low plateau between 10-6 and 10-7 m2/s after 300 hours. The measured bulk density showed a small increasing rate during the entire consolidation period, except at a short period between 80 and 90 hours after consolidation. Results from this study suggest a promising approach for developing an in-situ instrument to measure mud properties, as well as many other materials in other industries.

  7. Flume studies of mud deposition: Implications for shallow marine mud deposition and the stratigraphic record (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Racetrack flumes with paddle-belt drives, designed to avoid destruction of floccules, were used to examine mud deposition from swift moving suspensions. At flow velocities that transport and deposit sand (20-35 cm/s, 5 cm flow depth) muddy suspensions produce deposition-prone floccules that form migrating floccule ripples. Mud beds that form as a consequence of floccule ripple accretion appear parallel laminated at first glance, but reveal internal low angle cross-lamination on closer inspection. In plan view, the observed pattern of ripple foresets is identical to rib and furrow structure in sandstones. In experiments at marine salinity, where clays were mixed with quartz silt, uniform as well as gradually decelerating currents produce deposits that show low relief coarser silt ripples at the base, followed by low angle inclined silty laminae and an increasing clay component upwards. Once examined with proper care, the clay-rich upper portion of the deposits shows internal laminae and cross-laminae. We also observed comparable sedimentary features in various ancient shallow marine mudstone successions. When examined at the hand specimen or drill core scale, above experimental deposits show the same features that have been widely reported from fluid-mud event layers in modern shelf settings. The latter have been attributed to gravity flows that are triggered by wave re-suspension of surficial muds. Whereas that model is consistent with the features attributed to the purported process, our experiments point to a potential alternative scenario. In addition to fluid muds, meaning high concentration sediment suspensions with mass concentrations > 10 g/l, the low concentration sediment suspensions (<10 g/l) from our experiments appear to be able to create equivalent deposits when given sufficient time for advective sediment transport. Graded muddy deposits on modern shelves and in ancient shelf successions thus may be of multiple origins. In addition to being the result

  8. The Onset of Channelling in a Fluidized Mud Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.; Billing, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Fluidization of a soil occurs when the drag force exerted on the soil grains by upwelling water equals the submerged weight of the soil grains, hence reducing the effective (or contact) stress between the soil grains to zero. In nature, fluidization is commonly encountered in localized portions of highly saturated mud layers found in tidal flats, estuaries and lakes, where upward flow is initiated by significant pore water pressure gradients triggered by wave or tidal action. The water propagates through the fluidized mud layer by forming channels (or vents), carrying the fluidized mud to the surface and forming mud volcano structures. The presence of these fluidization channels alters the mud layer structure with implications on its hydraulic and geotechnical properties, such as the hydraulic conductivity. Despite the importance of these channels, the conditions that lead to their formation and their effects on the mud layer structure still remain poorly documented. The present study couples experimental and theoretical methods aimed at quantifying the conditions, under which fluidization of a saturated mud layer is accompanied by the formation of channels, and assessing the effects of channeling on the mud layer structure. Fluidization and channel formation in a mud layer were reproduced in the laboratory using a carefully designed fluidization column attached to a pressurized vessel (plenum). To eliminate any effects of the material, the mud was produced from pure kaolin clay and deionized water. Local porosity measurements along the mud layer prior, during and after fluidization were conducted using an Americium-241 gamma source placed on a fully automated carriage. Different water inflow rates, q, were applied to the base of the mud layer and the plenum pressure was monitored throughout the experiment. These experiments revealed that for high q values, a single vertical channel formed and erupted at the center of the fluidization column. Instead for low q

  9. 3-D Seismic Images of Mud Volcano North Alex, West-Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Joerg; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Gehrmann, Romina; Sommer, Malte

    2010-05-01

    Mud volcanoes within shelf areas are the bathymetric expression of mobilized overpressured sediments causing a feature of possible instability within the slope. Such a scene is given in the West-Nile Delta offshore Alexandria, Egypt at 700 m water depth, ,which was studied during a RWE Dea funded research project. The West Nile Delta forms part of the source of the large turbiditic Nile Deep Sea Fan. Since the late Miocene sediments have formed an up to 10 km thick pile, which includes about 1 - 3 km of Messinian evaporates. The sediment load of the overburden implies strong overpressures and salt-related tectonic deformation. Both are favourable for fluid migration towards the seafloor guided by the fractured margin. Deep-cutting channel systems like the Rosetta channel characterize the continental slope. Bathymetric expressions of slides and numerous mud volcanoes in the area are expressions of active processes, which contribute to the ongoing modification of the slope. The western deltaic system, Rosetta branch, has formed an 80 km wide continental shelf. Here at 700 m water depth the mud volcano North Alex developed his circular bathymetric feature, which proved to be an active gas and mud-expelling structure. A grid of 2-D seismic profiles did reveal a large set of faults located within the main mud volcano as well as surrounding the structure. Internal faults are mainly related to episodic mud expulsion processes and continuous gas and fluid production. Deep cutting external faults surround the structure in a half circle shape. They can be tracked up to the seafloor indicating ongoing tectonic activity of the slope area. A recently build 3-D acquisition system (funded by RWE Dea) suitable for mid-size research vessels was applied to collect an active seismic cube of the mud volcano. Based on the P-Cable design 11 parallel streamers (each 12.5 m long with 1.5 m group interval) were used to record shots of a single 210 cinch GI airgun. Based on GPS positions of

  10. Search of CH4 around the mud volcanism areas on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shohei

    2012-06-01

    We propose the first measurement of CH4 specialized in the mud volcanism areas on Mars. Although the small amount of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere is remarkable because its source is potentially geological (or biological) activity, it is still open question. The high spectral and spatial resolution with high sensitivity and wide spectral coverage of IRCS/Subaru enable us the first mapping of CH4 on the localized mud volcanism areas. In the terrestrial case, mud volcanism vents about 25% of CH4 released from geological sources to the atmosphere. In such locations, CH4 can potentially combine with the infiltrated H2O and generate CH4-hydrate. While in the Martian case, the mud volcanism is expected the mounds in Acidalia Planitia and the Utopia/Isidis pitted cones. However, the releases of CH4 on these locations have not been discovered yet. Since the CH4-hydrate suggests the correlation of CH4 and H2O, high spatial resolution with simultaneous measurements of CH4 and H2O lines are essential. IRCS/Subaru can provide this opportunity. In addition, our observation will override the past one with CSHELL/IRTF in the following aspects, (1) less uncertainty by simultaneous measurement of multiple CH4 lines with wider spectral coverage, and (2) better spatial resolution.

  11. Stepwise extraction of valuable components from red mud based on reductive roasting with sodium salts.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghui; Liu, Mingxia; Rao, Mingjun; Jiang, Tao; Zhuang, Jinqiang; Zhang, Yuanbo

    2014-09-15

    The feasibility of an integrated technological route for comprehensive utilization of red mud was verified in this study. Valuable components in the mud, including Fe2O3, Al2O3 and SiO2 were stepwise extracted by magnetic separation and sulfuric acid leaching from reduced red mud, and meanwhile TiO2 was enriched in the leaching residue. Sodium salts were proved to be favorable for the magnetic separation of metallic iron and the subsequent acid leaching of Al and Si, through facilitating the reduction of iron oxides and the growth of metallic iron grains, together with enhancing the activation of Al and Si components during the roasting process. After reductive roasting in the presence of 6% Na2CO3 and 6% Na2SO4, a magnetic concentrate containing 90.2% iron with iron recovery of 95.0% was achieved from the red mud by magnetic separation. Subsequently, 94.7% Fe, 98.6% Al and 95.9% Si were extracted by dilute sulfuric acid leaching from the upper-stream non-magnetic material, yielding a TiO2-rich material with 37.8% TiO2. Furthermore, value-added products of silica gel and Al(OH)3 were prepared from the leachate by ripening and neutralizing. PMID:25240647

  12. Submarine Volcanic Landforms and Endolithic Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Subaqueous volcanic eruptions produce characteristic landforms and lava flow morphologies that are distinct from subaerial eruptions. Eruptions from fissures on the sea floor produce hummocks rather than flat lava flows. Hummocky lava flows typically have dimensions of 500 meters wide, 5000 meters long, and 50 meters high. The hummocks are made of piles of bulbous pillows that are about 1 meter in diameter. Because of the high specific heat of water and the large temperature difference between magma and liquid water (about 1100 C) the exteriors of lava flows are quenched to glass. Cooling of lava flows in air does not have this effect, The quenched volcanic glass in aqueous environments contains microorganisms that dissolve the glass and leave secondary minerals such as clay, iron oxides, and sulfides in the voids. The microbial excavation of the glass produces a wide variety shapes and sizes. These microbially produced excavations may be 100 micrometers long by 3 micrometer diameter tubes, starbursts of radiating tubes, branching 1 micrometer diameter tubes, or other shapes. These tubes and excavations are distinctive, they are associated with bacteria, and they are preserved along with the glass. In surveys of volcanic glass from subaqueous lava flows we have found this evidence of microbial activity in rocks at ocean subbottom depths of a few meters to 1500 meters. These rocks range in age from about 1 million years to 170 millions years. Where submarine volcanic rocks have been uplifted to dry land, the glass may also preserve microbial patterns of glass alteration. Comparisons of terrestrial and Martian landforms could reveal the locations of subaqueous volcanic activity on Mars. Given the similarity of compositions of igneous rocks on the two planets, subaqueous eruptions on Mars will have quenched glass exteriors. Evidence of microbial colonization of the glass will be preserved as long as the glass is preserved. Also, the microbial activity that produces

  13. Inactivation of DDT deposits on mud surfaces*†

    PubMed Central

    Bordas, E.; Downs, W. G.; Navarro, L.

    1953-01-01

    The problem of the inactivation of DDT deposits on dry mud surfaces is presented and its causes outlined. The phenomenon is found to be due to adsorption of the DDT crystals present on the surface; this adsorption appears to be the initial step in the catalytic decomposition of DDT by the iron oxides present in soils, since there is a direct relation between the amount of oxides present and their capacity to inactivate DDT deposits. The DDT-inactivating capacity of soils can be determined by testing them for catalytic activity in the thermal decomposition of DDT. The adsorption of DDT by soil is influenced by environmental relative humidity. Inactivated deposits may be reactivated by increase of the atmospheric humidity. Several substances proposed for the protection of the DDT deposit from inactivation were tested without success. Reference is made, however, to the encouraging findings of some other workers. Limewashing is recommended for the protection of DDT deposits. PMID:13082389

  14. Impact of Submarine Geohazards on Organic Carbon Burial Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. C.; Tsai, P. H.; Liu, J. T.; Hsu, S. K.; Chiu, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonically active setting and climatic conditions give Taiwan a high exposure to severe natural hazards. After the Pingtung Earthquake and Morakot Typhoon which occurred in 2006 and 2009, the turbidity currents caused a series of submarine cable breaks along the Gaoping and Fangliao Submarine Canyons off SW Taiwan. Large amounts of terrestrial sediments were fast transported bypass the narrow continental shelf and rapidly moved southward through submarine canyons to the deep sea. Two piston cores which were taken from the Tsangyao Ridge and its adjacent area (OR5-1302-2-MT7 and MT6) might shed light on understanding the export of terrestrial organic carbon to the abyss by submarine geo-hazards. The 210Pb profile of MT7 in conjunction with the grain size data indicates the existence of the Pingtung Earthquake and Morakot Typhoon related deposits. The sedimentation rate of these two cores which derived from 210Pb is approximately 0.05 cm/yr. The cores collected from the Gaoping Submarine Canyon, Gaoping Slope and Fangliao Submarine Canyon are used for analyzing TOC, organic C/N and δ13C ratios. The concentrations of total organic carbon are ~0.5%, and C/N rations almost remain between 4 and 8. The high TOC (~1%) and C/N ratio (>10) are observed in the samples with plant debris. The fluctuation of TOC and C/N ratios in near-shore samples is higher than deep sea. In terms of δ13C-values, it progressively decreases with distances from coastal zone to the deep sea. Due to the larger proportions of land-derived organic carbon, the δ13C-values in the surface sediment of upper Gaoping Submarine Canyon, Gaoping Slope, and the turbidite layers at the head of Fangliao Submarine Canyon are lighter. Furthermore, we use the TOC concentrations and δ13C-values to estimate the fractional contributions of terrestrial organic carbon by a simple two component mixing model, and integrate with the 210Pb-derived sediment accumulation rates to evaluate the organic carbon burial

  15. Balamuthia mandrillaris therapeutic mud bath in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Todd, C D; Reyes-Batlle, M; Piñero, J E; Martínez-Carretero, E; Valladares, B; Lindo, J F; Lorenzo-Morales, J

    2015-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is an emerging cause of encephalitis in humans. The transmission dynamics are poorly understood due to the high fatality rate and the sporadic nature of cases. Seventy-two soil samples were collected from beaches and the banks of lagoons, rivers, ponds, mineral springs and streams from across Jamaica and assayed for the presence of B. mandrillaris. Seventy-nine sites were sampled and the mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene of B. mandrillaris was amplified and sequenced to confirm the presence of the amoeba. One isolate of B. mandrillaris was recovered from soil from mineral spring which hosts an informal therapeutic mud bath business. Although B. mandrillaris is less frequently isolated from soil than other free-living amoebae, rubbing mud containing the organism onto the skin increases the likelihood of exposure and infection. This first report on the isolation of B. mandrillaris in the Caribbean and its presence in soil where human contact is likely warrants further investigation using serological methods to elucidate exposure patterns. PMID:25335452

  16. Paleoenvironmental setting of Paleozoic mud mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wanless, H.R. . Dept. Geological Sciences); Tedesco, L.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Paleozoic carbonate mud mounds formed above storm wave base, which in many settings was in moderate to extremely shallow water. This is concluded by a comparative analysis of sedimentary structures, fabrics and small scale sequences occurring in Mississippian and Pennsylvanian mounds and in modern mud mounds and Halimeda bioherms. Most small mounds studied contain a shallowing sequence that represents shallowing into the zone of daily agitation. The bulk of each mound sequence is detrital deposition of layered mudstones to wackestones in the mound core and packstones to grainstones on the flanks and shoal cap. If macroskeletal fauna and flora are present, an autochthonous skeletal packstone may occur in the upper portion of the shallowing sequence beneath the detrital grainstone cap. Burrow excavations and grainy tubular tempestite infillings partially to completely modify the primary depositional fabric of all of these facies. Larger mounds studied are a composite of several to numerous smaller mound depositional sequences. High vertical relief of some larger mounds may be more the result of continued accommodation space provided by subsidence/downfaulting than be deposition in extremely deep water. Although the biotic components of carbonate mounds vary greatly through the Paleozoic, the contained sedimentary structures, fabrics and fundamental depositional sequences remain very similar. This suggests a general similarity in the mechanism and depositional setting of mound formation.

  17. Serpentinite mud volcanism: observations, processes, and implications.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Large serpentinite mud volcanoes form on the overriding plate of the Mariana subduction zone. Fluids from the descending plate hydrate (serpentinize) the forearc mantle and enable serpentinite muds to rise along faults to the seafloor. The seamounts are direct windows into subduction processes at depths far too deep to be accessed by any known technology. Fluid compositions vary with distance from the trench, signaling changes in chemical reactions as temperature and pressure increase. The parageneses of rocks in the mudflows permits us to constrain the physical conditions of the decollement region. If eruptive episodes are related to seismicity, seafloor observatories at these seamounts hold the potential to capture a subduction event and trace the effects of eruption on the biological communities that the slab fluids support, such as extremophile Archaea. The microorganisms that inhabit this high-pH, extreme environment support their growth by utilizing chemical constituents present in the slab fluids. Some researchers now contend that the serpentinization process itself may hold the key to the origin of life on Earth. PMID:22457979

  18. Serpentinite Mud Volcanism: Observations, Processes, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Large serpentinite mud volcanoes form on the overriding plate of the Mariana subduction zone. Fluids from the descending plate hydrate (serpentinize) the forearc mantle and enable serpentinite muds to rise along faults to the seafloor. The seamounts are direct windows into subduction processes at depths far too deep to be accessed by any known technology. Fluid compositions vary with distance from the trench, signaling changes in chemical reactions as temperature and pressure increase. The parageneses of rocks in the mudflows permits us to constrain the physical conditions of the decollement region. If eruptive episodes are related to seismicity, seafloor observatories at these seamounts hold the potential to capture a subduction event and trace the effects of eruption on the biological communities that the slab fluids support, such as extremophile Archaea. The microorganisms that inhabit this high-pH, extreme environment support their growth by utilizing chemical constituents present in the slab fluids. Some researchers now contend that the serpentinization process itself may hold the key to the origin of life on Earth.

  19. Mud volcanism at the Manihiki-Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorf, H. )

    1990-06-01

    In February 1987 a complex of mud volcanoes was discovered on the northeastern edge of the Manihiki-Plateau during a cruise of R/V MOANA WAVE. Forty out of about 100 cones coalesce to form an edifice about 25 km in diameter, 1,900 m high, rising from a plateau depth of 3,200 m. SeaMARC II side-scan images suggest radial fluid sediment flow from the center of this feature. Recent foraminiferal ooze was cored from a satellite cone. One dredge haul from the summit of the edifice recovered burrowed limestone with embedded Middle Eocene foraminifera. It suggests that parts of the sedimentary basement cover of the Manihiki Plateau have been mobilized together with pore fluids and moved upward. The causes of the movement as well as its mechanism, however, remain unknown because of the lack of direct measurements. There is a likelihood that overpressured methane, generated from organic carbon-rich sediments, acts as driving force. Therefore, BGR submitted a proposal to the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) to investigate the mud volcano complex and reference area with the most relevant outcropping sedimentary sequence of the northeastern Manihiki Plateau in detail. The preliminary results from these investigations carried out with R/V SONNE in spring of 1990 are presented.

  20. THE "MUD VOLCANO," A STINKY THERMAL FEATURE ON THE GRAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE "MUD VOLCANO," A STINKY THERMAL FEATURE ON THE GRAND LOOP ROAD. ACIDIC HOT SPRINGS HAVE REDUCED THE UNDERLYING LAVA TO A FINE CLAY, PRODUCING AN AREA OF BOILING MUD. THE ODOR OF ROTTEN EGGS IS FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE GAS. - Grand Loop Road, Forming circuit between Mammoth Hot Springs, Norris Junction, Madison Junction, Old Faithful, Mammoth, Park County, WY

  1. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  2. Rapid rates of growth and collapse of Monowai submarine volcano in the Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Peirce, C.; Grevemeyer, I.; Paulatto, M.; Stratford, W.; Bassett, D.; Hunter, J. A.; Kalnins, L. M.; de Ronde, C. E. J.

    2012-07-01

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are under water. As a result of their relative inaccessibility, little is known of the structure and evolution of submarine volcanoes. Advances in navigation and sonar imaging techniques have made it possible to map submarine volcanoes in detail, and repeat surveys allow the identification of regions where the depth of the sea floor is actively changing. Here we report the results of a bathymetric survey of Monowai submarine volcano in the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, which we mapped twice within 14 days. We found marked differences in bathymetry between the two surveys, including an increase in seafloor depth up to 18.8m and a decrease in depth up to 71.9m. We attribute the depth increase to collapse of the volcano summit region and the decrease to growth of new lava cones and debris flows. Hydroacoustic T-wave data reveal a 5-day-long swarm of seismic events with unusually high amplitude between the surveys, which directly link the depth changes to explosive activity at the volcano. The collapse and growth rates implied by our data are extremely high, compared with measured long-term growth rates of the volcano, demonstrating the pulsating nature of submarine volcanism and highlighting the dynamic nature of the sea floor.

  3. Potential environmental benefits from regulatory consideration of synthetic drilling muds

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, C.J.; Veil, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    When drilling exploration and production wells for oil and gas, drillers use specialized drilling fluids, referred to as muds, to help maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. Historically, either water-based muds (WBMs) or oil-based muds (OBMs) have been used for offshore wells. Recently, in response to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations and drilling-waste discharge requirements imposed by North Sea nations, the drilling industry has developed several types of synthetic-based muds (SBMs) that combine the desirable operating qualities of OBMs with the lower toxicity and environmental impact qualities of WBMs. This report describes the operational, environmental, and economic features of all three types of muds and discusses potential EPA regulatory barriers to wider use of SBMs.

  4. Mud volcanoes of trinidad as astrobiological analogs for martian environments.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Beckles, Denise M

    2014-01-01

    Eleven onshore mud volcanoes in the southern region of Trinidad have been studied as analog habitats for possible microbial life on Mars. The profiles of the 11 mud volcanoes are presented in terms of their physical, chemical, mineralogical, and soil properties. The mud volcanoes sampled all emitted methane gas consistently at 3% volume. The average pH for the mud volcanic soil was 7.98. The average Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) was found to be 2.16 kg/mol, and the average Percentage Water Content was 34.5%. Samples from three of the volcanoes, (i) Digity; (ii) Piparo and (iii) Devil's Woodyard were used to culture bacterial colonies under anaerobic conditions indicating possible presence of methanogenic microorganisms. The Trinidad mud volcanoes can serve as analogs for the Martian environment due to similar geological features found extensively on Mars in Acidalia Planitia and the Arabia Terra region. PMID:25370529

  5. Elastomers in mud motors for oil field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrik, J.

    1997-08-01

    Mud motors, the most frequently used downhole drilling motors in modern drilling systems, are described in their application and function. The elastomeric liner in a mud motor acts as a huge continuous seal. Important properties of elastomers such as chemical resistance, fatigue resistance, mechanical strength, abrasion resistance, bonding to steel and processability are discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of NBR, HNBR, FKM, TFEP, and EPDM elastomers for mud motor applications are briefly described. The importance of drilling fluids and their physical and chemical impact on motor elastomers are described. Drilling fluids are categorized in: oil based-, synthetic-, and water based. Results of compatibility tests in the different drilling muds of the presented categories demonstrate the complexity of elastomer development. Elastomers with an equally good performance in all drilling muds are not available. Future developments and improvements are directed towards higher chemical resistance at higher service temperatures. This will be possible only with improved elastomer-to-metal bonding, increased mechanical and better dynamic properties.

  6. Peloid Mud: a multi-step maturation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redolfi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is understanding the process involved in the maturation of artificial peloid mud commonly use in thermal spa. I prepare a standard protocol for analysis: XRD, chemical, heat capacity and heavy metal sequential extraction . I also prepare 12 artificial peloid mud following the procedure describe in Veniale et al. (2004) mixing natural thermal waters form the Lazio region with a common clay also collected in Lazio Region with a ration of 1:1 in weight and put this mud in a sealed box at 40 °C for all the maturation process without remixing. Each peloid mud was sampled at one, three and six month of maturation, dried at 60 °C degree and milled for analysis. Each mud was compared with the result at one, three and six month to identify the major different of parameters at different time of maturation.

  7. Mud Volcanoes of Trinidad as Astrobiological Analogs for Martian Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Beckles, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven onshore mud volcanoes in the southern region of Trinidad have been studied as analog habitats for possible microbial life on Mars. The profiles of the 11 mud volcanoes are presented in terms of their physical, chemical, mineralogical, and soil properties. The mud volcanoes sampled all emitted methane gas consistently at 3% volume. The average pH for the mud volcanic soil was 7.98. The average Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) was found to be 2.16 kg/mol, and the average Percentage Water Content was 34.5%. Samples from three of the volcanoes, (i) Digity; (ii) Piparo and (iii) Devil’s Woodyard were used to culture bacterial colonies under anaerobic conditions indicating possible presence of methanogenic microorganisms. The Trinidad mud volcanoes can serve as analogs for the Martian environment due to similar geological features found extensively on Mars in Acidalia Planitia and the Arabia Terra region. PMID:25370529

  8. 3D Subsoil Model of the San Biagio `Salinelle' Mud Volcanoes (Belpasso, Sicily) derived from Geophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imposa, S.; Grassi, S.; De Guidi, G.; Battaglia, F.; Lanaia, G.; Scudero, S.

    2016-07-01

    Mud volcanoes are common in active mountain fronts. At Mt. Etna, located just between the Apennine front in Sicily and its foredeep, there are some manifestations of mud volcanism in the lower border of the volcanic edifice. The activity of these mud volcanoes is characterized by persistent emission of muddy water mixed with salts, which rises to the surface due to the gas pressure in the subsoil. The San Biagio Salinelle is one of the three mud volcano fields located around the Paternò eruptive monogenic apparatus; this old volcanic structure was one of the first subaerial volcanic manifestations that formed in the pre-Etnean phase. It is not fully clear whether and how the activity of the mud fields is connected with the volcanic activity of Mt. Etna. Noninvasive geophysical surveys were carried out in the area of the active cone of the San Biagio Salinelle, in order to identify the probable ascent path of the emitted products. Seismic ambient noise records were collected at the nodes of a specially designed grid and, subsequently, the V s values were obtained from an active seismic survey. A digital elevation model (DEM) of the area was obtained by a topographic survey, carried out with the GNSS technique (global navigation satellite system), in real-time kinematic mode. The DEM and the topographic benchmark installed will represent the reference surface for future periodic monitoring of the ongoing deformation in the area. Our results provide an accurate and detailed 3D subsurface model showing the shallower feeding system of the investigated mud volcano.

  9. Natech events in mud flow prone areas. Methods and tools for risk prevention and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceudech, A.; Galderisi, A.; Profice, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of the present work, which is part of a National Research Project running between 2007 and 2009, is to develop methods and tools towards a better knowledge and mitigation of the Natech risk. The work grounds on the deeping of a case study: the Municipality of Siano, in the Campania Region (Italy), located in a valley area often subjected to hydro-geological events. More specifically the examined area is periodically affected by significant hydro-geological events that trigger rapidly evolving destructive phenomena (mud flows). A liquefied gas deposit (LPG), classified as a hazardous industrial plant (according to the Seveso II Directive and the Italian Law 334/99), is also localized in the town, in an area potentially affected by mud flows, next to a residential zone and to the main way of access and escape from town. In order to single out possible strategies of mitigation and emergency management, a scenario hypothesis of events, impacts and damages was outlined, starting from singling out possible mud flows triggering points. The complexity of the problem, characterised by simultaneous mud flow events and potential secondary technological hazards, required the implementation of a GIS capable of integrating not only data deriving from different disciplinary areas (geology, land use planning) but also automatic algorithms to estimate the possible impacts and damages of each chain generated from each mud flows and taking into account the potential of secondary hazards (technological accidents). Furthermore, because the evolution of these phenomena (mud flows) highly depends on the morphology of the territory and position of the buildings, it seemed appropriate to set up a tridimensional model of the area. The scenario is sketched as a logical-conceptual chain that, grounding on the characterisation of the primary event (mud flow) and on the tridimensional model of the site and buildings, leads to single out the possible impacts of the event on

  10. Submarine paleoseismology based on turbidite records.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Many of the largest earthquakes are generated at subduction zones or other plate boundary fault systems near enough to the coast that marine environments may record evidence of them. During and shortly after large earthquakes in the coastal and marine environments, a spectrum of evidence may be left behind, mirroring onshore paleoseismic evidence. Shaking or displacement of the seafloor can trigger processes such as turbidity currents, submarine landslides, tsunami (which may be recorded both onshore and offshore), and soft-sediment deformation. Marine sites may also share evidence of fault scarps, colluvial wedges, offset features, and liquefaction or fluid expulsion with their onshore counterparts. This article reviews the use of submarine turbidite deposits for paleoseismology, focuses on the dating and correlation techniques used to establish stratigraphic continuity of marine deposits, and outlines criteria for distinguishing earthquake deposits and the strategies used to acquire suitable samples and data for marine paleoseismology. PMID:21329198

  11. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  12. Engineered solutions to the hazards of oil based muds

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetsur, A.

    1987-01-01

    In the drilling process, mud performs a number of functions requiring different physical and chemical properties and it is useful to consider how these are affected by the use of an oil based fluid. The first function of the mud is to transport cuttings to the surface, which in general requires a velocity of around 100-200 ft/min and a viscosity of 30-50 secs/qt. The mud should have sufficient viscosity and gel strength to ensure that the cuttings are transported from the cutting surface and that they do no sink back to the bottom should circulation be interrupted. Secondly, the mud also works as a cutting fluid to lubricate and cool the bit and to ensure the at it is working on a clean formation, and to assist cutting via the energy of the fluid jets from the bit nozzles. The third essential function of the mud is as a primary means of pressure control. The hydrostatic head of the column of mud serves to counter-balance the formation pressure at any depth and must be amenable to adjust to compensate for variations in pressure. Also, by measuring flow rates in and out of the hole, the volume of mud in the tanks and by monitoring whether the mud contains gas, fluids or hydrocarbons, a large amount of information about what is happening at the bit can be obtained. The fourth property of mud is to provide a filter-cake that lines the bore of the well, helping to support is and preventing the loss of mud to the formation or the ingress of fluids form the formation into the hold.

  13. Mud Flow Characteristics Occurred in Izuoshima Island, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takebayashi, H.; Egashira, S.; Fujita, M.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides and mud flows were occurred in the west part of the Izuoshima Island, Japan on 16 October 2013. The Izuoshima Island is a volcanic island and the land surface is covered by the volcanic ash sediment in 1m depth. Hence, the mud flow with high sediment concentration was formed. The laminar layer is formed in the debris flow from the bed to the fluid surface. On the other hand, the laminar flow is restricted near the bed in the mud flow and the turbulence flow is formed on the laminar flow layer. As a result, the equilibrium slope of the mud flow becomes smaller comparing to the debris flow. In this study, the numerical analysis mud flow model considering the effect of turbulence flow on the equilibrium slope of the mud flow is developed. Subsequently, the model is applied to the mud flow occurred in the Izuoshima Island and discussed the applicability of the model and the flow characteristics of the mud flow. The differences of the horizontal flow areas between the simulated results and the field data are compared and it was found that the outline of the horizontal shape of the flow areas is reproduced well. Furthermore, the horizontal distribution of the erosion and deposition area is reproduced by the numerical analysis well except for the residential area (Kandachi area). Kandachi area is judged as the erosion area by the field observation, but the sediment was deposited in the numerical analysis. It is considered that the 1.5hour heavy rain over 100mm/h after the mud flow makes the discrepancy. The difference of the horizontal distribution of the maximum flow surface elevation between the simulated results and the field data are compared and it was found that the simulated flow depth is overestimated slightly, because of the wider erosion area due to the coarse resolution elevation data. The averaged velocity and the depth of the mud flow was enough large to collapse the houses.

  14. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  15. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  16. Preliminary Analytical Results for a Mud Sample Collected from the LUSI Mud Volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Wibowo, Handoko T.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Johnson, Craig A.; Breit, George N.; Lowers, Heather; Wolf, Ruth E.; Hageman, Philip L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Anthony, Michael W.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Fey, David L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Morman, Suzette A.

    2008-01-01

    On May 29, 2006, mud and gases began erupting unexpectedly from a vent 150 meters away from a hydrocarbon exploration well near Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia. The eruption, called the LUSI (Lumpur 'mud'-Sidoarjo) mud volcano, has continued since then at rates as high as 160,000 m3 per day. At the request of the United States Department of State, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing technical assistance to the Indonesian Government on the geological and geochemical aspects of the mud eruption. This report presents initial characterization results of a sample of the mud collected on September 22, 2007, as well as inerpretive findings based on the analytical results. The focus is on characteristics of the mud sample (including the solid and water components of the mud) that may be of potential environmental or human health concern. Characteristics that provide insights into the possible origins of the mud and its contained solids and waters have also been evaluated.

  17. Long- and short-term triggering and modulation of mud volcano eruptions by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Earthquakes can trigger the eruption of mud. We use eruptions in Azerbaijan, Italy, Romania, Japan, Andaman Islands, Pakistan, Taiwan, Indonesia, and California to probe the nature of stress changes that induce new eruptions and modulate ongoing eruptions. Dynamic stresses produced by earthquakes are usually inferred to be the dominant triggering mechanism; however static stress changes acting on the feeder systems of mud volcanoes may also play a role. In Azerbaijan, eruptions within 2-10 fault lengths from the epicenter are favored in the year following earthquakes where the static stress changes cause compression of the mud source and unclamp feeder dikes. In Romania, Taiwan, and some Italian sites, increased activity is also favored where the static stress changes act to unclamp feeder dikes, but responses occur within days. The eruption in the Andaman Islands, and those of the Niikappu mud volcanoes, Japan are better correlated with amplitude of dynamic stresses produced by seismic waves. Similarly, a new island that emerged off the coast of Pakistan in 2013 was likely triggered by dynamic stresses, enhanced by directivity. At the southern end of the Salton Sea, California earthquakes increase the gas flux at small mud volcanoes. Responses are best correlated with dynamic stresses. The comparison of responses in these nine settings indicates that dynamic stresses are most often correlated with triggering, although permanent stress changes as small as, and possibly smaller than, 0.1 bar may be sufficient to also influence eruptions. Unclamping stresses with magnitude similar to Earth tides (0.01 bar) persist over time and may play a role in triggering delayed responses. Unclamping stresses may be important contributors to short-term triggering only if they exceed 0.1-1 bar.

  18. "Internal Waves" Advancing along Submarine Canyons.

    PubMed

    Shepard, F P; Marshall, N F; McLoughlin, P A

    1974-01-18

    Patterns of alternating up- and downcanyon currents have been traced along the axes of submarine canyons off California. The patterns arrive later at stations nearer the heads of coastal canyons. Where a canyon heads between two islands, the patterns advance down the axis. The propagation speeds of these patterns were estimated as 25 to 88 centimeters per second. Internal waves are the probable explanation. PMID:17777263

  19. 50. PIPING FOR SUBMARINE SECTION, Y&D No. 107728 Scale 3/8' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. PIPING FOR SUBMARINE SECTION, Y&D No. 107728 Scale 3/8' = 1'; August 26, 1929 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  20. 16. INTERIOR VIEW OF SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110FOOT LEVEL, ESCAPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR VIEW OF SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110-FOOT LEVEL, ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING LADDER TO ESCAPE TANK, LOOKING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  1. First Survey For Submarine Hydrothermal Vents In NE Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConachy, T.; Binns, R.; Permana, H.

    2001-12-01

    The IASSHA-2001 cruise (Indonesia-Australia Survey for Submarine Hydrothermal Activity) was successfully conducted from June 1 to June 29 on board Baruna Jaya VIII. Preliminary results are reported of the first expedition to locate and study submarine hydrothermal activity in north east Sulawesi. Leg A focussed on Tomini Bay, a virtually unexplored Neogene sedimentary basin. Its objective was to test whether modern sediment-hosted hydrothermal activity occurred on the sea floor. The results of new bathymetric mapping, sediment coring and CTD/transmissometer hydrocasts negate the likely presence in central Tomini Bay of large-scale modern analogues of hydrothermal massive sulfide environments involving hydrothermal venting of basinal or magma-derived fluids into reduced sediments. It is possible that the "heat engine" required to drive circulation of basinal and hydrothermal fluids is today too weak. Surveys around Colo volcano indicate that it may be in its final stage of evolution. Leg B studied the arc and behind-arc sectors of the Sangihe volcanic island chain extending northwards from Quaternary volcanoes on the northeastern tip of Sulawesi's North Arm, near Manado. West of the main active chain and extending northwards from Manado there is a subparallel ridge surmounted by a number of high (>2000 m) seamounts of uncertain age. Fifteen relatively high-standing submarine edifices were crossed during this leg, of which nine were tested for hydrothermal activity by hydrocast and dredging. Eight sites were known from previous bathymetric surveys, and seven are new discoveries made by narrow-beam or multibeam echo sounding. Two submarine edifices at least 1000 m high were discovered in the strait immediately north of Awu volcano on Sangihe Island. One, with crest at 206 m, is surrounded by a circular platform 300m deep which we infer to be a foundered fringing reef to a formerly emergent island. The other, lacking such a platform, appears relatively young and may be

  2. The submarine service of the future?

    PubMed

    Bland, S A

    2000-01-01

    Space missions, although now routine, are unique in terms of their environment and logistical requirements. The number of missions (man-hours) remains relatively small and planning still relies on comparisons with analogous missions, including submarine operations. Antarctic missions, which tend not to be classified, have provided more information about isolated communities because of the number of personnel per base. Space medicine has traditionally been an extension of aviation medicine with high g-forces involved in the transition from Earth to orbit and astronauts such as Neil Armstrong recruited from the test pilot fraternity. As the length of a mission increases and the space habitation relies more on regenerative systems, the environment becomes more analogous with today's nuclear submarines. As well as the air purification implications, radiation still is a significant hazard with even greater impact on future Mars missions requiring the provision of health physics monitoring, advice and countermeasures well established in the submarine flotilla. Nevertheless, the specialty space medicine will progress as a specialty in its own right, pooling expertise from other specialties such as aviation, radiation, emergency and occupational medicine taking human exploration beyond the confines of land and sea. PMID:11346925

  3. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths < 200 meters is estimated to have DCS risk < 6%. Saturation at raised DISSUB pressure markedly increases risk, with > 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models. PMID:25109085

  4. Geochemical surveys in the Lusi mud eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Etiope, Giuseppe; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Hussein, Alwi; Hadi J., Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the Java Island. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we carried out geochemical surveys in the Sidoarjo district (Eastern Java Island, Indonesia) to investigate the gas bearing properties of the Watukosek fault system that crosses the Lusi mud eruption area. Soil gas (222Rn, CO2, CH4) concentration and flux measurements were performed 1) along two detailed profiles (~ 1km long), trending almost W-E direction, and 2) inside the Lusi embankment (about 7 km2) built to contain the erupted mud. Higher gas concentrations and fluxes were detected at the intersection with the Watukosek fault and the antithetic fault system. These zones characterized by the association of higher soil gas values constitute preferential migration pathways for fluids towards surface. The fractures release mainly CO2 (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and display higher temperatures (up to 41°C). The main shear zones are populated by numerous seeps that expel mostly CH4. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that φCO2 is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fractures, and two orders of magnitude higher for φCH4. An additional geochemical profile was completed perpendicularly to the Watukosek fault escarpement (W-E direction) at the foots of the Penanngungang volcano. Results reveal CO2 and CH4 flux values significantly lower than those measured in the embankment, however an increase of radon and flux measurements is observed approaching the foots of the escarpment. These measurements are complemented with a database of ~350 CH4 and CO2 flux measurements and some soil gas concentrations (He, H2, CO2, CH4 and C2H6) and their isotopic analyses (δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 and δ13C-CO2). Results show that the whole area is characterized by diffused gas release through seeps, fractures, microfractures and soil degassing. The collected results shed light on the origin of the

  5. Clay mineral provinces in tidal mud flats at Germany's North Sea coast with illite K-Ar ages potentially modified by biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockamp, Olaf; Clauer, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    Mineralogical studies, chemical analyses and K-Ar dating were carried out on clay fractions from tidal mud flats along the Lower Saxony coast and its bays to identify material sources and sedimentary processes at this dynamic interface between air, land and sea. From the coast into the bays, sediments are enriched in fine-grained smectite relative to the coarser grained illite, chlorite and kaolinite, due to the weakening of the tidal current energy in the bays. In addition, the study area can be divided into two provinces on the basis of the illite K/Rb ratios and Mg contents. To the west [Schiermonnikoog, Dollart, Ley Bay up to Norderney island], longshore currents carry suspensions from the Belgian and Dutch coasts; to the east [from Langeoog island, Jade Bay to the Helgoland mud area] suspensions from the Elbe and Weser rivers are mixed with submarine reworked glacial sediments, whereas the portion of longshore current suspensions from the west decreases, becoming negligible in the Helgoland mud area off the Elbe and Weser estuaries. The illite K-Ar data vary considerably and fail as source indicators due to differential settling and mixing of the clay material and probably to Ar loss from illite by biodegradation during digestive processes. Only further offshore, outside the zone of dynamic sediment dispersion, do the K-Ar data fit provenance patterns.

  6. Giant submarine landslides on the Colombian margin and tsunami risk in the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Stephen C.; Mann, Paul

    2016-09-01

    A series of three giant, previously unrecognized submarine landslides are defined on a 16,000 line km grid of multi-channel 2D seismic reflection profiles along the active margin of northern Colombia in the western Caribbean Sea. These deposits record the collapse and mobilization of immense segments (thousands of cubic kilometers) of the submarine slope and are comparable in scale to the largest known landslides on Earth. We show that the breakaway zone for these events corresponds to the tectonically over-steepened slopes of the Magdalena Fan, an extensive submarine fan composed of sediments sourced from the northern Andes and deposited by the Magdalena River. An over-pressured zone of weakness at the base of the gas-hydrate stability layer within the fan likely facilitates slope failure. Timing of these massive slope failures is constrained by well control and occurred from the mid-to-late Pliocene to mid-Pleistocene. To understand the tsunamigenic hazards posed by the recurrence of such an event today, we model the potential tsunami source created by a submarine landslide of comparable thickness (400 m) and lateral extent (1700 km2) derived from the over-steepened upper slopes of the present day Magdalena Fan. Our modeling indicates the recurrence of an analogous slope failure would result in a major tsunami that would impact population centers along the Caribbean coastlines of Colombia, Central America, and the Greater Antilles with little advance warning.

  7. Sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) using red mud.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishwajeet S; Prasad, Murari; Khan, Jeeshan; Amritphale, S S; Singh, M; Raju, C B

    2010-04-15

    Red mud, an aluminium industry hazardous waste, has been reported to be an inexpensive and effective adsorbent. In the present work applicability of red mud for the sequestration of green house gases with reference to carbon dioxide has been studied. Red mud sample was separated into three different size fractions (RM I, RM II, RM III) of varying densities (1.5-2.2 g cm(-3)). Carbonation of each fraction of red mud was carried out separately at room temperature using a stainless steel reaction chamber at a fixed pressure of 3.5 bar. Effects of reaction time (0.5-12 h) and liquid to solid ratio (0.2-0.6) were studied for carbonation of red mud. Different instrumental techniques such as X-ray diffraction, FTIR and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to ascertain the different mineral phases before and after carbonation of each fraction of red mud. Characterization studies revealed the presence of boehmite, cancrinite, chantalite, hematite, gibbsite, anatase, rutile and quartz. Calcium bearing mineral phases (cancrinite and chantalite) were found responsible for carbonation of red mud. Maximum carbonation was observed for the fraction RM II having higher concentration of cancrinite. The carbonation capacity is evaluated to be 5.3 g of CO(2)/100 g of RM II. PMID:20036053

  8. Bioerosion and carbonate mud production on high-latitude shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, George E.; Alan Fyfe, J.

    1988-11-01

    Low-latitude carbonate muds often are composed either of entire units of skeletons (e.g., algal muds) or of precipitates, whereas high-latitude carbonate muds are bioerosional or result from maceration. Bioerosion at high latitudes is most intense in the photic zone, particularly down to 25 m depth. Shelly substrata may be crushed, bitten, drilled, bored or scraped. Clionid sponges, endolithic algae, acmaeid gastropods and regular echinoids are the most significant agents. Clionids produce distinctive facetted carbonate silt chips when boring, which have been described from both high- and low-latitudes. Faecal pellets break down to yield mud-sized carbonate particles that are more irregular than those produced by maceration. Exhumed infaunal bivalves are often preferred to epifaunal organisms as substrata. Bioerosion occurs very rapidly; shells may be totally infested with boring algae in three months. A "moth-eaten" appearance therefore does not denote a relict grain. Reliable rates of fine sediment production are not yet available. The mud fraction of northwest European shelf sediment generally contains 10-20% CaCO 3, though an inshore and offshore belt with higher values may be identified. Some Holocene supratidal mud-flats exceed 50% CaCO 3. Much of the shelf represents a modern-day equivalent of the "calcareous shale" facies common in the geological record. Instances of synsedimentary cementation are not uncommon, particularly in association with heavily burrowed muds.

  9. Microtremor study of Gunung Anyar mud volcano, Surabaya, East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaifuddin, Firman; Bahri, Ayi Syaeful; Lestari, Wien; Pandu, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The existence of mud volcano system in East Java is known from the ancient period, especially in Surabaya. Gunung Anyar mud volcano is one of the mud volcano system manifestation was appeared close to the residence. Because of this phenomenon we have to learn about the impact of this mud volcano manifestation to the neighbourhood. The microtremor study was conducted to evaluate the possible influence effect of the mud volcano to the environment and get more information about the subsurface condition in this area. Microtremor is one of the geophysical methods which measure the natural tremor or vibration of the earth, the dominant frequency of the tremor represent thickness of the soft sediment layer overlay above the bed rock or harder rock layer beneath our feet. In this study 90 stations was measured to record the natural tremor. The result from this study shows the direct influenced area of this small mud volcano system is close to 50m from the centre of the mud volcano and bed rock of this area is range between 66 to 140 meter.

  10. Mud volcano venting induced gas hydrate formation at the upper slope accretionary wedge, offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Cheng, Wan-Yen; Chou, Cheng-Tien; Chen, NeiChen; Hsieh, I.-Chih

    2016-04-01

    TsanYao Mud Volcano (TYMV) is the largest mud volcano cone in the Hengchun Mud Volcano Group (HCMVG), located at the upper slope of the accrretionary wedge, southwest of Taiwan. The region is under active tectonic activity with the Philippine Plate, moving northwestward at a rate of ~8 cm/year. This region also receives huge quantity of suspended particle load of ~100 mT/year at present time from adjacent small rivers of the Island of Taiwan. Large loads of suspended sediments influx become a major source of organic carbon and later gas and other hydrocarbon. Gas and fluid in the mud volcano are actively venting from deep to the sea floor on the upper slope of the accretionary wedge. In order to understand venting on the HCMVG, echo sounder, towcam and coring were carried out. Pore water sulfate, chloride, potassium, calcium, stable isotope O-18, gas compositions, dissolved sulfide were analysed. The HCMVG consists of 12 volcano cones of different sizes. Large quantity of gas and fluid are venting directly from deep to the TYMV structure high, as well as 50+ other vents as appeared as flares on the echo sounder. Some flares are reaching to the atmosphere and likely a source of green house gases to the atmosphere. Venting fluids include gas bubbles, suspended particle, mud, and breccia. Breccia size could reach more than 12 cm in diameter. Circular bands in different color appeared around the cone may represent stages of vent eruptions. Compositions of vent gas include methane, ethane and propane. High proportions of ethane and propane in the vent gas demonstrated that source of gas are thermogenic in origin. Patchy authigenic carbonate, bacterial mats, bivalves, tube worms and other chemosynthesis organisms were supported by venting gas AOM process near the sea floor. Pore water chloride concentrations show distinct variation pattern from center cone to the side of the volcano, with low in the center and high away from the cone. Pore water with higher than seawater

  11. Oblique strike-slip faulting of the Cascadia submarine forearc: The Daisy Bank fault zone off central Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, Chris; Kulm, LaVerne D.; Yeats, Robert S.; Hummon, Cheryl; Huftile, Gary J.; Niem, Alan R.; McNeill, Lisa C.

    The Cascadia submarine forearc off Oregon and Washington is deformed by numerous active WNW-trending, left-lateral strike-slip faults. The kinematics of this set of sub-parallel left-lateral faults suggests clockwise block rotation of the forearc driven by oblique subduction. One major left-lateral strike-slip fault, the 94 km-long Daisy Bank fault, located off central Oregon, was studied in detail using high-resolution AMS 150 kHz and SeaMARC-lA sidescan sonar, swath bathymetry, multichannel seismic reflection profiles and a submersible. The Daisy Bank fault zone cuts the sediments and basaltic basement of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and the overriding North American plate, extending from the abyssal plain to the upper slope-outer shelf region. The Daisy Bank fault, a near-vertical left-lateral fault striking 292°, is a wide structural zone with multiple scarps observed in high-resolution sidescan images. From a submersible, we observe that these scarps offset late Pleistocene gray clay and overlying olive green Holocene mud, dating fault activity as post-12 ka on the upper slope. Vertical separation along individual fault scarps ranges from a few centimeters to 130 meters. Using a retrodeformation technique with multichannel reflection records, we calculate a net slip of 2.2±0.5 km. Fault movement commenced at about 380±50 ka near the western fault tip, based upon an analysis of growth strata and correlation with deep-sea drill hole biostratigraphy. We calculate a slip rate of 5.7±2.0 mm/yr. for the Daisy Bank fault at its western end on the Juan de Fuca plate. The motion of the set of oblique faults, including the Daisy Bank fault, may accommodate a significant portion of the oblique component of plate motion along the central Cascadia margin. We propose a block rotation model by which the seawardmost part of the forearc rotates clockwise and translates northward.

  12. Binding of Vapour-Phase Mercury (Hg0) on Chemically Treated Bauxite Residues (Red Mud)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, Hg capture using red mud, seawater-neutralized red mud, and acid-treated red mud is evaluated and compared to other, more conventional sorbent materials. Red mud (also known as bauxite residue) is a by-product of extracting alumina from ground bauxite ore by treati...

  13. Numerical investigation of fluid mud motion using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and two-dimensional fluid mud coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qinghe; Hao, Linnan

    2015-03-01

    A water-fluid mud coupling model is developed based on the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) to investigate the fluid mud motion. The hydrodynamics and sediment transport of the overlying water column are solved using the original three-dimensional ocean model. A horizontal two-dimensional fluid mud model is integrated into the FVCOM model to simulate the underlying fluid mud flow. The fluid mud interacts with the water column through the sediment flux, current, and shear stress. The friction factor between the fluid mud and the bed, which is traditionally determined empirically, is derived with the assumption that the vertical distribution of shear stress below the yield surface of fluid mud is identical to that of uniform laminar flow of Newtonian fluid in the open channel. The model is validated by experimental data and reasonable agreement is found. Compared with numerical cases with fixed friction factors, the results simulated with the derived friction factor exhibit the best agreement with the experiment, which demonstrates the necessity of the derivation of the friction factor.

  14. Submarine slumps, slides, and flows dominate sculpting of Beringian Margin, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, P.R.; Karl, H.A.; Edwards, B.D.; Gardner, J.V.; Hall, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The 1,400 km long Beringian margin is characterized by several very large submarine canyons and by a large oceanic plateau at the southern end. GLORIA sidescan-sonar imagery provides a perspective of this margin that is unattainable with conventional acoustic profiles. The broad coverage of GLORIA images emphasizes that, of all the sedimentary processes affecting this vast margin, mass movement is clearly the dominant shaping process. Styles of failure include mud and debris flows, slumps, and massive block slides, some covering areas greater than 1,500 km{sup 2}. GLORIA imagery and seismic-reflection profiles show evidence for a wide variety of slides and slumps in the canyons of the northern margin, Navarin and Pervenets. The 100 km long shelf edge between these two canyons is characterized by a series of scalloped slide scars and incipient scars associated with blocks of sedimentary material, 1 to 2 km across. One of the largest single slide masses is a huge block tens of kilometers wide that occurs on the rise in the central part of the margin beyond the mouth of Zhemchug Canyon. Sliding of this block may have initiated the incision of the world's largest submarine canyon. The removal of this block accelerated headward erosion by retrograde failure until Zhemchug Canyon was cut back to a fault parallel to the shelf edge. Mass movement along the southern margin is widespread at the edges of Umnak Plateau. One mass failure, well-defined by GLORIA, is about 30 km wide and 55 km long. This and other slides along the plateau are associated with diapiric-like structures, suggesting relatively recent tectonism.

  15. The Amazon-influenced muddy coast of South America: A review of mud-bank-shoreline interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Gratiot, Nicolas; Proisy, Christophe; Allison, Mead A.; Dolique, Franck; Fromard, François

    2010-12-01

    The 1500 km-long coast of South America between the Amazon and the Orinoco river mouths is the world's muddiest. This is due to the huge suspended-sediment discharge of the Amazon River (10 6 × 754 tons yr - 1 ± 9%), part of which is transported alongshore as mud banks. Mud-bank formation is controlled by the physical oceanography of the continental shelf seaward of the Amazon River mouth, an initial seafloor storage area for much of the suspended sediment discharged from the river. In this area, rapid and sustained fluid-mud concentration and trapping are associated with fresh water-salt water interaction and estuarine front activity on the shelf due to the enormous Amazon water discharge (ca. 173,000 m 3 s - 1 at Obidos, 900 km upstream of the mouth). Fluid mud is transported shoreward and then along the coasts of the Guianas by a complex interaction of wave and tidal forcing, and wind-generated coastal currents. The mud banks, which may number up to 15 or more at any time, are up to 5 m-thick, 10 to 60 km-long, and 20 to 30 km-wide, and each may contain the equivalent mass of the annual mud supply of the Amazon. As the banks migrate alongshore, their interaction with waves results in complex and markedly fluctuating shorelines that are associated with space- and time-varying depositional 'bank' phases and erosional 'inter-bank' phases. Bank zones are protected from wave attack as a result of wave-energy dampening by mud, and undergo significant, albeit temporary, coastal accretion accompanied by rapid mangrove colonization. The dampening of waves in bank areas as they propagate onshore is accompanied by the shoreward recycling of mud, commonly in the form of individual mud bars. These bars progressively undergo desiccation and consolidation, and thus constitute a major pathway for rapid and massive colonization by mangroves. Erosion by waves propagating across relatively mud-deficient shoreface zones in inter-bank areas can lead to muddy shoreline retreat

  16. A submarine landslide source for the devastating 1964 Chenega tsunami, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Liberty, Lee; Finlayson, David; Geist, Eric; Labay, Keith; Byerly, Mike

    2016-03-01

    During the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake (Mw 9.2), several fjords, straits, and bays throughout southern Alaska experienced significant tsunami runup of localized, but unexplained origin. Dangerous Passage is a glacimarine fjord in western Prince William Sound, which experienced a tsunami that devastated the village of Chenega where 23 of 75 inhabitants were lost - the highest relative loss of any community during the earthquake. Previous studies suggested the source of the devastating tsunami was either from a local submarine landslide of unknown origin or from coseismic tectonic displacement. Here we present new observations from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted in the waters adjacent to the village of Chenega. The seabed morphology and substrate architecture reveal a large submarine landslide complex in water depths of 120-360 m. Analysis of bathymetric change between 1957 and 2014 indicates the upper 20-50 m (˜0.7 km3) of glacimarine sediment was destabilized and evacuated from the steep face of a submerged moraine and an adjacent ˜21 km2 perched sedimentary basin. Once mobilized, landslide debris poured over the steep, 130 m-high face of a deeper moraine and then blanketed the terminal basin (˜465 m water depth) in 11 ± 5 m of sediment. These results, combined with inverse tsunami travel-time modeling, suggest that earthquake-triggered submarine landslides generated the tsunami that struck the village of Chenega roughly 4 min after shaking began. Unlike other tsunamigenic landslides observed in and around Prince William Sound in 1964, the failures in Dangerous Passage are not linked to an active submarine delta. The requisite environmental conditions needed to generate large submarine landslides in glacimarine fjords around the world may be more common than previously thought.

  17. A submarine landslide source for the devastating 1964 Chenega tsunami, southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel; Haeussler, Peter J.; Lee Liberty; David Finlayson; Geist, Eric L.; Labay, Keith; Michael Byerly

    2016-01-01

    During the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake (Mw 9.2), several fjords, straits, and bays throughout southern Alaska experienced significant tsunami runup of localized, but unexplained origin. Dangerous Passage is a glacimarine fjord in western Prince William Sound, which experienced a tsunami that devastated the village of Chenega where 23 of 75 inhabitants were lost – the highest relative loss of any community during the earthquake. Previous studies suggested the source of the devastating tsunami was either from a local submarine landslide of unknown origin or from coseismic tectonic displacement. Here we present new observations from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted in the waters adjacent to the village of Chenega. The seabed morphology and substrate architecture reveal a large submarine landslide complex in water depths of 120–360 m. Analysis of bathymetric change between 1957 and 2014 indicates the upper 20–50 m (∼0.7 km3) of glacimarine sediment was destabilized and evacuated from the steep face of a submerged moraine and an adjacent ∼21 km2 perched sedimentary basin. Once mobilized, landslide debris poured over the steep, 130 m-high face of a deeper moraine and then blanketed the terminal basin (∼465 m water depth) in 11 ± 5 m of sediment. These results, combined with inverse tsunami travel-time modeling, suggest that earthquake- triggered submarine landslides generated the tsunami that struck the village of Chenega roughly 4 min after shaking began. Unlike other tsunamigenic landslides observed in and around Prince William Sound in 1964, the failures in Dangerous Passage are not linked to an active submarine delta. The requisite environmental conditions needed to generate large submarine landslides in glacimarine fjords around the world may be more common than previously thought. 

  18. A submarine landslide source for the devastating 1964 Chenega tsunami, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Liberty, Lee; Finlayson, David; Geist, Eric; Labay, Keith; Byerly, Mike

    2016-03-01

    During the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake (Mw 9.2), several fjords, straits, and bays throughout southern Alaska experienced significant tsunami runup of localized, but unexplained origin. Dangerous Passage is a glacimarine fjord in western Prince William Sound, which experienced a tsunami that devastated the village of Chenega where 23 of 75 inhabitants were lost - the highest relative loss of any community during the earthquake. Previous studies suggested the source of the devastating tsunami was either from a local submarine landslide of unknown origin or from coseismic tectonic displacement. Here we present new observations from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted in the waters adjacent to the village of Chenega. The seabed morphology and substrate architecture reveal a large submarine landslide complex in water depths of 120-360 m. Analysis of bathymetric change between 1957 and 2014 indicates the upper 20-50 m (∼0.7 km3) of glacimarine sediment was destabilized and evacuated from the steep face of a submerged moraine and an adjacent ∼21 km2 perched sedimentary basin. Once mobilized, landslide debris poured over the steep, 130 m-high face of a deeper moraine and then blanketed the terminal basin (∼465 m water depth) in 11 ± 5 m of sediment. These results, combined with inverse tsunami travel-time modeling, suggest that earthquake-triggered submarine landslides generated the tsunami that struck the village of Chenega roughly 4 min after shaking began. Unlike other tsunamigenic landslides observed in and around Prince William Sound in 1964, the failures in Dangerous Passage are not linked to an active submarine delta. The requisite environmental conditions needed to generate large submarine landslides in glacimarine fjords around the world may be more common than previously thought.

  19. Ascent velocity and dynamics of the Fiumicino mud eruption, Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, A.; Giordano, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; D'Ambrosio, R.; Romano, C.; Manga, M.

    2015-08-01

    In August 2013 drilling triggered the eruption of mud near the international airport of Fiumicino (Rome, Italy). We monitored the evolution of the eruption and collected samples for laboratory characterization of physicochemical and rheological properties. Over time, muds show a progressive dilution with water; the rheology is typical of pseudoplastic fluids, with a small yield stress that decreases as mud density decreases. The eruption, while not naturally triggered, shares several similarities with natural mud volcanoes, including mud componentry, grain-size distribution, gas discharge, and mud rheology. We use the size of large ballistic fragments ejected from the vent along with mud rheology to compute a minimum ascent velocity of the mud. Computed values are consistent with in situ measurements of gas phase velocities, confirming that the stratigraphic record of mud eruptions can be quantitatively used to infer eruption history and ascent rates and hence to assess (or reassess) mud eruption hazards.

  20. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, Loïc; Burton, Michael R.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Smekens, Jean-François

    2014-07-01

    LUSI mud volcano has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. Mud extrusion rates of 180,000 m3 d-1 were measured in the first few months of the eruption, decreasing to a loosely documented <20,000 m3 d-1 in 2012. The last few years of activity have been characterized by periodic short-lived eruptive bursts. In May and October 2011, we documented this activity using high-resolution time-lapse photography, open-path FTIR, and thermal infrared imagery. Gases (98% water vapor, 1.5% carbon dioxide, 0.5% methane) were periodically released by the bursting of bubbles approximately 3 m in diameter which triggered mud fountains to ˜10 m and gas plumes to hundreds of meters above the vent. During periods of quiescence (1-3 min), no appreciable gas seepage occurred. We estimate that LUSI releases approximately 2300 t yr-1 of methane, 30,000 t yr-1 of CO2, and 800,000 t yr-1 of water vapor. Gas bubble nucleation depths are >4000 m for methane and approximately 600 m for carbon dioxide; however, the mass fractions of these gases are insufficient to explain the observed dynamics. Rather, the primary driver of the cyclic bubble-bursting activity is decompressional boiling of water, which initiates a few tens of meters below the surface, setting up slug flow in the upper conduit. Our measured gas flux and conceptual model lead to a corresponding upper-bound estimate for the mud-water mass flux of 105 m3 d-1.

  1. Sensitivity of Greenland outlet glacier dynamics to submarine melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Johanna; Siegrfied, Merten; Perrette, Mahé; Carlov, Reinhard; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Over the last few decades Greenland ice mass loss has strongly increased due to surface melt and dynamic changes in marine-terminating outlet glaciers. A major reason for the retreat of these glaciers is believed to be related to increased submarine melting, which in turn is caused by surrounding ocean warming and the enhanced subglacial water discharge. These complex physical processes are not yet fully understood. Inspecting the sensitivities of submarine melting to model formulation and model parameters is crucial for investigations of outlet glacier response to future climate change. Different approaches have been used to compute submarine melt rates of outlet glaciers using experimental data, numerical modelling and simplified analytical solutions. To model the process of submarine melting for a selection of Greenland outlet glaciers, a simple submarine melt parameterization is incorporated into a one-dimensional dynamic ice-flow model. The behaviour of this submarine melt parameterization is demonstrated by running a suite of simulations to investigate the sensitivity of submarine melt to changes in ocean properties and the amount and distribution of subglacial water discharge. A comparison of the simple parameterization with three-dimensional models and experimental data is conducted to assess the quality of parameterization and improve the parameterization of submarine melting.

  2. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  3. Identification of a ship or submarine from its magnetic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioannidis, G.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between the measured time fluctuations of the ambient magnetic field due to the passage of a ship or submarine and the characteristic magnetization properties of this vessel are derived. This relationship would be useful in identifying or classifying ships and submarines according to their magnetization properties.

  4. Detail of conning tower atop the submarine. Note the wire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of conning tower atop the submarine. Note the wire rope wrapped around the base of the tower, which may have been used in an attempt to pull the submarine offshore. - Sub Marine Explorer, Located along the beach of Isla San Telmo, Pearl Islands, Isla San Telmo, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  5. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  6. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  7. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  8. Uplift revealed by LASER scanner surveys in Murono mud volcano, Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and estimation of its source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Fukuda, Y.; Kusumoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Since mud volcanoes spew out pressurized material, such as natural gas, oil, mud including water from a deeper ground, the activities of the mud volcanoes are good indicators of the stress conditions/orientations as well as the tectonic controls. The Murono mud volcano area located in Tokamachi City, Niigata prefecture, Japan, is one of the active ground deforming areas associated with mud, natural gas, oil and water eruptions. This area is famous because rapid ground deformation events were recorded corresponding to neighboring large earthquakes. For instance, associated with Naganoken-Hokubu Earthquake (Mw. 6.7) which occurred in 2011, the area recorded a sudden large uplift of about 50 cm. In order to reveal the source mechanism of the mud volcano, Toyama University has been conducting successive leveling surveys at 61 benchmarks. They revealed that the same area of the rapid uplift of 2011 has been still uplifting, even the amount of the uplift is much smaller (20 mm/yr). However, the source of the uplift could not be well identified due to the low spatial resolutions. Therefore, in order to obtain a high resolution land deformation pattern, we have conducted laser scanning surveys two times in June and October 2013, using TOPCON Imaging Station IS-301, which can obtain 3D point cloud data by the automatic laser scanning mode without reflector. The surface deformations obtained by comparing the June and October datasets indicate clear uplifts where the sudden uplift occurred. Since the uplift area show a clear concentric pattern, we estimated the source of the uplift assuming a Mogi source model. The obtained source parameters are, depth=14[m], Volume=14[m3], assuming the Poisson's ratio of 0.25. Then the calculated uplift at the nearest benchmark also shows good agreement with the uplift obtained by the leveling survey. The current uplift is much smaller than the 2011 uplift. Nevertheless both sources could be the same, because the areas of the uplifts are

  9. Pre-eruptive ground deformation of Azerbaijan mud volcanoes detected through satellite radar interferometry (DInSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper A.; Aliyev, Chingiz S.

    2014-12-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that leads to the extrusion of subsurface mud, fragments of country rocks, saline waters and gases. This mechanism is typically linked to hydrocarbon traps, and the extrusion of this material builds up a variety of conical edifices with a similar morphology to those of magmatic volcanoes, though smaller in size. The Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique has been used to investigate the ground deformation related to the activity of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. The analysis of a set of wrapped and unwrapped interferograms, selected according to their coherence, allowed the detection of significant superficial deformation related to the activity of four mud volcanoes. The ground displacement patterns observed during the period spanning from October 2003 to November 2005 are dominated by uplift, which reach a cumulative value of up to 20 and 10 cm at the Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara-Zira Island mud volcanoes, respectively. However, some sectors of the mud volcano edifices are affected by subsidence, which might correspond to deflation zones that coexist with the inflation zones characterized by the dominant uplift. Important deformation events, caused by fluid pressure and volume variations, have been observed both (1) in connection with main eruptive events in the form of pre-eruptive uplift, and (2) in the form of short-lived deformation pulses that interrupt a period of quiescence. Both deformation patterns show important similarities to those identified in some magmatic systems. The pre-eruptive uplift has been observed in many magmatic volcanoes as a consequence of magma intrusion or hydrothermal fluid injection. Moreover, discrete short-duration pulses of deformation are also experienced by magmatic volcanoes and are repeated over time as multiple inflation and deflation events.

  10. Physical volcanology of the submarine Mariana and Volcano Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Sherman H.; Stern, Robert J.; Smoot, N. Christian

    1989-05-01

    Narrow-beam maps, selected dredge samplings, and surveys of the Mariana and Volcano Arcs identify 42 submarine volcanos. Observed activity and sample characteristics indicate 22 of these to be active or dormant. Edifices in the Volcano Arc are larger than most of the Mariana Arc edifices, more irregularly shaped with numerous subsidiary cones, and regularly spaced at 50 70 km. Volcanos in the Mariana Arc tend to be simple cones. Sets of individual cones and volcanic ridges are elongate parallel to the trend of the arc or at 110° counterclockwise from that trend, suggesting a strong fault control on the distribution of arc magmas. Volcanos in the Mariana Arc are generally developed west of the frontal arc ridge, on rifted frontal arc crust or new back-arc basin crust. Volcanos in the central Mariana Arc are usually subaerial, large (> 500 km3), and spaced about 50 70 km apart. Those in the northern and southern Marianas are largely submarine, closer together, and generally less than 500 km3 in volume. There is a shoaling of the arc basement around Iwo Jima, accompanied by the appearance of incompatible-element enriched lavas with alkalic affinities. The larger volcanic edifices must reflect either a higher magma supply rate or a greater age for the larger volcanos. If the magma supply (estimated at 10 20 km3/km of arc per million years at 18° N) has been relatively constant along the Mariana Arc, we can infer a possible evolutionary sequence for arc volcanos from small, irregularly spaced edifices to large (over 1000 km3) edifices spaced at 50 70 km. The volcano distribution and basal depths are consistent with the hypothesis of back-arc propagation into the Volcano Arc.

  11. The thermal regime around buried submarine high-voltage cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeana, C. J.; Hughes, T. J.; Dix, J. K.; Gernon, T. M.; Henstock, T. J.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Pilgrim, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of offshore renewable energy infrastructure and the need for trans-continental shelf power transmission require the use of submarine high-voltage (HV) cables. These cables have maximum operating surface temperatures of up to 70 °C and are typically buried 1-2 m beneath the seabed, within the wide range of substrates found on the continental shelf. However, the heat flow pattern and potential effects on the sedimentary environments around such anomalously high heat sources in the near-surface sediments are poorly understood. We present temperature measurements from a 2-D laboratory experiment representing a buried submarine HV cable, and identify the thermal regimes generated within typical unconsolidated shelf sediments-coarse silt, fine sand and very coarse sand. We used a large (2 × 2.5 m2) tank filled with water-saturated spherical glass beads (ballotini) and instrumented with a buried heat source and 120 thermocouples to measure the time-dependent 2-D temperature distributions. The observed and corresponding Finite Element Method simulations of the steady state heat flow regimes and normalized radial temperature distributions were assessed. Our results show that the heat transfer and thus temperature fields generated from submarine HV cables buried within a range of sediments are highly variable. Coarse silts are shown to be purely conductive, producing temperature increases of >10 °C up to 40 cm from the source of 60 °C above ambient; fine sands demonstrate a transition from conductive to convective heat transfer between cf. 20 and 36 °C above ambient, with >10 °C heat increases occurring over a metre from the source of 55 °C above ambient; and very coarse sands exhibit dominantly convective heat transfer even at very low (cf. 7 °C) operating temperatures and reaching temperatures of up to 18 °C above ambient at a metre from the source at surface temperatures of only 18 °C. These findings are important for the surrounding near

  12. The thermal regime around buried submarine high voltage cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeana, C. J.; Hughes, T. J.; Dix, J. K.; Gernon, T. M.; Henstock, T. J.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Pilgrim, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    The expansion of offshore renewable energy infrastructure and the need for trans-continental shelf power transmission require the use of submarine High Voltage (HV) cables. These cables have maximum operating surface temperatures of up to 70°C and are typically buried 1-2 m beneath the seabed, within the wide range of substrates found on the continental shelf. However, the heat flow pattern and potential effects on the sedimentary environments around such anomalously high heat sources in the near surface sediments are poorly understood. We present temperature measurements from a 2D laboratory experiment representing a buried submarine HV cable, and identify the thermal regimes generated within typical unconsolidated shelf sediments-coarse silt, fine sand and very coarse sand. We used a large (2 × 2.5 m) tank filled with water-saturated spherical glass beads (ballotini) and instrumented with a buried heat source and 120 thermocouples, to measure the time-dependent 2D temperature distributions. The observed and corresponding Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations of the steady state heat flow regimes, and normalised radial temperature distributions were assessed. Our results show that the heat transfer and thus temperature fields generated from submarine HV cables buried within a range of sediments are highly variable. Coarse silts are shown to be purely conductive, producing temperature increases of >10°C up to 40 cm from the source of 60°C above ambient; fine sands demonstrate a transition from conductive to convective heat transfer between c. 20°C and 36°C above ambient, with >10°C heat increases occurring over a metre from the source of 55°C above ambient; and very coarse sands exhibit dominantly convective heat transfer even at very low (c. 7°C) operating temperatures and reaching temperatures of up to 18°C above ambient at a metre from the source at surface temperatures of only 18°C. These findings are important for the surrounding near surface

  13. Volcanic Environments Monitoring by Drones Mud Volcano Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amici, S.; Turci, M.; Giulietti, F.; Giammanco, S.; Buongiorno, M. F.; La Spina, A.; Spampinato, L.

    2013-08-01

    Volcanic activity has often affected human life both at large and at small scale. For example, the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption caused severe economic damage at continental scale due to its strong effect on air traffic. At a local scale, ash fall and lava flow emission can cause harm and disruption. Understanding precursory signals to volcanic eruptions is still an open and tricky challenge: seismic tremor and gas emissions, for example, are related to upcoming eruptive activity but the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, information related to gases emission mostly comes from the summit crater area of a volcano, which is usually hard to investigate with required accuracy. Although many regulation problems are still on the discussion table, an increasing interest in the application of cutting-edge technology like unmanned flying systems is growing up. In this sense, INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) started to investigate the possibility to use unmanned air vehicles for volcanic environment application already in 2004. A flight both in visual- and radio-controlled mode was carried out on Stromboli volcano as feasibility test. In this work we present the preliminary results of a test performed by INGV in collaboration with the University of Bologna (aerospace division) by using a multi-rotor aircraft in a hexacopter configuration. Thermal camera observations and flying tests have been realised over a mud volcano located on its SW flank of Mt. Etna and whose activity proved to be related to early stages of magma accumulation within the volcano.

  14. Submarine Volcanology: 1950 to 2050 and Beyond (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The vigorous pursuit of submarine volcanism as a major field emerged in the mid 1900’s with the post WWII recognition that there is a Mid-Ocean Ridge System that is a 70,000 km long volcanic mountain chain stretching around the world like the strings on a baseball. By the mid 1960’s it emerged that rocks from volcanic feature were consistently basaltic in character and that they were the direct result of major melting processes associated with rise of much deeper mantle material beneath the spreading ridges in a global plate tectonics framework. More than 60% of the volcanism on the planet occurs in submarine environments. The next major discovery, using the deep diving submarine ALVIN, was in the late 1970’s involving hydrothermal systems near active ridges close to the Galapagos Islands and Baja California. The idea that these vent sites were the locus of major biological productivity based on volcanically-driven chemosynthesis was a fundamental new insight in the deep ocean ecology of our planet. This was a major planetological discovery and was followed within about 15 years with an even more powerful realization: our planet has a vast sub seafloor microbial biosphere thriving in the pores and the cracks of the oceanic crust driven by circulation of modified ocean fluids through large portions of the lithosphere. These organisms are largely supported by degassing and water-rock reactions associated with submarine volcanoes. Some estimates have posited that: 1) these thermally active systems and the chemosynthetic lifestyle are a natural consequence of certain types of planetary evolution, 2) that life may have originated in these systems, and, 3) that the biomass associated with the modern sub seafloor systems rivals most other living carbon on the continents. Indeed, parallel exploration of the outer solar system has lead to propositions that the second moon of Jupiter, Europa, has (or had) a high potential to harbor analogous hydrothermal life forms

  15. 5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS (CORNER POST, SILL AND STUD), SOUTHEAST CORNER OF EAST SIDE OF ORIGINAL SECTION. - Thomas Threlkeld House, Benson Pike, Shelbyville, Shelby County, KY

  16. Physical and chemical characterization of Dead Sea mud

    SciTech Connect

    Khlaifat, Abdelaziz; Al-Khashman, Omar; Qutob, Hani

    2010-05-15

    A laboratory analysis was performed to determine the physical and chemical properties of 24 Dead Sea mud samples collected from three different locations on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. Several analytical techniques were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of those samples including atomic absorption spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Physical parameters such as specific gravity, Atterberg limits, grain size, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, pH and electrical conductivity were also studied. The main focus of the work was to document mud characteristics and to study the interrelation between physical and chemical properties. The mud samples were quite rich in minerals. Strontium was the most abundant trace element in the samples (range: 410-810 ppm) followed by barium (range: 155-380 ppm), vanadium (range: 209-264 ppm) and lead (range: 108-114 ppm). There were significant differences in the elemental contents of mud samples collected from different locations.

  17. Recovering metals from red mud generated during alumina production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piga, Luigi; Pochetti, Fausto; Stoppa, Luisa

    1993-11-01

    There is growing interest in processing and utilizing the red mud by-product of the Bayer process for alumina extraction from bauxite. This interest stems largely from the environmental impacts associated with red mud and the storage costs involved. Furthermore, complete utilization of the raw materials, in this case bauxite, meets an ecological concept while ensuring raw material conservation. To prepare this article, the authors perused approximately 100 patents and articles in order to provide a concise description of the methods of storing red mud and its uses as a flocculant or construction material and in other minor applications. Special attention has been given to the methods developed for recovering metals contained in the red mud.

  18. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud. PMID:26365318

  19. Miniature Robotic Submarine for Exploring Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Bruhn, Fredrik; Carsey, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The miniature autonomous submersible explorer (MASE) has been proposed as a means of scientific exploration -- especially, looking for signs of life -- in harsh, relatively inaccessible underwater environments. Basically, the MASE would be a small instrumented robotic submarine (see figure) that could launch itself or could be launched from another vehicle. Examples of environments that might be explored by use of the MASE include subglacial lakes, deep-ocean hydrothermal vents, acidic or alkaline lakes, brine lenses in permafrost, and ocean regions under Antarctic ice shelves.

  20. Optical Guidance for a Robotic Submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Karl R.; LaFlash, Chris

    2002-11-01

    There is a need for autonomous submarines that can quickly and safely complete jobs, such as the recovery of a downed aircraft's black box recorder. In order to complete this feat, it is necessary to use an optical processing algorithm that distinguishes a desired target and uses the feedback from the algorithm to retrieve the target. The algorithm itself uses many bit mask filters for particle information, and then uses a unique rectation method in order to resolve complete objects. The algorithm has been extensively tested on an AUV platform, and proven to succeed repeatedly in approximately five or more feet of water clarity.

  1. Submarine LNG tanker concept for the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Veliotis, P.T.; Reitz, S.

    1981-01-01

    If LNG tankers could travel underwater, they could transport natural gas from Arctic regions year-round. General Dynamics has designed just such a tanker - a 140,000-m/sup 3/ submarine with a methane-fired steam-propulsion system that uses recirculated exhaust gas injected with oxygen to sustain combustion. (Nuclear power would be cheaper but might not be practical if new regulations are imposed.) Developed from parametric variations in cargo capacity, hull material, and ballasting, the design identifies such ship characteristics as length, beam, depth, cargo-system arrangement, speed, and ship control. An economic analysis indicates the concept's competitiveness with both pipelines and icebreaking tankers.

  2. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  3. Origin of lipid biomarkers in mud volcanoes from the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rodríguez, C.; Stadnitskaia, A.; De Lange, G. J.; Martínez-Ruíz, F.; Comas, M.

    2014-06-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) are the most prominent indicators of active methane/hydrocarbon venting at the seafloor on both passive and active continental margins. Their occurrence in the western Mediterranean is patent at the West Alboran Basin, where numerous MVs develop overlaying a major sedimentary depocentre containing overpressured shales. Although some of these MVs have been studied, the detailed biogeochemistry of expelled mud so far has not been examined in detail. This work provides the first results on the composition and origin of organic matter, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) processes and general characteristics on MV dynamics using lipid biomarkers as the main tool. Lipid biomarker analysis was performed on MV expelled material (mud breccias) and interbedded hemipelagic sediments from Perejil, Kalinin and Schneider's Heart MVs located in the northwest margin of the Alboran Sea. The n alkane distributions and n alkane-derived indices (CPI and ACL), in combination with the epimerization degree of hopanes (22S/(22S+22R)) indicate that all studied mud breccia have a similar biomarker composition consisting of mainly thermally immature organic matter with an admixture of petroleum-derived compounds. This concordant composition indicates that common source strata must feed all three studied MVs. The past or present AOM activity was established using lipid biomarkers specific for anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (irregular isoprenoids and dialkyl glycerol diethers) and the depleted carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of crocetane/phytane. The presence of these lipid biomarkers, together with the low amounts of detected glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, is consistent with the dominance of anaerobic methanotrophs of the ANME-2 over ANME-1, at least in mud breccia from Perejil MVs. In contrast, the scarce presence or lack of these AOM-related lipid biomarkers in sediments from Kalinin and Schneider's Heart MVs, suggests that no recent active methane seepage

  4. Influence of Primary Glyoxal on Properties of Tested Drilling Mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Martynova, D.; Knyazev, A.; Zaharov, A.; Shenderova, I.

    2014-08-01

    The research was done to observe the influence of primary glyoxal on properties of tested drilling mud. Glyoxal was used as a reagent to reduce viscosity and stabilize shale. Drilling mud processing parameters were estimated before and after affecting by glyoxal. Suggested is the method of polysaccharide modification by glyoxal for improving its resistance to microorganisms; carried out the research of bio- and thermal resistance of starchy and xanthan reagents.

  5. Characterization of submarine canyon bathymetries in northern Ionian Sea, Italy, using sediment geochemical variation induced by transportation distance and basin depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesco, Perri; Tohru, Ohta; Salvatore, Critelli

    2015-07-01

    Geochemical data of marine mud sediments collected from the Esaro, Neto and Corigliano canyons in the northern Ionian Sea (southern Italy) were investigated in order to characterize canyon bathymetry types. Mud sample compositions analyzed by the principal component analysis (PCA) provided useful information for the morphology of the depositional area of the northern Ionian Sea. The use of sediment geochemical data as well as transportation distance and depth as input variables for PCA enabled the extraction of following latent variables: basin depth (PC1), sedimentation rate (PC2) and transportation distance (PC3). Based on these results, we further developed geochemical indices that can estimate basin depth (F1), sedimentation rate (F2) and transportation distance (F3); these functions can be solely calculated from the elemental concentration data of the mud samples. Since these F1, F2 and F3 functions are mathematically independent variables, they facilitate more precise characterization of individual canyon types. That is, the Esaro Canyon is regarded as a sediment-starved deep canyon characterized by a single source area; the Neto Canyon can be seen as a deeply sloped submarine apron system and sediments are mainly supplied by the sediment gravity flows; the Corigliano Canyon is characterized by multiple sources and moderately sloped system, whose sediments disperse mainly by traction currents. These interpretations are concordant with the basin bathymetry of the studied area. Therefore, F1, F2 and F3 functions might be applicable to any oceanic basins.

  6. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano. PMID:21335391

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-01-01

    This closure report documents that the closure activities performed at Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, were in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 358.

  8. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON REACTION OF SEDIMENTARY ORGANIC MATTER AND AQUEOUS SULFIDES IN HOLOCENE SEDIMENTS OF MUD LAKE FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution and quantity of organic sulfur and iron sulfur species were determined in the
    Holocene sediments from Mud Lake, Florida. The sediments of this shallow, sinkhole lake are characterized by high sulfur and organic carbon contents as well as active sulfate reducti...

  9. Martian mud volcanism: Terrestrial analogs and implications for formational scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, J.A., Jr.; Mazzini, A.

    2009-01-01

    The geology of Mars and the stratigraphic characteristics of its uppermost crust (mega-regolith) suggest that some of the pervasively-occurring pitted cones, mounds, and flows may have formed through processes akin to terrestrial mud volcanism. A comparison of terrestrial mud volcanism suggests that equivalent Martian processes likely required discrete sedimentary depocenters, volatile-enriched strata, buried rheological instabilities, and a mechanism of destabilization to initiate subsurface flow. We outline five formational scenarios whereby Martian mud volcanism might have occurred: (A) rapid deposition of sediments, (B) volcano-induced destabilization, (C) tectonic shortening, (D) long-term, load-induced subsidence, and (E) seismic shaking. We describe locations within and around the Martian northern plains that broadly fit the geological context of these scenarios and which contain mud volcano-like landforms. We compare terrestrial and Martian satellite images and examine the geological settings of mud volcano provinces on Earth in order to describe potential target areas for piercement structures on Mars. Our comparisons help to evaluate not only the role of water as a functional component of geological processes on Mars but also how Martian mud volcanoes could provide samples of otherwise inaccessible strata, some of which could contain astrobiological evidence.

  10. Multibeam Bathymetry of the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Andreas; Rathlau, Rike; Schenke, Hans Werner

    2005-03-01

    The Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano is a natural laboratory to study geological, geochemical, and ecological processes related to deep-water mud volcanism. High resolution bathymetry of the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano was recorded during RV Polarstern expedition ARK XIX/3 utilizing the multibeam system Hydrosweep DS-2. Dense spacing of the survey lines and slow ship speed (5 knots) provided necessary point density to generate a regular 10 m grid. Generalization was applied to preserve and represent morphological structures appropriately. Contour lines were derived showing detailed topography at the centre of the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano and generalized contours in the vicinity. We provide a brief introduction to the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano area and describe in detail data recording and processing methods, as well as the morphology of the area. Accuracy assessment was made to evaluate the reliability of a 10 m resolution terrain model. Multibeam sidescan data were recorded along with depth measurements and show reflectivity variations from light grey values at the centre of the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano to dark grey values (less reflective) at the surrounding moat.

  11. Practical advantages of mud cooling systems for drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Maury, V.; Guenot, A.

    1995-03-01

    Field case studies of borehole stability have shown that some failures, previously unexplained, were due to thermal effects, such as heating the upper part of open hole sections by mud circulation when drilling deeper or reheating of the bottomhole when mud circulation is stopped. A complete analysis of the thermal regime in boreholes was performed and as a consequence, cooling of mud appeared as a means to mitigate these effects. A series of tests were then carried out to check the practicality of installing such mud cooling systems. Many other advantages then appeared: decrease of the temperature of the borehole allowing better operation of the logging tools, better control of the mud rheology with less additives, extended use of MWD/LWD devices. But the most significant advantage is for the oil based muds which can be maintained at surface below their flash point, improving the safety of operations. This paper recalls and summarizes the results of observations, measurements and studies performed to determine the feasibility of such systems. Operational results are given for several field cases with emphasis on safety. The use of these very simple devices, which have been field proven on normal and high temperature (BHCT = 150 C), is now contemplated for future HP-HT wells.

  12. Geochemistry of natural gases from mud volcanoes and surface gas seeps in NW-Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Beeunas, M.A. ); Schoell, M. ); Beroiz, C. )

    1991-03-01

    Mud volcanoes and natural gas seeps are common in the southwest-northeast-trending Sinu Atlantico basin (SAB) and San Jacinto Fold Belt (SJFB) of NW-Colombia. The structural subunits are part of a highly complex active continental margin where the sediments become increasingly younger to the west from Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary in the SJFB to Late Tertiary in the SAB. Some of the mud volcanoes are permanently active and form huge structures and are often aligned along major faults. Both seep and mud volcano gases are with low C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} contents. Carbon and hydrogen isotope concentrations allow the subdivision into four groups of gas. These gases can be divided into four genetic based on their carbon and hydrocarbon isotope compositions. The isotopic variability of the different groups attests to the fact that very different gas-forming processes are or have been operating in the subsurface ranging from low-temperature thermogenesis. The various groups show, with few exceptions, a distinct regional distribution: Mud volcanoes and seeps with bacterial gases are restricted to the southern part of the SAB where the greatest thickness of young sediments is observed; gases of mixed thermogenic and bacterial origin are found in the coastal areas of the northern SAB; gases of thermogenic origin are predominantly observed in the SJFB; the thermogenic gases of Group 3 are restricted to two locations in the north of the SJFB. This regional association of genetic gas types with specific geotectonic units reflects different thermal histories of the respective tectonic areas and allowed the authors to delineate prospective areas for oil in NW-Colombia.

  13. Microbial community of a saline mud volcano at San Biagio-Belpasso, Mt. Etna (Italy).

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; Giuliano, Laura; Crisafi, Ermanno; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Timmis, Kenneth N; Golyshin, Peter N

    2002-05-01

    In San Biagio of Belpasso, approximately 20 km south of Mt. Etna, in the area of contact between volcanic and sedimentary formations, a number of small (3- 60 cm in diameter) active mud eruptions discharge CO2-rich gases, mud and NaCl brines. They can be described as mini-volcanoes owing to their typical conic shapes and continuously bubbling peak craters. Samples were collected from the active peak craters at a depth of 20 cm and DNA was immediately extracted and amplified with universal 16S rRNA gene-specific primers, followed by cloning procedure. A total of 140 bacterial clones obtained were screened and clustered by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The pool of 16S rRNA sequences representing each RFLP cluster was subjected to phylogenetic analysis. All of the 33 sequences analysed were affiliated with the kingdom of Eubacteria; 28 sequences (77% of all clones) affiliated with the Proteobacteria, two sequences (19% of all clones) were affiliated with Actinobacteria and three sequences (4% of all clones) were affiliated with the Flexibacter-Cytophaga-Bacteroides division. The data obtained suggest that the microorganisms phylogenetically affiliated to autotrophic methane oxidizers and heterotrophic hydrocarbon degraders belonging to the gamma-subclass of Proteobacteria are major constituents of the microbial communities of the saline volcanic muds. Overall, the composition of the microbial community of the San Biagio mud volcano resembles the compositions of marine microbial communities, which might indicate that wind-blown seawater vapour acted as an inoculum for microbial community described in present work. PMID:12030850

  14. Rapid changes in the head of the Rio Balsas Submarine Canyon system, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Gutierrez-Estrada, M.

    1970-01-01

    The investigation of a river delta and the heads of several nearby submarine canyons in western Mexico produced evidence for rapid changes in the configuration and depth of the nearshore portions of canyon tributaries. General scarcity of data on the rates of submarine canyon formation and the relationship to river discharge should make these results of special interest. The Rio Balsas, one of Mexico's largest rivers, empties into the ocean near the heads of a large submarine canyon that terminates in the Middle America Trench. One of the distributaries of the Rio Balsas presently is discharging at the head of Can??o??n de la Necesidad, which is being eroded actively. Two inactive canyons are related to former discharge channels of the river. Their heads lie at some distance from shore and are being filled with sediment. The Can??o??n de Petacalco, not now receiving sediment directly from a Rio Balsas distributary, has remained active because the shoreline has not retreated far. Until about 100 years ago its head was being filled with fine-grained and highly organic sediments from a nearby rivermouth, while the coarse portion of the sediment supply joined the canyon via a tributary farther seaward. Since then the river has shifted away from this canyon, and the horizontally stratified sediments in the canyon head have been incised as much as 20-30 m, as evidenced by three 14C dates of organic material exposed in the steep to overhanging canyon walls. The changes in the shallow portion of the Rio Balsas submarine canyons seem to be related to changes in river discharge pattern, either directly or indirectly. A shifting point source of sediment supply either activates a pre-existing, partly filled canyon, or erodes a new one near the new river mouth, whereas the canyon at the abandoned river mouth is deactivated following retreat of the shoreline. The heads of the different tributaries form a dendritic pattern in Holocene unconsolidated sediment. Subaerial processes

  15. Tectonic control on the distribution of onshore mud volcanoes in parts of the Upper Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ojochenemi K.; Kurowska, Ewa E.; Schoeneich, Krzysztof; Alagbe, Solomon A.; Ayok, Jeremiah

    2016-06-01

    Onshore mud volcanoes are rare geological phenomena, which in Nigeria were reported for the first time few years ago in the Upper Benue Trough. In this study a detail geological mapping of the area of mud volcanoes occurrence was carried out, with the primary aim of defining their relationship, if any, to the structural geology there. The systematic field reconnaissance included field observations of the structural features, as well as analysis of the location and distribution of the onshore mud volcanoes, marking their locations on the topographic and geological maps, analysis of the aerial photographs and satellite images. The study area covered the central part of the Upper Benue Trough where the onshore mud volcanoes were found. The study area is the part of a sedimentary basin comprising Cretaceous clastic rocks that have been deformed intensively by a network of faults often embedded in the underlying Precambrian basement. This network of faults underwent a rejuvenation period from the Aptian to the Palaeocene. The most prominent tectonic structure in the study area is the NE - SW trending Kaltungo Fault Zone, however, there are other minor faults with N - S and NW - SE trends. This study shows that the mud volcanoes found in the study area are usually located near or within fault zones, within the outcropping Upper Cretaceous Yolde Formation and Upper Bima Sandstone, both of which were deformed by the Kaltungo faults, as well as by other minor faults. Worldwide, incidences of onshore mud volcano formation are usually attributed to areas of tectonic activity, rapid sedimentation or hydrocarbon occurrence. In this study, the interpretation of the field observations and mapping results, combined with information on the structural evolution of the study area and seismic pattern (very scarce), have led to the conclusion that the location of onshore mud volcanoes in the Upper Benue Trough, being located along the fault zones, is structurally controlled. The close

  16. Origin and burial depth of Médée-Hakuho Mud Volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.; Muraoka, S.; Sato, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Tokuyama, H.

    2012-04-01

    Present-day geodynamic framework in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and the surroundings is characterized by a complex pattern of active thick-skin crustal tectonics resulting from various plate and microplate interactions. Moreover, thick impermeable barrier of the Messinian evaporates exists below the entire Eastern Mediterranean foredeeps exceeding 3 km in thickness. These geological frameworks result in the Mediterranean Ridge differing from other accretionary complexes around the world, coupled with formation of mud diapir or mud volcano and brine lake. Ten-day PENELOPE Cruise in January/February 2007 (KH-06-4 Leg06 survey of the R/V Hakuho-Maru) made significant results in detailed mapping and piston/multicores sampling of newly-discovered Médée brine lake and its westward neighboring Médée-Hakuho Mud Volcano (MHMV) in the western branch of the Mediterranean Ridge. The MHMV has an almost circular dome structure in diameter of ~7km and reaching ~130m high, standing on the backstop boundary thrust in water depths of 2260 m. It was initially roughly-recognized during Médée Cruise conducted in 1995 on the basis of its distinct backscattering characteristics. The MHMV is interpreted to be active because of existence of many pebbles in the obtained core samples and the high backscatter intensity. Little has been clarified the relationship between undergoing collisional tectonics and mud volcanism, although these processes are strongly associated. Mud volcanism in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea is known to be present on contiguous belt along the Mediterranean Ridge, which is referred to as the Mediterranean Ridge mud diapiric belt, but mud fields in the western branch of the Mediterranean Ridge remain poorly solved. In this study, we measure vitrinite reflectance of the clasts from the obtained MHMV cores in order to evaluate the temperature history and thus burial depth of MHMV. Calculation of vitrinite reflectance is followed by using the ambient temperature at

  17. Risk assessment in submarine outfall projects: the case of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Ana; Losada, Miguel Ángel; Reis, Maria Teresa; Neves, Maria Graça

    2013-02-15

    Submarine outfalls need to be evaluated as part of an integrated environmental protection system for coastal areas. Although outfalls are tight with the diversity of economic activities along a densely populated coastline being effluent treatment and effluent reuse a sign of economic prosperity, precautions must be taken in the construction of these structures. They must be designed so as to have the least possible impact on the environment and at the same time be economically viable. This paper outlines the initial phases of a risk assessment procedure for submarine outfall projects. This approach includes a cost-benefit analysis in which risks are systematically minimized or eliminated. The methods used in this study also allow for randomness and uncertainty. The input for the analysis is a wide range of information and data concerning the failure probability of outfalls and the consequences of an operational stoppage or failure. As part of this risk assessment, target design levels of reliability, functionality, and operationality were defined for the outfalls. These levels were based on an inventory of risks associated with such construction projects, and thus afforded the possibility of identifying possible failure modes. This assessment procedure was then applied to four case studies in Portugal. The results obtained were the values concerning the useful life of the outfalls at the four sites and their joint probability of failure against the principal failure modes assigned to ultimate and serviceability limit states. Also defined were the minimum operationality of these outfalls, the average number of admissible technical breakdowns, and the maximum allowed duration of a stoppage mode. It was found that these values were in consonance with the nature of the effluent (tourist-related, industrial, or mixed) as well as its importance for the local economy. Even more important, this risk assessment procedure was able to measure the impact of the outfalls on

  18. Submarine mass failures as tsunami sources: their climate control.

    PubMed

    Tappin, D R

    2010-05-28

    Recent research on submarine mass failures (SMFs) shows that they are a source of hazardous tsunamis, with the tsunami magnitude mainly dependent on water depth of failure, SMF volume and failure mechanism, cohesive slump or fragmental landslide. A major control on the mechanism of SMFs is the sediment type, together with its post-depositional alteration. The type of sediment, fine- or coarse-grained, its rate of deposition together with post-depositional processes may all be influenced by climate. Post-depositional processes, termed sediment 'preconditioning', are known to promote instability and failure. Climate may also control the triggering of SMFs, for example through earthquake loading or cyclic loading from storm waves or tides. Instantaneous triggering by other mechanisms such as fluid overpressuring and hydrate instability is controversial, but is here considered unlikely. However, these mechanisms are known to promote sediment instability. SMFs occur in numerous environments, including the open continental shelf, submarine canyon/fan systems, fjords, active river deltas and convergent margins. In all these environments there is a latitudinal variation in the scale of SMFs. The database is limited, but the greatest climate influence appears to be in high latitudes where glacial/interglacial cyclicity has considerable control on sedimentation, preconditioning and triggering. Consideration of the different types of SMFs in the context of their climate controls provides additional insight into their potential hazard in sourcing tsunamis. For example, in the Atlantic, where SMFs are common, the tsunami hazard under the present-day climate may not be as great as their common occurrence suggests. PMID:20403835

  19. New Insights into Basaltic Balloon Formation during Submarine Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Kelly, J.; Rosi, M.; Pistolesi, M.; Marani, M.; Roman, C.; Croff Bell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) explorations in the area of the 1891 Foerstner submarine eruption (Pantelleria, Italy) during cruise NA-018 of the E/V Nautilus has provided the first examination of the vent site of a basaltic balloon-forming eruption. Ultra high-resolution bathymetric mapping defined a mound-like vent morphology in water depths of ~250 meter, constructed dominantly of highly vesicular scoriaceous fragments with minor pillow lava flows. The formation of floating basaltic balloons that reached the surface of the Strait of Sicily during the eruption is attributed to a hybrid Strombolian eruption mechanism that involved pre-concentration of volatiles into gas-rich portions of magma beneath the vent. An important difference of this Strombolian mechanism compared to its subaerial counterpart is the occurrence of buoyant magma discharge in the submarine environment caused by localized high gas contents. The added buoyancy flux modifies the fluid dynamic configuration of magma venting on the seafloor allowing for detachment of highly-inflated parcels of gas-rich magma. Some of these parcels contain large gas cavities that are enveloped in a partially quenched shell and maintain sufficient buoyancy to rise to the sea surface as a basaltic balloon. The majority of the vesicular magma maintains only partial positive buoyancy or negative buoyancy and is explosively fragmented to form large quantities of decimeter-scale fragments that accumulate close to the vent. Formation of the basaltic balloons is thus considered a somewhat accidental process that involves a subset of the total erupted volume of magma during the eruption. Suitable conditions for balloon formation include low magma viscosity, pre-concentration of gas, and moderate pressures (i.e.water depth). The dampening effect of seawater greatly reduces the dispersal of pyroclasts resulting in a mound-like vent morphology compared to subaerial scoria cones typically associated with Strombolian activity.

  20. Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is an aerial view of the deep-sea research submarine 'Ben Franklin' at dock. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  1. Deep-Sea Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The deep-sea submarine 'Ben Franklin' is being docked in the harbor. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life. It also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effect of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  2. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, J. M.; Allen, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (northwestern Mediterranean) was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby and Burger numbers were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively) and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (χ) was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10-day model period; however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation, and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. The offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m). Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate), as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies are explained within this new dynamic framework.

  3. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, J. M.; Allen, S. E.

    2014-05-01

    Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (Northwest Mediterranean) was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby number and Burger number were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively) and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (χ) was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10 day model period, however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. Offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m). Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate) as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies were explained within this new dynamic framework.

  4. Morphology of Submarine Landslides in Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. B.; Karlin, R.

    2003-12-01

    Submarine landslides, probably triggered by large earthquakes, disturb Holocene sediments in Puget Sound. High-resolution seismic reflection profiling and sidescan swath surveys were conducted over large submarine landslides and debris flows. These large slides are in close proximity to the South Whidbey Island fault zone at Possession Point, Mukilteo, and Edgewater; near the Seattle fault off Alki Point; and near the Tacoma fault at Maury Island. The boundaries of the slides were mapped using sidescan swath surveys. Preliminary slide morphologies were determined from the seismic cross-sections. Three large slide complexes with multiple block slides and debris flows are found off Possession Point; the largest of which is 1.5 km x 1.0 km with a maximum thickness of approximately 50 meters. Large sand flows with maximum thicknesses of 30 to 40 meters occur off Mukilteo and Edgewater. An approximately 3.3 km x 2.2 km, 30 meter thick flow off Alki Point was deposited on top of folded sediments within the deformation zone of the Seattle Fault zone. Three large block slides are present off Maury Island; the largest of which is 2.75 km x 1.0 km, with a maximum thickness of approximately 100 meters. The volumes of these landslides are more than an order of magnitude larger than subaerial landslides in the region. Tsunamis generated by landsliding potentially constitute a major seismic hazard in coastal areas of the Puget Lowland.

  5. Seismic response of buried submarine pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.K.; Mashaly, E.A.

    1988-12-01

    Submarine pipelines are many a time buried into a jet-blasted channel in the seabed. Seismic response of such buried pipelines are investigated in this paper. The earthquake is considered as a partially correlated stationary random proceeds characterized by a power spectral density function (PSDF). The cross-spectral density function between two random inputs along the length of the pipe is defined with the help of the local earthquake PSDF, which is the same for all points, and a frequency-dependent, exponentially decaying function (with distance). A lumped-mass model with 2-D beam elements is used to write the equation of motion. Soil resistance to dynamic excitation along the pipe length is obtained in an approximate manner with the help of frequency-independent impedance functions derived from half-space analysis and Mindlin's static stresses within the soil due to point loads. The responses are obtained by a spectral analysis for horizontal ground motions in two principal directions, which are assumed to coincide with pipe axis and the perpendicular to it. Using the proposed method of analysis, a parametric study is conducted. The results of the study help in understanding the behavior of buried submarine pipelines under seismic forces and its differences from that of the buried pipelines on land.

  6. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    PubMed

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  7. Invasion of drilling mud into gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Part I: effect of drilling mud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Fulong; Zhang, Keni; Wu, Nengyou; Zhang, Ling; Li, Gang; Jiang, Guosheng; Yu, Yibing; Liu, Li; Qin, Yinghong

    2013-06-01

    To our knowledge, this study is the first to perform a numerical simulation and analysis of the dynamic behaviour of drilling mud invasion into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment (GHBS) and to consider the effects of such an invasion on borehole stability and the reliability of well logging. As a case study, the simulation background sets up the conditions of mud temperature over hydrate equilibrium temperature and overbalanced drilling, considering the first Chinese expedition to drill gas hydrate (GMGS-1). The results show that dissociating gas may form secondary hydrates in the sediment around borehole by the combined effects of increased pore pressure (caused by mud invasion and flow resistance), endothermic cooling that accompanies hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and the lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments. The secondary hydrate ring around the borehole may be more highly saturated than the in situ sediment. Mud invasion in GHBS is a dynamic process of thermal, fluid (mud invasion), chemical (hydrate dissociation and reformation) and mechanical couplings. All of these factors interact and influence the pore pressure, flow ability, saturation of fluid and hydrates, mechanical parameters and electrical properties of sediments around the borehole, thereby having a strong effect on borehole stability and the results of well logging. The effect is particularly clear in the borehole SH7 of GMGS-1 project. The borehole collapse and resistivity distortion were observed during practical drilling and wireline logging operations in borehole SH7 of the GMGS-1.mud density (i.e. the corresponding borehole pressure), temperature and salinity have a marked influence on the dynamics of mud invasion and on hydrate stability. Therefore, perhaps well-logging distortion caused by mud invasion, hydrate dissociation and reformation should be considered for identifying and evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. And some suitable drilling

  8. What threat do turbidity currents and submarine landslides pose to submarine telecommunications cable infrastructure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, Michael; Pope, Edward; Talling, Peter; Hunt, James; Carter, Lionel

    2016-04-01

    The global economy relies on uninterrupted usage of a network of telecommunication cables on the seafloor. These submarine cables carry ~99% of all trans-oceanic digital data and voice communications traffic worldwide, as they have far greater bandwidth than satellites. Over 9 million SWIFT banks transfers alone were made using these cables in 2004, totalling 7.4 trillion of transactions per day between 208 countries, which grew to 15 million SWIFT bank transactions last year. We outline the challenge of why, how often, and where seafloor cables are broken by natural causes; primarily subsea landslides and sediment flows (turbidity currents and also debris flows and hyperpycnal flows). These slides and flows can be very destructive. As an example, a sediment flow in 1929 travelled up to 19 m/s and broke 11 cables in the NE Atlantic, running out for ~800 km to the abyssal ocean. The 2006 Pingtung earthquake triggered a sediment flow that broke 22 cables offshore Taiwan over a distance of 450 km. Here, we present initial results from the first statistical analysis of a global database of cable breaks and causes. We first investigate the controls on frequency of submarine cable breaks in different environmental and geological settings worldwide. We assess which types of earthquake pose a significant threat to submarine cable networks. Meteorological events, such as hurricanes and typhoons, pose a significant threat to submarine cable networks, so we also discuss the potential impacts of future climate change on the frequency of such hazards. We then go on to ask what are the physical impacts of submarine sediment flows on submerged cables? A striking observation from past cable breaks is sometimes cables remain unbroken, whilst adjacent cables are severed (and record powerful flows travelling at up to 6 m/s). Why are some cables broken, but neighbouring cables remain intact? We provide some explanations for this question, and outline the need for future in

  9. Histological evaluation of the healing properties of Dead Sea black mud on full-thickness excision cutaneous wounds in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Abu-al-Basal, Mariam A

    2012-04-01

    Dead Sea (DS) mud and salts are known for their therapeutic and cosmetic properties. Previous studies confirmed their efficacy in treating the more frequent skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the wound healing potential of natural and compounded skin-care product (facial mask) of DS black mud in BALB/c mice. Two full-thickness excision round wounds were created on the dorsum region of mouse. Each wound of mice test group were treated topically with 50 microL of 0.1% natural or compounded DS black mud or 50 microL of 0.2% nitrofurazone once a day for 2 consecutive days and the mice control group were left untreated. Healing was assessed by measuring the granulation tissue weight and percentage of wound contraction at day 3, 7, 14 and 21 after wounding. In addition to period of epithelialization and histological evaluation of the regenerated wound area at day 7 and 14 after wounding. Results revealed that DS black mud accelerate wound healing process by enhancing granulation, wound contraction, epithelialization, angiogenesis and collagen deposition. This may be due to high content of minerals and trace elements that possibly act as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant with enhancement effect on cell proliferation, migration and fibroblast cellular activity. However, the healing property of DS black mud compounded in skin-care product was greater than that of natural black mud, when compared to reference drug, nitrofurazone. PMID:24163956

  10. Submarine intrareef pisoliths and the origin of Silurian carbonate clinothems, northcentral Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, T.D.; Wilkinson, B.H.; Lohmann, K.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Evaluation of the relative importance of biological versus physical processes during the deposition of midwestern Silurian carbonate buildups has resulted in three generally incompatible scenarios: (1) that bioherms consist largely of autochthonous debris generated and deposited in deep shelf settings; (2) that most carbonate was generated in reefal settings, but styles of accumulation evolved from primarily core accretion to dominantly flank bed progradation with upward growth to shallower depths, and (3) that larger Silurian buildups are neither reefs nor bioherms in that they consist almost entirely of allochthonous biotic debris derived from high-energy wave-swept benches. Vertical tension fractures that crosscut proximal flank beds in the Pipe Creek Junior quarry of northcentral Indiana formed during compaction of underlying interreef muds and are commonly filled with well-sorted pisolitic grainstone. Pisolith cortices are petrologically indistinguishable from marine cement between pisoliths, from marine cement lining tension fractures, and from marine cement in surrounding grainstone. Isotopic signatures and trace element concentrations for these components are identical. In addition, the pisolitic grainstone commonly exhibits lateral grading, with pisolith size increasing toward fracture interiors. These features demonstrate that pisoliths are submarine cave pearls that formed from Silurian seawater within synsedimentary tension cracks during flank bed deposition and progradation. This origin supports an interpretation that present exposure levels at Pipe Creek Junior are generally coincident with the Silurian depositional top of the buildup, as minimum current energies necessary for the formation of large coated grains require high-energy, shallow-water conditions.

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Krauss

    2010-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544, Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following 20 corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): • 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit • 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit • 07-09-01, Mud Pit • 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit • 10-09-01, Mud Pit • 12-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 19-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-04, Mud Pit • 19-25-01, Oil Spill • 19-99-06, Waste Spill • 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-02, Mud Pit • 20-09-03, Mud Pit • 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-06, Mud Pit • 20-09-07, Mud Pit • 20-09-10, Mud Pit • 20-25-04, Oil Spills • 20-25-05, Oil Spills This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 544 using the SAFER process. Using the approach approved for previous mud pit investigations (CAUs 530–535), 14 mud pits have been identified that • are either a single mud pit or a system of mud pits, • are not located in a radiologically posted area, and • have no evident biasing factors based on visual inspections. These 14 mud pits are recommended for no further action (NFA), and further field investigations will not be conducted. For the sites that do not meet the previously approved closure criteria, additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible

  12. Microbial processes and communities in sediment samples along a transect across the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Martin; Straaten, Nontje; Mazzini, Adriano

    2015-04-01

    The Lusi eruption represents one of the largest ongoing sedimentary hosted geothermal systems. This eruption started in 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake that stroke Java Island. Since then it has been spewing boiling mud from a central crater with peaks reaching 180.000 m3 per day. Today an area of about 8 km2 is covered by locally dried mud breccia where a network of hundreds of satellite seeping pools is active. Numerous investigations focused on the study of offshore microbial colonies that commonly thrive at offshore methane seeps and mud volcanoes, however very little has been done for onshore seeping structures. Lusi represents a unique opportunity to complete a comprehensive study of onshore microbial communities fed by the seepage of CH4 and CO2 as well as of heavier liquid hydrocarbons originating from several km below the surface. We conducted a sampling campaign at the Lusi site collecting samples of fresh mud close to the erupting crater using a remote controlled drone. In addition we completed a transect towards outer parts of the crater to collect older, weathered samples for comparison. In all samples active microorganisms were present. The highest activities for CO2 and CH4 production as well as for CH4 oxidation and hydrocarbon degradation were observed in medium-age mud samples collected roughly in the middle of the transect. Rates for aerobic methane oxidation were high, as was the potential of the microbial communities to degrade hydrocarbons (oils, alkanes, BTEX tested). The data suggests a transition of microbial populations from an anaerobic, hydrocarbon-driven metabolism in fresher samples from center or from small seeps to more generalistic, aerobic microbial communities in older, more consolidated sediments. Currently, the microbial communities in the different sediment samples are analyzed using quantitative PCR and T-RFLP combined with MiSeq sequencing. This study represents an initial step to better understand onshore seepage

  13. New mud gas monitoring system aboard D/V Chikyu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yusuke; Inagaki, Fumio; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Igarashi, Chiaki

    2013-04-01

    Mud gas logging has been commonly used in oil industry and continental scientific drilling to detect mainly hydrocarbon gases from the reservoir formation. Quick analysis of the gas provides almost real-time information which is critical to evaluate the formation and, in particular, safety of drilling operation. Furthermore, mud gas monitoring complements the lack of core or fluid samples particularly in a deep hole, and strengthen interpretations of geophysical logs. In scientific ocean drilling, on the other hand, mud gas monitoring was unavailable in riserless drilling through the history of DSDP and ODP, until riser drilling was first carried out in 2009 by D/V Chikyu. In IODP Exp 319, GFZ installed the same system with that used in continental drilling aboard Chikyu. High methane concentrations are clearly correlated with increased wood content in the cuttings. The system installation was, however, temporary and gas separator was moved during the expedition for a technical reason. In 2011, new mud gas monitoring system was installed aboard Chikyu and was used for the first time in Exp 337. The gas separator was placed on a newly branched bypass mud flow line, and the gas sample was sent to analysis unit equipped with methane carbon isotope analyzer in addition to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph. The data from the analytical instruments is converted to depth profiles by calculating the lag effects due to mud circulation. Exp 337 was carried out from July 26 to Sep 30, 2011, at offshore Shimokita peninsula, northeast Japan, targeting deep sub-seafloor biosphere in and around coal bed. Data from the hole C0020A, which was drilled to 2466 mbsf with riser drilling, provided insights into bio-geochemical process through the depth of the hole. In this presentation, we show the design of Chikyu's new mud gas monitoring system, with preliminary data from Exp 337.

  14. Red Mud and Li-Ion Batteries: A Magnetic Connection.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Anil; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2016-08-23

    Exceptional Li-ion battery performance is presented with the oxide component of the anode was extracted from red mud by simple magnetic separation and applied directly without any further processing. The extracted material has γ-Fe2 O3 as the major phase with inter-dispersed phases of Ti, Al, and Si oxides. In a half-cell assembly, the phase displayed a reversible capacity (∼697 mA h g(-1) ) with excellent stability upon cycling. Interestingly, the stability is rendered by the multiphase constitution of the material with the presence of other electrochemically inactive metal oxides, such as Al2 O3 , SiO2 , and Fe2 TiO4 , which could accommodate the strain and facilitate release during the charge-discharge processes in the electrochemically active maghemite component. We fabricated the full-cell assembly with eco-friendly cathode LiMn2 O4 by adjusting the mass loading. Prior to full-cell assembly, an electrochemical pre-lithiation was enforced to overcome the irreversible capacity loss obtained from the anode. The full-cell delivered a capacity of ∼100 mA h g(-1) (based on cathode loading) with capacity retention of ∼61 % after 2000 cycles under ambient conditions. PMID:27403736

  15. Recent sea beam mapping of Ascension-Monterey Submarine Canyon System

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.G. )

    1990-06-01

    Extensive Sea Beam and Bathymetric Swatch Survey System (BS{sup 3}) data covering the Ascension-Monterey Submarine Canyon system and adjoining areas and canyons were collected offshore central California. Many discovered geomorphological features lead to significant new geologic conclusions about the formation and processes of submarine canyons in general and disclose unique sedimentary and tectonic features of the Ascension-Monterey Canyon system. The highly detailed bathymetric maps constructed from the Sea Beam data indicate that the seafloor topographic pattern is influenced by sedimentary and tectonic processes; both remain active along the central California margin. Interpretations of MOAA composite maps, final raw Sea Beam bathymetric maps, and three-dimensional physiographic renditions from bathymetric data indicate a diverse and complex geomorphology for the Ascension-Monterey Submarine Canyon system and adjoining region. Five distinct geomorphologic provinces and four well-defined geographic areas are mapped. Canyons cut by faults and canyon walls actively undergoing mass wasting are prominently displayed in the Sea Beam data. Sedimentary processes illustrating canyon channel capture and the formation of extensive mega-sedimentary wave fields where the canyons debouch onto the abyssal plain are spectacularly well defined. This new tool of seafloor mapping is contributing significant data for the geological interpretation of continental margins and seafloor in the world's oceans.

  16. Marine Diagenesis of Shallow Marine Lime-Mud Sediments: Insights from dgrO18 and dgrC13 Data.

    PubMed

    Choquette, P W

    1968-09-13

    Shallow marine lime-mud sediments of the Ste. Genevieve Formation (Mississippian), in part of the Illinois Basin, underwent at least three diagenetic changes: (i) local dolomitization in seawater or a brine, producing dolostone having average deltaC(13) of +2.5 per mille and deltaO(18) of +1.9 per mille (versus PDB-1); (ii) more usually cementation of unreplaced CaCO(3), in intrasediment seawater, yielding isotopically marine lime mudstone mainly composed of calcite, 4-micron or finer, with deltaO(18) of from -1 to +1 per mille; (iii) later partial alteration of CaCO(3), in permeable dolomitic rocks, by isotopically "lighter" waters, to calcite with an estimated deltaO(18) of -10 per mille or less. Isotope data appraised by petrographic analysis thus suggest "submarine" cementation of these carbonates in shallow marine conditions. PMID:17812283

  17. Underwater splice for submarine coaxial cable

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, A.T.; Roe, T. Jr.; Tausing, W.R.; Wilson, J.V.

    1984-10-30

    The invention is a device for splicing submarine coaxial cable underwater on the seafloor with a simple push-on operation to restore and maintain electrical and mechanical strength integrity; the splice device is mateable directly with the severed ends of a coaxial cable to be repaired. Splicing assemblies comprise a dielectric pressure compensating fluid filled guide cavity, a gelled castor oil cap and wiping seals for exclusion of seawater, electrical contacts, a cable strength restoration mechanism, and a pressure compensation system for controlled extrusion of and depletion loss prevention of dielectric seal fluid during cable splicing. A splice is made underwater by directly inserting prepared ends of coaxial cable, having no connector attachments, into splicing assemblies.

  18. A contaminant monitor for submarine atmospheres.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruecker, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    A requirement for monitoring selected atmospheric constituents on board nuclear powered submarines has been met by the development of the Central Atmosphere Monitoring System, Mark I. This system employs a mass spectrometer to monitor H2, H2O, N2, O2, CO2, Freon 11, Freon 12, and Freon 114, in addition to an infrared sensor for CO. The CAMS MKI development is discussed, including background, operating fundamentals, principal requirements, functional and physical descriptions, and summarized test results. Each of two prototype units has successfully completed over 9000 hr of operational sea trails, providing the necessary ground work for the manufacture of production units. At the same time, these units, which have benefited extensively from NASA hardware experience, may in turn provide useful data for the development of a new class of maintainable atmospheric monitoring instrumentation for manned spacecraft.

  19. EAARL submarine topography: Biscayne National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd; Harris, Melanie S.; Mosher, Lance

    2006-01-01

    This lidar-derived submarine topography map was produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs for the purposes of habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment (for example: bleaching, hurricanes, disease outbreaks). As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring water depth and conducting cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to managers of coastal tropical habitats.

  20. Estimation of bioavailability of metals from drilling mud barite.

    PubMed

    Neff, Jerry M

    2008-04-01

    Drilling mud and associated drill cuttings are the largest volume wastes associated with drilling of oil and gas wells and often are discharged to the ocean from offshore drilling platforms. Barite (BaSO4) often is added as a weighting agent to drilling muds to counteract pressure in the geologic formations being drilled, preventing a blowout. Some commercial drilling mud barites contain elevated (compared to marine sediments) concentrations of several metals. The metals, if bioavailable, may harm the local marine ecosystem. The bioavailable fraction of metals is the fraction that dissolves from the nearly insoluble, solid barite into seawater or sediment porewater. Barite-seawater and barite-porewater distribution coefficients (Kd) were calculated for determining the predicted environmental concentration (PEC; the bioavailable fraction) of metals from drilling mud barite in the water column and sediments, respectively. Values for Kdbarite-seawater and Kdbarite-porewater were calculated for barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in different grades of barite. Log Kdbarite-seawater values were higher (solubility was lower) for metals in the produced water plume than log Kdbarite-porewater values for metals in sediments. The most soluble metals were cadmium and zinc and the least soluble were mercury and copper. Log Kd values can be used with data on concentrations of metals in barite and of barite in the drilling mud-cuttings plume and in bottom sediments to calculate PECseawater and PECsediment. PMID:17994916

  1. Leaching of metals from fresh and sintered red mud.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrani; Guha, Saumyen; Balasubramaniam, R; Kumar, A V Ramesh

    2011-01-30

    The disposal of red mud, a solid waste generated during the extraction of alumina from bauxite, is one of the major problems faced by the aluminum industry. Proper disposal followed by its utilization, for example as bricks, can provide a satisfactory solution to this problem. Pollution potential of red mud and its finished product, due to metals leaching out from them under certain environmental conditions, need to be studied. Sintering of red mud was performed in a resistance type vertical tube furnace to simulate the brick-making conditions in lab-scale. Leachability of metals in red mud and the sintered product was evaluated by performing sequential extraction experiments on both. The metals studied were the 'macro metals' iron and aluminum and the 'trace metals' copper and chromium. The total extractabilities of all the metals estimated by the microwave digestion of red mud samples decreased due to sintering. The leachability in sequential extraction of the macro metals iron and aluminum, on the other hand, increased due to sintering in all phases of sequential extraction. However, the effect of sintering on the leachability of the trace metals by sequential extraction was different for copper and chromium in different fractions of sequential extraction. PMID:21035262

  2. Cationic polymer mud solves gumbo problems in North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, O.; Lee, L.J. )

    1992-07-13

    This paper reports on a recently developed cationic polymer mud, compatible with conventional polymer additives and designed to meet environmental regulations, which significantly minimized the gumbo problems common to the water-sensitive shales in the North Sea. The cationic polymer mud was used to drill highly reactive Tertiary shale formations which have caused severe gumbo problems on nearby wells drilled with other inhibitive water-based muds. Although many citonic polymers are toxic, aquatic toxicity tests performed by the Norwegian Statens Forurensningstilsyn (SFT) at the end of the test wells showed results far exceeding the SFT limits on the three species tested. The mud system on these wells was a seawater-based 15.0-ppg mud enhanced with 3% NaCl. A low molecular weight quaternary polyamine and a high molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide were used to suppress the swelling and dispersion of shales, respectively. Starch and polyanionic cellulose (PAC) polymers maintained fluid-loss control, and a lubricant reduced the torque and drag.

  3. Pyramid shaker screens help reduce oil mud losses

    SciTech Connect

    Neidhardt, D.

    1995-07-17

    The use of corrugated pyramid screens on a dryer in second stage mud and cuttings cleaning helped recover a large volume of oil-based drilling mud to save more than $60,000 in mud costs. Amoco Sharjah Oil Co. has conducted an extensive drilling program in the Sheikdom of Sharjah since early 1994. In a 67-day period of drilling, the company recovered 1,255 bbl of mud, saving $62,750 in mud costs. The net savings for the period totaled $35,815, about $535/day. No dollar values were placed on environmental benefits. A key to these savings was a High G Dryer from Derrick Equipment Co., equipped with corrugated pyramid screens. The corrugated surface on new pyramid screens provides a surface area exposed to cuttings that is 40% greater than that on a conventional flat-surface screen. The increased area improves throughput up to 60%. The upper section of the corrugated screens provides continuous self-cleaning action while the liquid pool accounts primarily for the improved performance.

  4. Viscoelastic Muds---Top-Kill in Rapidly Flowing Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    The attempted ``top-kill'' of the blown out Macondo (Deepwater Horizon) oil well by pumping a dense drilling ``mud'', i.e., a slurry of dense minerals, from above failed. This failure may be attributed to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the gravity driven counterflow between the descending ``mud'' and the rapidly upwelling crude oil. The instability produced turbulence that dispersed the denser fluid into small packets (if miscible with the oil) or droplets (if immiscible). Estimates from turbulence theory imply that the packets or droplets are so small (sub-mm) that their settling speed in the oil is less than the upwelling speed, with the consequence that the ``mud'' is spat out of the well, as observed, rather than descending to fill the bottom of the well bore and providing the hdyrodstatic head required to ``kill'' the well. The addition of a shear-thickening or viscoelastic polymer to the ``mud'' may suppress the turbulence and prevent its dispersal. Laboratory experiments with viscoelastic surrogate ``muds'' show complete turbulence suppression at the relevant speeds, with the viscoelastic fluid descending as a coherent slug. These experiments find several new phenomena. At high flow rates there is a viscoelastic analogue of the viscous buckling instability. At low flow rates suppression of the Plateau-Rayleigh instability combined with the dependence of viscous flow rate on diameter leads to the formation of globules on a looping filament. I thank LLNL, where the experimental work was done, for hospitality.

  5. Radiological aspects of red mud disaster in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Tibor; Sas, Zoltán; Jobbágy, Viktor; Csordás, Anita; Szeiler, Gábor; Somlai, János

    2013-08-01

    One of the most severe industrial catastrophes happened in Kolontár, Hungary, on 4 October 2010. Red mud (bauxite residue) broke through the eroded wall of the red mud reservoir pond "Number X" and flooded the surrounding area. This led to the instant death of 10 people and the injury of more than 100 people. Red mud is enriched in radium and thorium isotopes; therefore, there is a chance that this flooding will increase radionuclide concentrations of soils and also in air. In this study we have examined the site to assess the realistic radiological risks. For the risk assessment the following parameters were determined: gamma dose rate, radon concentration, radionuclide concentration of red mud and air dust concentration. It was found that the radiation dose exposure resulting from red mud contamination was < 0.045 mSv y-1 (excluding radon), which can be considered negligible when compared to the average annual effective dose from natural sources (2.4 mSv y-1).

  6. Effects of mud sedimentation on lugworm ecosystem engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montserrat, F.; Suykerbuyk, W.; Al-Busaidi, R.; Bouma, T. J.; van der Wal, D.; Herman, P. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Benthic ecosystem engineering organisms attenuate hydrodynamic or biogeochemical stress to ameliorate living conditions. Bioturbating infauna, like the lugworm Arenicola marina, determine intertidal process dynamics by maintaining the sediment oxygenated and sandy. Maintaining the permeability of the surrounding sediment enables them to pump water through the interstitial spaces, greatly increasing the oxygen availability. In a field experiment, both lugworm presence and siltation regime were manipulated to investigate to what extent lugworms are able to cope with sedimentation of increasing mud percentage and how this would affect its ecosystem engineering. Fluorescent tracers were added to experimentally deposited mud to visualise bioturbation effects on fine sediment fractions. Lugworm densities were not affected by an increasing mud percentage in experimentally deposited sediment. Negative effects are expected to occur under deposition with significantly higher mud percentages. Surface chlorophyll a content was a function of experimental mud percentage, with no effect of lugworm bioturbation. Surface roughness and sediment permeability clearly increased by lugworm presence, whereas sediment erosion threshold was not significantly affected by lugworms. The general idea that A. marina removes fine sediment fractions from the bed could not be confirmed. Rather, the main ecosystem engineering effect of A. marina is hydraulic destabilisation of the sediment matrix.

  7. H2O Contents of Submarine and Subaerial Silicic Pyroclasts from Oomurodashi Volcano, Northern Izu-Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Tani, K.; Nichols, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oomurodashi volcano is an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc, located ~20 km south of the inhabited active volcanic island of Izu-Oshima. Oomurodashi has a large (~20km diameter) flat-topped summit located at 100 - 150 metres below sea level (mbsl), with a small central crater, Oomuro Hole, located at ~200 mbsl. Surveys conducted during cruise NT12-19 of R/V Natsushima in 2012 using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin revealed that Oomuro Hole contains numerous active hydrothermal vents and that the summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with little biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s) from Oomuro Hole. Given the shallow depth of the volcano summit, such eruptions are likely to have generated subaerial eruption columns. A ~10ka pumiceous subaerial tephra layer on the neighbouring island of Izu-Oshima has a similar chemical composition to the submarine Oomurodashi rocks collected during the NT12-19 cruise and is thought to have originated from Oomurodashi. Here we present FTIR measurements of the H2O contents of rhyolitic pumice from both the submarine deposits sampled during ROV dives and the subaerial tephra deposit on Izu-Oshima, in order to assess magma degassing and eruption processes occurring during shallow submarine eruptions.

  8. Alternative OTEC Scheme for a Submarine Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Chao, Yi

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system for exploiting the ocean thermal gradient to generate power would be based on the thawing-expansion/ freezing-contraction behavior of a wax or perhaps another suitable phase-change material. The power generated by this system would be used to recharge the batteries in a battery-powered unmanned underwater vehicle [UUV (essentially, a small exploratory submarine robot)] of a type that has been deployed in large numbers in research pertaining to global warming. A UUV of this type travels between the ocean surface and various depths, measuring temperature and salinity. This proposed system would be an alternative to another proposed ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system that would serve the same purpose but would utilize a thermodynamic cycle in which CO2 would be the working fluid. That system is described in Utilizing Ocean Thermal Energy in a Submarine Robot (NPO-43304), immediately following this brief. The main advantage of this proposed system over the one using CO2 is that it could derive a useful amount of energy from a significantly smaller temperature difference. At one phase of its operational cycle, the system now proposed would utilize the surface ocean temperature (which lies between 15 and 20 C over most of the Earth) to melt a wax (e.g., pentadecane) that has a melting/freezing temperature of about 10 C. At the opposite phase of its operational cycle, the system would utilize the lower ocean temperature at depth (e.g., between 4 and 7 C at a depth of 300 m) to freeze the wax. The melting or freezing causes the wax to expand or contract, respectively, by about 8 volume percent.

  9. Improved OTEC System for a Submarine Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi; Jones, Jack; Valdez, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), now undergoing development, is a less-massive, more-efficient means of exploiting the same basic principle as that of the proposed system described in "Alternative OTEC Scheme for a Submarine Robot" (NPO-43500), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 2009), page 50. The proposed system as described previously would be based on the thawing-expansion/freezing-contraction behavior of a wax or perhaps another suitable phase-change material (PCM). The power generated by the system would be used to recharge the batteries in a battery- powered unmanned underwater vehicle [UUV (essentially, a small exploratory submarine robot)] of a type that has been deployed in large numbers in research pertaining to global warming. A UUV of this type travels between the ocean surface and depths, measuring temperature and salinity. At one phase of its operational cycle, the previously proposed system would utilize the surface ocean temperature (which lies between 15 and 30 C over most of the Earth) to melt a PCM that has a melting/freezing temperature of about 10 C. At the opposite phase of its operational cycle, the system would utilize the lower ocean temperature at depth (e.g., between 4 and 7 C at a depth of 300 m) to freeze the PCM. The melting or freezing would cause the PCM to expand or contract, respectively, by about 9 volume percent. The PCM would be contained in tubes that would be capable of expanding and contracting with the PCM. The PCM-containing tubes would be immersed in a hydraulic fluid. The expansion and contraction would drive a flow of the hydraulic fluid against a piston that, in turn, would push a rack-and-pinion gear system to spin a generator to charge a battery.

  10. Effect of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Relict Arctic Submarine Permafrost and Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits exist at shallow depths within the sediments of the circum-Arctic continental shelves. Degradation of this shallow water reservoir has the potential to release large quantities of methane gas directly to the atmosphere. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several factors, such as the lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, and the salinity of the pore water. The salinity of the pore water is especially relevant because it partially controls the freezing point for both ice and gas hydrate. Measurements of deep pore water salinity are few and far between, but show that deep off-shore sediments are fresh. Deep freshening has been attributed to large-scale topographically-driven submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater into deep marine sediments. We investigate the role of submarine ground water discharge on the salinity field and its effects on the seaward extent of relict submarine permafrost and gas hydrate stability on the Arctic shelf with a 2D shelf-scale model based on the finite volume method. The model tracks the evolution of the temperature, salinity, and pressure fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of water ice and hydrate formation included. The permeability structure of the sediments is coupled to changes in permafrost. Results show that pore fluid is strongly influenced by the permeability variations imposed by the overlying permafrost layer. Groundwater discharge tends to travel horizontally off-shore beneath the permafrost layer and the freshwater-saltwater interface location displays long timescale transient behavior that is dependent on the groundwater discharge strength. The seaward permafrost extent is in turn strongly influenced by the

  11. View west of reserve basin of submarine trout and frigate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of reserve basin of submarine trout and frigate Edward E. McDonnell - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Reserve Basin & Marine Railway, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. Three-dimensional grid generation about a submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid Samareh; Smith, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    A systematic multiple-block grid method has been developed to compute grids about submarines. Several topologies are proposed, and an oscillatory transfinite interpolation is used in the grid construction.

  13. A GIS typology to locate sites of submarine groundwater discharge.

    PubMed

    Rapaglia, John; Grant, Carley; Bokuniewicz, Henry; Pick, Tsvi; Scholten, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Although many researchers agree on the importance of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), it remains difficult to locate and quantify this process. A groundwater typology was developed based on local digital elevation models and compared to concurrent radon mapping indicative of SGD in the Niantic River, CT USA. Areas of high radon activity were located near areas of high flow accumulation lending evidence to the utility of this approach to locate SGD. The benefits of this approach are three-fold: fresh terrestrial SGD may be quickly located through widely-available digital elevation models at little or no cost to the investigator; fresh SGD may also be quantified through the GIS approach by multiplying pixelated flow accumulation with the expected annual recharge; and, as these data necessarily quantify only fresh SGD, a comparison of these data with SGD as calculated by Rn activity may allow for the separation of the fresh and circulated fractions of SGD. This exercise was completed for the Niantic River where SGD as calculated by the GIS model is 1.2 m(3)/s, SGD as calculated by Rn activity is 0.73-5.5 m(3)/s, and SGD as calculated via a theoretical approach is 1.8-4.3 m(3)/s. Therefore fresh, terrestrial SGD accounts for 22-100% of total SGD in the Niantic River. PMID:25863321

  14. Environmental impact of mud volcano inputs on the anthropogenically altered Porong River and Madura Strait coastal waters, Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjahn, Tim C.; Jänen, Ingo; Propp, Claudia; Adi, Seno; Nugroho, Sutopo Purwo

    2013-09-01

    Increasing human modifications of the coastal zone are endangering the integrity of coastal ecosystems. This is of particular importance in SE Asia where large parts of the population live in the coastal zone and are economically dependent on its resources. The region is also affected by a high frequency of extreme natural events like storms, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The eruption of a mud volcano, nicknamed "Lusi", near the city of Sidoarjo in eastern Java, Indonesia, on May 29, 2006 represents such an event. One of the measures to minimize the potential detrimental effects to the environment and the local population was to channelise part of the mud into the nearby Porong River, the major distributary of the Brantas River, which is affected by intensive land use and hydrological alterations in a densely populated catchment. Here we report for the first time on the effects of the mud volcano on the aquatic environment. The "Lusi" input more than doubled the suspended matter and particulate organic carbon load of the river. Moreover, we found decomposition of the additional organic matter worsening oxygen depletion in the river and adjacent coastal waters that can severely affect the well-being of aquatic organisms. We conclude that the mud volcano input adds to the adverse effects of human activities in the river catchment on the ecology and biogeochemistry of the estuary and Madura Strait coastal waters.

  15. Choke for controlling the flow of drilling mud

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1981-03-24

    This apparatus disclosed in its preferred form is a choke for controlling the flow of drilling mud which is highly abrasive. The abrasive drilling mud is introduced through a lateral port and an elongate, tubular body. In the tubular body, a fluid actuated, double acting piston is forced to a choke control position. The piston has appended to it a centralized, tubular extension which receives a sleeve of wear resistant material. The sleeve is positioned in a circular chamber communicated to the lateral port where the drilling mud is introduced. It travels toward a seat downstream of the body. The seat is formed of hardened material. The downstream outlet of the body is additionally lined with a wear resistant sleeve. An alternate embodiment is also disclosed. A hydraulic control system for operation of the choke is also disclosed.

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) family in arthropods: Cloning and expression analysis of two MIF and one D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT) homologues in mud crabs, Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Shu; Duan, Li-Peng; Huang, Bei; Wang, Ke-Jian; Zhang, Cai-Liang; Jia, Qin-Qin; Nie, Pin; Wang, Tiehui

    2016-03-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) family, consisting of MIF and D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT) in vertebrates, is evolutionarily ancient and has been found across Kingdoms including vertebrates, invertebrates, plants and bacteria. The mammalian MIF family are chemokines at the top of the inflammatory cascade in combating infections. They also possess enzymatic activities, e.g. DDT catalysis results in the production of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), a precursor of eumelanin. MIF-like genes are widely distributed, but DDT-like genes have only been described in vertebrates and a nematode. In this report, we cloned a DDT-like gene, for the first time in arthropods, and a second MIF in mud crab. The mud crab MIF family have a three exon/two intron structure as seen in vertebrates. The identification of a DDT-like gene in mud crab and other arthropods suggests that the separation of MIF and DDT preceded the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes. The MIF family is differentially expressed in tissues of adults and during embryonic development and early life. The high level expression of the MIF family in immune tissues, such as intestine and hepatopancreas, suggests an important role in mud crab innate immunity. Mud crab DDT is highly expressed in early embryos, in megalops and crablets and this coincides with the requirement for melanisation in egg chorion tanning and cuticular hardening in arthropods, suggesting a potential novel role of DDT in melanogenesis via its tautomerase activity to produce DHI in mud crab. The clarification of the presence of both MIF and DDT in this report paves the way for further investigation of their functional roles in immunity and in melanogenesis in mud crab and other arthropods. PMID:26826424

  17. Potential for SGD induced submarine geohazard off southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Lin, C.; Cheng, Y.; Chiu, H.

    2013-12-01

    The submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is not only play important roles on material exchange between land and sea, it may also trigger liquefaction process and induce further submarine geohazards in coastal zone. Since 2006, Southern Taiwan was experienced a series of natural hazards including earthquakes and typhoon that induced se