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Sample records for active submarine volcanoes

  1. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  2. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano.

    PubMed

    Embley, Robert W; Chadwick, William W; Baker, Edward T; Butterfield, David A; Resing, Joseph A; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lupton, John E; Juniper, S Kim; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stern, Robert J; Lebon, Geoffrey T; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Merle, Susan G; Hein, James R; Wiens, Douglas A; Tamura, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-25

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. PMID:16724063

  3. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-01-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report (3)He/(4)He measurements in CO2-dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a (3)He/(4)He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the (3)He/(4)He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10(-6)), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like (3)He/(4)He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano. PMID:27311383

  5. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-06-17

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report (3)He/(4)He measurements in CO2-dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a (3)He/(4)He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the (3)He/(4)He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10(-6)), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like (3)He/(4)He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano.

  6. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-01-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2–dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10−6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like 3He/4He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano. PMID:27311383

  7. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-06-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2–dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10‑6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like 3He/4He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano.

  8. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  9. Long-term explosive degassing and debris flow activity at West Mata submarine volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Matsumoto, H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Walker, S. L.; Lau, T.-K.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2015-03-01

    West Mata is a 1200 m deep submarine volcano where explosive boninite eruptions were observed in 2009. The acoustic signatures from the volcano's summit eruptive vents Hades and Prometheus were recorded with an in situ (~25 m range) hydrophone during ROV dives in May 2009 and with local (~5 km range) moored hydrophones between December 2009 and August 2011. The sensors recorded low frequency (1-40 Hz), short duration explosions consistent with magma bubble bursts from Hades, and broadband, 1-5 min duration signals associated with episodes of fragmentation degassing from Prometheus. Long-term eruptive degassing signals, recorded through May 2010, preceded a several month period of declining activity. Degassing episodes were not recorded acoustically after early 2011, although quieter effusive eruption activity may have continued. Synchronous optical measurements of turbidity made between December 2009 and April 2010 indicate that turbidity maxima resulted from occasional south flank slope failures triggered by the collapse of accumulated debris during eruption intervals.

  10. Plume indications from hydrothermal activity on Kawio Barat Submarine Volcano, Sangihe Talaud Sea, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarim, S.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Wirasantosa, S.; Permana, H.; Sulistiyo, B.; Shank, T. M.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D.; Ramdhan, M.; Adi, R.; Marzuki, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Kawio Barat submarine volcano has formed in response to the active tectonic conditions in Sangihe Talaud, an area that lies in the subduction zone between the Molucca Sea Plate and Celebes Sea Plate. Submarine volcanic activity in the western Sangihe volcanic arc is controlled by the west-dipping Molucca Sea Plate as it subducts beneath the Sangihe Arc. A secondary faulting system on Kawio Barat is in a northwest - southeast direction, and creates a network of deep cracks that facilitate hydrothermal discharge in this area. Hydrothermal activity on Kawio Barat was first discovered by joint Indonesia/Australian cruises in 2003. In 2010, as part of the joint US/Indonesian INDEX-SATAL expedition, we conducted CTD casts that confirmed continuing activity. Hydrothermal plumes were detected by light -scattering (LSS) and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensors on the CTD package. LSS anomalies were found between 1600-1900 m, with delta NTU levels of 0.020-0.040. ORP anomalies coincident with the LSS anomalies indicate strong concentrations of reduced species such as H2S and Fe, confirming the hydrothermal origin of the plumes. Images of hydrothermal vents on Kawio Barat Submarine volcano, recorded by high- definition underwater cameras on the ROV “Little Hercules” operated from the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer, confirmed the presence and sources of the detected vent plumes in the northern and southwest part of the summit in 1800-1900 m depth. In southwest part of this summit chimney, drips of molten sulfur were observed in the proximity of microbal staining.

  11. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Andrea; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valérie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important ource of mantle-derived gases. These gases are fundamental for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in key sectors where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by mixing with crustal and atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanic areas remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2-dominated gases discharged at 500 m below the sea level from the high-temperature (~220°C) hydrothermal system of Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). For the first time, we demonstrate that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.1 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10-6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for Santorini gases-rocks. This isotopic ratio is also the highest measured across HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a MORB-like mantle through lithospheric faults or a possible slab tear. We finally highlight that the 3He/4He ratio has been increasing since 2010 (ΔRa=0.3), which implies an enhanced magmatic activity beneath Kolumbo.

  12. Discovery of an Active Submarine Mud Volcano Along the Nootka Fault West of Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M.; Riedel, M.; Kelly, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Spence, G. D.; Hyndman, R. D.; Hyndman, R. D.; Mayer, L.; Calder, B.; Lilley, M. D.; Olson, E. O.; Schrenk, M. O.; Coffin, R.

    2001-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a common feature in margin environments, but few of them have been documented in the Northeast Pacific. However, during a Hydrosweep bathymetric survey in July, 2001, and a follow-on sub-surface seismic survey in August two mud volcanoes were imaged along the Nootka Fault, 16-18 km west of Vancouver Island at a water depth of 2500 m. The southern volcano, called Maquinna, lies directly along the southern expression of the left lateral, strike slip Nootka Fault. It is 1.5 km across, has a breached caldera and two small summit craters, and it stands about 30 m above the seafloor. The base is bounded by a narrow moat, partially filled by Holocene sediments that are flat lying; older, underlying sediments show steep downwarping towards the sides of the volcano. Subsurface imaging shows a dramatic loss of reflectivity beneath the volcano mound, which may indicate significant mobilization of material. However, a very bright reflector is seen at about 400 m depth below the volcano. This reflector is too deep for stability of methane clathrate, and is interpreted as a zone of high fluid content. A CTD vertical cast above the summit of the volcano showed strong, co-registered thermal, particulate, and oxygen anomalies that extend 50 m up into the overlying water column. These data indicate that the volcano is actively venting warm hydrothermal fluids. The fluids are depleted in CO2, contain background concentrations of CH4, but show elevated H2 concentrations above ocean background water. Microscopic examination of the Nootka hydrothermal samples shows that they contain dense and morphologically diverse microbial communities in comparison to background seawater with cell densities of 106 cells/ml. Enrichment culturing indicates that these communities include both anaerobic and aerobic organisms, some of which are thermophilic with optimal growth temperatures in excess of 50 deg C. Some of these cultures can use methane oxidation as an energy

  13. Esmeralda Bank: Geochemistry of an active submarine volcano in the Mariana Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert J.; Bibee, L. D.

    1984-05-01

    Esmeralda Bank is the southernmost active volcano in the Izu-Volcano-Mariana Arc. This submarine volcano is one of the most active vents in the western Pacific. It has a total volume of about 27 km3, rising to within 30 m of sea level. Two dredge hauls from Esmeralda recovered fresh, nearly aphyric, vesicular basalts and basaltic andesites and minor basaltic vitrophyre. These samples reflect uniform yet unusual major and trace element chemistries. Mean abundances of TiO2 (1.3%) and FeO* (12.6%) are higher and CaO (9.2%) and Al2O3 (15.1%) are lower than rocks of similar silica content from other active Mariana Arc volcanoes. Mean incompatible element ratios K/Rb (488) and K/Ba (29) of Esmeralda rocks are indistinguishable from those of other Mariana Arc volcanoes. On a Ti-Zr plot, Esmeralda samples plot in the field of oceanic basalts while other Mariana Arc volcanic rocks plot in the field for island arcs. Incompatible element ratios K/Rb and K/Ba and isotopic compositions of Sr (87Sr/86Sr=0.70342 0.70348), Nd (ɛND=+7.6 to +8.1), and O(δ18O=+5.8 to +5.9) are incompatible with models calling for the Esmeralda source to include appreciable contributions from pelagic sediments or fresh or altered abyssal tholeiite from subduction zone melting. Instead, incompatible element and isotopic ratios of Esmeralda rocks are similar to those of intra-plate oceanic islands or “hot-spot” volcanoes in general and Kilauean tholeiites in particular. The conclusion that the source for Esmeralda lavas is an ocean-island type mantle reservoir is preferred. Esmeralda Bank rare earth element patterns are inconsistent with models calling for residual garnet in the source region, but are adequately modelled by 7 10% equilibrium partial melting of spinel lherzolite. This is supported by consideration of the results of melting experiments at 20 kbars, 1,150° C with CO2 and H2O as important volatile components. These experiments further indicate that low MgO (4.1%), MgO/FeO*(0.25) and

  14. Hydrodynamic modeling of magmatic-hydrothermal activity at submarine arc volcanoes, with implications for ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Gillian; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.

    2014-10-01

    Subduction-related magmas have higher volatile contents than mid-ocean ridge basalts, which affects the dynamics of associated submarine hydrothermal systems. Interaction of saline magmatic fluids with convecting seawater may enhance ore metal deposition near the seafloor, making active submarine arcs a preferred modern analogue for understanding ancient massive sulfide deposits. We have constructed a quantitative hydrological model for sub-seafloor fluid flow based on observations at Brothers volcano, southern Kermadec arc, New Zealand. Numerical simulations of multi-phase hydrosaline fluid flow were performed on a two-dimensional cross-section cutting through the NW Caldera and the Upper Cone sites, two regions of active venting at the Brothers volcanic edifice, with the former hosting sulfide mineralization. Our aim is to explore the flow paths of saline magmatic fluids released from a crystallizing magma body at depth and their interaction with seawater circulating through the crust. The model includes a 3×2 km sized magma chamber emplaced at ∼2.5 km beneath the seafloor connected to the permeable cone via a ∼200 m wide feeder dike. During the simulation, a magmatic fluid was temporarily injected from the top of the cooling magma chamber into the overlying convection system, assuming hydrostatic conditions and a static permeability distribution. The simulations predict a succession of hydrologic regimes in the subsurface of Brothers volcano, which can explain some of the present-day hydrothermal observations. We find that sub-seafloor phase separation, inferred from observed vent fluid salinities, and the temperatures of venting at Brothers volcano can only be achieved by input of a saline magmatic fluid at depth, consistent with chemical and isotopic data. In general, our simulations show that the transport of heat, water, and salt from magmatic and seawater sources is partly decoupled. Expulsion of magmatic heat and volatiles occurs within the first few

  15. Lateral Dispersion of Volcanic Ash From the Flanks of an Actively Erupting Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Lebon, G. T.; Lupton, J. E.; Greene, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is an actively erupting submarine volcano along the Mariana Arc, rising some 2500 m from the local seafloor. Eruptions at Brimstone Pit, located about 30 m below the summit on the south side of the volcano at 550 m water depth, have been directly observed since 2004. Water column surveys (using CTD-O vertical cast and tow methods) in 2003, 2004 and 2006 mapped the distribution of both persistent and variable particle plumes over the summit and down the flanks. In all years, there was a non-buoyant laterally dispersing plume over the summit that was optically intense and very thin (25-30 m plume maximum), measurable up to 2-3 km from the summit. The plume was most intense in 2003 and 2004 with dNTU values reaching 5 (the upper limit of the optical backscatter sensor). High concentrations of particulate sulfur in the plume contribute to these unusually intense optical signals, as sulfur particles are efficient optical backscatters. The plume maxima depth has steadily declined over 3 years: 460 m in 2003, 485 m in 2004, and 505-530 m in 2006. In 2003, both hydrothermal and volcanic components were detected in the plume, so it is not certain that the 2003 data represent pre-eruption conditions. Deeper layers of turbidity were absent in 2003, but were observed in multiple layers surrounding the volcano in 2004 and 2006 from depths of about 700 m extending to >2500 m, and were detectable at distances up to 18 km from the summit. Microscopy and chemical analysis indicates that the particles in these layers are overwhelmingly glass fragments rather than hydrothermal precipitates. Over the scale of 3-6 days, repeat tows showed significant decreases in particle concentrations, implying some of the particles settled rapidly from these plumes. The most likely source of these layers is gravity flow of volcanic ash down the flanks, fed by violent eruptions at the summit. Detachment from the seafloor may be controlled by turbulence from current flow or internal waves

  16. Active Volcanic and Hydrothermal Processes at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano: Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, W. W.; de Ronde, C.; Dower, J.; Evans, L.; Hein, J.; Juniper, K.; Lebon, G.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S.; Metaxas, A.; Nakamura, K.; Resing, J. E.; Roe, K.; Stern, R.; Tunnicliffe, V.

    2004-12-01

    Dives with the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS in March/April 2004 documented a volcanic eruption at NW Rota-1, a submarine volcano of basaltic composition located at 14\\deg 36.0'N, 144\\deg 46.5'E lying 65 km northwest of Rota Island in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The site was chosen as a dive target because of the of the high concentrations of H2S and alunite in the hydrothermal plume overlying its summit in February 2003. The summit of the volcano is composed of curvilinear volcanic ridge oriented NW-SE bounded by NE-SW trending normal faults. Lavas collected on the upper part of the edifice are primitive to moderately fractionated basalts (Mg# = 51-66). The eruptive activity is occurring within a small crater (Brimstone Pit) located on the upper south flank of the volcano at 550 m, about 30 m below the summit. The crater is approximately 15 m wide and at least 20 meters deep. The ROPOS's cameras observed billowing clouds of sulfur-rich fluid rising out of the crater, punctuated by frequent bursts of several minutes duration that entrained glassy volcanic ejecta up to at least 2 cm in diameter. ROPOS recorded a temperature of 38\\degC within the plume. The volcanic activity had substantial temporal variability on the scale of minutes. ROPOS was sometimes completely enveloped by the plume while on the rim of the crater, and its surfaces were coated with large sulfur droplets. Black glassy fragments were entrained in the plume up to least 50 m above the crater and deposits of this material were on ledges and tops of outcrops up to several hundred meters from Brimstone Pit. The pit crater fluids have an extremely high content of particulate sulfur and extremely acidic, with pH around 2.0. This strongly implicates magmatic degassing of SO2 and disproportionation into elemental S and sulfuric acid. Diffuse venting of clear fluids was also present on the summit of the volcano, with temperatures exceeding 100\\degC in volcaniclastic sands

  17. The study of active submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Tsai, C.; Lee, C.

    2004-12-01

    The study area is located in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough (SPOT), which is a back-arc basin formed by extension of Eurasian plate. Previous research indicated two extensional stages in SPOT area. Many normal-fault structures were come into existence during both extensional processes. The SPOT is presently in an activity tectonic episode. Therefore, the area becomes a frequent earthquake and abundant magmatism. The purpose of this study is to discuss which relationship between tectonics, submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in SPOT area. The investigations are continued from 1998 to 2004, we have found at least twelve active hydrothermal vents in study area. Compare the locations hydrothermal vents with fault systems, we find both of them have highly correlated. We can distinguish them into two shapes, pyramidal shape and non-pyramidal shape. According to plumes height, we are able to divide these vents into two groups near east longitude 122.5° . East of this longitude, the hydrothermal plumes are more powerful and west of it are the weaker. This is closely related to the present extensional axis (N80° E) of the southern part of the Okinawa Trough. This can be explained the reason of why the more powerful vents coming out of the east group. The east group is associated with the present back-arc spreading system. West of 122.5° , the spreading system are in a primary stage. The andesitic volcanic island, the Turtle Island, is a result of N60° E extensional tectonism with a lot of faults. Besides the pyramidal shape, this can be proved indirectly. The vents located in the west side were occurred from previous extensional faults and are weaker than the eastern. Therefore, we suggest that if last the extension keeps going on, the hydrothermal vents located at the west side of the longitude 122.5° will be intensified.

  18. Numerical Tsunami Hazard Assessment of the Only Active Lesser Antilles Arc Submarine Volcano: Kick 'em Jenny.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondin, F. J. Y.; Dorville, J. F. M.; Robertson, R. E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc has potentially been hit by prehistorical regional tsunamis generated by voluminous volcanic landslides (volume > 1 km3) among the 53 events recognized so far. No field evidence of these tsunamis are found in the vincity of the sources. Such a scenario taking place nowadays would trigger hazardous tsunami waves bearing potentially catastrophic consequences for the closest islands and regional offshore oil platforms.Here we applied a complete hazard assessment method on the only active submarine volcano of the arc Kick 'em Jenny (KeJ). KeJ is the southernmost edifice with recognized associated volcanic landslide deposits. From the three identified landslide episodes one is associated with a collapse volume ca. 4.4 km3. Numerical simulations considering a single pulse collapse revealed that this episode would have produced a regional tsunami. An edifice current volume estimate is ca. 1.5 km3.Previous study exists in relationship to assessment of regional tsunami hazard related to shoreline surface elevation (run-up) in the case of a potential flank collapse scenario at KeJ. However this assessment was based on inferred volume of collapse material. We aim to firstly quantify potential initial volumes of collapse material using relative slope instability analysis (RSIA); secondly to assess first order run-ups and maximum inland inundation distance for Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago, i.e. two important economic centers of the Lesser Antilles. In this framework we present for seven geomechanical models tested in the RSIA step maps of critical failure surface associated with factor of stability (Fs) for twelve sectors of 30° each; then we introduce maps of expected potential run-ups (run-up × the probability of failure at a sector) at the shoreline.The RSIA evaluates critical potential failure surface associated with Fs <1 as compared to areas of deficit/surplus of mass/volume identified on the volcanic edifice using (VolcanoFit 2

  19. Direct Observations of Explosive Eruptive Activity at a Submarine Volcano, NW Rota-1, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; de Ronde, C. E.; Deardorff, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Cashman, K. V.; Dziak, R. P.; Merle, S. G.

    2006-12-01

    In April 2006, a series of extraordinary observations of a deep-sea volcanic eruption were made at NW Rota-1, located at 14^{circ}36'N in the Mariana arc, western Pacific. This is a conical, basaltic-andesite submarine volcano with a summit depth of 517 m. Explosive eruptive activity at NW Rota-1 was discovered in 2004 and was witnessed again in 2005, but the activity in 2006 was especially vigorous and well documented. During six dives with the remotely operated vehicle Jason II over a period of 7 days, video observations made at close range documented a diverse and increasingly energetic range of volcanic activity that culminated in explosive bursts with flashes of glowing red lava propelled by violently expanding gases. Other notable activity included discreet degassing events, extrusion of sluggish lava flows, explosions that formed dilute density currents and/or expelled rocks and ash tens of meters from the vent, and rapid pressure oscillations apparently caused by the repeated formation and condensation of steam. During the last dive when the highest extrusion rates were observed, quasi-periodic bursts from the vent, each lasting 1-10 minutes, were separated by pauses lasting 10 seconds to a few minutes. Each burst started as a plug of crusted-over lava rose in the vent and was blown apart by expanding gases, producing large lava bombs with distinctly flat, disc-like shapes. A remarkable aspect of these observations was how close Jason II could be to the vent during the eruptions. This was because the pressure of the overlying seawater dampened the energy of the explosions and slowed the velocity of volcanic ejecta. Also, lava degassing could be visualized with great clarity underwater as either clear bubbles (CO2) or opaque yellow clouds (dominated by SO2 and H2S). A portable hydrophone with a 30-hour recording capacity was deployed twice by Jason II at the summit of NW Rota-1 during the 2006 dive series. The hydrophone data extends the visual observations

  20. Unusual seismic activity in 2011 and 2013 at the submarine volcano Rocard, Society hot spot (French Polynesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talandier, Jacques; Hyvernaud, Olivier; Maury, René C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two seismic events that occurred on 27 May 2011 and 29 April 2013 at the Rocard submarine volcano which overlies the Society hot spot. The Polynesian Seismic Network recorded for the first time unusual associated short- and long-period signals, with perfectly monochromatic (0.0589 Hz) Rayleigh wave trains of long period and duration. None of the numerous observations of long-period (10-30 s) signals previously associated with volcanic activity in Japan, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Antarctica, and the Hawaiian Islands have the characteristics we observed at Rocard. We propose a tentative model for these unusual and rather enigmatic signals, in which the movement of lava excited the resonance of a shallow open conduit under a high hydrostatic pressure of ~400 bars.

  1. Continuous, Long-term, Cyclic, Varied Eruptive Activity Observed at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Dziak, R. P.; Baker, E. T.; Cashman, K. V.; Embley, R. W.; Ferrini, V.; de Ronde, C. E.; Butterfield, D. A.; Deardorff, N.; Haxel, J. H.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M. J.; Walker, S. L.; Bobbitt, A. M.; Merle, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is a conical, basaltic-andesite submarine volcano in the Mariana arc with a summit depth of 520 m. Eruptive activity was first witnessed here during remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives in 2004, and was also observed during all four subsequent ROV expeditions in 2005, 2006, and 2009. Cyclic explosive bursts were documented by a portable hydrophone during the 2006 ROV dives. More recently, a year of instrumental monitoring data from a moored hydrophone and plume sensor show that the volcano was continuously active from February 2008 to February 2009, and that the cyclic character of the eruptions occurred with variable intensity and periodicity. The 2008-2009 hydrophone record includes explosive bursts every 1-2 minutes, with high acoustic amplitudes in the first half of the year and lower more variable amplitudes in the second half. In contrast, the moored turbidity sensor recorded major eruptive plumes on a time scale of every few days to weeks, and at approximately the same frequency throughout the year. This apparent disparity may be explained by the most recent ROV and portable hydrophone observations at NW Rota-1 in April 2009, which confirmed continuous and diverse eruptive activity with cyclicity over several time scales, from minutes to days. Visual observations at the eruptive vent provided new insight into the process of very slow lava extrusion on the seafloor. During slow extrusion (at rates of 1-2 m3/hr), lava spines rose in the eruptive vent, then gradually disintegrated into angular blocks as they cooled and were shoved aside by the next lava to emerge. Freshly erupted lava blocks periodically tumbled down the sides of a growing cone (40-m high and 300-m wide) that had been constructed by this process since the last visit in 2006. Thus auto-brecciation during slow lava extrusion underwater produces primary deposits that could easily be mistaken as secondary, and can construct substantial landforms on submarine arc volcanoes. Even during

  2. Vailulu'u Seamount, Samoa: Life and death on an active submarine volcano.

    PubMed

    Staudigel, Hubert; Hart, Stanley R; Pile, Adele; Bailey, Bradley E; Baker, Edward T; Brooke, Sandra; Connelly, Douglas P; Haucke, Lisa; German, Christopher R; Hudson, Ian; Jones, Daniel; Koppers, Anthony A P; Konter, Jasper; Lee, Ray; Pietsch, Theodore W; Tebo, Bradley M; Templeton, Alexis S; Zierenberg, Robert; Young, Craig M

    2006-04-25

    Submersible exploration of the Samoan hotspot revealed a new, 300-m-tall, volcanic cone, named Nafanua, in the summit crater of Vailulu'u seamount. Nafanua grew from the 1,000-m-deep crater floor in <4 years and could reach the sea surface within decades. Vents fill Vailulu'u crater with a thick suspension of particulates and apparently toxic fluids that mix with seawater entering from the crater breaches. Low-temperature vents form Fe oxide chimneys in many locations and up to 1-m-thick layers of hydrothermal Fe floc on Nafanua. High-temperature (81 degrees C) hydrothermal vents in the northern moat (945-m water depth) produce acidic fluids (pH 2.7) with rising droplets of (probably) liquid CO(2). The Nafanua summit vent area is inhabited by a thriving population of eels (Dysommina rugosa) that feed on midwater shrimp probably concentrated by anticyclonic currents at the volcano summit and rim. The moat and crater floor around the new volcano are littered with dead metazoans that apparently died from exposure to hydrothermal emissions. Acid-tolerant polychaetes (Polynoidae) live in this environment, apparently feeding on bacteria from decaying fish carcasses. Vailulu'u is an unpredictable and very active underwater volcano presenting a potential long-term volcanic hazard. Although eels thrive in hydrothermal vents at the summit of Nafanua, venting elsewhere in the crater causes mass mortality. Paradoxically, the same anticyclonic currents that deliver food to the eels may also concentrate a wide variety of nektonic animals in a death trap of toxic hydrothermal fluids. PMID:16614067

  3. Vailulu’u Seamount, Samoa: Life and death on an active submarine volcano

    PubMed Central

    Staudigel, Hubert; Hart, Stanley R.; Pile, Adele; Bailey, Bradley E.; Baker, Edward T.; Brooke, Sandra; Connelly, Douglas P.; Haucke, Lisa; German, Christopher R.; Hudson, Ian; Jones, Daniel; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Konter, Jasper; Lee, Ray; Pietsch, Theodore W.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Zierenberg, Robert; Young, Craig M.

    2006-01-01

    Submersible exploration of the Samoan hotspot revealed a new, 300-m-tall, volcanic cone, named Nafanua, in the summit crater of Vailulu’u seamount. Nafanua grew from the 1,000-m-deep crater floor in <4 years and could reach the sea surface within decades. Vents fill Vailulu’u crater with a thick suspension of particulates and apparently toxic fluids that mix with seawater entering from the crater breaches. Low-temperature vents form Fe oxide chimneys in many locations and up to 1-m-thick layers of hydrothermal Fe floc on Nafanua. High-temperature (81°C) hydrothermal vents in the northern moat (945-m water depth) produce acidic fluids (pH 2.7) with rising droplets of (probably) liquid CO2. The Nafanua summit vent area is inhabited by a thriving population of eels (Dysommina rugosa) that feed on midwater shrimp probably concentrated by anticyclonic currents at the volcano summit and rim. The moat and crater floor around the new volcano are littered with dead metazoans that apparently died from exposure to hydrothermal emissions. Acid-tolerant polychaetes (Polynoidae) live in this environment, apparently feeding on bacteria from decaying fish carcasses. Vailulu’u is an unpredictable and very active underwater volcano presenting a potential long-term volcanic hazard. Although eels thrive in hydrothermal vents at the summit of Nafanua, venting elsewhere in the crater causes mass mortality. Paradoxically, the same anticyclonic currents that deliver food to the eels may also concentrate a wide variety of nektonic animals in a death trap of toxic hydrothermal fluids. PMID:16614067

  4. Prokaryotic community structure and diversity in the sediments of an active submarine mud volcano (Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Lykousis, Vasilios; Stefanou, Euripides G; Kormas, Konstantinos A

    2010-06-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA gene diversity at a high sediment depth resolution (every 5 cm, top 30 cm) in an active site of the Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea. A total of 242 archaeal and 374 bacterial clones were analysed, which were attributed to 38 and 205 unique phylotypes, respectively (> or = 98% similarity). Most of the archaeal phylotypes were related to ANME-1, -2 and -3 members originating from habitats where anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs, although they occurred in sediment layers with no apparent AOM (below the sulphate depletion depth). Proteobacteria were the most abundant and diverse bacterial group, with the Gammaproteobacteria dominating in most sediment layers and these were related to phylotypes involved in methane cycling. The Deltaproteobacteria included several of the sulphate-reducers related to AOM. The rest of the bacterial phylotypes belonged to 15 known phyla and three unaffiliated groups, with representatives from similar habitats. Diversity index H was in the range 0.56-1.73 and 1.47-3.82 for Archaea and Bacteria, respectively, revealing different depth patterns for the two groups. At 15 and 20 cm below the sea floor, the prokaryotic communities were highly similar, hosting AOM-specific Archaea and Bacteria. Our study revealed different dominant phyla in proximate sediment layers. PMID:20370830

  5. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  6. Submarine explosive activity and ocean noise generation at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc: constraints from hydroacoustic T-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Submarine volcanic activity is difficult to detect, because eruptions at depth are strongly attenuated by seawater. With increasing depth the ambient water pressure increases and limits the expansion of gas and steam such that volcanic eruptions tend to be less violent and less explosive with depth. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of water causes rapid cooling of ejected products and hence erupted magma cools much more quickly than during subaerial eruptions. Therefore, reports on submarine volcanism are restricted to those sites where erupted products - like the presence of pumice rafts, gas bubbling on the sea surface, and local seawater colour changes - reach the sea surface. However, eruptions cause sound waves that travel over far distances through the Sound-Fixing-And-Ranging (SOFAR) channel, so called T-waves. Seismic networks in French Polynesia recorded T-waves since the 1980's that originated at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc, and were attributed to episodic growth and collapse events. Repeated swath-mapping campaigns conducted between 1998 and 2011 confirm that Monowai volcano is a highly dynamic volcano. In July of 2007 a network of ocean-bottom-seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones was deployed and recovered at the end of January 2008. The instruments were located just to the east of Monowai between latitude 25°45'S and 27°30'S. The 23 OBS were placed over the fore-arc and on the incoming subducting plate to obtain local seismicity associated with plate bending and coupling of the subduction megathrust. However, we recognized additional non-seismic sleuths in the recordings. Events were best seen in 1 Hz high-pass filtered hydrophone records and were identified as T-waves. The term T-wave is generally used for waves travelling through the SOFAR channel over large distances. In our case, however, they were also detected on station down to ~8000 m, suggesting that waves on the sea-bed station were direct waves caused by explosive

  7. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds.

  8. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25627249

  9. High-Temperature Hydrothermal Vent Field of Kolumbo Submarine Volcano, Aegean Sea: Site of Active Kuroko-Type Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Alexandri, M.; Vougioukalakis, G.; Croff, K.; Roman, C.; Sakellariou, D.; Anagnostou, C.; Rousakis, G.; Ioakim, C.; Gogou, A.; Ballas, D.; Misaridis, T.; Nomikou, P.

    2006-12-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano is located 7 km north-east of the island of Santorini in the Hellenic arc (Greece), and comprises one of about twenty submarine cones in a NE-trending rift zone. Kolumbo erupted explosively in 1649-50AD, causing 70 fatalities on Santorini. Kolumbo's crater is 1700 m in diameter, with a crater rim at 10 m below sea level and crater floor at depth of 505 m. Recent marine geological investigations, using ROVs, reveal a very active high-temperature hydrothermal vent field in the northeastern part of the Kolumbo crater floor, about 25,000 m2. Vent chimneys up to 4 m high are vigorously emitting colorless gas plumes up to 10 m high in the water column. Temperatures up to 220oC are recorded in vent fluids. Some vents are in crater- like depressions, containing debris from collapsed extinct chimneys. The entire crater floor of Kolumbo is mantled by a reddish-orange bacterial mat, and bacterial filaments of a variety of colors cling to chimneys in dense clusters. Glassy tunicates and anemones are common in lower-temperature environments on the crater floor. Most chimneys show a high porosity, with a central conduit surrounded by an open and very permeable framework of sulfides and sulfates, aiding fluid flow through the chimney walls. In the sulfate-rich samples, blades of euhedral barite and anhydrite crystals coat the outside of the chimney wall, and layers of barite alternate with sulfide in the interior. The dominant sulfides are pyrite, sphalerite, wurtzite, marcasite and galena. Crusts on extinct and lower-temperature chimneys are composed of amorphous silica, goethite and halite. Sulfur isotope composition of sulfates is virtually at sea water values, whereas the sulfides are more depleted. Elevated levels of copper, gold and silver are observed in bulk composition of chimney samples. Both the structural setting, character of the vent field and sulfide/sulfate mineralogy and geochemistry indicate on-going Kuroko-type mineralization in the

  10. Discovery of an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc: volcanic structure and potential hazards of Oomurodashi Volcano (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Nichols, A. R.; Hirahara, Y.; Carey, R.; McIntosh, I. M.; Masaki, Y.; Kondo, R.; Miyairi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Oomurodashi is a bathymetric high located ~20 km south of Izu-Oshima, an active volcanic island of the northern Izu-Bonin Arc. Using the 200 m bathymetric contour to define its summit dimensions, the diameter of Oomurodashi is ~20 km. Oomurodashi has been regarded as inactive, largely because it has a vast flat-topped summit at 100 - 150 meters below sea level (mbsl). During cruise NT07-15 of R/V Natsushima in 2007, we conducted a dive survey in a small crater, Oomuro Hole, located in the center of the flat-topped summit, using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin. The only heat flow measurement conducted on the floor of Oomuro Hole during the dive recorded an extremely high value of 4,200 mW/m2. Furthermore, ROV observations revealed that the southwestern wall of Oomuro Hole consists of fresh rhyolitic lavas. These findings suggest that Oomurodashi is in fact an active silicic submarine volcano. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted detailed geological and geophysical ROV Hyper-Dolphin (cruise NT12-19). In addition to further ROV surveys, we carried out single-channel seismic (SCS) surveys across Oomurodashi in order to examine the shallow structures beneath the current edifice. The ROV surveys revealed numerous active hydrothermal vents on the floor of Oomuro Hole, at ~200 mbsl, with maximum water temperature measured at the hydrothermal vents reaching 194°C. We also conducted a much more detailed set of heat flow measurements across the floor of Oomuro Hole, detecting very high heat flows of up to 29,000 mW/m2. ROV observations revealed that the area surrounding Oomuro Hole on the flat-topped summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with minimum biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s). These findings strongly indicate that Oomurodashi is an active silicic submarine volcano, with recent eruption(s) occurring from Oomuro Hole. Since the summit of Oomurodashi is in shallow water, it

  11. NeMO-Net: A System for Near Real-Time Remote Sensing of Hydrothermal and Biological Activity in the Caldera of an Active Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, S. R.; Butterfield, D.; Embley, R. W.; Meinig, C.; Stalin, S.

    2001-12-01

    In July of 2000, a camera and three temperature sensors were placed on the seafloor near a hydrothermal vent located in the caldera of an active submarine volcano. The volcano's summit lies at a depth of about 1500 m and is located at 46° N, 130° W, approximately 250 nautical miles off the Oregon coast. The volcano is the site of a long-term interdisciplinary study focused in part on discovering relationships between submarine volcanic and hydrothermal activity and a microbial biosphere which exists beneath the sea floor within the volcano's summit caldera. NeMO-Net utilizes an acoustic modem to communicate with a surface mooring anchored nearby. The mooring, in turn, is linked from the ocean surface to the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory by means of satellite systems. A unique feature of NeMO-Net is that it enables shore-based investigators to interrogate and command the system to perform specific tasks, the results of which are then reported back typically within several minutes . In the initial year-long deployment, photographic images, along with hourly readings from the three temperature probes, were available on a website which was updated every 24 hours. During the year, the camera documented a dynamic vent biological community as well as water temperature variations due to the influence of tides, and possibly with changing vent fluid temperatures The NeMO-Net system is under continuing development with particular emphasis on linking it to multiple sea floor instruments including near-real-time chemical and water samplers. Near-future plans also call for NeMO Net to be linked to a resident sea floor AUV.

  12. Vailulu'u Seamount, Samoa: Life and Death at the Edge of An Active Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vailulu'U Research Group, T.

    2005-12-01

    Exploration of Vailulu'u seamount (14°13'S; 169°04'W) by manned submersible, ROV, and surface ship revealed a new, 300m tall volcano that has grown in the summit crater in less than four years. This shows that Vailulu'u's eruption behavior is at this stage not predictable and continued growth could allow Vailulu'u to breach sea level within decades Several types of hydrothermal vents fill Vailulu'u crater with particulates that reduce visibility to less than a few meters in some regions. Hydrothermal solutions mix with seawater that enters the crater from its breaches to produce distinct biological habitats. Low temperature hydrothermal vents can produce Fe-oxide chimneys or up to one meter-thick microbial mats. Higher temperature vents (85°C) produce low salinity acidic fluids containing buoyant droplets of immiscible CO2. Low temperature hydrothermal vents at Nafanua summit (708m depth) support a thriving population of eels (Dysommia rusosa). The areas around the high temperature vents and the moat and remaining crater around the new volcano is almost devoid of any macroscopic life and is littered with fish, and mollusk carcasses that apparently died from exposure to hydrothermal fluid components in deeper crater waters. Acid- tolerant polychaetes adapt to this environment and feed near and on these carcasses. Vailulu'u presents a natural laboratory for the study of how seamounts and their volcanic systems interact with the hydrosphere to produce distinct biological habitats, and how marine life can adapt to these conditions or be trapped in a toxic volcanic system that leads to mass mortality. The Vailulu'u research team: Hubert Staudigel, Samantha Allen, Brad Bailey, Ed Baker, Sandra Brooke, Ryan Delaney, Blake English, Lisa Haucke, Stan Hart, John Helly, Ian Hudson, Matt Jackson, Daniel Jones, Alison Koleszar, Anthony Koppers, Jasper Konter, Laurent Montesi, Adele Pile, Ray Lee, Scott Mcbride, Julie Rumrill, Daniel Staudigel, Brad Tebo, Alexis Templeton

  13. Rapid rates of growth and collapse of Monowai submarine volcano in the Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Peirce, C.; Grevemeyer, I.; Paulatto, M.; Stratford, W.; Bassett, D.; Hunter, J. A.; Kalnins, L. M.; de Ronde, C. E. J.

    2012-07-01

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are under water. As a result of their relative inaccessibility, little is known of the structure and evolution of submarine volcanoes. Advances in navigation and sonar imaging techniques have made it possible to map submarine volcanoes in detail, and repeat surveys allow the identification of regions where the depth of the sea floor is actively changing. Here we report the results of a bathymetric survey of Monowai submarine volcano in the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, which we mapped twice within 14 days. We found marked differences in bathymetry between the two surveys, including an increase in seafloor depth up to 18.8m and a decrease in depth up to 71.9m. We attribute the depth increase to collapse of the volcano summit region and the decrease to growth of new lava cones and debris flows. Hydroacoustic T-wave data reveal a 5-day-long swarm of seismic events with unusually high amplitude between the surveys, which directly link the depth changes to explosive activity at the volcano. The collapse and growth rates implied by our data are extremely high, compared with measured long-term growth rates of the volcano, demonstrating the pulsating nature of submarine volcanism and highlighting the dynamic nature of the sea floor.

  14. Fluid Flow Patterns in a Submarine Volcano: Simulating the Hydrothermal Evolution of Brothers Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, G.; de Ronde, C. E.; Driesner, T.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Brothers volcano is part of the southern Kermadec intra-oceanic arc located northeast of New Zealand, and is one of the world’s best-studied active submarine volcanoes. It provides insight into the complex subseafloor hydrology of a submarine arc volcano with evidence for different stages in its magmatic-hydrothermal evolution [1]. The volcanic edifice comprises an elongated caldera surrounding an asymmetrically centered post-collapse cone. While hydrothermal venting at the NW caldera wall is focused and dates back to at least 1,200 years, hydrothermal discharge at the cone summit is diffuse and considered to be significantly younger. Recent studies of regional seismicity and local harmonic tremor at Brothers volcano imply the existence of a hydrothermal fluid reservoir underneath the area of the present cone [2]. Using a combined finite element - finite volume method, we have computed multi-phase mass and heat transport with a process simulation scheme based on realistic fluid properties. We have used correlations that describe phase stability relations in the binary NaCl-H2O system up to 1000°C [3]. Our earlier results of generic fluid flow simulations showed that water depth and seafloor topography, together with crustal permeability and the relative contributions of seawater and magmatic fluids, are first-order physical parameters controlling the fluid flow patterns and the style of hydrothermal venting. In our more recent simulations, we use available data from Brothers volcano, including detailed bathymetry, physical and chemical measurements from different vent sites and information on the size and location of the subseafloor magma chamber(s). The implementation of two distinct magmatic stages (i.e., pre-cone vs. post-cone) shows that the topography of the volcanic edifice, in combination with the location and size of an underlying magma chamber, play an important role in the style and evolution of the hydrothermal system. [1] de Ronde, C. E. J., et al

  15. Comparative Study of Submarine Volcanoes and Small Venusian Volcanic Edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, G.; Krempasky, M. C.

    1996-03-01

    The small volcanic edifices on Venus are important because of their common occurrence on the planet's surface. They normally range 0-10 km in diameter. An extensive inventory has been compiled for more than 2000 small edifices. Based on this inventory, it is estimated that there are about half million identifiable small volcanic edifices on the planet. This work also indicates that the small volcanic edifices' size frequency distribution is very similar to that of submarine volcanoes (seamounts) distributed on the East Pacific Rise. It has been suggested that submarine volcanoes, particularly flat-topped seamounts located off the coast of Hawaii, are analogous to "pancake domes" on Venus. However the detailed geomorphic analysis of seamounts located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Pacific Ocean Basin indicates that submarine volcanoes are better analogs for small volcanic edifices.

  16. Integrated volcanologic and petrologic analysis of the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantner, Kathleen; Carey, Steven; Nomikou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of Santorini, Greece in the Aegean Sea, last erupted in 1650 AD. Submarine and subaerial explosive activity lasted for a period of about four months and led to the formation of thick (~ 250 m) highly stratified pumice deposits on the upper crater walls as well as extensive pumice rafts that were dispersed throughout the southern Aegean Sea. Subaerial tephra fallout from eruption columns that breached the surface occurred as far east as Turkey.

  17. Submarine radial vents on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V. Dorsey; Garcia, M.O.; Trusdell, F.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Norman, M.D.; Weis, Dominique; Fornari, D.J.; Kurz, M.D.; Guillou, Herve

    2006-01-01

    A 2002 multibeam sonar survey of Mauna Loa's western flank revealed ten submarine radial vents and three submarine lava flows. Only one submarine radial vent was known previously. The ages of these vents are constrained by eyewitness accounts, geologic relationships, Mn-Fe coatings, and geochemical stratigraphy; they range from 128 years B.P. to possibly 47 ka. Eight of the radial vents produced degassed lavas despite eruption in water depths sufficient to inhibit sulfur degassing. These vents formed truncated cones and short lava flows. Two vents produced undegassed lavas that created “irregular” cones and longer lava flows. Compositionally and isotopically, the submarine radial vent lavas are typical of Mauna Loa lavas, except two cones that erupted alkalic lavas. He-Sr isotopes for the radial vent lavas follow Mauna Loa's evolutionary trend. The compositional and isotopic heterogeneity of these lavas indicates most had distinct parental magmas. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter results, along with photography and sampling during four JASON2 dives, are used to produce a detailed geologic map to evaluate Mauna Loa's submarine geologic history. The new map shows that the 1877 submarine eruption was much larger than previously thought, resulting in a 10% increase for recent volcanism. Furthermore, although alkalic lavas were found at two radial vents, there is no systematic increase in alkalinity among these or other Mauna Loa lavas as expected for a dying volcano. These results refute an interpretation that Mauna Loa's volcanism is waning. The submarine radial vents and flows cover 29 km2 of seafloor and comprise a total volume of ∼2×109 m3 of lava, reinforcing the idea that submarine lava eruptions are important in the growth of oceanic island volcanoes even after they emerged above sea level.

  18. Hydrothermal Helium Plumes over Submarine Volcanoes of the Marianas Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.; Resing, J. E.; Massoth, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Greene, R.; Walker, S.; Lebon, G.

    2003-12-01

    During February-March, 2003, as part of the Submarine Ring of Fire project funded by NOAA's Ocean Exploration Program, the R/V T.G. Thompson conducted a comprehensive survey of hydrothermal activity along 1200 km of the Mariana Arc from 13.5° N to 22.5° N [see Embley et al., EOS Trans. AGU, 2003]. Plume surveys were conducted in the water-column above ~50 submarine volcanoes using a CTD/rosette system. A total of 70 CTD casts were completed, and discrete water samples were collected for analysis of a variety of hydrothermal tracers, including 3He, CH4, CO2, H2S, Fe, Mn, pH, and suspended particles. Although shorebased analysis of the samples is still underway, preliminary results indicate that about 11 of the 50 submarine volcanoes surveyed are hydrothermally active. Because many of the Marianas Arc volcanoes rise to within 500 m of the sea surface, hydrothermal plume signals such as light attenuation (suspended particles) and temperature anomaly have limited utility due to masking by near surface effects. For this reason 3He, an unambiguous hydrothermal tracer, has been particularly useful for identifying which of the shallow arc volcanoes are hydrothermally active. Our expectation was that the water-column helium signal might be reduced at shallow depths due to ventilation into the atmosphere. However, we observed very high 3He enrichments at shallow depths both at Maug Islands and at NW Rota #1 (14° 36'N; 144° 46.5'E). The 3He enrichments were strongly correlated with changes in pH, Mn, and other hydrothermal tracers. The three Maug Islands mark the perimeter of a caldera formed by an explosive eruption, and a single hydrocast in the center of the caldera detected a robust helium plume at 120-200 m depth with δ 3He reaching a maximum of 250% at 150m depth. Analysis of the co-variation of [3He] vs. [4He] at Maug gave R/Ra = 6.6 for an estimate of the end-member helium isotope ratio (R = 3He/4He and Ra = Rair). This value falls well within the range of R

  19. Products of Submarine Fountains and Bubble-burst Eruptive Activity at 1200 m on West Mata Volcano, Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Keller, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    An eruption was observed and sampled at West Mata Volcano using ROV JASON II for 5 days in May 2009 during the NSF-NOAA eruption response cruise to this region of suspected volcanic activity. Activity was focused near the summit at the Prometheus and Hades vents. Prometheus erupted almost exclusively as low-level fountains. Activity at Hades cycled between vigorous degassing, low fountains, and bubble-bursts, building up and partially collapsing a small spatter/scoria cone and feeding short sheet-like and pillow flows. Fire fountains at Prometheus produced mostly small primary pyroclasts that include Pele's hair and fluidal fragments of highly vesicular volcanic glass. These fragments have mostly shattered and broken surfaces, although smooth spatter-like surfaces also occur. As activity wanes, glow in the vent fades, and denser, sometimes altered volcanic clasts are incorporated into the eruption. The latter are likely from the conduit walls and/or vent-rim ejecta, drawn back into the vent by inrushing seawater that replaces water entrained in the rising volcanic plume. Repeated recycling of previously erupted materials eventually produces rounded clasts resembling beach cobbles and pitted surfaces on broken phenocrysts of pyroxene and olivine. We estimate that roughly 33% of near vent ejecta are recycled. Our best sample of this ejecta type was deposited in the drawer of the JASON II ROV during a particularly large explosion that occurred during plume sampling immediately above the vent. Elemental sulfur spherules up to 5 mm in diameter are common in ejecta from both vents and occur inside some of the lava fragments Hades activity included dramatic bubble-bursts unlike anything previously observed under water. The lava bubbles, sometimes occurring in rapid-fire sequence, collapsed in the water-column, producing fragments that are quenched in less than a second to form Pele's hair, limu o Pele, spatter-like lava blobs, and scoria. All are highly vesicular

  20. Active Submarine Volcanoes and Electro-Optical Sensor Networks: The Potential of Capturing and Quantifying an Entire Eruptive Sequence at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Proskurowski, G.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The NE Pacific Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is designed to provide unprecedented electrical power and bandwidth to the base and summit of Axial Seamount. The scientific community is engaged in identifying a host of existing and innovative observation and measurement techniques that utilize the high-power and bandwidth infrastructure and its real-time transmission capabilities. The cable, mooring, and sensor arrays will enable the first quantitative documentation of myriad processes leading up to, during, and following a submarine volcanic event. Currently planned RSN instrument arrays will provide important and concurrent spatial and temporal constraints on earthquake activity, melt migration, hydrothermal venting behavior and chemistry, ambient currents, microbial community structure, high-definition (HD) still images and HD video streaming from the vents, and water-column chemistry in the overlying ocean. Anticipated, but not yet funded, additions will include AUVs and gliders that continually document the spatial-temporal variations in the water column above the volcano and the distal zones. When an eruption appears imminent the frequency of sampling will be increased remotely, and the potential of repurposing the tracking capabilities of the mobile sensing platforms will be adapted to the spatial indicators of likely eruption activity. As the eruption begins mobile platforms will fully define the geometry, temperature, and chemical-microbial character of the volcanic plume as it rises into the thoroughly documented control volume above the volcano. Via the Internet the scientific community will be able to witness and direct adaptive sampling in response to changing conditions of plume formation. A major goal will be to document the eruptive volume and link the eruption duration to the volume of erupted magma. For the first time, it will be possible to begin to quantify the time-integrated output of an underwater

  1. The Chemistry of Hydrothermal venting at a Volcano "O", a large Submarine Volcano in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, J. A.; Baker, E. T.; Lupton, J. E.; Lilley, M. D.; Rubin, K. H.; Buck, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcano O is located in the NE Lau basin in a highly extensional region between the Tonga arc and back arc. The NE Lau basin has the highest subduction rates on Earth [Bevis et al., 1995] and is Earth's fastest-opening back-arc basin [Zellmer and Taylor, 2001]. The NE Lau Basin contains abundant recent submarine volcanism with magma production likely driven by water released from the subducting slab and decompression associated with crustal extension. One manifestation of this abundant volcanism is Volcano O, one of the largest discrete active-submarine volcanoes on Earth. It is hard to classify this volcano is either arc or back arc because its location behind the magmatic arc is inconsistent with the eruption of dacitic lavas and highly acidic hydrothermal activity reported here. Volcano O has exhibited ongoing hydrothermal activity as documented in 2004 (Lupton pers. Comm.), 2006 [Kim et al., 2009], and in both 2008 and 2010 as presented here. In 2008 and 2010, we documented intense hydrothermal plumes in several locations in the caldera. The most intense hydrothermal plume was observed in 2010 directly above a small cone on the eastern side of the caldera. A camera tow across the cone revealed fresh blocky lavas with a hint of sulfur-rich waters surrounding the cone. Here we present data on the chemistry of hydrothermal plumes at Volcano O. Of particular interest is a hydrocast conducted directly above the cone. During this hydrocast we collected fluids rich in Fe (≤13,000nM), Mn (≤665nM), particulate Al (≤1500nM), particulate sulfur (≤18000nM), and with large decreases in pH (≤0.9 pH units). These anomalies are extraordinarily large and are much greater than the Fe and Mn levels observed by Kim et al. These chemical enrichments and depletions strongly suggest that Volcano O is actively degassing SO2 which, in turn, suggests that the magma chamber must be fairly shallow. This may indicate an active state of cone building at Volcano O. In addition to

  2. Environmental monitoring of El Hierro Island submarine volcano, by combining low and high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, F.; Martin, J.; Marcello, J.; Fraile-Nuez, E.

    2014-06-01

    El Hierro Island, located at the Canary Islands Archipelago in the Atlantic coast of North Africa, has been rocked by thousands of tremors and earthquakes since July 2011. Finally, an underwater volcanic eruption started 300 m below sea level on October 10, 2011. Since then, regular multidisciplinary monitoring has been carried out in order to quantify the environmental impacts caused by the submarine eruption. Thanks to this natural tracer release, multisensorial satellite imagery obtained from MODIS and MERIS sensors have been processed to monitor the volcano activity and to provide information on the concentration of biological, chemical and physical marine parameters. Specifically, low resolution satellite estimations of optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration under these abnormal conditions have been assessed. These remote sensing data have played a fundamental role during field campaigns guiding the oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. In addition, to analyze El Hierro submarine volcano area, WorldView-2 high resolution satellite spectral bands were atmospherically and deglinted processed prior to obtain a high-resolution optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient model. This novel algorithm was developed using a matchup data set with MERIS and MODIS data, in situ transmittances measurements and a seawater radiative transfer model. Multisensor and multitemporal imagery processed from satellite remote sensing sensors have demonstrated to be a powerful tool for monitoring the submarine volcanic activities, such as discolored seawater, floating material and volcanic plume, having shown the capabilities to improve the understanding of submarine volcanic processes.

  3. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected. PMID:18247739

  4. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected.

  5. A Miocene submarine volcano at Low Layton, Jamaica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.

    1982-01-01

    A submarine fissure eruption of Upper Miocene age produced a modest volume of alkaline basalt at Low Layton, on the north coast of Jamaica. The eruption occurred in no more than a few hundred meters of water and produced a series of hyaloclastites, pillow breccias and pillow lavas, massive lavas, and dikes with an ENE en echelon structure. The volcano lies on the trend of one of the island's major E-W strike-slip fault zones; the Dunavale Fault Zone. The K-Ar age of the eruption of 9.5 plus or minus 0.5 Ma. B.P. corresponds to an extension of the Mid-Cayman Rise spreading center inferred from magnetic anomalies and bathymetry of the Cayman Trough to the north and west of Jamaica. The Low Layton eruption was part of the response of the strike-slip fault systems adjacent to this spreading center during this brief episode of tectonic readjustment.

  6. The 2014 Submarine Eruption of Ahyi Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Chadwick, W.; Merle, S. G.; Buck, N. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Coombs, M. L.; Evers, L. G.; Heaney, K. D.; Lyons, J. J.; Searcy, C. K.; Walker, S. L.; Young, C.; Embley, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    On April 23, 2014, Ahyi Volcano, a submarine cone in the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI), ended a 13-year-long period of repose with an explosive eruption lasting over 2 weeks. The remoteness of the volcano and the presence of several seamounts in the immediate area posed a challenge for constraining the source location of the eruption. Critical to honing in on the Ahyi area quickly were quantitative error estimates provided by the CTBTO on the backazimuth of hydroacoustic arrivals observed at Wake Island (IMS station H11). T-phases registered across the NMI seismic network at the rate of approximately 10 per hour until May 8 and were observed in hindsight at seismic stations on Guam and Chichijima. After May 8, sporadic T-phases were observed until May 17. Within days of the eruption onset, reports were received from NOAA research divers of hearing explosions underwater and through the hull on the ship while working on the SE coastline of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas), a distance of 20 km NW of Ahyi. In the same area, the NOAA crew reported sighting mats of orange-yellow bubbles on the water surface and extending up to 1 km from the shoreline. Despite these observations, satellite images showed nothing unusual throughout the eruption. During mid-May, a later cruise leg on the NOAA ship Hi'ialakai that was previously scheduled in the Ahyi area was able to collect some additional data in response to the eruption. Preliminary multibeam sonar bathymetry and water-column CTD casts were obtained at Ahyi. Comparison between 2003 and 2014 bathymetry revealed that the minimum depth had changed from 60 m in 2003 to 75 m in 2014, and a new crater ~95 m deep had formed at the summit. Extending SSE from the crater was a new scoured-out landslide chute extending downslope to a depth of at least 2300 m. Up to 125 m of material had been removed from the head of the landslide chute and downslope deposits were up to 40 m thick. Significant particle plumes were detected at all three

  7. Carbon Fluxes from Submarine Arc Volcanoes - examples from the Mariana and Kermadec Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J.; Butterfield, D.; Lilley, M.; Evans, L.; Greene, R.; Resing, J.; Embley, R.; Massoth, G.; Christenson, B.; de Ronde, C.; Olson, E.; Proskurowski, G.; Nakamura, K.; Schmidt, M.; Stoffers, P.; Worthington, T.; Hannington, M.

    2005-12-01

    Recent investigations of volcanic arcs have revealed unusually high fluxes of CO2 from several submarine arc volcanoes. In 2004 the ROPOS ROV was used to map and sample ~10 active volcanoes along the Mariana arc, and in 2005 a similar study of volcanoes along the Kermadec arc was conducted using the HURL Pisces submersible. Of particular interest are 3 volcanoes that, in addition to discharging hot vent fluid, were found to be venting a separate CO2-rich phase in the form of gas bubbles or, in one case, droplets of liquid CO2. The Champagne hydrothermal site situated at ~1600-m depth near the summit of NW Eifuku volcano (21.49°N, 144.04°E) in the northern Mariana Arc, was discovered in 2004 during NOAAs Submarine Ring of Fire (SROF) project. This unusual site was discharging two distinct fluids from the same vent field: a 103°C gas-rich hydrothermal fluid, and cold (4°C) droplets of liquid CO2. The hot fluid contained ~2.2 moles/kg CO2, the highest ever reported for submarine hydrothermal fluids and about twice the saturation value at that p,T. The carbon flux from this site was estimated to be ~23 moles CO2/sec, about 0.1% of the global MOR carbon flux. Two similar but much shallower CO2-rich systems were discovered on the Kermadec arc. Pisces dives on Giggenbach volcano (30.04°S, 178.71°W) in the Kermadec arc discovered a mixture of gas bubbles and 203°C fluid discharging at 164-m depth. The fluid contained 250 - 500 mM/kg total gas. At Volcano 1 (21.15°S, 175.75°W), Pisces found streams of gas bubbles rising from the seafloor at ~100 m depth. This vent area had areas of diffuse discharge (30 to 150°C) with gas contents up to 130 mM/kg. Although analyses are still in progress for these two sites, the gas bubbles are assumed to be mainly CO2. It is notable that discharges of pure CO2 have never been reported for MOR hydrothermal systems, and only one other submarine occurrence of liquid CO2 has been reported (in the Okinawa Trough, a back-arc system

  8. H2O Contents of Submarine and Subaerial Silicic Pyroclasts from Oomurodashi Volcano, Northern Izu-Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Tani, K.; Nichols, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oomurodashi volcano is an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc, located ~20 km south of the inhabited active volcanic island of Izu-Oshima. Oomurodashi has a large (~20km diameter) flat-topped summit located at 100 - 150 metres below sea level (mbsl), with a small central crater, Oomuro Hole, located at ~200 mbsl. Surveys conducted during cruise NT12-19 of R/V Natsushima in 2012 using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin revealed that Oomuro Hole contains numerous active hydrothermal vents and that the summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with little biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s) from Oomuro Hole. Given the shallow depth of the volcano summit, such eruptions are likely to have generated subaerial eruption columns. A ~10ka pumiceous subaerial tephra layer on the neighbouring island of Izu-Oshima has a similar chemical composition to the submarine Oomurodashi rocks collected during the NT12-19 cruise and is thought to have originated from Oomurodashi. Here we present FTIR measurements of the H2O contents of rhyolitic pumice from both the submarine deposits sampled during ROV dives and the subaerial tephra deposit on Izu-Oshima, in order to assess magma degassing and eruption processes occurring during shallow submarine eruptions.

  9. Mapping the sound field of an erupting submarine volcano using an acoustic glider.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Haru; Haxel, Joseph H; Dziak, Robert P; Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne R; Embley, Robert W

    2011-03-01

    An underwater glider with an acoustic data logger flew toward a recently discovered erupting submarine volcano in the northern Lau basin. With the volcano providing a wide-band sound source, recordings from the two-day survey produced a two-dimensional sound level map spanning 1 km (depth) × 40 km(distance). The observed sound field shows depth- and range-dependence, with the first-order spatial pattern being consistent with the predictions of a range-dependent propagation model. The results allow constraining the acoustic source level of the volcanic activity and suggest that the glider provides an effective platform for monitoring natural and anthropogenic ocean sounds. PMID:21428474

  10. Helium Isotopes of Fluids from Submarine Volcanoes in the South-Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsin Kao, Li; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Wen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Ai-Ti; Lee, Hsiao-Fen

    2014-05-01

    Many active submarine volcanoes have been found in southern Okinawa Trough. Water column samples from the hydrothermal plumes above venting volcanoes were collected during the OR2-1897 and -1984 cruises. Meanwhile, diving at shallower depths were conducted several times to collect the water samples near the venting sites. In total, 122 water samples from various depths in the offshore area of NE Taiwan were collected for dissolved gases and helium isotopes measurement. The dissolved gases of water column samples show that the CO2 concentration and the alkalinity increase with depth and become higher at the bottom, while the result of O2 concentration shows a reverse pattern. The 3He/4He ratios near the vicinity of active Kueishantao volcano show highest value, up to 5.5 RA, where RA is the atmospheric ratios of 1.39 x 10-6. The plot of 3He/4He and 3He/20Ne ratios suggests that there may be different sources in this region. Furthermore, we will estimate the helium flux from the venting volcanoes in this area.

  11. Preliminary results from Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 - NE Lau: First explorations of hydrothermally active volcanoes across the supra-subduction zone and a return to the West Mata eruption site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, J.; Embley, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    Several expeditions in the past few years have shown that the NE Lau basin has one of the densest concentrations of volcanically and hydrothermally active volcanoes on the planet. In 2008 two active submarine volcanic eruptions were discovered during a one week period and subsequent dives with the Jason remotely operated vehicle at one of the sites (West Mata) revealed an active boninite eruption taking place at 1200 m depth. Two dives at the other revealed evidence for recent eruption along the NE Lau Spreading Center. Several more expeditions in 2010-11 discovered additional evidence about the extent and types of hydrothermal activity in this area. Data from CTDO (conductivity, temperature, depth, optical) vertical casts, tow-yos, and towed camera deployments revealed more than 15 hydrothermal sites at water depths from ~800 to 2700 m that include sites from the magmatic arc, the "rear arc," and the back arc spreading centers. These sites range from high temperature black smoker sulfide-producing systems to those dominated by magmatic degassing. Dives by remotely operated vehicle (Quest 4000) in September 2012 will explore these sites and return samples for chemical, biological and geologic studies. One of the dives will be a return visit to West Mata volcano, the site of the deepest submarine eruption yet observed (in 2009). Recent multibeam data reveal large changes in West Mata's summit, suggesting that the nature of the eruption and the location of the erupting vents may have changed. In addition to the preliminary results from the science team, we will also discuss our use and experience with continuous live video transmission (through the High Definition video camera on the Quest 4000) back to shore via satellite and through the internet. Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 Science Team: Bradley Tebo, Bill Chadwick, Ed Baker, Ken Rubin, Susan Merle, Timothy Shank, Sharon Walker, Andra Bobbitt, Nathan Buck, David Butterfield, Eric Olson, John Lupton, Richard Arculus

  12. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the polygenetic Kolumbo submarine volcano/Santorini (Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübscher, Christian; Ruhnau, M.; Nomikou, P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we show for the first time the 3D-structural evolution of an explosive submarine volcano by means of reflection seismic interpretation. Four to five vertically stacked circular and cone-shaped units consisting mainly of volcaniclastics build the Kolumbo underwater volcano which experienced its first eruption > 70 ka ago and its last explosive eruption 1650 AD, 7 km NE of Santorini volcano (southern Aegean Sea). The summed volume of volcaniclastics is estimated to range between 13-22 km3. The entire Kolumbo volcanic complex has a height of ≥ 1 km and a diameter of ≥ 11 km. All volcaniclastic units reveal the same transparent reflection pattern strongly suggesting that explosive underwater volcanism was the prevalent process. Growth faults terminate upwards at the base of volcaniclastic units, thus representing a predictor to an eruption phase. Similarities in seismic reflection pattern between Kolumbo and near-by volcanic cones imply that the smaller cones evolved through explosive eruptions as well. Hence, the central Aegean Sea experienced several more explosive eruptions (≥ 23) than previously assumed, thus justifying further risk assessment. However, the eruption columns from the smaller volcanic cones did not reach the air and- consequently - no sub-aerial pyroclastic surge was created. The Anydros basin that hosts Kolumbo volcanic field opened incrementally NW to SE and parallel to the Pliny and Strabo trends during four major tectonic pulses prior to the onset of underwater volcanism.

  13. Distribution of tephra from the 1650 AD submarine eruption of Kolumbo volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, S. A.; Carey, S.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-12-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of Santorini in the Aegean Sea, last erupted in 1650 AD resulting in about 70 fatalities on Thera from gas discharge and significant coastal destruction from tsunamis. Extensive pumice rafts were reported over a large area surrounding Santorini, extending as far south as Crete. Tephra from the 1650 AD submarine eruption has been correlated in sediment box cores using a combination of mineralogy and major element composition of glass shards. The biotite-bearing rhyolite of Kolumbo can be readily discriminated from other silicic pyroclastics derived from the main Santorini complex. In general the tephra deposits are very fine grained (silt to fine sand-size), medium gray in color, and covered by about 10 cms of brown hemipelagic sediment. This corresponds to an average background sedimentation rate of 29 cm/kyr. The distribution of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tephra extends over an area larger than previously inferred from seismic profiles on the volcano's slopes and in adjacent basins. The cores indicate tephra deposits at least 19 km from the caldera, more than double the approximate 9 km inferred from seismic data. The preferential occurrence of the tephra within basins and sedimentological features such as cross bedding and laminations suggests that emplacement was dominated by sediment gravity flows generated from submarine and subaerial eruption plumes. We suggest that generation of the sediment gravity flows took place by collapse of submarine eruption columns and by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that formed on the sea surface as subaerial fallout accumulated from parts of the columns that breached the surface. Additionally, SEM imaging reveals particle morphologies that can be attributed to fragmentation by both primary volatile degassing (bubble wall shards) and phreatomagmatic activity (blocky equant grains). It is likely that phreatomagmatic activity became more important in the latter stages of the eruptive

  14. Looking for Larvae Above an Erupting Submarine Volcano, NW Rota-1, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, M.; Beaulieu, S.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Chadwick, W.; Breuer, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    In 2009 the first marine protected areas for deep-sea hydrothermal vents in U.S. waters were established as part of the Volcanic Unit of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument. In this region, hydrothermal vents are located along the Mariana Arc and back-arc spreading center. In particular hydrothermal vents are located near the summit of NW Rota-1, an active submarine volcano on the Mariana Arc which was erupting between 2003 through 2010 and ceased as of 2014. In late 2009, NW Rota-1 experienced a massive landslide decimating the habitat on the southern side of the volcano. This presented an enormous natural disturbance to the community. This project looked at zooplankton tow samples taken from the water column above NW Rota-1 in 2010, searching specifically for larvae which have the potential to recolonize the sea floor after such a major disturbance. We focused on samples for which profiles with a MAPR sensor indicated hydrothermal plumes in the water column. Samples were sorted in entirety into coarse taxa, and then larvae were removed for DNA barcoding. Overall zooplankton composition was dominated by copepods, ostracods, and chaetognaths, the majority of which are pelagic organisms. Comparatively few larvae of benthic invertebrates were found, but shrimp, gastropod, barnacle, and polychaete larvae did appear in low numbers in the samples. Species-level identification obtained via genetic barcoding will allow for these larvae to be matched to species known to inhabit the benthic communities at NW Rota-1. Identified larvae will give insight into the organisms which can re-colonize the seafloor vent communities after a disturbance such as the 2009 landslide. Communities at hydrothermal vents at other submarine volcanoes in the Monument also can act as sources for these planktonic, recolonizing larvae. As the microinvertebrate biodiversity in the Monument has yet to be fully characterized, our project also provides an opportunity to better describe both

  15. Bubble Plumes above erupting NW Rota-1 submarine volcano, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Merle, S. G.; Embley, R. W.; Buck, N.; Resing, J. A.; Leifer, I.

    2013-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is a submarine volcano in the Mariana volcanic arc with a summit depth of 517 m, located ~100 km north of Guam. Underwater explosive eruptions driven by magmatic gases were first witnessed here in 2004 and the volcano has remained persistently active ever since. During a March 2010 expedition to NW Rota-1 with the remotely operated vehicle Jason, we observed intermittent explosive activity at five distinct eruptive vents along a line 100-m long near the summit of the volcano (550-590 m depth). The continuous but variable eruptive activity produced CO2 bubble plumes that rose in the water column over the volcano and could be readily imaged by sonar because they provide excellent acoustic reflectors. This study compares the manifestations of NW Rota's eruptive activity as measured by several independent methods, including: (1) an EM122 multibeam sonar system (12 kHz) on the R/V Kilo Moana that imaged bubble plumes in the water column over the volcano, (2) hydrophone data that recorded the sounds of the variable eruptive activity, and (3) visual observations of the activity at the eruptive vents on the seafloor from Jason. Throughout the 2010 expedition numerous passes were made over the volcano's summit to image the bubble plumes with the EM122 multibeam sonar, in order to capture the variability of the plumes over time and to relate them to the eruptive output of the volcano. The mid-water sonar dataset totals >95 hours of observations over a 12-day period. Analysis of the EM122 dataset shows: (1) bubble plumes were visible in the water column on every pass over the summit, (2) separate plumes were resolvable from up to 4 of the 5 eruptive vents at times, (3) plume heights and intensities were variable with time, (4) the highest observed bubble plume rise height was 415 meters above the seafloor to within 175 m of the ocean surface, while lower amplitude wisps rose to heights <100 m from the surface, (5) most of the bubble plumes were deflected to the WSW

  16. Numerical tsunami hazard assessment of the submarine volcano Kick 'em Jenny in high resolution are

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondin, Frédéric; Dorville, Jean-Francois Marc; Robertson, Richard E. A.

    2016-04-01

    Landslide-generated tsunami are infrequent phenomena that can be potentially highly hazardous for population located in the near-field domain of the source. The Lesser Antilles volcanic arc is a curved 800 km chain of volcanic islands. At least 53 flank collapse episodes have been recognized along the arc. Several of these collapses have been associated with underwater voluminous deposits (volume > 1 km3). Due to their momentum these events were likely capable of generating regional tsunami. However no clear field evidence of tsunami associated with these voluminous events have been reported but the occurrence of such an episode nowadays would certainly have catastrophic consequences. Kick 'em Jenny (KeJ) is the only active submarine volcano of the Lesser Antilles Arc (LAA), with a current edifice volume estimated to 1.5 km3. It is the southernmost edifice of the LAA with recognized associated volcanic landslide deposits. The volcano appears to have undergone three episodes of flank failure. Numerical simulations of one of these episodes associated with a collapse volume of ca. 4.4 km3 and considering a single pulse collapse revealed that this episode would have produced a regional tsunami with amplitude of 30 m. In the present study we applied a detailed hazard assessment on KeJ submarine volcano (KeJ) form its collapse to its waves impact on high resolution coastal area of selected island of the LAA in order to highlight needs to improve alert system and risk mitigation. We present the assessment process of tsunami hazard related to shoreline surface elevation (i.e. run-up) and flood dynamic (i.e. duration, height, speed...) at the coast of LAA island in the case of a potential flank collapse scenario at KeJ. After quantification of potential initial volumes of collapse material using relative slope instability analysis (RSIA, VolcanoFit 2.0 & SSAP 4.5) based on seven geomechanical models, the tsunami source have been simulate by St-Venant equations-based code

  17. North Kona slump: Submarine flank failure during the early(?) tholeiitic shield stage of Hualalai Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Coombs, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The North Kona slump is an elliptical region, about 20 by 60 km (1000-km2 area), of multiple, geometrically intricate benches and scarps, mostly at water depths of 2000–4500 m, on the west flank of Hualalai Volcano. Two dives up steep scarps in the slump area were made in September 2001, using the ROV Kaiko of the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), as part of a collaborative Japan–USA project to improve understanding of the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes. Both dives, at water depths of 2700–4000 m, encountered pillow lavas draping the scarp-and-bench slopes. Intact to only slightly broken pillow lobes and cylinders that are downward elongate dominate on the steepest mid-sections of scarps, while more equant and spherical pillow shapes are common near the tops and bases of scarps and locally protrude through cover of muddy sediment on bench flats. Notably absent are subaerially erupted Hualalai lava flows, interbedded hyaloclastite pillow breccia, and/or coastal sandy sediment that might have accumulated downslope from an active coastline. The general structure of the North Kona flank is interpreted as an intricate assemblage of downdropped lenticular blocks, bounded by steeply dipping normal faults. The undisturbed pillow-lava drape indicates that slumping occurred during shield-stage tholeiitic volcanism. All analyzed samples of the pillow-lava drape are tholeiite, similar to published analyses from the submarine northwest rift zone of Hualālai. Relatively low sulfur (330–600 ppm) and water (0.18–0.47 wt.%) contents of glass rinds suggest that the eruptive sources were in shallow water, perhaps 500–1000-m depth. In contrast, saturation pressures calculated from carbon dioxide concentrations (100–190 ppm) indicate deeper equilibration, at or near sample sites at water depths of − 3900 to − 2800 m. Either vents close to the sample sites erupted mixtures of undegassed and degassed magmas, or volatiles were resorbed from

  18. Collapse and Re-growth of Monowai Submarine Volcano, Kermadec Arc, 1998-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Wright, I. C.; de Ronde, C. E.; Reymond, D.; Hyvernaud, O.; Bannister, S.; Stoffers, P.

    2005-12-01

    Monowai submarine volcano is located at 25°53.5'S/177°11.1'W, about 1400 km NNE of New Zealand along the Kermadec arc, and consists of a shallow symmetrical cone with a summit depth of ~100 m. Monowai is one of the most active submarine volcanoes in the Kermadec arc, based on visual reports from overflights, oceanographic surveys of hydrothermal plumes, and seismoacoustic monitoring from French Polynesia and elsewhere. Since the late 1970's, Monowai has been the source of frequent swarms of acoustic T-wave events every few years. On 24 May 2002 there was a particularly large seismoacoustic event with a duration of 6-8 minutes and an exceptional amplitude that was 4-5 times larger than any other T-wave signal recorded from Monowai. Bathymetric surveys of Monowai that bracket this event were collected with multibeam sonars in 1998 and 2004 by R/V Sonne (Hydrosweep) and R/V Tangaroa (EM300), respectively. A new collapse feature is apparent on the SE side of the volcano in the 2004 bathymetry. The two surveys were compared using a quantitative technique that has been used for documenting depth changes due to volcanic eruptions on mid-ocean ridges. The results of this comparison show that the summit depth of Monowai changed from 69 m below sealevel in 1998 to 135 m in 2004, a difference of -66 m, and the location of the shallowest point moved ~200 m to the NNW. However, the maximum depth change between the surveys is -105 m and is located near the 1998-summit, which in 2004 is south of the new headwall scarp on the SE flank of the volcano. The total area of significant depth change is 1.26 x 106 m2, and the decrease in volume is 6.12 x 107 m3 (or 0.06 km3). From the distribution of the depth changes it is also clear that two things occurred between the surveys: removal of volume from slope failure and the subsequent addition of volume from an eruptive vent within the new slide scar. Therefore, the volume removed by slope failure was probably closer to 0.1 km3 whereas

  19. The growth rate of submarine volcanoes on the South Honshu and East Mariana ridges — Comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael C.; Fryer, Patricia

    1991-04-01

    Growth rates, recently reported for eleven submarine volcanoes of the Mariana arc, are probably in error by several orders of magnitude. The reported growth rates are based solely on comparison of bathymetric surveys done by different methods over a 15-20-year time span. We have additional data on three of the volcanoes which argue against the inferred high growth rates. A detailed seismic reflection survey of one edifice (Fukujin Seamount) reveals that it has a very sharp peak which would be difficult to detect by more regional-scale sonar surveys. Examination of side-scan sonar images and bottom photography, and the recovery of highly weathered rocks in dredge hauls from another volcano (Kasuga Seamount), which is presumed to have grown almost 200 m in height in the last 17 years on the basis of bathymetric surveys, show it to be most likely extinct. Alvin submersible dives, as well as bottom photography and sonar images, on a third seamount (South Kasuga) show processes at its summit to be mainly erosional rather than constructional even though it is considered to be active. The inferred average growth rates of 15 m/y in height for six of the eleven volcanoes located in the northernmost part of the Mariana arc imply a volumetric volcanic production rate for this 500-km-long section of the arc of up to 9 km 3/y which exceeds the estimated global rate for all subduction zones. We believe that navigational errors and lack of total coverage over the summits of these seamounts are the main causes of the apparent differences in their minimum shoal depths between different survey methods.

  20. Argon-40: excess in submarine pillow basalts from kilauea volcano, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, G B; Moore, J G

    1968-09-13

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating. PMID:17812284

  1. Argon-40: Excess in submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Moore, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon-40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating.

  2. Submarine venting of liquid carbon dioxide on a Mariana Arc volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, John; Butterfield, David; Lilley, Marvin; Evans, Leigh; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Chadwick, William; Resing, Joseph; Embley, Robert; Olson, Eric; Proskurowski, Giora; Baker, Edward; de Ronde, Cornel; Roe, Kevin; Greene, Ronald; Lebon, Geoff; Young, Conrad

    2006-08-01

    Although CO2 is generally the most abundant dissolved gas found in submarine hydrothermal fluids, it is rarely found in the form of CO2 liquid. Here we report the discovery of an unusual CO2-rich hydrothermal system at 1600-m depth near the summit of NW Eifuku, a small submarine volcano in the northern Mariana Arc. The site, named Champagne, was found to be discharging two distinct fluids from the same vent field: a 103°C gas-rich hydrothermal fluid and cold (<4°C) droplets composed mainly of liquid CO2. The hot vent fluid contained up to 2.7 moles/kg CO2, the highest ever reported for submarine hydrothermal fluids. The liquid droplets were composed of ˜98% CO2, ˜1% H2S, with only trace amounts of CH4 and H2. Surveys of the overlying water column plumes indicated that the vent fluid and buoyant CO2 droplets ascended <200 m before dispersing into the ocean. Submarine venting of liquid CO2 has been previously observed at only one other locality, in the Okinawa Trough back-arc basin (Sakai et al., 1990a), a geologic setting much different from NW Eifuku, which is a young arc volcano. The discovery of such a high CO2 flux at the Champagne site, estimated to be about 0.1% of the global MOR carbon flux, suggests that submarine arc volcanoes may play a larger role in oceanic carbon cycling than previously realized. The Champagne field may also prove to be a valuable natural laboratory for studying the effects of high CO2 concentrations on marine ecosystems.

  3. Historical bathymetric charts and the evolution of Santorini submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Nomikou, P.; Parks, M.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    Historical bathymetric charts are a potential resource for better understanding the dynamics of the seafloor and the role of active processes such as those associated with submarine faulting, landsliding, and magmatism. The UK Hydrographic Office, for example, has been involved in lead line measurements of seafloor depth since the early 1790s in a range of geological settings including ocean islands. Here, we report on an analysis of historical bathymetric charts in the region of Santorini volcano, Greece. Repeat lead line surveys in 1848, 1866 and 1928 and multibeam swath bathymetric surveys in 2001 and 2006 have been used to document changes in the depth of the seafloor in Santorini caldera. The data reveal that the flanks of the Kameni islands, a volcanic dome and dacitic lava complex in the caldera centre, have shallowed by up to 215 m and deepened by up to 60 m since 1848. The largest shallowing occurred between the 1866 and 1928 surveys and was accompanied by a significant increase in the surface area of the island of Nea Kameni, especially its southeast flank. Field observations by the French Geologist, F. A. Fouqué, during 1866-1870 suggest the shallowing is associated with the formation of the Giorgos and Aphroessa domes and their associated lava flows. Other shallowing probably occurred during 1925-1928 when lava flows filled the narrow strait between Nea Kameni and Mikra Kameni. The largest deepenings occurred between the 1928 and 2001 and 2006 surveys, on the shelf and slope of Nea Kameni. One possibility is that the deepening is caused by mass wasting due to large-scale slope failure and debris flow. Another is that it reflects a stress-induced viscoelastic relaxation of the crust following dome loading. Irrespective, the rates implied from the volumes and duration of the 19th century submarine magmatic activity are up to 0.11 km3/yr, which is significantly larger than rates inferred from mapping of surface lava flows.

  4. The INGV's new OBS/H: Analysis of the signals recorded at the Marsili submarine volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe; Luzio, Dario; Mangano, Giorgio

    2009-05-01

    The ocean bottom seismometer with hydrophone deployed on the flat top of the Marsili submarine volcano (790 m deep) by the Gibilmanna OBS Lab (CNT-INGV) from 12th to 21st July, 2006, recorded more than 1000 transient seismic signals. Nineteen of these signals were associated with tectonic earthquakes: 1 teleseismic, 8 regional (located by INGV) and 10 small local seismic events (non located earthquakes). The regional events were used to determine sensor orientation. By comparing the signals recorded with typical volcanic seismic activity, we were able to group all the other signals into three categories: 817 volcano-tectonic type B (VT-B) events, 159 occurrences of high frequency tremor (HFT) and 32 short duration events (SDE). Small-magnitude VT-B swarms, having a frequency band of 2-6 Hz and a mean length of about 30 s, were almost all recorded during the first 7 days. During the last 2 days, the OBS/H mainly recorded HFT events with frequencies of over 40 Hz and of a few minutes in length. Signals that have similar features in frequency and time domain are generally associated with hydrothermal activity. During the last two days a signal was recorded that had a frequency content similar to that of VT-B events was recorded. It will be referred to as continuous volcanic tremor (CVT). The SDE signals, characterized by a quasi-monochromatic waveform and having an exponential decaying envelope, may have been generated by oscillations of resonant bodies excited by magmatic or hydrothermal activity. By applying polarization and parametric spectral analyses, we inferred that the VT-B were probably multi P-phase events having shallow sources that were situated in narrow azimuthal windows in relation to the positions of the OBS/H. The parametric spectral analysis of the SDE signals allowed us to determine their dominant complex frequencies with high accuracy; these frequencies are distributed in two distinct clusters on the complex plane.

  5. Direct video and hydrophone observations of submarine explosive eruptions at NW Rota-1 volcano, Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Cashman, K. V.; Embley, R. W.; Matsumoto, H.; Dziak, R. P.; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Lau, T. K.; Deardorff, N. D.; Merle, S. G.

    2008-08-01

    Extraordinary video and hydrophone observations of a submarine explosive eruption were made with a remotely operated vehicle in April 2006 at a depth of 550-560 m on NW Rota-1 volcano in the Mariana arc. The observed eruption evolved from effusive to explosive, while the eruption rate increased from near zero to 10-100 m3/h. During the peak in activity, cyclic explosive bursts 2-6 min long were separated by shorter non-eruptive pauses lasting 10-100 s. The size of the ejecta increased with the vigor of the explosions. A portable hydrophone deployed near the vent recorded sounds correlated with the explosive bursts; the highest amplitudes were ˜50 dB higher than ambient noise at frequencies between 10 and 50 Hz. The acoustic data allow us to quantify the durations, amplitudes, and evolution of the eruptive events over time. The low eruption rate, high gas/lava ratio, and rhythmic eruptive behavior at NW Rota-1 are most consistent with a Strombolian eruptive style. We interpret that the eruption was primarily driven by the venting of magmatic gases, which was also the primary source of the sound recorded during the explosive bursts. The rhythmic nature of the bursts can be explained by partial gas segregation in the conduit and upward migration in a transitional regime between bubbly flow and fully developed slug flow. The strongest explosive bursts were accompanied by flashes of red glow and oscillating eruption plumes in the vent, apparently caused by magma-seawater interaction and rapid steam formation and condensation. This is the first time submarine explosive eruptions have been witnessed with simultaneous near-field acoustic recordings.

  6. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  7. Transition from circular to stellate forms of submarine volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.

    2001-02-01

    Large volcanic islands and guyots have stellate forms that reflect the relief of radiating volcanic rift zones, multiple volcanic centers, and embayments due to giant flank failures. Small mid-ocean ridge volcanoes, in contrast, are commonly subcircular in plan view and show only embryonic rift zones. In order to characterize the transition between these two end-members the morphology of 141 seamounts and guyots was studied using the shape of the depth contour at half the height of each edifice. Irregularity was characterized by measuring perimeter distance, elongation, and moment of inertia of the contours, assuming an "ideal" edifice is circular. The analysis reveals a general transition over 2-4 km edifice height (best transition estimate 3 km), while some large edifices 4-5 km high show no major embayments or ridges, suggesting considerable variation in the effectiveness of mechanisms that cause flank instability and growth of rift zones. The various origins of the transition are discussed, and the upper limit of magma chambers, many of which lie above the basement of the larger edifices, is proposed to affect the morphologic complexity via a number of mechanisms and is an important factor affecting the mode of growth. The origins of the truncated cone shape of mid-ocean ridge volcanoes are also discussed. Of the eruption mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their flat summits, the most likely mechanisms involve eruption from small ephemeral magma bodies lying within the low-density upper oceanic crust. The discussion includes speculations on factors affecting the depths of magma chambers beneath oceanic volcanoes. Supporting table is available via Web browser or via Anonymous FTP from ftp://kosmos.agu.org, directory "append" (Username = "anonymous", Password ="guest"); subdirectories in the ftp site are arranged by paper number. Information on searching and submitting electronic supplements is found at http://www.agu.org/pubs/csupp_about.html.

  8. Exploring the "Sharkcano": Biogeochemical observations of the Kavachi submarine volcano (Solomon Islands) using simple, cost-effective methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. T.; Albert, S.; Carey, S.; DeCiccio, A.; Dunbabin, M.; Flinders, A. F.; Grinham, A. R.; Henning, B.; Howell, C.; Kelley, K. A.; Scott, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Kavachi is a highly active undersea volcano located in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands, known for its frequent phreatomagmatic eruptions and ephemeral island-forming activity. The remote location of Kavachi and its explosive behavior has restricted scientific exploration of the volcano, limiting observations to surface imagery and peripheral water-column data. An expedition to Kavachi in January 2015 was timed with a rare lull in volcanic activity, allowing for observation of the inside of Kavachi's caldera and its flanks. Here we present medium-resolution bathymetry of the main peak paired with benthic imagery, petrologic analysis of samples from the caldera rim, measurements of gas flux over the main peak, and hydrothermal plume structure data. A second peak was discovered to the Southwest of the main cone and displayed evidence of diffuse-flow venting. Populations of gelatinous animals, small fish, and sharks were observed inside the active crater, raising new questions about the ecology of active submarine volcanoes. Most equipment used in this study was lightweight, relatively low-cost, and deployed using small boats; these methods may offer developing nations an economic means to explore deep-sea environments within their own territorial waters.

  9. Long-distance magma transport from arc volcanoes inferred from the submarine eruptive fissures offshore Izu-Oshima volcano, Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Geshi, Nobuo; Kawanabe, Yoshihisa; Ogitsu, Itaru; Taylor, Rex N.; Tuzino, Taqumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Arai, Kohsaku; Nakano, Shun

    2014-09-01

    Long-distance lateral magma transport away from volcanic centers in island arcs is emerging as a common phenomenon where the regional stress regime is favorable. It should also be recognized as an important factor in the construction and growth of island arcs, and a potential trigger for devastating eruptions. In this contribution, we report on recent investigations into the magma dynamics of Izu-Oshima volcano, an active basaltic volcano with an extensive fissure system. Izu-Oshima is flanked by numerous, subparallel NW-SE trending submarine ridges extending up to 22 km to the NW and the SE from the central vent. During a recent submersible survey we have identified that these ridges are fissures which erupted basaltic spatter and lava flows. Furthermore, lavas are petrographically similar along each ridge, while there are noticeable differences between ridges. The subparallel ridges are observed to transect a series of seamounts - the Izu-Tobu monogenetic volcanoes - which are dispersed across this area of the rear-arc. However, there are consistent petrographic and chemical differences between these seamounts and the ridges, indicating that they have different magma sources, yet, they are essentially bounding each other in dive tracks. The most appropriate scenario for their development is one where the Izu-Tobu Volcanoes are fed by an "in-situ" underlying source, while the NW-SE ridges are fed by lateral magma transport from Izu-Oshima. Magma erupted from each ridge is of a consistent geochemistry along its length, but has experienced crystal fractionation and some plagioclase accumulation. Compositions of the ridges are also very similar to lavas from the subaerial cones that can be traced down the flanks of Izu-Oshima. This implies that pairs of subaerial cones and submarine ridges represent the locus of magma transport events away from the storage system beneath Izu-Oshima. Hence, magma from this crustal reservoir moved upward to feed the on-edifice cones

  10. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  11. Long-term explosion records from two erupting submarine volcanoes in the Mariana and Tonga island-arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Chadwick, W. W.; Resing, J.; Matsumoto, H.; Walker, S. L.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Klink, H.

    2009-12-01

    Records of explosive activity longer than a few weeks are rare for subaerial volcanoes, and nonexistent for submarine volcanoes. From February 2008 to February 2009, we recorded a year long, continuous acoustic and volcanic plume record from NW Rota-1, an erupting submarine volcano located within the Mariana Arc. From December 2008 to May 2009, we also obtained acoustic records of ongoing explosion and tremor activity at West Mata, a submarine volcano in the NE Lau basin near the Tofua volcanic-arc. At NW Rota-1, a hydrophone and turbidity/temperature sensor were moored ~150 m from the volcano’s summit vent (520 m deep). The volcano exhibited frequent degassing explosions lasting 60-120 s, separated by quiet periods of 10-30 s, for the entire 12-months resulting in >284,000 discrete explosion events. The explosions are broadband (1-80 Hz) with typical source levels of 191 dB re μPa @ 1m. Harmonic tremor is also present at times in the explosions, typically with <5 Hz fundamentals and extremely high-amplitude overtone peaks near 30 Hz. The fundamentals are likely due to resonance of the entire volcanic edifice, while the peak overtone may represent reverberation of an internal structure, possibly the conduit feeding the summit vent. The hydrophone also documents a 103 decrease in explosion amplitude over the year, marked by a sharp reduction after 6 mos, which may be part of the typical eruption cycle or due to burial of the vent by accumulated ejecta. Explosions at the summit vent produced a steady series of volcanic plumes that carried ash and hydrothermal precipitates into the water column. Hundreds of short-lived turbidity spikes are present, with no long periods of quiescence, indicating changes in explosion intensity did not affect the pattern of volcanic plume creation. Our data are the first to confirm the frequent creation and dispersal of submarine volcanic plumes on a year-long scale. In December 2008 a moored hydrophone (250 Hz) was deployed ~30 km

  12. Significant discharge of CO2 from hydrothermalism associated with the submarine volcano of El Hierro Island.

    PubMed

    Santana-Casiano, J M; Fraile-Nuez, E; González-Dávila, M; Baker, E T; Resing, J A; Walker, S L

    2016-01-01

    The residual hydrothermalism associated with submarine volcanoes, following an eruption event, plays an important role in the supply of CO2 to the ocean. The emitted CO2 increases the acidity of seawater. The submarine volcano of El Hierro, in its degasification stage, provided an excellent opportunity to study the effect of volcanic CO2 on the seawater carbonate system, the global carbon flux, and local ocean acidification. A detailed survey of the volcanic edifice was carried out using seven CTD-pH-ORP tow-yo studies, localizing the redox and acidic changes, which were used to obtain surface maps of anomalies. In order to investigate the temporal variability of the system, two CTD-pH-ORP yo-yo studies were conducted that included discrete sampling for carbonate system parameters. Meridional tow-yos were used to calculate the amount of volcanic CO2 added to the water column for each surveyed section. The inputs of CO2 along multiple sections combined with measurements of oceanic currents produced an estimated volcanic CO2 flux = 6.0 10(5) ± 1.1 10(5 )kg d(-1) which is ~0.1% of global volcanic CO2 flux. Finally, the CO2 emitted by El Hierro increases the acidity above the volcano by ~20%.

  13. Significant discharge of CO2 from hydrothermalism associated with the submarine volcano of El Hierro Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Fraile-Nuez, E.; González-Dávila, M.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Walker, S. L.

    2016-05-01

    The residual hydrothermalism associated with submarine volcanoes, following an eruption event, plays an important role in the supply of CO2 to the ocean. The emitted CO2 increases the acidity of seawater. The submarine volcano of El Hierro, in its degasification stage, provided an excellent opportunity to study the effect of volcanic CO2 on the seawater carbonate system, the global carbon flux, and local ocean acidification. A detailed survey of the volcanic edifice was carried out using seven CTD-pH-ORP tow-yo studies, localizing the redox and acidic changes, which were used to obtain surface maps of anomalies. In order to investigate the temporal variability of the system, two CTD-pH-ORP yo-yo studies were conducted that included discrete sampling for carbonate system parameters. Meridional tow-yos were used to calculate the amount of volcanic CO2 added to the water column for each surveyed section. The inputs of CO2 along multiple sections combined with measurements of oceanic currents produced an estimated volcanic CO2 flux = 6.0 105 ± 1.1 105 kg d‑1 which is ~0.1% of global volcanic CO2 flux. Finally, the CO2 emitted by El Hierro increases the acidity above the volcano by ~20%.

  14. Significant discharge of CO2 from hydrothermalism associated with the submarine volcano of El Hierro Island.

    PubMed

    Santana-Casiano, J M; Fraile-Nuez, E; González-Dávila, M; Baker, E T; Resing, J A; Walker, S L

    2016-01-01

    The residual hydrothermalism associated with submarine volcanoes, following an eruption event, plays an important role in the supply of CO2 to the ocean. The emitted CO2 increases the acidity of seawater. The submarine volcano of El Hierro, in its degasification stage, provided an excellent opportunity to study the effect of volcanic CO2 on the seawater carbonate system, the global carbon flux, and local ocean acidification. A detailed survey of the volcanic edifice was carried out using seven CTD-pH-ORP tow-yo studies, localizing the redox and acidic changes, which were used to obtain surface maps of anomalies. In order to investigate the temporal variability of the system, two CTD-pH-ORP yo-yo studies were conducted that included discrete sampling for carbonate system parameters. Meridional tow-yos were used to calculate the amount of volcanic CO2 added to the water column for each surveyed section. The inputs of CO2 along multiple sections combined with measurements of oceanic currents produced an estimated volcanic CO2 flux = 6.0 10(5) ± 1.1 10(5 )kg d(-1) which is ~0.1% of global volcanic CO2 flux. Finally, the CO2 emitted by El Hierro increases the acidity above the volcano by ~20%. PMID:27157062

  15. Significant discharge of CO2 from hydrothermalism associated with the submarine volcano of El Hierro Island

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Fraile-Nuez, E.; González-Dávila, M.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Walker, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The residual hydrothermalism associated with submarine volcanoes, following an eruption event, plays an important role in the supply of CO2 to the ocean. The emitted CO2 increases the acidity of seawater. The submarine volcano of El Hierro, in its degasification stage, provided an excellent opportunity to study the effect of volcanic CO2 on the seawater carbonate system, the global carbon flux, and local ocean acidification. A detailed survey of the volcanic edifice was carried out using seven CTD-pH-ORP tow-yo studies, localizing the redox and acidic changes, which were used to obtain surface maps of anomalies. In order to investigate the temporal variability of the system, two CTD-pH-ORP yo-yo studies were conducted that included discrete sampling for carbonate system parameters. Meridional tow-yos were used to calculate the amount of volcanic CO2 added to the water column for each surveyed section. The inputs of CO2 along multiple sections combined with measurements of oceanic currents produced an estimated volcanic CO2 flux = 6.0 105 ± 1.1 105 kg d−1 which is ~0.1% of global volcanic CO2 flux. Finally, the CO2 emitted by El Hierro increases the acidity above the volcano by ~20%. PMID:27157062

  16. A large submarine sand-rubble flow on kilauea volcano, hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fornari, D.J.; Moore, J.G.; Calk, L.

    1979-01-01

    Papa'u seamount on the south submarine slope of Kilauea volcano is a large landslide about 19 km long, 6 km wide, and up to 1 km thick with a volume of about 39 km3. Dredge hauls, remote camera photographs, and submersible observations indicate that it is composed primarily of unconsolidated angular glassy basalt sand with scattered basalt blocks up to 1 m in size; no lava flows were seen. Sulfur contents of basalt glass from several places on the sand-rubble flow and nearby areas are low (< 240 ppm), indicating that the clastic basaltic material was all erupted on land. The Papa'u sandrubble flow was emplaced during a single flow event fed from a large near-shore bank of clastic basaltic material which in turn was formed as lava flows from the summit area of Kilauea volcano disintegrated when they entered the sea. The current eruptive output of the volcano suggests that the material in the submarine sand-rubble flow represents about 6000 years of accumulation, and that the flow event occurred several thousand years ago. ?? 1979.

  17. Analysis of Submarine Landslides at West Mata Volcano, NE Lau Basin, Using Hydroacoustic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Chadwick, B.; Lau, T. K. A.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hundreds of submarine landslides were detected by a network of moored hydrophones near the erupting West Mata submarine volcano during a five month deployment in 2010-2011. The landslides are identifiable by their spectral characteristics, including a low frequency onset and extended broadband coda. All hydroacoustic signals at West Mata exhibit spectral banding due to interference of direct and surface-reflected waves (the Lloyd's Mirror effect), but in landslide signals the bands change frequency over the duration of the signal. This shows that the source is propagating, and the timing between direct and reflected arrivals is changing. We use the change in spectral content to estimate source and terminus depths and average propagation velocity. Landslides were only weakly recorded on a hydrophone to the south of West Mata suggesting that the events took place on the volcano's north flank, a region known from bathymetric mapping to have experienced significant mass wasting. We propose that the few landslides that did not exhibit spectral banding failed over a large source area and depth range and represent the largest West Mata slides. West Mata landslides occurred frequently during the eruption, suggesting that they may be triggered by loading of fragmental material on the volcano's flanks. While the slides occurred throughout the duration of the deployment, events tend to cluster in time, possibly indicating sequential or retrogressive failures.

  18. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  19. Degassing history of water, sulfur, and carbon in submarine lavas from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.E.; Stolper, E.M. ); Clague, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Major, minor, and dissolved volatile element concentrations were measured in tholeiitic glasses from the submarine portion (Puna Ridge) of the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Dissolved H{sub 2}O and S concentrations display a wide range relative to nonvolatile incompatible elements at all depths. This range cannot be readily explained by fractional crystallization, degassing of H{sub 2}O and S during eruption on the seafloor, or source region heterogeneities. Dissolved CO{sub 2} concentrations, in contrast, show a positive correlation with eruption depth and typically agree within error with the solubility at that depth. The authors propose that most magmas along the Puna Ridge result from (1) mixing of a relatively volatile-rich, undegassed component with magmas that experienced low pressure (perhaps subaerial) degassing during which substantial H{sub 2}O, S, and CO{sub 2} were lost, followed by (2) fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase from this mixture to generate a residual liquid; and (3) further degassing, principally of CO{sub 2} for samples erupted deeper than 1,000 m, during eruption on the seafloor. They predict that average Kilauean primary magmas with 16% MgO contain {approximately}0.47 wt % H{sub 2}0, {approximately}900 ppm S, and have {delta}D values of {approximately}{minus}30 to {minus}40%. The model predicts that submarine lavas from wholly submarine volcanoes (i.e., Loihi), for which there is no opportunity to generate the degassed end member by low pressure degassing, will be enriched in volatiles relative to those from volcanoes whose summits have breached the sea surface (i.e., Kilauea and Mauna Loa).

  20. The Geologic Setting of Hydrothermal Vents at Mariana Arc Submarine Volcanoes: High-Resolution Bathymetry and ROV Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; de Ronde, C. E.; Stern, R. J.; Hein, J.; Merle, S.; Ristau, S.

    2004-12-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives were made at 7 submarine volcanoes between 14-23° N in the Mariana Arc in April 2004 with the ROPOS ROV. Six of these volcanoes were known to be hydrothermally active from CTD data collected during a previous expedition in March 2003: NW Rota-1, E Diamante, NW Eifuku, Daikoku, Kasuga-2, and Maug, a partly submerged caldera. The physical setting of hydrothermal venting varies widely from volcano to volcano. High-resolution bathymetric surveys of the summits of NW Rota-1 and NW Eifuku volcanoes were conducted with an Imagenex scanning sonar mounted on ROPOS. Near bottom observations during ROPOS dives were recorded with digital video and a digital still camera and the dives were navigated acoustically from the R/V Thompson using an ultra-short baseline system. The mapping and dive observations reveal the following: (1) The summits of some volcanoes have pervasive diffuse venting (NW Rota-1, Daikoku, NW Eifuku) suggesting that hydrothermal fluids are able to circulate freely within a permeable edifice. At other volcanoes, the hydrothermal venting is more localized (Kasuga-2, Maug, E Diamante), suggesting more restricted permeability pathways. (2) Some volcanoes have both focused venting at depth and diffuse venting near the summit (E Diamante, NW Eifuku). Where the hydrothermal vents are focused, fluid flow appears to be localized by massive lava outcrops that form steep cliffs and ridges, or by subsurface structures such as dikes. High-temperature (240° C) venting was only observed at E Diamante volcano, where the "Black Forest" vent field is located on the side of a constructional cone near the middle of E Diamante caldera at a depth of 350 m. On the side of an adjacent shallower cone, the venting style changed to diffuse discharge and it extended all the way up into the photic zone (167 m). At NW Eifuku, the pattern of both deep-focused and shallow-diffuse venting is repeated. "Champagne vent" is located at 1607 m, ~150 m

  1. Remote Analysis of Grain Size Characteristic in Submarine Pyroclastic Deposits from Kolumbo Volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, C.; Whitesell, D. P.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Grain size characteristics of pyroclastic deposits provide valuable information about source eruption energetics and depositional processes. Maximum size and sorting are often used to discriminate between fallout and sediment gravity flow processes during explosive eruptions. In the submarine environment the collection of such data in thick pyroclastic sequences is extremely challenging and potentially time consuming. A method has been developed to extract grain size information from stereo images collected by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). In the summer of 2010 the ROV Hercules collected a suite of stereo images from a thick pumice sequence in the caldera walls of Kolumbo submarine volcano located about seven kilometers off the coast of Santorini, Greece. The highly stratified, pumice-rich deposit was likely created by the last explosive eruption of the volcano that took place in 1650 AD. Each image was taken from a distance of only a few meters from the outcrop in order to capture the outlines of individual clasts with relatively high resolution. Mosaics of individual images taken as the ROV transected approximately 150 meters of vertical outcrop were used to create large-scale vertical stratigraphic columns that proved useful for overall documentation of the eruption sequence and intracaldera correlations of distinct tephra units. Initial image processing techniques, including morphological operations, edge detection, shape and size estimation were implemented in MatLab and applied to a subset of individual images of the mosiacs. A large variety of algorithms were tested in order to best discriminate the outlines of individual pumices. This proved to be challenging owing to the close packing and overlapping of individual pumices. Preliminary success was achieved in discriminating the outlines of the large particles and measurements were carried out on the largest clasts present at different stratigraphic levels. In addition, semi-quantitative analysis of the

  2. Submarine geology of Hana Ridge and Haleakala Volcano's northeast flank, Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a morphostructural analysis of the submarine portions of Haleakala Volcano and environs, based upon a 4-year program of geophysical surveys and submersible explorations of the underwater flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes that was conducted by numerous academic and governmental research organizations in Japan and the U.S. and funded primarily by the Japan Agency for Marine–Earth Science and Technology. A resulting reconnaissance geologic map features the 135-km-long Hana Ridge, the 3000 km2 Hana slump on the volcano's northeast flank, and island-surrounding terraces that are the submerged parts of volcanic shields. Hana Ridge below 2000 m water depth exhibits the lobate morphology typical of the subaqueously erupted parts of Hawaiian rift zones, with some important distinctions: namely, subparallel crestlines, which we propose result from the down-rift migration of offsets in the dike intrusion zone, and an amphitheater at its distal toe, where a submarine landslide has embayed the ridge tip. Deformation of Haleakala's northeast flank is limited to that part identified as the Hana slump, which lies downslope from the volcano's submerged shield, indicating that flank mobility is also limited in plan, inconsistent with hypothesized volcanic spreading driven by rift-zone dilation. The leading edge of the slump has transverse basins and ridges that resemble the thrust ramps of accretionary prisms, and we present a model to describe the slump's development that emphasizes the role of coastally generated fragmental basalt on gravitational instability of Haleakala's northeast flank and that may be broadly applicable to other ocean-island slumps.

  3. Historical bathymetric charts and the evolution of Santorini submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Nomikou, P.; Moore, J. D. P.; Parks, M. M.; Alexandri, M.

    2015-03-01

    Historical bathymetric charts are a potential resource for better understanding the dynamics of the seafloor and the role of active processes, such as submarine volcanism. The British Admiralty, for example, have been involved in lead line measurements of seafloor depth since the early 1790s. Here, we report on an analysis of historical charts in the region of Santorini volcano, Greece. Repeat lead line surveys in 1848, late 1866, and 1925-1928 as well as multibeam swath bathymetry surveys in 2001 and 2006 have been used to document changes in seafloor depth. These data reveal that the flanks of the Kameni Islands, a dacitic dome complex in the caldera center, have shallowed by up to ˜175 m and deepened by up to ˜80 m since 1848. The largest shallowing occurred between the late 1866 and 1925-1928 surveys and the largest deepening occurred during the 1925-1928 and 2001 and 2006 surveys. The shallowing is attributed to the emplacement of lavas during effusive eruptions in both 1866-1870 and 1925-1928 at rates of up to 0.18 and 0.05 km3 a-1, respectively. The deepening is attributed to a load-induced viscoelastic stress relaxation following the 1866-1870 and 1925-1928 lava eruptions. The elastic thickness and viscosity that best fits the observed deepening are 1.0 km and ˜1016 Pa s, respectively. This parameter pair, which is consistent with the predictions of a shallow magma chamber thermal model, explains both the amplitude and wavelength of the historical bathymetric data and the present day rate of subsidence inferred from InSAR analysis.

  4. Internal structure of Puna Ridge: evolution of the submarine East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai ̀i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Stephen C.; Moore, Gregory F.; Morgan, Julia K.

    2004-01-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection, sonobuoy, gravity and magnetics data collected over the submarine length of the 75 km long Puna Ridge, Hawai ̀i, resolve the internal structure of the active rift zone. Laterally continuous reflections are imaged deep beneath the axis of the East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea Volcano. We interpret these reflections as a layer of abyssal sediments lying beneath the volcanic edifice of Kilauea. Early arrival times or 'pull-up' of sediment reflections on time sections imply a region of high P-wave velocity ( Vp) along the submarine ERZ. Refraction measurements along the axis of the ridge yield Vp values of 2.7-4.85 km/s within the upper 1 km of the volcanic pile and 6.5-7 km/s deeper within the edifice. Few coherent reflections are observed on seismic reflection sections within the high-velocity area, suggesting steeply dipping dikes and/or chaotic and fractured volcanic materials. Southeastward dipping reflections beneath the NW flank of Puna Ridge are interpreted as the buried flank of the older Hilo Ridge, indicating that these two ridges overlap at depth. Gravity measurements define a high-density anomaly coincident with the high-velocity region and support the existence of a complex of intrusive dikes associated with the ERZ. Gravity modeling shows that the intrusive core of the ERZ is offset to the southeast of the topographic axis of the rift zone, and that the surface of the core dips more steeply to the northwest than to the southeast, suggesting that the dike complex has been progressively displaced to the southeast by subsequent intrusions. The gravity signature of the dike complex decreases in width down-rift, and is absent in the distal portion of the rift zone. Based on these observations, and analysis of Puna Ridge bathymetry, we define three morphological and structural regimes of the submarine ERZ, that correlate to down-rift changes in rift zone dynamics and partitioning of intrusive materials. We propose that these

  5. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    PubMed Central

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; González-Dávila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Arístegui, J.; Alonso-González, I. J.; Hernández-León, S.; Blanco, M. J.; Rodríguez-Santana, A.; Hernández-Guerra, A.; Gelado-Caballero, M. D.; Eugenio, F.; Marcello, J.; de Armas, D.; Domínguez-Yanes, J. F.; Montero, M. F.; Laetsch, D. R.; Vélez-Belchí, P.; Ramos, A.; Ariza, A. V.; Comas-Rodríguez, I.; Benítez-Barrios, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. PMID:22768379

  6. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response.

    PubMed

    Fraile-Nuez, E; González-Dávila, M; Santana-Casiano, J M; Arístegui, J; Alonso-González, I J; Hernández-León, S; Blanco, M J; Rodríguez-Santana, A; Hernández-Guerra, A; Gelado-Caballero, M D; Eugenio, F; Marcello, J; de Armas, D; Domínguez-Yanes, J F; Montero, M F; Laetsch, D R; Vélez-Belchí, P; Ramos, A; Ariza, A V; Comas-Rodríguez, I; Benítez-Barrios, V M

    2012-01-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. PMID:22768379

  7. Remote Sensing of Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Rothery, David

    The synoptic coverage offered by satellites provides unparalleled opportunities for monitoring active volcanoes, and opens new avenues of scientific inquiry. Thermal infrared radiation can be used to monitor levels of activity, which is useful for automated eruption detection and for studying the emplacement of lava flows. Satellite radars can observe volcanoes through clouds or at night, and provide high-resolution topographic data. In favorable conditions, radar inteferometery can be used to measure ground deformation associated with eruptive activity on a centimetric scale. Clouds from explosive eruptions present a pressing hazard to aviation; therefore, techniques are being developed to assess eruption cloud height and to discriminate between ash and meterological clouds. The multitude of sensors to be launched on future generations of space platforms promises to greatly enhance volcanological studies, but a satellite dedicated to volcanology is needed to meet requirements of aviation safety and volcano monitoring.

  8. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kilias, Stephanos P.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe3+-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe2+-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate. PMID:23939372

  9. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece.

    PubMed

    Kilias, Stephanos P; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+)-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe(2+)-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate.

  10. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece.

    PubMed

    Kilias, Stephanos P; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+)-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe(2+)-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate. PMID:23939372

  11. Bubble Plumes at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano, Mariana Arc: Visualization and Analysis of Multibeam Water Column Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, S. G.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; Doucet, M.

    2012-12-01

    During a March 2010 expedition to NW Rota-1 submarine volcano in the Mariana arc a new EM122 multibeam sonar system on the R/V Kilo Moana was used to repeatedly image bubble plumes in the water column over the volcano. The EM122 (12 kHz) system collects seafloor bathymetry and backscatter data, as well as acoustic return water column data. Previous expeditions to NW Rota-1 have included seafloor mapping / CTD tow-yo surveys and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2009. Much of the focus has been on the one main eruptive vent, Brimstone, located on the south side of the summit at a depth of ~440m, which has been persistently active during all ROV visits. Extensive degassing of CO2 bubbles have been observed by the ROV during frequent eruptive bursts from the vent. Between expeditions in April 2009 and March 2010 a major eruption and landslide occurred at NW Rota-1. ROV dives in 2010 revealed that after the landslide the eruptive vent had been reorganized from a single site to a line of vents. Brimstone vent was still active, but 4 other new eruptive vents had also emerged in a NW/SE line below the summit extending ~100 m from the westernmost to easternmost vents. During the ROV dives, the eruptive vents were observed to turn on and off from day to day and hour to hour. Throughout the 2010 expedition numerous passes were made over the volcano summit to image the bubble plumes above the eruptive vents in the water column, in order to capture the variability of the plumes over time and to relate them to the eruptive output of the volcano. The mid-water sonar data set totals >95 hours of observations over a 12-day period. Generally, the ship drove repeatedly over the eruptive vents at a range of ship speeds (0.5-4 knots) and headings. In addition, some mid-water data was collected during three ROV dives when the ship was stationary over the vents. We used the FMMidwater software program (part of QPS Fledermaus) to visualize and analyze the data

  12. Cold seeps associated with a submarine debris avalanche deposit at Kick'em Jenny volcano, Grenada (Lesser Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Steven; Ballard, Robert; Bell, Katherine L. C.; Bell, Richard J.; Connally, Patrick; Dondin, Frederic; Fuller, Sarah; Gobin, Judith; Miloslavich, Patricia; Phillips, Brennan; Roman, Chris; Seibel, Brad; Siu, Nam; Smart, Clara

    2014-11-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) exploration at the distal margins of a debris avalanche deposit from Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano in Grenada has revealed areas of cold seeps with chemosynthetic-based ecosystems. The seeps occur on steep slopes of deformed, unconsolidated hemipelagic sediments in water depths between 1952 and 2042 m. Two main areas consist of anastomosing systems of fluid flow that have incised local sediments by several tens of centimeters. No temperature anomalies were observed in the vent areas and no active flow was visually observed, suggesting that the venting may be waning. An Eh sensor deployed on a miniature autonomous plume recorder (MAPR) recorded a positive signal and the presence of live organisms indicates at least some venting is still occurring. The chemosynthetic-based ecosystem included giant mussels (Bathymodiolus sp.) with commensal polychaetes (Branchipolynoe sp.) and cocculinid epibionts, other bivalves, Siboglinida (vestimentiferan) tubeworms, other polychaetes, and shrimp, as well as associated heterotrophs, including gastropods, anemones, crabs, fish, octopods, brittle stars, and holothurians. The origin of the seeps may be related to fluid overpressure generated during the collapse of an ancestral Kick'em Jenny volcano. We suggest that deformation and burial of hemipelagic sediment at the front and base of the advancing debris avalanche led to fluid venting at the distal margin. Such deformation may be a common feature of marine avalanches in a variety of geological environments especially along continental margins, raising the possibility of creating large numbers of ephemeral seep-based ecosystems.

  13. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  14. Flank Collapse Assessment At Kick-'em-Jenny Submarine Volcano (Lesser Antilles): A Combined Approach Using Modelling and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondin, Frédéric; Heap, Michael; Robert, Richard E. A.; Dorville, Jean-Francois M.; Carey, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landslides - the result of volcanic flank failure - are highly hazardous mass movements due to their high mobility, the wide area they can impact, and their potential to generate tsunamis. In the Lesser Antilles at least 53 episodes of flank collapse have been identified, with many of them associated with voluminous (Vdeposit exceeding 1 km3) submarine volcanic landslide deposits. The existence of such voluminous deposits highlights the hazard of potentially devastating tsunami waves to the populated islands of the Lesser Antilles. To help understand and mitigate such hazards, we applied a relative stability assessment method to the only active submarine volcano of the Lesser Antilles island arc: Kick-'em-Jenny (KeJ). KeJ - located 8 km north of the island of Grenada - is the southernmost edifice in the arc with recognized associated volcanic landslide deposits. From the three identified landslide prehistoric episodes, one is associated with a collapse volume of about 4.4 km3. Numerical simulations considering a single pulse collapse revealed that this episode would have produced a regional tsunami. A volume estimate of the present day edifice is about 1.5 km3. We aim to quantify potential initial volumes of collapsed material using relative instability analysis (RIA). The RIA evaluates the critical potential failure surface associated with factor of safety (Fs) inferior to 1 and compares them to areas of deficit/surplus of mass/volume obtained from the comparison of an high resolution digital elevation model of the edifice with an ideal 3D surface named Volcanoid. To do so we use freeware programs VolcanoFit 2.0 and SSAP 4.5. We report, for the first time, results of a Limit Equilibrium Method (Janbu's rigorous method) as a slope stability computation analysis performed using geomechanical parameters retrieved from rock mechanics tests performed on two rock basaltic-andesite rock samples collected from within the crater of the volcano during the 1

  15. Bacterial diversity in Fe-rich hydrothermal sediments at two South Tonga Arc submarine volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Forget, N L; Murdock, S A; Juniper, S K

    2010-12-01

    Seafloor iron oxide deposits are a common feature of submarine hydrothermal systems. Morphological study of these deposits has led investigators to suggest a microbiological role in their formation, through the oxidation of reduced Fe in hydrothermal fluids. Fe-oxidizing bacteria, including the recently described Zetaproteobacteria, have been isolated from a few of these deposits but generally little is known about the microbial diversity associated with this habitat. In this study, we characterized bacterial diversity in two Fe oxide samples collected on the seafloor of Volcanoes 1 and 19 on the South Tonga Arc. We were particularly interested in confirming the presence of Zetaproteobacteria at these two sites and in documenting the diversity of groups other than Fe oxidizers. Our results (small subunit rRNA gene sequence data) showed a surprisingly high bacterial diversity, with 150 operational taxonomic units belonging to 19 distinct taxonomic groups. Both samples were dominated by Zetaproteobacteria Fe oxidizers. This group was most abundant at Volcano 1, where sediments were richer in Fe and contained more crystalline forms of Fe oxides. Other groups of bacteria found at these two sites include known S- and a few N-metabolizing bacteria, all ubiquitous in marine environments. The low similarity of our clones with the GenBank database suggests that new species and perhaps new families were recovered. The results of this study suggest that Fe-rich hydrothermal sediments, while dominated by Fe oxidizers, can be exploited by a variety of autotrophic and heterotrophic micro-organisms.

  16. Bacterial diversity in Fe-rich hydrothermal sediments at two South Tonga Arc submarine volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Forget, N L; Murdock, S A; Juniper, S K

    2010-12-01

    Seafloor iron oxide deposits are a common feature of submarine hydrothermal systems. Morphological study of these deposits has led investigators to suggest a microbiological role in their formation, through the oxidation of reduced Fe in hydrothermal fluids. Fe-oxidizing bacteria, including the recently described Zetaproteobacteria, have been isolated from a few of these deposits but generally little is known about the microbial diversity associated with this habitat. In this study, we characterized bacterial diversity in two Fe oxide samples collected on the seafloor of Volcanoes 1 and 19 on the South Tonga Arc. We were particularly interested in confirming the presence of Zetaproteobacteria at these two sites and in documenting the diversity of groups other than Fe oxidizers. Our results (small subunit rRNA gene sequence data) showed a surprisingly high bacterial diversity, with 150 operational taxonomic units belonging to 19 distinct taxonomic groups. Both samples were dominated by Zetaproteobacteria Fe oxidizers. This group was most abundant at Volcano 1, where sediments were richer in Fe and contained more crystalline forms of Fe oxides. Other groups of bacteria found at these two sites include known S- and a few N-metabolizing bacteria, all ubiquitous in marine environments. The low similarity of our clones with the GenBank database suggests that new species and perhaps new families were recovered. The results of this study suggest that Fe-rich hydrothermal sediments, while dominated by Fe oxidizers, can be exploited by a variety of autotrophic and heterotrophic micro-organisms. PMID:20533949

  17. Characteristics of Offshore Hawai';i Island Seismicity and Velocity Structure, including Lo';ihi Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, D. K.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    the regional velocity model (HG50; Klein, 1989) in the shallow lithosphere above 16 km depth. This is likely a result of thick deposits of volcaniclastic sediments and fractured pillow basalts that blanket the southern submarine flank of Mauna Loa, upon which Lo';ihi is currently superimposing (Morgan et al., 2003). A broad, low-velocity anomaly was observed from 20-40 km deep beneath the area of Pahala, and is indicative of the central plume conduit that supplies magma to the active volcanoes. A localized high-velocity body is observed 4-6 km deep beneath Lo';ihi's summit, extending 10 km to the North and South. Oriented approximately parallel to Lo';ihi's active rift zones, this high-velocity body is suggestive of intrusion in the upper crust, similar to Kilauea's high-velocity rift zones.

  18. Growth and collapse of Waianae Volcano, Hawaii, as revealed by exploration of its submarine flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, Michelle L.; Clague, David A.; Moore, Gregory F.; Cousens, Brian L.

    2004-08-01

    Wai`anae Volcano comprises the western half of O`ahu Island, but until recently little was known about the submarine portion of this volcano. Seven new submersible dives, conducted in 2001 and 2002, and multibeam bathymetry offshore of Wai`anae provide evidence pertaining to the overall growth of the volcano's edifice as well as the timing of collapses that formed the Wai`anae slump complex. A prominent slope break at ˜1400 mbsl marks the paleoshoreline of Wai`anae at the end of its shield-building stage and wraps around Ka`ena Ridge, suggesting that this may have been an extension of Wai`anae's northwest rift zone. Subaerially erupted tholeiitic lavas were collected from a small shield along the crest of Ka`ena Ridge. The length of Wai`anae's south rift zone is poorly constrained but reaches at least 65 km on the basis of recovered tholeiite pillows at this distance from the volcano's center. Wai`anae's growth was marked by multiple collapse and deformation events during and after its shield stage, resulting in the compound mass wasting features on the volcano's southwest flank (Wai`anae slump complex). The slump complex, one of the largest in Hawai`i, covering an area of ˜5500 km2, is composed of several distinct sections on the basis of morphology and the lithologies of recovered samples. Two dives ascended the outer bench of the slump complex and collected predominantly low-S tholeiites that correlate with subaerial lavas erupted early during the volcano's shield stage, from 3.9 to 3.5 Ma. Pillow lavas from the outer bench have Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic values that overlap with previously published subaerial Wai`anae lavas. On the basis of the compositions of the recovered samples, the main body of the slump complex, as represented by the outer bench, probably formed during and shortly after the early shield stage. To the southwest of the outer bench lies a broad debris field on the seafloor, interpreted to have formed by a catastrophic collapse event that

  19. Hydrothermal mineralization at Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano in the Lesser Antilles island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R.; Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Cornell, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    Kick 'em Jenny (KeJ) is an active submarine volcano located in the Lesser Antilles island arc, ~7.5 km northwest of Grenada. Of the twelve eruptions detected since 1939, most have been explosive as evidenced by eyewitness accounts in 1939, 1974, and 1988 and the dominance of explosive eruption products recovered by dredging. In 2003, vigorous hydrothermal activity was observed in the crater of KeJ. Video footage taken by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during the cruise RB-03-03 of the R/V Ronald Brown documented the venting of a vapor phase in the form of bubbles that ascended through the water column and a clear fluid phase in the form of shimmering water. The shimmering water generally ascended through the water column but can also been seen flowing down gradient from a fissure at the top of a fine-grained sediment mound. These fine-grained sediment mounds are the only structure associated with hydrothermal venting; spire or chimney structures were not observed. Hydrothermal venting was also observed coming from patches of coarse-grained volcaniclastic sediment on the crater floor and from talus slopes around the perimeter of the crater. Samples were collected from these areas and from areas void of hydrothermal activity. XRD and ICPMS analyses of bulk sediment were carried out to investigate the geochemical relationships between sediment types. Sediment samples from the hydrothermal mound structures are comprised of the same components (plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, and scoria) as sediment samples from areas void of hydrothermal activity (primary volcaniclastic sediment) in the 500-63 μm size range. High resolution grain size analyses show that >78% of sediment in the hydrothermal mound samples are between 63-2 μm with 6-20% clay sized (<2 μm) whereas <40% of the primary volcaniclastic sediment is between 63-2 μm with ~2% clay sized. The presence of clay minerals (smectite, illite, talc, and I/S mixed layer) in the hydrothermal mound samples was

  20. Liquid and Emulsified Sulfur in Submarine Solfatara Fields of two Northern Mariana Arc Volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Embley, R. W.; Chadwick, W. W.; Butterfield, D. A.; Takano, B.; Resing, J. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S. G.; Inagaki, F.

    2006-12-01

    Because elemental sulfur melting point is ca 100 deg C (depend on allotropes and heating rate, S8 triple point temperature: 115 deg C), the evidence of liquid sulfur has been known for many subaerial crater lakes and small ponds in geothermal regions throughout the world. But the milky nature of water (sulfur-in- water emulsion in limited water mass) prohibited the direct observation of on-going processes at the bottom of these subaerial lakes. In the passive degassing environment at the summit craters of Daikoku and Nikko Seamounts of the northern Mariana Arc, the continuous flushing of sulfur emulsion by seawater allowed us to observe on- going submarine solfatara processes and associated chemistry through dives with ROVs during the NT05-18 cruise (JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima and ROV hyper-Dolphin) and the Submarine Ring of Fire 2006 cruise (R/V Melville and ROV JASON II). A higher viscosity for liquid elemental sulfur relative to that of seawater, as well as a limited stability of sulfur emulsion (aqueous sulfur sol) at high temperatures in electrolyte solution (seawater), ensures limited mobility of liquid sulfur in the conduits of hydrothermal vents. The subseafloor boiling depth of hydrothermal fluid limits the locus of any liquid sulfur reservoir. It was observed in an exposed liquid sulfur pond that the penetration of gas bubbles (mostly CO2) created sulfur emulsion while collapsing liquid sulfur film between seawater and gas bubbles. Liquid sulfur pits, encrusted sulfur, liquid sulfur fountain structure, sulfur stalactites and stalagmites, mini-pillow lava-like sulfur flows, accretionary sulfur lapilli and sulfur deltas were also observed at the summits of two volcanoes. Note: Solfatara: Italian. A type of fumarole, the gases of which are characteristically sulfurous. In 'Glossary of geology.'

  1. Transport and Deposition During The 2012 Submarine Explosive Eruption of Havre Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, S. A.; Carey, R.; Jones, M.; Ikegami, F.; Yoerger, D.; Fornari, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Havre Volcano in the Kermadec Arc experienced a large eruption in 2012. The eruption was identified when ships in the area intersected a pumice raft, which was subsequently tracked by NASA MODIS satellite imagery. In 2015, an NSF-sponsored research cruise to the area conducted AUV and ROV dives to map and sample the deposits of this eruption. This presentation describes the high-resolution mapping data and seafloor observations that illustrate the processes of lava and pyroclast transport and deposition. The National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF) AUV Sentry collected multibeam bathymetry data over the Havre caldera rim and floor - an area of 56 km2 - at a resolution of 1m. In addition, Sentry collected high-resolution sidescan sonar backscatter data over the same area. The NDSF ROV Jason collected HD video and down-looking still imagery along dive transects. These data allow us to document the depositional landforms in great detail. Notable features include effusive domes, lava flows, and a widespread blanket of giant pumice and ash. With constraints from seafloor imagery, we use the morphology of the imaged landforms to delineate deposit extents, identify intra-flow and intra-deposit features, pinpoint vent locations, and, in comparison with pre-eruption bathymetry, determine eruptive volumes. This information informs preliminary models of transport and deposition processes that are unique to submarine explosive eruptions.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of submarine Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, Brian R.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Singer, Brad S.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2012-09-01

    New geochronologic constraints refine the growth history of Mauna Loa volcano and enhance interpretations of the petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic evolution of Hawaiian magmatism. We report results of 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on low-K, tholeiitic lavas from the 1.6 km high Kahuku landslide scarp cutting Mauna Loa's submarine southwest rift zone, and from lavas in a deeper section of the rift. Obtaining precise40Ar/39Ar ages from young, tholeiitic lavas containing only 0.2-0.3 wt.% K2O is challenging due to their extremely low radiogenic 40Ar contents. Analyses of groundmass from 45 lavas yield 14 new age determinations (31% success rate) with plateau and isochron ages that agree with stratigraphic constraints. Lavas collected from a 1250 m thick section in the landslide scarp headwall were all erupted around 470 ± 10 ka, implying an extraordinary period of accumulation of ˜25 mm/yr, possibly correlating with the peak of the shield-building stage. This rate is three times higher than the estimated vertical lava accumulation rate for shield-building at Mauna Kea (8.6 ± 3.1 mm/yr) based on results from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. Between ˜470 and 273 ka, the lava accumulation rate along the southwest rift zone decreased dramatically to ˜1 mm/yr. We propose that the marked reduction in lava accumulation rate does not mark the onset of post-shield volcanism as previously suggested, but rather indicates the upward migration of the magma system as Mauna Loa evolved from a submarine stage of growth to one that is predominantly subaerial, thereby cutting off supply to the distal rift zone. Prior to ˜250 ka, lavas with Loihi-like isotopic signatures were erupted along with lavas having typical Mauna Loa values, implying greater heterogeneity in the plume source earlier in Mauna Loa's growth. In addition to refining accumulation rates and the isotopic evolution of the lavas erupted along the southwest rift zone, our new40Ar/39Ar results

  3. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  4. Hydrothermal Venting at Kick'Em Jenny Submarine Volcano (West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Croff Bell, K. L.; Dondin, F. J. Y.; Roman, C.; Smart, C.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Ballard, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Kick'em Jenny is a frequently-erupting, shallow submarine volcano located ~8 km off the northwest coast of Grenada in the West Indies. The last eruption took place in 2001 but did not breach the sea surface. Focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting is taking place mainly within a small (~100 x 100 m) depression within the 300 m diameter crater of the volcano at depths of about 265 meters. Near the center of the depression clear fluids are being discharged from a focused mound-like vent at a maximum temperature of 180o C with the simultaneous discharge of numerous bubble streams. The gas consists of 93-96% CO2 with trace amounts of methane and hydrogen. A sulfur component likely contributes 1-4% of the gas total. Gas flux measurements on individual bubble streams ranged from 10 to 100 kg of CO2 per day. Diffuse venting with temperatures 5 to 35o C above ambient occurs throughout the depression and over large areas of the main crater. These zones are extensively colonized by reddish-yellow bacterial mats with the production of loose Fe-oxyhydroxides largely as a surface coating and in some cases, as fragile spires up to several meters in height. A high-resolution photo mosaic of the crater depression was constructed using the remotely operated vehicle Hercules on cruise NA039 of the E/V Nautilus. The image revealed prominent fluid flow patterns descending the sides of the depression towards the base. We speculate that the negatively buoyant fluid flow may be the result of second boiling of hydrothermal fluids at Kick'em Jenny generating a dense saline component that does not rise despite its elevated temperature. Increased density may also be the result of high dissolved CO2 content of the fluids, although we were not able to measure this directly. The low amount of sulphide mineralization on the crater floor suggests that deposition may be occurring mostly subsurface, in accord with models of second boiling mineralization from other hydrothermal vent systems.

  5. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) ( = BCRC AR10044(T) = DSM 29354(T)). PMID:25855623

  6. A distinct source and differentiation history for Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field, Aegean arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, Martijn; Carey, Steven; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Smet, Ingrid; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Vroon, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the first detailed geochemical characterization of Kolumbo submarine volcano in order to investigate the role of source heterogeneity in controlling geochemical variability within the Santorini volcanic field in the central Aegean arc. Kolumbo, situated 15 km to the northeast of Santorini, last erupted in 1650 AD and is thus closely associated with the Santorini volcanic system in space and time. Samples taken by remotely-operated vehicle that were analyzed for major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope composition include the 1650 AD and underlying K2 rhyolitic, enclave-bearing pumices that are nearly identical in composition (73 wt.% SiO2, 4.2 wt.% K2O). Lava bodies exposed in the crater and enclaves are basalts to andesites (52-60 wt.% SiO2). Biotite and amphibole are common phenocryst phases, in contrast with the typically anhydrous mineral assemblages of Santorini. The strong geochemical signature of amphibole fractionation and the assimilation of lower crustal basement in the petrogenesis of the Kolumbo magmas indicates that Kolumbo and Santorini underwent different crustal differentiation histories and that their crustal magmatic systems are unrelated. Moreover, the Kolumbo samples are derived from a distinct, more enriched mantle source that is characterized by high Nb/Yb (>3) and low 206Pb/204Pb (<18.82) that has not been recognized in the Santorini volcanic products. The strong dissimilarity in both petrogenesis and inferred mantle sources between Kolumbo and Santorini suggests that pronounced source variations can be manifested in arc magmas that are closely associated in space and time within a single volcanic field.

  7. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) ( = BCRC AR10044(T) = DSM 29354(T)).

  8. Influence of hydrothermal venting on water column properties in the crater of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, Maria E.; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steven; Mandalakis, Manolis

    2016-02-01

    The Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of the island of Santorini, is part of Santorini's volcanic complex in the south Aegean Sea, Greece. Kolumbo's last eruption was in 1650 AD. However, a unique and active hydrothermal vent field has been revealed in the northern part of its crater floor during an oceanographic survey by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in 2006. In the present study, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data collected by ROV Hercules during three oceanographic surveys onboard E/V Nautilus in 2010 and 2011 have served to investigate the distribution of physicochemical properties in the water column, as well as their behavior directly over the hydrothermal field. Additional CTD measurements were carried out in volcanic cone 3 (VC3) along the same volcanic chain but located 3 km northeast of Kolumbo where no hydrothermal activity has been detected to date. CTD profiles exhibit pronounced anomalies directly above the active vents on Kolumbo's crater floor. In contrast, VC3 data revealed no such anomalies, essentially resembling open-sea (background) conditions. Steep increases of temperature (e.g., from 16 to 19 °C) and conductivity near the maximum depth (504 m) inside Kolumbo's cone show marked spatiotemporal correlation. Vertical distributions of CTD signatures suggest a strong connection to Kolumbo's morphology, with four distinct zones identified (open sea, turbid flow, invariable state, hydrothermal vent field). Additionally, overlaying the near-seafloor temperature measurements on an X-Y coordinate grid generates a detailed 2D distribution of the hydrothermal vent field and clarifies the influence of fluid discharges in its formation.

  9. Submarine Hydrothermal Activity on the Aeolian Arc: New Evidence from Helium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J.; de Ronde, C.; Baker, E.; Sprovieri, M.; Bruno, P.; Italiano, F.; Walker, S.; Faure, K.; Leybourne, M.; Britten, K.; Greene, R.

    2008-12-01

    In November 2007 we conducted a water-column and seafloor mapping study of the submarine volcanoes of the Aeolian Arc in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea aboard the R/V Urania. A total of 26 CTD casts were completed, 13 vertical casts and 13 tows. In addition to in situ measurements of temperature, conductivity, pressure and suspended particles, we also collected discrete samples for helium isotopes, methane, and trace metals. The helium isotope ratio, which is known to be an unambiguous indicator of hydrothermal input, showed a clear excess above background at 5 out of the 10 submarine volcanoes surveyed. We found the strongest helium anomaly over Marsili seamount, where the 3He/4He ratio reached maximum values of δ3He = 23% at 610 m depth compared with background values of ~7%. We also found smaller but distinct δ3He anomalies over Enerato, Eolo, Palinuro, and Secca del Capo. We interpret these results as indicating the presence of hydrothermal activity on these 5 seamounts. Hydrothermal venting has been documented at subsea vents offshore of the islands of Panarea, Stromboli, and Vulcano (Dando et al., 1999; Di Roberto et al., 2008), and hydrothermal deposits have been sampled on many of the submarine volcanoes of the Aeolian Arc (Dekov and Savelli, 2004). However, as far as we know this is the first evidence of present day hydrothermal activity on Marsili, Enerato, and Eolo. Samples collected over Filicudi, Glabro, Lamentini, Sisifo, and Alcioni had δ3He very close to the regional background values, suggesting either absence of or very weak hydrothermal activity on these seamounts. Helium isotope measurements from the background hydrocasts positioned between the volcanoes revealed the presence of an excess in 3He throughout the SE Tyrrhenian Sea. These background profiles reach a consistent maximum of about δ3He = 11% at 2300 m depth. Historical helium profiles collected in the central and northern Tyrrhenian Sea in 1987 and 1997 do not show this deep 3He

  10. A Geochemical Study of Magmatic Processes and Evolution along the Submarine Southwest Rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Garcia, M. O.; Weis, D.; Trusdell, F. A.; Vollinger, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    Mauna Loa's southwest rift zone (SWR) extends for 102 km from its summit caldera, at an elevation of 4,170 m above sea level, to submarine depths of over 4,500 m. About 65% of the rift zone is subaerial and 35% submarine. Recent sampling with the Jason II submersible of the `mile-high' (1800 m) Ka Lae submarine landslide scarp and the deepest section of the rift zone, in conjunction with previous submersible and dredge-haul collecting, provides petrological and geochemical understanding of rift zone processes, as well as a record of Mauna Loa's eruptive history extending back about 400 ka. The major and trace element trends of the submarine lavas are remarkably similar to those of historical and young prehistoric lavas (<31 ka) erupted along the subaerial SWR. We take this to imply that magma-forming processes have remained relatively constant over much of the volcano's recorded eruptive history. However, the distribution of samples along these trends has varied, and is correlated with elevation. There are very few picrites (>12% MgO) among the subaerial lavas, and compositions tend to cluster around 6.8-8.0% MgO. In contrast, picritic lavas are extremely abundant in the submarine samples, increasing in frequency with depth, especially below 1200 m. These observations support earlier interpretations that the submarine lavas are derived directly from deeper levels in the magma column, and that magmas from a shallow, steady-state, magma reservoir are of uncommon at these depths. Isotopic ratios of Pb and Sr in the submarine lavas, in conjunction with Nb/Y and Zr/Nb ratios, extend from values that are identical with subaerial historical Mauna Loa lavas to lavas with markedly lower 87Sr/86Sr and higher 206Pb/204Pb isotopic ratios. As yet, we see no correlation with depth or age, but the implications are that, in the past, the plume source of Mauna Loa magmas was more variable than in the last 31 ka, and contained a greater proportion of the Kea component. *Team members

  11. Endogenous growth of persistently active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stevenson, David

    1993-12-01

    LAVA lakes and active strombolian vents have persisted at some volcanoes for periods exceeding the historic record. They liberate prodigious amounts of volatiles and thermal energy but erupt little lava, a paradox that raises questions about how volcanoes grow. Although long-lasting surface manifestations can be sustained by convective exchange of magma with deeper reservoirs, residence times of magmas beneath several basaltic volcanoes are & sim10-100 years1,2, indicating that where surface activity continues for more than 100-1,000 years, the reservoirs are replenished by new magma. Endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) through dyke intrusion and cumulate formation is a well-understood consequence of the steady supply of mantle-derived magma3,4. As we show here, inferred heat losses from the Halemaumau lava lake indicate a period of dominantly endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano during the nineteenth century. Moreover, heat losses and degassing rates for several other volcanoes, including Stromboli, also indicate cryptic influxes of magma that far exceed visible effluxes of lavas. We propose that persistent activity at Stromboli, and at other volcanoes in different tectonic settings, is evidence of endogenous growth, involving processes similar to those at Kilauea.

  12. High-Resolution Distribution of Temperature, Particle and Oxidation/Reduction Potential Anomalies From a Submarine Hydrothermal System: Brothers Volcano, Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; de Ronde, C. E.; Yoerger, D.; Embley, R. W.; Davy, B.; Merle, S. G.; Resing, J. A.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-12-01

    The complex relationships between geological setting and hydrothermal venting have, to date, largely been explored with ship-based surveys that effectively examine regional relationships, or with remotely operated vehicles (ROV) and manned submersibles which allow close examination of individual vent fields. Higher- resolution surveys than are possible with ship-based techniques and broader surveys than are practical with ROVs and manned submersibles are necessary for more thoroughly understanding hydrothermal systems and their impact on ocean ecosystems. Autonomous vehicles (AUVs), such as the WHOI Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) can be programmed to conduct high-resolution surveys that systematically cover a broad area of seafloor. Brothers volcano, a hydrothermally active submarine caldera volcano located on the Kermadec arc northwest of New Zealand, was surveyed in July-August 2007 using ABE. Brothers caldera is ~3 km in diameter with a floor depth of 1850 m and walls that rise 290-530 m above the caldera floor. A dacite cone with a summit depth of ~1200 m sits within the caldera, partially merging with the southern caldera wall. Prior to the survey, active hydrothermal vents were known to be perched along the NW caldera wall and located at three sites on the cone. The enclosed caldera, presence of known vent fields with differing geochemical characteristics, and existence of at least one currently inactive site made Brothers volcano an ideal site for a high-resolution survey to explore in greater detail the mass, thermal and geochemical exchanges of hydrothermal systems. During our expedition, the caldera walls and dacite cone (~7 km2) were completely surveyed by ABE with 50-60 m trackline spacing at an altitude of 50 m above the seafloor. Hydrothermal plumes were mapped with ABE's integrated CTD (conductivity- temperature-depth) and sensors measuring optical backscatter (particle concentrations) and oxidation- reduction potential (ORP; indicating the

  13. Viral infections stimulate the metabolism and shape prokaryotic assemblages in submarine mud volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Mud volcanoes are geological structures in the oceans that have key roles in the functioning of the global ecosystem. Information on the dynamics of benthic viruses and their interactions with prokaryotes in mud volcano ecosystems is still completely lacking. We investigated the impact of viral infection on the mortality and assemblage structure of benthic prokaryotes of five mud volcanoes in the Mediterranean Sea. Mud volcano sediments promote high rates of viral production (1.65-7.89 × 10(9) viruses g(-1) d(-1)), viral-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM) (33% cells killed per day) and heterotrophic prokaryotic production (3.0-8.3 μgC g(-1) d(-1)) when compared with sediments outside the mud volcano area. The viral shunt (that is, the microbial biomass converted into dissolved organic matter as a result of viral infection, and thus diverted away from higher trophic levels) provides 49 mgC m(-2) d(-1), thus fuelling the metabolism of uninfected prokaryotes and contributing to the total C budget. Bacteria are the dominant components of prokaryotic assemblages in surface sediments of mud volcanoes, whereas archaea dominate the subsurface sediment layers. Multivariate multiple regression analyses show that prokaryotic assemblage composition is not only dependant on the geochemical features and processes of mud volcano ecosystems but also on synergistic interactions between bottom-up (that is, trophic resources) and top-down (that is, VIPM) controlling factors. Overall, these findings highlight the significant role of the viral shunt in sustaining the metabolism of prokaryotes and shaping their assemblage structure in mud volcano sediments, and they provide new clues for our understanding of the functioning of cold-seep ecosystems.

  14. Viral infections stimulate the metabolism and shape prokaryotic assemblages in submarine mud volcanoes

    PubMed Central

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Mud volcanoes are geological structures in the oceans that have key roles in the functioning of the global ecosystem. Information on the dynamics of benthic viruses and their interactions with prokaryotes in mud volcano ecosystems is still completely lacking. We investigated the impact of viral infection on the mortality and assemblage structure of benthic prokaryotes of five mud volcanoes in the Mediterranean Sea. Mud volcano sediments promote high rates of viral production (1.65–7.89 × 109 viruses g−1 d−1), viral-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM) (33% cells killed per day) and heterotrophic prokaryotic production (3.0–8.3 μgC g−1 d−1) when compared with sediments outside the mud volcano area. The viral shunt (that is, the microbial biomass converted into dissolved organic matter as a result of viral infection, and thus diverted away from higher trophic levels) provides 49 mgC m−2 d−1, thus fuelling the metabolism of uninfected prokaryotes and contributing to the total C budget. Bacteria are the dominant components of prokaryotic assemblages in surface sediments of mud volcanoes, whereas archaea dominate the subsurface sediment layers. Multivariate multiple regression analyses show that prokaryotic assemblage composition is not only dependant on the geochemical features and processes of mud volcano ecosystems but also on synergistic interactions between bottom-up (that is, trophic resources) and top-down (that is, VIPM) controlling factors. Overall, these findings highlight the significant role of the viral shunt in sustaining the metabolism of prokaryotes and shaping their assemblage structure in mud volcano sediments, and they provide new clues for our understanding of the functioning of cold-seep ecosystems. PMID:22170423

  15. Viral infections stimulate the metabolism and shape prokaryotic assemblages in submarine mud volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Mud volcanoes are geological structures in the oceans that have key roles in the functioning of the global ecosystem. Information on the dynamics of benthic viruses and their interactions with prokaryotes in mud volcano ecosystems is still completely lacking. We investigated the impact of viral infection on the mortality and assemblage structure of benthic prokaryotes of five mud volcanoes in the Mediterranean Sea. Mud volcano sediments promote high rates of viral production (1.65-7.89 × 10(9) viruses g(-1) d(-1)), viral-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM) (33% cells killed per day) and heterotrophic prokaryotic production (3.0-8.3 μgC g(-1) d(-1)) when compared with sediments outside the mud volcano area. The viral shunt (that is, the microbial biomass converted into dissolved organic matter as a result of viral infection, and thus diverted away from higher trophic levels) provides 49 mgC m(-2) d(-1), thus fuelling the metabolism of uninfected prokaryotes and contributing to the total C budget. Bacteria are the dominant components of prokaryotic assemblages in surface sediments of mud volcanoes, whereas archaea dominate the subsurface sediment layers. Multivariate multiple regression analyses show that prokaryotic assemblage composition is not only dependant on the geochemical features and processes of mud volcano ecosystems but also on synergistic interactions between bottom-up (that is, trophic resources) and top-down (that is, VIPM) controlling factors. Overall, these findings highlight the significant role of the viral shunt in sustaining the metabolism of prokaryotes and shaping their assemblage structure in mud volcano sediments, and they provide new clues for our understanding of the functioning of cold-seep ecosystems. PMID:22170423

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT, a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from a Submarine Mud Volcano in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Sue-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the genome sequence of ITALIC! Methanoculleus sediminisS3Fa(T)(DSM 29354(T)), a strict anaerobic methanoarchaeon, which was isolated from sediments near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located offshore in southwestern Taiwan. The 2.49-Mb genome consists of 2,459 predicted genes, 3 rRNAs, 48 tRNAs, and 1 ncRNA. The sequence of this novel strain may provide more information for species delineation and the roles that this strain plays in the unique marine mud volcano habitat. PMID:27103730

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT, a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from a Submarine Mud Volcano in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Sue-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the genome sequence of ITALIC! Methanoculleus sediminisS3Fa(T)(DSM 29354(T)), a strict anaerobic methanoarchaeon, which was isolated from sediments near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located offshore in southwestern Taiwan. The 2.49-Mb genome consists of 2,459 predicted genes, 3 rRNAs, 48 tRNAs, and 1 ncRNA. The sequence of this novel strain may provide more information for species delineation and the roles that this strain plays in the unique marine mud volcano habitat.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT, a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen Isolated from a Submarine Mud Volcano in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the genome sequence of Methanoculleus sediminis S3FaT (DSM 29354T), a strict anaerobic methanoarchaeon, which was isolated from sediments near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located offshore in southwestern Taiwan. The 2.49-Mb genome consists of 2,459 predicted genes, 3 rRNAs, 48 tRNAs, and 1 ncRNA. The sequence of this novel strain may provide more information for species delineation and the roles that this strain plays in the unique marine mud volcano habitat. PMID:27103730

  19. Extensive and Diverse Submarine Volcanism and Hydrothermal Activity in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J.; Baker, E. T.; Lilley, M. D.; Arculus, R. J.; Crowhurst, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    The northeast Lau basin, the NE “corner” of the Tonga subduction zone, has an unusual concentration of young submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity. The area is bounded on the west by overlapping spreading centers opening at rates up to 120 mm/yr, on the north by the E-W trending Tonga trench and on the east by the Tofua arc front. From the south, the Fonualei rift spreading center (FRSC) overlaps with the southern rift of The Mangatolo triple junction spreading center (MTJSC). The northern arm of the MTJSC overlaps with the northeast Lau spreading center (NELSC). Surveys of the area with an EM300 sonar system in November 2008 show high backscatter over the 10-20 km wide neovolcanic zones of the FRSC, MTJSC and NELSC. High backscatter is also associated with: (1) a 10-km diameter, hydrothermally active, volcanic caldera/cone (Volcano “O”) lying between the NELSC and the northern Tofua arc front; (2) a rift zone extending north from volcano “O” and intersecting the NELSC near the Tonga trench; and (3) a series of volcanoes constructed along SW-NE trending crustal tears in the northernmost backarc near the east-west portion of the Tonga Trench. Two eruptions were detected in November 2008 during hydrothermal plume surveys of the area. Subsequent dives with the remotely operated vehicle Jason 2 in May 2009 revealed that the southern NELSC eruption was a short-lived, primarily effusive eruption. The second eruption was detected on the summit of the largest SW-NE trending volcano (West Mata) and was ongoing when Jason 2 arrived on site more than 6 months later. It was producing both pillow lavas and abundant volcaniclastic debris streams that have a characteristic appearance on the sonar backscatter map. There is also an unusual series of lava flows emanating from ridges and scarps between Volcano “O” and West Mata. These flows contain drained-out lava ponds up to 2 km in diameter. The apparent high level of volcanic activity in the NE Lau basin

  20. Earthquakes, Subaerial and Submarine Landslides, Tsunamis and Volcanoes in Aysén Fjord, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastras, G.; Amblas, D.; Calafat-Frau, A. M.; Canals, M.; Frigola, J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Lafuerza, S.; Longva, O.; Micallef, A.; Sepulveda, S. A.; Vargas Easton, G.; Azpiroz, M.; Bascuñán, I.; Duhart, P.; Iglesias, O.; Kempf, P.; Rayo, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Aysén fjord, 65 km long and east-west oriented, is located at 45.4ºS and 73.2ºW in Chilean Patagonia. It has a maximum water depth of 345 m. It collects the inputs of Aysén, Pescado, Condor and Cuervo rivers, which drain the surrounding Patagonian Andes. The fjord is crossed by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone, a seismically active trench parallel intra-arc fault system. On 21 April 2007, an Mw 6.2 earthquake triggered numerous subaerial and submarine landslides along the fjord flanks. Some of the subaerial landslides reached the water mass, generating tsunami-like displacement waves that flooded the adjacent coastlines, withlocal >50 m high run-ups, causing ten fatalities and damage to salmon farms. The research cruise DETSUFA on board BIO Hespérides in March 2013, aiming to characterise the landslides and their effects, mapped with great detail the submerged morphology of the fjord. Multibeam data display deformation structures created by the impact of the landslides in the inner fjord floor. Landslide material descended and accelerated down the highly sloping fjord flanks, and reached the fjord floor at 200 m water depth generating large, 10-m-deep impact depressions. Fjord floor sediment was pushed and piled up in arcuate deformation areas formed by 15-m-high compressional ridges, block fields and a narrow frontal depression. Up to six >1.5 km2 of these structures have been identified. In addition, the cruise mapped the outer fjord floor beyond the Cuervo ridge. This ridge, previously interpreted as a volcanic transverse structure, most probably acted as a limit for grounding ice in the past, as suggested by the presence of a melt-water channel. The fjord smoothens and deepens to more than 330 m forming an enclosed basin, before turning SW across a field of streamlined hills of glacial origin. Three volcanic cones, one of them forming Isla Colorada and the other two totally submerged and previously unknown, have been mapped in the outer fjord. The largest

  1. Submarine evidence of a debris avalanche deposit on the eastern slope of Santorini volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Katherine Lynn Croff; Carey, Steven N.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2013-06-01

    Hummocky seafloor features were discovered on the eastern flank of Santorini volcano, Greece. Multibeam bathymetric mapping, airgun seismic profiling, side scan sonar survey, and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives have been carried out to characterize the nature of the hummocks. These hummocks appear to be composed of several tens of blocks that are up to several hundred meters in diameter, and are the surface expression of a much larger deposit than is observed in the bathymetry. The sidescan and airgun data show that the deposit covers an area of approximately 6 km wide by 20 km long, and is up to 75 m thick. We estimate the total volume of the deposit to be approximately 4.4 × 109 m3. Sampling of these blocks show they are composed of pyroclastic flow deposits produced during the Minoan eruption of Santorini (ca. 3600 BP). We propose that the deposit is the result of a multi-stage landslide event that was caused by one of the several large earthquakes or volcanic eruptions that have occurred in the vicinity of Santorini since the Minoan eruption. One or more of these events likely triggered the destabilization of a part of the eastern flank of Santorini, which led to a debris avalanche, depositing blocks and forming a hummocky terrain at the base of the island's slope. The mass movement later evolved into a turbulent suspension flow that traveled 20 km or more from the presumed initial failure. Given the size of the landslide deposit, it might have a tsunami potentially affecting the islands across the southern Aegean Sea. The understanding of earthquake-landslide dynamics has important implications for hazard assessment in this seismically active, historical, and highly populated region of the world.

  2. 1891 Submarine eruption of Foerstner volcano (Pantelleria, Sicily) : insights into the vent structure of basaltic balloon eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. T.; Carey, S.; Bell, K. L.; Rosi, M.; Marani, M.; Roman, C.; Pistolesi, M.; Baker, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous shallow water basaltic eruptions have produced abundant floating scoria up to several meters in diameter, yet little is known about the conditions that give rise to this unusual style of volcanism. On October 17, 1891, a submarine eruption began 4 kilometers northwest of the island of Pantelleria, Sicily. The eruptive vent was located at a depth of 250 meters along the NW-SE trending Sicily Channel Rift Zone. Evidence for the eruption was provided by the occurrence of hot, scoriaceous lava "balloons" floating on the sea surface along a narrow line about 850-1000 meters long trending along the rift. These extremely vesicular fragments were spherical to ellipsoidal in shape and ranged from <50 to 250 cm in diameter. Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and existing bathymetric maps have been used to conduct the first detailed investigation of a vent site associated with this unique style of volcanism. In 2011 the ROV Hercules, deployed from the E/V Nautilus, explored the 1891 Foerstner vent using high definition video cameras and produced a high resolution bathymetric map of the area using a BlueView multibeam imaging sonar. Light backscattering and oxidation-reduction potential sensors (MAPRs) were added to Hercules to detect discharge from active venting. ROV video footage has been used in conjunction with the high resolution bathymetric data to construct a geologic map of the vent area based on a variety of facies descriptors, such as abundance of scoria bombs, occurrence of pillow or scoria flow lobes, extent of sediment cover, and presence of spatter-like deposits. Initial results of the mapping have shown that there are two main vents that erupted within the observed area of floating scoria and most likely erupted at the same time as evidenced by similar bulk chemical compositions of recovered samples. Scoria bomb beds and some scoria flow lobes largely cover the suspected main vent, located at a depth of 250 meters. Distinct pillow flow lobes cover the

  3. Source of the tsunami generated by the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Paris, R.; Nomikou, P.; Kelfoun, K.; Leibrandt, S.; Tappin, D. R.; McCoy, F. W.

    2016-07-01

    The 1650 AD explosive eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) generated a destructive tsunami. In this paper we propose a source mechanism of this poorly documented tsunami using both geological investigations and numerical simulations. Sedimentary evidence of the 1650 AD tsunami was found along the coast of Santorini Island at maximum altitudes ranging between 3.5 m a.s.l. (Perissa, southern coast) and 20 m a.s.l. (Monolithos, eastern coast), corresponding to a minimum inundation of 360 and 630 m respectively. Tsunami deposits consist of an irregular 5 to 30 cm thick layer of dark grey sand that overlies pumiceous deposits erupted during the Minoan eruption and are found at depths of 30-50 cm below the surface. Composition of the tsunami sand is similar to the composition of the present-day beach sand but differs from the pumiceous gravelly deposits on which it rests. The spatial distribution of the tsunami deposits was compared to available historical records and to the results of numerical simulations of tsunami inundation. Different source mechanisms were tested: earthquakes, underwater explosions, caldera collapse, and pyroclastic flows. The most probable source of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tsunami is a 250 m high water surface displacement generated by underwater explosion with an energy of ~ 2 × 1016 J at water depths between 20 and 150 m. The tsunamigenic explosion(s) occurred on September 29, 1650 during the transition between submarine and subaerial phases of the eruption. Caldera subsidence is not an efficient tsunami source mechanism as short (and probably unrealistic) collapse durations (< 5 min) are needed. Pyroclastic flows cannot be discarded, but the required flux (106 to 107 m3 · s- 1) is exceptionally high compared to the magnitude of the eruption.

  4. Source of the tsunami generated by the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Paris, Raphael; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Tappin, Dave

    2016-04-01

    The 1650 AD explosive eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) generated a destructive tsunami. In this paper we propose a source mechanism of this poorly documented tsunami using both geological investigations and numerical simulations. Sedimentary evidences of the 1650 AD tsunami were found along the coast of Santorini Island at maximum altitudes ranging between 3.5 m a.s.l. (Perissa, southern coast) and 20 m a.s.l. (Monolithos, eastern coast), corresponding to a minimum inundation of 360 and 630 m respectively. Tsunami deposits correspond to an irregular 5 to 30 cm thick layer of dark grey sand intercalated in soil at depths between 30 and 50 cm. Composition of the tsunami sand is similar to the composition of the present-day beach and clearly differs from the pumiceous gravelly soil. Spatial distribution of the tsunami deposits was confronted to available historical records and to the results of numerical simulations of tsunami inundation. Different scenarios of source mechanism were tested: earthquakes, underwater explosions, caldera collapse, and pyroclastic flows. The most probable source of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tsunami is a 250 m high water surface displacement generated by underwater explosion with an energy of ~2 E15 J at water depths between 20 and 150 m. The tsunamigenic explosion(s) occurred on September 29, 1650 during the transition between submarine and subaerial phases. Caldera subsidence is not an efficient source of tsunami, as short (and probably unrealistic) collapse durations (< 5 minutes) are needed. Pyroclastic flows cannot be discarded, but the required flux (E6 to E7 m³.s-1) is exceptionally high compared to the magnitude of the eruption.

  5. Ultra-long-range hydroacoustic observations of submarine volcanic activity at Monowai, Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, D.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Rodgers, M.; Paulatto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Monowai is an active submarine volcanic center in the Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of 5 days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic T phases. We show, using cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that the eruption is detected as far as Ascension Island, equatorial South Atlantic Ocean, where a bottom moored hydrophone array is operated as part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. Hydroacoustic phases from the volcanic center must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing and Ranging channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, a source-receiver distance of ~15,800 km. We believe this to be the furthest documented range of a naturally occurring underwater signal above 1 Hz. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and long-range, acoustic parabolic equation modeling, have implications for submarine volcano monitoring.

  6. SeaMARC 2 side-scan images of submarine volcanoes: Potential analogues for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, P.; Hussong, D.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth's surface beneath the oceans may be very similar, in terms of ambient pressures, to the surface of Venus. For that reason it is particularly important for geologists studying the surface of Venus to understand the processes which form features on the floors of the oceans. With the SeaMARC 2 seafloor mapping system, it is possible to view a swath of seafloor that is 10 km wide (about 6.2 mi). Side scan images of the Mariana region show that volcanoes of the island arc are more complicated than previously realized and that features of the fore-arc region, which resemble volcanoes morphologically, may result from processes other than volcanism. By comparing data obtained from the ocean floor with radar images of Venus, the geological evolution of that planet may be more fully understood.

  7. Hydrothermal venting and mineralization in the crater of Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano, Grenada (Lesser Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Steven; Olsen, Rene; Bell, Katherine L. C.; Ballard, Robert; Dondin, Frederic; Roman, Chris; Smart, Clara; Lilley, Marvin; Lupton, John; Seibel, Brad; Cornell, Winton; Moyer, Craig

    2016-03-01

    Kick'em Jenny is a frequently erupting, shallow submarine volcano located 7.5 km off the northern coast of Grenada in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone. Focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting is taking place mainly within a small (˜70 × 110 m) depression within the 300 m diameter crater of the volcano at depths of about 265 m. Much of the crater is blanketed with a layer of fine-grained tephra that has undergone hydrothermal alteration. Clear fluids and gas are being discharged near the center of the depression from mound-like vents at a maximum temperature of 180°C. The gas consists of 93-96% CO2 with trace amounts of methane and hydrogen. Gas flux measurements of individual bubble streams range from 10 to 100 kg of CO2 per day. Diffuse venting with temperatures 5-35°C above ambient occurs throughout the depression and over large areas of the main crater. These zones are colonized by reddish-yellow bacteria with the production of Fe-oxyhydroxides as surface coatings, fragile spires up to several meters in height, and elongated mounds up to tens of centimeters thick. A high-resolution photomosaic of the inner crater depression shows fluid flow patterns descending the sides of the depression toward the crater floor. We suggest that the negatively buoyant fluid flow is the result of phase separation of hydrothermal fluids at Kick'em Jenny generating a dense saline component that does not rise despite its elevated temperature.

  8. Molecular comparison of bacterial communities within iron-containing flocculent mats associated with submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Tyler W; Olson, Julie B

    2009-03-01

    Iron oxide sheaths and filaments are commonly found in hydrothermal environments and have been shown to have a biogenic origin. These structures were seen in the flocculent material associated with two submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc north of New Zealand. Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities associated with the flocculent samples indicated that no known Fe-oxidizing bacteria dominated the recovered clone libraries. However, clones related to the recently described Fe-oxidizing bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans were obtained from both the iron-containing flocculent (Fe-floc) and sediment samples, and peaks corresponding to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as the related clones, were observed in several of our terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles. A large group of epsilonproteobacterial sequences, for which there is no cultured representative, dominated clones from the Fe-floc libraries and were less prevalent in the sediment sample. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that several operational taxonomic units appeared to be site specific, and statistical analyses of the clone libraries found that all samples were significantly different from each other. Thus, the bacterial communities in the Fe-floc samples were not more closely related to each other than to the sediment communities.

  9. Molecular comparison of bacterial communities within iron-containing flocculent mats associated with submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Tyler W; Olson, Julie B

    2009-03-01

    Iron oxide sheaths and filaments are commonly found in hydrothermal environments and have been shown to have a biogenic origin. These structures were seen in the flocculent material associated with two submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc north of New Zealand. Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities associated with the flocculent samples indicated that no known Fe-oxidizing bacteria dominated the recovered clone libraries. However, clones related to the recently described Fe-oxidizing bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans were obtained from both the iron-containing flocculent (Fe-floc) and sediment samples, and peaks corresponding to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as the related clones, were observed in several of our terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles. A large group of epsilonproteobacterial sequences, for which there is no cultured representative, dominated clones from the Fe-floc libraries and were less prevalent in the sediment sample. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that several operational taxonomic units appeared to be site specific, and statistical analyses of the clone libraries found that all samples were significantly different from each other. Thus, the bacterial communities in the Fe-floc samples were not more closely related to each other than to the sediment communities. PMID:19114513

  10. Lava bubble-wall fragments formed by submarine hydrovolcanic explosions on Lo'ihi Seamount and Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Davis, A.S.; Bischoff, J.L.; Dixon, J.E.; Geyer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Glassy bubble-wall fragments, morphologically similar to littoral limu o Pele, have been found in volcanic sands erupted on Lo'ihi Seamount and along the submarine east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano. The limu o Pele fragments are undegassed with respect to H2O and S and formed by mild steam explosions. Angular glass sand fragments apparently form at similar, and greater, depths by cooling-contraction granulation. The limu o Pele fragments from Lo'ihi Seamount are dominantly tholeiitic basalt containing 6.25-7.25% MgO. None of the limu o Pele samples from Lo'ihi Seamount contains less than 5.57% MgO, suggesting that higher viscosity magmas do not form lava bubbles. The dissolved CO2 and H2O contents of 7 of the limu o Pele fragments indicate eruption at 1200??300 m depth (120??30 bar). These pressures exceed that generally thought to limit steam explosions. We conclude that hydrovolcanic eruptions are possible, with appropriate pre-mixing conditions, at pressures as great as 120 bar.

  11. Molecular Comparison of Bacterial Communities within Iron-Containing Flocculent Mats Associated with Submarine Volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Tyler W.; Olson, Julie B.

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide sheaths and filaments are commonly found in hydrothermal environments and have been shown to have a biogenic origin. These structures were seen in the flocculent material associated with two submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc north of New Zealand. Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities associated with the flocculent samples indicated that no known Fe-oxidizing bacteria dominated the recovered clone libraries. However, clones related to the recently described Fe-oxidizing bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans were obtained from both the iron-containing flocculent (Fe-floc) and sediment samples, and peaks corresponding to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as the related clones, were observed in several of our terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles. A large group of epsilonproteobacterial sequences, for which there is no cultured representative, dominated clones from the Fe-floc libraries and were less prevalent in the sediment sample. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that several operational taxonomic units appeared to be site specific, and statistical analyses of the clone libraries found that all samples were significantly different from each other. Thus, the bacterial communities in the Fe-floc samples were not more closely related to each other than to the sediment communities. PMID:19114513

  12. A Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Jun Jaegyu Volcano: An active undersea volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, G.; Brachfeld, S.; Gorring, M.; Prezant, R. S.; Domack, E.

    2005-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu volcano, an Antarctic submarine volcano, was dredged in May 2004 during cruise 04-04 of the RV Laurence M. Gould to determine rock, sediment composition and marine macroinvertebrate diversity. The objectives of this study are to examine the benthic assemblages and biodiversity present on a young volcano. The volcano is located on the continental shelf of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula, where recent changes in surface temperature and ice shelf stability have been observed. This volcano was originally swath-mapped during cruise 01-07 of the Research Vessel-Ice Breaker Nathaniel B. Palmer. During LMG04-04 we also studied the volcano using a SCUD video camera, and performed temperature surveys along the flanks and crest. Both the video and the dredge indicate a seafloor surface heavily colonized by benthic organisms. Indications of fairly recent lava flows are given by the absence of marine life on regions of the volcano. The recovered dredge material was sieved, and a total of thirty-three invertebrates were extracted. The compilation of invertebrate community data can subsequently be compared to other benthic invertebrate studies conducted along the peninsula, which can determine the regional similarity of communities over time, their relationship to environmental change and health, if any, and their relationship to geologic processes in Antarctic Sound. Twenty-two rock samples, all slightly weathered and half bearing encrusted organisms, were also analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Except for one conglomerate sample, all are alkali basalts and share similar elemental compositions with fresh, unweathered samples from the volcano. Two of the encrusted basalt samples have significantly different compositions than the rest. We speculate this difference could be due to water loss during sample preparation, loss of organic carbon trapped within the vesicles of the samples and/or elemental uptake by the

  13. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  14. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  15. Two-dimensional simulations of explosive eruptions of Kick-em Jenny and other submarine volcanos

    SciTech Connect

    Gisler, Galen R.; Weaver, R. P.; Mader, Charles L.; Gittings, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    Kick-em Jenny, in the Eastern Caribbean, is a submerged volcanic cone that has erupted a dozen or more times since its discovery in 1939. The most likely hazard posed by this volcano is to shipping in the immediate vicinity (through volcanic missiles or loss-of-buoyancy), but it is of interest to estimate upper limits on tsunamis that might be produced by a catastrophic explosive eruption. To this end, we have performed two-dimensional simulations of such an event in a geometry resembling that of Kick-em Jenny with our SAGE adaptive mesh Eulerian multifluid compressible hydrocode. We use realistic equations of state for air, water, and basalt, and follow the event from the initial explosive eruption, through the generation of a transient water cavity and the propagation of waves away from the site. We find that even for extremely catastrophic explosive eruptions, tsunamis from Kick-em Jenny are unlikely to pose significant danger to nearby islands. For comparison, we have also performed simulations of explosive eruptions at the much larger shield volcano Vailuluu in the Samoan chain, where the greater energy available can produce a more impressive wave. In general, however, we conclude that explosive eruptions do not couple well to water waves. The waves that are produced from such events are turbulent and highly dissipative, and don't propagate well. This is consistent with what we have found previously in simulations of asteroid-impact generated tsunamis. Non-explosive events, however, such as landslides or gas hydrate releases, do couple well to waves, and our simulations of tsunamis generated by subaerial and sub-aqueous landslides demonstrate this.

  16. Caldera structure of submarine Volcano #1 on the Tonga Arc at 21°09'S, southwestern Pacific: Analysis of multichannel seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Lee, Gwang-Hoon; Na, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Sub; Jang, Ugeun; Lee, Kyeong-Yong; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Chan-Hong; Jung, Seom-Kyu; Suk, Bong-Cool

    2013-08-01

    Volcano #1 is a large submarine stratovolcano with a summit caldera in the south central part of the Tonga Arc. We collected and analyzed multichannel seismic profiles in conjunction with magnetic data from Volcano #1 to investigate the structure of the intracaldera fill and processes of caldera formation. The intracaldera fill, exhibiting stratified units with a maximum thickness of 2 km, consists of at least four seismic units and a thick wedge of landslide debris derived from the caldera wall. The structural caldera floor, deepening toward the northwestern rim, suggests asymmetric collapse in the initial stage, which, in turn, appears to have contributed to the creation of a caldera elongated to the northwest by enhancing gravitational instability along the northwestern caldera boundary. Occasional, but repeated, eruptions resulted in a thick accumulation of the intracaldera fill and further subsidence in the mode of piston collapse. Magnetization lows are well-defined along the structural rim of the caldera that is interpreted as the inner principal ring fault. The magnetization lows indicate sites of submarine hydrothermal vents that caused an alteration of magnetic minerals. Faults recognized on the outer slope of the volcano are interpreted to be involved in hydrothermal fluid circulation.

  17. The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island: effects on the scattering migrant biota and the evolution of the pelagic communities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  18. The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island: effects on the scattering migrant biota and the evolution of the pelagic communities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community.

  19. The Submarine Volcano Eruption off El Hierro Island: Effects on the Scattering Migrant Biota and the Evolution of the Pelagic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  20. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    People on the Island of Hawai'i face many hazards that come with living on or near active volcanoes. These include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and tsunamis (giant seawaves). As the population of the island grows, the task of reducing the risk from volcano hazards becomes increasingly difficult. To help protect lives and property, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory closely monitor and study Hawai'i's volcanoes and issue timely warnings of hazardous activity.

  1. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity. PMID:21382146

  2. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity.

  3. Active monitoring at an active volcano: amplitude-distance dependence of ACROSS at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Koshun; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Kunitomo, Takahiro; Michishita, Tsuyoshi; Ikuta, Ryoya; Iguchi, Masato

    2014-12-01

    First testing of volcanic activity monitoring with a system of continuously operatable seismic sources, named ACROSS, was started at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan. Two vibrators were deployed on the northwestern flank of the volcano, with a distance of 3.6 km from the main crater. We successfully completed the testing of continuous operation from 12 June to 18 September 2012, with a single frequency at 10.01 Hz and frequency modulation from 10 to 15 Hz. The signal was detected even at a station that is 28 km from the source, establishing the amplitude decay relation as a function of distance in the region in and around Sakurajima Volcano. We compare the observed amplitude decay with the prediction that was made before the deployment as a feasible study. In the prediction, we used the existing datasets by an explosion experiment in Sakurajima and the distance-dependent amplitude decay model that was established for the ACROSS source in the Tokai region. The predicted amplitude in Sakurajima is systematically smaller than that actually observed, but the dependence on distance is consistent with the observation. On the basis of the comparison of the noise level in Sakurajima Volcano, only 1-day stacking of data is necessary to reduce the noise to the level that is comparable to the signal level at the stations in the island.

  4. Lavas from Active Boninite and Very Recent Basalt Eruptions at Two Submarine NE Lau Basin Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Clague, D. A.; Resing, J. A.; Michael, P. J.; Keller, N. S.; Baker, E. T.

    2009-12-01

    Very young submarine lava flows were discovered at two sites in the NE Lau Basin during a May 2009 NSF-NOAA expedition. The multidisciplinary rapid response expedition was organized to investigate these sites based on chemical and physical water column signatures observed during a NOAA-led regional study in Nov. 2008. An active eruption was discovered and observed for 5 days in May 2009 at W. Mata volcano, just behind the northernmost segment of the Tofua arc. The ongoing eruption produced extrusive and pyroclastic deposits from multiple vents near the 1200m depth summit of the volcano. Lavas were sampled from the summit and volcano flanks using the ROV Jason II. The samples indicate that W. Mata is currently erupting orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene-olivine porphyritic boninite magmas, which is also the predominant rock composition elsewhere on the seamount. The youngest lavas are very fresh, highly vesicular (up to ~30%) and occur as predominantly pillow and lobate forms, sometimes mantled by very young pyroclastic deposits and/or thin chemical coatings of presumed microbial and/or inorganic origin. The coatings and pyroclast apron make it difficult to map the extent of the youngest deposits by visual indicators alone, so we are currently dating 7 well-distributed samples from the W. Mata summit by 210Po-210Pb chronology. Very preliminary age results indicate that samples collected near the active vents are <1 month old, although samples collected further afield erupted sometime between early 2009 and Fall 2008, implying either that active vents have migrated or that lavas flowed farther from the vents in earlier eruptive phases. Extremely fresh but no longer active lava flows were also discovered along 2 km of the NE Lau Spreading Center axis, at 1600m water depth. The highly vesicular and sparsely phyric basalts occur as a series of high effusion rate sheets and lobates at vent-proximal sites along the ridge axis, transitional to pillows in distal locations. Very

  5. July 1973 ground survey of active Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground survey has shown that thermal anomalies of various sizes associated with volcanic activity at several Central American volcanoes should be detectable from Skylab. Anomalously hot areas of especially large size (greater than 500 m in diameter) are now found at Santiaguito and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala and San Cristobal in Nicaragua. Smaller anomalous areas are to be found at least seven other volcanoes. This report is completed after ground survey of eleven volcanoes and ground-based radiation thermometry mapping at these same points.

  6. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Exhibit That Simulates Making an ROV Dive to a Submarine Volcano, Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center, Newport, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.; Hanshumaker, W.; Osis, V.; Hamilton, C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a new interactive exhibit in which the user can sit down and simulate that they are making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. This new public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The exhibit is designed to look like the real ROPOS control console and includes three video monitors, a PC, a DVD player, an overhead speaker, graphic panels, buttons, lights, dials, and a seat in front of a joystick. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. The user can choose between 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the joystick. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are going or what they are looking at. After the user is finished exploring the dive site they end the dive by leaving the bottom and watching the ROV being recovered onto the ship at the surface. The user can then choose a different dive or make the same dive again. Within the three simulated dives there are a total of 6 arrival and departure movies, 7 seafloor panoramas, 12 travel movies, and 23 ROPOS video clips. The exhibit software was created

  7. Digital data set of volcano hazards for active Cascade Volcanos, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.

    1996-01-01

    Scientists at the Cascade Volcano Observatory have completed hazard assessments for the five active volcanos in Washington. The five studies included Mount Adams (Scott and others, 1995), Mount Baker (Gardner and others, 1995), Glacier Peak (Waitt and others, 1995), Mount Rainier (Hoblitt and others, 1995) and Mount St. Helens (Wolfe and Pierson, 1995). Twenty Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets have been created that represent the hazard information from the assessments. The twenty data sets have individual Open File part numbers and titles

  8. Active submarine volcanism on the Society hotspot swell (west Pacific): A geochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Devey, C.W.; Albarede, F.; Michard, A. ); Cheminee, J.L. ); Muehe, R.; Stoffers, P. )

    1990-04-10

    The present work deals with the petrography and geochemistry of lavas dredged from five active submarine volcanoes (named Mehetia, Moua Pihaa, Rocard, Teahitia, and Cyana) from the southeast end of the Society Islands hotspot trace. Most samples are basic and alkaline. Fractionation modelling based on major and minor compatible element variations suggests that olivine and minor clinopyroxene were the major fractionating phases. Rocard and Cyana have yielded more evolved, trachy-phonolitic, glassy samples. Both basaltic and phonolitic samples are incompatible-element enriched. The trachy-phonolite patterns show middle (REE) depletion and negative Eu anomalies. The Moua Pihaa basalts have flatter patterns than the other basalts. All smaples, with the exception of a sample from Moua Pihaa which has elevated {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, fall on linear Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic arrays, suggesting two end-member mixing. The Sr isotopic variations in the samples excluding Moua Pihaa correlate positively with Rb/Nb, Pb/Ce, and SiO{sub 2} variations, idicating a component of mantle enriched by injection of material from a subducted oceanic slab. Correlation of {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr suggests that the subducted material is geochemically old. The absence of a MORB component in the Society magmatism, the small volumes of the Polynesian hotspot volcanoes, and the lack of more intense volcanic activity near the center of the Pacific Superswell, all lead to the conclusion that the latter is unlikely to be caused by a large convective plume.

  9. Geochemistry of Fresh Submarine HSDP-2 Glasses from Mauna Kea Volcano: Unexpected Mobility of 'Immobile' Trace Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, M. A.; Jochum, K. P.; Stoll, B.; Willbold, M.; Sobolev, A. V.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2002-12-01

    The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project-2 provides the opportunity to investigate the geochemical evolution of the submarine section of Mauna Kea. Our previous analyses of bulk-rock trace element concentrations had revealed relatively high degrees of scatter of trace element ratios such as Th/U, Ta/U and even Nb/Ta, and we suspected that many of the samples had been affected by seawater alteration. Fortunately, fresh glasses are found throughout the drill core in many glass-rich hyaloclastic and pillow basalts with glass proportions up to 10%. We therefore determined incompatible trace elements such as Th, U, Nb, Ta, Zr, Ba, Pb, Rb in carefully handpicked, fresh glasses in 16 samples derived from depths between 1310 m and 3050 m. The samples were crushed to less than 0.425 mm grain size in order to obtain very fresh glass fragments free of contamination by alteration products, olivines or other minerals. The glass fractions and their corresponding bulk samples were analyzed for major and trace elements by EMP, MIC-SSMS and HR-ICPMS. The differences between glass and bulk are particularly obvious in Pb, Rb, Cs and U. As expected, Pb, Rb and Cs were found to be mobile, with concentrations in the bulk samples varying by up to a factor of 5 relative to the glass samples. Similarly, U concentrations in glass are up to a factor of 2 higher than in bulk samples. More surprising is the observation that Th and Ta are quite probably mobile, because these elements are normally believed to be immobile. However, these results are consistent with those of Bienvenue et al. (1990), who found that Th appears to be sensitive to seawater alteration. Our glass data indicate that Ta/U (3.7+/-0.2) is uniform along the sequence, in contrast to the bulk data which show a large scatter (3.7-6.5). Th/U ratios in the glasses show a maximum (~3.5) at a depth of ~2100 m, whereas low ratios of about 3 were found in depths of 1300-1400 m and 2800-3000 m. The high Th/U ratios in the 2100 m region

  10. Global data collection and the surveillance of active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    Data relay systems on existing earth-orbiting satellites provide an inexpensive way to collect environmental data from numerous remote sites around the world. This technology could be used effectively for fundamental monitoring of most of the world's active volcanoes. Such global monitoring would focus attention on the most dangerous volcanoes that are likely to significantly impact the geosphere and the biosphere. ?? 1990.

  11. Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; ,

    1998-01-01

    Volcanoes destroy and volcanoes create. The catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, made clear the awesome destructive power of a volcano. Yet, over a time span longer than human memory and record, volcanoes have played a key role in forming and modifying the planet upon which we live. More than 80 percent of the Earth's surface--above and below sea level--is of volcanic origin. Gaseous emissions from volcanic vents over hundreds of millions of years formed the Earth's earliest oceans and atmosphere, which supplied the ingredients vital to evolve and sustain life. Over geologic eons, countless volcanic eruptions have produced mountains, plateaus, and plains, which subsequent erosion and weathering have sculpted into majestic landscapes and formed fertile soils.

  12. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  13. Olivine-rich submarine basalts from the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano: Implications for magmatic processes and geochemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael O.; Hulsebosch, Thomas P.; Rhodes, J. Michael

    The east Ka Lae landslide on the submarine south flank of Mauna Loa exposed a 1.3 km thick section into the interior of its southwest rift zone. We sampled this section in four dredge hauls and four submersible dives and made a multibeam survey of the rift zone. New magnetic data and our observations and bathymetric results indicate that the axis of the southwest rift is two to three kilometers west of the present topographic high. Our submersible observations of old beach deposits and the low sulfur content of pillow-rim glasses indicate that this portion of the southwest rift zone has subsided >400 m. Olivine-rich basalts are extremely abundant along the submarine portion of Mauna Loa's southwest rift zone but their abundance decreases significantly in the upper parts of the two sections examined. This change probably occurred, ˜60 ka when Mauna Loa's eruption rate slowed and was unable to keep up with its subsidence rate. The dense magmas for these olivine-rich basalts were probably intruded into the deeper portions of the rift zones and erupted from its distal regions during periods of high magma supply. The preferential eruption of olivine-rich lavas on the flanks of Mauna Loa and other Hawaiian volcanoes is a strong indication that a density filter operates within these volcanoes. These lavas contain abundant euhedral, undeforrned olivine with high forsterite contents (typically 90%). Some of these olivines grew in magmas with 17.5 wt% MgO at temperatures of 1415°C, indicating that Hawaiian tholeiitic magmas are some of the most mafic and hottest magmas erupted during the Cenozoic. All of the submarine lavas have major element contents typical of Mauna Loa, but unlike its subaerial lavas, some of the submarine lavas have trace element and isotope ratios that overlap with those of Kilauea lavas. Thus, the source for Mauna Loa contained a Kilauea-like component that has been consumed during the last hundred thousand years, but the melt extraction conditions

  14. Using IMS hydrophone data for detecting submarine volcanic activity: Insights from Monowai, 26°S Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony B.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Rodgers, Mel; Paulatto, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Only little is known on active volcanism in the ocean. As eruptions are attenuated by seawater and fallout does not regularly reach the sea surface, eruption rates and mechanisms are poorly understood. Estimations on the number of active volcanoes across the modern seas range from hundreds to thousands, but only very few active sites are known. Monowai is a submarine volcanic centre in the northern Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of five days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic tertiary waves ('T-phases'), recorded at three broadband seismic stations in the region. We show, using windowed cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that T-phases associated with this eruption are detected as far as Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, where two bottom-moored hydrophone arrays are operated as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). We observe a high incidence of T-phase arrivals during the time of the eruption, with the angle of arrival stabilizing at the geodesic azimuth between the IMS arrays and Monowai. T-phases from the volcanic centre must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans and over a total geodesic range of approximately 15,800 km, one of the longest source-receiver distances of any naturally occurring underwater signal ever observed. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and two dimensional, long-range, parabolic equation modelling, highlight the exceptional capabilities of the hydroacoustic waveform component of the IMS for remotely detecting episodes of submarine volcanic activity. Using Monowai and the hydrophone arrays at Ascension Island as a natural laboratory, we investigate the long-term eruptive record of a submarine volcano from

  15. Scaling explosive activity at Stromboli Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    marchetti, emanuele; ripepe, maurizio

    2013-04-01

    Ordinary explosive activity at Stromboli volcano is sometimes interrupted by Paroxysms and more often by Major Explosions. Major explosion represent a primary element of risk, given the large amount of material ejected, able to reach Pizzo Sopra la Fossa and the other summit trails, and the frequency of occurrence (2.1 events/year). However, while paroxysms are easy to be identified and there is a general consensous on their occurrence this does not necessarily hold for Major Explosions. Generally, Major Explosions are defined as based on the amount of material emitted and on the area covered by the ejecta dispersal, as well as on the properties of material emitted, but this is not always possible nor suitable for a near-real time information delivery to Civil Defence Authorities. With this purpose we have analyzed the seismic, tilt and infrasonic data collected at Stromboli since 2008 for a total database >400000 events to provide a geophysical classification of major explosions. We assumed that seismic (in the VLP band), ground tilt, and the acoustic excess pressure are efficient signals to discriminate different explosive energy. We show how ordinary activity is confined below a seismic VLP ground displacement of 8x10-6 m, a deformation of 0.25 μrad and an infrasonic excess pressure of 100 Pa. A separate cluster of events, characterized by tilt and seismic displacement significantly larger than these threshold are defined as Major Explosions. Here we propose these threshold can be used to quantitatively discriminate between ordinary activity and Major explosions. While above these precise threshold we have several explosions which can be considered as Major Explosions, the two paroxysms are associated to orders of magnitude (ground displacement of 10-3 m and tilt of 10 μrad) larger ground tilt and seismic VLP displacement. Besides our classification is suggesting the existence of a possible energy gap between Major and Paroxysms explosive dynamics which has

  16. Distribution of trace elements including tellurium, gallium, indium, and select REE in sulfide chimneys from Brothers submarine volcano, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkenbosch, H. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; McNeill, A.; Goemann, K.; Gemmell, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Brothers volcano is a dacitic volcano located along the Kermadec arc, New Zealand, and hosts the NW Caldera hydrothermal vent field perched on part of the steep caldera walls. The field strikes for ~600 m between depths of 1550 and 1700 m and includes numerous, active, high-temperature (max 302°C) chimneys and even more dead, sulfide-rich spires. Chimney samples collected from Brothers show distinct mineralogical zonation reflecting gradients in oxidation state, temperature, and pH from the inner walls in contact with hydrothermal fluids through to the outer walls in contact with seawater. Minerals deposited from hotter fluids (e.g., chalcopyrite) are located in the interior of the chimneys and are surrounded by an external zone of minerals deposited by cooler fluids (e.g., sulfates, sphalerite). Four chimneys types are identified at Brothers volcano based on the relative proportions of chalcopyrite and sulfate layers, and the presence or absence of anhydrite. Two are Cu-rich, i.e., chalcopyrite-rich and chalcopyrite-bornite-rich chimneys, and two are Zn-rich, i.e., sphalerite-rich and sphalerite-chalcopyrite-rich. Barite and anhydrite are common to both Cu-rich chimney types whereas Zn-rich chimneys contain barite only. The main mineral phases in all the chimneys are anhydrite, barite, chalcopyrite, pyrite/marcasite, and sphalerite. Trace minerals include galena, covellite, tennantite, realgar, chalcocite, bornite, hematite, goethite, Pb-As sulfosalts, and Bi- or Au-tellurides. The vast majority of tellurides are <5 μm in size, although columnar crystals up to 80 μm long have been observed. The tellurides commonly form in bands, cluster in patches, or occur along internal grain boundaries within chalcopyrite. They also are found at the contact between chalcopyrite and pyrite grains. In sulfate layers adjacent to the chalcopyrite zones tellurides can occur as inclusions in anhydrite, barite or pyrite and/or occupy void space within the chimney. One Cu

  17. Hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines): Implications to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Alanis, P. B.; Yamaya, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Bornas, M. V.; Cordon, J. M.; Puertollano, J.; Clarito, C. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Mogi, T.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The first recorded eruption was in 1573. Since then it has erupted 33 times resulting in thousands of casualties and large damages to property. In 1995, it was declared as one of the 15 Decade Volcanoes. Beginning in the early 1990s it has experienced several phases of abnormal activity, including seismic swarms, episodes of ground deformation, ground fissuring and hydrothermal activities, which continues up to the present. However, it has been noted that past historical eruptions of Taal Volcano may be divided into 2 distinct cycles, depending on the location of the eruption center, either at Main Crater or at the flanks. Between 1572-1645, eruptions occurred at the Main Crater, in 1707 to 1731, they occurred at the flanks. In 1749, eruptions moved back to the Main Crater until 1911. During the 1965 and until the end of the 1977 eruptions, eruptive activity once again shifted to the flanks. As part of the PHIVOLCS-JICA-SATREPS Project magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric surveys were conducted on Volcano Island in March 2011 and March 2012. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion and 3-D forward modeling reveals a prominent and large zone of relatively high resistivity between 1 to 4 kilometers beneath the volcano almost directly beneath the Main Crater, surrounded by zones of relatively low resistivity. This anomalous zone of high resistivity is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir filled with volcanic fluids. The presence of this large hydrothermal reservoir could be related to past activities of Taal Volcano. In particular we believe that the catastrophic explosion described during the 1911 eruption was the result of the hydrothermal reservoir collapsing. During the cycle of Main Crater eruptions, this hydrothermal reservoir is depleted, while during a cycle of flank eruptions this reservoir is replenished with hydrothermal fluids.

  18. Temporary seismic networks on active volcanoes of Kamchatka (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Abkadyrov, Ilyas; Shapiro, Nikolay; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Deev, Evgeny; Gordeev, Evgeny; Chebrov, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    We present details of four field campaigns carried out on different volcanoes of Kamchatka in 2012-2015. Each campaign was performed in three main steps: (i) installation of the temporary network of seismic stations; (ii) autonomous continuous registration of three component seismic signal; (III) taking off the network and downloading the registered data. During the first campaign started in September 2012, 11 temporary stations were installed over the Avacha group of volcanoes located 30 km north to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in addition to the seven permanent stations operated by the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey (KBGS). Unfortunately, with this temporary network we faced with two obstacles. The first problem was the small amount of local earthquakes, which were detected during operation time. The second problem was an unexpected stop of several stations only 40 days after deployment. Nevertheless, after taking off the network in August 2013, the collected data appeared to be suitable for analysis using ambient noise. The second campaign was conducted in period from August 2013 to August 2014. In framework of the campaign, 21 temporary stations were installed over Gorely volcano, located 70 km south to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Just in time of the network deployment, Gorely Volcano became very seismically active - every day occurred more than 100 events. Therefore, we obtain very good dataset with information about thousands of local events, which could be used for any type of seismological analysis. The third campaign started in August 2014. Within this campaign, we have installed 19 temporary seismic stations over Tolbachik volcano, located on the south side of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group. In the same time on Tolbachik volcano were installed four temporary stations and several permanent stations operated by the KBGS. All stations were taking off in July 2015. As result, we have collected a large dataset, which is now under preliminary analysis

  19. Measuring thermal budgets of active volcanoes by satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L.; Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper measurements of the total radiant energy flux Q at Lascar volcano in north Chile for December 1984 are reported. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestion that a lava lake is the source of a reported thermal budget anomaly, and with values for 1985-1986 that are much lower, suggesting that fumarolic activity was then a more likely heat source. The results show that satellite remote sensing may be used to monitor the activity of a volcano quantitatively, in a way not possible by conventional ground studies, and may provide a method for predicting eruptions.

  20. Prokaryotic diversity and metabolically active microbial populations in sediments from an active mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Robert J; Mills, Heath J; Story, Sandra; Sobecky, Patricia A

    2006-10-01

    In this study, ribosomes and genomic DNA were extracted from three sediment depths (0-2, 6-8 and 10-12 cm) to determine the vertical changes in the microbial community composition and identify metabolically active microbial populations in sediments obtained from an active seafloor mud volcano site in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Domain-specific Bacteria and Archaea 16S polymerase chain reaction primers were used to amplify 16S rDNA gene sequences from extracted DNA. Complementary 16S ribosomal DNA (crDNA) was obtained from rRNA extracted from each sediment depth that had been subjected to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification. Twelve different 16S clone libraries, representing the three sediment depths, were constructed and a total of 154 rDNA (DNA-derived) and 142 crDNA (RNA-derived) Bacteria clones and 134 rDNA and 146 crDNA Archaea clones obtained. Analyses of the 576 clones revealed distinct differences in the composition and patterns of metabolically active microbial phylotypes relative to sediment depth. For example, epsilon-Proteobacteria rDNA clones dominated the 0-2 cm clone library whereas gamma-Proteobacteria dominated the 0-2 cm crDNA library suggesting gamma to be among the most active in situ populations detected at 0-2 cm. Some microbial lineages, although detected at a frequency as high as 9% or greater in the total DNA library (i.e. Actinobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria), were markedly absent from the RNA-derived libraries suggesting a lack of in situ activity at any depth in the mud volcano sediments. This study is one of the first to report the composition of the microbial assemblages and physiologically active members of archaeal and bacterial populations extant in a Gulf of Mexico submarine mud volcano. PMID:16958759

  1. Volcanic Activities of Hakkoda Volcano after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake of 11 March 2011 generated large deformation in and around the Japanese islands, and the large crustal deformation raises fear of further disasters including triggered volcanic activities. In this presentation, as an example of such potential triggered volcanic activities, we report the recent seismic activities of Hakkoda volcano, and discuss the relation to the movement of volcanic fluids. Hakkoda volcano is a group of stratovolcanoes at the northern end of Honshu Island, Japan. There are fumaroles and hot springs around the volcano, and phreatic eruptions from Jigoku-numa on the southwestern flank of Odake volcano, which is the highest peak of the volcanic group, were documented in its history. Since just after the occurrence of the Tohokui Earthquake, the seismicity around the volcano became higher, and the migration of hypocenters of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes was observed.In addition to these VT earthquakes, long-period (LP) events started occurring beneath Odake at a depth of about 2-3 km since February, 2013, and subtle crustal deformation caused by deep inflation source was also detected by the GEONET GNSS network around the same time. The spectra of LP events are common between events irrespective of the magnitude of events, and they have several spectral peaks at 6-7 sec, 2-3 sec, 1 sec, and so on. These LP events sometimes occur like a swarm with an interval of several minutes. The characteristics of observed LP events at Hakkoda volcano are similar to those of LP events at other active volcanoes and hydrothermal area in the world, where abundant fluids exist. Our further analysis using far-field Rayleigh radiation pattern observed by NIED Hi-net stations reveals that the source of LP events is most likely to be a nearly vertical tensile crack whose strike is NE-SW direction. The strike is almost perpendicular to the direction of maximum extensional strain estimated from the geodetic analysis, and is almost parallel to

  2. Reconstructing Final H2O Contents of Hydrated Rhyolitic Glasses: Insights into H2O Degassing and Eruptive Style of Silicic Submarine Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Nichols, A. R.; Tani, K.; Llewellin, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    H2O degassing influences the evolution of magma viscosity and vesicularity during ascent through the crust, and ultimately the eruptive style. Investigating H2O degassing requires data on both initial and final H2O contents. Initial H2O contents are revealed by melt inclusion data, while final H2O contents are found from dissolved H2O contents of volcanic glass. However volcanic glasses, particularly of silicic composition, are susceptible to secondary hydration i.e. the addition of H2O from the surrounding environment at ambient temperature during the time following pyroclast deposition. Obtaining meaningful final H2O data therefore requires distinguishing between the original final dissolved H2O content and the H2O added subsequently during hydration. Since H2O added during hydration is added as molecular H2O (H2Om), and the species interconversion between H2Om and hydroxyl (OH) species is negligible at ambient temperature, the final OH content of the glass remains unaltered during hydration. By using H2O speciation models to find the original H2Om content that would correspond to the measured OH content of the glass, the original total H2O (H2Ot) content of the glass prior to hydration can be reconstructed. These H2O speciation data are obtained using FTIR spectroscopy. In many cases, particularly where vesicular glasses necessitate thin wafers, OH cannot be measured directly and instead is calculated indirectly as OH = H2Ot - H2Om. Here we demonstrate the importance of using a speciation-dependent H2Ot molar absorptivity coefficient to obtain accurate H2Ot and H2O speciation data and outline a methodology for calculating such a coefficient for rhyolite glasses, with application to hydrated silicic pumice from submarine volcanoes in the Japanese Izu-Bonin Arc. Although hydrated pumice from Kurose Nishi and Oomurodashi now contain ~1.0 - 2.5 wt% H2Ot, their pre-hydration final H2O contents were typically ~0.3 - 0.4 wt% H2Ot. Furthermore, we show that pre

  3. Monitoring volcano activity through Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, C.; Montalto, P.; Prestifilippo, M.; Aliotta, M.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.

    2013-12-01

    During 2011-2013, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by cyclic occurrences of lava fountains, totaling to 38 episodes. During this time interval Etna volcano's states (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN), whose automatic recognition is very useful for monitoring purposes, turned out to be strongly related to the trend of RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area. Since RMS time series behavior is considered to be stochastic, we can try to model the system generating its values, assuming to be a Markov process, by using Hidden Markov models (HMMs). HMMs are a powerful tool in modeling any time-varying series. HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observed emissions. In our framework, observed emissions are characters generated by the SAX (Symbolic Aggregate approXimation) technique, which maps RMS time series values with discrete literal emissions. The experiments show how it is possible to guess volcano states by means of HMMs and SAX.

  4. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while

  5. Linking petrology and seismology at an active volcano.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate; Blundy, Jon; Dohmen, Ralf; Cashman, Kathy

    2012-05-25

    Many active volcanoes exhibit changes in seismicity, ground deformation, and gas emissions, which in some instances arise from magma movement in the crust before eruption. An enduring challenge in volcano monitoring is interpreting signs of unrest in terms of the causal subterranean magmatic processes. We examined over 300 zoned orthopyroxene crystals from the 1980-1986 eruption of Mount St. Helens that record pulsatory intrusions of new magma and volatiles into an existing larger reservoir before the eruption occurred. Diffusion chronometry applied to orthopyroxene crystal rims shows that episodes of magma intrusion correlate temporally with recorded seismicity, providing evidence that some seismic events are related to magma intrusion. These time scales are commensurate with monitoring signals at restless volcanoes, thus improving our ability to forecast volcanic eruptions by using petrology. PMID:22628652

  6. Linking petrology and seismology at an active volcano.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate; Blundy, Jon; Dohmen, Ralf; Cashman, Kathy

    2012-05-25

    Many active volcanoes exhibit changes in seismicity, ground deformation, and gas emissions, which in some instances arise from magma movement in the crust before eruption. An enduring challenge in volcano monitoring is interpreting signs of unrest in terms of the causal subterranean magmatic processes. We examined over 300 zoned orthopyroxene crystals from the 1980-1986 eruption of Mount St. Helens that record pulsatory intrusions of new magma and volatiles into an existing larger reservoir before the eruption occurred. Diffusion chronometry applied to orthopyroxene crystal rims shows that episodes of magma intrusion correlate temporally with recorded seismicity, providing evidence that some seismic events are related to magma intrusion. These time scales are commensurate with monitoring signals at restless volcanoes, thus improving our ability to forecast volcanic eruptions by using petrology.

  7. Analysis of active volcanoes from the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Rowland, Scott; Crisp, Joy; Glaze, Lori; Jones, Kenneth; Kahle, Anne; Pieri, David; Zebker, Howard; Krueger, Arlin; Walter, Lou

    1991-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) scheduled for launch in 1997 and 1999 is briefly described, and the EOS volcanology investigation objectives are discussed. The volcanology investigation will include long- and short-term monitoring of selected volcanoes, the detection of precursor activity associated with unanticipated eruptions, and a detailed study of on-going eruptions. A variety of instruments on the EOS platforms will enable the study of local- and regional-scale thermal and deformational features of volcanoes, and the chemical and structural features of volcanic eruption plumes and aerosols.

  8. Volcano-seismic activity before and after the Maule 2010 Earthquake (Southern Chile): a comparison between Llaima and Villarrica volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Stock, C.; Thorwart, M.; Wunderlich, T.; Bredemeyer, S.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    Llaima and Villarrica are two of the most actives volcanoes in the Southern Volcanic Zone in the Chilean Andes, with different type of activity and edifice. Llaima is a close vent volcano with constant seismic activity, while Villarrica is an open vent volcano with lava lake at the summit and constant degassing. The relation between volcano eruptions following a great earthquake has been studied in different cases around the world, and it has been the case for the 1960 Valdivia earthquake in southern Chile, where Llaima and Villarrica presented eruptions on the following months to years. This study is focused on characterizing the volcano-seismic activity in the months before and after the M8.8 Maule earthquake on the 27th February 2010. Time series for tremors, long period and volcano tectonic events were obtained from the catalogue of the Volcanic Observatory of the Southern Andes (OVDAS in Spanish) and from the continuous record of the SFB 574 temporary volcanic network. In Villarrica volcano, peaks of activity of tremor and long period events were observed months prior to and after the earthquake, followed by degassing activity, which is consistent with an increase in the activity related to fluids (gas and magma). While in Llaima volcano, a high increase in the volcano tectonic activity was observed directly after the earthquake, consistent with a possible structural adjustment response. The values for pressure change and normal stress were calculated for the Maule earthquake (M8.8) giving results two orders of magnitude lower in comparison to the ones obtained for Valdivia earthquake (M9.5). Finally, these changes in the seismic behavior had lasted over a year, than it is possible to state that the Maule earthquake affected Llaima and Villarrica in some way due to static stress, but given the location and the insufficient critical state of both edifices, it was not possible to generate a great eruption.

  9. Research activities on submarine landslides in gentle continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Goto, S.; Miyata, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Kitahara, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In the north Sanrikuoki Basin off Shimokita Peninsula, NE Japan, a great number of buried large slump deposits have been identified in the Pliocene and younger formations. The basin has formed in a very gentle continental slope of less than one degree in gradient and is composed of well-stratified formations which basically parallel to the present seafloor. This indicates that the slumping have also occurred in such very gentle slope angle. The slump units and their slip surfaces have very simple and clear characteristics, such as layer-parallel slip on the gentle slope, regularly imbricated internal structure, block-supported with little matrix structure, widespread dewatering structure, and low-amplitude slip surface layer. We recognize that the large slump deposits group of layer-parallel slip in this area is an appropriate target to determine 'mechanism of submarine landslides', that is one of the subjects on the new IODP science plan for 2013 and beyond. So, we started some research activities to examine the feasibility of the future scientific drilling. The slump deposits were recognized basically by 3D seismic analysis. Further detailed seismic analysis using 2D seismic data in wider area of the basin is being performed for better understanding of geologic structure of the sedimentary basin and the slump deposits. This will be good source to extract suitable locations for drill sites. Typical seismic features and some other previous studies imply that the formation fluid in this study area is strongly related to natural gas, of which condition is strongly affected by temperature. So, detailed heat flow measurements was performed in the study area in 2013. For that purpose, a long-term water temperature monitoring system was deployed on the seafloor in October, 2012. The collected water temperature variation is applied to precise correction of heat flow values. Vitrinite reflectance analysis is also being carried out using sediments samples recovered by IODP

  10. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island

  11. Investigating the active hydrothermal field of Kolumbo Volcano using CTD profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni Christopoulou, Maria; Mertzimekis, Theo; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The submarine Kolumbo volcano NE of Santorini Island and the unique active hydrothermal vent field on its crater field (depth ~ 500 m) have been recently explored in multiple cruises aboard E/V Nautilus. ROV explorations showed the existence of extensive vent activity and almost completely absence of vent-specific macrofauna. Gas discharges have been found to be 99%-rich in CO2, which is sequestered at the bottom of the crater due to a special combination of physicochemical and geomorphological factors. The dynamic conditions existing along the water column in the crater have been studied in detail by means of temperature, salinity and conductivity depth profiles for the first time. CTD sensors aboard the ROV Hercules were employed to record anomalies in those parameters in an attempt to investigate several active and inactive vent locations. Temporal CTD monitoring inside and outside of the crater was carried out over a period of two years. Direct comparison between the vent field and locations outside the main cone, where no hydrothermal activity is known to exist, showed completely different characteristics. CTD profiles above the active vent field (NNE side) are correlated to Kolumbo's cone morphology. The profiles suggest the existence of four distinct zones of physicochemical properties in the water column. The layer directly above the chimneys exhibit gas discharges highly enriched in CO2. Continuous gas motoring is essential to identify the onset of geological hazards in the region.

  12. Open-System Magma Reservoir Affects Gas Segregation, Vesiculation, Fragmentation and Lava/Pyroclast Dispersal During the 1.2 km-deep 2007-2010 Submarine Eruption at West Mata Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Soule, S. A.; Resing, J.

    2014-12-01

    West Mata, a small, active rear-arc volcano in the NE Lau Basin, erupts crystal and gas rich boninite magma. Eruptions were observed at the summit (1.2 km water depth) during 5 ROV Jason dives in 2009 (the deepest erupting submarine volcano observed to date). Subsequent ROV and ship-based bathymetric mapping revealed that a pit crater formed and the summit eruption ceased in 2010, with roughly simultaneous eruptions along the SW rift zone. During the summit eruption, a combination of water depth, H2O-CO2-rich and high crystallinity magma, a split in the conduit to feed two vent sites, and waxing/waning magma supply led to a range of effusive/explosive eruption styles and volcanic deposit types. The 2-3 vent Hades cluster and the lone Prometheus vent had different eruption characteristics. Petrographic, petrologic and geochemical studies of erupted products indicate a change in magma composition in time and space over a period of 3.5 yrs, suggesting a small, open-system magma reservoir within the volcano. Prometheus (1174m depth) produced mostly pyroclastic material during our observations (e.g., highly vesicular glowing fluidal ejecta that cooled in the water column and rounded recycled dense clasts), but sampling and 210Po radiometric dating show that several months prior pillowed lava flows, subsequently covered with cm-sized pyroclasts, had flowed >50m from the vent. In contrast, vents at Hades (1200m depth) cycled between lava production and vigorous degassing, 10-20m high fire fountains and bursts of glowing lava-skinned bubbles, the products of which froze/broke in the water column, forming unstable cones of spatter and scoria near the vents. We hypothesize that bubbles collapse rather than form lava balloons because of skin brittleness (from high crystal content) and hydrostatic pressure. Clast settling times and patterns suggest >100m water column rise height for 10+ cm-sized fragments. Pillow flows were also observed to be issuing from the base of the

  13. Numerical model of heat conduction in active volcanoes induced by magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmojo, Antono Arif; Rosandi, Yudi

    2015-09-01

    We study the heat transfer mechanism of active volcanoes using the numerical thermal conduction model. A 2D model of volcano with its conduit filled by magma is considered, and acts as a constant thermal source. The temperature of the magma activity diffuses through the rock layers of the mountain to the surface. The conduction equation is solved using finite-difference method, with some adaptations to allow temperature to flow through different materials. Our model allows to simulate volcanoes having dikes, branch-pipes, and sills by constructing the domain appropriately, as well as layers with different thermal properties. Our research will show the possibility to monitor magma activity underneath a volcano by probing its surface temperature. The result of our work will be very useful for further study of volcanoes, eruption prediction, and volcanic disaster mitigation.

  14. The volcanic debris avalanche on the SE submarine slope of Nisyros volcano, Greece: geophysical exploration and implications for subaerial eruption history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livanos, Isidoros; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-12-01

    A spectacular hummocky topography was discovered offshore of the south-eastern slope of the Nisyros island volcano in the eastern sector of the Aegean volcanic arc in 2000-2001, using multibeam bathymetric mapping and seismic profiling, and interpreted as part of a volcanic debris avalanche originating onland. During E/V Nautilus cruise NA011 in 2010, a detailed side-scan sonar and ROV exploration aimed at evaluating the surface morphology of this avalanche field. Combining the new data with selected older datasets reveals that the debris avalanche is characterized by numerous (at least 78) variously sized and shaped hummocks. Some of these are distinctly round, either scattered or aligned in groups, whereas others are elongated in the form of ridges. This is consistent with existing models accounting for variations in the longitudinal and lateral velocity ratio of landslides. Maximum dimensions reach 60 m in height above the sea bottom, 220 m in length and 230 m in width. The structures outline a large tongue-shaped, submarine hummock field of about 22.2 km2, approx. 4.8 km wide and 4.6 km long and with an estimated volume of 0.277 km3. Due to its characteristic shape, the collapsed volcanic flank is interpreted to represent a singular failing event, involving a rapid and virtually instantaneous downslope movement of the slide mass into the sea. Indeed, the H/L (height of 280 m vs. run-out of 7 km) ratio for the Nisyros slide is 0.04; plotted against volume, this falls within the theoretical bounds as well as measured values typical of submarine landslides. The timing of the event is probably related to the extrusion of Nikia lavas and their subsequent failure and formation of a main scarp observed at about 120 m depth on an 8-km-long seismic profile and a map of slope angle distribution, at the depth where the palaeo-coastline was located 40 ka ago. An inferred age of ca. 40 ka for the avalanche awaits confirmation based on dating of core material.

  15. Near-bottom water column anomalies associated with active hydrothermal venting at Aeolian arc volcanoes, Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. L.; Carey, S.; Bell, K. L.; Baker, E. T.; Faure, K.; Rosi, M.; Marani, M.; Nomikou, P.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrothermal deposits such as metalliferous sediments, Fe-Mn crusts, and massive sulfides are common on the submarine volcanoes of the Aeolian arc (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), but the extent and style of active hydrothermal venting is less well known. A systematic water column survey in 2007 found helium isotope ratios indicative of active venting at 6 of the 9 submarine volcanoes surveyed plus the Marsili back-arc spreading center (Lupton et al., 2011). Other plume indicators, such as turbidity and temperature anomalies were weak or not detected. In September 2011, we conducted five ROV Hercules dives at Eolo, Enarete, and Palinuro volcanoes during an E/V Nautilus expedition. Additionally, two dives explored the Casoni seamount on the southern flank of Stromboli where a dredge returned apparently warm lava in 2002 (Gamberi, 2006). Four PMEL MAPRs, with temperature, optical backscatter (particles), and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensors, were arrayed along the lowermost 50 m of the Hercules/Argus cable during the dives to assess the relationship between seafloor observations and water column anomalies. Active venting was observed at each of the volcanoes visited. Particle anomalies were weak or absent, consistent with the 2007 CTD surveys, but ORP anomalies were common. Venting at Eolo volcano was characterized by small, localized patches of yellow-orange bacteria; living tubeworms were observed at one location. ORP anomalies (-1 to -22 mv) were measured at several locations, primarily along the walls of the crescent-shaped collapse area (or possible caldera) east of the Eolo summit. At Enarete volcano, we found venting fluids with temperatures up to 5°C above ambient as well as small, fragile iron-oxide chimneys. The most intense ORP anomaly (-140 mv) occurred at a depth of about 495 m on the southeast side of the volcano, with smaller anomalies (-10 to -20 mv) more common as the ROV moved upslope to the summit. At Palinuro volcano, multiple dives located

  16. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  17. Continuous gravity observations at active volcanoes through superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Greco, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous gravity measurements at active volcanoes are usually taken through spring gravimeters that are easily portable and do not require much power to work. However, intrinsic limitations dictate that, when used in continuous, these instruments do not provide high-quality data over periods longer than some days. Superconducting gravimeters (SG), that feature a superconducting sphere in a magnetic field as the proof mass, provide better-quality data than spring gravimeters, but are bigger and need mains electricity to work, implying that they cannot be installed close to the active structures of high volcanoes. An iGrav SG was installed on Mt. Etna (Italy) in September 2014 and has worked almost continuously since then. It was installed about 6km from the active craters in the summit zone of the volcano. Such distance is normally too much to observe gravity changes due to relatively fast (minutes to days) volcanic processes. Indeed, mass redistributions in the shallowest part of the plumbing system induce short-wavelength gravity anomalies, centered below the summit craters. Nevertheless, thanks to the high precision and long-term stability of SGs, it was possible to observe low-amplitude changes over a wide range of timescales (minutes to months), likely driven by volcanic activity. Plans are in place for the implementation of a mini-array of SGs at Etna.

  18. Rock magnetic and petrographical-mineralogical studies of the dredged rocks from the submarine volcanoes of the Sea-of-Okhotsk slope within the northern part of the Kuril Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, V. A.; Pilipenko, O. V.; Petrova, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The rock magnetic properties of the samples of dredged rocks composing the submarine volcanic edifices within the Sea-of-Okhotsk slope of the northern part of the Kuril Island Arc are studied. The measurements of the standard rock magnetic parameters, thermomagnetic analysis, petrographical studies, and microprobe investigations have been carried out. The magnetization of the studied rocks is mainly carried by the pseudo-single domain and multidomain titanomagnetite and low-Ti titanomagnetite grains. The high values of the natural remanent magnetization are due to the pseudo-single-domain structure of the titanomagnetite grains, whereas the high values of magnetic susceptibility are associated with the high concentration of ferrimagnetic grains. The highest Curie points are observed in the titanomagnetite grains of the igneous rocks composing the edifices of the Smirnov, Edelshtein, and 1.4 submarine volcanoes.

  19. Deep structure and origin of active volcanoes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2010-12-01

    Recent geophysical studies have provided important constraints on the deep structure and origin of the active intraplate volcanoes in Mainland China. Magmatism in the western Pacific arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab (e.g., Zhao et al., 2009a), while the intraplate magmatism in China has different origins. The active volcanoes in Northeast China (such as the Changbai and Wudalianchi) are caused by hot upwelling in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and deep slab dehydration as well (Zhao et al., 2009b). The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is caused by a similar process in the BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate) (Lei et al., 2009a). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China is a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume which may be associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle (Lei et al., 2009b; Zhao, 2009). The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which can trigger the upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and may cause the slab-plume interactions (Zhao, 2009). References Lei, J., D. Zhao, Y. Su, 2009a. Insight into the origin of the Tengchong intraplate volcano and seismotectonics in southwest China from local and teleseismic data. J. Geophys. Res. 114, B05302. Lei, J., D. Zhao, B. Steinberger et al., 2009b. New seismic constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Hainan plume. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 173, 33-50. Zhao, D., 2009. Multiscale seismic tomography and mantle dynamics. Gondwana Res. 15, 297-323. Zhao, D., Z. Wang, N. Umino, A. Hasegawa, 2009a. Mapping the mantle wedge and interplate thrust zone of the northeast Japan arc. Tectonophysics 467, 89-106. Zhao, D., Y. Tian, J. Lei, L. Liu, 2009b. Seismic

  20. Submarine seismic monitoring of El Hierro volcanic eruption with a 3C-geophone string: applying new acquisition and data processing techniques to volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lopez, Carmen; Blanco, Maria Jose; Crespo, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2011 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. Right after the eruption onset, in October 2011 a geophone string was deployed by the CSIC-IGN to monitor seismic activity. Monitoring with the seismic array continued till May 2012. The array was installed less than 2 km away from the new vol¬cano, next to La Restinga village shore in the harbor from 6 to 12m deep into the water. Our purpose was to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. Each geophone consists on a 3-component module based on 3 orthogonal independent sensors that measures ground velocity. Some of the geophones were placed directly on the seabed, some were buried. Due to different factors, as the irregular characteristics of the seafloor. The data was recorded on the surface with a seismometer and stored on a laptop computer. We show how acoustic data collected underwater show a great correlation with the seismic data recorded on land. Finally we compare our data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing). This evidence is disclosing new and innovative tecniques on monitoring submarine volcanic activity. Reference Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN), "Serie El Hierro." Internet: http://www.ign.es/ign/resources /volcanologia/HIERRO.html [May, 17. 2013

  1. Active Volcano Monitoring using a Space-based Hyperspectral Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipar, J. J.; Dunn, R.; Cooley, T.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanoes occur on every continent, often in close proximity to heavily populated areas. While ground-based studies are essential for scientific research and disaster mitigation, remote sensing from space can provide rapid and continuous monitoring of active and potentially active volcanoes [Ramsey and Flynn, 2004]. In this paper, we report on hyperspectral measurements of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Hyperspectral images obtained by the US Air Force TacSat-3/ARTEMIS sensor [Lockwood et al, 2006] are used to obtain estimates of the surface temperatures for the volcano. ARTEMIS measures surface-reflected light in the visible, near-infrared, and short-wave infrared bands (VNIR-SWIR). The SWIR bands are known to be sensitive to thermal radiation [Green, 1996]. For example, images from the NASA Hyperion hyperspectral sensor have shown the extent of wildfires and active volcanoes [Young, 2009]. We employ the methodology described by Dennison et al, (2006) to obtain an estimate of the temperature of the active region of Kilauea. Both day and night-time images were used in the analysis. To improve the estimate, we aggregated neighboring pixels. The active rim of the lava lake is clearly discernable in the temperature image, with a measured temperature exceeding 1100o C. The temperature decreases markedly on the exterior of the summit crater. While a long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensor would be ideal for volcano monitoring, we have shown that the thermal state of an active volcano can be monitored using the SWIR channels of a reflective hyperspectral imager. References: Dennison, Philip E., Kraivut Charoensiri, Dar A. Roberts, Seth H. Peterson, and Robert O. Green (2006). Wildfire temperature and land cover modeling using hyperspectral data, Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 100, pp. 212-222. Green, R. O. (1996). Estimation of biomass fire temperature and areal extent from calibrated AVIRIS spectra, in Summaries of the 6th Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, Pasadena, CA

  2. Shallow Submarine Hydrothermal Systems in the Aeolian Volcanic Arc, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Thomas; Petersen, Sven; Lackschewitz, Klas; Hügler, Michael; Hannington, Mark D.; Gemmell, J. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    The majority of known high-temperature hydrothermal vents occur at mid-ocean ridges and back-arc spreading centers, typically at water depths from 2000 to 4000 meters. Compared with 30 years of hydrothermal research along spreading centers in the deep parts of the ocean, exploration of the approximately 700 submarine arc volcanoes is relatively recent [de Ronde et al., 2003]. At these submarine arc volcanoes, active hydrothermal vents are located at unexpectedly shallow water depth (95% at <1600-meter depth), which has important consequences for the style of venting, the nature of associated mineral deposits, and the local biological communities. As part of an ongoing multinational research effort to study shallow submarine volcanic arcs, two hydrothermal systems in the submerged part of the Aeolian arc have been investigated in detail during research cruises by R/V Poseidon (July 2006) and R/V Meteor (August 2007). Comprehensive seafloor video surveys were conducted using a remotely operated vehicle, and drilling to a depth of 5 meters was carried out using a lander-type submersible drill. This research has resulted in the first detailed, three-dimensional documentation of shallow submarine hydrothermal systems on arc volcanoes.

  3. Dike propagation in active volcanoes: importance, evidence, models and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, V.

    2011-12-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes; therefore, better knowledge of dike propagation is crucial to improve our understanding of how magma is transferred and extruded at volcanoes. Dike pattern data from a few tens of active volcanic edifices show how dike propagation in a volcano is not a random process; rather, it depends from the following factors (listed in order of importance): the presence of relief, the shape of the edifice, the proximity to the surface, and regional tectonic control. Relief enhances the development of radial dikes, which may also cluster following volcano elongation or regional patterns. Dikes approaching the surface of volcanic edifices, regardless of their initial orientation, reorient to become radial (parallel to the maximum gravitational stress); in presence of scarps, dikes reorient subparallel to the scarp (perpendicular to the minimum gravitational stress). These relationships have been also observed or inferred during eruptions at Etna, Stromboli, Vesuvio (Italy), Erta Ale (Afar) and Faial (Azores). While numerical modelling of dike propagation remains challenging, analogue models of dike emplacement have been performed over a few decades, also supporting part of the above-described evidence. Analogue models have been mostly conducted injecting air or water within gelatine and, recently, injecting vegetable oil within sand. More sophisticated analogue modelling is foreseen for the future, using a more appropriate scaling, a larger sensitivity and providing a more quantitative approach in capturing relationships. More in general, future research on dikes should be devoted towards identifying dike propagation paths, dike arrest mechanisms, and likely locations of vent formation at specific volcanoes, to better aid hazards assessment.

  4. Venus lives!. [evidence for active volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles A.; Francis, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Observational evidence which supports the contention that Venus is a volcanically and tectonically active planet is discussed. It is argued that, although there are no observations to date that would prove that Venus has been volcanically active during the last decade, planetological studies presented evidence for youthful volcanic mountains on Venus: the surface of the northern quarter of Venus is considered to be younger than 1 Gy, and some units are likely to be much younger. Because of the small sizes of likely volcanic manifestations and the long intervals expected between eruptions, it is unlikely that any direct evidence of eruptions will be detected with existing and planned spacecraft. It is suggested that future studies of the dynamics and the chemical mixing of the Venusian atmosphere might supply an unequivocal evidence for active volcanism on this planet.

  5. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  6. Interagency collaboration on an active volcano: a case study at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Orlando, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Because Kilauea and Mauna Loa are included within the National Park, there is a natural intersection of missions for the National Park Service (NPS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). HAVO staff and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists have worked closely together to monitor and forecast multiple eruptions from each of these volcanoes since HAVO’s founding in 1916.

  7. A Broadly-Based Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring at the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Bevens, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, in cooperation with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program at HVO and CVO, offers a broadly based volcano hazards training program targeted toward scientists and technicians from developing nations. The program has been offered for 25 years and provides a hands-on introduction to a broad suite of volcano monitoring techniques, rather than detailed training with just one. The course content has evolved over the life of the program as the needs of the trainees have changed: initially emphasizing very basic monitoring techniques (e.g. precise leveling, interpretation of seismic drum records, etc.) but, as the level of sophistication of the trainees has increased, training in more advanced technologies has been added. Currently, topics of primary emphasis have included volcano seismology and seismic networks; acquisition and modeling of geodetic data; methods of analysis and monitoring of gas geochemistry; interpretation of volcanic deposits and landforms; training in LAHARZ, GIS mapping of lahar risks; and response to and management of volcanic crises. The course also provides training on public outreach, based on CSAV's Hawaii-specific hazards outreach programs, and volcano preparedness and interactions with the media during volcanic crises. It is an intensive eight week course with instruction and field activities underway 6 days per week; it is now offered in two locations, Hawaii Island, for six weeks, and the Cascades volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest, for two weeks, to enable trainees to experience field conditions in both basaltic and continental volcanic environments. The survival of the program for more than two decades demonstrates that a need for such training exists and there has been interaction and contribution to the program by the research community, however broader engagement with the latter continues to present challenges. Some of the reasons for this will be discussed.

  8. ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal activities using barite in sulfide deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, S.; Fujiwara, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Isono, Y.; Uchida, A.; Takamasa, A.; Nakai, S.

    2012-12-01

    The temporal change of submarine hydrothermal activities has been an important issue in the aspect of the evolution of hydrothermal systems which is related with ore formation (Urabe, 1995) and biological systems sustained by the chemical species arising from hydrothermal activities (Macdonald et al., 1980). Determining the ages of the hydrothermal deposit will provide essential information on such studies. Dating methods using disequilibrium between radioisotopes such as U-Th method (e.g. You and Bickle, 1998), 226}Ra-{210Pb and 228}Ra-{228Th method (e.g. Noguchi et al., 2011) have been applied to date submarine hydrothermal deposits. ESR (electron spin resonance) dating method is commonly applied to fossil teeth, shells, and quartz of Quaternay period where the natural accumulated dose is obtained from the intensities of the ESR signals which are created by natural radiation. The natural dose is divided by the dose rate to the mineral/sample to deduce the age. Okumura et al., (2010) made the first practical application of ESR (electron spin resonance) dating technique to a sample of submarine hydrothermal barite (BaSO4) to obtain preliminary ages, where Kasuya et al. (1991) first pointed out that barite can be used for ESR dating. Knowing that ESR dating of barite is promising, in this paper, we will present how we have investigated each factor that contributes ESR dating of barite in submarine hydrothermal sulfide deposition. (1) The best ESR condition for measuring the SO3- signal in barite is with the microwave power of 1mW and modulation amplitude of 0.1mT. (2) As results of heating experiments, the signal was found to be stable for the dating age range of several thousands. (3) 226Ra replacing Ba in barite is the source of the radiation. The amount of radioactive elements in sulfide mineral surrounding barite is negligible. (4) The external radiation from the sea water is negligible even in the submarine hydrothermal area where the radiation level is much

  9. Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes. [infrared scanner recordings of thermal anomalies of Mt. Baker volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. By the end of 1973, aerial infrared scanner traverses for thermal anomaly recordings of all Cascade Range volcanoes were essentially completed. Amplitude level slices of the Mount Baker anomalies were completed and compiled at a scale of 1:24,000, thus producing, for the first time, an accurate map of the distribution and intensity of thermal activity on Mount Baker. The major thermal activity is concentrated within the crater south of the main summit and although it is characterized by intensive solfataric activity and warm ground, it is largely subglacial, causing the development of sizable glacier perforation features. The outgoing radiative flux from the east breach anomalies is sufficient to account for the volume of ice melted to form the glacier perforations. DCP station 6251 has been monitoring a thermally anomalous area on the north slope of Mount Baker. The present thermal activity of Mount Baker accounts for continuing hydrothermal alteration in the crater south of the main summit and recurrent debris avalanches from Sherman Peak on its south rim. The infrared anomalies mapped as part of the experiment SR 251 are considered the basic evidence of the subglacial heating which was the probable triggering mechanism of an avalanche down Boulder Glacier on August 20-21, 1973.

  10. Seismic exploration of Fuji volcano with active sources in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Kagiyama, T.; Tanaka, S.; Miyamachi, H.; Tsutsui, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Katayama, H.; Matsuo, N.; Oshima, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yamazaki, F.

    2004-12-01

    the Tanzawa Range to the east. This uplifted body is formed by plate subduction and collision with the Izu Peninsula, and is believed to have influence at significant depth. This is considered to be the reason for the change in the geologic structure beneath Fuji volcano from west to east. The dome structure of the bedrock layer (second layer) directly beneath the summit is considered to have formed in the initial period of volcanic activity that formed Mt. Fuji, leading to the subsequent formation of Komitake volcano, Ko-Fuji volcano and the present day Fuji volcano.

  11. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  12. Remote sensing for active volcano monitoring in Barren Island, India

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Reddy, C.S.S.; Srivastav, S.K. )

    1993-08-01

    The Barren Island Volcano, situated in the Andaman Sea of the Bay of Bengal, erupted recently (March, 1991) after a prolonged period of quiescence of about 188 years. This resumed activity coincides with similar outbreaks in the Philippines and Japan, which are located in an identical tectonic environment. This study addresses (1) remote sensing temporal monitoring of the volcanic activity, (2) detecting hot lava and measuring its pixel-integrated and subpixel temperatures, and (3) the importance of SWIR bands for high temperature volcanic feature detection. Seven sets of TM data acquired continuously from 3 March 1991 to 8 July 1991 have been analyzed. It is concluded that detectable pre-eruption warming took place around 25 March 1991 and volcanic activity started on 1 April 1991. It is observed that high temperature features, such as an erupting volcano, can register emitted thermal radiance in SWIR bands. Calculation of pixel-integrated and sub-pixel temperatures related to volcanic vents has been made, using the dual-band method. 6 refs.

  13. Using the Landsat Thematic Mapper to detect and monitor active volcanoes - An example from Lascar volcano, northern Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) offers a means of detecting and monitoring thermal features of active volcanoes. Using the TM, a prominent thermal anomaly has been discovered on Lascar volcano, northern Chile. Data from two short-wavelength infrared channels of the TM show that material within a 300-m-diameter pit crater was at a temperature of at least 380 C on two dates in 1985. The thermal anomaly closely resembles in size and radiant temperature the anomaly over the active lava lake at Erta'ale in Ethiopia. An eruption took place at Lascar on Sept. 16, 1986. TM data acquired on Oct. 27, 1986, revealed significant changes within the crater area. Lascar is in a much more active state than any other volcano in the central Andes, and for this reason it merits further careful monitoring. Studies show that the TM is capable of confidently identifying thermal anomalies less than 100 m in size, at temperatures of above 150 C, and thus it offers a valuable means of monitoring the conditions of active or potentially active volcanoes, particularly those in remote regions.

  14. In search of ancestral Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Sisson, T.W.; Ui, T.; Naka, J.

    2000-01-01

    Submersible observations and samples show that the lower south flank of Hawaii, offshore from Kilauea volcano and the active Hilina slump system, consists entirely of compositionally diverse volcaniclastic rocks; pillow lavas are confined to shallow slopes. Submarine-erupted basalt clasts have strongly variable alkalic and transitional basalt compositions (to 41% SiO2, 10.8% alkalies), contrasting with present-day Kilauea tholeiites. The volcaniclastic rocks provide a unique record of ancestral alkalic growth of an archetypal hotspot volcano, including transition to its tholeiitic shield stage, and associated slope-failure events.

  15. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  16. Automated system for magnetic monitoring of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Negro, Ciro; Napoli, Rosalba; Sicali, Antonino

    2002-01-01

    In order to provide a basis for short-term decision-making in the forecasting and monitoring of volcanic activity, we developed an entirely automated system of data acquisition and reduction for magnetic data. The system (Mag-Net) is designed to provide monitoring and analysis of magnetic data on Etna volcano at large distances from the central observatory. The Mag-Net system uses data from an array of continuously recording remote stations spread over the volcanic area and linked by mobile phone to the control center at the local observatory. At this location a computer receives the data and performs data sorting and reduction as well as limited evaluation to detect abnormal behavior or breakdown of remote sensors. Communication software, called MagTalk, is also designed to provide data to distant users. With a view to using continuous magnetic observations in advanced analysis techniques for volcano monitoring, the Mag-Net system also delivers two graphical user interface based applications to provide an interpretation capability. The former, called MADAP, speeds up all the data reduction processes in order to evaluate the reliability of magnetic signals. The latter, called VMM, is a procedure for modeling magnetic fields associated with tectonic and volcanic activity to facilitate the identification and interpretation of the sources of a wide spectrum of magnetic signals.

  17. Quantitative measurements of active Ionian volcanoes in Galileo NIMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saballett, Sebastian; Rathbun, Julie A.; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Spencer, John R.

    2016-10-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in our solar system. The spatial distribution of volcanoes a planetary body's surface gives clues into its basic inner workings (i.e., plate tectonics on earth). Tidal heating is the major contributor to active surface geology in the outer solar system, and yet its mechanism is not completely understood. Io's volcanoes are the clearest signature of tidal heating and measurements of the total heat output and how it varies in space and time are useful constraints on tidal heating. Hamilton et al. (2013) showed through a nearest neighbor analysis that Io's hotspots are globally random, but regionally uniform near the equator. Lopes-Gautier et al. (1999) compared the locations of hotspots detected by NIMS to the spatial variation of heat flow predicted by two end-member tidal heating models. They found that the distribution of hotspots is more consistent with tidal heating occurring in asthenosphere rather than the mantle. Hamilton et al. (2013) demonstrate that clustering of hotspots also supports a dominant role for asthenosphere heating. These studies were unable to account for the relative brightness of the hotspots. Furthermore, studies of the temporal variability of Ionian volcanoes have yielded substantial insight into their nature. The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) gave us a large dataset from which to observe active volcanic activity. NIMS made well over 100 observations of Io over an approximately 10-year time frame. With wavelengths spanning from 0.7 to 5.2 microns, it is ideally suited to measure blackbody radiation from surfaces with temperatures over 300 K. Here, we report on our effort to determine the activity level of each hotspot observed in the NIMS data. We decide to use 3.5 micron brightness as a proxy for activity level because it will be easy to compare to, and incorporate, ground-based observations. We fit a 1-temperature blackbody to spectra in each grating position and averaged the

  18. Catalogue of satellite photography of the active volcanoes of the world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.

    1976-01-01

    A catalogue is presented of active volcanoes as viewed from Earth-orbiting satellites. The listing was prepared of photographs, which have been screened for quality, selected from the earth resources technology satellite (ERTS) and Skylab, Apollo and Gemini spacecraft. There is photography of nearly every active volcano in the world; the photographs are particularly useful for regional studies of volcanic fields.

  19. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  20. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift

  1. Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Doukas, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    During 1993, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to episodes of eruptive activity or false alarms at nine volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. Additionally, as part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also responded to eruptions on the Kamchatka Peninsula, details of which are summarized in Miller and Kurianov (1993). In 1993, AVO maintained seismic instrumentation networks on four volcanoes of the Cook Inlet region--Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine--and two stations at Dutton Volcano near King Cove on the Alaska Peninsula. Other routine elements of AVO's volcano monitoring program in Alaska include periodic airborne measurement of volcanic SO2 and CO2 at Cook Inlet volcanoes (Doukas, 1995) and maintenance of a lightning detection system in Cook Inlet (Paskievitch and others, 1995).

  2. A fluorescein tracer release experiment in the hydrothermally active crater of Vailulu'u volcano, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Workman, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Girard, A. P.

    2003-08-01

    On 3 April 2001, a 20 kg point source of fluorescein dye was released 30 m above the bottom of the active summit caldera of Vailulu'u submarine volcano, Samoa. Vailulu'u crater is 2000 m wide and at water depths of 600-1000 m, with the bottom 200 m completely enclosed; it thus provides an ideal site to study the hydrodynamics of an active hydrothermal system. The magmatically driven hydrothermal system in the crater is currently exporting massive amounts of particulates, manganese, and helium. The dispersal of the dye was tracked for 4 days with a fluorimeter in tow-yo mode from the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Sea. Lateral dispersion of the dye ranged from 80 to 500 m d-1; vertical dispersion had two components: a diapycnal diffusivity component averaging 21 cm2 s-1, and an advective component averaging 0.025 cm s-1. These measurements constrain the mass export of water from the crater during this period to be 8-1.3+4.6 × 107 m3 d-1, which leads to a "turnover" time for water in the crater of ˜3.2 days. Coupled with temperature data from CTD profiles and Mn analyses of water samples, the power output from the crater is 610-100+350 MW, and the manganese export flux is ˜240 kg d-1. The Mn/Heat ratio of 4.7 ng J-1 is significantly lower than ratios characteristic of hot smokers and diffuse hydrothermal flows on mid-ocean ridges and points to phase separation processes in this relatively shallow hydrothermal system.

  3. Linking subsurface to surface degassing at active volcanoes: A thermodynamic model with applications to Erebus volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovino, Kayla

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumbing systems are the pathways through which volatiles are exchanged between the deep Earth and the atmosphere. The interplay of a multitude of processes occurring at various depths in the system dictates the composition and quantity of gas eventually erupted through volcanic vents. Here, a model is presented as a framework for interpreting surface volcanic gas measurements in terms of subsurface degassing processes occurring throughout a volcanic plumbing system. The model considers all possible sources of fluid from multiple depths, including degassing of dissolved volatiles during crystallization and/or decompression as recorded in melt inclusions plus any co-existing fluid phase present in a magma reservoir. The former is achieved by differencing melt inclusion volatile contents between groups of melt inclusions saturated at discrete depths. The latter is calculated using a thermodynamic model, which computes the composition of a C-O-H-S fluid in equilibrium with a melt given a minimum of five thermodynamic parameters commonly known for natural systems (T, P, fO2, either fH2 or one parameter for H2O, and either fS2 or one parameter for CO2). The calculated fluids are thermodynamically decompressed and run through a mixing model, which finds all possible mixtures of subsurface fluid that match the chemistry of surface gas within ±2.0 mol%. The method is applied to Mount Erebus (Antarctica), an active, intraplate volcano whose gas emissions, which emanate from an active phonolitic lava lake, have been well quantified by FTIR, UV spectroscopy, and multi-gas sensors over the last several decades. In addition, a well-characterized suite of lavas and melt inclusions, and petrological interpretations thereof, represent a wealth of knowledge about the shallow, intermediate, and deep parts of the Erebus plumbing system. The model has been used to calculate the compositions of seven C-O-H-S fluids that originate from four distinct regions within the Erebus

  4. Attack submarines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This issue discusses missions for submarines, technology proliferation; implications for U.S. security; U.S. SSN-21 Seawolf versus other submarines; stability and arms control; nuclear propulsion and nuclear proliferation; air independent propulsion.

  5. Abundances of platinum group elements in native sulfur condensates from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc: Implications for PGE mineralization in porphyry deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Campbell, Ian H.; Kim, Jonguk

    2016-02-01

    Some porphyry Cu-Au deposits, which are enriched in Pd, are potentially an economic source of Pd. Magmatic volatile phases are thought to transport the platinum group elements (PGEs) from the porphyry source magma to the point of deposition. However, the compatibilities of the PGEs in magmatic volatile phases are poorly constrained. We report PGE and Re contents in native sulfur condensates and associated altered dacites from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc, in order to determine the compatibility of PGEs and Re in magmatic volatile phases, and their mobility during secondary hydrothermal alteration. The native sulfur we analyzed is the condensate of a magmatic volatile phase exsolved from the Niuatahi-Motutahi magma. The PGEs are moderately enriched in the sulfur condensates in comparison to the associated fresh dacite, with enrichment factors of 11-285, whereas Au, Cu and Re are strongly enriched with enrichment factors of ∼20,000, ∼5000 and ∼800 respectively. Although the PGEs are moderately compatible into magmatic volatile phases, their compatibility is significantly lower than that of Au, Cu and Re. Furthermore, the compatibility of PGEs decrease in the order: Ru > Pt > Ir > Pd. This trend is also observed in condensates and sublimates from other localities. PGE mineralization in porphyry Cu-Au deposits is characterized by substantially higher Pd/Pt (∼7-60) and Pd/Ir (∼100-10,500) than typical orthomagmatic sulfide deposits (e.g. Pd/Pt ∼0.6 and Pd/Ir ∼20 for the Bushveld). It has previously been suggested that the high mobility of Pd, relative to the other PGEs, may account for the preferential enrichment of Pd in porphyry Cu-Au deposits. However, the low compatibility of Pd in the volatile phase relative to the other PGEs, shown in this study, invalidates this explanation. We suggest that the PGE geochemistry of Pd-rich Cu-Au deposits is principally derived from the PGE characteristics of the magma from which the ore

  6. The recent seismo-volcanic activity at Deception Island volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Almendros, Javier; Carmona, Enrique; Martínez-Arévalo, Carmen; Abril, Miguel

    2003-06-01

    This paper reviews the recent seismic studies carried out at Deception Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, which was monitored by the Argentinean and Spanish Antarctic Programs since 1986. Several types of seismic network have been deployed temporarily during each Antarctic summer. These networks have consisted of a variety of instruments, including radio-telemetered stations, autonomous digital seismic stations, broadband seismometers, and seismic arrays. We have identified two main types of seismic signals generated by the volcano, namely pure seismo-volcanic signals, such as volcanic tremor and long-period (LP) events, and volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes. Their temporal distributions are far from homogeneous. Volcanic tremors and LP events usually occur in seismic swarms lasting from a few hours to some days. The number of LP events in these swarms is highly variable, from a background level of less than 30/day to a peak activity of about 100 events/h. The occurrence of VT earthquakes is even more irregular. Most VT earthquakes at Deception Island have been recorded during two intense seismic crises, in 1992 and 1999, respectively. Some of these VT earthquakes were large enough to be felt by researchers working on the island. Analyses of both types of seismic events have allowed us to derive source locations, establish seismic source models, analyze seismic attenuation, calculate the energy and stress drop of the seismic sources, and relate the occurrence of seismicity to the volcanic activity. Pure seismo-volcanic signals are modelled as the consequence of hydrothermal interactions between a shallow aquifer and deeper hot materials, resulting in the resonance of fluid-filled fractures. VT earthquakes constitute the brittle response to changes in the distribution of stress in the volcanic edifice. The two VT seismic series are probably related to uplift episodes due to deep injections of magma that did not reach the surface. This evidence, however

  7. Growth and degradation of Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 3 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Sherrod, David R.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Large Hawaiian volcanoes can persist as islands through the rapid subsidence by building upward rapidly enough. But in the long run, subsidence, coupled with surface erosion, erases any volcanic remnant above sea level in about 15 m.y. One consequence of subsidence, in concert with eustatic changes in sea level, is the drowning of coral reefs that drape the submarine flanks of the actively subsiding volcanoes. At least six reefs northwest of the Island of Hawai‘i form a stairstep configuration, the oldest being deepest.

  8. Tectonic activity and the evolution of submarine canyons: The Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micallef, Aaron; Mountjoy, Joshu; Barnes, Philip; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are Earth's most dramatic erosional features, comprising steep-walled valleys that originate in the continental shelf and slope. They play a key role in the evolution of continental margins by transferring sediments into deep water settings and are considered important biodiversity hotspots, pathways for nutrients and pollutants, and analogues of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Although comprising only one third of continental margins worldwide, active margins host more than half of global submarine canyons. We still lack of thorough understanding of the coupling between active tectonics and submarine canyon processes, which is necessary to improve the modelling of canyon evolution in active margins and derive tectonic information from canyon morphology. The objectives of this study are to: (i) understand how tectonic activity influences submarine canyon morphology, processes, and evolution in an active margin, and (2) formulate a generalised model of canyon development in response to tectonic forcing based on morphometric parameters. We fulfil these objectives by analysing high resolution geophysical data and imagery from Cook Strait Canyon system, offshore New Zealand. Using these data, we demonstrate that tectonic activity, in the form of major faults and structurally-generated tectonic ridges, leaves a clear topographic signature on submarine canyon location and morphology, in particular their dendritic and sinuous planform shapes, steep and linear longitudinal profiles, and cross-sectional asymmetry and width. We also report breaks/changes in canyon longitudinal slope gradient, relief and slope-area regression models at the intersection with faults. Tectonic activity gives rise to two types of knickpoints in the Cook Strait Canyon. The first type consists of low slope gradient, rounded and diffusive knickpoints forming as a result of short wavelength folds or fault break outs and being restored to an equilibrium profile by upstream erosion and

  9. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Robert; Okamura, Arnold; Miklius, Asta; Poland, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Everything responds to pressure, even rocks. Deformation studies involve measuring and interpreting the changes in elevations and horizontal positions of the land surface or sea floor. These studies are variously referred to as geodetic changes or ground-surface deformations and are sometimes indexed under the general heading of geodesy. Deformation studies have been particularly useful on active volcanoes and in active tectonic areas. A great amount of time and energy has been spent on measuring geodetic changes on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawai`i. These changes include the build-up of the surface by the piling up and ponding of lava flows, the changes in the surface caused by erosion, and the uplift, subsidence, and horizontal displacements of the surface caused by internal processes acting beneath the surface. It is these latter changes that are the principal concern of this review. A complete and objective review of deformation studies on active Hawaiian volcanoes would take many volumes. Instead, we attempt to follow the evolution of the most significant observations and interpretations in a roughly chronological way. It is correct to say that this is a subjective review. We have spent years measuring and recording deformation changes on these great volcanoes and more years trying to understand what makes these changes occur. We attempt to make this a balanced as well as a subjective review; the references are also selective rather than exhaustive. Geodetic changes caused by internal geologic processes vary in magnitude from the nearly infinitesimal - one micron or less, to the very large - hundreds of meters. Their apparent causes also are varied and include changes in material properties and composition, atmospheric pressure, tidal stress, thermal stress, subsurface-fluid pressure (including magma pressure, magma intrusion, or magma removal), gravity, and tectonic stress. Deformation is measured in units of strain or displacement. For example, tilt

  10. Recent Seismic and Geodetic Activity at Multiple Volcanoes in the Ecuadorean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; McCausland, W. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Mothes, P. A.; Bell, A. F.; Hidalgo, S.; Barrington, C.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.; Plain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The state of volcanic activity often fluctuates between periods of repose and unrest. The transition time between a period of repose and unrest, or vice versa for an open system, can occur within a matter of hours or days. Because of this short time scale, real-time seismic and geodetic (e.g. tiltmeter, GPS) monitoring networks are crucial for characterizing the state of activity of a volcano. In the Ecuadorean Andes, 5 volcanoes demonstrate long-term (Tungurahua, Reventador, and Guagua Pichincha) or recently reactivated (Cotopaxi, Chiles-Cerro Negro) seismic and geodetic activity. The Instituto Geofisico regularly characterizes volcano seismicity into long period, very long period, volcano-tectonic, and tremor events. Significant recent changes at these volcanoes include: rigorous reactivation of glacier-capped Cotopaxi, drumbeat seismicity absent a dome extrusion at Tungurahua, and regularly reoccurring (~7 day recurrence interval), shallow seismic swarms at Guagua Pichincha. These volcanoes locate along both the Western and Eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorean Andes and, where data are available, manifest important variations in chemical composition, daily gas flux, and surficial deformation. We summarize the long-term geophysical parameters measured at each volcano and place recent changes in each parameter in a larger magmatic and hydrothermal context. All of the studied volcanoes present significant societal hazards to local and regional communities.

  11. Sangay volcano, Ecuador: structural development, present activity and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzier, Michel; Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Hall, Minard L.; Cotten, Jo; Mothes, Patricia; Arnaud, Nicolas

    1999-05-01

    Sangay (5230 m), the southernmost active volcano of the Andean Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ), sits ˜130 km above a >32-Ma-old slab, close to a major tear that separates two distinct subducting oceanic crusts. Southwards, Quaternary volcanism is absent along a 1600-km-long segment of the Andes. Three successive edifices of decreasing volume have formed the Sangay volcanic complex during the last 500 ka. Two former cones (Sangay I and II) have been largely destroyed by sector collapses that resulted in large debris avalanches that flowed out upon the Amazon plain. Sangay III, being constructed within the last avalanche amphitheater, has been active at least since 14 ka BP. Only the largest eruptions with unusually high Plinian columns are likely to represent a major hazard for the inhabited areas located 30 to 100 km west of the volcano. However, given the volcano's relief and unbuttressed eastern side, a future collapse must be considered, that would seriously affect an area of present-day colonization in the Amazon plain, ˜30 km east of the summit. Andesites greatly predominate at Sangay, there being few dacites and basalts. In order to explain the unusual characteristics of the Sangay suite—highest content of incompatible elements (except Y and HREE) of any NVZ suite, low Y and HREE values in the andesites and dacites, and high Nb/La of the only basalt found—a preliminary five-step model is proposed: (1) an enriched mantle (in comparison with an MORB source), or maybe a variably enriched mantle, at the site of the Sangay, prior to Quaternary volcanism; (2) metasomatism of this mantle by important volumes of slab-derived fluids enriched in soluble incompatible elements, due to the subduction of major oceanic fracture zones; (3) partial melting of this metasomatized mantle and generation of primitive basaltic melts with Nb/La values typical of the NVZ, which are parental to the entire Sangay suite but apparently never reach the surface and subordinate

  12. Seismicity study of volcano-tectonic in and around Tangkuban Parahu active volcano in West Java region, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ry, Rexha V.; Priyono, A.; Nugraha, A. D.; Basuki, A.

    2016-05-01

    Tangkuban Parahu is one of the active volcano in Indonesia located about 15 km northern part of Bandung city. The objective of this study is to investigate the seismic activity in the time periods of January 2013 to December 2013. First, we identified seismic events induced by volcano-tectonic activities. These micro-earthquake events were identified as having difference of P-wave and S-wave arrival times less than three seconds. Then, we constrained its location of hypocenter to locate the source of the activities. Hypocenter determination was performed using adaptive simulated annealing method. Using these results, seismic tomographic inversions were conducted to image the three-dimensional velocity structure of Vp, Vs, and the Vp/Vs ratio. In this study, 278 micro-earthquake events have been identified and located. Distribution of hypocenters around Tangkuban Parahu volcano forms an alignment structure and may be related to the stress induced by magma below, also movement of shallow magma below Domas Crater. Our preliminary tomographic inversion results indicate the presences of low Vp, high Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio that associate to accumulated young volcanic eruption products and hot material zones.

  13. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  14. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  15. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ≥2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge

  16. Identifying hazard parameter to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suminar, Wulan; Saepuloh, Asep; Meilano, Irwan

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of hazard assessment to active volcanoes is crucial for risk management. The hazard map of volcano provides information to decision makers and communities before, during, and after volcanic crisis. The rapid and accurate hazard assessment, especially to an active volcano is necessary to be developed for better mitigation on the time of volcanic crises in Indonesia. In this paper, we identified the hazard parameters to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano. The Guntur volcano in Garut Region, West Java, Indonesia was selected as study area due population are resided adjacent to active volcanoes. The development of infrastructures, especially related to tourism at the eastern flank from the Summit, are growing rapidly. The remote sensing and field investigation approaches were used to obtain hazard parameters spatially. We developed a quantitative and dynamic algorithm to map spatially hazard potential of volcano based on index overlay technique. There were identified five volcano hazard parameters based on Landsat 8 and ASTER imageries: volcanic products including pyroclastic fallout, pyroclastic flows, lava and lahar, slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and vegetation density. Following this proposed technique, the hazard parameters were extracted, indexed, and calculated to produce spatial hazard values at and around Guntur Volcano. Based on this method, the hazard potential of low vegetation density is higher than high vegetation density. Furthermore, the slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and fragmental volcanic product such as pyroclastics influenced to the spatial hazard value significantly. Further study to this proposed approach will be aimed for effective and efficient analyses of volcano risk assessment.

  17. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis.

  18. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  19. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  20. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Submarine landslides in Society and Austral Islands, French Polynesia: Evolution with the age of the edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouard, V.; Bonneville, A.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents descriptions of numerous submarine landslides in French Polynesia. This inventory shows an evolution of the landslide type with the age of oceanic islands. Submarine active volcanoes are subject to superficial landslides of fragmental material whereas young islands exhibit marks of mass wasting corresponding to giant lateral collapses due to debris avalanche that occurred during the period of volcanic activity. Later, erosional processes generate sand-rubble flows and lead the islands to the stellate morphology known on atolls and guyots. In addition, Tupai atoll and Rurutu Island have been subject to giant slump that deeply modify their shape.

  2. Risk-Free Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: seismic observations near the active vent of Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Yasuda, A.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kanda, W.; Iguchi, M.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are important not only for understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit but also for eruption prediction and volcanic hazards mitigation. It is, however, challenging to install observation sensors near active vents because of the danger of sudden eruptions. We need safe and efficient ways of installing sensors near the summit of active volcanoes. We have been developing an volcano observation system based on an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) for risk-free volcano observations. Our UAV is an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. The UAV is 3.6m long and weighs 84kg with maximum payload of 10kg. The UAV can aviate autonomously along a previously programmed path within a meter accuracy using real-time kinematics differential GPS equipment. The maximum flight time and distance from the operator are 90 minutes and 5km, respectively. We have developed various types of volcano observation techniques adequate for the UAV, such as aeromagnetic survey, taking infrared and visible images from onboard high-resolution cameras, volcanic ash sampling in the vicinity of active vents. Recently, we have developed an earthquake observation module (EOM), which is exclusively designed for the UAV installation in the vicinity of active volcanic vent. In order to meet the various requirements for UAV installation, the EOM is very compact, light-weight (5-6kg), and is solar-powered. It is equipped with GPS for timing, a communication device using cellular-phone network, and triaxial accelerometers. Our first application of the EOM installation using the UAV is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, Sakurajima volcano. Since 2006, explosive eruptions have been continuing at the reopened Showa crater at the eastern flank near the summit of Sakurajima. Entering the area within 2 km from the active craters is prohibited, and thus there were no observation station in the vicinity

  3. Trace element distribution, with a focus on gold, in copper-rich and zinc-rich sulfide chimneys from Brothers submarine volcano, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkenbosch, H. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; McNeill, A.; Goemann, K.; Gemmell, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Brothers volcano is a dacitic volcano located along the Kermadec arc, New Zealand, and hosts the NW Caldera hydrothermal vent field perched on part of the steep caldera walls. The field strikes for ~600 m between depths of 1550 and 1700 m and includes numerous, active, high-temperature (max 302°C) chimneys and even more dead, sulfide-rich spires. Chimney samples collected from Brothers show distinct mineralogical zonation reflecting gradients in oxidation state, temperature, and pH from the inner walls in contact with hydrothermal fluids through to the outer walls in contact with seawater. Minerals deposited from hotter fluids (e.g., chalcopyrite) are located in the interior of the chimneys and are surrounded by an external zone of minerals deposited by cooler fluids (e.g., sulfates, sphalerite). Four chimneys types are identified at Brothers volcano based on the relative proportions of chalcopyrite and sulfate layers, and the presence or absence of anhydrite. Two are Cu-rich, i.e., chalcopyrite-rich and chalcopyrite-bornite-rich chimneys, and two are Zn-rich, i.e., sphalerite-rich and sphalerite-chalcopyrite-rich. Barite and anhydrite are common to both Cu-rich chimney types whereas Zn-rich chimneys contain barite only. The main mineral phases in all the chimneys are anhydrite, barite, chalcopyrite, pyrite/marcasite, and sphalerite. Trace minerals include galena, covellite, tennantite, realgar, chalcocite, bornite, hematite, goethite, Pb-As sulfosalts, and Bi- or Au-tellurides. The vast majority of tellurides are <5 μm in size and they commonly form in bands, cluster in patches, or occur along internal grain boundaries within chalcopyrite. In sulfate layers adjacent to the chalcopyrite zones tellurides can occur as inclusions in anhydrite, barite or pyrite and/or occupy void space within the chimney. The occurrence of specular hematite and Bi- or Au-tellurides associated with chalcopyrite are consistent with magmatic contributions to the NW Caldera vent site

  4. Submarine landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Lee, H.J.; Locat, J.

    1996-01-01

    Landslides are common on inclined areas of the seafloor, particularly in environments where weak geologic materials such as rapidly deposited, finegrained sediment or fractured rock are subjected to strong environmental stresses such as earthquakes, large storm waves, and high internal pore pressures. Submarine landslides can involve huge amounts of material and can move great distances: slide volumes as large as 20,000 km3 and runout distances in excess of 140 km have been reported. They occur at locations where the downslope component of stress exceeds the resisting stress, causing movement along one or several concave to planar rupture surfaces. Some recent slides that originated nearshore and retrogressed back across the shoreline were conspicuous by their direct impact on human life and activities. Most known slides, however, occurred far from land in prehistoric time and were discovered by noting distinct to subtle characteristics, such as headwall scarps and displaced sediment or rock masses, on acoustic-reflection profiles and side-scan sonar images. Submarine landslides can be analyzed using the same mechanics principles as are used for occurrences on land. However, some loading mechanisms are unique, for example, storm waves, and some, such as earthquakes, can have greater impact. The potential for limited-deformation landslides to transform into sediment flows that can travel exceedingly long distances is related to the density of the slope-forming material and the amount of shear strength that is lost when the slope fails.

  5. Virtual Investigations of an Active Deep Sea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, L.; Taylor, M. M.; Fundis, A.; Kelley, D. S.; Elend, M.

    2013-12-01

    Axial Seamount, located on the Juan de Fuca spreading ridge 300 miles off the Oregon coast, is an active volcano whose summit caldera lies 1500 m beneath the sea surface. Ongoing construction of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) cabled observatory by the University of Washington (funded by the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative) has allowed for exploration of recent lava flows and active hydrothermal vents using HD video mounted on the ROVs, ROPOS and JASON II. College level oceanography/marine geology online laboratory exercises referred to as Online Concept Modules (OCMs) have been created using video and video frame-captured mosaics to promote skill development for characterizing and quantifying deep sea environments. Students proceed at their own pace through a sequence of short movies with which they (a) gain background knowledge, (b) learn skills to identify and classify features or biota within a targeted environment, (c) practice these skills, and (d) use their knowledge and skills to make interpretations regarding the environment. Part (d) serves as the necessary assessment component of the laboratory exercise. Two Axial Seamount-focused OCMs will be presented: 1) Lava Flow Characterization: Identifying a Suitable Cable Route, and 2) Assessing Hydrothermal Vent Communities: Comparisons Among Multiple Sulfide Chimneys.

  6. Cyclic activity of the LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Mud volcanoes often release fluids in a pulsating fashion, with periodic timescales ranging from minutes to days. These oscillations, common in natural systems of multi-phase fluid flow, are thought to result from some combination of complex feedback mechanisms between conduit and source geometry, and such factors as: fluid compressibility, viscosity and density, changes in lithostatic stresses, reservoir pressure, or vent conditions. The LUSI mud volcano is in a densely populated district of the Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), and has been erupting since May 2006. Crisis management workers and local residents have reported observations of pulsating eruptive cycles lasting a few hours during the first two years of the eruption, and possibly beyond. Since 2010, however, the activity has shifted to individual transient eruptions recurring at intervals of a few minutes. In the summer of 2011, we documented this cyclic behavior at LUSI using a combination of high-resolution time-lapse photography, webcam, and thermal infrared imagery. The imagery reveals that hot mud and gases were released from three individual sources within the 150 m wide vent pond. The mud, consisting of at least 70% water, is erupted at temperatures close to boiling. Released gases consist principally of water vapor, carbon dioxide and methane. Eruptions ejected mud some 20 m above the vent in an unsteady fountain and formed 50 m-high plumes of hot gas. Pulses, on average 50 s in duration, were characterized by sharp onsets and exponential decays in intensity. We observed explosion periods ranging from 1 to 3 minutes during this campaign, the median period was 100 s, and pulses were separated by periods of apparent quiescence. Each vent was characterized by a different dominant period, indicating that parameters controlling activity vary among the vents. Potential conceptual eruptive models are gas accumulation and release, slug flow, or oscillations in pressure at depth to account for

  7. Interpreting Low Spatial Resolution Thermal Data from Active Volcanoes on Io and the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keszthelyi, L.; Harris, A. J. L.; Flynn, L.; Davies, A. G.; McEwen, A.

    2001-01-01

    The style of volcanism was successfully determined at a number of active volcanoes on Io and the Earth using the same techniques to interpret thermal remote sensing data. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Shallow outgassing changes disrupt steady lava lake activity, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Persistent lava lakes are a testament to sustained magma supply and outgassing in basaltic systems, and the surface activity of lava lakes has been used to infer processes in the underlying magmatic system. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, the lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater has been closely studied for several years with webcam imagery, geophysical, petrological and gas emission techniques. The lava lake in Halema`uma`u is now the second largest on Earth, and provides an unprecedented opportunity for detailed observations of lava lake outgassing processes. We observe that steady activity is characterized by continuous southward motion of the lake's surface and slow changes in lava level, seismic tremor and gas emissions. This normal, steady activity can be abruptly interrupted by the appearance of spattering - sometimes triggered by rockfalls - on the lake surface, which abruptly shifts the lake surface motion, lava level and gas emissions to a more variable, unstable regime. The lake commonly alternates between this a) normal, steady activity and b) unstable behavior several times per day. The spattering represents outgassing of shallowly accumulated gas in the lake. Therefore, although steady lava lake behavior at Halema`uma`u may be deeply driven by upwelling of magma, we argue that the sporadic interruptions to this behavior are the result of shallow processes occurring near the lake surface. These observations provide a cautionary note that some lava lake behavior is not representative of deep-seated processes. This behavior also highlights the complex and dynamic nature of lava lake activity.

  9. Volcanoes. A planetary perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, P.

    In this book, the author gives an account of the familiar violent aspects of volcanoes and the various forms that eruptions can take. He explores why volcanoes exist at all, why volcanoes occur where they do, and how examples of major historical eruptions can be interpreted in terms of physical processes. Throughout he attempts to place volcanism in a planetary perspective, exploring the pre-eminent role of submarine volcanism on Earth and the stunning range of volcanic phenomena revealed by spacecraft exploration of the solar system.

  10. Analysis of Active Lava Flows on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, Using SIR-C Radar Correlation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Rosen, P.; Hensley, S.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Precise eruption rates of active pahoehoe lava flows on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, have been determined using spaceborne radar data acquired by the Space Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C). Measurement of the rate of lava flow advance, and the determination of the volume of new material erupted in a given period of time, are among the most important observations that can be made when studying a volcano.

  11. Explosive activity at Mt. Yasur volcano: characterization of acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.; Freda, C.; Gresta, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mt. Yasur (Vanuatu Islands) is an active volcano characterized by persistent Strombolian to mild Vulcanian explosive activity, well known to generate a broad variety of air pressure waves. Between 9 and 12 July 2011, we recorded explosive activity from the three active vents of Mt. Yasur by means of a multiparametric station, comprising thermal and visual high-speed cameras and two ECM microphones recording both infrasonic and sonic signals at 10 kHz sampling frequency. A total of 106 major acoustic events, lasting on average 5 seconds (up to 20 in some ash-rich explosion), correspond to visually recorded explosions at the vents and exhibit a surprisingly broad waveform variability. Major events intervene between minor transients with strongly repetitive waveforms typical of puffing activity. Spectral analyses have been computed on both major events and whole traces. Analysis of major events, carried out using a 5.12 s long window, reveals peak frequencies mostly beneath 5 Hz, only a few events displaying a notable energy content in the sonic band (up to 100 Hz ca). Peak-to-peak amplitude as well as RMS values (evaluated from event start to end) were computed on both raw and filtered (above and below 20 Hz) signals. Spectrograms of the whole traces, carried out using 1.28, 2.56, and 5.12 seconds long windows with 50% overlap, outline clearly the frequency content of major events and the occurrence of puffing ones. We also evaluated the peak frequency of each spectrum of the spectrogram, in order to detect spectral variation of the puffing signal. Considering their great variability, we classified the major events on the base of their spectral content rather than on waveform, grouping together all events having similar spectra by cross-correlating them. Three spectral families cover most of the dataset, as follows: 1) variable and irregular shaped spectra, with energy mainly below 4 Hz; 2) monochromatic events, with simple spectra corresponding in the time domain to

  12. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Neal, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analyzed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analyzed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the U. S. Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  13. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Near, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of the Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analysed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analysed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the US Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  14. Morne aux Diables. a potentially active volcano in northern Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheubottom, A. N.; Smith, A. L.; Roobol, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    The island of Dominica, which is located near the center of the Lesser Antilles island arc, comprises at least 8 potentially active volcanoes. One of these is Morne aux Diables, an isolated composite cone situated at the extreme northern end of the island. Age dating suggests that the main cone building activity occurred between 1.5 and 1.0 million years ago. Exposed on the volcano's flanks however are a number of unconsolidated valley-fill block and ash flow deposits suggesting more recent activity. One of these deposits, on the north-east flank of the volcano, has been recently dated at > 46,000 years B.P. Other evidence of potential activity from this center includes the presence of warm (27°C), acidic (pH 1.6), sulfate-rich springs on the summit of the volcano, hot springs on the coast, and the occurrence in 2002 and 2003 of shallow earthquake swarms partially located beneath the volcano. Morne aux Diables is dominantly composed of deposits of block and ash flows and associated domes from Pelean-style activity, however, semi-vesicular andesite block and ash flows and surges (Asama-style activity) and pumiceous lapilli falls (Plinian-style activity) are locally abundant. The Pelean domes are located both in the summit region and along the southern flanks of the volcano. Petrologically, the volcano is composed of a monotonous series of porphyritic andesites and dacites containing phenocrysts of plagioclase+augite-hypersthene with very sparse crystals of hornblende and quartz. Petrological models suggest the Morne aux Diables andesites and dacites can be produced by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma (such as those erupted from centers such as Morne Anglais and Morne Plat Pays in the south). Minor variations within this suite of andesites and dacites can be related to upper crustal fractionation of phenocryst phases.

  15. Subaqueous cryptodome eruption, hydrothermal activity and related seafloor morphologies on the andesitic North Su volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thal, Janis; Tivey, Maurice; Yoerger, Dana R.; Bach, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    North Su is a double-peaked active andesite submarine volcano located in the eastern Manus Basin of the Bismarck Sea that reaches a depth of 1154 m. It hosts a vigorous and varied hydrothermal system with black and white smoker vents along with several areas of diffuse venting and deposits of native sulfur. Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 and 2011 combined with morphologic features identified from repeated bathymetric surveys in 2002 and 2011 documents the emplacement of a volcanic cryptodome between 2006 and 2011. We use our observations and rock analyses to interpret an eruption scenario where highly viscous, crystal-rich andesitic magma erupted slowly into the water-saturated, gravel-dominated slope of North Su. An intense fragmentation process produced abundant blocky clasts of a heterogeneous magma (olivine crystals within a rhyolitic groundmass) that only rarely breached through the clastic cover onto the seafloor. Phreatic and phreatomagmatic explosions beneath the seafloor cause mixing of juvenile and pre-existing lithic clasts and produce a volcaniclastic deposit. This volcaniclastic deposit consists of blocky, non-altered clasts next, variably (1-100%) altered clasts, hydrothermal precipitates and crystal fragments. The usually applied parameters to identify juvenile subaqueous lava fragments, i.e. fluidal shape or chilled margin, were not applicable to distinguish between pre-existing non-altered clasts and juvenile clasts. This deposit is updomed during further injection of magma and mechanical disruption. Gas-propelled turbulent clast-recycling causes clasts to develop variably rounded shapes. An abundance of blocky clasts and the lack of clasts typical for the contact of liquid lava with water is interpreted to be the result of a cooled, high-viscosity, crystal-rich magma that failed as a brittle solid upon stress. The high viscosity allows the lava to form blocky and short lobes. The pervasive volcaniclastic cover on North Su is

  16. Volcanic evolution of the submarine super volcano, Tamu Massif of Shatsky Rise: New insights from Formation MicroScanner logging imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Iturrino, Gerardo; Evans, Helen F.

    2015-01-01

    Massif, the southernmost plateau of Shatsky Rise, is recently reported as the largest single volcano known on Earth. This work seeks to understand the type of volcanism necessary to form such an anomalously large single volcano by integrating core and high-resolution wireline logging data. In particular, resistivity imagery obtained by the Formation MicroScanner, in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole U1347A, located on the eastern flank of Tamu Massif, was used to construct a logging-based volcanostratigraphy. This model revealed two different volcanic stages formed Tamu Massif: (i) the core part of the massif's basaltic basement was formed by a "construction phase" of volcanism with cyclic eruption events from a steady state magma supply and (ii) the very topmost basaltic section was formed by a "depositional phase" of volcanism during which long-traveling lava flows were deposited from a distant eruption center.

  17. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  18. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  19. Comparison of submarine gully morphologies in passive and active margin settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Shumaker, L.; Johnstone, S.; Graham, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active tectonic margins have inherently different hypsometry, due to local patterns of deformation and subsequent impacts on the style of sedimentation. One way we can analyze and compare the two settings is through observation of submarine gullies, which are small channel features that form along the continental slope as it descends to the ocean floor. By documenting the geometries of gullies that have formed on passive margins and gullies that have formed on active margins, we attempt to distinguish differences in gully morphologies in these two settings. We manually mapped over 600 gullies and interfluves from shaded relief and contour maps generated from bathymetric data across the globe, including the coast of California, the Beaufort Sea, and the Black Sea. We extrapolated and plotted elevation profiles of the gullies along their downslope distance, and compared a range of gully properties, such as length, spacing, and slope, to look at the correlations among those elements of gullies and their tectonic setting. We find that gullies forming on active margins show the greatest variability in their slopes, exhibiting both the steepest and the shallowest slopes of the dataset. The slopes of the passive margin gullies fall within the range of the active margin gully slopes, but interestingly, we note patterns in the ranges of gully steepness at different localities. These results differ from our our anticipation that active margin gullies are steeper than passive margin gullies, but suggest that gullies in all settings display a variety of morphologies. Additional mapping of active margin gullies will better determine if there are morphological differences between the two settings.

  20. Volcano Deformation and Modeling on Active Volcanoes in the Philippines from ALOS InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Eco, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    Bulusan, Kanlaon, and Mayon volcanoes have erupted over the last decade, and Taal caldera showed signs of volcanic unrest within the same time range. Eruptions at these volcanoes are a threat to human life and infrastructure, having over 1,000,000 people living within 10 km from just these 4 volcanic centers. For this reason, volcano monitoring in the Philippines is of extreme importance. We use the ALOS-1 satellite from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to make an InSAR time series analysis over Bulusan, Kanlaon, Mayon, and Taal volcanoes for the 2007-2011 period. Time-dependent deformation was detected at all of the volcanoes. Deformation related to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems was found on Taal caldera and Bulusan volcanoes, with best fitting Mogi sources located at half-space depths of 3.07 km and 0.5 km respectively.

  1. The Fukuyama volcanic rocks: Submarine composite volcano in the Late Miocene to Early Pliocene Akita-Yamagata back-arc basin, northeast Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Masahiko; Ohguch, Takeshi; Akiba, Fumio; Yoshida, Takeyoshi; Tiba, Tokiko

    2009-10-01

    The Fukuyama Volcanic Rocks are composed of pyroxene andesite (FKV-1), hornblende-pyroxene andesite (FKV-2), biotite-hornblende dacite (FKV-3) and volcaniclastic debris-flow deposits and/or turbidites. FKV-1, FKV-2 and FKV-3 are medium-K calc-alkaline rocks depleted in Nd, similar to other back-arc volcanic rocks of the northeast Japan arc and constitute a dome cluster at Fukuyama. Volcaniclastic beds surround the dome cluster and thin and fine upwards. The predominant clast type in the volcaniclastic beds changes upwards from pyroxene andesite, through hornblende-pyroxene andesite, to biotite-hornblende dacite, consistent with the stratigraphic relationships of FKV-1, FKV-2 and FKV-3 lavas. All the siltstones inter-bedded with the volcaniclastic beds and overlying the whole succession contain diatom fossils indicative of the lower part of the Thalassionema schraderi zone (7.8 Ma to 8.5 Ma), compatible with the isotopic ages of FKV-1, FKV-2 and FKV-3. The Fukuyama volcano has a total eruption volume of 60-100 km 3, with a lifetime of the order of 10 5 years, as typically observed for volcanoes in the present back-arc region of northeast Honshu. FKV-1 erupted in deep water and partly disintegrated into hyaloclastite breccias due to direct contact with water. FKV-2 lava repeatedly effused over the FKV-1 lava and produced a volcanic apron of breccias that eventually grew above wave base and was eroded by wave action. The magma of FKV-3 was probably hydrous as it contains biotite and hornblende. The FKV-3 magma could have explosively erupted from a shallow-water dome or vent emergent above the wave base, followed by growth of a degassing lava dome. Repose between eruptions allowed accumulation of silt, and after the Fukuyama eruptions ceased silt entirely mantled the volcano. A small magma supply rate perhaps allowed a relatively long period of quiescence between eruptions of FKV-1, FKV-2 and FKV-3 magmas, resulting in abrasion and reworking of volcanic fragments and

  2. Active volcanoes observed through Art: the contribution offered by the social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Neri, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes have always fascinated people for the wild beauty of their landscapes and also for the fear that they arouse with their eruptive actions, sometimes simply spectacular, but other times terrifying and catastrophic for human activities. In the past, volcanoes were sometimes imagined as a metaphysical gateway to the otherworld; they have inspired the creation of myths and legends ever since three thousand years ago, also represented by paintings of great artistic impact. Modern technology today offers very sophisticated and readily accessed digital tools, and volcanoes continue to be frequently photographed and highly appreciated natural phenomena. Moreover, in recent years, the spread of social networks (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, etc.) have made the widespread dissemination of graphic contributions even easier. The result is that very active and densely inhabited volcanoes such as Etna, Vesuvius and Aeolian Islands, in Italy, have become among the most photographed subjects in the world, providing a popular science tool with formidable influence and usefulness. The beauty of these landscapes have inspired both professional artists and photographers, as well as amateurs, who compete in the social networks for the publication of the most spectacular, artistic or simply most informative images. The end result of this often frantic popular scientific activity is at least two-fold: on one hand, it provides geoscientists and science communicators a quantity of documentation that is almost impossible to acquire through the normal systems of volcano monitoring, while on the other it raises awareness and respect for the land among the civil community.

  3. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  4. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  5. Seismically Articulating Kilauea Volcano's Active Conduits, Rift Zones, and Faults through HVO's Second Fifty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, P.; Nakata, J.; Klein, F.; Koyanagi, R.; Thelen, W.

    2011-12-01

    While seismic monitoring of active Hawaiian volcanoes began 100 years ago, the build-up of the U. S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismographic network to its current configuration began in 1955, when Jerry Eaton established remote stations that telemetered data via landline to recorders at HVO. With network expansion through the 1960's, earthquake location and cataloging capabilities have evolved to afford a computer processed seismic catalog now spanning fifty years. Location accuracy and catalog completeness to smaller magnitudes have increased. Research and insights developed using HVO's seismic record have exploited the ability to seismically monitor volcanic activity at depth, to identify active regions within the volcanoes on the basis of computed hypocentral locations, to infer regions of magma storage by recognizing different families of volcanic earthquakes, and to forecast volcanic activity in both short and longer term from seismicity patterns. HVO's seismicity catalog was central to calculations of probabilistic seismic hazards. The ability to develop and implement additional analytical and interpretive capabilities has kept pace with improvements in both field and laboratory hardware and software. While the basic capabilities continue as part of HVO's core monitoring, additional interpretive capabilities now include adding details of volcanic and earthquake source regions, and viewing seismic data in juxtaposition with other observatory data streams. As HVO looks to its next century of volcano studies, research and development continue to shape the future. Broadband seismic recording at HVO has enabled extensive study by Chouet, Dawson, and co-workers of the relationship of very-long-period seismic sources beneath Kilauea's summit caldera to magma supply and transport. Recent upgrades have improved the ability to use these data in seismic cataloging and research. Data processing upgrades have bolstered the ability to

  6. Acoustic scattering from mud volcanoes and carbonate mounds.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Weber, Thomas C; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes occur in many parts of the world's oceans and form an aperture for gas and fluidized mud emission from within the earth's crust. Their characteristics are of considerable interest to the geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and underwater acoustics communities. For the latter, mud volcanoes are of interest in part because they pose a potential source of clutter for active sonar. Close-range (single-interaction) scattering measurements from a mud volcano in the Straits of Sicily show scattering 10-15 dB above the background. Three hypotheses were examined concerning the scattering mechanism: (1) gas entrained in sediment at/near mud volcano, (2) gas bubbles and/or particulates (emitted) in the water column, (3) the carbonate bio-construction covering the mud volcano edifice. The experimental evidence, including visual, acoustic, and nonacoustic sensors, rules out the second hypothesis (at least during the observation time) and suggests that, for this particular mud volcano the dominant mechanism is associated with carbonate chimneys on the mud volcano. In terms of scattering levels, target strengths of 4-14 dB were observed from 800 to 3600 Hz for a monostatic geometry with grazing angles of 3-5 degrees. Similar target strengths were measured for vertically bistatic paths with incident and scattered grazing angles of 3-5 degrees and 33-50 degrees, respectively. PMID:17225386

  7. Acoustic scattering from mud volcanoes and carbonate mounds.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Weber, Thomas C; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes occur in many parts of the world's oceans and form an aperture for gas and fluidized mud emission from within the earth's crust. Their characteristics are of considerable interest to the geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and underwater acoustics communities. For the latter, mud volcanoes are of interest in part because they pose a potential source of clutter for active sonar. Close-range (single-interaction) scattering measurements from a mud volcano in the Straits of Sicily show scattering 10-15 dB above the background. Three hypotheses were examined concerning the scattering mechanism: (1) gas entrained in sediment at/near mud volcano, (2) gas bubbles and/or particulates (emitted) in the water column, (3) the carbonate bio-construction covering the mud volcano edifice. The experimental evidence, including visual, acoustic, and nonacoustic sensors, rules out the second hypothesis (at least during the observation time) and suggests that, for this particular mud volcano the dominant mechanism is associated with carbonate chimneys on the mud volcano. In terms of scattering levels, target strengths of 4-14 dB were observed from 800 to 3600 Hz for a monostatic geometry with grazing angles of 3-5 degrees. Similar target strengths were measured for vertically bistatic paths with incident and scattered grazing angles of 3-5 degrees and 33-50 degrees, respectively.

  8. Evaluating life-safety risk of fieldwork at New Zealand's active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia; Jolly, Gill; Taig, Tony; Webb, Terry

    2014-05-01

    Volcano observatories monitor active or potentially active volcanoes. Although the number and scope of remote monitoring instruments and methods continues to grow, in-person field data collection is still required for comprehensive monitoring. Fieldwork anywhere, and especially in mountainous areas, contains an element of risk. However, on volcanoes with signs of unrest, there is an additional risk of volcanic activity escalating while on site, with potentially lethal consequences. As an employer, a volcano observatory is morally and sometimes legally obligated to take reasonable measures to ensure staff safety and to minimise occupational risk. Here we present how GNS Science evaluates life-safety risk for volcanologists engaged in fieldwork on New Zealand volcanoes with signs of volcanic unrest. Our method includes several key elements: (1) an expert elicitation for how likely an eruption is within a given time frame, (2) quantification of, based on historical data when possible, given a small, moderate, or large eruption, the likelihood of exposure to near-vent processes, ballistics, or surge at various distances from the vent, and (3) estimate of fatality rate given exposure to these volcanic hazards. The final product quantifies hourly fatality risk at various distances from a volcanic vent; various thresholds of risk (for example, zones with more than 10-5 hourly fatality risk) trigger different levels of required approval to undertake work. Although an element of risk will always be present when conducting fieldwork on potentially active volcanoes, this is a first step towards providing objective guidance for go/no go decisions for volcanic monitoring.

  9. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  10. White submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    While not everyone gets to live in a yellow submarine, the scientific community may get to have a decommissioned U.S. Navy nuclear submarine dedicated to it. The Sturgeon class of submarines, which scientists say are the ideal choice for the project, will be coming up for decommissioning in this next decade. So the time is ripe, scientists say. Two weeks ago, oceanographers, submarine specialists, marine biologists, and geophysicists, among others met at AGU headquarters in Washington to discuss how to get the project in the water. If all goes well, the project would be the "biggest thing that ever happened in ocean and Earth science," according to Lloyd Keigwin of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, who convened the meeting. For example, the submarine could make many types of "compelling" research possible that can not be done now by other means, such as studies in the Arctic that may have significant bearing on global change research, Keigwin says. However, the imposing hurdles that the project must overcome are as big as the opportunities it offers. Foremost, there is a question as to who will pick up the tab for such an endeavor.

  11. Infrasound Monitoring of the Volcanic Activities of Japanese Volcanoes in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. I.; Che, I. Y.; Shin, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1999 when our first infrasound array station(CHNAR) has been installed at Cheolwon, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources(KIGAM) is continuously observing infrasound signals with an infrasound array network, named KIN(Korean Infrasound Network). This network is comprised of eight seismo-acoustic array stations(BRDAR, YPDAR, KMPAR, CHNAR, YAGAR, KSGAR, ULDAR, TJIAR). The aperture size of the smallest array is 300m and the largest is about 1.4km. The number of infrasound sensors are between 4(TJIAR) and 18(YAGAR), and 1~5 seismometers are collocated with infrasound sensors. Many interesting infrasound signals associated with different type of sources, such as blasting, large earthquake, bolide, volcanic explosion are detected by KIN in the past 15 years. We have analyzed the infrasound signals possibly associated with the japanese volcanic explosions with reference to volcanic activity report published by Japanese Meteorological Agency. Analysis results of many events, for example, Asama volcano explosion in 2004 and Shinmoe volcano in 2011, are well matched with the official report. In some cases, however, corresponding infrasound signals are not identified. By comparison of the infrasound signals from different volcanoes, we also found that the characteristics of signals are distinguishing. It may imply that the specific volcano has its own unique fingerprint in terms of infrasound signal. It might be investigated by long-term infrasound monitoring for a specific volcano as a ground truth generating repetitive infrasound signal.

  12. Making a Submarine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornacchia, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Archimedes principle and why a ship sinks when it gets a hole in it. Suggests an activity for teaching the concept of density and water displacement through the construction of a simple submarine. Includes materials and procedures for this activity. (KHR)

  13. Hydrogochemical tools for monitoring active volcanoes: Applications to El Chichón volcano, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, M. A.; de La Cruz-Reyna, S.; Ramos, S.; Morton, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A.; Cruz, O.

    2010-03-01

    In 1982, a series of eruptions resulted in the worst disaster linked with volcanic activity in México. The characteristics of the phenomena together with a lack of prevention measures resulted in approximately 2000 deaths. An important aspect to prevent disasters is a thorough knowledge and monitoring of the potentially destructive natural phenomena. Monitoring the activity of dormant or active volcanoes by various methods is thus a key measure to estimate the hazard and design adequate risk reduction measures. Despite of the 1982 volcanic disaster, until only a few years, hydrogeochemical monitoring was the only regular surveillance of El Chichón post-eruptive activity. The first samples of the crater-lake water were collected by Casadevall et al. in 1983. Since 1985, a systematic sampling and chemical analyses program has been carried out by the Geophysics Institute in collaboration with local authorities from the State of Chiapas. Chemical analyses of main ions and Rare Earth elements (REE) are performed in the Laboratorio de Química Analítica and Laboratorio ICP-MS of the Instituto de Geofísica, UNAM. Results are interpreted considering the physico-chemical changes that may be recognized as precursors of volcanic activity. The problem is difficult because at least two main water reservoirs feed the crater lake; besides, dissolution of acid volcanic gases, water-rock interactions and geochemical processes among dissolved species have resulted in a complex chemical behavior of the lake-water along the years. The calculated degree of neutralization, pH values, and chloride and sulfate concentrations of samples taken at different dates result in a classification of the volcano as active or inactive according to the method developed by Varekamp. A pH of 0.5, very high conductivity and a temperature of about 50°C characterized the first years following the eruptions. An overall decrease on the temperature and ionic concentrations, along with a less acid p

  14. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  15. Remote sensing and tectonic analysis of active volcanoes in continental arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Rick Lee

    Variations in arc volcano spatial distribution and morphology are influenced by the crustal structure beneath the arc. In Colombia and Ecuador, most of the active volcanoes lie on or near regional arc-parallel fault zones, and many of the major volcanoes are aligned or elongated parallel to the faults. Two dominant volcano-fault geometry patterns exist: (1) From north to south, the orientation of the fractures and volcano-shapes changes along the arc from primarily north-northwest trending to east-northeast trending; and (2) From west to east, the fault and volcano alignment patterns vary from north-northwest trends at the outer edges of the arc to east-northeast trending in the middle of the arc. The fault and volcano orientation patterns are related to the age and type of crust being faulted during oblique subduction. The regionally active strike-slip faults in the Northern Andes and other arcs provide long-lasting paths for magma ascent that penetrate much deeper through the lithosphere than the secondary features. Local zones of extension and pre-existing fractures in the last several kilometers of lithosphere provide the plumbing that diverts magma slightly away from the primary linear volcanic front. The dissertation also describes a technique for merging multiple remote sensing data sets over the extremely rough terrain of silicic volcanoes. The major focus of this work was on overcoming coregistration errors from geometric distortion induced by local topography. The geometric distortion was compensated for by first creating an accurate base image with a combination of global positioning system (GPS) ground control, high resolution digital elevation models (DEM), and orthorectified aerial photographs. The individual sensor data were then rectified to the new reference base using triangulation geocoding. The final multi-layered, geocoded product is being used to enhance an existing thermal infrared technique for mapping complex textural patterns in silicic

  16. Submarine volcanism surrounding Tenerife, Canary Islands: implications for tectonic controls, and oceanic shield forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C. Romeo; García-Cacho, L.; Araña, V.; Luque, A. Yanes; Felpeto, A.

    2000-12-01

    Using high-resolution bathymetric data, 97 seamounts within two large submarine areas, N and SE of Tenerife, have been identified and studied in detail. Main dimensions and associated parameters of these seamounts have been measured, allowing a morphometric and morphologic classification on a shape basis. In order to be certain of their volcanic origin, several restrictive criteria were applied (conical shape with maximum height >150 m, basal ratio >1, aspect ratio >0.1) to the initial tally, obtaining finally 31 regular shapes that can be identified without any reasonable doubt as volcanic seamounts. These are very similar to submarine volcanoes described elsewhere on the sea floor. Most of these volcanic seamounts are aligned along two lines that follow the main volcano-tectonic trends of the Canary Archipelago. The NW-SE line crosses the island, while the NE-SW line coincides with a seismically active reverse fault that separates the Tenerife and Gran Canaria insular blocks. The distribution of the submarine volcanism to the north of Tenerife permits a better knowledge of the island from its base on the sea floor and defines the tectonic control of the growth of the shield between 4 and 2 Ma. Therefore, the evolution of the submarine edifice of Tenerife shows that the widespread parasite or satellite eruption centres are also very important in the overall growth of large shield edifices of volcanic islands.

  17. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  18. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  19. Inside active volcanoes; an exhibit on the move!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fiske, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    All of us are aware of the emphasis currently being placed in the United States on science education and public understanding of science. Most of this emphasis is directed toward mass audiences through book publications, school curricula, and television programs; sadly, most of it deals with non-earth science topics. In an effort to take advantage of this awakened consciousness and to highlight the earth sciences, the Smithsonian Institution and the U.S Geological Survey joined forces to prepare a traveling exhibit on volcanoes that is currently touring the country. This note will serve to bring you up to date on the progress of this exhibit as it reaches the mid-point of its tour. 

  20. Diffuse H_{2} emission: a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity at El Hierro volcano system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; González-Santana, Judit; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of interfering processes affecting reactive gases as CO2 during its ascent from magmatic bodies or hydrothermal systems toward the surface environment hinders the interpretation of their enrichments in the soil atmosphere and fluxes for volcano monitoring purposes (Marini and Gambardella, 2005). These processes include gas scrubbing by ground-waters and interaction with rocks, decarbonatation processes, biogenic production, etc. Within the rest of the soil gases, particularly interest has been addressed to light and highly mobile gases. They offer important advantages for the detection of vertical permeability structures, because their interaction with the surrounding rocks or fluids during the ascent toward the surface is minimum. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach, 1987). Although H2 can be produced in soils by N2-fixing and fertilizing bacteria, soils are considered nowadays as sinks of molecular hydrogen (Smith-Downey et al., 2006). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 generated within the crust moves rapidly and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 one of the best geochemical indicators of magmatic and geothermal activity at depth. El Hierro is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands and the scenario of the last volcanic eruption of the archipelago, a submarine eruption that took place 2 km off the southern coast of the island from October 2011 to March 2012. Since at El Hierro Island there are not any surface geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Here we show the results of soil H2 emission surveys that have been carried out regularly since mid-2012. Soil gas samples were collected in ˜600 sites selected based on their accessibility and geological criteria. Soil gases were sampled at ˜40

  1. Diffuse H_{2} emission: a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity at El Hierro volcano system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; González-Santana, Judit; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of interfering processes affecting reactive gases as CO2 during its ascent from magmatic bodies or hydrothermal systems toward the surface environment hinders the interpretation of their enrichments in the soil atmosphere and fluxes for volcano monitoring purposes (Marini and Gambardella, 2005). These processes include gas scrubbing by ground-waters and interaction with rocks, decarbonatation processes, biogenic production, etc. Within the rest of the soil gases, particularly interest has been addressed to light and highly mobile gases. They offer important advantages for the detection of vertical permeability structures, because their interaction with the surrounding rocks or fluids during the ascent toward the surface is minimum. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach, 1987). Although H2 can be produced in soils by N2-fixing and fertilizing bacteria, soils are considered nowadays as sinks of molecular hydrogen (Smith-Downey et al., 2006). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 generated within the crust moves rapidly and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 one of the best geochemical indicators of magmatic and geothermal activity at depth. El Hierro is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands and the scenario of the last volcanic eruption of the archipelago, a submarine eruption that took place 2 km off the southern coast of the island from October 2011 to March 2012. Since at El Hierro Island there are not any surface geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Here we show the results of soil H2 emission surveys that have been carried out regularly since mid-2012. Soil gas samples were collected in ˜600 sites selected based on their accessibility and geological criteria. Soil gases were sampled at ˜40

  2. Submarine Landslides: A Multidisciplinary Crossroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscardelli, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    The study of submarine landslides has advanced considerably in the last decade. A multitude of geoscience disciplines, including marine, petroleum and planetary geology, as well as geohazard assessments, are concerned with the study of these units. Oftentimes, researchers working in these fields disseminate their findings within their own communities and a multidisciplinary approach seems to lack. This presentation showcases several case studies in which a broader approach has increased our understanding of submarine landslides in a variety of geologic settings. Three-dimensional seismic data from several continental margins (Trinidad, Brazil, Morocco, Canada, GOM), as well as data from outcrop localities are shown to explore geomorphological complexities associated with submarine landslides. Discussion associated with the characterization and classification of submarine landslides is also part of this work. Topics that will be cover include: 1) how data from conventional oil and gas exploration activities can be used to increase our understanding of the dynamic behavior of submarine landslides, 2) analogies between terrestrial submarine landslides and potential Martian counterparts, 3) impact of submarine landslides in margin construction, as well as their economic significance and 4) the importance of quantifying the morphology of submarine landslides in a systematic fashion.

  3. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes.

  4. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes. PMID:22458514

  5. Ultra-high Resolution Mapping of the Inner Crater of the Active Kick'em Jenny Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, L.; Scott, C.; Tominaga, M.; Smart, C.; Vaughn, I.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.; German, C. R.; Participants, T.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted high-resolution geological characterization of a 0.015km^2 region of the inner crater of the most active submarine volcano in the Caribbean, Kick'em Jenny, located 8 km off Grenada in the Lesser Antilles Island Arc. We obtained digital still images and microbathymetery at an altitude of 3 m from the seafloor by using stereo cameras and a BlueView system mounted on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Hercules during the NA054 cruise on E/V Nautilus (Sept. - Oct. 2014). The seafloor images were processed to construct 2-D photo mosaics of the survey area using Standard Hercules Imaging Suite. We systematically classified the photographed seafloor geology based on the distribution of seafloor morphology and the observable rock fragment and outcrop sizes. The center of the crater floor shows a smooth, coherent texture with little variation in sea floor morphology. From immediately outside this area toward the crater rim, we observe an extensive area covered with outcrops, small rocks, and sediment: and within this area, (1) the north section is partially covered by uneven outcrops with elongated lineaments and a course, rugged seafloor with individual rock fragments observable; (2) the middle section contains high variability and heterogeneity in seafloor morphology in a non-systematic manner; and (3) overall, the southern most section displays subdued seafloor features both in space and variability compared to the other areas. The distributions of rock fragments were classified into four distinct sizes. We observe: (i) little variation in size distribution near the center of the crater floor; and (ii) rock fragment size increasing toward the rim of the crater. To obtain a better understanding of the link between variation in seafloor morphology, rock size distribution, and other in situ processes, we compare our observations on the digital photo mosaic to bathymetry data and ROV visuals (e.g. vents and bacterial mats).

  6. Volcano Infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Fee, D.; Matoza, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Open-vent volcanoes generate prodigious low frequency sound waves that tend to peak in the infrasound (<20 Hz) band. These long wavelength (> ~20 m) atmospheric pressure waves often propagate long distances with low intrinsic attenuation and can be well recorded with a variety of low frequency sensitive microphones. Infrasound records may be used to remotely monitor eruptions, identify active vents or track gravity-driven flows, and/or characterize source processes. Such studies provide information vital for both scientific study and volcano monitoring efforts. This presentation proposes to summarize and standardize some of the terminology used in the still young, yet rapidly growing field of volcano infrasound. Herein we suggest classification of typical infrasound waveform types, which include bimodal pulses, blast (or N-) waves, and a variety of infrasonic tremors (including broadband, harmonic, and monotonic signals). We summarize various metrics, including reduced pressure, intensity, power, and energy, in which infrasound excess pressures are often quantified. We also describe the spectrum of source types and radiation patterns, which are typically responsible for recorded infrasound. Finally we summarize the variety of propagation paths that are common for volcano infrasound radiating to local (<10 km), regional (out to several hundred kilometers), and global distances. The effort to establish common terminology requires community feedback, but is now timely as volcano infrasound studies proliferate and infrasound becomes a standard component of volcano monitoring.

  7. Bathymetry of the southwest flank of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the seafloor topography in the map area is on the southwest submarine flank of the currently active Mauna Loa Volcano. The benches and blocky hills shown on the map were shaped by giant landslides that resulted from instability of the rapidly growing volcano. These landslides were imagined during a 1986 to 1991 swath sonar program of the United States Hawaiian Exclusive Economic Zone, a cooperative venture by the U.S. Geological Survey and the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (Lipman and others, 1988; Moore and others, 1989). Dana Seamount (and probably also the neighboring Day Seamount) are apparently Cretaceous in age, based on paleomagnetic studies, and predate the growth of the Hawaiian Ridge volcanoes (Sager and Pringle, 1990).

  8. Eruptive history, current activity and risk estimation using geospatial information in the Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Flores-Peña, S.

    2013-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19 30.696 N, 103 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. In January 20, 1913, Colima had its biggest explosion of the twentieth century, with VEI 4, after the volcano had been dormant for almost 40 years. In 1961, a dome reached the northeastern edge of the crater and started a new lava flow, and from this date maintains constant activity. In February 10, 1999, a new explosion occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching altitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 masl, further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events, ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affecting the nearby villages: Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlan, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During 2005 to July 2013, this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity; similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1905. That was before the Plinian eruption of 1913, where pyroclastic flows reached a distance of 15 km from the crater. In this paper we estimate the risk of Colima volcano through the analysis of the vulnerability variables, hazard and exposure, for which we use: satellite imagery, recurring Fenix helicopter over flights of the state government of Jalisco, the use of the images of Google Earth and the population census 2010 INEGI. With this information and data identified changes in economic activities, development, and use of land. The expansion of the agricultural frontier in the lower sides of the volcano Colima, and with the advancement of traditional crops of sugar cane and corn, increased the growth of

  9. Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Helge; Lösekann, Tina; de Beer, Dirk; Elvert, Marcus; Nadalig, Thierry; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Sauter, Eberhard J; Schlüter, Michael; Klages, Michael; Foucher, Jean Paul; Boetius, Antje

    2006-10-19

    Mud volcanism is an important natural source of the greenhouse gas methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Recent investigations show that the number of active submarine mud volcanoes might be much higher than anticipated (for example, see refs 3-5), and that gas emitted from deep-sea seeps might reach the upper mixed ocean. Unfortunately, global methane emission from active submarine mud volcanoes cannot be quantified because their number and gas release are unknown. It is also unclear how efficiently methane-oxidizing microorganisms remove methane. Here we investigate the methane-emitting Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV, Barents Sea, 72 degrees N, 14 degrees 44' E; 1,250 m water depth) to provide quantitative estimates of the in situ composition, distribution and activity of methanotrophs in relation to gas emission. The HMMV hosts three key communities: aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (Methylococcales), anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) thriving below siboglinid tubeworms, and a previously undescribed clade of archaea (ANME-3) associated with bacterial mats. We found that the upward flow of sulphate- and oxygen-free mud volcano fluids restricts the availability of these electron acceptors for methane oxidation, and hence the habitat range of methanotrophs. This mechanism limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux. PMID:17051217

  10. Explorations of Mariana Arc Volcanoes Reveal New Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Massoth, G. J.; Nakamura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Some 20,000 km of volcanic arcs, roughly one-third the length of the global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system, rim the western Pacific Ocean. Compared to 25 years of hydrothermal investigations along MORs, exploration of similar activity on the estimated ~600 submarine arc volcanoes is only beginning [Ishibashi and Urabe, 1995; De Ronde et al., 2003]. To help alleviate this under-sampling, the R/V T. G. Thompson was used in early 2003 (9 February to 5 March) to conduct the first complete survey of hydrothermal activity along 1200 km of the Mariana intra-oceanic volcanic arc. This region includes both the Territory of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The expedition mapped over 50 submarine volcanoes with stunning new clarity (Figures 1 and 2) and found active hydrothermal discharge at 12 sites, including the southern back-arc site. This includes eight new sites along the arc (West Rota, Northwest Rota, E. Diamante, Zealandia Bank, Maug Caldera, Ahyi, Daikoku, and Northwest Eifuku) and four sites of previously known hydrothermal activity (Seamount X, Esmeralda, Kasuga 2, and Nikko) (Figures 1 and 2). The mapping also fortuitously provided a ``before'' image of the submarine flanks of Anatahan Island, which had its first historical eruption on 10 May 2003 (Figures 1 and 3).

  11. Coastal and submarine instabilities distribution in the tectonically active SW margin of the Corinth Rift (Psathopyrgos, Achaia, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simou, Eirini; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Lykousis, Vasilios; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Vassilakis, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The Corinth Rift, one of the most active rifts in the world as local extension trending NE-SW reaches the amount of 14±2 mm/yr, corresponds to one of the largest zones of seismically active normal faulting. The formation, growth and migration southwards of the prevailing fault systems, which evolve simultaneously with the intense morphogenetic processes, are overprinted in the age, facies and thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sequences constructing the south margin of the western Gulf of Corinth. The dominant fault blocks, defined by east-west trending, north dipping normal faults, are accompanied by several morphological features and anomalies, noticed in both the terrestrial and the marine environment. Our main aim has been to examine how the tectonic evolution, in combination with the attendant fierce erosional and sedimentary processes, has affected the morphology through geodynamic processes expressed as failures in the wider coastal area. High resolution multibeam bathymetry in combination with the available land surface data have contributed to submarine and subaerial morphological mapping. These have been used as a basis for the detection of all those geomorphic features that indicate instabilities probably triggered, directly or indirectly, by the ongoing active tectonic deformation. The interpretation of the combined datasets shows that the southwestern margin of the Corinth Rift towards Psathopyrgos fault zone is characterized by intense coastal relief and a narrow, almost absent, continental shelf, which passes abruptly to steep submarine slopes. These steep slope values denote the effects of the most recent brittle deformation and are related to coastal and submarine instabilities and failures. High uplift rates and rapid sedimentation, indicative of the regional high-energy terrestrial and submarine environment, are subsequently balanced by the transportation of the seafloor currents, especially where slope gradients decrease, disintegrating the

  12. BrO/SO2 ratios at Popocatepetl volcano during increased activity in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickel, M.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2012-12-01

    Since its reactivation in 1994 after many decades of inactivity, Popocatepetl volcano has been showing long periods of quiescent degassing and some events of intensified activity in connection with dome building and destruction processes. During a period of increased activity of the volcano, which began in April 2012, mobile ultraviolet DOAS measurements and stationary DOAS scans were performed to quantify SO2 fluxes and BrO/SO2 ratios within the volcanic plume. The results of these measurements are presented in the context of the volcanic activity, which consisted of increased emission of gas and ash and Vulcanian type explosions. In general, SO2 emissions were high during the period April-June 2012 and so the BrO emissions, however, the BrO/SO2 ratios did not change strongly before, during and after the increased activity.

  13. Repeated remobilisation of submarine landslide debris on an active subduction margin interpreted from multibeam bathymetry and multichannel seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, J. J.; Barnes, P. M.; McKean, J.; Pettinga, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    EM300 multibeam and multichannel seismic data reveal a 230 square kilometre submarine landslide complex which exhibits many of the characteristic features of equivalent terrestrial creeping earthflow complexes. Slope failures are sourced from the shelf edge/upper slope of the Poverty Bay reentrant on the active Hikurangi subduction margin of New Zealand where tectonic deformation, via major thrust faults with slip rates of c. 3-4 mm/yr, exerts a controlling influence on seafloor physiography. Individual landslides within this submarine complex are up to 14 km long over a vertical elevation drop of 700 m. Debris streams are in excess of 2 km wide with a debris thickness of 100 m. While multibeam data is limited to c. 10 m resolution, the scale of submarine landslide features allows us to resolve internal debris detail equivalent to terrestrial landslide examples using terrestrial techniques (e.g. airborne lidar). DEM derivative surface roughness techniques are employed to delineate the geomorphic expression of features including active and abandoned lateral shears, and contractional and extensional deformation of the landslide debris. From these interpretations multiple internal failures are recognised along the length of the landslide debris. Debris deformation is also imaged in high fold multichannel seismic data and correlated to the imaged surface geomorphic features, providing insight into the failure mechanics of the landslides. Failures initiate and evolve within the quasi-stable prograding sediment wedge built onto the upper slope during lowstand sealevels. Landslides within the greater complex are at different stages of development providing information on their spatial and temporal evolution headward and laterally along the transition from shelf to upper slope margin. We infer that failures are triggered and evolve in response to sealevel rise, and/or the frequent occurrence large earthquakes along the margin.

  14. Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of a large map sheet and a pamphlet. The map shows the geology, some photographs, description of map units, and correlation of map units. The pamphlet gives the full text about the geologic map. The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water; the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones.

  15. Magnetic precursors to the 2013 eruptive activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J.; Flores, A.

    2013-12-01

    Popocateptl volcano, 60km from Mexico City, has been erupting since 1994 with periods of more intense activity. Volcanomagnetic signals at Popocatepetl have been correlated with different volcanic phenomena especially ascent of several magma batches in pulses lasting several hours that precede increasing seismicity at the volcano. Data from the TL magnetic station on the northern flank of the volcano at 4000masl and from the CPX station at the same altitude on the southwestern flank are processed with the data from the TEO base station (weighted differences) in order to remove signals not associated with the volcano. Short term negative volcanic anomalies around 10nT preceded sharp increases in seismicity and copious ash emission during April and May 2013. They were correlated with periods of harmonic tremor and interpreted as new ascending magma batches, below the Curie point. A longer term descending magnetic trend from February on, is of thermomagnetic origen and is associated with the more mafic andesite compositions of the ash which contain higher MgO and are consistent with influx of deeper magma at higher magmatic temperatures. Sharp positive magnetic peaks are related both with explosions and seismic events, while sustained steps of positive anomalies are related with dome growth and cooling

  16. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  17. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  18. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  19. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  20. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  1. Dueling Volcanoes: How Activity Levels At Kilauea Influence Eruptions At Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusdell, F.

    2011-12-01

    The eruption of Kilauea at Pu`u `O`o is approaching its 29th anniversary. During this time, Mauna Loa has slowly inflated following its most recent eruption in 1984. This is Mauna Loa's longest inter-eruptive interval observed in HVO's 100 years of operation. When will the next eruption of Mauna Loa take place? Is the next eruption of Mauna Loa tied to the current activity at Kilauea? Historically, eruptive periods at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes appear to be inversely correlated. In the past, when Mauna Loa was exceptionally active, Kilauea Volcano was in repose, recovery, or in sustained lava lake activity. Swanson and co-workers (this meeting) have noted that explosive activity on Kilauea, albeit sporadic, was interspersed between episodes of effusive activity. Specifically, Swanson and co-workers note as explosive the time periods between 300 B.C.E.-1000 C.E and 1500-1800 C.E. They also point to evidence for low magma supply to Kilauea during these periods and few flank eruptions. During the former explosive period, Mauna Loa was exceedingly active, covering approximately 37% of its surface or 1882 km2, an area larger than Kilauea. This period is also marked by summit activity at Mauna Loa sustained for 300 years. In the 1500-1800 C.E. period, Mauna Loa was conspicuously active with 29 eruptions covering an area of 446 km2. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Kilauea was dominated by nearly continuous lava-lake activity. Meanwhile Mauna Loa was frequently active from 1843 C.E. to 1919 C.E., with 24 eruptions for an average repose time of 3.5 years. I propose that eruptive activity at one volcano may affect eruptions at the other, due to factors that impact magma supply, volcanic plumbing, and flank motion. This hypothesis is predicated on the notion that when the rift zones of Kilauea, and in turn its mobile south flank, are active, Mauna Loa's tendency to erupt is diminished. Kilauea's rift zones help drive the south flank seaward, in turn, as Mauna

  2. Active Source Seismic Experiment Peers Under Soufrière Hills Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voight, Barry; Sparks, R. S. J.; Hammond, J.; Shalev, E.; Malin, P.; Kenedi, C.; Minshull, T. A.; Paulatto, M.; Mattioli, G.; Hidayat, D.; Widiwijayanti, C.

    2010-07-01

    Characterizing internal structures of active volcanoes remains an enigmatic issue in geosciences. Yet studies of such structures can greatly improve hazard assessments, helping scientists to better monitor seismic signatures, geodetic deformation, and gas emissions, data that can be used to improve models and forecasts of future eruptions. Several passive seismic tomography experiments—which use travel times of seismic waves from natural earthquakes to image underground structures—have been conducted at active volcanoes (Hawaii's Kilauea, Washington's Mount St. Helens, Italy's Etna, and Japan's Unzen), but an inhomogeneous distribution of earthquakes compromises resolution. Further, if volcanic earthquakes are dominantly shallow at a given location, passive methods are limited to studying only shallow features. Thus, active source experiments—where seismic waves from the explosion of deliberately set charges are used to image below the surface—hold great potential to illuminate structures not readily seen through passive measures.

  3. Recent turbidity current activity in sediment-starved submarine canyons (Northwestern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Bourgault, Daniel; Neumeier, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are known to be main conduits for the transport of sediments to deep-sea basins, mostly by turbidity currents. Turbidity currents flowing in submarine canyons are mostly triggered by hyperpycnal flows, small to large slope failures and advection of shelf sediment offshore. In these contexts, sediment supply is necessary to maintain canyon activity over time. In 2007, a high-resolution mapping of small-scale submarine canyons offshore Pointe-des-Monts (NW Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada) revealed a series of incisions characterized by the presence of numerous confined crescentic bedforms. The repeat mapping of the canyons in 2012 and 2015 revealed that the bedforms migrated upslope, indicating that they are cyclic steps produced by supercritical flows. Surprisingly, the comparison of multibeam surveys did not show any evidence of slope failures that could have triggered the turbidity currents responsible for recent bedform migration. Additionally, the rocky shores and coastal shelf do not supply sediments to these canyons, thus excluding turbidity current triggers such as advection of shelf sediments or hyperpycnal flows. In this context, we suggest that hydrodynamic processes are responsible for suspending in-situ sediments, which then may flow as turbidity currents when density of the water-sediment mixture is high enough. ADCPs deployed for 3,5 months during the summer of 2015 revealed along-canyon currents following tidal cycles with speeds up to 0.4 m/s, which were not strong enough to produce bedform migration. Therefore, the currents responsible for bedforms occur during infrequent events or during winter conditions, which both require longer instrument time-series to be observed.

  4. Rapid response of a hydrologic system to volcanic activity: Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.C.P.; Connor, C.B.; Sanford, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic systems change in response to volcanic activity, and in turn may be sensitive indicators of volcanic activity. Here we investigate the coupled nature of magmatic and hydrologic systems using continuous multichannel time series of soil temperature collected on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America. The soil temperatures were measured in a low-temperature fumarole field located 3.5 km down the flanks of the volcano. Analysis of these time series reveals that they respond extremely rapidly, on a time scale of minutes, to changes in volcanic activity also manifested at the summit vent. These rapid temperature changes are caused by increased flow of water vapor through flank fumaroles during volcanism. The soil temperature response, ~5 °C, is repetitive and complex, with as many as 13 pulses during a single volcanic episode. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of these temperature time series shows that these anomalies are characterized by broad frequency content during volcanic activity. They are thus easily distinguished from seasonal trends, diurnal variations, or individual rainfall events, which triggered rapid transient increases in temperature during 5% of events. We suggest that the mechanism responsible for the distinctive temperature signals is rapid change in pore pressure in response to magmatism, a response that can be enhanced by meteoric water infiltration. Monitoring of distal fumaroles can therefore provide insight into coupled volcanic-hydrologic-meteorologic systems, and has potential as an inexpensive monitoring tool.

  5. Geothermal activity and energy of the Yakedake volcano, Gifu-Nagano, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Iriyama, Jun

    1996-12-31

    The temperature of the most active solfatara in the summit crater of the Yakedake volcano (altitude 2,455 m Gifu-Nagano, Japan) was 92.2 and 129.4{degrees}C in September 1995 and in October 1994, respectively. The temperature of solfatara in the northern summit dome at an altitude of 2,240 to 2,270 m ranged from 68.2 to 92.5{degrees}C in September 1995. The water sample from a crater pond, Shoga-ike, located on the summit, showed a pH and electrical conductivity of 4.38 and 42.2 {mu}S/cm in October 1991, 4.35 and 42.4 {mu}S/cm in September 1992, 4.11 and 76.6 {mu}S/cm in October 1994, and 4.30 and 45.1 {mu}S/cm in September 1995, respectively. In 1960, the water sample from the same pond showed the pH and electrical conductivity of 3.7 and 80.8 {mu}S/cm, respectively. Although the values of pH and electrical conductivity in 1994 approached to the values at the volcano`s pre-eruption in 1960, the eruption in the summit dome did not occur in 1995. However, a large steam explosion occurred in the Nakanoyu area of the southeastern Mountainside of the volcano. The geothermal energy within the summit dome at an altitude of 2,050 to 2,455 m of the Yakedake volcano is calculated, using new data, to be about 4.8 x 10{sup 17} J, which represents a thermal power output of 5.1 x 10{sup 2} MW{sub th} averaged over 30 yrs.

  6. Active tectonic morphology and submarine deformation of the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba from analyses of multibeam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Gideon; Niemi, Tina M.; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Sade, Ronnie A.; Hall, John K.; Hartman, Gal; Akawi, Emad; Abueladas, Abdelrahmem; Al-Ruzouq, Rami

    2010-12-01

    A high-resolution marine geophysical study was conducted during October-November 2006 in the northern Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat, providing the first multibeam imaging of the seafloor across the entire gulf head spanning both Israeli and Jordanian territorial waters. Analyses of the seafloor morphology show that the gulf head can be subdivided into the Eilat and Aqaba subbasins separated by the north-south-trending Ayla high. The Aqaba submarine basin appears starved of sediment supply, apparently causing erosion and a landward retreat of the shelf edge. Along the eastern border of this subbasin, the shelf is largely absent and its margin is influenced by the Aqaba Fault zone that forms a steep slope partially covered by sedimentary fan deltas from the adjacent ephemeral drainages. The Eilat subbasin, west of the Ayla high, receives a large amount of sediment derived from the extensive drainage basins of the Arava Valley (Wadi ’Arabah) and Yutim River to the north-northeast. These sediments and those entering from canyons on the south-western border of this subbasin are transported to the deep basin by turbidity currents and gravity slides, forming the Arava submarine fan. Large detached blocks and collapsed walls of submarine canyons and the western gulf margin indicate that mass wasting may be triggered by seismic activity. Seafloor lineaments defined by slope gradient analyses suggest that the Eilat Canyon and the boundaries of the Ayla high align along north- to northwest-striking fault systems—the Evrona Fault zone to the west and the Ayla Fault zone to the east. The shelf-slope break that lies along the 100 m isobath in the Eilat subbasin, and shallower (70-80 m isobaths) in the Aqaba subbasin, is offset by approx. 150 m along the eastern edge of the Ayla high. This offset might be the result of horizontal and vertical movements along what we call the Ayla Fault on the east side of the structure. Remnants of two marine terraces at 100 m and approx. 150 m water

  7. Active tectonic morphology and submarine deformation of the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba from analyses of multibeam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Gideon; Niemi, Tina; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Sade, Ronnie; Hall, John; Hartman, Gal; Akawi, Emad; Abueladas, Abed; Al-Ruzouq, Rami

    2010-05-01

    A high-resolution marine geophysical study was conducted during October-November 2006 in the northern Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat (gulf head). The gulf head can be subdivided into the Eilat and Aqaba subbasins separated by the north-south-trending Ayla high. The Aqaba submarine basin appears starved of sediment supply, apparently causing erosion and a landward retreat of the shelf edge. Along the eastern border of this subbasin, the shelf is largely absent and its margin is influenced by the Aqaba fault zone that forms a steep slope partially covered by sedimentary fan deltas from the adjacent ephemeral drainages. The Eilat subbasin, west of the Ayla high, receives a large amount of sediment derived from the extensive drainage basins of the Arava Valley (Wadi 'Arabah) and Yutim River to the north-northeast. These sediments and those entering from canyons on the south-western border of this subbasin are transported to the deep basin by turbidity currents and gravity slides, forming the Arava submarine fan. Large detached blocks and collapsed walls of submarine canyons and the western gulf margin indicate that mass wasting may be triggered by seismic activity. Seafloor lineaments defined by slope gradient analyses suggest that the Eilat Canyon and the boundaries of the Ayla high align along north- to northwest-striking fault systems—the Evrona Fault Zone to the west and the Ayla Fault Zone to the east. The shelf-slope break that lies along the 100 m isobath in the Eilat subbasin, and shallower (70-80 m isobaths) in the Aqaba subbasin, is offset by approx. 150 m along the eastern edge of the Ayla high. This offset might be the result of horizontal and vertical movements along what we call the Ayla Fault on the east side of the structure. Remnants of two marine terraces at 100 m and approx. 150 m water depths line the southwest margin of the gulf. These terraces are truncated by faulting along their northern end. Fossil coral reefs, which have a similar

  8. How volcano monitoring in New Zealand can contribute to a global volcano dataset: The GeoNet Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, G. E.; Scott, B.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanism plays an important role in New Zealand. Much of the landscape of the central North Island owes its shape to volcanism, with the soils supporting forestry and farming economies, geothermal systems providing renewable electricity production and the spectacular landscape supporting tourism and adventure. However volcanism also has it disadvantages: eruptive activity brings physical damage and economic losses and, sometimes, tragically the loss of life. Historically, in New Zealand, volcanoes represent the largest single source of fatalities from natural disasters. To better mitigate the hazard from New Zealand’s volcanoes, a multidisciplinary approach is applied. In 2001 the NZ Earthquake Commission (EQC) commenced funding the GeoNet project, providing the first totally national modern geological hazard monitoring system in New Zealand. The GeoNet project is responsibly for monitoring and assessing all of the active volcanoes (and other geological hazards) in New Zealand. The volcano monitoring programme is integrated into the national seismograph and geodetic networks. The volcano monitoring covers active volcanic cones, resting calderas, volcanic fields, and submarine volcanoes. Monitoring techniques include volcano seismology, geodesy, gas and water chemistry, remote sensing and other geophysical techniques, producing a wide variety of data sets, with both temporal and spatial distribution. These data sets form the basis for detailed research to achieve in depth understanding of these volcanoes and will contribute to the global knowledge of volcanic processes. However to achieve this the data sets need to be accessible by a range of end users, so that they can be used to underpin fundamental research and applied hazard assessments. This presentation will outline the NZ data sets and the problems of presenting and sharing them globally.

  9. Analysis of the seismicity activity of the volcano Ceboruco, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Gomez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a stratovolcano is located in the state of Nayarit,Mexico (104 ° 30'31 .25 "W, 21 ° 7'28 .35" N, 2280msnm). This is an volcano active, as part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Nelson (1986) reports that it has had activity during the last 1000 years has averaged eruptions every 125 years or so, having last erupted in 1870, currently has fumarolic activity. In the past 20 years there has been an increase in the population and socio-economic activities around the volcano (Suárez Plascencia, 2013); which reason the Ceboruco study has become a necessity in several ways. Recent investigations of seismicity (Rodríguez Uribe et al., 2013) have classified the earthquakes in four families Ceboruco considering the waveform and spectral features. We present analysis included 57 days of seismicity from March to October 2012, in the period we located 97 events with arrivals of P and S waves clear, registered in at least three seasons, three components of the temporal network Ceboruco volcano.

  10. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  11. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  12. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  13. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  14. Seismicity at Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia: Volcano-Tectonic Earthquake Swarms Triggered by the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake and Non-Triggered Background Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, D. H.; Chartrand, Z. A.; Jay, J.; Pritchard, M. E.; West, M. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We find that the 270 ky dormant Uturuncu Volcano in SW Bolivia exhibits relatively high rates of shallow, volcano-tectonic seismicity that is dominated by swarm-like activity. We also document that the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake triggered an exceptionally high rate of seismicity in the seconds to days following the main event. Although dormant, Uturuncu is currently being studied due to its large-scale deformation rate of 1-2 cm/yr uplift as revealed by InSAR. As part of the NASA-funded Andivolc project to investigate seismicity of volcanoes in the central Andes, a seismic network of 15 stations (9 Mark Products L22 short period and 6 Guralp CMG40T intermediate period sensors) with an average spacing of about 10 km was installed at Uturuncu from April 2009 to April 2010. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes occur at an average rate of about 3-4 per day, and swarms of 5-60 events within a span of minutes to hours occur a few times per month. Most of these earthquakes are located close to the summit at depths near and above sea level. The largest swarm occurred on 28 September 2009 and consisted of 60 locatable events over a time span of 28 hours. The locations of volcano-tectonic earthquakes at Uturuncu are oriented in a NW-SE trend, which matches the dominant orientation of regional faults and suggests a relationship between the fault system at Uturuncu and the regional tectonics of the area; a NW-SE trending fault beneath Uturuncu may serve to localize stresses that are accumulating over the broad area of uplift. Based on automated locations, the maximum local magnitude of these events is approximately M = 4 and the average magnitude is approximately M = 2. An initial estimate of the b-value is about b = 1.2. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake on 27 February 2010 triggered hundreds of local volcano-tectonic events at Uturuncu. High-pass filtering of the long period surface waves reveals that the first triggered events occurred with the onset of the Rayleigh

  15. Simultaneous use of various sensors for thermal monitoring of active volcanoes - an application of Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaksek, K.; Hort, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Thermal remote sensing is a valuable tool for monitoring active volcanoes. One can detect thermal anomalies originating from a volcano by comparing signals in mid and thermal infrared spectra. Once a thermal anomaly is detected, it has to be characterized in order to evaluate the activity status of volcano. The usual procedure is to compute temperature and area of the thermal anomaly using the dual band method proposed by Dozier (1981). More recent work, however, has shown that radiant flux (can be derived from the temperature and area or directly from measured radiances) is a more robust parameter for volcano characterization. Atmosphere, satellite viewing angle and sensor characteristics have a significant influence on the thermal anomaly characterization. Some of the influences are easy to correct using standard remote sensing preprocessing techniques, however, some noise still remains in data. In addition, satellites in polar orbits have long revisit times and thus they might fail to detect short volcanic events. It would therefore desirable to use data from different satellites in order to a) reduce uncertainties and b) improve temporal resolution. If one tries to simultaneously use data from different instruments, the measurements are often not comparable. Fortunately, there are statistical techniques that allow the combination of measurements from different sources that have different levels of accuracy. A suitable method for such a data fusion is Kalman filter. It is a recursive operator that returns the optimal estimation of a system state in a chosen time. Here we applied the Kalman filter to reduce noise and increase the temporal resolution of volcano radiant flux measurements from simultaneous MODIS and AVHRR measurements. As the evolution of the volcanic activity is difficult to predict we did not apply a physical model for the system state transition; we used a stochastic based model. A main challenge was to define the process noise covariance matrix

  16. Hydraulic Jumps, Cyclic Steps and Scour Formation in an Active Submarine Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, E. J.; Peakall, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Darby, S. E.; Dorrell, R. M.; Wynn, R.

    2011-12-01

    Field scale submarine channel gravity currents are notoriously difficult to measure and thus directly investigate due to their inaccessible location and infrequent nature, which is compounded by present sea-level high-stand. An exception to this is the almost continuous density-driven current that results from the inflow of saline Mediterranean water, via the Bosporus strait, into the Black Sea. This flow has carved a sinuous channel system in water depths of 70 to 120 m containing a series of prominent scours at the upstream end. Despite being driven by the salinity contrast, the flow is sufficiently energetic to transport and rework coarse sand within the channel network. The relatively shallow depths of the channel and the continuous nature of this current provide a unique opportunity to study three-dimensional flow dynamics and the interaction of the flow with a seafloor channel network. Thus, it provides a rare analogue for channelized dilute sediment-laden turbidity currents. There has been speculation for nearly half a century that hydraulic jumps are an important process in submarine density currents. Hydraulic jumps have been implicated in causing the development of submarine fans, large scale (km-scale) scouring, the formation of cyclic steps and channel genesis. However, until now this has been inferred from a combination of small scale laboratory experiments and making inferences about flow processes from the geological record and modern bathymetry. Here we provide the first direct field evidence of hydraulic jumps and cyclic step formation in a density-driven current. The decrease in density due to entrainment of fluid across the jump is negligible compared to entrainment into the supercritical flow prior to the jump. The largest hydraulic jump imaged corresponds to a 100 m scour in the seafloor, with which it is in-phase. The decrease in velocity and thus bed shear stress across the jump is not as extreme as present models predict, and this suggests

  17. Hanging canyons of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada: Fault-control on submarine canyon geomorphology along active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter T.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.; Greene, H. Gary

    2014-06-01

    Faulting commonly influences the geomorphology of submarine canyons that occur on active continental margins. Here, we examine the geomorphology of canyons located on the continental margin off Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, that are truncated on the mid-slope (1200-1400 m water depth) by the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone (QCFZ). The QCFZ is an oblique strike-slip fault zone that has rates of lateral motion of around 50-60 mm/yr and a small convergent component equal to about 3 mm/yr. Slow subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone has accreted a prism of marine sediment against the lower slope (1500-3500 m water depth), forming the Queen Charlotte Terrace, which blocks the mouths of submarine canyons formed on the upper slope (200-1400 m water depth). Consequently, canyons along this margin are short (4-8 km in length), closely spaced (around 800 m), and terminate uniformly along the 1400 m isobath, coinciding with the primary fault trend of the QCFZ. Vertical displacement along the fault has resulted in hanging canyons occurring locally. The Haida Gwaii canyons are compared and contrasted with the Sur Canyon system, located to the south of Monterey Bay, California, on a transform margin, which is not blocked by any accretionary prism, and where canyons thus extend to 4000 m depth, across the full breadth of the slope.

  18. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  19. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    PubMed

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution.

  20. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    PubMed

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution. PMID:24631200

  1. Ground survey of active Central American volcanoes in November - December 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Thermal anomalies at two volcanoes, Santiaguito and Izalco, have grown in size in the past six months, based on repeated ground survey. Thermal anomalies at Pacaya volcano have became less intense in the same period. Large (500 m diameter) thermal anomalies exist at 3 volcanoes presently, and smaller scale anomalies are found at nine other volcanoes.

  2. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data.

    PubMed

    Del Negro, Ciro; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-10-30

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 - December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption.

  3. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  4. Investigation of Surtsey Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; Norrman, John O.

    The volcanic island of Surtsey, Iceland, was built during the period November 1963 to June 1967 and is one of the few oceanic volcanic islands that has formed and survived in recent times. New stimulus to geologic work on the island was provided in 1979 by completion of a 181-m-deep hole that was drilled to investigate the structure of the volcano and the active hydrothermal system below.During August 1985 an international group of researchers undertook a series of geologic and biologic investigations on the island. This work was facilitated by new aerial photographs taken by the Icelandic Geodetic Survey and a new bathymetric map of the Surtsy region made by the Icelandic Hydrographic Service (both in Reykjavik). Ground surveying of markers appearing in the photographs will permit a major revision of the to pographic map of the island (scale 1:5000). The new bathymetry defines the extent of continuing erosion of three volcanic vents, two of which formed short-lived islands during the Surtsey eruptive episode. Since 1967, when the first bathymetry of these submarine features was made, the summitt errace of Syrtlingur has been reduced from 23 to 32 m below sea level; that of Jolnir, from 15 to 37 m; and that of Surtla, from 32 t o 46 m.

  5. Io’s active volcanoes during the New Horizons era: Insights from New Horizons imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Lopes, R. M.; Howell, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    In February 2007, the New Horizons spacecraft flew by the Jupiter system, obtaining images of Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), a four-color (visible to near infrared) camera, obtained 17 sets of images. The Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), a high-resolution panchromatic camera, obtained 190 images, including many of Io eclipsed by Jupiter. We present a complete view of the discrete point-like emission sources in all images obtained by these two instruments. We located 54 emission sources and determined their brightnesses. These observations, the first that observed individual Ionian volcanoes on short timescales of seconds to minutes, demonstrate that the volcanoes have stable brightnesses on these timescales. The active volcanoes Tvashtar (63N, 124W) and E. Girru (22N, 245W) were observed by both LORRI and MVIC, both in the near-infrared (NIR) and methane (CH4) filters. Tvashtar was additionally observed in the red filter, which allowed us to calculate a color temperature of approximately 1200 K. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the volcanoes frequently active during the Galileo era continued to be active during the New Horizons flyby. We found that none of the seven volcanoes observed by New Horizons multiple times over short timescales showed substantial changes on the order of seconds and only one, E. Girru exhibited substantial variation over minutes to days, increasing by 25% in just over an hour and decreasing by a factor of 4 over 6 days. Observations of Tvashtar are consistent with a current eruption similar to previously observed eruptions and are more consistent with the thermal emission of a lava flow than the fire fountains inferred from the November 1999 observations. These data also present new puzzles regarding Ionian volcanism. Since there is no associated surface change or low albedo feature that could be identified nearby, the source of the emission from

  6. Boron-rich mud volcanoes of the Black Sea region: modern analogues to ancient sea-floor tourmalinites associated with Sullivan-type Pb-Zn deposits?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Turner, R.J.W.; Ware, P.L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Large submarine mud volcanoes in the abyssal part of the Black Sea south of the Crimean Peninsula are similar in many respects to synsedimentary mud volcanoes in the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell basin. One of the Belt-Purcell mud volcanoes directly underlies the giant Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit in southeastern British Columbia. Footwall rocks to the Sullivan deposit comprise variably tourmalinized siltstone, conglomerate, and related fragmental rock; local thin pyrrhotite-rich and spessartine-quartz beds are interpreted as Fe and Fe-Mn exhalites, respectively. Analogous Fe- and Mn-rich sediments occur near the abyssal Black Sea mud volcanoes. Massive pyrite crusts and associated carbonate chimneys discovered in relatively shallow waters (~200 m depth) west of the Crimean Peninsula indicate an active sea-floor-hydrothermal system. Subaerial mud volcanoes on the Kerch and Taman Peninsulas (~100 km north of the abyssal mud volcanoes) contain saline thermal waters that locally have very high B contents (to 915 mg/L). These data suggest that tourmalinites might be forming in or near submarine Black Sea mud volcanoes, where potential may also exist for Sullivan-type Pb-Zn mineralization.

  7. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 ??m) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  9. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-11-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  10. Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of the Deep Subsurface Environment: Kumano Mud Volcano, Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, D. H.; Ijiri, A.; Morono, Y.; Orphan, V. J.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes play an important environmental role by delivering deep-sourced fluids, elements, and hydrocarbons to the seafloor. These fluxes in turn support chemosynthetic benthic communities. However, due to difficulty in accessing the deep biosphere most mud volcano samples only represent the top one to several meters below seafloor (mbsf) obtainable by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) or gravity cores. Thus, the geochemical and microbiological conditions, as well as vertical homogeneity, deep within mud volcanoes remains poorly constrained. In 2012, using the deep-sea drilling vessel Chikyu, we drilled one of the most active submarine mud volcanoes in the Kumano forearc basin of the Nankai Trough, off the Kii Peninsula of Japan (33°67.581'N, 136°56.8085'E: 1,986.7 m in water depth). Cores were obtained down to 200 mbsf. Cell counts indicate the presence of microorganisms at relatively low abundance (less than 105 cells/cm3) throughout the cored depth. Molecular analyses reveal vertical heterogeneity in the microbial community composition, including specific depth horizons harboring putative methanogenic and methanotrophic phylotypes at >100 mbsf. Geochemical profiles indicate the potential for microbial activity and rate measurements with radiotracers revealed active homoacetogenesis rates that were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than rates of homo- and acetoclastic methanogenesis. To assess active autotrophic, methanotrophic and heterotrophic populations, 13C- and 15N-amendment experiments with sediment samples collected from 15 and 115 mbsf were established and single cell stable isotope analyses with nanoSIMS are in progress. Our samples and analyses represent a unique observation of a subseafloor setting different from previously explored stratified sediments on continental margins and will allow further understanding of how submarine mud volcanoes contribute to geochemical and microbiological fluxes into the surface biosphere.

  11. Understanding how active volcanoes work: a contribution from synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Baker, D. R.; Mancini, L.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes are complex systems that require the integration of many different geoscience disciplines to understand their behaviour and to monitor and forecast their activity. In the last two decades an increasing amount of information on volcanic processes has been obtained by studying the textures and compositions of volcanic rocks. Five years ago we started a continuing collaboration with the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Sincrotrone, a third generation synchrotron light source near Trieste, Italy, with the goal of performing high-resolution, phase-contrast X-ray tomographic scans and reconstructing 3-D digital volumes of volcanic specimens. These volumes have been then used for the visualization of the internal structure of rocks and for the quantification of rock textures (i.e., vesicle and crystal volume fraction, individual vesicle volumes and shapes, vesicle connectivity, vesicle volume distributions, permeability simulations etc.). We performed tomographic experiments on volcanic products erupted from different hazardous volcanic systems in Italy and around the world: Campi Flegrei, Stromboli, Etna (Southern Italy), Villarrica (Chile), Yasur and Ambrym (Vanuatu Islands). As an example, we used the results of these studies to constrain the dynamics of vesiculation and degassing in basaltic (Polacci et al., 2006; Burton et al., 2007; Colò et al., 2007; Andronico et al., 2008; Polacci et al., 2008a) and trachytic (Piochi et al., 2008) magmas. A better knowledge of how gas is transported and lost from magmas has led us in turn to draw new implications on the eruptive style of these active, hazardous volcanoes (Polacci et al., 2008b). Work in progress consists of optimizing our procedure by establishing a precise protocol that will enable us to quantitatively study the 3-D texture and composition of rocks in a statistically representative way. Future work will concentrate on the study of the spatial relations between phases (crystals, vesicles and glass) in rocks

  12. SO2 emissions from persistently active explosive volcanoes: can we estimate their contribution using satellite instruments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J.; Clarke, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The scientific community has long since recognized the importance of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on climate change. The most universally accepted theory is that large amounts of SO2 injected into the atmosphere will react to form sulfate aerosols that reflect sunlight, thereby decreasing global temperature. This cooling effect has been observed after large eruptions throughout the geologic and historic records. The exact effect of SO2 on global climate though is still poorly understood. Estimates of global volcanic SO2 emissions rely primarily on two sets of data: ground-based measurements of SO2 fluxes using COSPEC or DOAS and more recently satellite observations. Both of these usually represent ‘snapshots’ of the gas emissions and at only a few places is continuous monitoring and data acquisition possible. Because continuous data are so rare, many assumptions have to be made when trying to estimate the global volcanic SO2 input to the atmosphere. This is especially true when it comes to frequently exploding volcanoes. Most of their background activity is very low in intensity or the gas plume may simply not reach the stratosphere, both of which make it impossible for satellite instruments to detect it. On the other hand, while individual explosions produce plumes big enough to be detected by satellite instruments, they are often not captured from the ground because no continuous monitoring is in place. Therefore neither satellite nor ground-based data fully represents the total SO2 emissions of these volcanoes. We have analyzed satellite data for several persistently active explosive volcanic centers in an attempt to determine whether their SO2 emissions are detectable and to what extent we can quantify them. We used data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), which operates in the UV spectrum, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and, when available, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Radiometer (ASTER), both of which operate in the

  13. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  14. Activity of Earthquakes with Similar Waveforms Around Ontake Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, T.; Yamazaki, F.; Tadokoro, K.

    2005-12-01

    Ontake volcano area is known for its very high seismicity. Swarm activity has been repeatedly observed since 1976. The volcano erupted in 1979 and a large earthquake with a magnitude of 6.8 occurred in 1984 in the southeastern part of the volcano. A dense seismic network has been constructed for monitoring in this area. Recent studies using leveling survey reveal uplift above the swarm area. Earthquakes with similar waveforms (similar earthquakes) have been observed mainly at geothermal areas and plate boundaries. It is possible to use them to detect temporal change of crustal structure due to large earthquakes or volcanic eruptions using repeating similar earthquakes. With a view to use them as a monitoring tool, we search for similar earthquakes in Ontake area and examine temporal change of observed seismic waveforms. We use ~3300 events which occurred in this area from January 1999 to August 2000. First we pick up event pairs of which hypocenters are manually determined within 4 km. Then we calculate cross-correlation coefficients at each station from the waveform pairs band-pass-filtered at 4 to 8 Hz. The calculation uses 15-second time window that contains both P- and S-waves. We define similar earthquake pairs as event pairs with cross-correlation coefficients larger than 0.9 at more than 8 stations. Such event pairs are distributed mainly in earthquake clusters located to the east and southeastern flank of the volcano. The similar earthquakes have magnitude ranging from 1 to 2 and focal depths of 1 to 7 km. Occurrence intervals of the most pairs are very short, between a few hours and a few days. A few pairs have intervals of several months. But repeating groups with nearly the same interval have not been found due probably to the short data period. We will further analyze using expanded data period and area.

  15. Evidence for a seismic activity mainly constituted of hybrid events at Cayambe volcano, Ecuador. Interpretation in a iced-domes volcano context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillier, Bertrand; Chatelain, Jean-Luc

    2006-06-01

    The high activity level of Hybrid Events (HE) detected beneath the Cayambe volcano since 1989 has been more thoroughly investigated with data from a temporary array. The unusual HE spectral content allows separating a high-frequency signal riding on a low-frequency one, with a probable single source. HEs are interpreted as high frequency VT events, produced by the interaction between magmatic heat and an underground water system fed by thaw water from the summital glacier, which trigger simultaneous low-frequency fluid resonance in the highly fractured adjacent medium. Pure VTs are interpreted as 'aborted' HEs occurring probably in the oldest and coldest part of the volcano complex. To cite this article: B. Guillier, J.-L. Chatelain, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  16. Combining Infrasound and Imaging Techniques to Characterize and Quantify Eruptive Activity at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fee, D.; Lopez, T. M.; Rowell, C.; Matoza, R. S.; Szuberla, C.; Prata, F.; Firstov, P.; Makhmudov, E.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in atmospheric pressure at volcanic vents caused by the rapid release and expansion of volcanic material (e.g., gas, ash, lava) produce low frequency sound waves known as infrasound. Because of the direct link between the infrasound source and the eruption and emission of volcanic material, complementary direct and remote observations of gas, ash, and other eruptive phenomena can be combined with infrasound measurements to characterize and quantify volcanic activity. Here we present coincident measurements collected over two 10-day periods at Karymsky Volcano in August 2011 and July 2012 of infrasound, SO2, thermal radiation, ash (2011 only), and visual imagery. Infrasound and audible (up to 250 Hz) acoustic data were recorded using arrays of portable digital microphones. SO2 emissions were measured using both a scanning FLYSPEC ultraviolet spectrometer system as well as a CyClops infrared camera equipped with broadband, 8.6, 10, and 11 micron filters permitting detection and quantification of both SO2 and ash. A FLIR infrared camera was utilized to record high temporal resolution thermal observations of the volcanic emissions and hot eruption deposits. Lastly, visual imagery was taken with an HD camcorder. Correlations between this multiparameter dataset allow a better understanding of both the infrasound data and eruptive activity. Karymsky Volcano is one of the most active and dynamic volcanoes in Kamchatka, Russia, with activity during our experiments consisting of vigorous degassing, frequent ash explosions, apparent vent sealing, and intermittent explosive magmatic eruptions. This varied activity produced diverse acoustic and emissions signals. Large explosive eruptions in 2011 are preceded by vent sealing and produce high-amplitude infrasound with occasional visible shock waves. Vigorous gas jetting is also observed and accompanied by elevated SO2 emissions and low infrasound levels. The gas jetting produced clear audible sound (~20-100 Hz) that

  17. Development and experimental verification of a robust active noise control system for a diesel engine in submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, D.; Jukkert, S.; Hövelmann, N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental validation of an ANC (active noise control)-system designed for a particular application in the exhaust line of a submarine. Thereby, tonal components of the exhaust noise in the frequency band from 75 Hz to 120 Hz are reduced by more than 30 dB. The ANC-system is based on the feedforward leaky FxLMS-algorithm. The observability of the sound pressure in standing wave field is ensured by using two error microphones. The noninvasive online plant identification method is used to increase the robustness of the controller. Online plant identification is extended by a time-varying convergence gain to improve the performance in the presence of slight error in the frequency of the reference signal.

  18. Submarine Silicic Explosive Eruptions: what can submarine pyroclasts tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Allen, S.; McPhie, J.; Fiske, R. S.; Tani, K.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of submarine volcanism is in its infancy with respect to subaerial eruption processes. Two fundamental differences between eruptions in seawater compared to those on land are that (1) eruptions occur at higher confining pressures, and (2) in a seawater medium, which has a higher heat capacity, density and viscosity than air. Together with JAMSTEC collaborators we have a sample suite of submarine pumice deposits from modern volcanoes of known eruption depths. This sample suite spans a spectrum of eruption intensities, from 1) powerful explosive caldera-forming (Myojin Knoll caldera); to 2) weakly explosive cone building (pre-caldera Myojin Knoll pumice and Kurose-Nishi pumice); to 3) volatile-driven effusive dome spalling (Sumisu knoll A); to 4) passive dome effusion (Sumisu knoll B and C). This sample suite has exceptional potential, not simply because the samples have been taken from well-constrained, sources but because they have similar high silica contents, are unaltered and their phenocrysts contain melt inclusions. Microtextural quantitative analysis has revealed that (i) clast vesicularities remain high (69-90 vol.%) regardless of confining pressure, mass eruption rate or eruption style , (ii) vesicle number densities scale with inferred eruption rate, and (iii) darcian and inertial permeabilities of submarine effusive and explosive pyroclasts overlap with explosively-erupted subaerial pyroclasts.

  19. Chemical evolution of thermal springs at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica: Effect of volcanic activity, precipitation, seismic activity, and Earth tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, D. L.; Bundschuh, J.; Soto, G. J.; Fernández, J. F.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2006-09-01

    Arenal Volcano in NW Costa Rica, Central America has been active during the last 37 years. However, only relatively low temperature springs have been identified on its slopes with temperatures less than around 60 °C. The springs are clustered on the NE and NW slopes of the volcano, close to contacts between the recent and older volcanic products or at faults that intercept the volcano. This volcano is located in a rain forest region with annual rainfall averaging around 5 m. During the last 15 years, the temperature and chemical composition of 4 hot springs and 2 cold springs have been monitored approximately every 3 months. In addition, two more thermal sites were identified recently and sampled, as well as two boreholes located on a fault NE of the volcano. Scatter plots of chemical species such as Cl and B suggest that the waters in these discharges belong to the same aquifer with a saline end member similar to Río Tabacón at the beginning of the study period (1990) and the deeper borehole (B-2) in 2004. The waters of Quebrada Bambú and Quebrada Fría represent a more dilute end member. Both long-term (over the 15 years) and short-term or seasonal decreases in concentration and steady or decreasing temperature are noted in NW springs. Springs located at the NE show increasing temperatures and ion concentrations, except for bicarbonate that has decreased in concentration for all the springs. This behavior is likely associated with a shallow source for the solutes and heat for this aquifer. To the NW the early lavas and pyroclastic flows have been cooling down, decreasing the contribution of leaching products to the infiltrating waters. To the NE, pyroclastic flows to the N during the last decade are contributing increasing concentrations of solutes and heat throughout water infiltration and circulation within the faults and the surficial drainage that has a NE regional trend. For the short-term or seasonal variations, concentrations of chemical constituents

  20. Degassing Dynamics at Stromboli Volcano: Insights From Infrasonic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.; Ulivieri, G.; Delle Donne, D.

    2006-12-01

    Infrasound at Stromboli consists on transients related to explosions and on small amplitude intermittent pulses associated with "active" over-pressurized degassing of the magma column. Degassing of a magmatic system is generally understood as a quasi-steady "non-explosive" passive mechanism, when the slow exsolution process allows the continuous compensation of the gas pressure. In contrast infrasound indicates that degassing can occur also in over-pressurized condition, associated to the bursting of small gas pockets at the magma free-surface. This intermittent release of gas induces in the atmosphere small (< 0.1 x105 Pa at the source) infrasonic pulses and occurs almost regularly every ~1-2 s. The permanent small aperture 5-elements infrasonic array at Stromboli is monitoring both explosions and degassing providing position, over-pressure and occurrence of the source and revealing the complex and complete behavior of the magma column. Log-linear amplitude distribution of infrasonic data shows 2 different trends of decay suggesting that degassing and explosions are driven by a different gas dynamics. Moreover, infrasound location indicates that over-pressurized degassing is active only in one vent at once. Location of the puffing is stable in a single vent over hours-to-days periods, or it can shift from vent to vent with smooth or abrupt transitions. The stability in the position of the puffing within the crater terrace is suggesting that the over-pressurized gas bubble flow is following only one preferential segment of the feeding conduits at once. The stable location of the bursting bubbles, however, may change from time to time and without any apparent evidence or trigger mechanisms, leading to a sharp change in the rising path of gas bubbles. This gas bubble behavior seems to be consistent with experimental and numerical studies on the flow of particles and drops at pipe bifurcations. Over-pressurized gas bursting could reflect higher gas flux regimes in the

  1. Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter : seismic and GPS observations near the active summit area of Sakurajima and Kirishima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Iguchi, M.; Honda, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are very important from various viewpoints such as understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit. It is, however, highly difficult to install observation sensors near active vents because of the risk of sudden eruptions. We have been developing a safe volcano observation system based on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). As an UAV, we adopted an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. We have also developed earthquake observation modules and GPS receiver modules that are exclusively designed for UAV installation at summit areas of active volcanoes. These modules are light weight, compact size, and solar powered. For data transmission, a commercial cellular-phone network is used. Our first application of the sensor installation by the UAV is Sakurajima, one of the most active volcanos in Japan. In November 2009, 2010, and 2011, we installed up to four seismic sensors within 2km from the active summit crater. In the 2010 and 2011 operations, we succeeded in pulling up and collecting the sensor modules by using the UAV. In the 2011 experiment, we installed two GPS receivers near the summit area of Sakurajima volcano. We also applied the UAV installation to another active volcano, Shinmoedake in Kirishima volcano group. Since the sub-plinian eruption in February 2011, entering the area 3km from the summit of Shinmoe-dake has been prohibited. In May and November 2011, we installed seismic sensors and GPS receivers in the off-limit zone. Although the ground coupling of the seismic modules is not perfect due to the way they are installed, the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic signals recorded by these modules is fairly good. Despite the low antenna height of 50 cm from the ground surface, the location errors in horizontal and vertical GPS components are 1cm and 3cm, respectively. For seismic signals associated with eruptions at Sakurajima from November 2010 to

  2. Submarine hydrothermal activity along the mid-Kermadec Arc, New Zealand: Large-scale effects on venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Baker, E. T.; Massoth, G. J.; Lupton, J. E.; Wright, I. C.; Sparks, R. J.; Bannister, S. C.; Reyners, M. E.; Walker, S. L.; Greene, R. R.; Ishibashi, J.; Faure, K.; Resing, J. A.; Lebon, G. T.

    2007-07-01

    The 2,500-km Kermadec-Tonga arc is the longest submarine arc on the planet. Here, we report on the second of a series of cruises designed to investigate large-scale controls on active hydrothermal venting on this arc. The 2002 NZAPLUME II cruise surveyed 12 submarine volcanic centers along ~580 km of the middle Kermadec arc (MKA), extending a 1999 cruise that surveyed 260 km of the southern Kermadec arc (SKA). Average spacing between volcanic centers increases northward from 30 km on backarc crust along the SKA, to 45 km on backarc crust along the southern MKA, to 58 km where the MKA joins the Kermadec Ridge. Volcanic cones dominate in the backarc, and calderas dominate the Kermadec Ridge. The incidence of venting is higher along the MKA (83%, 10 of 12 volcanic centers) than the SKA (67%, 8 of 12), but the relative intensity of venting, as given by plume thickness, areal extent, and concentration of dissolved gases and ionic species, is generally weaker in the MKA. This pattern may reflect subduction of the ~17-km-thick oceanic Hikurangi Plateau beneath the SKA. Subduction of this basaltic mass should greatly increase fluid loss from the downgoing slab, initiating extensive melting in the upper mantle wedge and invigorating the hydrothermal systems of the SKA. Conversely, volcanic centers in the southern MKA are starved of magma replenishment and so their hydrothermal systems are waning. Farther north, where the MKA centers merge with the Kermadec Ridge, fewer but larger magma bodies accumulate in the thicker (older) crust, ensuring more widely separated, caldera-dominated volcanic centers.

  3. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine landsliding represents aside submarine earthquakes major natural hazard to coastal and sea-floor infrastructure as well as to coastal communities due to their ability to generate large-scale tsunamis with their socio-economic consequences. The investigation of submarine landslides, their conditions and trigger mechanisms, recurrence rates and potential impact remains an important task for the evaluation of risks in coastal management and offshore industrial activities. In the light of a changing globe with warming oceans and rising sea-level accompanied by increasing human population along coasts and enhanced near- and offshore activities, slope stability issues gain more importance than ever before. The Arctic exhibits the most rapid and drastic changes and is predicted to change even faster. Aside rising air temperatures, enhanced inflow of less cooled Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean reduces sea-ice cover and warms the surroundings. Slope stability is challenged considering large areas of permafrost and hydrates. The Hinlopen/Yermak Megaslide (HYM) north of Svalbard is the first and so far only reported large-scale submarine landslide in the Arctic Ocean. The HYM exhibits the highest headwalls that have been found on siliciclastic margins. With more than 10.000 square kilometer areal extent and app. 2.400 cubic kilometer of involved sedimentary material, it is one of the largest exposed submarine slides worldwide. Geometry and age put this slide in a special position in discussing submarine slope stability on glaciated continental margins. The HYM occurred 30 ka ago, when the global sea-level dropped by app. 50 m within less than one millennium due to rapid onset of global glaciation. It probably caused a tsunami with circum-Arctic impact and wave heights exceeding 130 meters. The HYM affected the slope stability field in its neighbourhood by removal of support. Post-megaslide slope instability as expressed in creeping and smaller-scaled slides are

  4. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  5. Morphometric, acoustic and lithofacies characterization of mud volcanoes in the Eastern Mediterranean: Toward a new approach and classification to constrain the regional distribution and activity of mud volcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flore, Mary; Sébastien, Migeon; Elia, d'Acremont; Alain, Rabaute; Silvia, Ceramicola; Daniel, Praeg; Christian, Blanpied

    2015-04-01

    On continental margins, several types of seabed features recording fluid circulation within the sediment column have already been recognized, including mud volcanoes, pockmarks, carbonates pavements and/or mounds and brine lakes. They can be associated to (a) thermogenic or biogenic fluids migrating along tectonic conduits, (b) dissociation of gas hydrates, or (c) dewatering of turbidite channels and mass-transport deposits. Although fluid-escape structures have been analyzed for the last two decades using diverse and complementary data, many questions are still debated about their morphologies/architectures, origin and formation, their temporal dynamic and the impact of the geodynamical context on their location/formation. In the Eastern Mediterranean, fluid seepages and in particular mud volcanoes, were identified in three geodynamical contexts including active margins (Calabrian accretionary prism and Mediterranean ridge) and highly-sedimented passive margin (Nil deep-sea fan). In this study, we follow a new approach allowing to (1) better quantify a broad set of morphological parameters that characterize the seabed fluid-escape structures, (2) propose an advance classification of these structures, the final goal being to test whether one or several morphological types of fluid-escape structures can be characteristic of one tectonic and sedimentological setting in the Eastern Mediterranean basin. To achieve this classification based on geophysical and geological analysis (morphometry, reflectivity, seismic r and lithofacies features), we used a broad homogenous dataset at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean, including multibeam bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, 2D/3D seismic reflection, and sediment cores description and analysis. More than 500 mud volcano-like structures were identified based on one criterion or on the association of several criteria, while 40 of them were clearly proved to be mud volcanoes by coring. These structures exhibit different

  6. Jun Jaegyu Volcano: A Recently Discovered Alkali Basalt Volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, A.; Bailey, D.; Domack, E.; Brachfeld, S.; Gilbert, R.; Ishman, S.; Krahmann, G.; Leventer, A.

    2004-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu is a young volcanic construct discovered in May 2004 by researchers aboard the National Science Foundation (NSF) vessel Laurence M. Gould (LMG04-04). The volcano is located on the Antarctic continental shelf in Antarctic Sound, approximately 9 km due north of the easternmost point of Andersson Island. Swath bathymetry (NBP01-07) indicates that the volcano stands 700 meters above the seafloor, yet remains 275 meters short of the ocean surface. The seamount lies along a northwest-southeast oriented fault scarp and contains at least 1.5 km3 of volcanic rock. Video recording of the volcano's surface revealed regions nearly devoid of submarine life. These areas are associated with a thermal anomaly of up to 0.052° C higher than the surrounding ocean water. A rock dredge collected ~13 kg of material, over 80% of which was fresh volcanic rock; the remainder was glacial IRD. These observations, along with reports by mariners of discolored water in this region of Antarctic Sound, suggest that the volcano has been recently active. The basalt samples are generally angular, glassy and vesicular. Preliminary petrographic observations indicate that plagioclase, olivine, and clinopyroxene are all present as phenocryst phases, and that small (<1cm) rounded xenoliths are common. A comprehensive study of the volcano's petrography and whole-rock chemistry is currently underway. Jun Jaegyu is the northernmost volcanic center of the James Ross Island Volcanic Group (JRIVG), and the only center in this region of the Antarctic Peninsula with evidence of recent activity. It lies along the boundary between the Late Cenozoic JRIVG and the Upper Paleozoic rocks of the Trinity Peninsula Formation. While the tectonic setting of the region is complex, volcanism appears to be associated with active faults related to within-plate extension.

  7. Implications for future activity of Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland, from compositional time series of historical tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, Marion; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Larsen, Gudrun

    2014-05-01

    The nature of future eruptions of active volcanoes is hard to predict. Improved understanding of the past volcanic activity is probably the best way to infer future eruptive scenarios. The most active volcano in Iceland, Grímsvötn, last erupted in 2011 with consequences for habitants living close to the volcano and aviation in the North-Atlantic. In an effort to better understand the magmatic system of the volcano, we have investigated the compositions of 23 selected tephra layers representing the last 8 centuries of volcanic activity at Grímsvötn. The tephra was collected in the ablation area of outlet glaciers from Vatnajökull ice cap. The ice-conserved tephra are less prone to alteration than those exposed in soil sections. Major element analyses are indistinguishable and of quartz-normative tholeiite composition, and Sr and Nd isotope ratios are constant. In contrast, both trace element concentrations (Th range from 0.875 ppm to 1.37 ppm and Ni from 28.5 ppm to 56.6 ppm) in the basalts and Pb isotopes show small but significant variations. The high-precision analyses of Pb isotope ratios allow the identification of tephra samples (3 in total) with more radiogenic ratios than the bulk of the samples. The tephra of constant isotope ratios show linear increase in incompatible element concentrations with time. The rate of increasing concentrations permits exploring possible future scenarios assuming that the magmatic system beneath the volcano follows the established historical evolution. Assuming similar future behaviour of the magma system beneath Grímsvötn volcano, the linear increase in e.g. Th concentration suggests that the volcano is likely to principally produce basalts for the next 500-1000 years. Evolution of water concentration will most likely follow those of incompatible elements with consequent increases in explosiveness of future Grímsvötn eruptions.

  8. What drives centuries-long polygenetic scoria cone activity at Barren Island volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu

    2014-12-01

    Barren Island in the Andaman Sea is an active mafic stratovolcano, which had explosive and effusive eruptions, followed by caldera formation, in prehistoric time (poorly dated). A scoria cone within the caldera, marking volcanic resurgence, was active periodically from 1787 to 1832 (the historic eruptions). Since 1991, the same scoria cone has produced six eruptions, commonly including lava flows. Links between Barren Island's eruptions and giant earthquakes (such as the 26 December 2004 Great Sumatra megathrust earthquake) have been suggested, though there is no general correlation between them. The ≥ 227-year-long activity of the scoria cone, named here Shanku ("cone"), is normally driven by purely magmatic processes. I present a "source to surface" model for Barren Island and Shanku, including the source region, deeper and shallow magma chambers, volcanotectonics, dyking from magma chambers, and eruptions and eruptive style as controlled by crustal stresses, composition and volatile content. Calculations show that dykes ~ 0.5 m thick and a few hundred meters long, originating from shallow-level magma chambers (~ 5 km deep), are suitable feeders of the Shanku eruptions. Shanku, a polygenetic scoria cone (at least 13 eruptions since 1787), has three excellent analogues, namely Anak Krakatau (40 eruptions since 1927), Cerro Negro (23 eruptions since 1850), and Yasur (persistent activity for the past hundreds of years). This is an important category of volcanoes, gradational between small "monogenetic" scoria cones and larger "polygenetic" volcanoes.

  9. Mercury distribution in seawater of Kagoshima Bay near the active Volcano, Mt. Sakurajima in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Megumi; Tomiyasu, Takashi; Tsuji, Mayumi; Akiba, Suminori

    2010-04-01

    Kagoshima bay has a highly active volcano in its center. In the filtered seawater and suspended matter collected from 200-m deep fumaroles at the bottom of the inner bay, the geometric mean concentrations of total mercury were 7.6 and 65.0 ng/L, respectively. The surface seawater collected at the inner bay had a higher concentration of mercury when compared to that in the bay entrance (average: 1.0 vs. 0.5 ng/L). In July, however, no such difference was observed. The fumaroles seem to contribute to relatively high concentrations of mercury in the inner bay except in summer, when thermal cline is formed.

  10. Source mechanism of very-long-period signals accompanying dome growth activity at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hidayat, D.; Chouet, B.; Voight, B.; Dawson, P.; Ratdomopurbo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Very-long-period (VLP) pulses with period of 6-7s, displaying similar waveforms, were identified in 1998 from broadband seismographs around the summit crater. These pulses accompanied most of multiphase (MP) earthquakes, a type of long-period event locally defined at Merapi Volcano. Source mechanisms for several VLP pulses were examined by applying moment tensor inversion to the waveform data. Solutions were consistent with a crack striking ???70?? and dipping ???50?? SW, 100m under the active dome, suggest pressurized gas transport involving accumulation and sudden release of 10-60 m3 of gas in the crack over a 6s interval.

  11. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  12. Active Source Tomography of Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Results From the 2006 Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, L.; Patanè, D.; Cocina, O.; Castellano, M.; Sgroi, T.; Favali, P.; de Gori, P.

    2008-12-01

    Stromboli island, located in the Southern Tyrrhenian sea, is the emerged part (about 900 m a.s.l.) of a 3km-high strato-volcano. Its persistent Strombolian activity, documented for over 2000 years, is sometimes interrupted by lava effusions or major explosions. Despite the amount of recent published geophysical studies aimed to clarifying eruption dynamics, the spatial extend and geometrical characteristics of the plumbing system remain poorly understood. In fact, the knowledge of the inner structure and the zones of magma storage is limited to the upper few hundreds meters of the volcanic edifice and P- and S-waves velocity models are available only in restricted areas. In order to obtain a more suitable internal structural and velocity models of the volcano, from 25 November to 2 December 2006, a seismic tomography experiment through active seismics using air-gun sources was carried out and the final Vp model is here presented. The data has been inverted for the Vp structure by using the code Simulps13q, considering a 3D grid of nodes spaced 0.5 km down to 2 km depth, beneath the central part of volcano. The results show a relatively high velocity zones located both in the inner part of the volcanic structure, at about 1km b.s.l. and in the last 200-300 m a.s.l. in correspondence with the volcanic conduit. Slower zones were located around the summit craters in agreement with volcanological and petrological informations for the area. The relatively high velocity zones could suggest the presence of intrusive bodies related to the plumbing system.

  13. Water chemistry of lakes related to active and inactive Mexican volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; Vilaclara, Gloria; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2008-12-01

    Water chemistry of crater lakes, maars and water reservoirs linked to some Mexican volcanoes within and outside the Mexican Volcanic Belt has been determined for several years and examined regarding environmental and volcanic factors. All the analyzed lakes are relatively small with a maximum depth of 65 m, and are located in regions with different climates, from semi-arid to very humid, with altitudes ranging from 100 to more than 4000 m a.s.l. Crater lakes in active volcanoes (El Chichón, Popocatépetl) have very low pH, moderate to high temperatures and major ion concentrations varying with the level of volcanic unrest. Lakes in sub-arid and temperate-arid regions (like maars in Puebla and Guanajuato states) show high alkalinity and pH, with bicarbonate/carbonate, chloride, sodium and magnesium as predominant ions. Lakes located in humid climates (Central Michoacán and Veracruz state) have low mineralization and near-neutral pH values. In general, conservative dissolved ions and conductivity appear to be mostly controlled by precipitation/evaporation and by the ionic concentration of groundwater inputs. Calcium, magnesium, sulfate concentrations and pH are strongly influenced by volcanic-rock or volcanic gas interactions with water. The influence of low-level volcanic activity on crater lakes may be obscured by water-rock interactions, and climatic factors. One of the aims of this paper is to define the relative influence of these factors searching for a reference frame to recognize the early volcanic precursors in volcano-related lakes.

  14. Gas flux measurements of episodic bimodal eruptive activity at Karymsky volcano (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Melnikov, D.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanoes of intermediate magmatic composition commonly exhibit episodes of intermittent gas and ash emission of variable duration. Due to the multiple conditions present at each system, different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the observed activity, and without key measurements at hand, a definite understanding of the situation might not be singled out. Karymsky, the most active volcano of Central Kamchatka, has presented a remarkably stable pattern of bimodal eruption since a few weeks after its violent reactivation in 1996. Periods of quasi-periodic explosive emissions with typical recurrence intervals of 3-10 min are alternated with episodes of semi-continuous discharge which intensity has a typical modulation at a frequency of 1 Hz. Geophysical studies at Karymsky have identified the main visual, seismic and acoustic features of these two eruption modalities. From these observations, the time scales of the processes have been defined and relevant models have been formulated, according to which the two modes are controlled by the rheological properties of an intruding gas-saturated magma batch and a shallow gas-depleted magma plug. Explosions are explained as the consequence of the formation of temporary sealing, overpressure buildup and vent clearance. Clearly, direct measurements of the gas emission rate are the key parameter to test such models. In this work, we report on the results of a field campaign for SO2 gas measurements carried out at Karymsky during 10-14 September 2011. We deployed 2 NOVAC-type, scanning DOAS systems as well as 1 rapid wide-Field of View mini-DOAS plume tracker. With this setup, we derived time-resolved SO2 flux, plume height, direction and speed, and detected pulses of increasing emission with high temporal resolution. We observed phases of explosive and quiescent degassing with variable amounts of ash emission and detected intensity changes of the associated acoustic signals. The repose time intervals between these

  15. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  16. Active hydrocarbon (methane) seepage at the Alboran Sea mud volcanoes indicated by specific lipid biomarkers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, C.; Stadnitskaia, A.; De Lange, G. J.; Martínez-Ruiz, F.; Comas, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) and pockmark fields are known to occur in the Alboran Basin (Westernmost Mediterranean). These MVs occur above a major sedimentary depocenter that includes up to 7 km thick early Miocene to Holocene sequences. MVs located on the top of diapiric structures that originated from undercompacted Miocene clays and olistostromes. Here we provide results from geochemical data-analyses of four gravity cores acquired in the Northern Mud Volcano Field (north of the 36°N): i.e. Perejil, Kalinin and Schneiderś Heart mud expulsion structures. Extruded materials include different types of mud breccias. Specific lipid biomarkers (n-alkanes, hopanes, irregular isoprenoid hydrocarbons and Dialkyl Glycerol Diethers (DGDs) were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Determination of Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers (GDGTs) by high performance liquid chromatography-spectrometry (HPLC-MS), and analysis of biomarker δ13C values were performed in selected samples. Lipid biomarker analysis from the three MVs revealed similar n-alkane distributions in all mud breccia intervals, showing significant hydrocarbon-derived signals and the presence of thermally immature organic-matter admixture. This suggests that similar strata fed these MVs. The hemipelagic drapes reveal comparable n-alkane distributions, suggesting that significant upward diffusion of fluids occurs. Distributions of GDGTs are generally accepted as usefull biomarkers to locate the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments. However, our GDGT profiles only reflect the marine thaumarchaeotal signature. There seems to be no archaea producing specific GDGTs involved in AOM in the recovered interval. Evidence of recent activity (i.e., methane gas-bubbling and chemosynthetic fauna at the Perejil MV) and the presence of specific lipid biomarker related with methanotropic archaea (Irregular Isoprenoids and DGDs), however, suggest the existence of

  17. Holocene sedimentary activity in a non-terrestrially coupled submarine canyon: Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, J. J.; Micallef, A.; Stevens, C. L.; Stirling, M. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Cook Strait Canyon system, located between the North and South islands of New Zealand, is a large (1800 km2), multi-branching, shelf-indenting canyon on an active subduction margin. The canyon comes within 1 km of the coast, but does not intercept fluvial or littoral sediment systems and is therefore defined as a non-terrestrially coupled system. Sediment transport associated with a strong tidal stream, and seafloor disturbance related to numerous high-activity faults, is known from previous studies. Little is known, however, about the rates of sedimentary activity in the canyon and the processes driving it. A substantial dataset of EM300 multibeam bathymetry, gravity cores, 3.5 kHz seismic reflection profiles, camera and video transects and current meter data have been collected across the region between 2002 and 2011. The canyon system therefore provides an excellent study area for understanding sediment transport in a non-coupled submarine canyon system. Analysis of the data reveals a two-staged sediment transport system where: (1) oceanographic (tidal) processes mobilise sediment from the continental shelf and transport it to depocentres in the upper-central canyons, and (2) tectonic (earthquake) processes remobilise sediment that is transported through the lower canyon to the deep ocean. Tidal boundary-layer currents within the canyon reach velocities up to 0.53 m/s and are capable of mobilising fine sand in the central reach of the upper canyons. The velocity is higher at the canyon rim and capable of mobilising coarse sand. Sediment depocentres resulting from this tidally forced sediment transport have a well formed geomorphology within the mid-upper canyon arms of Cook Strait and Nicholson Canyons. Pseudo-static stability modelling, supported by sediment core analysis, indicates that sediment accumulated in the upper canyons fails during seismic events approximately every 100 years. The 100 year return period ground shaking-level (peak ground

  18. Soil gas radon and volcanic activity at El Hierro (Canary Islands) before and after the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos, J.; Padilla, G.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padron, E.; Perez, N.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Nolasco, D.; Dionis, S.; Rodriguez, F.; Calvo, D.; Hernandez, I.

    2012-12-01

    El Hierro is the youngest and southernmost island of the Canarian archipelago and represents the summit of a volcanic shield elevating from the surrounding seafloor at depth of 4000 m to up to 1501 m above sea level. The island is believed to be near the present hotspot location in the Canaries with the oldest subaerial rocks dated at 1.12 Ma. The subaerial parts of the El Hierro rift zones (NE, NW and S Ridges) are characterized by tightly aligned dyke complexes with clusters of cinder cones as their surface expressions. Since July 16, 2011, an anomalous seismicity at El Hierro Island was recorded by IGN seismic network. Volcanic tremor started at 05:15 hours on October 10, followed on the afternoon of October 12 by a green discolouration of seawater, strong bubbling and degassing indicating the initial stage of submarine volcanic eruption at approximately 2 km off the coast of La Restinga, El Hierro. Soil gas 222Rn and 220Rn activities were continuously measured during the period of the recent volcanic unrest occurred at El Hierro, at two different geochemical stations, HIE02 and HIE03. Significant increases in soil 222Rn activity and 222Rn/220Rn ratio from the soil were observed at both stations prior the submarine eruption off the coast of El Hierro, showing the highest increases before the eruption onset and the occurrence of the strongest seismic event (M=4.6). A statistical analysis showed that the long-term trend of the filtered data corresponded closely to the seismic energy released during the volcanic unrest. The observed increases of 222Rn are related to the rock fracturing processes (seismic activity) and the magmatic CO2 outflow increase, as observed in HIE03 station. Under these results, we find that continuous soil radon studies are important for evaluating the volcanic activity of El Hierro and they demonstrate the potential of applying continuous monitoring of soil radon to improve and optimize the detection of early warning signals of future

  19. Kilauea's Explosive Past: Understanding Violent Explosions at Hawai'i's most Active Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.; Swanson, D.

    2010-12-01

    A sequence of explosions that occurred from Kilauea caldera around 1790 A.D. includes the most deadly pyroclastic eruptions recorded in the USA. The products, the upper part of the Keanakāko`i tephra formation, are believed to be responsible for the deaths of a Hawaiian war party on the summit of the volcano. Little is known about the parent eruptions or even how many explosions there were in or around 1790; also, no hazard maps exist at Kilauea for this type of violent yet short-lived activity, with few clear precursors. The c. 1790 deposits show both marked sectoral changes and also, on a finer length scale, rapid lateral variability over distances of less than 1 kilometer. In the southern sector, they form a series of striking alternating coarse-grained beds, cross-bedded pyroclastic density current deposits (pdc) and accretionary-lapilli-bearing fine ashes. This study focuses primarily on the coarse-grained units, which are largely absent west and east of the caldera. Through characterization of the beds in the field and analysis of grain size and dispersal data, the size and intensity of these eruptions have been defined. The coarse-grained units include both pyroclastic fall and pdc deposits. Unusually, only bedding characteristics, (and not grain size or dispersal) unequivocally distinguish between these two transport processes. This study offers a clearer, more quantitative picture of the c. 1790 events and advances the understanding of how explosive eruptions can occur at an otherwise gently effusive volcano. It also constrains the dynamics associated with these events and improves volcanic hazard mitigation at Kilauea and shield volcanoes worldwide.

  20. The weathering and element fluxes from active volcanoes to the oceans: a Montserrat case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Hembury, Deborah J.; Palmer, Martin R.; Tonge, Bill; Darling, W. George; Loughlin, Susan C.

    2011-04-01

    The eruptions of the Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat (Lesser Antilles) from 1995 to present have draped parts of the island in fresh volcaniclastic deposits. Volcanic islands such as Montserrat are an important component of global weathering fluxes, due to high relief and runoff and high chemical and physical weathering rates of fresh volcaniclastic material. We examine the impact of the recent volcanism on the geochemistry of pre-existing hydrological systems and demonstrate that the initial chemical weathering yield of fresh volcanic material is higher than that from older deposits within the Lesser Antilles arc. The silicate weathering may have consumed 1.3% of the early CO2 emissions from the Soufrière Hills volcano. In contrast, extinct volcanic edifices such as the Centre Hills in central Montserrat are a net sink for atmospheric CO2 due to continued elevated weathering rates relative to continental silicate rock weathering. The role of an arc volcano as a source or sink for atmospheric CO2 is therefore critically dependent on the stage it occupies in its life cycle, changing from a net source to a net sink as the eruptive activity wanes. While the onset of the eruption has had a profound effect on the groundwater around the Soufrière Hills center, the geochemistry of springs in the Centre Hills 5 km to the north appear unaffected by the recent volcanism. This has implications for the potential risk, or lack thereof, of contamination of potable water supplies for the island's inhabitants.

  1. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  2. The activity of the Colima volcano and morphological changes in the summit between 2004 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Camarena Garcia, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    Colima Volcano, located in the West of the Volcanic Mexican Belt (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W), has shown a new cycle of explosive activity beginning May 30 1999, and reaching its maximum in March-April of 2005 and January 2013. In the 2005 the explosive activity increased gradually, having the largest event on May 23, when a new dome was created. Hours later this dome was destroyed by a strong explosion, forming an ash column 5.6 km high with subsequent pyroclastic flows that reached a distance of 4.2 km flowing along the ravines of the South sector. On May 30 the most intense explosion in 1999 occurred, when the plume reached heights in excess of 4.4 km above the crater, and pyroclastic flows were created. On the same year in July two explosive events occurred of characteristics similar to those in May. These constant explosions caused continuous morphological changes in the summit, the most significant being the collapse of the North and South walls of the crater, in the first week of June of 2005, and the creation of a new crater in July. In 2006 the most significant explosive activity took place during April, May and July, when the eruptive columns reached heights of more than 1500 meters above the crater, occasionally forming small pyroclastic flows. In May of 2007 morphological changes were observed in the summit. Among them a crater explosion on the East side, a dome was formed on the West side, with 20 m in high and 50 m in diameter. Since the end of 2008 to December of 2012 the volcano remained calm, with a dome diameter of 220 m and height of 60 m, in January 2013 three explosions occurred, destroying the dome and throwing a volume of 1.5 million cubic meters. The eruptive column reached a height of 3000 above the crater. It reported light ashfall to the NE to 100 km away from the volcano. The explosive events continue to date, but they have diminished in size and intensity. This activity was similar to the one observed in 1902-1903 and reported by

  3. Monitoring Monitoring Evolving Activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-DelPozzo, A.; Aceves, F.; Bonifaz, R.; Humberto, S.

    2001-12-01

    After 6 years of small eruptions, activity at Mexico's 5,452m high Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico, peaked in the December 2000-January 2001 eruptions. Precursors included an important increase in seismicity as well as in magmatic components of spring water and small scale deformation which resulted in growth of a new crater dome from January 16 on. Evacuation of the towns nearest the volcano over Christmas was decided because of the possibility of pyroclastic flows. During the previous years, crater dome growth, contraction and explosive clearing has dominated the activity. The January 22 eruption produced an eruption column approximately 17km high with associated pyroclastic flows. Ejecta was composed of both basic and evolved scoria and pumice and dome lithics. A large proportion of the juvenile material was intermediate between these 2 endmenbers (59-63percent SiO2 and 3.5 to 5.5 MgO) consistent with a small basic pulse entering a more evolved larger batch of magma. The January eruption left a large pit which has been partially infilled by another crater dome this August 2001.

  4. Relationship between fumarole gas composition and eruptive activity at Galeras Volcano, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, T.P.; Williams, S.N.; Arehart, G.B.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1996-06-01

    Forecasting volcanic eruptions is critical to the mitigation of hazards for the millions of people living dangerously close to active volcanoes. Volcanic gases collected over five years from Galeras Volcano, Colombia, and analyzed for chemical and isotopic composition show the effects of long-term degassing of the magma body and a gradual decline in sulfur content of the gases. In contrast, short-term (weeks), sharp variations are the precursors to explosive eruptions. Selective absorption of magmatic SO{sub 2} and HCl due to interaction with low-temperature geothermal waters allows the gas emissions to become dominated by CO{sub 2}. Absorption appears to precede an eruption because magmatic volatiles are slowed or retained by a sealing carapace, reducing the total flux of volatiles and allowing the hydrothermal volatiles to dominate gas emissions. Temporal changes in gas compositions were correlated with eruptive activity and provide new evidence bearing on the mechanism of this type of `pneumatic` explosive eruptions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Development of an automatic volcanic ash sampling apparatus for active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, Taketo; Nishimura, Takeshi; Chiga, Nobuyuki; Shibasaki, Yoshinobu; Iguchi, Masato; Miki, Daisuke; Yokoo, Akihiko

    2013-12-01

    We develop an automatic system for the sampling of ash fall particles, to be used for continuous monitoring of magma ascent and eruptive dynamics at active volcanoes. The system consists of a sampling apparatus and cameras to monitor surface phenomena during eruptions. The Sampling Apparatus for Time Series Unmanned Monitoring of Ash (SATSUMA-I and SATSUMA-II) is less than 10 kg in weight and works automatically for more than a month with a 10-kg lead battery to obtain a total of 30 to 36 samples in one cycle of operation. The time range covered in one cycle varies from less than an hour to several months, depending on the aims of observation, allowing researchers to target minute-scale fluctuations in a single eruptive event, as well as daily to weekly trends in persistent volcanic activity. The latest version, SATSUMA-II, also enables control of sampling parameters remotely by e-mail commands. Durability of the apparatus is high: our prototypes worked for several months, in rainy and typhoon seasons, at windy and humid locations, and under strong sunlight. We have been successful in collecting ash samples emitted from Showa crater almost everyday for more than 4 years (2008-2012) at Sakurajima volcano in southwest Japan.

  6. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Pitt, A.M.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200 000 to 50 000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes (Pitt and Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day-1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997) which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds Vp/VS was about 9% lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko and Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss and Nur 1979) and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that Vp/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on Vp. The observed Vp/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic Vp/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  7. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, F.; Rivalta, E.; Pinel, V.; Maccaferri, F.; Bagnardi, M.; Acocella, V.

    2015-12-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we show with numerical models that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observations. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control: 1) the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations; 2) the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  8. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection. PMID:20480029

  9. SO2 Emissions at Semeru Volcano, Indonesia: Characterization and Quantification of Persistent and Periodic Explosive Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J. F.; Clarke, A. B.; Burton, M. R.; Harijoko, A.; Wibowo, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first measurements of SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using an SO2 camera. Activity at Semeru is characterized by quiescent degassing interspersed with short-lived explosive events with low ash burden. The interval between explosions was measured at 32.1±15.7 minutes in a webcam survey of the volcano between the months of June and December 2013. We distinguish between two types of events: shorter events (type I: ~5 mins duration) with emissions returning quickly to baseline levels, and longer events (type II: ~15 mins duration) often showing multiple pulses and a longer period of increased emissions before a return to quiescent levels. Type I events represent >90% of the activity and release an average of 200-450 kg of SO2 per event. The single type II event we documented with the SO2 camera released a total of 1300 kg of SO2. We estimate the daily average emissions of Semeru to be 21-60 t d-1 of SO2, amounting to a yearly output of 7.5-22 Gg (7,500 - 22,000 metric tons), with 35-60% released during explosive events. The time series patterns of degassing are consistent with the existence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit, causing accumulation and pressurization of the magma to produce the explosive events.

  10. SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia: Characterization and quantification of persistent and periodic explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-François; Clarke, Amanda B.; Burton, Michael R.; Harijoko, Agung; Wibowo, Haryo E.

    2015-07-01

    We present the first measurements of SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using an SO2 camera. Activity at Semeru is characterized by quiescent degassing interspersed with short-lived explosive events with low ash burden. The interval between explosions was measured at 32.1 ± 15.7 min in a webcam survey of the volcano between the months of June and December 2013. We distinguish between two types of events: shorter events (type I: ~ 5 min duration) with emissions returning quickly to baseline levels, and longer events (type II: ~ 15 min duration) often showing multiple pulses and a longer period of increased emissions before a return to quiescent levels. Type I events represent > 90% of the activity and release an average of 200-500 kg of SO2 per event. The single type II event we documented with the SO2 camera released a total of 1460 kg of SO2. We estimate the daily average emissions of Semeru to be 21-71 t d- 1 of SO2, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Gg (8000-26,000 metric tons), with 35-65% released during explosive events. The time series patterns of degassing are consistent with the existence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit, which seals the conduit immediately prior to explosive events, causing pressurization of the underlying magma followed by a sudden release of gas and fragmented magma.

  11. Origin and distribution of thiophenes and furans in gas discharges from active volcanoes and geothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-03-31

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C(2)-C(20) species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C(4)H(8)O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection.

  12. Dynamics of an Array of Hydraulic Jumps in an Active Submarine Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Sumner, E. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Darby, S. E.; Wynn, R. B.; Ozsoy, E.; Tezcan, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic jumps, or bores, are formed when a flow rapidly thickens and slows down, passing from a Froude number defined super to subcritical state. Such transitional behaviour occurs as a flow responds to changes in bed slope or channel geometry. Hydraulic jumps are thought to be ubiquitous features formed in submarine channelized flows, as well as in river channels. Here, for the first time, we present integrated velocity and density measurements across an array of hydraulic jumps. The velocity data were collected using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP)), and the density data were collected using a Conductivity, Temperature Depth (CTD) probe. The hydraulic jumps were generated by scour features, in a channelized, density stratified flow exiting the Bosphorus Strait onto the continental shelf region in South West Black Sea. It is observed that with stratification of the flow the dilute upper layer completely bypasses any forcing arising from the changing bed slope, whilst the denser lower layer responds by generating an internal hydraulic jump. Such flow behaviour is distinct to that observed in open-channel systems, where flows are rarely sufficiently stratified to generate internal hydraulic jumps. This direct field evidence supports previous experimental and theoretical analysis of hydraulic jumps in stratified shear flow. However, the field data raise several fundamental physical questions relating to the mechanics of internal hydraulic jumps. Firstly, it is observed that surface rollers, resulting in upstream flow velocity, are consistently found hundreds of metres before the slope break initiating the hydraulic jump. Secondly it is observed that the Froude criticality of the upper dilute layer is inversely related to that of the lower layer. Thirdly, it is noted that with a bypassing upper flow layer, sediment transport dynamics of coarse versus fine grained sediment past the slope break will be

  13. Stable and unstable phases of elevated seismic activity at the persistently restless Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Mel; Roman, Diana C.; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; McNutt, Stephen R.; Muñoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently restless volcano with daily seismicity rates that can vary by orders of magnitude without apparent connection to eruptive activity. Low-frequency (LF) events are dominant and peaks in seismicity rate show little correlation with eruptive episodes, presenting a challenge for seismic monitoring and eruption forecasting. A short period seismic station (TELN) has been operated on Telica's summit since 1993, and in 2010 the installation of a six-station broadband seismic and eleven-station continuous GPS network (the TESAND network) was completed to document in detail the seismic characteristics of a persistently restless volcano. Between our study period of November 2009 and May 2013, over 400,000 events were detected at the TESAND summit station (TBTN), with daily event rates ranging from 5 to 1400. We present spectral analyses and classifications of ~ 200,000 events recorded by the TESAND network between April 2010 and March 2013, and earthquake locations for a sub-set of events between July 2010 and February 2012. In 2011 Telica erupted in a series of phreatic vulcanian explosions. Six months before the 2011 eruption, we observe a sudden decrease in LF events concurrent with a swarm of high-frequency (HF) events, followed by a decline in overall event rates, which reached a minimum at the eruption onset. We observe repeated periods of high and low seismicity rates and suggest these changes in seismicity represent repeated transitions between open-system and closed-system degassing. We suggest that these short- and long-term transitions between open to closed-system degassing form part of a long-term pattern of stable vs. unstable phases at Telica. Stable phases are characterised by steady high-rate seismicity and represent stable open-system degassing, whereas unstable phases are characterised by highly variable seismicity rates and represent repeated transitions from open to closed-system degassing, where the system is

  14. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  15. Early growth of Kohala volcano and formation of long Hawaiian rift zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Transitional-composition pillow basalts from the toe of the Hilo Ridge, collected from outcrop by submersible, have yielded the oldest ages known from the Island of Hawaii: 1138 ?? 34 to 1159 ?? 33 ka. Hilo Ridge has long been interpreted as a submarine rift zone of Mauna Kea, but the new ages validate proposals that it is the distal east rift zone of Kohala, the oldest subaerial volcano on the island. These ages constrain the inception of tholeiitic volcanism at Kohala, provide the first measured duration of tholeiitic shield building (???870 k.y.) for any Hawaiian volcano, and show that this 125-km-long rift zone developed to near-total length during early growth of Kohala. Long eastern-trending rift zones of Hawaiian volcanoes may follow fractures in oceanic crust activated by arching of the Hawaiian Swell in front of the propagating hotspot. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  16. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement.

    PubMed

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4 m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO₂ from the seafloor.

  17. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  18. Some insights about the activity of the Ceboruco Volcano (Nayarit, Mexico) from recent seismic low-frequency activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Uribe, María Carolina; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco Javier; Nava Pichardo, Fidencio Alejandro; Suárez-Plascencia, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the western end of the Mexican volcanic belt, near several population centers and by the side of a strategic highway. During the last 1,000 years it has had, on the average, one eruption every 125 years. It last eruptive activity began in 1870, and during the following 5 years it presented superficial activity including vapor emissions, ash falls, and rhyodacitic lava flows along the southeast side. A data set consisting of 139 low-frequency volcanic-type earthquakes, recorded from March 2003 to July 2008 at the CEBN triaxial short period digital station on the southwestern side of the volcano, was classified according to waveform and spectral characteristics into four families: short duration, extended coda, bobbin, and modulated amplitude. Approximate hypocentral locations indicate that there is no particular location for events of any family, but rather that all events occur at different points within the volcano. The presence of ongoing volcanic-earthquake activity together with the ongoing vapor emissions indicate that the Ceboruco volcano continues to be active, and the higher occurrence rates of short-duration events, as compared with those for the other families, could indicate an increase in the stress in the volcanic edifice. This apparent stress increase, together with the fact that the last eruption occurred 143 years ago, tell us that the Ceboruco may be approaching a critical state, and may represent a hazard to the surrounding communities and economic activities.

  19. Monitoring El Hierro submarine volcanic eruption events with a submarine seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Molino, Erik; Lopez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2012 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. From the beginning of the eruption a geophone string was installed less than 2 km away from the new volcano, next to La Restinga village shore, to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. The analysis of the dataset using spectral techniques allows the characterization of the different phases of the eruption and the study of its dynamics. The correlation of the data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing) and also with the seismic activity recorded by the IGN field seismic monitoring system, allows the identification of different stages suggesting the existence of different signal sources during the volcanic eruption and also the posteruptive record of the degassing activity. The study shows that the high frequency capability of the geophone array allow the study of important features that cannot be registered by the standard seismic stations. The accumulative spectral amplitude show features related to eruptive changes.

  20. Detailed analysis of amplitude and recurrence times of LP activity at Mt. Etna Volcano, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchie, L.; Saccorotti, G.; Bean, C.; de Barros, L.

    2012-04-01

    Long-Period (LP) events recorded on many volcanoes worldwide are thought to be associated with conduit resonance triggered by fluid flow instabilities throughout the volcano plumbing system. The rate of Long-Period activity, however, varies greatly depending on the particular volcano taken into account. At Piton de la Fournaise, for instance, LP event rate is on the order of 10 events /year, while at Mt. Etna it is not unusual to observe several thousands of events per month. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the LP source mechanism through a statistical analysis of detailed LP catalogues. The behaviour of LP activity is compared with the empirical laws governing earthquakes recurrence (e.g., Gutenberg-Richter [GR] and Omori's laws), in order to understand what relationships, if any, exist between these two apparently different earthquake classes. In particular, we investigated the amplitude and the recurrence time of LP activity on Mt. Etna, Italy, using data from a temporary network (inter-station distance ~5km ) and a small-aperture array (inter-station distance ~50m) deployed in 2005. Some 13,000 LP events were detected in August 2005 through a short-term average/long-term average (STA/LTA) method. Directional properties of these events were obtained by applying a Plane Wave Fitting (PWF) method to data from the small array. The different directions of propagation measured for such events suggest that at least two different sources are active. From PWF alone we were not able to isolate the contribution of individual sources without ambiguity. LP signals, however, exhibit a high degree of waveform similarity, thus providing a criterion for classification / source separation. Using correlation analysis, we then grouped the events into families containing comparable waveforms. By waveforms stacking, we obtained a representative, template event for each family. These template signals were then used for a Matched-Filtering of the continuous data

  1. Recent uplift and hydrothermal activity at Tangkuban Parahu volcano, west Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.; Matahelumual, J.; Okamura, A.T.; Said, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Mulyadi, D.

    1990-01-01

    Tangkuban Parahu is an active stratovolcano located 17 km north of the city of Bandung in the province west Java, Indonesia. All historical eruptive activity at this volcano has been confined to a complex of explosive summit craters. About a dozen eruptions-mostly phreatic events- and 15 other periods of unrest, indicated by earthquakes or increased thermal activity, have been noted since 1829. The last magmatic eruption occurred in 1910. In late 1983, several small phreatic explosions originated from one of the summit craters. More recently, increased hydrothermal and earthquake activity occurred from late 1985 through 1986. Tilt measurements, using a spirit-level technique, have been made every few months since February 1981 in the summit region and along the south and east flanks of the volcano. Measurements made in the summit region indicated uplift since the start of these measurements through at least 1986. From 1981 to 1983, the average tilt rate at the edges of the summit craters was 40-50 microradians per year. After the 1983 phreatic activity, the tilt rate decreased by about a factor of five. Trilateration surveys across the summit craters and on the east flank of the volcano were conducted in 1983 and 1986. Most line length changes measured during this three-year period did not exceed the expected uncertainty of the technique (4 ppm). The lack of measurable horizontal strain across the summit craters seems to contradict the several years of tilt measurements. Using a point source of dilation in an elastic half-space to model tilt measurements, the pressure center at Tangkuban Parahu is located about 1.5 km beneath the southern part of the summit craters. This is beneath the epicentral area of an earthquake swarm that occurred in late 1983. The average rate in the volume of uplift from 1981 to 1983 was 3 million m3 per year; from 1983 to 1986 it averaged about 0.4 million m3 per year. Possible causes for this uplift are increased pressure within a very

  2. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Ciro Del; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 – December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption. PMID:24169569

  3. Social studies of volcanology: knowledge generation and expert advice on active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Amy; Oppenheimer, Clive; Bravo, Michael

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the philosophy and evolution of volcanological science in recent years, particularly in relation to the growth of volcanic hazard and risk science. It uses the lens of Science and Technology Studies to examine the ways in which knowledge generation is controlled and directed by social forces, particularly during eruptions, which constitute landmarks in the development of new technologies and models. It also presents data from a survey of volcanologists carried out during late 2008 and early 2009. These data concern the felt purpose of the science according to the volcanologists who participated and their impressions of the most important eruptions in historical time. It demonstrates that volcanologists are motivated both by the academic science environment and by a social concern for managing the impact of volcanic hazards on populations. Also discussed are the eruptions that have most influenced the discipline and the role of scientists in policymaking on active volcanoes. Expertise in volcanology can become the primary driver of public policy very suddenly when a volcano erupts, placing immense pressure on volcanologists. In response, the epistemological foundations of volcanology are on the move, with an increasing volume of research into risk assessment and management. This requires new, integrated methodologies for knowledge collection that transcend scientific disciplinary boundaries.

  4. Fiber Bragg grating strain sensors to monitor and study active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Fiodor; Beverini, Nicolò; Carbone, Daniele; Carelli, Giorgio; Francesconi, Francesco; Gambino, Salvo; Giacomelli, Umberto; Grassi, Renzo; Maccioni, Enrico; Morganti, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Stress and strain changes are among the best indicators of impending volcanic activity. In volcano geodesy, borehole volumetric strain-meters are mostly utilized. However, they are not easy to install and involve high implementation costs. Advancements in opto-electronics have allowed the development of low-cost sensors, reliable, rugged and compact, thus particularly suitable for field application. In the framework of the EC FP7 MED-SUV project, we have developed strain sensors based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. In comparison with previous implementation of the FBG technology to study rock deformations, we have designed a system that is expected to offer a significantly higher resolution and accuracy in static measurements and a smooth dynamic response up to 100 Hz, implying the possibility to observe seismic waves. The system performances are tailored to suit the requirements of volcano monitoring, with special attention to power consumption and to the trade-off between performance and cost. Preliminary field campaigns were carried out on Mt. Etna (Italy) using a prototypal single-axis FBG strain sensor, to check the system performances in out-of-the-lab conditions and in the harsh volcanic environment (lack of mains electricity for power, strong diurnal temperature changes, strong wind, erosive ash, snow and ice during the winter time). We also designed and built a FBG strain sensor featuring a multi-axial configuration which was tested and calibrated in the laboratory. This instrument is suitable for borehole installation and will be tested on Etna soon.

  5. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data.

    PubMed

    Del Negro, Ciro; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 - December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption. PMID:24169569

  6. Measuring volcanic gases at Taal Volcano Main Crater for monitoring volcanic activity and possible gas hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpa, M.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Reniva, P.; Bariso, E.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Nolasco, D.; Padron, E.; Garduque, R.; Villacorte, E.; Fajiculay, E.; Perez, N.; Solidum, R.

    2012-12-01

    Taal is an active volcano located in southwest Luzon, Philippines. It consists of mainly tuff cones which have formed an island at the center of a 30 km wide Taal Caldera. Most historical eruptions, since 1572 on Taal Volcano Island, have been characterized as hydromagmatic eruptions. Taal Main Crater, produced during the 1911 eruption, is the largest crater in the island currently filled by a 1.2 km wide, 85 m deep acidic lake. The latest historical eruption occurred in 1965-1977. Monitoring of CO2 emissions from the Main Crater Lake (MCL) and fumarolic areas within the Main Crater started in 2008 with a collaborative project between ITER and PHIVOLCS. Measurements were done by accumulation chamber method using a Westsystem portable diffuse fluxmeter. Baseline total diffuse CO2 emissions of less than 1000 t/d were established for the MCL from 3 campaign-type surveys between April, 2008 to March, 2010 when seismicity was within background levels. In May, 2010, anomalous seismic activity from the volcano started and the total CO2 emission from the MCL increased to 2716±54 t/d as measured in August, 2010. The CO2 emission from the lake was highest last March, 2011 at 4670±159 t/d when the volcano was still showing signs of unrest. Because CO2 emissions increased significantly (more than 3 times the baseline value) at this time, this activity may be interpreted as magmatic and not purely hydrothermal. Most likely deep magma intrusions occurred but did not progress further to shallower depths and no eruption occurred. No large increase in lake water temperature near the surface (average for the whole lake area) during the period when CO2 was above background, it remained at 30-34°C and a few degrees lower than average ambient temperature. Total CO2 emissions from the MCL have decreased to within baseline values since October, 2011. Concentrations of CO2, SO2 and H2S in air in the fumarolic area within the Main Crater also increased in March, 2011. The measurements

  7. The preliminary results of new submarine caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigane, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Shimoda, G.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Ryukyu Arc occurs between the islands of Kyushu and Taiwan with approximately 1200 km in the full length. This volcanic arc is caused by subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath the Eurasia Plate along the Ryukyu trench, and is composed of forearc islands, chains of arc volcanoes, and a back-arc rift called Okinawa Trough. The Ryukyu Arc is commonly divided into three segments (northern, central and southern) that bounded by the Tokara Strait and the Kerama Gap, respectively (e.g., Konishi 1965; Kato et al., 1982). Sato et al. (2014) mentioned that there is no active subaerial volcano in the southwest of Iotori-shima in the Central Ryukyu Arc whereas the Northern Ryukyu Arc (i.e., the Tokara Islands) has active frontal arc volcanoes. Therefore, the existence of volcanoes and volcanotectonic history of active volcanic front in the southwestern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc are still ambiguous. Detailed geophysical and geological survey was mainly conducted using R/V Kaiyou-maru No.7 during GK12 cruise operated by the Geological Survey of Japan/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan. As a result, we have found a new submarine volcanic caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, where located the southwestern part of Central Ryukyu Arc. Here, we present (1) the bathymetrical feature of this new submarine caldera for the first time and (2) the microstructural and petrological observations of volcanic rocks (20 volcanic samples in 13 dredge sites) sampled from the small volcanic cones of this caldera volcano. The dredged samples from the caldera consist of mainly rhyolite pumice with minor andesites, Mn oxides-crust and hydrothermally altered rocks. Andesite has plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts. Key words: volcanic rock, caldera, arc volcanism, active volcanic front, Kume-jima island, Ryukyu Arc

  8. Infrasound of basaltic effusive activity at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Valade, Sebastien; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Peltier, Aline; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    On August 24th 2015, a 67 days long eruptive activity started at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano. During the last phases of the eruption we deployed a portable, small aperture, infrasonic array which allowed us to record unprecedented data from effusive volcanic activity. The array consisted on four, few tens of meters spaced, infrasound pressure sensors and was installed on the outer rim of the Enclos Foqué, roughly 2.5 km far from the active vent, sited on the southern flank of the central cone. The system was almost continuously operating from October, 15th to December, 7th 2015, thus recording the end of the first eruptive phase (Autust 24th - October 17th) as well as the two short-living following phases (from 22 to 24 and from 29 to 31 October, 2015). The infrasound records have been coupled with discrete high-rate (30 Hz) thermal and visible imagery acquisitions located at a short distance from the vent (100-200 m) providing detailed information on the eruptive source dynamics. The comparison with seismic and ground tilt data recorded by the permanent network operated by the Observatoire Volcanologique du Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF), shows that infrasound can be succesfully used to locate the source, detect the onset, and the end, of the effusive phases as well as accurately track the time evolution of the effusive process. We present results which allows a detailed analysis of the shallow magma dynamics during the effusive activity at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano. As far as we know these are amongst the few rare infrasound dataset reported for this style of basaltic volcanic activity.

  9. Subglacial melting associated with activity at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, explored using numerical reservoir simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Hannah I.; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Högnadóttir, Thórdís

    2015-04-01

    Increased seismic activity was observed within the caldera of Bárdarbunga, a central volcano beneath Vatnajökull glacier, on 16 August 2014. The seismicity traced the path of a lateral dyke, initially propagating to the south east of the volcano, before changing course and continuing beyond the northern extent of the glacier. A short fissure eruption occurred at the site of the Holuhraun lavas on 29 August, lasting for approximately 5 hours and producing less than 1 million cubic meters of lava, before recommencing in earnest on 31 August with the large effusive eruption, which is still ongoing at the time of writing. The glacier surface has been monitored aerially since the onset of heightened seismic activity, and the caldera and dyke propagation path surveyed using radar profiling. Ice cauldrons are shallow depressions which form on the glacier surface due to basal melting, as a manifestation of heat flux from below; the melting ice acts as a calorimeter, allowing estimations of heat flux magnitude to be made. Several cauldrons were observed outside the caldera, two to the south east of Bárdarbunga, and three located above the path of the dyke under the Dyngjujökull outlet glacier. The cauldrons range in volume from approximately 0.001 km3 to 0.02 km3. We present time series data of the development and evolution of these cauldrons, with estimates of the heat flux magnitudes involved. The nature of the heat source required to generate the aforementioned cauldrons is not obvious and two scenarios are explored: 1) small subglacial eruptions; or 2) increased geothermal activity induced by the dyke intrusion. We investigate these scenarios using analytical and finite element modelling, considering the surface heat flux produced, and timescales and spatial extent of associated surface anomalies. A range of permeabilities has been explored. It is found that an intrusion of a dyke or sill into rocks where the groundwater is near or at the boiling point curve can

  10. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  11. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  12. San Cristobal Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A white plume of smoke, from San Cristobal Volcano (13.0N, 87.5W) on the western coast of Nicaragua, blows westward along the Nicaraguan coast just south of the Gulf of Fonseca and the Honduran border. San Csistobal is a strato volcano some 1,745 meters high and is frequently active.

  13. Highlights from the 2002 JASON2 marine expedition to Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.; Submarine Mauna Loa Science Team

    2003-04-01

    The new JASON2 ROV was used for 12 dives to explore and sample the submarine flanks of Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano. JASON2 collected 215 visually (using video and still camera) and spatially well-documented rock and sediment samples totaling 1130 kg from the volcano’s southwest rift zone and western flank. The goals of the expedition were to investigate the nature and history of the Hawaiian mantle plume as revealed in a 1.6 km thick, submarine landslide scarp, to examine volcanic processes along the 37 km long, submarine portion of the southwest rift zone, which has 4.5 km of relief, and to sample the newly discovered submarine radial vents. In addition, detailed bathymetric data was collected for an area of 2000 km2 using an EM300 system, which has a pixel resolution of 30 m allowing for identification of small (horizontal) scale volcanic and tectonic features. These surveys provide the first detailed examination of the volcano’s submarine rift zone and western flank. They revealed 11 new radial vents, many of which appear to be young based on examination by JASON2. Radial vents are uncommon on Hawaiian volcanoes and represent only 2 of the 39 historical Mauna Loa eruptions. Picritic basalts are remarkably abundant in the rift zone section, which may record 400,000 years of eruptive activity representing about one half of the volcano’s total lifetime. This time period is comparable to that sampled by phase 2 of the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project. The initial bathymetric and geologic results from this cruise will be presented.

  14. Chlorine isotopes of thermal springs in arc volcanoes for tracing shallow magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bonifacie, Magali; Aubaud, Cyril; Crispi, Olivier; Dessert, Céline; Agrinier, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of the status of shallow magma body (i.e., from the final intrusion stage, to quiescence, and back to activity), one of the key parameters that trigger and sustain volcanic eruptions, has been challenging in modern volcanology. Among volatile tracers, chlorine (Cl) uniquely exsolves at shallow depths and is highly hydrophilic. Consequently, Cl enrichment in volcanic gases and thermal springs has been proposed as a sign for shallow magmatic activities. However, such enrichment could also result from numerous other processes (e.g., water evaporation, dissolution of old chloride mineral deposits, seawater contamination) that are unrelated to magmatic activity. Here, based on stable isotope compositions of chloride and dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as previous published 3He/4He data obtained in thermal springs from two recently erupted volcanoes (La Soufrière in Guadeloupe and Montagne Pelée in Martinique) in the Lesser Antilles Arc, we show that the magmatic Cl efficiently trapped in thermal springs displays negative δ37Cl values (≤ - 0.65 ‰), consistent with a slab-derived origin but distinct from the isotope compositions of chloride in surface reservoirs (e.g. seawater, local meteoric waters, rivers and cold springs) displaying common δ37Cl values of around 0‰. Using this δ37Cl difference as an index of magmatic Cl, we further examined thermal spring samples including a 30-year archive from two thermal springs in Guadeloupe covering samples from its last eruption in 1976-1977 to 2008 and an island-wide sampling event in Martinique in 2008 to trace the evolution of magmatic Cl in the volcanic hydrothermal systems over time. The results show that magmatic Cl can be rapidly flushed out of the hydrothermal systems within <30 to 80 years after the eruption, much quicker than other volatile tracers such as CO2 and noble gases, which can exsolve at greater depths and constantly migrate to the surface. Because arc volcanoes often have well

  15. A Newly Recognized Shield Volcano Southwest of Oahu Island, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, E.; Moore, J. G.; Yokose, H.; Clague, D. A.; Nakagawa, M.; Kani, T.; Coombs, M.; Moore, G.; Harada, Y.; Kunikiyo, T.; Robinson, J.

    2001-12-01

    alkalic basalt composition. Dive K206 (20\\deg39.0'N, 158\\deg47.5'W) on one of the flat top cones imaged and sampled dense aphyric pillow lava (also with thick Mn-coating) cascading down the steep flank. Preliminary data collected from the recently completed cruise indicates that this newly mapped submarine Hawaiian shield volcano (2000-4000 km3) is similar in age to those on Oahu island (Waianae and Koolau), and apparently grew during several stages of magmatic activity.

  16. Increasing sediment accumulation rates in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon axis and their relationship with bottom trawling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Martín, J.; Masqué, P.; Palanques, A.

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies conducted in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean) found that trawling activities along the canyon flanks cause resuspension and transport of sediments toward the canyon axis. 210Pb chronology supported by 137Cs dating applied to a sediment core collected at 1750 m in 2002 suggested a doubling of the sediment accumulation rate since the 1970s, coincident with the rapid industrialization of the local trawling fleet. The same canyon area has been revisited a decade later, and new data are consistent with a sedimentary regime shift during the 1970s and also suggest that the accumulation rate during the last decade could be greater than expected, approaching ~2.4 cm yr-1 (compared to ~0.25 cm yr-1 pre-1970s). These results support the hypothesis that commercial bottom trawling can substantially affect sediment dynamics and budgets on continental margins, eventually initiating the formation of anthropogenic depocenters in submarine canyon environments.

  17. The Pulse of the Volcano: Discovery of Episodic Activity at Prometheus on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    The temporal behaviour of thermal output from a volcano yields valuable clues to the processes taking place at and beneath the surface. Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data show that the ionian volcanoes Prometheus and Amirani have significant thermal emission in excess of nonvolcanic background emission in every geometrically appropriate NIMS observation. The 5 micron brightness of these volcanoes shows considerable variation from orbit to orbit. Prometheus in particular exhibits an episodicity that yields valuable constraints to the mechanisms of magma supply and eruption. This work is part of an on-going study to chart and quantify the thermal emission of Io's volcanoes, determine mass eruption rates, and note eruption style.

  18. Effects of Human Activities on Submarine Topography in Lingding Bay of the Pearl River Estuary During the Last Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, Z. Y.; Saito, Y.; Milliman, J. D.; Zhao, D.; Zhou, J.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries have been the site of intensive human activities. During the past century, decreased fluvial water and sediment discharge, increasing land reclamation, changing climate, and rising sea level have had an ever-increasing impact on river deltas, particularly those deltas bordering Southeast Asia. Using six stages of navigational and bathymetric chart data from 1906 to 2013 and 2 years (2012,2013) single-beam bathymetric data, together with more than 50 years of fluvial discharge data, we document the impact of human activities on the Pearl River Delta and its estuary at Lingding Bay. Between 1906 and 2010, land reclamation decreased the bay's water area by ~300 km2 (>17%), mostly at the expense of the shrinking intertidal and shallow subtidal mudflats. Before 1980, the estuary was mainly governed by natural processes with slight net deposition, whereas after 1980 dredging in the estuary and large port engineering projects changed the estuarine topography by shallowing the shoals and deepening the troughs. From 1955 to 2010, the water volume of Lingding Bay decreased by 536 × 106 m3 for a net decrease of 9.7 × 106 m3 a year, which indicates that approximately 9.7 Mt/yr of sediment was deposited in Lingding Bay during that period. In 2012 and 2013, large-scale human activities within Lingding Bay included continued dredging plus a surge of sand excavation that changed local water depths by ±5 m/yr, far exceeding the range of natural topographic evolution in the estuary. The impacts of various human activities have significantly changed submarine topography in Lingding Bay of the complex Pearl River Estuary. With continuing economic expansion in the Pearl River Delta, Lingding Bay should continue to shrink in both area and water volume.

  19. Broadband seismic monitoring of active volcanoes using deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Nakano, M.; Maeda, T.; Yepes, H.; Palacios, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Arrais, S.; Vaca, M.; Molina, I.; Yamashina, T.

    2009-12-01

    We systematically used two approaches to analyze broadband seismic signals observed at active volcanoes: one is waveform inversion of very-long-period (VLP) signals in the frequency domain assuming possible source mechanisms; the other is a source location method of long-period (LP) and tremor using their amplitudes. The deterministic approach of the waveform inversion is useful to constrain the source mechanism and location, but is basically only applicable to VLP signals with periods longer than a few seconds. The source location method uses seismic amplitudes corrected for site amplifications and assumes isotropic radiation of S waves. This assumption of isotropic radiation is apparently inconsistent with the hypothesis of crack geometry at the LP source. Using the source location method, we estimated the best-fit source location of a VLP/LP event at Cotopaxi using a frequency band of 7-12 Hz and Q = 60. This location was close to the best-fit source location determined by waveform inversion of the VLP/LP event using a VLP band of 5-12.5 s. The waveform inversion indicated that a crack mechanism better explained the VLP signals than an isotropic mechanism. These results indicated that isotropic radiation is not inherent to the source and only appears at high frequencies. We also obtained a best-fit location of an explosion event at Tungurahua when using a frequency band of 5-10 Hz and Q = 60. This frequency band and Q value also yielded reasonable locations for the sources of tremor signals associated with lahars and pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua. The isotropic radiation assumption may be valid in a high frequency range in which the path effect caused by the scattering of seismic waves results in an isotropic radiation pattern of S waves. The source location method may be categorized as a stochastic approach based on the nature of scattering waves. We further applied the waveform inversion to VLP signals observed at only two stations during a volcanic crisis

  20. Active mud volcanoes on the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Caress, D. W.; Gwiazda, R.; Melling, H.; Riedel, M.; Jin, Y. K.; Hong, J. K.; Kim, Y.-G.; Graves, D.; Sherman, A.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, L.; Villinger, H.; Kopf, A.; Johnson, S. B.; Hughes Clarke, J.; Blasco, S.; Conway, K.; Neelands, P.; Thomas, H.; Côté, M.

    2015-09-01

    Morphologic features, 600-1100 m across and elevated up to 30 m above the surrounding seafloor, interpreted to be mud volcanoes were investigated on the continental slope in the Beaufort Sea in the Canadian Arctic. Sediment cores, detailed mapping with an autonomous underwater vehicle, and exploration with a remotely operated vehicle show that these are young and actively forming features experiencing ongoing eruptions. Biogenic methane and low-chloride, sodium-bicarbonate-rich waters are extruded with warm sediment that accumulates to form cones and low-relief circular plateaus. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the ascending water indicate that a mixture of meteoric water, seawater, and water from clay dehydration has played a significant role in the evolution of these fluids. The venting methane supports extensive siboglinid tubeworms communities and forms some gas hydrates within the near seafloor. We believe that these are the first documented living chemosynthetic biological communities in the continental slope of the western Arctic Ocean.

  1. Mercury distribution in seawater of Kagoshima Bay near the active Volcano, Mt. Sakurajima in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Megumi; Tomiyasu, Takashi; Tsuji, Mayumi; Akiba, Suminori

    2010-04-01

    Kagoshima bay has a highly active volcano in its center. In the filtered seawater and suspended matter collected from 200-m deep fumaroles at the bottom of the inner bay, the geometric mean concentrations of total mercury were 7.6 and 65.0 ng/L, respectively. The surface seawater collected at the inner bay had a higher concentration of mercury when compared to that in the bay entrance (average: 1.0 vs. 0.5 ng/L). In July, however, no such difference was observed. The fumaroles seem to contribute to relatively high concentrations of mercury in the inner bay except in summer, when thermal cline is formed. PMID:20182698

  2. Lightning and electrical activity during the Shiveluch volcano eruption on 16 November 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, Boris M.; Firstov, Pavel P.; Cherneva, Nina V.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Akbashev, Renat R.

    2016-03-01

    According to World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data, a sequence of lightning discharges was detected which occurred in the area of the explosive eruption of Shiveluch volcano on 16 November 2014 in Kamchatka. Information on the ash cloud motion was confirmed by the measurements of atmospheric electricity, satellite observations and meteorological and seismic data. It was concluded that WWLLN resolution is enough to detect the earlier stage of volcanic explosive eruption when electrification processes develop the most intensively. The lightning method has the undeniable advantage for the fast remote sensing of volcanic electric activity anywhere in the world. There is a good opportunity for the development of WWLLN technology to observe explosive volcanic eruptions.

  3. Volcanogenic fluorine in rainwater around active degassing volcanoes: Mt. Etna and Stromboli Island, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, S; D'Alessandro, W; Longo, M

    2003-01-01

    Many studies have assessed the strong influence of volcanic activity on the surrounding environment. This is particularly true for strong gas emitters such as Mt. Etna and Stromboli volcanoes. Among volcanic gases, fluorine compounds are potentially very harmful. Fluorine cycling through rainwater in the above volcanic areas was studied analysing more than 400 monthly bulk samples. Data indicate that only approximately 1% of fluorine emission through the plume is deposited on the two volcanic areas by meteoric precipitations. Although measured bulk rainwater fluorine fluxes are comparable to and sometimes higher than in heavily polluted areas, their influence on the surrounding vegetation is limited. Only annual crops, in fact, show some damage that could be an effect of fluorine deposition, indicating that long-living endemic plant species or varieties have developed some kind of resistance.

  4. Submarine evidence for large-scale debris avalanches in the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplus, Christine; Le Friant, Anne; Boudon, Georges; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Villemant, Benoit; Harford, Chloe; Ségoufin, Jacques; Cheminée, Jean-Louis

    2001-10-01

    Results from a recent marine geophysical survey demonstrate the importance of the process of flank collapse in the growth and evolution of volcanoes along an island arc. The Aguadomar cruise, aboard the French R/V L'Atalante, surveyed the flanks of the Lesser Antilles Arc between the islands of Montserrat and St. Lucia. Analysis of the data shows that flank collapse events occurred on active volcanoes all along the arc and resulted in debris avalanches, some of them being of large magnitude. The debris avalanche deposits display hummocky topography on the swath bathymetry, speckled pattern on backscatter images, hyperbolic facies on 3.5 kHz echosounder data and chaotic units on air gun seismic profiles. They extend from horseshoe-shaped structures previously identified on the subaerial part of the volcanoes. In the southern part of the arc, large-scale debris avalanche deposits were identified on the floor of the Grenada Basin west of active volcanoes on Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia. The extent of debris avalanche deposits off Dominica is about 3500 km 2. The debris avalanches have resulted from major flank collapse events which may be mainly controlled by the large-scale structure of the island arc and the presence of the deep Grenada Basin. In the northern part of the arc, several debris avalanche deposits were also identified around the island of Montserrat. With smaller extent (20-120 km 2), they are present on the east, south and west submarine flanks of Soufriere Hills volcano which has been erupting since July 1995. Flank collapse is thus a recurrent process in the recent history of this volcano. The marine data are also relevant for a discussion of the transport mechanisms of debris avalanches on the seafloor surrounding a volcanic island arc.

  5. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, Fabio; Rivalta, Eleonora; Pinel, Virginie; Maccaferri, Francesco; Bagnardi, Marco; Acocella, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we use numerical models to show that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observation. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations as well as the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  6. Seismicity and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala: February 1975 -January 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuan, A.T.E.; McNutt, S.R.; Harlow, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    We examine seismic and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano (14??29???N, 90?? 53???W), a 3800-m-high stratovolcano located in the active volcanic arc of Guatemala. Eruptions at Fuego are typically short-lived vulcanian eruptions producing ash falls and ash flows of high-alumina basalt. From February 1975 to December 1976, five weak ash eruptions occurred, accompanied by small earthquake swarms. Between 0 and 140 (average ??? 10) A-type or high-frequency seismic events per day with M > 0.5 were recorded during this period. Estimated thermal energies for each eruption are greater by a factor of 106 than cumulative seismic energies, a larger ratio than that reported for other volcanoes. Over 4000 A-type events were recorded January 3-7, 1977 (cumulative seismic energy ??? 109 joules), yet no eruption occurred. Five 2-hour-long pulses of intense seismicity separated by 6-hour intervals of quiescence accounted for the majority of events. Maximum likelihood estimates of b-values range from 0.7 ?? 0.2 to 2.1 ?? 0.4 with systematically lower values corresponding to the five intense pulses. The low values suggest higher stress conditions. During the 1977 swarm, a tiltmeter located 6 km southeast of Fuego recorded a 14 ?? 3 microradian tilt event (down to SW). This value is too large to represent a simple change in the elastic strain field due to the earthquake swarm. We speculate that the earthquake swarm and tilt are indicative of subsurface magma movement. ?? 1984.

  7. Numerical simulations of tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2014-02-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world provoke the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami run-ups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of the Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, the Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  8. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-11-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case-study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami runups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  9. Volcano infrasound: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Bruce; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2011-09-01

    Exploding volcanoes, which produce intense infrasound, are reminiscent of the veritable explosion of volcano infrasound papers published during the last decade. Volcano infrasound is effective for tracking and quantifying eruptive phenomena because it corresponds to activity occurring near and around the volcanic vent, as opposed to seismic signals, which are generated by both surface and internal volcanic processes. As with seismology, infrasound can be recorded remotely, during inclement weather, or in the dark to provide a continuous record of a volcano's unrest. Moreover, it can also be exploited at regional or global distances, where seismic monitoring has limited efficacy. This paper provides a literature overview of the current state of the field and summarizes applications of infrasound as a tool for better understanding volcanic activity. Many infrasound studies have focused on integration with other geophysical data, including seismic, thermal, electromagnetic radiation, and gas spectroscopy and they have generally improved our understanding of eruption dynamics. Other work has incorporated infrasound into volcano surveillance to enhance capabilities for monitoring hazardous volcanoes and reducing risk. This paper aims to provide an overview of volcano airwave studies (from analog microbarometer to modern pressure transducer) and summarizes how infrasound is currently used to infer eruption dynamics. It also outlines the relative merits of local and regional infrasound surveillance, highlights differences between array and network sensor topologies, and concludes with mention of sensor technologies appropriate for volcano infrasound study.

  10. International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska: Experiencing Language, Culture, Environment, and Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Ivanov, B.; Izbekov, P.; Kasahara, M.; Melnikov, D.; Selyangin, O.; Vesna, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University of Education, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Hokkaido University are developing an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. An experimental first session was held on Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in Kamchatka during August 2003. Objectives of the school are to:(1) Acquaint students with the chemical and physical processes of explosive volcanism, through first-hand experience with some of the most spectacular volcanic features on Earth; (2) Expose students to different concepts and approaches to volcanology; (3) Expand students' ability to function in a harsh environment and to bridge barriers in language and culture; (4) Build long-lasting collaborations in research among students and in teaching and research among faculty in the North Pacific region. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Russia, the United States, and Japan participated. The school was based at a mountain hut situated between Gorely and Mutnovsky Volcanoes and accessible by all-terrain truck. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of both volcanoes, flank lava flows, fumarole fields, ignimbrite exposures, and a geothermal area and power plant. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. Although subjects were taught at the undergraduate level, lectures led to further discussion with more advanced students. Graduate students participated by describing their research activities to the undergraduates. A final session at a geophysical field station permitted demonstration of instrumentation and presentations requiring sophisticated graphics in more comfortable surroundings. Plans are underway to make this school an annual offering for academic credit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska and in Kamchatka. The course will be targeted at undergraduates with a strong interest in and

  11. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    on surface, often of plane-conical shape, rising for 5 to 400 m and more over the country (for example, mud volcano Toragay, 400 m height). The base diameter is from 100 m to 3-4 km and more. Like the magmatic ones, the mud volcanoes are crowned with crater of convex-plane or deeply-seated shape. In Azerbaijan there are all types of mud volcanoes: active, extinct, buried, submarine, island, abundantly oil seeping. According to their morphology they are defined into cone-shaped, dome-shaped, ridge-shaped, plateau-shaped. The crater shapes are also various: conical, convex-plane, shield-shaped, deeply-seated, caldera-like. The most complete morphological classification was given in "Atlas of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan" (Yakubov et al., 1971). Recently (Aliyev Ad. et al., 2003) it was proposed a quite new morphological classification of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. For the first time the mud volcanic manifestations had been defined. Volcanoes are ranged according to morphological signs, crater shape and type of activity.

  12. Linking observations at active volcanoes to physical processes through conduit flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mark; Neuberg, Jurgen

    2010-05-01

    Low frequency seismic events observed on volcanoes such as Soufriere hills, Montserrat may offer key indications about the state of a volcanic system. To obtain a better understanding of the source of these events and of the physical processes that take place within a volcano it is necessary to understand the conditions of magma a depth. This can be achieved through conduit flow modelling (Collier & Neuberg, 2006). 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved through a Finite Element approach, for differing initial water and crystal contents, magma temperatures, chamber overpressures and geometric shapes of conduit. In the fully interdependent modelled system each of these variables has an effect on the magma density, viscosity, gas content, and also the pressure within the flow. These variables in turn affect the magma ascent velocity and the overall eruption dynamics of an active system. Of particular interest are the changes engendered in the flow by relativity small variations in the conduit geometry. These changes can have a profound local effect of the ascent velocity of the magma. By restricting the width of 15m wide, 5000m long vertical conduit over a 100m distance a significant acceleration of the magma is seen in this area. This has implications for the generation of Low-Frequency (LF) events at volcanic systems. The strain-induced fracture of viscoelastic magma or brittle failure of melt has been previously discussed as a possible source of LF events by several authors (e.g. Tuffen et al., 2003; Neuberg et al., 2006). The location of such brittle failure however has been seen to occur at relativity shallow depths (<1000m), which does not agree with the location of recorded LF events. By varying the geometry of the conduit and causing accelerations in the magma flow, localised increases in the shear strain rate of up to 30% are observed. This provides a mechanism of increasing the depth over witch brittle failure of melt may occur. A key observable

  13. Organic geochemical signatures controlling methane outgassing at active mud volcanoes in the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DongHun, Lee; YoungKeun, Jin; JungHyun, Kim; Heldge, Niemann; JongKu, Gal; BoHyung, Choi

    2016-04-01

    Based on the water column acoustic anomalies related to active methane (CH4) venting, numerous active Mud Volcanoes (MVs) were recently identified at ~282, ~420, and ~740 m water depths on the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea (Paull et al., 2015). While geophysical aspects such as the multibeam bathymetric mapping are thoroughly investigated, biogeochemical processes controlling outgassing CH4 at the active MVs are not well constrained. Here, we investigated three sediment cores from the active MVs and one sediment core from a non-methane influenced reference site recovered during the ARA-05C expedition with the R/V ARAON in 2014. We analyzed lipid biomarkers and their stable carbon isotopic values (δ13C) in order to determine key biogeochemical processes involved in CH4 cycling in the MV sediments. Downcore CH4 and sulphate (SO42-) concentration measurements revealed a distinct sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) at the shallow sections of the cores (15 - 45 cm below seafloor (cm bsf) at 282 m MV, 420 m MV, and 740 m MV). The most abundant diagnostic lipid biomarkers in the SMTZ were sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol (-94‰) and archaeol (-66‰) with the sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol: archaeol ratio of 1.1 to 5, indicating the presence of ANME-2 or -3. However, we also found substantial amounts of monocyclic biphytane-1 (BP-1, -118‰), which is rather indicative for ANME-1. Nevertheless, the concentration of sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol was 2-fold higher than any other archaeal lipids, suggesting a predominant ANME-2 or -3 rather than ANME-1 as a driving force for the anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) in these systems. We will further investigate the microbial community at the active MVs using nucleic acid (RNA and DNA) sequence analyses in near future. Our study provides first biogeochemical data set of the active MVs in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, which helps to better understand CH4 cycling mediated in these systems. Reference Paull, C.K., et al. (2015), Active mud

  14. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  15. A Wireless Seismoacoustic Sensor Network for Monitoring Activity at Volcano Reventador, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, M.; Werner-Allen, G.; Lorincz, K.; Marcillo, O.; Ruiz, M.; Johnson, J.; Lees, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    We developed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcano Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The small size, low power, and wireless communication capabilities can greatly simplify deployments of large sensor arrays. The network consisted of 16 wireless sensor nodes, each outfitted with an 8 MHz CPU (TI MSP430) and a 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.15.4 radio (Chipcon CC2420) with data rates up to 80 Kbps. Each node acquired acoustic and seismic data at 24-bit resolution, with a microphone and either a single-axis geophone or triaxial short-period seismometer. Each node is powered by two D-cell batteries with a lifetime of about 1 week, and measures 18 x 10 x 8 cm. Nodes were distributed radially from the vent over a 3 km aperture. Control and data messages are relayed via radio to a base station node, with inter-node distances of up to 420 m. The base station transmits data using a FreeWave radio modem, via a repeater, to a laptop located 4 km from the deployment site. Each node samples continuous sensor data and a simple event-detection algorithm is used to trigger data collection. When a sensor detects an event, it relays a short message to the base station via radio. If several nodes report an event within a short time interval, the last 60 seconds of data is downloaded from each node in turn. One of the sensor nodes is programmed to transmit continuous data; due to limited radio bandwidth, it is not possible to collect continuous data from all nodes in the array. A GPS receiver and time synchronization protocol is used to establish a global timebase across all sensor nodes.

  16. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  17. Cotopaxi volcano's unrest and eruptive activity in 2015: mild awakening after 73 years of quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Silvana; Bernard, Benjamin; Battaglia, Jean; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Barrington, Charlotte; Andrade, Daniel; Ramón, Patricio; Arellano, Santiago; Yepes, Hugo; Proaño, Antonio; Almeida, Stefanie; Sierra, Daniel; Dinger, Florian; Kelly, Peter; Parra, René; Bobrowski, Nicole; Galle, Bo; Almeida, Marco; Mothes, Patricia; Alvarado, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Cotopaxi volcano (5,897 m) is located 50 km south of Quito, the capital of Ecuador. The most dangerous hazards of this volcano are the devastating lahars that can be generated by the melting of its ice cap during pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions. The first seismic station was installed in 1976. Cotopaxi has been monitored by the Instituto Geofísico (Escuela Politécnica Nacional) since 1983. Presently the monitoring network is comprised of 11 broadband and 5 short period seismometers, 4 scanning DOAS, 1 infrared and 5 visible cameras, 7 DGPS, 5 tiltmeters, 11 AFM (lahar detectors) and a network of ashmeters. Due to the recent unrest, the monitoring of the volcano has been complemented by campaign airborne Multi-GAS and thermal IR measurements and ground-based mobile DOAS and stationary solar FTIR. After 73 years of quiescence, the first sign of unrest was a progressive increase in the amplitude of transient seismic events in April 2015. Since May 20, an increase in SO2 emissions from ˜500 t/d to ˜3 kt/day was detected followed by the appearance of seismic tremor on June 4. Both SO2 emissions of up to 5 kt/day and seismic tremor were observed until August 14 when a swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes preceded the first phreatic explosions. These explosions produced ash and gas columns reaching up to 9 km above the crater. The ash fall produced by the opening phase covered over 500 km2 with a submillimetric deposit corresponding to a mass of 1.65E+8 kg (VEI 1). During this period of explosions, SO2 emission rates up to 24 kt/day were observed, the highest thus far. The ash was dominantly hydrothermally altered and oxidized lithic fragments, hydrothermal minerals (alunite, gypsum), free crystals of plagioclase and pyroxenes, and little juvenile material. Unrest continued after August 14, with three episodes of ash emission. However, the intensity of ash fallout, average seismic amplitude, and SO2 emissions during each successive episode progressively decreased

  18. The activity of the Colima volcano and morphological changes in the summit between 2004 and 2007.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Sanchez-Aguilar, J.; Arriaga, F.

    2007-12-01

    Colima Volcano, located in the West of the Volcanic Mexican Belt, has shown a new cycle of explosive activity beginning May 30 1999, and reaching its maximum in March and April of 2005. This year the explosive activity increased gradually, having the largest event on May 23, when a new dome was created. Hours later this dome was destroyed by a strong explosion, forming an ash column 5.6 km high with subsequent pyroclastic flows that reached a distance of 4.2 km flowing along the ravines of the South sector. On May 30 the most intense explosion in 1999 occurred, when the plume reached heights in excess of 4.4 km above the crater, and piroclastic flows were created. On the same year in July two explosive events occurred of characteristics similar to those in May. These constant explosions caused continuos morphological changes in the summit, the most significant being the collapse of the North and South walls of the crater, in the first week of June of 2005, and the creation of a new crater in July. In 2006 the most significant explosive activity took place during April, May and July, when the eruptive columns reached heights of more than 1500 meters above the crater, occasionally forming small pyroclastic flows. In May of 2007 morphological changes were observed in the summit. Among them a crater explosion on the East side, a new dome was formed on the West side, with 20 m in high and 50 m in diameter. The explosive events continue to date, but they have diminished in size and intensity. This activity was similar to the one observed in 1902-1903 and reported by Severo Diaz (1906), but without reaching the maximum levels of activity reported for 1903, where it had levels of three to five maximum explosive events per day. The photographs and the digital mapping have provided detailed information to quantify the dynamic evolution of the volcanic structures that developed on the summit of the volcano in the course of the last for years.

  19. Imaging the magmatic system of Newberry Volcano using Joint active source and teleseismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Benjamin A.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we combine active and passive source P wave seismic data to tomographically image the magmatic system beneath Newberry Volcano, located east of the Cascade arc. By using both travel times from local active sources and delay times from teleseismic earthquakes recorded on closely spaced seismometers (300-800 m), we significantly improve recovery of upper crustal velocity structure (<10 km depth). The tomographic model reveals a low-velocity feature between 3 and 5 km depth that lies beneath the caldera, consistent with a magma body. In contrast to earlier tomographic studies, where elevated temperatures were sufficient to explain the recovered low velocities, the larger amplitude low-velocity anomalies in our joint tomography model require low degrees of partial melt (˜10%), and a minimum melt volume of ˜2.5 km3. Furthermore, synthetic tests suggest that even greater magnitude low-velocity anomalies, and by inference larger volumes of magma (up to 8 km3), are needed to explain the observed waveform variability. The lateral extent and shape of the inferred magma body indicates that the extensional tectonic regime at Newberry influences the emplacement of magmatic intrusions. Our study shows that jointly inverting active source and passive source seismic data improves tomographic imaging of the shallow crustal seismic structure of volcanic systems and that active source experiments would benefit from longer deployment times to also record teleseismic sources.

  20. Volcano hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, William E.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1997-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon. It has been built by thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during several eruptive episodes of the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. The most-visited part of the volcano is Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera at the summit of the volcano. Seven campgrounds, two resorts, six summer homes, and two major lakes (East and Paulina Lakes) are nestled in the caldera. The caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Other eruptions during this time have occurred along a rift zone on the volcano's northwest flank and, to a lesser extent, the south flank. Many striking volcanic features lie in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument includes the caldera and extends along the northwest rift zone to the Deschutes River. About 30 percent of the area within the monument is covered by volcanic products erupted during the past 10,000 years from Newberry volcano. Newberry volcano is presently quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. This report describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. In terms of our own lifetimes, volcanic events at Newberry are not of day-to-day concern because they occur so infrequently; however, the consequences of some types of eruptions can be severe. When Newberry

  1. The heartbeat of the volcano: The discovery of episodic activity at Prometheus on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Wilson, L.; Matson, D.; Leone, G.; Keszthelyi, L.; Jaeger, W.

    2006-01-01

    The temporal signature of thermal emission from a volcano is a valuable clue to the processes taking place both at and beneath the surface. The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observed the volcano Prometheus, on the jovian moon Io, on multiple occasions between 1996 and 2002. The 5 micron (??m) brightness of this volcano shows considerable variation from orbit to orbit. Prometheus exhibits increases in thermal emission that indicate episodic (though non-periodic) effusive activity in a manner akin to the current Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha (afterwards referred to as the Pu'u 'O'o) eruption of Kilauea, Hawai'i. The volume of material erupted during one Prometheus eruption episode (defined as the interval from minimum thermal emission to peak and back to minimum) from 6 November 1996 to 7 May 1997 is estimated to be ???0.8 km3, with a peak instantaneous volumetric flux (effusion rate) of ???140 m3 s-1, and an averaged volumetric flux (eruption rate) of ???49 m3 s-1. These quantities are used to model subsurface structure, magma storage and magma supply mechanisms, and likely magma chamber depth. Prometheus appears to be supplied by magma from a relatively shallow magma chamber, with a roof at a minimum depth of ???2-3 km and a maximum depth of ???14 km. This is a much shallower depth range than sources of supply proposed for explosive, possibly ultramafic, eruptions at Pillan and Tvashtar. As Prometheus-type effusive activity is widespread on Io, shallow magma chambers containing magma of basaltic or near-basaltic composition and density may be common. This analysis strengthens the analogy between Prometheus and Pu'u 'O'o, at least in terms of eruption style. Even though the style of eruption appears to be similar (effusive emplacement of thin, insulated, compound pahoehoe flows) the scale of activity at Prometheus greatly exceeds current activity at Pu'u 'O'o in terms of volume erupted, area covered, and magma flux. Whereas the estimated magma chamber at

  2. The proximal part of the giant submarine Wailau landslide, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    The main break-in-slope on the northern submarine flank of Molokai at -1500 to -1250 m is a shoreline feature that has been only modestly modified by the Wailau landslide. Submarine canyons above the break-in-slope, including one meandering stream, were subaerially carved. Where such canyons cross the break-in-slope, plunge pools may form by erosion from bedload sediment carried down the canyons. West Molokai Volcano continued infrequent volcanic activity that formed a series of small coastal sea cliffs, now submerged, as the island subsided. Lavas exposed at the break-in-slope are subaerially erupted and emplaced tholeiitic shield lavas. Submarine rejuvenated-stage volcanic cones formed after the landslide took place and following at least 400-500 m of subsidence after the main break-in-slope had formed. The sea cliff on east Molokai is not the headwall of the landslide, nor did it form entirely by erosion. It may mark the location of a listric fault similar to the Hilina faults on present-day Kilauea Volcano. The Wailau landslide occurred about 1.5 Ma and the Kalaupapa Peninsula most likely formed 330??5 ka. Molokai is presently stable relative to sea level and has subsided no more than 30 m in the last 330 ka. At their peak, West and East Molokai stood 1.6 and 3 km above sea level. High rainfall causes high surface runoff and formation of canyons, and increases groundwater pressure that during dike intrusions may lead to flank failure. Active shield or postshield volcanism (with dikes injected along rift zones) and high rainfall appear to be two components needed to trigger the deep-seated giant Hawaiian landslides. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seismic body wave separation in volcano-tectonic activity inferred by the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Lauro, Enza; De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Petrosino, Simona

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenge in volcano-seismological literature is to locate and characterize the source of volcano/tectonic seismic activity. This passes through the identification at least of the onset of the main phases, i.e. the body waves. Many efforts have been made to solve the problem of a clear separation of P and S phases both from a theoretical point of view and developing numerical algorithms suitable for specific cases (see, e.g., Küperkoch et al., 2012). Recently, a robust automatic procedure has been implemented for extracting the prominent seismic waveforms from continuously recorded signals and thus allowing for picking the main phases. The intuitive notion of maximum non-gaussianity is achieved adopting techniques which involve higher-order statistics in frequency domain., i.e, the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis (CICA). This technique is successful in the case of the blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. In seismological framework, indeed, seismic signals are thought as the convolution of a source function with path, site and the instrument response. In addition, time-delayed versions of the same source exist, due to multipath propagation typically caused by reverberations from some obstacle. In this work, we focus on the Volcano Tectonic (VT) activity at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2006 ground uplift (Ciaramella et al., 2011). The activity was characterized approximately by 300 low-magnitude VT earthquakes (Md < 2; for the definition of duration magnitude, see Petrosino et al. 2008). Most of them were concentrated in distinct seismic sequences with hypocenters mainly clustered beneath the Solfatara-Accademia area, at depths ranging between 1 and 4 km b.s.l.. The obtained results show the clear separation of P and S phases: the technique not only allows the identification of the S-P time delay giving the timing of both phases but also provides the independent waveforms of the P and S phases. This is an enormous

  4. Integrating science and education during an international, multi-parametric investigation of volcanic activity at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Yan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Andrews, Benjamin; Wolf, Rudiger; Rose, William; Chigna, Gustavo; Pineda, Armand

    2016-04-01

    In January 2016, we held the first scientific/educational Workshops on Volcanoes (WoV). The workshop took place at Santiaguito volcano - the most active volcano in Guatemala. 69 international scientists of all ages participated in this intensive, multi-parametric investigation of the volcanic activity, which included the deployment of seismometers, tiltmeters, infrasound microphones and mini-DOAS as well as optical, thermographic, UV and FTIR cameras around the active vent. These instruments recorded volcanic activity in concert over a period of 3 to 9 days. Here we review the research activities and present some of the spectacular observations made through this interdisciplinary efforts. Observations range from high-resolution drone and IR footage of explosions, monitoring of rock falls and quantification of the erupted mass of different gases and ash, as well as morphological changes in the dome caused by recurring explosions (amongst many other volcanic processes). We will discuss the success of such integrative ventures in furthering science frontiers and developing the next generation of geoscientists.

  5. Volcanic activity and satellite-detected thermal anomalies at Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A large nuee ardente eruption occurred at Santiaguito volcano, within the test area on 16 September 1973. Through a system of local observers, the eruption has been described, reported to the international scientific community, extent of affected area mapped, and the new ash sampled. A more extensive report on this event will be prepared. The eruption is an excellent example of the kind of volcanic situation in which satellite thermal imagery might be useful. The Santiaguito dome is a complex mass with a whole series of historically active vents. It's location makes access difficult, yet its activity is of great concern to large agricultural populations who live downslope. Santiaguito has produced a number of large eruptions with little apparent warning. In the earlier ground survey large thermal anomalies were identified at Santiaguito. There is no way of knowing whether satellite monitoring could have detected changes in thermal anomaly patterns related to this recent event, but the position of thermal anomalies on Santiaguito and any changes in their character would be relevant information.

  6. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John R.; Zucca, John J.

    1988-12-01

    We determine compressional wave velocity and attenuation structures for the upper crust beneath Medicine Lake volcano in northeast California using a high-resolution active source seismic tomography method. Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. This lineament is interpreted to be the result of an old crustal weakness now affecting the emplacement of magma, both on direct ascent from the lower crust and mantle and in migration from the shallow silicic chamber to summit vents. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newbeny volcano, a volcano in central Oregon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault, a normal fault mapped at the surface north of the volcano. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region

  7. The magmatic- and hydrothermal-dominated fumarolic system at the Active Crater of Lascar volcano, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, F.; Aguilera, F.; Vaselli, O.; Medina, E.; Tedesco, D.; Delgado Huertas, A.; Poreda, R.; Kojima, S.

    2009-03-01

    Low-to-high temperature fumaroles discharging from the Active Crater of Lascar volcano (northern Chile) have been collected in November 2002, May 2005 and October 2006 for chemical and isotopic analysis to provide the first geochemical survey on the magmatic-hydrothermal system of this active volcano. Chemical and isotopic gas composition shows direct addition of high-temperature fluids from magmatic degassing, mainly testified by the very high contents of SO2, HCl and HF (up to 87,800, 29,500 and 2,900 μmol/mol) and the high R/Ra values (up to 7.29). Contributions from a hydrothermal source, mainly in gas discharges of the Active Crater rim, has also been detected. Significant variations in fluid chemistry, mainly consisting of a general decrease of magmatic-related compounds, i.e. SO2, have affected the fumarolic system during the period of observation, indicating an increase of the influence of the hydrothermal system surrounding the ascending deep fluids. The chemical composition of Active Crater fumaroles has been used to build up a geochemical model describing the main processes that regulate the fluid circulation system of Lascar volcano to be utilized in volcanic surveillance.

  8. Electric and magnetic phenomena observed before the volcano-seismic activity in 2000 in the Izu Island Region, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, S.; Hayakawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Molchanov, O.; Hattori, K.; Orihara, Y.; Gotoh, K.; Akinaga, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2002-01-01

    Significant anomalous changes in the ultra low frequency range (≈0.01 Hz) were observed in both geoelectric and geomagnetic fields before the major volcano-seismic activity in the Izu Island region, Japan. The spectral intensity of the geoelectric potential difference between some electrodes on Niijima Island and the third principal component of geomagnetic field variations at an array network in Izu Peninsula started to increase from a few months before the onset of the volcano-seismic activity, culminating immediately before nearby magnitude 6 class earthquakes. Appearance of similar changes in two different measurements conducted at two far apart sites seems to provide information supporting the reality of preseismic electromagnetic signals. PMID:12032286

  9. Identifying different regimes in eruptive activity: An application to Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, F.; Gasperini, P.; Tinti, S.

    1987-12-01

    The objective identification of different regimes in the eruptive time-history of a volcano is crucial to the understanding of its physics. While a problem well-known in statistical literature under the name of change-point or scan-point problem, no method of general applicability exists for the identification of different regimes in a time-series. In particular, the available techniques seem unsuitable to the volcanological case. We developed an original procedure based on two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics which offers satisfactory accuracy in a broad range of conditions with a minimum of assumptions and is expressly tailored to the study of geophysical phenomena. Our procedure requires neither the a priori knowledge of the number of regimes nor of the statistical distributions governing the whole process, which can be of different type. The parent distribution of each regime is inferred through a goodness-of-fit test, and this in turn allows the confidence intervals for each of the change-points identified to be estimated by numerical simulation. This procedure is applied to the eruptive history of Mount Etna volcano. Available data allow the analysis of flank eruptions in the period 1600-1980, while the total output (summit and flank activity) can be studied only in the period 1971-1981. Information on eruptive history can be therefore obtained at two different timescales. Since no univocally accepted catalog exists except for the last few decades, we use two different sets of data, which practically exhaust all the available information. The results are interpreted by a stability analysis, and only stable results are retained. Our analysis yields that: - The inter-event times of flank eruptions in the period 1600-1980 follow two regimes before and after year 1865, while the eruptive activity in the period 1971-1981 follows four different regimes. In each regime eruptions occur according to a Poisson process and Etna behaves as a random nonstationary

  10. Submarine cable route survey

    SciTech Connect

    Herrouin, G.; Scuiller, T.

    1995-12-31

    The growth of telecommunication market is very significant. From the beginning of the nineties, more and more the use of optical fiber submarine cables is privileged to that of satellites. These submarine telecommunication highways require accurate surveys in order to select the optimum route and determine the cable characteristics. Advanced technology tools used for these surveys are presented along with their implementation.

  11. Paint-Stirrer Submarine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn; Hardy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a unique and challenging laboratory exercise called, the paint-stir-stick submarine, that keeps the students enthralled. The paint-stir-stick submarine fits beautifully with the National Science Education Standards Physical Science Content Standard B, and with the California state science standards for physical…

  12. Bathymetry,submarine geomorphology and tectonics of the Aeolian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, M.; Karatson, D.; Mazzuoli, R.; Pareschi, M. T.; Ventura, G.

    2003-04-01

    On the basis of a new DEM of the submarine portions of the Aeolian Island Arc, Southern Italy, we discuss the offshore geomorphology, morphometry and tectonics of the seven major volcanic edifices and their surroundings. Bathymetric data have been compiled from various sources. Geomorphological maps reveal important details of the submerged volcanic structures as well as tectonic lineaments that are related to the most evident on land pattern. Geomorphological and morphomnetrical data have allowed us to get an insight into the evolution of the submarine volcanoes and the relationship between tectonics and volcanism in the archipelago.

  13. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  14. The Giant Submarine Alika Debris Slide, Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipman, Peter W.; Normark, William R.; Moore, James G.; Wilson, John B.; Gutmacher, Christina E.

    1988-05-01

    A 4000-km2 area of submarine slump and slide deposits along the west flank of Mauna Loa volcano has been mapped with GLORIA side-scan sonar images, seismic reflection profiles, and new bathymetry. The youngest deposits are two debris avalanche lobes that travelled from their breakaway area near the present shoreline as much as 100 km into the Hawaiian Deep at water depths of 4800 m. The two lobes partly overlap and together are designated the Alika slide. They were derived from the same source area and probably formed in rapid succession. Distinction hummocky topography, marginal levees, and other features on lower slopes (0.3°-0.6°) of these deposits resemble subaerial volcanic debris avalanche deposits such as 1980 Mount St. Helens and suggest high emplacement velocities. The breakaway area for the Alika slide (10°-15° slopes) is characterized by large block slumps, bounded by normal faults, that probably represent multiple subsidence events before, during, and after the debris avalanches. Lower slopes of the slide contain distinctive lobate-terraced deposits that are interpreted as having been emplaced more slowly, prior to the debris avalanches. Estimated thicknesses of 50-200 m suggest volumes of 200-600 km3 for the two lobes. The combined volume of the entire slide and slump terrane is probably 1500-2000 km3. The slide deposits predate a 13-ka coral reef and probably postdate the block-faulted Ninole Basalt, roughly dated as a few hundred thousand years old. The Alika slide, or a similar deposit recognized on GLORIA images further north along the Hawaiian Ridge, probably triggered a giant wave that washed 325 m high on Lanai at about 100 ka. Slumping on Mauna Loa has been most intense adjacent to the large arcuate bend in its southwest rift zone, as the rift zone migrated westward away from the growing Kilauea volcano. Slumping events were probably triggered by seismic activity accompanying dike injection along the rift zone. Such massive slumps

  15. Spectral Analysis of the Signals Associated with Increased Activity in Popocatepetl Volcano April 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, J.

    2013-05-01

    After several decades of being inactive in 1994 had a strong reactivation. Since then he has had long periods where volcanic activity including increased growth and destruction of a dome. In April 2012 Popocatepetl Volcano activity showed an increase in the emission of gas and ash, and Vulcanian type explosions. As a result the National Center for Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) raised the yellow phase from 2 to 3. Spectrally analyzes seismic activity characteristic of the types of events (explosions, LP, Type-B and tremors) that provides information of the source processes that cause it, despite sustained change reflected by the complexity of the volcanic apparatus, through of: 1) the spectral content of the process provides the source, 2) the spectral ratio H / V, its associated amplification and dominant frequencies, 3) time frequency analysis showing the variation in frequency, 4) the particle motion to analyze its retrograde or prograde acting in a volcanic complex medium. The calculation of H / V was performed by each hour using windows with duration of 80 seconds in the broadband seismic station "Canario" (PPPB). The predominant frequencies of H / V are around 1.4-1.8 Hz to 2.1-2.6 Hz and amplifications from 2.3 to 6.9 times. Analysis of H / V of 48 hours (days 16 and April 17) for the case of 1.4-1.8 Hz was observed: (1) From 0-9 hours there is no amplification. (2) The seismic amplification increases from 10 to 11 hours. (3) A first crisis reaches a maximum at 13 hours with about 6 times of amplification. (4) From 14 to 15 hours there is a strong relaxation of the activity. (5) The activity begins to increase from 16 to 23 hours where it reaches its maximum amplification of almost 7 times. (6) The following two hours and is kept exceeding 6 times of amplification. (7) Then is followed by a decrease to 4 hours on the day 17, from which is maintained at a level variable. (8) At 18 hours of the day 17 grows the amplification at 6.2 times, which conforms a

  16. Changes of biogeochemical activities before and after significant mud displacement at the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, J.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Yoerger, D.; Camilli, R.; German, C.; Olu, K.; Feseker, T.; de Beer, D.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano (72°N, 14° 43' E, 1250 m water depth) was studied for a period of a year by the Long-term Observatory On Mud-volcano Eruptions (LOOME) in 2009-2010, to investigate temporal variations of mud volcanism and consequences for biogeochemical processes. The HMMV is a highly active methane cold seep ecosystem characterized by high rates of methane efflux. It hosts different chemosynthetic communities such as thiotrophic bacterial mats and siboglinid tubeworm assemblages. This study focuses on changes in community composition and biogeochemical activity such as methane emission, total benthic oxygen uptake, microbial methane and sulfate consumption before and after a major mud displacement recorded by LOOME. The sensor-enabled long-term observations of the HMMV habitats were combined with short-term analyses before and after the displacement events by ROVs QUEST (MARUM) and GENESIS (University of Gent), the AUV Sentry (WHOI) equipped with a multibeam and subbottom profiler, CTD and photographic unit as well as with a mass spectrometer. We found shifts in the distribution patterns of chemosynthetic communities and also substantial changes in their activity, consistent with changes in temperature gradients. This study was sponsored by the EU-Projects HERMIONE "Hotspot Ecosystem Research and Man's Impact on European Seas", and ESONET "European Seas Observatory Network" (Demonstration Mission LOOME "Long term observations on mud volcano eruptions").

  17. Monitoring crater-wall collapse at active volcanoes: a study of the 12 January 2013 event at Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, Sonia; Intrieri, Emanuele; Di Traglia, Federico; Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Casagli, Nicola; Cristaldi, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Crater-wall collapses are fairly frequent at active volcanoes and they are normally studied through the analysis of their deposits. In this paper, we present an analysis of the 12 January 2013 crater-wall collapse occurring at Stromboli volcano, investigated by means of a monitoring network comprising visible and infrared webcams and a Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. The network revealed the triggering mechanisms of the collapse, which are comparable to the events that heralded the previous effusive eruptions in 1985, 2002, 2007 and 2014. The collapse occurred during a period of inflation of the summit cone and was preceded by increasing explosive activity and the enlargement of the crater. Weakness of the crater wall, increasing magmastatic pressure within the upper conduit induced by ascending magma and mechanical erosion caused by vent opening at the base of the crater wall and by lava fingering, are considered responsible for triggering the collapse on 12 January 2013 at Stromboli. We suggest that the combination of these factors might be a general mechanism to generate crater-wall collapse at active volcanoes.

  18. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  19. Coupling of Activity at Neighbouring Volcanoes in Iceland: Ground Deformation and Activity at the Bárðarbunga-Tungnafellsjökull and Eyjafjallajökull-Katla Volcano Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, M.; Heimisson, E. R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Ofeigsson, B.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Arnadottir, T.; Dumont, S.; Drouin, V.; Bagnardi, M.; Spaans, K.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Friðriksdóttir, H. M.; Jonsdottir, K.; Guðmundsson, G.; Hensch, M.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Hjartardottir, A. R.; Einarsson, P.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hognadottir, T.; Lafemina, P.; Geirsson, H.; Sturkell, E.; Magnússon, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques are used to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of two pairs of closely spaced volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull, as well as Eyjafjallajökull and Katla. Following the declaration of Icelandic Volcanoes as a Permanent Geohazard Supersite in 2013, a considerable amount of SAR data was made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images and historic C-band images. InSAR time series have been formed using these data and compared to other geodetic and microseismic measurements to determine the most likely processes responsible for recently observed deformation and/or seismicity. A comprehensive network of seismometers and continuous GPS stations are already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements have been undertaken since 2010. We present an overview of the temporal variation in InSAR observations and these complementary field based measurements at Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull from 2014-2015 (covering the recent eruption at Holuhraun and contemporaneous slow collapse of the Bárðarbunga caldera), and Eyjafjallajökull and Katla volcanoes from 2010 onwards, after the 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull. We undertake a joint InSAR-GPS inversion using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach. The best-fit source geometries responsible for both the inflation of a 50 km long dyke and simultaneous deflation of the Bárðarbunga central volcano during the 2014-2015 unrest and eruption are found. Using these we calculate the stress changes associated with the Bárðarbunga deformation events and compare our results to the location of earthquake swarms in the vicinity of neighbouring Tungnafellsjökull, where seismic activity increased significantly following the onset of unrest at Bárðarbunga in August 2014. We also determine the optimal source parameters for

  20. Hg Isotopic Compositions of Chimneys and Pelagic Sediments at Active Submarine Hydrothermal Field in the Okinawa Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Marumo, K.; Tomiyasu, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Komuro, K.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed and highly toxic pollutant in the environment. It is known that a submarine hydrothermal activity is one of the natural processes to emit Hg to marine environment. In order to estimate the degree to which the Hg found in the marine environment is from anthropogenic versus natural sources, it is important to characterize the Hg from the hydrothermal vents. Samples of chimneys and a ~20 cm sediment core, collected by a deep-sea remotely operated vehicle, from Iheya North hydrothermal field in Okinawa Trough, Japan, were analyzed for Hg concentrations and Hg isotopic compositions. Total Hg concentrations of chimneys range between 8.2 and 16.9 mg/kg, whereas seafloor sediment total Hg concentrations are from 3.8 to 34.8 mg/kg. Approximately 0.4 to 1.1 μg/kg of monomethyl Hg (MMHg) was detected in the top 6 cm sediment cores. Hg isotopic compositions (δ202Hg) of chimneys are between -0.30 and -0.96 ‰, whereas δ202Hg values of sediment samples range from -0.85 to -1.60 ‰. Neither chimneys nor sediment samples exhibit the significant mass independent fractionations in Hg isotopes (Δ201Hg > ± 0.10). The chimney δ202Hg values are slightly higher than the δ202Hg values of sediments. This may indicate that the heavier Hg isotopes tend to be incorporated with mercury-bearing sulfides in chimneys, and the lighter isotopes tend to be remained in the hydrothermal fluid and distributed in the surrounding sediments. Also, the sediment samples from the upper portion of cores demonstrate approximately 0.4 - 0.5 ‰ lower δ202Hg values than those from the lower part. This isotopic fractionation may be resulted from a demethylated process of MMHg by microbes. Several studies have previously demonstrated the rapid demethylation of MMHg by microbes in Hg-contaminated aquatic sediments, and range of the isotopic fractionation is similar to that of the experimentally determined isotopic fractionation of MMHg by bacterial reduction

  1. Volcanic history of El Chichón Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, J. M.; Macías, J. L.; Tilling, R. I.; Sheridan, M. F.

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichón Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichón in the past 8000years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichón also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the collapse

  2. Volcanic history of El Chichon Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espindola, J.M.; Macias, J.L.; Tilling, R.I.; Sheridan, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichon Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichon in the past 8000 years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700 years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500 years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600 years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichon also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the

  3. Post-eruptive morphological evolution of island volcanoes: Surtsey as a modern case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romagnoli, C.; Jakobsson, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Surtsey is a small volcanic island in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, off the south coast of Iceland. The eruption leading to the island's emersion lasted for 3.5 yr (1963-1967) while destructive forces have been active for over 50 yr (1963-present-day) during which Surtsey has suffered rapid subaerial and submarine erosion and undergone major morphological changes. Surtsey is a well-documented modern example of the post-eruptive degradational stage of island volcanoes, and has provided the unique opportunity to continuously observe and quantify the effects of intense geomorphic processes. In this paper we focus on coastal and marine processes re-shaping the shoreline and shallow-water portions of the Surtsey complex since its formation and on the related geomorphological record. Analogies with the post-eruptive morphological evolution of recently active island volcanoes at the emerging stage, encompassing different climatic conditions, wave regimes and geological contexts, are discussed.

  4. Mud Volcanoes - Analogs to Martian Cones and Domes (by the Thousands!)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Mud volcanoes are mounds formed by low temperature slurries of gas, liquid, sediments and rock that erupt to the surface from depths of meters to kilometers. They are common on Earth, with estimates of thousands onshore and tens of thousands offshore. Mud volcanoes occur in basins with rapidly-deposited accumulations of fine-grained sediments. Such settings are ideal for concentration and preservation of organic materials, and mud volcanoes typically occur in sedimentary basins that are rich in organic biosignatures. Domes and cones, cited as possible mud volcanoes by previous authors, are common on the northern plains of Mars. Our analysis of selected regions in southern Acidalia Planitia has revealed over 18,000 such features, and we estimate that more than 40,000 occur across the area. These domes and cones strongly resemble terrestrial mud volcanoes in size, shape, morphology, associated flow structures and geologic setting. Geologic and mineralogic arguments rule out alternative formation mechanisms involving lava, ice and impacts. We are studying terrestrial mud volcanoes from onshore and submarine locations. The largest concentration of onshore features is in Azerbaijan, near the western edge of the Caspian Sea. These features are typically hundreds of meters to several kilometers in diameter, and tens to hundreds of meters in height. Satellite images show spatial densities of 20 to 40 eruptive centers per 1000 square km. Many of the features remain active, and fresh mud flows as long as several kilometers are common. A large field of submarine mud volcanoes is located in the Gulf of Cadiz, off the Atlantic coasts of Morocco and Spain. High-resolution sonar bathymetry reveals numerous km-scale mud volcanoes, hundreds of meters in height. Seismic profiles demonstrate that the mud erupts from depths of several hundred meters. These submarine mud volcanoes are the closest morphologic analogs yet found to the features in Acidalia Planitia. We are also conducting

  5. Mud Volcanoes - Analogs to Martian Cones and Domes (by the thousands !)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Oehler, D.

    2010-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are mounds formed by low temperature slurries of gas, liquid, sediments and rock that erupt to the surface from depths of meters to kilometers. They are common on Earth, with estimates of thousands onshore and tens of thousands offshore. Mud volcanoes occur in basins with rapidly-deposited accumulations of fine-grained sediments. Such settings are ideal for concentration and preservation of organic materials, and mud volcanoes typically occur in sedimentary basins that are rich in organic biosignatures. Domes and cones, cited as possible mud volcanoes by previous authors, are common on the northern plains of Mars. Our analysis of selected regions in southern Acidalia Planitia has revealed over 18,000 such features, and we estimate that more than 40,000 occur across the area. These domes and cones strongly resemble terrestrial mud volcanoes in size, shape, morphology, associated flow structures and geologic setting. Geologic and mineralogic arguments rule out alternative formation mechanisms involving lava, ice and impacts. We are studying terrestrial mud volcanoes from onshore and submarine locations. The largest concentration of onshore features is in Azerbaijan, near the western edge of the Caspian Sea. These features are typically hundreds of meters to several kilometers in diameter, and tens to hundreds of meters in height. Satellite images show spatial densities of 20 to 40 eruptive centers per 1000 km2. Many of the features remain active, and fresh mud flows as long as several kilometers are common. A large field of submarine mud volcanoes is located in the Gulf of Cadiz, off the Atlantic coasts of Morocco and Spain. High-resolution sonar bathymetry reveals numerous km-scale mud volcanoes, hundreds of meters in height. Seismic profiles demonstrate that the mud erupts from depths of several hundred meters. These submarine mud volcanoes are the closest morphologic analogs yet found to the features in Acidalia Planitia. We are also conducting

  6. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  7. Active sulfur cycling by diverse mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms in terrestrial mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Green-Saxena, A; Feyzullayev, A; Hubert, C R J; Kallmeyer, J; Krueger, M; Sauer, P; Schulz, H-M; Orphan, V J

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial mud volcanoes (TMVs) represent geochemically diverse habitats with varying sulfur sources and yet sulfur cycling in these environments remains largely unexplored. Here we characterized the sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and activity in four TMVs in Azerbaijan. A combination of geochemical analyses, biological rate measurements and molecular diversity surveys (targeting metabolic genes aprA and dsrA and SSU ribosomal RNA) supported the presence of active sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing guilds in all four TMVs across a range of physiochemical conditions, with diversity of these guilds being unique to each TMV. The TMVs varied in potential sulfate reduction rates (SRR) by up to four orders of magnitude with highest SRR observed in sediments where in situ sulfate concentrations were highest. Maximum temperatures at which SRR were measured was 60°C in two TMVs. Corresponding with these trends in SRR, members of the potentially thermophilic, spore-forming, Desulfotomaculum were detected in these TMVs by targeted 16S rRNA analysis. Additional sulfate-reducing bacterial lineages included members of the Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae detected by aprA and dsrA analyses and likely contributing to the mesophilic SRR measured. Phylotypes affiliated with sulfide-oxidizing Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria were abundant in aprA libraries from low sulfate TMVs, while the highest sulfate TMV harboured 16S rRNA phylotypes associated with sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria. Altogether, the biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate these unique terrestrial habitats support diverse active sulfur-cycling microorganisms reflecting the in situ geochemical environment.

  8. Active sulfur cycling by diverse mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms in terrestrial mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Green-Saxena, A; Feyzullayev, A; Hubert, C R J; Kallmeyer, J; Krueger, M; Sauer, P; Schulz, H-M; Orphan, V J

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial mud volcanoes (TMVs) represent geochemically diverse habitats with varying sulfur sources and yet sulfur cycling in these environments remains largely unexplored. Here we characterized the sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and activity in four TMVs in Azerbaijan. A combination of geochemical analyses, biological rate measurements and molecular diversity surveys (targeting metabolic genes aprA and dsrA and SSU ribosomal RNA) supported the presence of active sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing guilds in all four TMVs across a range of physiochemical conditions, with diversity of these guilds being unique to each TMV. The TMVs varied in potential sulfate reduction rates (SRR) by up to four orders of magnitude with highest SRR observed in sediments where in situ sulfate concentrations were highest. Maximum temperatures at which SRR were measured was 60°C in two TMVs. Corresponding with these trends in SRR, members of the potentially thermophilic, spore-forming, Desulfotomaculum were detected in these TMVs by targeted 16S rRNA analysis. Additional sulfate-reducing bacterial lineages included members of the Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae detected by aprA and dsrA analyses and likely contributing to the mesophilic SRR measured. Phylotypes affiliated with sulfide-oxidizing Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria were abundant in aprA libraries from low sulfate TMVs, while the highest sulfate TMV harboured 16S rRNA phylotypes associated with sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria. Altogether, the biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate these unique terrestrial habitats support diverse active sulfur-cycling microorganisms reflecting the in situ geochemical environment. PMID:23116231

  9. A real-time framework for classifying, indexing and querying image database volcano activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, M. A.; Cannata, A.; Cassisi, C.; Montalto, P.; Prestifilippo, M.

    2013-12-01

    INGV-OE monitors explosive activity at Stromboli Volcano in order to analyze its eruptive dynamics. Since strombolian activity can be monitored using thermal camera frames, an efficient system able to require information from a huge amount of frames is needed. Aim of this work is the development of a novel system capable of fast data retrieval, based on similarity concepts. In the light of it, an indexing algorithm was developed. The concept is finding elements of a set that are close respect to a query element, according to a similarity criterion. To accomplish this task each video frame is processed using morphological image processing techniques to extract the image area of the explosion. Each closed curve, representing the explosion contour, is processed in order to extract useful features that constitute the metric space in which similarity between objects can be evaluated calculating the distances using an appropriate distance function. This approach suffers from an intrinsic problem related to the number of distances to be computed on a huge amount of data. To overcome this drawback, an indexing algorithm was applied. The idea behind this concept is a tree data structure that minimizes the number of distances to be computed among objects. Proposed method allows us to perform a fast query execution. The proposed system is able to find similar objects using distance among their features. Thus, we can group together explosions related to different kinds of activities using reference items. For instance, if we have a known image sequence, showing a given explosion, we can easily and quickly find all sequences containing explosions similar to it. The developed framework is able to both classifying each new explosion and dynamically insert the corresponding object into the tree structure. Therefore, by our approach, we can cluster the entire data space grouping objects having similar characteristics and classify them.

  10. A large hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines) revealed by magnetotelluric observations and its implications to the volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Paul K B; Yamaya, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Sasai, Yoichi; Okada, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The magnetotelluric 3D forward analyses indicate the existence of a large high resistivity anomaly (∼100 Ω·m) with a volume of at least 3 km×3 km×3 km, which is capped by a conductive layer (∼10 Ω·m), beneath the Main Crater. This high resistivity anomaly is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir, consisting of the aggregate of interconnected cracks in rigid and dense host rocks, which are filled with hydrothermal fluids coming from a magma batch below the reservoir. The hydrothermal fluids are considered partly in gas phase and liquid phase. The presence of such a large hydrothermal reservoir and the stagnant magma below may have influences on the volcano's activity. Two possibilities are presented. First, the 30 January 1911 explosion event was a magmatic hydrothermal eruption rather than a base-surge associated with a phreato-magmatic eruption. Second, the earlier proposed four eruption series may be better interpreted by two cycles, each consisting of series of summit and flank eruptions. PMID:24126286

  11. A large hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines) revealed by magnetotelluric observations and its implications to the volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Paul K B; Yamaya, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Sasai, Yoichi; Okada, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The magnetotelluric 3D forward analyses indicate the existence of a large high resistivity anomaly (∼100 Ω·m) with a volume of at least 3 km×3 km×3 km, which is capped by a conductive layer (∼10 Ω·m), beneath the Main Crater. This high resistivity anomaly is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir, consisting of the aggregate of interconnected cracks in rigid and dense host rocks, which are filled with hydrothermal fluids coming from a magma batch below the reservoir. The hydrothermal fluids are considered partly in gas phase and liquid phase. The presence of such a large hydrothermal reservoir and the stagnant magma below may have influences on the volcano's activity. Two possibilities are presented. First, the 30 January 1911 explosion event was a magmatic hydrothermal eruption rather than a base-surge associated with a phreato-magmatic eruption. Second, the earlier proposed four eruption series may be better interpreted by two cycles, each consisting of series of summit and flank eruptions.

  12. The Alaska Volcano Observatory - Expanded Monitoring of Volcanoes Yields Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, Steven R.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent explosive eruptions at some of Alaska's 52 historically active volcanoes have significantly affected air traffic over the North Pacific, as well as Alaska's oil, power, and fishing industries and local communities. Since its founding in the late 1980s, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has installed new monitoring networks and used satellite data to track activity at Alaska's volcanoes, providing timely warnings and monitoring of frequent eruptions to the aviation industry and the general public. To minimize impacts from future eruptions, scientists at AVO continue to assess volcano hazards and to expand monitoring networks.

  13. Observed inflation-deflation cycles at Popocatepetl volcano using tiltmeters and its possible correlation with regional seismic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G., Sr.; Jimenez Velazquez, J. C., Sr.; Valdes Gonzalez, C. M., Sr.; Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Galaviz Alonso, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl, the smoking mountain, is a stratovolcano located in central Mexico with an elevation of 5450 masl. The active volcano, close to some of the largest urban centers in Mexico - 60 km and 30 km far from Mexico City and Puebla, respectively - poses a high hazard to an estimated population of 500 thousand people living in the vicinity of the edifice. Accordingly, in July 1994 the Popocatepetl Volcanological Observatory (POVO) was established. The observatory is operated and supported by the National Center for Disaster Prevention of Mexico (CENAPRED), and is equipped to fully monitor different aspects of the volcanic activity. Among the instruments deployed, we use in this investigation two tiltmometers and broad-band seismometers at two sites (Chipiquixtle and Encinos), which send the information gathered continuously to Mexico City.In this research, we study the characteristics of the tiltmeters signals minutes after the occurrence of certain earthquakes. The Popocatepetl volcano starts inflation-deflation cycles due to the ground motion generated by events located at certain regions. We present the analysis of the tiltmeters and seismic signals of all the earthquakes (Mw>5) occurred from January 2013 to June 2014, recorded at Chipiquixtle and Encinos stations. First, we measured the maximum tilt variation after each earthquake. Next, we apply a band-pass filter for different frequency ranges to the seismic signals of the two seismic stations, and estimated the total energy of the strong motion phase of the seismic record. Finally, we compared both measurements and observed that the maximum tilt variations were occurring when the maximum total energy of the seismic signals were in a specific frequency range. We also observed that the earthquake records that have the maximum total energy in that frequency range were the ones with a epicentral location south-east of the volcano. We conclude that our observations can be used set the ground for an early

  14. Fundamental changes in the activity of the natrocarbonatite volcano Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kervyn, M.; Ernst, G.G.J.; Keller, J.; Vaughan, R. Greg; Klaudius, J.; Pradal, E.; Belton, F.; Mattsson, H.B.; Mbede, E.; Jacobs, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    On September 4, 2007, after 25 years of effusive natrocarbonatite eruptions, the eruptive activity of Oldoinyo Lengai (OL), N Tanzania, changed abruptly to episodic explosive eruptions. This transition was preceded by a voluminous lava eruption in March 2006, a year of quiescence, resumption of natrocarbonatite eruptions in June 2007, and a volcano-tectonic earthquake swarm in July 2007. Despite the lack of ground-based monitoring, the evolution in OL eruption dynamics is documented based on the available field observations, ASTER and MODIS satellite images, and almost-daily photos provided by local pilots. Satellite data enabled identification of a phase of voluminous lava effusion in the 2 weeks prior to the onset of explosive eruptions. After the onset, the activity varied from 100 m high ash jets to 2–15 km high violent, steady or unsteady, eruption columns dispersing ash to 100 km distance. The explosive eruptions built up a ∼400 m wide, ∼75 m high intra-crater pyroclastic cone. Time series data for eruption column height show distinct peaks at the end of September 2007 and February 2008, the latter being associated with the first pyroclastic flows to be documented at OL. Chemical analyses of the erupted products, presented in a companion paper (Keller et al.2010), show that the 2007–2008 explosive eruptions are associated with an undersaturated carbonated silicate melt. This new phase of explosive eruptions provides constraints on the factors causing the transition from natrocarbonatite effusive eruptions to explosive eruptions of carbonated nephelinite magma, observed repetitively in the last 100 years at OL.

  15. A Sinuous Tumulus over an Active Lava Tube at Klauea Volcano: Evolution, Analogs, and Hazard Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Tim R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Wooten, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflation of narrow tube-fed basaltic lava flows (tens of meters across), such as those confined by topography, can be focused predominantly along the roof of a lava tube. This can lead to the development of an unusually long tumulus, its shape matching the sinuosity of the underlying lava tube. Such a situation occurred during Klauea Volcanos (Hawaii, USA) ongoing East Rift Zone eruption on a lava tube active from July through November 2010. Short-lived breakouts from the tube buried the flanks of the sinuous, ridge-like tumulus, while the tumulus crest, its surface composed of lava formed very early in the flows emplacement history, remained poised above the surrounding younger flows. At least several of these breakouts resulted in irrecoverable uplift of the tube roof. Confined sections of the prehistoric Carrizozo and McCartys flows (New Mexico, USA) display similar sinuous, ridge-like features with comparable surface age relationships. We contend that these distinct features formed in a fashion equivalent to that of the sinuous tumulus that formed at Kilauea in 2010. Moreover, these sinuous tumuli may be analogs for some sinuous ridges evident in orbital images of the Tharsis volcanic province on Mars. The short-lived breakouts from the sinuous tumulus at Kilauea were caused by surges in discharge through the lava tube, in response to cycles of deflation and inflation (DI events) at Kilauea's summit. The correlation between DI events and subsequent breakouts aided in lava flow forecasting. Breakouts from the sinuous tumulus advanced repeatedly toward the sparsely populated Kalapana Gardens subdivision, destroying two homes and threatening others. Hazard assessments, including flow occurrence and advance forecasts, were relayed regularly to the Hawai?i County Civil Defense to aid their lava flow hazard mitigation efforts while this lava tube was active.

  16. Developing monitoring capability of a volcano observatory: the example of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.; Jolly, G. E.; Sherburn, S.; Scott, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Fournier, N.; Miller, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Vanuatu lies on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire'. With 6 active subaerial and 3 submarine (identified so far) volcanoes, monitoring and following up their activities is a considerable work for a national observatory. The Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory is a good example of what can be done from ‘scratch’ to develop a volcanic monitoring capability in a short space of time. A fire in June 2007 completely destroyed the old observatory building and many valuable records leaving Vanuatu with no volcano monitoring capacity. This situation forced the Government of Vanuatu to reconsider the structure of the hazards monitoring group and think about the best way to rebuild a complete volcano monitoring system. Taking the opportunity of the re-awakening of Gaua volcano (North of Vanuatu), the Vanuatu Geohazards section in partnership with GNS Science, New Zealand developed a new program including a strategic plan for Geohazards from 2010-2020, the installation of a portable seismic network with real-time data transmission in Gaua, the support of the first permanent monitoring station installation in Ambrym and the design and implementation of volcano monitoring infrastructure and protocol. Moreover the technology improvements of the last decade and the quick extension of enhanced communication systems across the islands of Vanuatu played a very important role for the development of this program. In less than one year, the implementation of this program was beyond expectations and showed considerable improvement of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory volcano monitoring capability. In response to increased volcanic activity (or unrest) in Ambae, the Geohazards section was fully capable of the installation of a portable seismic station in April 2010 and to follow the development of the activity. Ultimately, this increased capability results in better and timelier delivery of information and advice on the threat from volcanic activity to the National Disaster Management Office and

  17. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  18. Magmatically Greedy Reararc Volcanoes of the N. Tofua Segment of the Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Arculus, R. J.; Lupton, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanism along the northernmost Tofua Arc is enigmatic because edifices of the arc's volcanic front are mostly, magmatically relatively anemic, despite the very high convergence rate of the Pacific Plate with this section of Tonga Arc. However, just westward of the arc front, in terrain generally thought of as part of the adjacent NE Lau Backarc Basin, lie a series of very active volcanoes and volcanic features, including the large submarine caldera Niuatahi (aka volcano 'O'), a large composite dacite lava flow terrain not obviously associated with any particular volcanic edifice, and the Mata volcano group, a series of 9 small elongate volcanoes in an extensional basin at the extreme NE corner of the Lau Basin. These three volcanic terrains do not sit on arc-perpendicular cross chains. Collectively, these volcanic features appear to be receiving a large proportion of the magma flux from the sub-Tonga/Lau mantle wedge, in effect 'stealing' this magma flux from the arc front. A second occurrence of such magma 'capture' from the arc front occurs in an area just to the south, on southernmost portion of the Fonualei Spreading Center. Erupted compositions at these 'magmatically greedy' volcanoes are consistent with high slab-derived fluid input into the wedge (particularly trace element abundances and volatile contents, e.g., see Lupton abstract this session). It is unclear how long-lived a feature this is, but the very presence of such hyperactive and areally-dispersed volcanism behind the arc front implies these volcanoes are not in fact part of any focused spreading/rifting in the Lau Backarc Basin, and should be thought of as 'reararc volcanoes'. Possible tectonic factors contributing to this unusually productive reararc environment are the high rate of convergence, the cold slab, the highly disorganized extension in the adjacent backarc, and the tear in the subducting plate just north of the Tofua Arc.

  19. Cost effective aero-photogrammetry toys at active volcanoes: On the use of drones, balloons and kites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The availability of aerial photographs allows spatial mapping of flows and fractures, generation of digital elevation models and other change detection. Therefore aerial photographs significantly improve our understanding of volcanic processes. The common problem is the lack of available data for most volcanoes, and the lack of systematic and chronologic repeat surveys. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge and technical implementations that currently revolutionize the field of aero-photogrammetry. By the use of unmanned vehicles, such as octocopters, helicopters and small airplanes, photo data can be acquired from almost any place at distances up to kilometres from the operator. Moreover, by the use of helium balloons, kites or their hybrid helikites, near field aero-photographs are obtained. In combination with modern stitching procedures and computer vision algorithms, the positioning of the camera and the digital elevation model of the ground can be extracted, and the active volcano and its eruption cloud be imaged from almost any perspective. This field is increasingly gaining flexibility, as lightweight cameras are available from visible, infrared and other spectral bands. Here example data are provided from volcanoes that are difficult to access by regular airplanes, showing the strengths and the limits of these new aero-photogrammetry toys.

  20. Muon dynamic radiography of density changes induced by hydrothermal activity at the La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano

    PubMed Central

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; de Bremond d’Ars, Jean; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Imaging geological structures through cosmic muon radiography is a newly developed technique which shows a great potential in volcanology. Here we demonstrate that muon radiography permits to detect and characterize mass movements in shallow hydrothermal systems of low-energy active volcanoes like the La Soufrière lava dome. We present an experiment conducted on this volcano during the Summer 2014 and bring evidence that very important density changes occurred in three domains of the lava dome. Depending on their position and on the medium porosity the volumes of these domains vary from 1 × 106 m3 to 7 × 106 m3. However, the total mass budget remains approximately constant : two domains show a mass loss (Δm∈ [−0.8;−0.4] × 109 kg) and the third one a mass gain (Δm∈ [1.5; 2.5] × 109 kg). We attribute the negative mass changes to the formation of steam in shallow hydrothermal reservoir previously partly filled with liquid water. This coincides with the emergence of new fumaroles on top of the volcano. The positive mass change is synchronized with the negative mass changes indicating that liquid water probably flowed from the two reservoirs invaded by steam toward the third reservoir. PMID:27629497

  1. Muon dynamic radiography of density changes induced by hydrothermal activity at the La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano.

    PubMed

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; de Bremond d'Ars, Jean; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Imaging geological structures through cosmic muon radiography is a newly developed technique which shows a great potential in volcanology. Here we demonstrate that muon radiography permits to detect and characterize mass movements in shallow hydrothermal systems of low-energy active volcanoes like the La Soufrière lava dome. We present an experiment conducted on this volcano during the Summer 2014 and bring evidence that very important density changes occurred in three domains of the lava dome. Depending on their position and on the medium porosity the volumes of these domains vary from 1 × 10(6) m(3) to 7 × 10(6) m(3). However, the total mass budget remains approximately constant : two domains show a mass loss (Δm∈ [-0.8;-0.4] × 10(9) kg) and the third one a mass gain (Δm∈ [1.5; 2.5] × 10(9) kg). We attribute the negative mass changes to the formation of steam in shallow hydrothermal reservoir previously partly filled with liquid water. This coincides with the emergence of new fumaroles on top of the volcano. The positive mass change is synchronized with the negative mass changes indicating that liquid water probably flowed from the two reservoirs invaded by steam toward the third reservoir. PMID:27629497

  2. Muon dynamic radiography of density changes induced by hydrothermal activity at the La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano.

    PubMed

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; de Bremond d'Ars, Jean; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-15

    Imaging geological structures through cosmic muon radiography is a newly developed technique which shows a great potential in volcanology. Here we demonstrate that muon radiography permits to detect and characterize mass movements in shallow hydrothermal systems of low-energy active volcanoes like the La Soufrière lava dome. We present an experiment conducted on this volcano during the Summer 2014 and bring evidence that very important density changes occurred in three domains of the lava dome. Depending on their position and on the medium porosity the volumes of these domains vary from 1 × 10(6) m(3) to 7 × 10(6) m(3). However, the total mass budget remains approximately constant : two domains show a mass loss (Δm∈ [-0.8;-0.4] × 10(9) kg) and the third one a mass gain (Δm∈ [1.5; 2.5] × 10(9) kg). We attribute the negative mass changes to the formation of steam in shallow hydrothermal reservoir previously partly filled with liquid water. This coincides with the emergence of new fumaroles on top of the volcano. The positive mass change is synchronized with the negative mass changes indicating that liquid water probably flowed from the two reservoirs invaded by steam toward the third reservoir.

  3. Muon dynamic radiography of density changes induced by hydrothermal activity at the La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; de Bremond D’Ars, Jean; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Imaging geological structures through cosmic muon radiography is a newly developed technique which shows a great potential in volcanology. Here we demonstrate that muon radiography permits to detect and characterize mass movements in shallow hydrothermal systems of low-energy active volcanoes like the La Soufrière lava dome. We present an experiment conducted on this volcano during the Summer 2014 and bring evidence that very important density changes occurred in three domains of the lava dome. Depending on their position and on the medium porosity the volumes of these domains vary from 1 × 106 m3 to 7 × 106 m3. However, the total mass budget remains approximately constant : two domains show a mass loss (Δm∈ [‑0.8‑0.4] × 109 kg) and the third one a mass gain (Δm∈ [1.5; 2.5] × 109 kg). We attribute the negative mass changes to the formation of steam in shallow hydrothermal reservoir previously partly filled with liquid water. This coincides with the emergence of new fumaroles on top of the volcano. The positive mass change is synchronized with the negative mass changes indicating that liquid water probably flowed from the two reservoirs invaded by steam toward the third reservoir.

  4. Waters associated with an active basaltic volcano, Kilaue