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Sample records for active substance users

  1. Sexual identity and drug use harm among high-risk, active substance users.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clifton; Vallance, Kate; Stockwell, Tim; Macdonald, Scott; Martin, Gina; Ivsins, Andrew; Marsh, David C; Michelow, Warren; Roth, Eric; Duff, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that sexual minorities are at greater risk for illicit substance use and related harm than their heterosexual counterparts. This study examines a group of active drug users to assess whether sexual identity predicts increased risk of substance use and harm from ecstasy, ketamine, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and crack. Structured interviews were conducted with participants aged 15 years and older in Vancouver and Victoria, BC, Canada, during 2008-2012. Harm was measured with the World Health Organization's AUDIT and ASSIST tools. Regression analysis controlling for age, gender, education, housing and employment revealed lesbian, gay or bisexual individuals were significantly more likely to have used ecstasy, ketamine and alcohol in the past 30 days compared to heterosexual participants. Inadequate housing increased the likelihood of crack use among both lesbian, gay and bisexuals and heterosexuals, but with considerably higher odds for the lesbian, gay and bisexual group. Lesbian, gay and bisexual participants reported less alcohol harm but greater ecstasy and ketamine harm, the latter two categorised by the ASSIST as amphetamine and hallucinogen harms. Results suggest encouraging harm reduction among sexual minority, high-risk drug users, emphasising ecstasy and ketamine. The impact of stable housing on drug use should also be considered.

  2. [Oral health of users of psychoactive substances].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fabien

    2016-12-01

    This article reminds you that, whatever the psychoactive substance in question, it is not one that has repercussions on the oral health of its user. This affects both the tooth, the periodontal and oral mucosa. Drug addicts, especially those engaged in polydrug use, represent the population at the largest risk for oral cancer. Of all the factors, smoking is by far the largest risk. The alcohol has a synergistic effect with the tobacco, so that the combined effect is more than multiplied. Preventing risks of these products is possible through good oral hygiene and lifestyle, preventive care and followed by a regular dentist. Regaining self-esteem, however, should be one of the key dimensions of social reappropriation through his body.

  3. Rural drug users: factors associated with substance abuse treatment utilization.

    PubMed

    Oser, Carrie B; Leukefeld, Carl G; Tindall, Michele Staton; Garrity, Thomas F; Carlson, Robert G; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a modified version of Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to identify the correlates of the number of substance abuse treatment episodes received by rural drug users. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with 711 drug users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Descriptive analyses examine rural drug users' substance use histories and retrospective substance abuse treatment service utilization patterns. A negative binomial regression model indicated that selected predisposing, historical health, and enabling factors were significantly associated with the utilization of substance abuse treatment among rural drug users. Despite high levels of recent and lifetime self-reported substance use among these rural drug users, treatment services were underutilized. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the health care system and characteristics of the external environment associated with rural substance abuse treatment in order to increase utilization among drug users.

  4. Cigarette smoking in pregnant substance users: Association with substance use and desire to quit.

    PubMed

    Winhusen, Theresa; Lewis, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is prevalent in pregnant substance users but receives low priority in substance use disorder treatment. This article reports the results of a secondary analysis of a randomized, multisite trial with 200 pregnant substance users, 145 (72.5%) of whom smoked at baseline. As predicted: (1) smokers had significantly greater substance use; (2) approximately half of smokers wanted to quit; and (3) smokers with a quit goal had significantly greater self-efficacy and lower perceived difficulty of quitting. Smoking may be associated with more severe substance use in pregnant substance-using patients, half of whom may be interested in smoking-cessation interventions.

  5. Primary and substance-induced psychotic disorders in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Hides, Leanne; Dawe, Sharon; McKetin, Rebecca; Kavanagh, David J; Young, Ross McD; Teesson, Maree; Saunders, John B

    2015-03-30

    This study investigates the rates of primary psychotic disorders (PPD) and substance-induced psychotic disorders (SIPDs) in methamphetamine (MA) users accessing needle and syringe programs (NSPs). The aim was to determine if there are systematic differences in the characteristics of MA users with PPDs and SIPDs compared to those with no psychotic disorder. Participants were 198 MA users reporting use in the previous month. Diagnosis was determined using the Psychiatric Research Interview for DSM-IV Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM-IV). Current psychiatric symptoms and substance use were also measured. Just over half (n=101) of participants met DSM-IV criteria for a lifetime psychotic disorder, including 81 (80%) with a SIPD and 20 (20%) with a PPD. Those with a younger age of onset of weekly MA use were at increased risk of a lifetime SIPD. A current psychotic disorder was found in 62 (39%), comprising 49 SIPDs (79%) and 13 PPDs (21%). MA users with a current PPD were more likely to have received psychiatric treatment in the past month than those with a current SIPD, despite a similar level of psychotic symptom severity. A high proportion of MA users accessing NSPs have psychotic disorders, the majority of which are substance-induced.

  6. Promoting Reduced and Discontinued Substance Use among Adolescent Substance Users: Effectiveness of a Universal Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Nieri, Tanya; Yabiku, Scott; Stromwall, Layne K.; Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to address youth substance use have focused on prevention among non-users and treatment among severe users with less attention given to youth occupying the middle ground who have used substances but not yet progressed to serious abuse or addiction. Using a sample from 35 middle schools of 1,364 youth who reported using substances, this study examined the effectiveness of a universal youth substance use prevention program, the SAMHSA Model Program keepin’ it REAL, in promoting reduced or recently discontinued alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. Discrete-time event history methods modeled the rates of reduced and recently discontinued use across four waves of data. Each substance (alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) was modeled separately. Beginning at the second wave, participants who reported use at wave 1 were considered at risk of reducing or discontinuing use. Since the data sampled students in schools, multi-level models accounted for the nesting of data at the school level. Results indicated that prevention program participation influenced the rates of reduced and recently discontinued use only for alcohol, controlling for baseline use severity, age, grades, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and gender. Among youth who reported use of alcohol in wave 1 (N= 1,028), the rate of reducing use for program participants was 72% higher than the rate for control students. The rate of discontinuing use was 66% higher than the rate for control students. Among youth who reported use of one or more of the three substances in wave 1 (N = 1,364), the rate of discontinuing all use was 61% higher for program participants than for control students. Limitations and implications of these findings and plans for further research are discussed. PMID:17096196

  7. HIV Risk Behavior Among Methamphetamine Users Entering Substance Abuse Treatment in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meade, Christina S; Lion, Ryan R; Cordero, Daniella M; Watt, Melissa H; Joska, John A; Gouse, Hetta; Burnhams, Warren

    2016-10-01

    South Africa is experiencing a growing methamphetamine problem, and there is concern that methamphetamine use may accelerate HIV transmission. There has been little research on the HIV prevention needs of methamphetamine users receiving substance abuse treatment in South Africa. This study assessed the prevalence and correlates of HIV risk behaviors among 269 methamphetamine users entering substance abuse treatment in two clinics in Cape Town. The prevalence of sexual risk behaviors was high among sexually active participants: 34 % multiple partners, 26 % unprotected intercourse with a casual partner, and 24 % sex trading for money/methamphetamine. The strongest predictor of all sexual risk behaviors was concurrent other drug use. Over half had not been HIV tested in the past year, and 25 % had never been tested, although attitudes toward HIV testing were overwhelmingly positive. This population of primarily heterosexual, non-injecting methamphetamine users is a high-risk group in need of targeted HIV prevention interventions. Substance abuse treatment is an ideal setting in which to reach methamphetamine users for HIV services.

  8. A Comparison of Opioid and Nonopioid Substance Users in Residential Treatment for Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bride, Brian E.; Macmaster, Samuel A.; Morse, Siobhan A.; Watson, Cayce M.; Choi, Sam; Seiters, John

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen a marked increase in the illicit use of opioids, as well as a doubling of the percentage of individuals seeking treatment for opioid use disorders. However, little is known about the differences between opioid users and nonopioid users in residential treatment. Further, no studies have been published that compare opioid users and nonopioid users in treatment for co-occurring substance use and mental disorders. To address this gap, this study examined differences between opioid and nonopioid substance users in residential treatment for co-occurring disorders. Data was drawn from 1,972 individuals treated between 2009 and 2011 at one of three private residential treatment centers that provide integrated treatment for co-occurring substance use and mental disorders. Data was collected at program intake, and 1- and 6-month postdischarge using the Addiction Severity Index and the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment. To examine within-group changes in substance use, addiction severity, and mental health across time, linear mixed-model analyses were conducted with facility, year, age, gender, and race included as covariates. The authors found more similarities than differences between the two groups on baseline characteristics, treatment motivation, length of stay, and outcomes on measures of substance use, addiction severity, and mental health. The results demonstrate that though opioid users entered treatment with higher levels of substance use–related impairment, they were just as successful in treatment outcomes as their non-opioid-using peers. PMID:27366988

  9. Quality of life of users of psychoactive substances, relatives, and non-users assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Taís de Campos; Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Fernandes, Simone; Justo, Fernanda Maia; Dias, Ismael Rodrigo; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser; Ferigolo, Maristela

    2013-07-01

    Quality of life is related to one of the basic human desires, which is to live well and feel good. The scope of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of psychoactive substance users and relatives, compared to non-users, analyzed by socioeconomic strata. A cross-sectional study with users of psychoactive substances, relatives, and other individuals who called the Information and Orientation Service regarding drug abuse. Data collection took place between November 2009 and December 2010. Data was collected from users, relatives, and non-users, including socioeconomic characteristics and data regarding substance consumption when appropriate. In addition to this the abbreviated version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire was given to 347 individuals. Among the 138 users (70%) used alcohol, 76 (39%), marijuana, 111 (57%) tobacco, 78 (40%) cocaine and 70 (36%) crack. Control subjects had higher, scores than the relatives of users and users in all areas of the questionnaire (p < 0.05). Psychoactive substance users scored lower in almost all domains and overall score in the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire in comparison with the sample of non-drug users. These findings reflect poor quality of life of patients and their relatives.

  10. Waiting Time as a Barrier to Treatment Entry: Perceptions of Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Redko, Cristina; Rapp, Richard C.; Carlson, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Many substance users report that they experience multiple barriers that produce significant challenges to linking with treatment services. Being on a waiting list is frequently mentioned as a barrier, leading some people to give up on treatment and to continue using, while prompting others to view sobriety during the waiting period as proof they do not need treatment. This ethnographic study examines the views that 52 substance users have of the waiting time before treatment and the strategies they created to overcome it. Understanding how substance users react to waiting time itself and in relation to other barriers can lead to services that are effective in encouraging treatment linkage. PMID:18509514

  11. Neurocognitive Correlates of White Matter Quality in Adolescent Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bava, Sunita; Jacobus, Joanna; Mahmood, Omar; Yang, Tony T.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Progressive myelination during adolescence implicates an increased vulnerability to neurotoxic substances and enduring neurocognitive consequences. This study examined the cognitive manifestations of altered white matter microstructure in chronic marijuana and alcohol-using (MJ + ALC) adolescents. Methods: Thirty-six MJ + ALC…

  12. Physical Health, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse Problems of Shelter Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Shirley N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined physical health of 72 users of homeless shelters, comparing shelter users with mental illness or substance abuse problems with those without these problems. Found that alcohol abusers were significantly more likely to have low blood pressure, symptoms of liver disease, and tuberculosis treatment history. Found no health differences for…

  13. Integrating Spiritual and Western Treatment Modalities in a Native American Substance User Center: Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Jacquelene F.; Momper, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies examine how traditional Native American and Western healing practices are being integrated in Native American substance user treatment centers. Data are presented from a 2008 study of providers of integrated substance user treatment for Native Americans at an urban Western US center. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine 10 providers’ views of the integration of traditional and Western healing and the impact on recovery for clients. We used a grounded theory approach to data analysis with manual and NVivo codes and themes developed. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:21810077

  14. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M.; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, Jose; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and are often excluded from clinical trials in the United States. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. The authors conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of 3…

  15. Patterns of concurrent substance use among adolescent nonmedical ADHD stimulant users

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yu; Crum, Rosa M.; Strain, Eric C.; Martins, Silvia S.; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are growing concerns about nonmedical use of ADHD stimulants among adolescents; yet, little is known whether there exist heterogeneous subgroups among adolescents with nonmedical ADHD stimulant use according to their concurrent substances use. Methods We used latent class analysis (LCA) to examine patterns of past-year problematic substance use (meeting any criteria for abuse or dependence) in a sample of 2,203 adolescent participants from the National Surveys on Drug Use and Health 2006–2011 who reported past-year nonmedical use of ADHD stimulants. Multivariable latent regression was used to assess the association of socio-demographic characteristics, mental health and behavioral problems with the latent classes. Results The model fit indices favored a four-class model, including a large class with frequent concurrent use of alcohol and marijuana (Alcohol/Marijuana class; 41.2%), a second large class with infrequent use of other substances (Low substance class, 36.3%), a third class characterized by more frequent misuse of prescription drugs as well as other substances (Prescription drug+ class; 14.8%), and finally a class characterized by problematic use of multiple substances (Multiple substance class; 7.7%). Compared with individuals in Low substance class, those in the other three classes were all more likely to report mental health problems, deviant behaviors and substance abuse service use. Conclusions Adolescent nonmedical ADHD stimulants users are a heterogeneous group with distinct classes with regard to concurrent substance use, mental health and behavioral problems. The findings have implications for planning of tailored prevention and treatment programs to curb stimulant use for this age group. PMID:26026384

  16. Factor structure and diagnostic efficiency of the BDI-II in treatment-seeking substance users.

    PubMed

    Seignourel, Paul J; Green, Charles; Schmitz, Joy M

    2008-03-01

    Screening instruments are needed to rapidly and efficiently identify depression in drug and alcohol users. The Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) has excellent validity in psychiatric, normative and primary care samples, but its diagnostic efficiency has not been examined in substance users. Using a large sample of treatment-seeking substance users and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) to establish diagnosis, we examined the factor structure of the BDI-II and its ability to detect clinical depression, defined as the presence of a Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or substance-induced depression. A three-factor structure provided the best fit, and the diagnostic efficiency of the BDI-II was moderate, and independent of gender and substance of abuse. Subscores had lower diagnostic efficiency than the BDI-II total score. A range of possible cutoff scores with corresponding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power and negative predictive power is provided to aid clinicians and researchers in choosing the optimal parameters for their screening needs.

  17. Substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM social media users

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sean D.; Nianogo, Roch A.; Chiu, ChingChe J.; Menacho, Lucho; Galea, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Peru is experiencing a concentrated HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Substance use (alcohol and drug use) has been found to be associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. A recent surge in the number of social media users in Peru has enabled these technologies to be potential tools for reaching HIV at-risk individuals. This study sought to assess the relationship between substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM who use social media. A total of 556 Peruvian MSM Facebook users (ages 18–59) were recruited to complete a 92-item survey on demographics, sexual risk behaviors, and substance use. We performed a logistic regression of various sexual risk behaviors (e.g. unprotected sex, casual sex) on substance abuse, including alcohol, adjusting for potential covariates. Drinking more than five alcoholic drinks a day in the past three months was associated with an increased odds of having unprotected sex (vaginal and anal) (aOR: 1.52; 95%CL: 1.01, 2.28), casual sex (1.75; 1.17, 2.62) and sex with unknown persons (1.82; 1.23, 2.71). Drug use was not significantly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Among Peruvian MSM social media users, findings suggest that alcohol use was associated with increased HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. PMID:26324405

  18. Substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM social media users.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Nianogo, Roch A; Chiu, ChingChe J; Menacho, Lucho; Galea, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Peru is experiencing a concentrated HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Substance use (alcohol and drug use) has been found to be associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. A recent surge in the number of social media users in Peru has enabled these technologies to be potential tools for reaching HIV at-risk individuals. This study sought to assess the relationship between substance use and sexual risk behaviors among Peruvian MSM who use social media. A total of 556 Peruvian MSM Facebook users (ages 18-59) were recruited to complete a 92-item survey on demographics, sexual risk behaviors, and substance use. We performed a logistic regression of various sexual risk behaviors (e.g., unprotected sex, casual sex) on substance abuse, including alcohol, adjusting for potential covariates. Drinking more than five alcoholic drinks a day in the past three months was associated with an increased odds of having unprotected sex (vaginal and anal) (aOR: 1.52; 95% CL: 1.01, 2.28), casual sex (1.75; 1.17, 2.62), and sex with unknown persons (1.82; 1.23, 2.71). Drug use was not significantly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Among Peruvian MSM social media users, findings suggest that alcohol use was associated with increased HIV-related sexual risk behaviors.

  19. A second type of magnitude effect: Reinforcer magnitude differentiates delay discounting between substance users and controls.

    PubMed

    Mellis, Alexandra M; Woodford, Alina E; Stein, Jeffrey S; Bickel, Warren K

    2017-01-01

    Basic research on delay discounting, examining preference for smaller-sooner or larger-later reinforcers, has demonstrated a variety of findings of considerable generality. One of these, the magnitude effect, is the observation that individuals tend to exhibit greater preference for the immediate with smaller magnitude reinforcers. Delay discounting has also proved to be a useful marker of addiction, as demonstrated by the highly replicated finding of greater discounting rates in substance users compared to controls. However, some research on delay discounting rates in substance users, particularly research examining discounting of small-magnitude reinforcers, has not found significant differences compared to controls. Here, we hypothesize that the magnitude effect could produce ceiling effects at small magnitudes, thus obscuring differences in delay discounting between groups. We examined differences in discounting between high-risk substance users and controls over a broad range of magnitudes of monetary amounts ($0.10, $1.00, $10.00, $100.00, and $1000.00) in 116 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers. We found no significant differences in discounting rates between users and controls at the smallest reinforcer magnitudes ($0.10 and $1.00) and further found that differences became more pronounced as magnitudes increased. These results provide an understanding of a second form of the magnitude effect: That is, differences in discounting between populations can become more evident as a function of reinforcer magnitude.

  20. Dimensions of Religion, Depression Symptomatology, and Substance Use Among Rural African American Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brooke E. E.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Bryant, Keneshia J.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown a relationship between depression, substance use, and religiosity but, few have investigated this relationship in a community sample of drug-using African Americans. This study examined the relationship between dimensions of religion (positive and negative religious coping, private and public religious participation, religious preference, and God-based, clergy-based, and congregation-based religious support), depression symptomatology, and substance use among 223 African American cocaine users. After controlling for gender, employment, and age, greater congregation-based support and greater clergy-based support were associated with fewer reported depressive symptoms. Additionally, greater congregation-based support was associated with less alcohol use. PMID:24564561

  1. Sex differences amongst dependent heroin users: histories, clinical characteristics and predictors of other substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shand, Fiona L; Degenhardt, Louisa; Slade, Tim; Nelson, Elliot C

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and aims To examine differences in the characteristics and histories of male and female dependent heroin users, and in the clinical characteristics associated with multiple substance dependence diagnoses. Design and methods 1513 heroin dependent participants underwent an interview covering substance use and dependence, psychiatric history, child maltreatment, family background, adult violence and criminal history. Family background, demographic and clinical characteristics were analysed by sex. Ordinal regression was used to test for a relationship between number of substance dependence diagnoses and other clinical variables. Results Women were more likely to experience most forms of child maltreatment, to first use heroin with a boyfriend or partner, to experience ongoing adult violence at the hands of a partner, and to have a poorer psychiatric history than men. Males had more prevalent lifetime substance dependence diagnoses and criminal histories and were more likely to meet criteria for ASPD. Predictors of multiple substance dependence diagnoses for both sexes were mental health variables, antisocial behaviour, childhood sexual abuse, victim of adult violence, younger age at first cannabis use and overdose. As the number of dependence diagnoses increased, clinical and behavioural problems increased. Childhood emotional neglect was related to increasing dependence diagnoses for females but not males, whereas PTSD was a significant predictor for males but not females. Discussion and conclusions Mental health problems, other substance dependence, childhood and adult trauma were common in this sample, with sex differences indicating different treatment needs and possible different pathways to heroin dependence for men and women. PMID:20833480

  2. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ashlee A; Neale, Michael C; Silberg, Judy L; Verhulst, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  3. Interactive Voice Response Self-Monitoring to Assess Risk Behaviors in Rural Substance Users Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Jalie A.; Blum, Elizabeth R.; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L.; Simpson, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4–10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease. PMID:21311964

  4. Interactive voice response self-monitoring to assess risk behaviors in rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jalie A; Blum, Elizabeth R; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L; Simpson, Cathy A

    2012-02-01

    Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4-10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease.

  5. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, José; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and often excluded from clinical trials in the US. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. We conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of three individual sessions of motivational enhancement therapy (MET) to three individual sessions of counseling as usual (CAU) on treatment retention and frequency of substance use, with all assessment and treatment sessions conducted in Spanish among 405 individuals seeking treatment for any type of current substance use. Treatment exposure was good, with 66% of participants completing all three protocol sessions. Although both interventions resulted in reductions in substance use during the 4-week therapy phase, there were no significant treatment condition by time interactions nor site by treatment condition interactions. Results suggest that the individual treatments delivered in Spanish were both attractive to and effective with this heterogeneous group of Hispanic adults, but the differential effectiveness of MET may be limited to those whose primary substance use problem is alcohol and may be fairly modest in magnitude. PMID:19803579

  6. Understanding active and passive users: the effects of an active user using normal, hard and unreliable technologies on user assessment of trust in technology and co-user.

    PubMed

    Montague, Enid; Xu, Jie

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how passive users perceive the trustworthiness of active users and technologies under varying technological conditions. An experimental study was designed to vary the functioning of technologies that active users interacted with, while passive users observed these interactions. Active and passive user ratings of technology and partner were collected. Exploratory data analysis suggests that passive users developed perceptions of technologies based on the functioning of the technology and how the active user interacted with the technology. Findings from this research have implications for the design of technologies in environments where active and passive users interact with technologies in different ways. Future work in this area should explore interventions that lead to enhanced affective engagement and trust calibration.

  7. Shaping Social Activity by Incentivizing Users

    PubMed Central

    Farajtabar, Mehrdad; Du, Nan; Rodriguez, Manuel Gomez; Valera, Isabel; Zha, Hongyuan; Song, Le

    2015-01-01

    Events in an online social network can be categorized roughly into endogenous events, where users just respond to the actions of their neighbors within the network, or exogenous events, where users take actions due to drives external to the network. How much external drive should be provided to each user, such that the network activity can be steered towards a target state? In this paper, we model social events using multivariate Hawkes processes, which can capture both endogenous and exogenous event intensities, and derive a time dependent linear relation between the intensity of exogenous events and the overall network activity. Exploiting this connection, we develop a convex optimization framework for determining the required level of external drive in order for the network to reach a desired activity level. We experimented with event data gathered from Twitter, and show that our method can steer the activity of the network more accurately than alternatives. PMID:26005312

  8. Recent national trends in Salvia divinorum use and substance-use disorders among recent and former Salvia divinorum users compared with nonusers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Woody, George E; Yang, Chongming; Li, Jih-Heng; Blazer, Dan G

    2011-04-01

    CONTEXT: Media and scientific reports have indicated an increase in recreational use of Salvia divinorum. Epidemiological data are lacking on the trends, prevalence, and correlates of S. divinorum use in large representative samples, as well as the extent of substance use and mental health problems among S. divinorum users. OBJECTIVE: To examine the national trend in prevalence of S. divinorum use and to identify sociodemographic, behavioral, mental health, and substance-use profiles of recent (past-year) and former users of S. divinorum. DESIGN: Analyses of public-use data files from the 2006-2008 United States National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (N = 166,453). SETTING: Noninstitutionalized individuals aged 12 years or older were interviewed in their places of residence. MAIN MEASURES: Substance use, S. divinorum, self-reported substance use disorders, criminality, depression, and mental health treatment were assessed by standardized survey questions administered by the audio computer-assisted self-interviewing method. RESULTS: Among survey respondents, lifetime prevalence of S. divinorum use had increased from 0.7% in 2006 to 1.3% in 2008 (an 83% increase). S. divinorum use was associated with ages 18-25 years, male gender, white or multiple race, residence of large metropolitan areas, arrests for criminal activities, and depression. S. divinorum use was particularly common among recent drug users, including users of lysergic acid diethylamide (53.7%), ecstasy (30.1%), heroin (24.2%), phencyclidine (22.4%), and cocaine (17.5%). Adjusted multinomial logistic analyses indicated polydrug use as the strongest determinant for recent and former S. divinorum use. An estimated 43.0% of past-year S. divinorum users and 28.9% of former S. divinorum users had an illicit or nonmedical drug-use disorder compared with 2.5% of nonusers. Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed that recent and former S. divinorum users had greater odds of having past-year depression and

  9. Recent national trends in Salvia divinorum use and substance-use disorders among recent and former Salvia divinorum users compared with nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Woody, George E; Yang, Chongming; Li, Jih-Heng; Blazer, Dan G

    2011-01-01

    Context Media and scientific reports have indicated an increase in recreational use of Salvia divinorum. Epidemiological data are lacking on the trends, prevalence, and correlates of S. divinorum use in large representative samples, as well as the extent of substance use and mental health problems among S. divinorum users. Objective To examine the national trend in prevalence of S. divinorum use and to identify sociodemographic, behavioral, mental health, and substance-use profiles of recent (past-year) and former users of S. divinorum. Design Analyses of public-use data files from the 2006–2008 United States National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (N = 166,453). Setting Noninstitutionalized individuals aged 12 years or older were interviewed in their places of residence. Main measures Substance use, S. divinorum, self-reported substance use disorders, criminality, depression, and mental health treatment were assessed by standardized survey questions administered by the audio computer-assisted self-interviewing method. Results Among survey respondents, lifetime prevalence of S. divinorum use had increased from 0.7% in 2006 to 1.3% in 2008 (an 83% increase). S. divinorum use was associated with ages 18–25 years, male gender, white or multiple race, residence of large metropolitan areas, arrests for criminal activities, and depression. S. divinorum use was particularly common among recent drug users, including users of lysergic acid diethylamide (53.7%), ecstasy (30.1%), heroin (24.2%), phencyclidine (22.4%), and cocaine (17.5%). Adjusted multinomial logistic analyses indicated polydrug use as the strongest determinant for recent and former S. divinorum use. An estimated 43.0% of past-year S. divinorum users and 28.9% of former S. divinorum users had an illicit or nonmedical drug-use disorder compared with 2.5% of nonusers. Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed that recent and former S. divinorum users had greater odds of having past-year depression and a

  10. Oral lesions of 500 habitual psychoactive substance users in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Rooban; Rao, Anita; Raman, Uma; Rajasekaran, Saraswathi T; Joshua, Elizabeth; R, Hemalatha; Kannan, Ranganathan

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of oral lesions among 500 psychoactive substance users in a hospital-based population. The study group consisted of 500 consecutive patients attending TTK Hospital, a non-governmental organisation involved in rehabilitation of substance users. Patient history was recorded in a pre-determined format and clinical findings were recorded by a trained physician and dental surgeons. Psychoactive substances used by the patients were alcohol (97%), tobacco (72%), arecanut (57.2%), narcotics (6.8%), cannabis (3.2%) and benzodiazipines (1.8%). Ninety-one percent of patients had one or more oral lesions: dental caries (39%), gingivitis (37.6%), extrinsic stains (24%), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) (8%), periodontitis (7.4%), leukoplakia (6.6%), melanosis (5.2%), nicotina palatini (2.2%) and erythroplakia (0.6%). For OSF, those using arecanut and alcohol had an odds ratio (OR) of 2.4 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.23-4.69, P=0.009], smokers using arecanut products and alcohol had an OR of 3.07 (95% CI 1.59-5.91, P=0.000), and smokers who chewed arecanut products and used drugs had an OR of 23.1 (95% CI 2.05-260, P=0.001) compared with the general population. Those who smoked and used alcohol, arecanut and drugs had a 20.67-fold higher risk of developing leukoplakia compared with those who did not engage in these habits. In conclusion, 91% of patients had one or more oral lesions that needed dental treatment, and most patients were not aware of their oral lesions. The high prevalence of OSF and leukoplakia in substance abusers compared with the general population emphasises the need for regular dental assessments in these patients.

  11. DYNAMICS OF OPIOID SUBSTITUTION TREATMENTIN DIFFERENT INITIAL SUBSTANCE USER OPIOID DEPENDENT PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Todadze, Kh; Mosia, S

    2016-05-01

    Injecting drug user size estimation studies carried out in 2009, 2012 and 2015 revealed growing trends of drug abuse in Georgia:estimated number of people who inject drugs (PWID) have been increased from 40000 and 45000 to 50000. Since Soviet period the most popular injective narcotics have been opioids: home-made opium, heroine, buprenorphine and home-made desomorphine ("Krokodile") replacing each other on the black market. Self-made desomorphine typically contains big amounts of different toxic substances and causes significant somatic disorders, especially skin, bone, blood infections, liver and kidney failure; is highly addictive, associates with frequent injections that enhance injecting-related harm, including the risk of HIV transmission, in comparison with typical opioids. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of opioid substitution treatment (OST) on depression and anxiety in opioid dependent clients with history of different opioid substance use. 104 opioid drug users undergoing OST with intensive psychological counseling have been divided in 5 groups according to the principal opioid drug that was abused during past 6 months before starting treatment: heroine, desomorphine, illicit methadone injectors, illicit buprenorphine injectors, and multiple drug abusers consuming opioids as primary drugs. Level of depression (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Spielberger Anxiety Inventory) as well as clinical symptoms, risky behavior, quality of life (WHO), and other data were measured before starting and after 3, 9, 15, 21 months of treatment. The illegal use of psychotropic-narcotics was checked through random urine-testing 1-2 times per patient per month. In all five groups remarkable decrease of depression and anxiety was observed in comparison with the starting data. Before inclusion desomorphine and poly-drug users had the highest scores of depression and anxiety while buprenorphine users manifested the lowest rate. Improvement of

  12. Abbreviated Goal Management Training Shows Preliminary Evidence as a Neurorehabilitation Tool for HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders among Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Moore, David J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Umlauf, Anya; Scott, J. C.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Substance use disorders are highly comorbid with and contribute to the increased prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction observed in HIV infection. Despite their adverse impact on everyday functioning, there are currently no compensatory-based neurorehabilitation interventions validated for use among HIV+ substance users (HIV/SUD). This study examined the effectiveness of Goal Management Training (GMT) alone or GMT as part of a metacognitive training among HIV/SUD individuals with executive dysfunction. Methods Ninety HIV/SUD individuals were randomized to a single 15-minute session: 1) GMT (n=30); 2) GMT plus metacognitive training (neurocognitive awareness; GMT+Meta; n=30); or 3) active control (n=30). Following a brief neurocognitive battery and study condition, participants performed a complex laboratory-based function task, Everyday Multitasking Test (Everyday MT), during which metacognition (awareness) was evaluated. Results There was an increasing, but nonsignificant tendency for better Everyday MT performances across study conditions (Control≤GMT≤GMT+Meta; ps<0.08). Post-hoc analyses showed that GMT and GMT+Meta groups demonstrated small benefits (d=0.20–0.27) compared to the control arm but did not differ from one another (ds<0.10). When GMT groups were combined, there were significant medium effect-size benefits in Everyday MT performance and metacognitive task appraisals as compared to the control condition. Among participants who underwent GMT, benefits were most prominent in persons with poorer pre-training dual-tasking ability, depression, and methamphetamine use disorders (ds=0.35–1.04). Conclusions A brief compensatory strategy has benefits for everyday multitasking and metacognition among HIV+ substance users with executive dysfunction. Future work exploring more intensive trainings, potentially complimentary to other restorative approaches and/or pharmacological treatments, is warranted. PMID:26753986

  13. Can behavioral theory inform the understanding of depression and medication nonadherence among HIV-positive substance users?

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Listhaus, Alyson; Seitz-Brown, C J; Safren, Steven A; Lejuez, C W; Daughters, Stacey B

    2015-04-01

    Medication adherence is highly predictive of health outcomes across chronic conditions, particularly HIV/AIDS. Depression is consistently associated with worse adherence, yet few studies have sought to understand how depression relates to adherence. This study tested three components of behavioral depression theory--goal-directed activation, positive reinforcement, and environmental punishment--as potential indirect effects in the relation between depressive symptoms and medication nonadherence among low-income, predominantly African American substance users (n = 83). Medication nonadherence was assessed as frequency of doses missed across common reasons for nonadherence. Non-parametric bootstrapping was used to evaluate the indirect effects. Of the three intermediary variables, there was only an indirect effect of environmental punishment; depressive symptoms were associated with greater nonadherence through greater environmental punishment. Goal-directed activation and positive reinforcement were unrelated to adherence. Findings suggest the importance of environmental punishment in the relation between depression and medication adherence and may inform future intervention efforts for this population.

  14. Assessing Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness among Psychoactive Substance Users in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abiola, Tajudeen; Udofia, Owoidoho; Sheikh, Taiwo L; Sanni, Kamaldeen

    2015-11-01

    Studies on psychoactive substance use in Nigeria had focused on prevalence and rarely on treatment implication(s) of large rates reported. Further challenge was to find suitable instruments to monitor change readiness as well as predict treatment outcomes along motivation continuum and according to resilience characteristics. Such ability will not only help to match treatment strategy with stage of change but also come with a more satisfactory outcome. This study therefore provided psychometric properties of one of such measuring scales: Stage of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale version 8 (SOCRATES-8) and the accompanying change in resilience among Nigerians using psychoactive substances. Participants were 111 psychoactive substance dependent users in three treatment centers in Northern Nigeria. All respondents filled sociodemographic questionnaire, SOCRATES-8 and 14-item Resilience Scale. The study found overall motivation for change among participants to be medium on the three subscales of SOCRATES-8: ambivalence (median=14.00; range=7-20); recognition (median=31.00; range=7-35); and taking steps (median=35.00; range=12-40). More than half (61.3%) scored moderately on resilience. The Internal reliability of SOCRATES-8's subscales fell into acceptable range (ambivalence=0.54; recognition=0.87; taking steps=0.84). Pearson correlation coefficients of subscales with resilience are positive and in moderate range except for ambivalence with very low coefficient. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on participants' resilience characteristics yields five distinct profiles corresponding to five stages of motivational change. ANOVA of these five profiles based on SOCRATES' 3 subscales was significant. The study demonstrates utility of SOCRATES-8 to assess change readiness and treatment eagerness of psychoactive substance abusers according to stages of change and their resilience characteristics. This will aid treatment planning and can also measure treatment

  15. CFC users seek exemptions from ban on ozone-depleting substances

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.

    1993-08-16

    Environmental Protection Agency officials were surprised last month as the deadline passed for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) users to ask for exemptions from the production ban that goes into effect in less than 29 months. Only a handful of CFC users petitioned EPA to put their case before the countries that are party to the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer. Three major groups--as well as a few other minor users--say they must have CFCs available after the Jan. 1, 1996, phaseout deadline. The automobile industry and commercial building owners cite the turmoil and expense of switching to substitutes for existing air-conditioning and commercial building owners cite the turmoil and expense of switching to substitutes for existing air-conditioning equipment. And the pharmaceutical industry has not yet developed approved alternatives for certain medical devices. But only metered-dose inhalers, which use CFCs to propel medication directly into the lungs of patients suffering from asthma and other respiratory diseases, are likely to be deemed an exempt essential use.

  16. Psychometric Evaluation of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in an Inpatient Sample of Substance Users Using Cue-Reactivity Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Schlauch, Robert C.; Crane, Cory A.; Houston, Rebecca J.; Molnar, Danielle S.; Schlienz, Nicolas J.; Lang, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    The current project sought to examine the psychometric properties of a personality based measure (Substance Use Risk Profile Scale; SURPS: introversion-hopelessness, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity, and sensation seeking) designed to differentially predict substance use preferences and patterns by matching primary personality-based motives for use to the specific effects of various psychoactive substances. Specifically, we sought to validate the SURPS in a clinical sample of substance users using cue reactivity methodology to assess current inclinations to consume a wide range of psychoactive substances. Using confirmatory factor analysis and correlational analyses, the SURPS demonstrated good psychometric properties and construct validity. Further, impulsivity and sensation-seeking were associated with use of multiple substances but could be differentiated by motives for use and susceptibility to the reinforcing effects of stimulants (i.e., impulsivity) and alcohol (i.e. sensation-seeking). In contrast, introversion-hopelessness and anxiety sensitivity demonstrated a pattern of use more focused on reducing negative affect, but were not differentiated based on specific patterns of use. Taken together, results suggests that among those receiving inpatient treatment for substance use disorders, the SURPS is a valid instrument for measuring four distinct personality dimensions that may be sensitive to motivational susceptibilities to specific patterns of alcohol and drug use. PMID:26052180

  17. Research on substances with activity against orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Marcin; Joniec, Justyna; Bartoszcze, Michał; Gryko, Romuald; Kocik, Janusz; Knap, Józef

    2013-01-01

    Although smallpox was eradicated over 30 years ago, the disease remains a major threat. High mortality, high infectivity and low resistance of the contemporary population make the smallpox virus very attractive to terrorists. The possible presence of illegal stocks of the virus or risk of deliberate genetic modifications cause serious concerns among experts. Hence, it is reasonable to seek effective drugs that could be used in case of smallpox outbreak. This paper reviews studies on compounds with proven in vitro or in vivo antipoxviruses potential, which show various mechanisms of action. Nucleoside analogues, such as cidofovir, can inhibit virus replication. Cidofovir derivatives are developed to improve the bioavailability of the drug. Among the nucleoside analogues under current investigation are: ANO (adenozine N1-oxide) and its derivatives, N-methanocarbothymidine [(N)-MCT], or derivatitives of aciklovir, peninclovir and brivudin. Recently, ST-246 - which effectively inhibits infection by limiting release of progeny virions - has become an object of attention. It has been also been demonstrated that compounds such as: nigericin, aptamers and peptides may have antiviral potential. An interesting strategy to fight infections was presented in experiments aimed at defining the role of individual genes (E3L, K3L or C6L) in the pathogenesis, and looking for their potential blockers. Additionally, among substances considered to be effective in the treatment of smallpox cases, there are factors that can block viral inhibitors of the human complement system, epidermal growth factor inhibitors or immunomodulators. Further studies on compounds with activity against poxviruses are necessary in order to broaden the pool of available means that could be used in the case of a new outbreak of smallpox.

  18. Exploring the Attractiveness of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) among Experienced Drug Users.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan G C; Nabben, Ton; Keiman, Daan; Haanschoten, Gijs; Korf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) appear yearly on the European market (81 for the first time in 2013, adding to a total of over 350 NPS). Using semi-structured interviews with 25 Dutch experienced recreational drug users, the role of the Internet and friends in gathering and exchanging information about NPS was elaborated. Furthermore, we investigated how NPS were acquired and which aspects make NPS more or less attractive, including their legal status. It appeared that the Internet was an important source of information about NPS in general. Personal experiences with NPS were preferably shared face-to-face with friends, as for privacy reasons users were cautious to post their experiences on web sites and forums. NPS were usually obtained or bought from friends or-to a lesser extent-purchased via the Internet. The preference for a specific NPS depended on the desired effects (mostly stimulant or psychedelic), price (similar to MDMA or amphetamine), duration of effect (preferably around four hours), and setting (at home, at festivals, or in nightlife). Legal status was not relevant for the decision to use NPS. Most NPS are not superior to the already marketed drugs, and do not displace conventional illicit drugs.

  19. Peer Network Counseling with Urban Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Moderate Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Mason, Michael; Light, John; Campbell, Leah; Keyser-Marcus, Lori; Crewe, Stephanie; Way, Thomas; Saunders, Heather; King, Laura; Zaharakis, Nikola M; McHenry, Chantal

    2015-11-01

    Close peer networks can affect adolescents' health behaviors by altering their social environments, and thus their risk for and protection against substance use involvement. We tested a 20 minute intervention named Peer Network Counseling that integrates motivational interviewing and peer network strategies with 119 urban adolescents who reported occasional or problem substance use. Adolescents presenting at primary care clinic were randomized to intervention or control conditions and followed for 6 months. Mixed-effect latent growth models were used to evaluate intervention effects on trajectories of alcohol and marijuana use, offers to use substances, and moderation models to test for interactions between intervention condition and peer network characteristics. A significant intervention effect was found for boys for offers to use alcohol from friends (p<.05), along with a trend significant effect for alcohol use (p<.08). Intervention was more effective in reducing marijuana use, vs. control, for participants with more peer social support (p<.001) and with more peer encouragement for prosocial behavior (school, clubs, sports, religious activities); however, intervention did not affect these network characteristics. Results provide support to continue this line of research to test brief interventions that activate protective peer network characteristics among at-risk adolescents, while also raising some interesting gender-based intervention questions for future research.

  20. Biologically active substances produced by antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R; Friedmann, E I

    1993-01-01

    Researchers report results of laboratory studies of over 200 microbial strains of fungi, algae, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria collected in the Ross Desert region of Antarctica. All of the 35 fungal strains produced substances that inhibited the growth of cyanobacteria and algae. The inhibitory effect of the biologically active substance was evident in crushed cell extract but less in spent broth.

  1. Activity Spaces and Urban Adolescent Substance Use and Emotional Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael J.; Korpela, Kalevi

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzed routine locations (activity spaces) of urban adolescents enrolled in a substance abuse treatment program to understand the relationship between their spatial lives and health outcomes such as substance use and mental health. Sixty-eight adolescents were interviewed and produced a list of 199 locations identified as most…

  2. Active microwave users working group program planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bare, J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Childs, L. F.; Dellwig, L. F.; Heighway, J. E.; Joosten, R.; Lewis, A. J.; Linlor, W.; Lundien, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed programmatic and technical development plan for active microwave technology was examined in each of four user activities: (1) vegetation; (2) water resources and geologic applications, and (4) oceanographic applications. Major application areas were identified, and the impact of each application area in terms of social and economic gains were evaluated. The present state of knowledge of the applicability of active microwave remote sensing to each application area was summarized and its role relative to other remote sensing devices was examined. The analysis and data acquisition techniques needed to resolve the effects of interference factors were reviewed to establish an operational capability in each application area. Flow charts of accomplished and required activities in each application area that lead to operational capability were structured.

  3. The impact of childhood abuse on inpatient substance users: specific links with risky sex, aggression, and emotion dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Banducci, Anne N; Hoffman, Elana M; Lejuez, C W; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-05-01

    Adults with substance use disorders (SUDs) report a high prevalence of childhood abuse. Research in the general population suggests specific types of abuse lead to particular negative outcomes; it is not known whether this pattern holds for adults with SUDs. We hypothesized that specific types of abuse would be associated with particular behavioral and emotional outcomes among substance users. That is, childhood sexual abuse would be associated with risky sex behaviors, childhood physical abuse with aggression, and childhood emotional abuse with emotion dysregulation. 280 inpatients (M age=43.3; 69.7% male; 88.4% African American) in substance use treatment completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), HIV Risk-Taking Behavior Scale, Addiction Severity Index, Difficulties with Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Distress Tolerance Scale (DTS), and Affect Intensity and Dimensions of Affiliation Motivation (AIM). Consistent with our hypotheses, the CTQ sexual abuse subscale uniquely predicted exchanging sex for cocaine and heroin, number of arrests for prostitution, engaging in unprotected sex with a casual partner during the prior year, and experiencing low sexual arousal when sober. The physical abuse subscale uniquely predicted number of arrests for assault and weapons offenses. The emotional abuse subscale uniquely predicted the DERS total score, AIM score, and DTS score. Among substance users, different types of abuse are uniquely associated with specific negative effects. Assessment of specific abuse types among substance users may be informative in treatment planning and relapse prevention.

  4. Under Pressure: Adolescent Substance Users Show Exaggerated Neural Processing of Aversive Interoceptive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Lotte; Stewart, Jennifer L.; May, April C.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Davenport, Paul W.; Paulus, Martin P.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD) exhibit hyposensitivity to pleasant internally generated (interoceptive) stimuli and hypersensitivity to external rewarding stimuli. It is unclear whether similar patterns exist for aversive interoceptive stimuli. We compared activation in the insular cortex and other brain regions during the anticipation and experience of aversive stimuli between adolescents with SUD and those without. Design and participants Cross-sectional experimental study with two groups: Adolescents (ages 15–17) with an alcohol or marijuana SUD (n=18) and healthy comparison subjects (CON, n=15). Participants were recruited by distributing flyers at local high schools. Setting Keck Imaging Center, University of California San Diego, USA. Measurements Behavioral and neural responses to a continuous performance task with inspiratory breathing load recorded during an fMRI session. Questionnaires assessed lifetime drug use, anxiety, sensation seeking, impulsivity, affect, and bodily awareness. Visual analogue scales assessed drug craving and breathing load responses. Findings Across subjects, experience of breathing load elicited greater bilateral anterior and posterior insula (AI and PI, respectively) activation than anticipation (F(1,31)=4.16, p<.05). SUD exhibited greater left AI and bilateral PI activation during breathing load than anticipation, compared with CON (F(1,31)=4.16, p<.05). In contrast, CON showed greater activation during anticipation than breathing load in left PI, compared with SUD (F(1,31)=4.16, p<.05). Conclusions Adolescents with alcohol and marijuana substance use disorders may be hypersensitive to aversive interoceptive stimuli. PMID:26234745

  5. Correlates of Injecting in an HIV Incidence Hotspot among Substance Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Kori, Nana; Roth, Alexis M.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Brouwer, Kimberly C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Substance use and HIV are growing problems in the Mexico-U.S. border city of Tijuana, a sex tourism destination situated on a northbound drug trafficking route. In a previous longitudinal study of injection drug users (IDUs), we found that >90% of incident HIV cases occurred within an ‘HIV incidence hotspot,’ consisting of 2.5-blocks. This study examines behavioral, social, and environmental correlates associated with injecting in this HIV hotspot. Methods From 4/06–6/07, IDUs aged ≥18 years were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Participants underwent antibody testing for HIV and syphilis and interviewer-administered surveys eliciting information on demographics, drug use, sexual behaviors, and socio-environmental influences. Participants were defined as injecting in the hotspot if they most frequently injected within a 3 standard deviational ellipse of the cohort’s incident HIV cases. Logistic regression was used to identify individual and structural factors associated with the HIV ‘hotspot’. Results Of 1,031 IDUs, the median age was 36 years; 85% were male; HIV prevalence was 4%. As bivariate analysis indicated different correlates for males and females, models were stratified by sex. Factors independently associated with injecting in the HIV hotspot for male IDUs included homelessness (AOR 1.72; 95%CI 1.14–2.6), greater intra-urban mobility (AOR 3.26; 95% CI 1.67–6.38), deportation (AOR 1.58; 95% CI 1.18–2.12), active syphilis (AOR 3.03; 95%CI 1.63–5.62), needle sharing (AOR 0.57; 95%CI 0.42–0.78), various police interactions, perceived HIV infection risk (AOR 1.52; 95%CI 1.13–2.03), and health insurance status (AOR 0.53; 95%CI 0.33–0.87). For female IDUs, significant factors included sex work (AOR 8.2; 95%CI 2.2–30.59), lifetime syphilis exposure (AOR 2.73; 95%CI 1.08–6.93), injecting inside (AOR 5.26; 95%CI 1.54–17.92), arrests for sterile syringe possession (AOR 4.87; 95%CI 1.56–15.15), prior HIV

  6. [Bio-active substances derived from marine microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanyong; Hu, Jiangchun; Xue, Delin; Ma, Chengxin; Wang, Shujin

    2002-07-01

    Marine microorganisms, which are taxonomically diverse and genetically special, have powerful potential in producing novel bio-active substances. This article summarized research progress in this respect. The results showed that marine bacteria which are main marine microorganism flora can produce rich kinds of bio-active substances and that even though marine actinomycetes and marine fungi are not as many as marine bacteria in species and quantity, they should be paid no less attention about their bio-active substances. Besides, present research are limited to those marine microorganisms which are easily cultured. One of the future research trends will be focused on bio-active substances derived from non-culturable marine microorganisms.

  7. Dimensions of Treatment Quality Most Valued by Adolescent Substance Users and their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sara J; Midoun, Miriam M; Zeithaml, Valarie A; Clark, Melissa A; Spirito, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Professional psychologists are increasingly encouraged to document and evaluate the quality of the treatment they provide. However, there is a significant gap in knowledge about the extent to which extant definitions of treatment quality converge with patient perceptions. The primary goal of this study was to examine how adolescent substance users (ASU) and their caregivers perceive treatment quality. The secondary goal was to determine how these perceptions align with expert-derived definitions of ASU treatment quality and dimensions of perceived quality used frequently in other service disciplines. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 24 ASU and 29 caregivers to explore how participants conceptualize a quality treatment experience. Content analysis identified three major dimensions of perceived treatment quality, each of which contained three sub-dimensions: Therapeutic Relationship (i.e., Acceptance, Caring, Connection), Provider Characteristics (i.e., Experience, Communication Skills, Accessibility), and Treatment Approach (i.e., Integrated Care, Use of Structure, and Parent Involvement). Results revealed modest convergence between patient perceptions and existing definitions of quality, with several meaningful discrepancies. Most notably, the Therapeutic Relationship was the most important dimension to ASU and their caregivers, while expert-derived definitions emphasized the Treatment Approach. Implications for practicing psychologists to enhance training and supervision, quality improvement, and health education initiatives are discussed.

  8. Dimensions of Treatment Quality Most Valued by Adolescent Substance Users and their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sara J.; Midoun, Miriam M.; Zeithaml, Valarie A.; Clark, Melissa A.; Spirito, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Professional psychologists are increasingly encouraged to document and evaluate the quality of the treatment they provide. However, there is a significant gap in knowledge about the extent to which extant definitions of treatment quality converge with patient perceptions. The primary goal of this study was to examine how adolescent substance users (ASU) and their caregivers perceive treatment quality. The secondary goal was to determine how these perceptions align with expert-derived definitions of ASU treatment quality and dimensions of perceived quality used frequently in other service disciplines. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 24 ASU and 29 caregivers to explore how participants conceptualize a quality treatment experience. Content analysis identified three major dimensions of perceived treatment quality, each of which contained three sub-dimensions: Therapeutic Relationship (i.e., Acceptance, Caring, Connection), Provider Characteristics (i.e., Experience, Communication Skills, Accessibility), and Treatment Approach (i.e., Integrated Care, Use of Structure, and Parent Involvement). Results revealed modest convergence between patient perceptions and existing definitions of quality, with several meaningful discrepancies. Most notably, the Therapeutic Relationship was the most important dimension to ASU and their caregivers, while expert-derived definitions emphasized the Treatment Approach. Implications for practicing psychologists to enhance training and supervision, quality improvement, and health education initiatives are discussed. PMID:27524856

  9. Psychometric properties of the positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS) in a heterogeneous sample of substance users

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Malin-Mayor, Bo; Nich, Charla; Hunkele, Karen; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) is a widely used measure of affect, and a comprehensive psychometric evaluation has never been conducted among substance users. Objective To examine the psychometric properties of the PANAS in a sample of outpatient treatment substance users. Methods We used pooled data from four randomized clinical trials (N = 416; 34% female, 48% African American). Results A confirmatory factor analysis indicated adequate support for a two-factor correlated model comprised of Positive Affect and Negative Affect with correlated item errors (Comparative Fit Index = .93, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = .07, χ2 = 478.93, df = 156). Cronbach’s α indicated excellent internal consistency for both factors (.90 and .91, respectively). The PANAS factors had good convergence and discriminability (Composite Reliability >.7; Maximum Shared Variance < Average Variance Extracted). A comparison from baseline to Week 1 indicated acceptable test-retest reliability (Positive Affect = .80, Negative Affect = .76). Concurrent and discriminant validity were demonstrated with correlations with the Brief Symptom Inventory and Addiction Severity Index. The PANAS scores were also significantly correlated with treatment outcomes (e.g., Positive Affect was associated with the maximum days of consecutive abstinence from primary substance of abuse, r = .16, p = .001). Conclusion Our data suggest that the psychometric properties of the PANAS are retained in substance using populations. Although several studies have focused on the role of Negative Affect, our findings suggest that Positive Affect may also be an important factor in substance use treatment outcomes. PMID:26905228

  10. Can behavioral theory inform the understanding of depression and medication nonadherence among HIV-positive substance users?

    PubMed Central

    Listhaus, Alyson; Seitz-Brown, C. J.; Safren, Steven A.; Lejuez, C. W.; Daughters, Stacey B.

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is highly predictive of health outcomes across chronic conditions, particularly HIV/AIDS. Depression is consistently associated with worse adherence, yet few studies have sought to understand how depression relates to adherence. This study tested three components of behavioral depression theory—goal-directed activation, positive reinforcement, and environmental punishment—as potential indirect effects in the relation between depressive symptoms and medication nonadherence among low-income, predominantly African American substance users (n = 83). Medication nonadherence was assessed as frequency of doses missed across common reasons for nonadherence. Non-parametric bootstrapping was used to evaluate the indirect effects. Of the three intermediary variables, there was only an indirect effect of environmental punishment; depressive symptoms were associated with greater nonadherence through greater environmental punishment. Goal-directed activation and positive reinforcement were unrelated to adherence. Findings suggest the importance of environmental punishment in the relation between depression and medication adherence and may inform future intervention efforts for this population. PMID:25381605

  11. The relationship between distress tolerance and antisocial personality disorder among male inner-city treatment seeking substance users.

    PubMed

    Daughters, Stacey B; Sargeant, Marsha N; Bornovalova, Marina A; Gratz, Kim L; Lejuez, C W

    2008-10-01

    There is currently limited research on the potential mechanisms underlying the development of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). One such mechanism, distress tolerance (defined as an individual's behavioral persistence in the face of emotional distress) may underlie the development of ASPD and its associated behavioral difficulties. It was hypothesized that substance users with ASPD would evidence significantly lower levels of distress tolerance than substance users without ASPD. To test this relationship, we assessed 127 inner-city males receiving residential substance abuse treatment with two computerized laboratory measures of distress tolerance. The mean age of the sample was 40.1 years (SD = 9.8) and 88.2% were African American. As expected, multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that distress intolerance significantly predicted the presence of an ASPD diagnosis, above and beyond key covariates including substance use frequency and associated Axis I and II psychopathology. Findings suggest that distress tolerance may be a key factor in understanding the development of ASPD, setting the stage for future studies expanding on the nature of this relationship, as well as the development of appropriate interventions for this at-risk group.

  12. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    climate-sensitive decisions. Course evaluation survey collected 20 responses and indicated a high level of satisfaction. Valuable written comments offered an input for further improvement of the training services. The course offers a prototype for the conduct of training activities developed in partnership with climate information providers and the intended user group(s), in this case the California DWR.

  13. Pilot RCT of Bidirectional Text Messaging for ART Adherence Among Nonurban Substance Users with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Karen S.; Dillingham, Rebecca A.; Hettema, Jennifer E.; Conaway, Mark; Freeman, Jason; Reynolds, George; Hosseinbor, Sharzad

    2015-01-01

    Objective This pilot study tested the preliminary efficacy of a theory-based bidirectional text messaging intervention (TEXT) on antiretroviral (ART) adherence, missed care visits, and substance use among people with HIV. Methods Participants with recent substance use and ART nonadherence from 2 nonurban HIV clinics were randomized to TEXT or to usual care (UC). The TEXT intervention included daily queries of ART adherence, mood, and substance use. The system sent contingent intervention messages created by participants for reports of adherence/non-adherence, good mood/poor mood, and no substance use/use. Assessments were at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 3-month post-intervention follow-up. Objective primary outcomes were adherence, measured by past 3-month pharmacy refill rate, and proportion of missed visits (PMV), measured by medical records. The rate of substance-using days from the timeline follow-back was a secondary outcome. Results Sixty-three patients participated, with 33 randomized to TEXT and 30 to UC. At pre-intervention, adherence was 64.0%, PMV was 26.9%, and proportion of days using substances was 53.0%. At post-intervention, adherence in the TEXT condition improved from 66% to 85%, compared to 62 to 71% in UC participants (p=.04). PMV improved from 23% to 9% for TEXT participants and 31% to 28% in UC participants (p =.12). There were no significant differences between conditions in substance-using days at post-intervention. At 3-month follow-up, differences were not significant. Conclusions Personalized bidirectional text messaging improved adherence and shows promise to improve visit attendance, but did not reduce substance using days. This intervention merits further testing and may be cost-efficient given its automation. PMID:26651472

  14. Reward salience and risk aversion underlie differential ACC activity in substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, William H.; Fukunaga, Rena; Finn, Peter; Brown, Joshua W.

    2015-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex, especially the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), has long been implicated in cognitive control and error processing. Although the association between ACC and behavior has been established, it is less clear how ACC contributes to dysfunctional behavior such as substance dependence. Evidence from neuroimaging studies investigating ACC function in substance users is mixed, with some studies showing disengagement of ACC in substance dependent individuals (SDs), while others show increased ACC activity related to substance use. In this study, we investigate ACC function in SDs and healthy individuals performing a change signal task for monetary rewards. Using a priori predictions derived from a recent computational model of ACC, we find that ACC activity differs between SDs and controls in factors related to reward salience and risk aversion between SDs and healthy individuals. Quantitative fits of a computational model to fMRI data reveal significant differences in best fit parameters for reward salience and risk preferences. Specifically, the ACC in SDs shows greater risk aversion, defined as concavity in the utility function, and greater attention to rewards relative to reward omission. Furthermore, across participants risk aversion and reward salience are positively correlated. The results clarify the role that ACC plays in both the reduced sensitivity to omitted rewards and greater reward valuation in SDs. Clinical implications of applying computational modeling in psychiatry are also discussed. PMID:26106528

  15. A Software for managing afterhours activities in research user facilities

    DOE PAGES

    Camino, Fernando E.

    2016-10-13

    Here, we present an afterhours activity management program for shared facilities, which handles the processes required for afterhours access (request, approval, extension, etc.). It implements the concept of permitted afterhours activities, which consists of a list of well-defined activities that each user can perform afterhours. The program provides an easy and unambiguous way for users to know which activities they are allowed to perform afterhours. In addition, the program can enhance its safety efficacy by interacting with lab and instrument access control systems commonly present in user facilities.

  16. A novel substance with allelopathic activity in Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Takeshita, Sayaka; Kimura, Fukiko; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2013-12-15

    Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is one of the oldest living tree species and has been widely used in traditional medicine. Leaf extracts of ginkgo, such as the standardized extract EGb761, have become one of the best-selling herbal products. However, no bioactive compound directed at plants has been reported in this species. Therefore, we investigated possible allelopathic activity and searched for allelopathically active substances in ginkgo leaves. An aqueous methanol leaf extract inhibited the growth of roots and shoots of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), timothy (Phleum pratense) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) seedlings. The extract was purified by several chromatographic runs and an allelopathically active substance was isolated and identified by spectral analysis to be the novel compound 2-hydroxy-6-(10-hydroxypentadec-11-enyl)benzoic acid. The compound inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress and timothy at concentrations greater than 3 μM. The activity of the compound was 10- to 52-fold that of nonanoic acid. These results suggest that 2-hydroxy-6-(10-hydroxypentadec-11-enyl)benzoic acid may contribute to the allelopathic effect caused by ginkgo leaf extract. The compound may also have potential as a template for the development of new plant control substances.

  17. Results from Two Randomized Clinical Trials Evaluating the Impact of Quarterly Recovery Management Checkups with Adult Chronic Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Christy K; Dennis, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Post-discharge monitoring and early re-intervention have become standard practice when managing numerous chronic conditions. These two experiments tested the effectiveness of Recovery Management Checkup (RMC) protocols for adult chronic substance users. Intervention RMC included quarterly monitoring; motivational interviewing to provide personalized feedback and to resolve ambivalence about substance use; treatment linkage, engagement, and retention protocols to increase the amount of treatment received. Participants and Setting Recruited from sequential addiction treatment admissions, participants in the two experiments were on average 36 and 38 years of age, mostly female (59% vs. 46%), African American (85% vs. 80%), and met past-year criteria for dependence (87% vs. 76%). Design Participants in both experiments were randomly assigned to the RMC or control condition and interviewed quarterly for 2 years. Measurement The Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) was the main assessment instrument. Findings RMC participant outcomes were better than control participants in both experiments. Effect sizes were larger in the second experiment in terms of reducing days to readmission (Cohen’s d=0.41 vs. d=0.22), successive quarters in the community using substances (d= −0.32 vs. −0.19), past-month symptoms of abuse/dependence (d=−0.23 vs. −0.02) and increasing the days of abstinence over 2 years (d=+0.29 vs. 0.04). Conclusion RMC, which provided ongoing monitoring and linkage, is feasible to conduct and is effective for adults with chronic substance dependence. PMID:19344441

  18. Misuse of Psychologically Active Substances of Convicts being in Prisons and their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Plojovic, Safuadan; Dimitrijevic, Slavica; Maksimovic, Andrijana; Zejnelagic, Sabina; Hurem, Adem; Muraspahic, Muamer

    2016-01-01

    Due to the data of the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Serbia, over 70% of persons being in prisons and serving their sentences are drug addicts, and 50% of them are drug users. In the European prisons, the percentage of persons using drugs in the entire prison population is 20-70%, and in the USA 70-80%, in the Australian prisons between 50 and 80% of the convicts in prisons are addicts of psychologically active substances. The results of our survey are pursuant to official statistics data for Serbia, the European countries, USA and Australia, since 80% of our convicts in prisons have misused psychologically active substances during the period of 30 days, the previous period before coming to these institutions. More than a half of our examinees (60%), misuses narcotics and alcohol occasionally or permanently, the alcohol users only 12.7%, and only narcotics 7.3% of the ones, meaning that a treatment of addiction disease should have a significant role in prevention of recidivism. PMID:27275354

  19. A comparison of delay discounting among substance users with and without suicide attempt history

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Richard T.; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gonzalez, Raul; Martin, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Although substance use disorders are associated with overall increased suicide risk, there is considerable variability in suicide risk among substance dependent individuals (SDIs). Impairment in impulse control is common among SDIs and may contribute to vulnerability to suicidal behavior. The present study examined the relation between one specific aspect of impulsivity, delay discounting, and suicide attempt history in a sample of SDIs. An interaction was observed between suicide attempt history and discounting rates across delayed reward size. Specifically, SDIs with no history of attempted suicide, devalued small relative to large delayed rewards. In contrast, SDIs with a history of suicide attempts appeared comparatively indifferent to delayed reward size, discounting both small and large delayed rewards at essentially identical rates. These findings provide evidence that, despite the view that SDIs are characterized by marked difficulties in impulsivity, significant variability nevertheless exists within this group in delay discounting tendencies. Furthermore, these differences provide preliminary evidence that specific aspects of impulsivity may help to identify those most at risk for suicidal behavior in this population. The potential implications of our findings for suicide prevention efforts are discussed. PMID:22369220

  20. A comparison of delay discounting among substance users with and without suicide attempt history.

    PubMed

    Liu, Richard T; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gonzalez, Raul; Martin, Eileen M

    2012-12-01

    Although substance use disorders are associated with overall increased suicide risk, there is considerable variability in suicide risk among substance-dependent individuals (SDIs). Impairment in impulse control is common among SDIs, and it may contribute to vulnerability to suicidal behavior. The present study examined the relation between one specific aspect of impulsivity-delay discounting-and suicide attempt history in a sample of SDIs. An interaction was observed between suicide attempt history and discounting rates across delayed reward size. Specifically, SDIs with no history of attempted suicide, devalued small relative to large delayed rewards. In contrast, SDIs with a history of suicide attempts appeared comparatively indifferent to delayed reward size, discounting both small and large delayed rewards at essentially identical rates. These findings provide evidence that, despite the view that SDIs are characterized by marked difficulties in impulsivity, significant variability exists within this group in delay-discounting tendencies. Furthermore, these differences provide preliminary evidence that specific aspects of impulsivity may help to identify those most at risk for suicidal behavior in this population. The potential implications of our findings for suicide prevention efforts are discussed.

  1. AhR-mediated and antiestrogenic activity of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Janosek, J; Bittner, M; Hilscherová, K; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Holoubek, I

    2007-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) were for decades regarded as inert in the ecosystems with respect to their possible toxicity. However, HS have been recently shown to elicit various adverse effects generally attributed to xenobiotics. In our study, we used MVLN and H4IIE-luc cell lines stably transfected with luciferase gene under control of estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah receptor (AhR; receptor connected with so-called dioxin-like toxicity) for assessment of anti/estrogenic and AhR-mediated effects of 12 commercially available humic substances. Out of those, five humic acids were shown to induce AhR-mediated activity with relative potencies related to TCDD 2.6 x 10(-8)-7.4 x 10(-8). Organic extracts of HS solutions also elicited high activities what means that lipophilic molecules are responsible for a great part of effect. However, relatively high activity remaining in extracted solution suggests also presence of polar AhR-agonists. Contribution of persistent organic compounds to the observed effects was ruled out by H(2)SO(4) treatment. Eight out of twelve HS elicited significant antiestrogenic effects with IC(50) ranging from 40 to 164 mg l(-1). The possible explanations of the antiestrogenic effect include sorption of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) on HS, changes in membrane permeability for E2 or another specific mechanism.

  2. Risk of Suicide and Dysfunctional Patterns of Personality among Bereaved Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Masferrer, Laura; Caparrós, Beatriz

    2017-03-20

    Background: Research has shown that suicide is a phenomenon highly present among the drug dependent population. Different studies have demonstrated an upraised level of comorbidity between personality disorders (PD) and substance use disorders (SUD). This study aimed to describe which PDs are more frequent among those patients with a risk of suicide. Methods: The study was based on a consecutive non-probabilistic convenience sample of 196 bereaved patients attended to in a Public Addiction Center in Girona (Spain). Sociodemographic data, as well as suicide and drug related characteristics were recorded. The risk of suicide was assessed with the Spanish version of "Risk of suicide". Personality disorders were measured with the Spanish version of Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory. Results: The PDs more associated with the presence of risk of suicide were depressive, avoidant, schizotypal and borderline disorders. However, the histrionic, narcissistic and compulsive PDs are inversely associated with risk of suicide even though the narcissistic scale had no statistical correlation. Conclusions: The risk of suicide is a significant factor to take into account related to patients with SUD and especially with the presence of specific PDs. These findings underline the importance of diagnosing and treating rigorously patients with SUD.

  3. Risk of Suicide and Dysfunctional Patterns of Personality among Bereaved Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Masferrer, Laura; Caparrós, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research has shown that suicide is a phenomenon highly present among the drug dependent population. Different studies have demonstrated an upraised level of comorbidity between personality disorders (PD) and substance use disorders (SUD). This study aimed to describe which PDs are more frequent among those patients with a risk of suicide. Methods: The study was based on a consecutive non-probabilistic convenience sample of 196 bereaved patients attended to in a Public Addiction Center in Girona (Spain). Sociodemographic data, as well as suicide and drug related characteristics were recorded. The risk of suicide was assessed with the Spanish version of “Risk of suicide”. Personality disorders were measured with the Spanish version of Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory. Results: The PDs more associated with the presence of risk of suicide were depressive, avoidant, schizotypal and borderline disorders. However, the histrionic, narcissistic and compulsive PDs are inversely associated with risk of suicide even though the narcissistic scale had no statistical correlation. Conclusions: The risk of suicide is a significant factor to take into account related to patients with SUD and especially with the presence of specific PDs. These findings underline the importance of diagnosing and treating rigorously patients with SUD. PMID:28335530

  4. Understanding the risks associated with the use of new psychoactive substances (NPS): high variability of active ingredients concentration, mislabelled preparations, multiple psychoactive substances in single products.

    PubMed

    Zamengo, Luca; Frison, Giampietro; Bettin, Chiara; Sciarrone, Rocco

    2014-08-17

    New psychoactive substances (NPS), are now a large group of substances of abuse not yet completely controlled by international drug conventions, which may pose a public health threat. Anxiety, paranoia, hallucinations, seizures, hyperthermia and cardiotoxicity are some of the common adverse effects associated with these compounds. In this paper, three case reports taken from the archive of processed cases of the authors' laboratory are presented and discussed to stress the risks of possible adverse consequences for NPS users: in particular, (i) the risk deriving from the difficulty of predicting the actual consumed dose, due to variability of active ingredients concentration in consumed products, (ii) the risk deriving from the difficulty of predicting the actual active ingredients present in consumed products, as opposed to those claimed by the manufacturer, and (iii) the risk deriving from the difficulty of predicting the actual pharmacological and toxicological effects related to the simultaneous consumption of different psychoactive ingredients contained in single products, whose interactions are mostly unknown. Each of them individually provide a source of concern for possible serious health related consequences. However, they should be considered in conjunction with each others, with the worldwide availability of NPS through the web and also with the incessantly growing business derived from the manipulation and synthesis of new substances. The resulting scenario is that of a cultural challenge which demands a global approach from different fields of knowledge.

  5. Agreement between prospective interactive voice response telephone reporting and structured recall reports of risk behaviors in rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cathy A; Xie, Lili; Blum, Elizabeth R; Tucker, Jalie A

    2011-03-01

    Sound measurement of risk behaviors is essential to guide tailored risk reduction strategies as HIV infection patterns shift toward rural minorities, particularly in the southeastern United States where HIV disease remains highly stigmatized. Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems appear to enhance reports of sensitive behaviors and can support telehealth applications to extend the reach of care in rural, underserved areas. This study evaluated the feasibility and data quality of an IVR telephone reporting system with rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS. Community-dwelling patients were recruited from a nonprofit HIV medical clinic in rural Alabama (N = 35 men, 19 women). Participants engaged in daily IVR reporting of substance use and sexual practices for up to 10 weeks. IVR reports were compared with retrospective Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview reports for the same period. IVR and TLFB reports showed good to excellent agreement for summary measures of alcohol consumption and sexual activity. Agreements for illicit drug use reports were less satisfactory. Reports of monetary spending on alcohol and drugs were significantly higher on the IVR. Most individuals showed good agreements for reports of day-to-day alcohol and drug use and sexual practices. The study established the utility of IVR assessment with rural, disadvantaged adults living with HIV/AIDS who are priority targets for risk reduction interventions.

  6. Mood state and brain electric activity in ecstasy users.

    PubMed

    Gamma, A; Frei, E; Lehmann, D; Pascual-Marqui, R D; Hell, D; Vollenweider, F X

    2000-01-17

    Resting EEG during open and closed eyes and subsequent mood ratings were obtained from 15 Ecstasy users and 14 Ecstasy-naive controls. Absolute spectral power on the scalp, and the three-dimensional, intracerebral distribution of neuroelectric activity using low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) were computed. LORETA revealed global increases of theta, alpha 1 and beta 2/3 power during eyes open in Ecstasy users, and spectral analyses revealed a right-posterior increase of alpha 2 power (confirmed by LORETA) and increased beta band activity during open eyes. Ecstasy users had higher levels of state depressiveness, emotional excitability and a trend-level increase in state anxiety. The observed differences may be related to regular exposure to Ecstasy or other illicit drugs, or may be pre-existing.

  7. Understanding the Heterogeneity of BPD Symptoms through Latent Class Analysis: Initial Results and Clinical Correlates among Inner-City Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Levy, Roy; Gratz, Kim L.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the heterogeneity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms in a sample of 382 inner-city, predominantly African American male substance users through the use of latent class analysis. A 4-class model was statistically preferred, with 1 class interpreted to be a baseline class, 1 class interpreted to be a…

  8. "A different atmosphere of love": a qualitative study of the experiences of participants in Evangelical substance user rehabilitation programs in the Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Kenneth M; Cecil, David

    2013-04-01

    This article explores the lived experiences of individuals who have participated in faith-based substance user rehabilitation programs in the Russian Federation. The Russian Federation has high rates of alcohol and opioid dependence and a dearth of professional treatment options. In the post-Soviet period, Evangelical Christian groups have developed substance user rehabilitation programs to attempt to address substance use and its related problems. Data were collected during 2010 via focus group interviews with participants in three Evangelical rehabilitation programs in the Volga region of the Russian Federation. Themes emerging from the qualitative data analysis process were classified into three broad categories: Typical Day, Personal Background/Decision to Enter Rehabilitation, and Helpful Aspects of Rehabilitation Process.

  9. 77 FR 51818 - Agency Information Collection Activities; User Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the OMB Desk Officer for U.S. Customs and Border... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; User Fees AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day notice and request...

  10. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Therapy for Substance Dependence Using Breaking Free Online: Subgroup Analyses of a Heterogeneous Sample of Service Users

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Glyn; Ward, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Substance misuse services within the United Kingdom have traditionally been oriented to opiate and crack users, and attended predominantly by male service users. Groups who do not fit this demographic, such as women or those whose primary drug of choice is neither heroin nor crack, have tended to be underrepresented in services. In addition, there can be stigma associated with traditional opiate and crack-centric services. Therefore, the computerized treatment and recovery program, Breaking Free Online (BFO), was developed to enable service users to access confidential support for dependence on a wide range of substances. BFO is delivered as computer-assisted therapy (CAT), or, where appropriate, used as self-help. Objective The aim of this study was to report psychometric outcomes data from 393 service users accessing online support for substance misuse via BFO. Methods Following initial referral to substance misuse services, all participants were supported in setting up a BFO login by a practitioner or peer mentor, and, where required, assisted as they completed an online baseline assessment battery contained within the BFO program. Following a period of engagement with BFO, all participants completed the same battery of assessments, and changes in the scores on these assessments were examined. Results Significant improvements were found across the 393 service users in several areas of psychosocial functioning, including quality of life, severity of alcohol and drug dependence, depression, and anxiety (P=<.001 across all aspects of functioning). Additionally, significant improvements were found within specific subgroups of participants, including females (P=.001-<.001), males (P=.004-<.001), service users reporting alcohol dependence (P=.002-<.001), opiate and crack dependence (P=.014-<.001), and those seeking support for other substances that may be less well represented in the substance misuse sector (P=.001-<.001). Conclusions Data from this study

  11. Recent advances in researches on physiologically active substances in holothurians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi, Hirata; Nobuhiro, Zaima; Kyoko, Yamashita; Ryoko, Noguchi; Xue, Changhu; Tatsuya, Sugawara

    2005-07-01

    In this report, we reviewed recent literature on physiologically active substances from sea cucumbers (SCs) and their activities together with results obtained from our study. Preventive properties against lipid metabolism were reported in rats using a whole SC preparation with no particular constituent specified. Administration of the preparation lowered serum and hepatic cholesterol levels and improved the HDL/LDL ratio. These functions may be attributed to the stimulatory effect of the extract on the secretion of cholesterol in feces. Novel fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCSs) from Ludwigothurea grisea significantly induced fibroblast growth factor 2-dependent angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HU-VECs). The proangiogenetic activity seemed attributable to the action of the sulfated fucose branches on the polysaccharide. SCs contain mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) that are capable of absorbing UV. A biogenetic precursor of MAAs was first reported in SCs. The anti-proliferative effects of a branched chain fatty acid from a sea cucumber on prostate cancer cells was reported with the activity of 5-lipoxygenase. Glycosphingolipid constituents in SCs have been systematically analyzed over the past ten years. The results showed that the gangliosides in several SCs differed from those of mammals in that a sialic acid of SC gangliosides directly binded to glucose of cerebroside. Neuritogenic activity of the glycosphingolipids was demonstrated in vitro experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutic products for neurological disorders. Our study also showed that sphingoid bases, the hydrolyzed products of glycosphingolipids from SCs, induced significant apoptosis in several tumor cell lines.

  12. Study of adsorption process of iron colloid substances on activated carbon by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhina, K. I.; Shiyan, L. N.; Yurmazova, T. A.; Voyno, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The paper reports on the adsorption of iron colloid substances on activated carbon (PAC) Norit SA UF with using ultrasound. It is found that time of adsorption is equal to three hours. High-frequency electrical oscillation is 35 kHz. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon was determined and it is equal to about 0.25 mg iron colloid substances /mg PAC. The iron colloid substances size ranging from 30 to 360 nm was determined. The zeta potential of iron colloid substances which consists of iron (III) hydroxide, silicon compounds and natural organic substances is about (-38mV). The process of destruction iron colloid substances occurs with subsequent formation of a precipitate in the form of Fe(OH)3 as a result of the removal of organic substances from the model solution.

  13. Identification of physiologically active substances as novel ligands for MRGPRD.

    PubMed

    Uno, Makiko; Nishimura, Satoko; Fukuchi, Keisuke; Kaneta, Yasuyuki; Oda, Yoko; Komori, Hironobu; Takeda, Shigeki; Haga, Tatsuya; Agatsuma, Toshinori; Nara, Futoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mas-related G-protein coupled receptor member D (MRGPRD) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) which belongs to the Mas-related GPCRs expressed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In this study, we investigated two novel ligands in addition to beta-alanine: (1) beta-aminoisobutyric acid, a physiologically active substance, with which possible relation to tumors has been seen together with beta-alanine; (2) diethylstilbestrol, a synthetic estrogen hormone. In addition to the novel ligands, we found that transfection of MRGPRD leads fibroblast cells to form spheroids, which would be related to oncogenicity. To understand the MRGPRD novel character, oncogenicity, a large chemical library was screened in order to obtain MRGPRD antagonists to utilize in exploring the character. The antagonist in turn inhibited the spheroid proliferation that is dependent on MRGPRD signaling as well as MRGPRD signals activated by beta-alanine. The antagonist, a small-molecule compound we found in this study, is a potential anticancer agent.

  14. Identification of Physiologically Active Substances as Novel Ligands for MRGPRD

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Makiko; Nishimura, Satoko; Fukuchi, Keisuke; Kaneta, Yasuyuki; Oda, Yoko; Komori, Hironobu; Takeda, Shigeki; Haga, Tatsuya; Agatsuma, Toshinori; Nara, Futoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mas-related G-protein coupled receptor member D (MRGPRD) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) which belongs to the Mas-related GPCRs expressed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In this study, we investigated two novel ligands in addition to beta-alanine: (1) beta-aminoisobutyric acid, a physiologically active substance, with which possible relation to tumors has been seen together with beta-alanine; (2) diethylstilbestrol, a synthetic estrogen hormone. In addition to the novel ligands, we found that transfection of MRGPRD leads fibroblast cells to form spheroids, which would be related to oncogenicity. To understand the MRGPRD novel character, oncogenicity, a large chemical library was screened in order to obtain MRGPRD antagonists to utilize in exploring the character. The antagonist in turn inhibited the spheroid proliferation that is dependent on MRGPRD signaling as well as MRGPRD signals activated by beta-alanine. The antagonist, a small-molecule compound we found in this study, is a potential anticancer agent. PMID:23091359

  15. Diet and Physical Activity Apps: Perceived Effectiveness by App Users

    PubMed Central

    Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Amdam, Gro V; Almli, Valerie L; Oostindjer, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Background Diet and physical activity apps are two types of health apps that aim to promote healthy eating and energy expenditure through monitoring of dietary intake and physical activity. No clear evidence showing the effectiveness of using these apps to promote healthy eating and physical activity has been previously reported. Objective This study aimed to identify how diet and physical activity (PA) apps affected their users. It also investigated if using apps was associated with changes in diet and PA. Methods First, 3 semi-structured focus group discussions concerning app usability were conducted (15 app users and 8 nonusers; mean age 24.2 years, SD 6.4), including outcome measures such as motivations, experiences, opinions, and adherence. Results from the discussions were used to develop a questionnaire. The questionnaire, which contained questions about behavior changes, app usage, perceived effectiveness, and opinions of app usability, was answered by 500 Norwegians, with a mean age of 25.8 years (SD 5.1). Results App users found diet and PA apps effective in promoting healthy eating and exercising. These apps affected their actions, health consciousness, and self-education about nutrition and PA; and were also a part of their social lives. Over half of the users perceived that apps were effective in assisting them to eat healthily and to exercise more. Diet apps were more effective when they were frequently used and over a long period of time, compared to infrequent or short-term use (P=.01 and P=.02, respectively). Users who used diet and PA apps, perceived apps as more effective than users who only used one type of app (all P<.05). App users were better at maintaining diet and PA behaviors than nonusers (all P<.05). Young adults found apps fun to use, but sometimes time consuming. They wanted apps to be designed to meet their personal expectations. Conclusions App usage influenced action, consciousness, self-education about nutrition and PA, and social

  16. Adolescent Psychological Health Problems and Delinquency among Volatile Substance Users in a School Sample in South London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, David; Manning, Victoria; Gossop, Michael; Witton, John; Floyd, Karen; Rawaf, Salman; Strang, John

    2004-01-01

    The study assessed prevalence of volatile substance abuse (VSA), and its link to other forms of psychoactive substance use and to other problem behaviours among 14-15 year olds recruited from sixteen secondary schools in south-west London. Lifetime use of volatile substances was reported by 126 young people (6% of the sample) whose mean age of…

  17. Supporting the process of removing humic substances on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Olesiak, Paulina; Stępniak, Longina

    2014-01-01

    This study is focused on biosorption process used in water treatment. The process has a number of advantages and a lot of research has been done into its intensification by means of ultrasonic modification of solutions. The study carried out by the authors leads to the conclusion that sonication of organic solutions allows for extension of the time of operation of carbon beds. For the analysis of the results obtained during the sorption of humic substances (HS) from the solution dependencies UV/UV₀ or DOC/DOC₀ were used. In comparative studies the effectiveness of sorption and sonosorption (UV/UV₀) shows that the share of ultrasounds (US) is beneficial for extension of time deposit, both at a flow rate HS solution equal to 1 m/h and 5 m/h. Analysis of the US impact sorption on HS sorption in a biological fluidized bed, both prepared from biopreparat and the activated sludge confirms the higher efficiency compared to sonobiosorption than biosorption. These results confirm the degree of reduction UV₂₅₄/UV₀ and DOC/DOC₀ for the same processes. EMS index also confirms the improvement of HSbiodegradation by sludge microorganisms.

  18. Technologies for physical activity self-monitoring: a study of differences between users and non-users

    PubMed Central

    Åkerberg, Anna; Söderlund, Anne; Lindén, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background Different kinds of physical activity (PA) self-monitoring technologies are used today to monitor and motivate PA behavior change. The user focus is essential in the development process of this technology, including potential future users such as representatives from the group of non-users. There is also a need to study whether there are differences between the groups of users and non-users. The aims of this study were to investigate possible differences between users and non-users regarding their opinions about PA self-monitoring technologies and to investigate differences in demographic variables between the groups. Materials and methods Participants were randomly selected from seven municipalities in central Sweden. In total, 107 adults responded to the Physical Activity Products Questionnaire, which consisted of 22 questions. Results Significant differences between the users and non-users were shown for six of the 20 measurement-related items: measures accurately (p=0.007), measures with high precision (p=0.024), measures distance (p=0.020), measures speed (p=0.003), shows minutes of activity (p=0.004), and shows geographical position (p=0.000). Significant differences between the users and non-users were also found for two of the 29 encouragement items: measures accurately (p=0.001) and has long-term memory (p=0.019). Significant differences between the groups were also shown for level of education (p=0.030) and level of physical exercise (p=0.037). Conclusion With a few exceptions, the users and the non-users in this study had similar opinions about PA self-monitoring technologies. Because this study showed significant differences regarding level of education and level of physical exercise, these demographic variables seemed more relevant to investigate than differences in opinions about the PA self-monitoring technologies. PMID:28280399

  19. Predicting active users' personality based on micro-blogging behaviors.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Li, Ang; Hao, Bibo; Guan, Zengda; Zhu, Tingshao

    2014-01-01

    Because of its richness and availability, micro-blogging has become an ideal platform for conducting psychological research. In this paper, we proposed to predict active users' personality traits through micro-blogging behaviors. 547 Chinese active users of micro-blogging participated in this study. Their personality traits were measured by the Big Five Inventory, and digital records of micro-blogging behaviors were collected via web crawlers. After extracting 839 micro-blogging behavioral features, we first trained classification models utilizing Support Vector Machine (SVM), differentiating participants with high and low scores on each dimension of the Big Five Inventory [corrected]. The classification accuracy ranged from 84% to 92%. We also built regression models utilizing PaceRegression methods, predicting participants' scores on each dimension of the Big Five Inventory. The Pearson correlation coefficients between predicted scores and actual scores ranged from 0.48 to 0.54. Results indicated that active users' personality traits could be predicted by micro-blogging behaviors.

  20. How Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Unit Director Activities May Affect Provision of Community Outreach Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey; Green, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Community outreach services play an important role in infectious disease prevention and engaging drug users not currently in treatment. However, fewer than half of US substance abuse treatment units provide these services and many have little financial incentive to do so. Unit directors generally have latitude about scope of services,…

  1. Active solar heating and cooling information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  2. Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Montoya, Jessica L.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Depp, Colin A.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; TMARC Group, The

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277. PMID:24078868

  3. Substance P receptor desensitization requires receptor activation but not phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiya, Hiroshi; Putney, J.W. Jr. )

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of parotid acinar cells to substance P at 37{degree}C results in activation of phospholipase C, formation of ({sup 3}H)inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), and persistent desensitization of the substance P response. In cells treated with antimycin in medium containing glucose, ATP was decreased to {approximately}20% of control values, IP{sub 3} formation was completely inhibited, but desensitization was unaffected. When cells were treated with antimycin in the absence of glucose, cellular ATP was decreased to {approximately}5% of control values, and both IP{sub 3} formation and desensitization were blocked. A series of substance P-related peptides increased the formation of ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} and induced desensitization of the substance P response with a similar rank order of potencies. The substance P antagonist, (D-Pro{sup 2}, D-Try{sup 7,9})-substance P, inhibited substance P-induced IP{sub 3} formation and desensitization but did not induce desensitization. These results suggest that the desensitization of substance P-induced IP{sub 3} formation requires agonist activation of a P-type substance P receptor, and that one or more cellular ATP-dependent processes are required for this reaction. However, activation of phospholipase C and the generation of inositol phosphates does not seem to be a prerequisite for desensitization.

  4. Trail user demographics, physical activity behaviors, and perceptions of a newly constructed greenway trail.

    PubMed

    Price, Anna E; Reed, Julian A; Muthukrishnan, Suresh

    2012-10-01

    To better understand and promote physical activity on a newly constructed trail, the present study examined the demographic characteristics and physical activity behaviors of trail users; the demographic characteristics of trail users compared to the demographic profile Greenville County, South Carolina residents; trail users' purpose for using the trail; the distance trail users traveled to access the trail from their homes; channels through which trail users learned about the trail; and trail characteristics liked by trail users. Using a valid and reliable intercept survey, 1,148 trail users were interviewed. Trail users were mostly white (93.1%), male (59.1%) adults (84.2%) who reported using the trail for exercise (91%). Significant associations were identified between trail user demographic characteristics and how trail users learned about the trail and trail characteristics liked by trail users. The findings may contribute to the development of targeted health promotion efforts to promote physical activity on this and similar trails.

  5. ACT HEALTHY: A Combined Cognitive-Behavioral Depression and Medication Adherence Treatment for HIV-Infected Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daughters, Stacey B.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Schuster, Randi M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The two most common comorbid conditions with HIV are substance use disorders and depression, and individuals with comorbid HIV, depression, and substance dependence face a more chronic and treatment-resistant course. As an example of how to adapt evidence-based approaches to a complex comorbid population, the current case study examined the…

  6. Spectrum of antimicrobial activity and user acceptability of the hand disinfectant agent Sterillium Gel.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Rudolf, M; Labadie, J-C; Barrett, S P

    2002-10-01

    The antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels has been shown to be significantly less than liquid hand rubs probably because of a lower concentration of alcohol. Sterillium Gel is the first hand gel with 85% ethanol. Its antimicrobial efficacy and user acceptability was studied. Bactericidal activity was tested according to prEN 12054 against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus hirae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli (suspension test) and EN 1500 (15 volunteers; four replicates), fungicidal activity according to EN 1275 against Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (suspension test) and tuberculocidal activity against Mycobacterium terrae using the DGHM suspension test. Virucidal activity was determined in suspension tests based on reduction of infectivity with and without interfering substances (10% fetal calf serum; 0.3% erythrocytes and 0.3% bovine serum albumin). Ninety-six healthcare workers in hospitals in France and the UK used the gel for four weeks and assessed it by filling out a questionnaire. The gel was bactericidal (a reduction factor of > 10(5)-fold), tuberculocidal (reduction factor > 10(5)) and fungicidal (reduction factor > 10(4)) in 30 s. Irrespective of interfering substances the gel inactivated orthopoxvirus and herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 in 15 s, adenovirus in 2 min, poliovirus in 3 min and papovavirus in 15 min by a factor of > 10(4)-fold. Rotavirus and human immunodeficiency virus were inactivated in 30 s (without interfering substances). Under practical use conditions it was as effective in 30 s as the reference alcohol in 60 s. Most users described the tackiness, aggregation, skin feeling after use and smell as positive or acceptable. A total of 65.6% assessed the new gel to be better than a comparator irrespective of its type (gel or liquid). Overall Sterillium Gel had a unique spectrum of antimicrobial activity. It is probably the first alcohol-based hand gel to pass EN 1500 in 30 s. Due to the

  7. Regulation of sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis caused by egg-derived substance(s) in sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masaya; Kitamura, Makoto; Nakajima, Ayako; Sri Susilo, Endang; Takemura, Akihiro; Okuno, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    The sea cucumber Holothuria atra is a broadcast spawner. Among broadcast spawners, fertilization occurs by means of an egg-derived substance(s) that induces sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis. Holothuria atra sperm were quiescent in seawater, but exhibited flagellar motility activation near eggs with chorion (intact eggs). In addition, they moved in a helical motion toward intact eggs as well as a capillary filled with the water layer of the egg extracts, suggesting that an egg-derived compound(s) causes motility activation and chemotaxis. Furthermore, demembranated sperm flagella were reactivated in high pH (> 7.8) solution without cAMP, and a phosphorylation assay using (gamma-32P)ATP showed that axonemal protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation also occurred in a pH-dependent manner. These results suggest that the activation of sperm motility in holothurians is controlled by pH-sensitive changes in axonemal protein phosphorylation. Ca2+ concentration affected the swimming trajectory of demembranated sperm, indicating that Ca2+-binding proteins present at the flagella may be associated with regulation of flagellar waveform. Moreover, the phosphorylation states of several axonemal proteins were Ca2+-sensitive, indicating that Ca2+ impacts both kinase and phosphatase activities. In addition, in vivo sperm protein phosphorylation occurred after treatment with a water-soluble egg extract. Our results suggest that one or more egg-derived compounds activate motility and subsequent chemotactic behavior via Ca2+-sensitive flagellar protein phosphorylation.

  8. Peer groups and substance use: examining the direct and interactive effect of leisure activity.

    PubMed

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic adolescents, exploring the variations in the use of alcohol and illegal drugs among three different patterns of leisure activity, controlling for parental ties and school commitment. The findings show that alcohol and substance use varies significantly across the three leisure patterns. Moreover, it was found that the well-known relationship between adolescent substance use and having substance-using friends is significantly contingent on the type of leisure pattern. Our findings suggest that it is important to take into account different peer leisure activities in order to understand adolescent substance use. Finally, we discuss the implications of the findings for prevention work with adolescents.

  9. The Dose-Response Relationship of Adolescent Religious Activity and Substance Use: Variation across Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinman, Kenneth J.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Sahr, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses two inconsistent findings in the literature on adolescent religious activity (RA) and substance use: whether a dose-response relationship characterizes the association of these variables, and whether the association varies by grade, gender, ethnicity, family structure, school type, and type of substance. Multinomial logistic…

  10. An Extensible, User- Modifiable Framework for Planning Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshing, Joseph C.; Abramyan, Lucy; Mickelson, Megan C.; Wallick, Michael N.; Kurien, James A.; Crockett, Thomasa M.; Powell, Mark W.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash

    2013-01-01

    This software provides a development framework that allows planning activities for the Mars Science Laboratory rover to be altered at any time, based on changes of the Activity Dictionary. The Activity Dictionary contains the definition of all activities that can be carried out by a particular asset (robotic or human). These definitions (and combinations of these definitions) are used by mission planners to give a daily plan of what a mission should do. During the development and course of the mission, the Activity Dictionary and actions that are going to be carried out will often be changed. Previously, such changes would require a change to the software and redeployment. Now, the Activity Dictionary authors are able to customize activity definitions, parameters, and resource usage without requiring redeployment. This software provides developers and end users the ability to modify the behavior of automatically generated activities using a script. This allows changes to the software behavior without incurring the burden of redeployment. This software is currently being used for the Mars Science Laboratory, and is in the process of being integrated into the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) mission, as well as the International Space Station.

  11. Activities on Facebook Reveal the Depressive State of Users

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jinah

    2013-01-01

    Background As online social media have become prominent, much effort has been spent on identifying users with depressive symptoms in order to aim at early diagnosis, treatment, and even prevention by using various online social media. In this paper, we focused on Facebook to discern any correlations between the platform’s features and users’ depressive symptoms. This work may be helpful in trying to reach and detect large numbers of depressed individuals more easily. Objective Our goal was to develop a Web application and identify depressive symptom–related features from users of Facebook, a popular social networking platform. Methods 55 Facebook users (male=40, female=15, mean age 24.43, SD 3.90) were recruited through advertisement fliers distributed to students in a large university in Korea. Using EmotionDiary, the Facebook application we developed, we evaluated depressive symptoms using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. We also provided tips and facts about depression to participants and measured their responses using EmotionDiary. To identify the Facebook features related to depression, correlation analyses were performed between CES-D and participants’ responses to tips and facts or Facebook social features. Last, we interviewed depressed participants (CES-D≥25) to assess their depressive symptoms by a psychiatrist. Results Facebook activities had predictive power in distinguishing depressed and nondepressed individuals. Participants’ response to tips and facts, which can be explained by the number of app tips viewed and app points, had a positive correlation (P=.04 for both cases), whereas the number of friends and location tags had a negative correlation with the CES-D scale (P=.08 and P=.045 respectively). Furthermore, in finding group differences in Facebook social activities, app tips viewed and app points resulted in significant differences (P=.01 and P=.03 respectively) between probably depressed and

  12. Activity Catalog Tool (ACT) user manual, version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.; Andre, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    This report comprises the user manual for version 2.0 of the Activity Catalog Tool (ACT) software program, developed by Leon D. Segal and Anthony D. Andre in cooperation with NASA Ames Aerospace Human Factors Research Division, FLR branch. ACT is a software tool for recording and analyzing sequences of activity over time that runs on the Macintosh platform. It was designed as an aid for professionals who are interested in observing and understanding human behavior in field settings, or from video or audio recordings of the same. Specifically, the program is aimed at two primary areas of interest: human-machine interactions and interactions between humans. The program provides a means by which an observer can record an observed sequence of events, logging such parameters as frequency and duration of particular events. The program goes further by providing the user with a quantified description of the observed sequence, through application of a basic set of statistical routines, and enables merging and appending of several files and more extensive analysis of the resultant data.

  13. Factors associated with co-occurring borderline personality disorder among inner-city substance users: the roles of childhood maltreatment, negative affect intensity/reactivity, and emotion dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T; Baruch, David E; Bornovalova, Marina A; Lejuez, C W

    2008-01-01

    The co-occurrence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) among individuals with substance use disorders is a common and clinically relevant phenomenon in need of further empirical investigation. The present study adds to the extant literature on the factors associated with co-occurring BPD among substance users, examining the relationships between childhood maltreatment (in the form of sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect), negative affect intensity/reactivity, emotion dysregulation, and BPD pathology (both diagnostic status and symptom count) among a sample of 76 inner-city treatment-seeking substance users. Emotion dysregulation was expected to mediate the relationships between childhood maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity (and their interaction) and BPD pathology. Results indicate that the presence of a BPD diagnosis was associated with higher levels of both childhood maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity. However, only childhood maltreatment emerged as a unique predictor of BPD diagnostic status. Conversely, both childhood maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity accounted for unique variance in the number of endorsed BPD symptoms. Moreover, emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relationships between maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity and BPD symptom count, as well as the relationship between emotional abuse in particular and BPD diagnostic status. Contrary to hypotheses, results provided no support for the interaction between maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity in the prediction of BPD pathology (diagnosis or symptom count), above and beyond the main effects of these factors.

  14. Crack users show high rates of antisocial personality disorder, engagement in illegal activities and other psychosocial problems.

    PubMed

    Paim Kessler, Felix Henrique; Barbosa Terra, Mauro; Faller, Sibele; Ravy Stolf, Anderson; Carolina Peuker, Ana; Benzano, Daniela; Pechansky, Flavio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three groups of Brazilian psychoactive substance (PAS) abuse patients (crack cocaine users, cocaine snorters, and non-cocaine PAS users) in terms of psychiatric comorbidities and severity of psychosocial problems. A cross-sectional, multi-center study was conducted at five Brazilian research centers. A total of 738 current PAS abusers seeking specialized treatment (outpatient and inpatient clinics) were assessed using the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6): 293 patients using crack cocaine were compared with 126 using powder cocaine and 319 using non-cocaine PAS (mostly alcohol and marijuana). Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed in a smaller sample (290 cases), originating from three of the centers, using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus (MINI-Plus). Crack and powder cocaine users were significantly younger than non-cocaine PAS users (31.1 ± 8.1 and 32.9 ± 8.8 vs. 42.4 ± 12, respectively; p < .001). Crack users presented a higher rate of antisocial personality disorder (25%) than powder cocaine (9%) and non-cocaine PAS users (9%), even when adjusted for confounding factors (Pr = 2.6; 95% CI 1.10-6.40). According to ASI-6 summary scores, crack users presented a significantly higher rate of occupational, family, and legal problems and reported more illegal and violent activities such as burglary and theft (23%) and threatening or assaulting (32%) than non-cocaine PAS users. Our findings, combined with the recent increase observed in the prevalence of crack use in Brazil, highlight the severity of psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial problems related to this powerful drug and corroborate the already suggested association between crack/cocaine, violence, and legal problems. Treatment programs for crack users should routinely consider the possibility of associated psychiatric comorbidities, such as antisocial personality disorder, which may affect treatment outcomes.

  15. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy–Based Text Messaging Intervention Versus Medical Management for HIV-Infected Substance Users: Study Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Kevin; Ybarra, Michele L; Reback, Cathy J; Rawson, Richard A; Chokron Garneau, Helene; Chavez, Kathryn; Venegas, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence-based psychosocial interventions for addictions and related conditions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are underutilized. Obstacles to implementation of CBT in clinical settings include limited availability of quality training, supervision, and certification in CBT for clinicians; high rates of clinician turnover and high caseloads; and limited qualifications of the workforce to facilitate CBT expertise. Objective Mobile phone–based delivery of CBT, if demonstrated to be feasible and effective, could be transformative in broadening its application and improving the quality of addiction treatment. No experimental interventions that deliver CBT targeting both drug use and medication adherence using text messaging have been previously reported; as such, the objective of this study is to develop and test an SMS-based treatment program for HIV-positive adults with comorbid substance use disorders. Methods With user input, we developed a 12-week CBT-based text messaging intervention (TXT-CBT) targeting antiretroviral (ART) adherence, risk behaviors, and drug use in a population of HIV-infected substance users. Results The intervention has been developed and is presently being tested in a pilot randomized clinical trial. Results will be reported later this year. Conclusions This investigation will yield valuable knowledge about the utility of a cost-effective, readily deployable text messaging behavioral intervention for HIV-infected drug users. PMID:27341852

  16. Ranking online quality and reputation via the user activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Guo, Qiang; Hou, Lei; Cheng, Can; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2015-10-01

    How to design an accurate algorithm for ranking the object quality and user reputation is of importance for online rating systems. In this paper we present an improved iterative algorithm for online ranking object quality and user reputation in terms of the user degree (IRUA), where the user's reputation is measured by his/her rating vector, the corresponding objects' quality vector and the user degree. The experimental results for the empirical networks show that the AUC values of the IRUA algorithm can reach 0.9065 and 0.8705 in Movielens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the traditional iterative ranking methods. Meanwhile, the results for the synthetic networks indicate that user degree should be considered in real rating systems due to users' rating behaviors. Moreover, we find that enhancing or reducing the influences of the large-degree users could produce more accurate reputation ranking lists.

  17. Biological activity of silylated amino acid containing substance P analogues.

    PubMed

    Cavelier, F; Marchand, D; Martinez, J; Sagan, S

    2004-03-01

    The need to replace natural amino acids in peptides with nonproteinogenic counterparts to obtain new medicinal agents has stimulated a great deal of innovation on synthetic methods. Here, we report the incorporation of non-natural silylated amino acids in substance P (SP), the binding affinity for the two hNK-1 binding sites and, the potency to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylate cyclase of the resulting peptide. We also assess the improvement of their stability towards enzyme degradation. Altogether, we found that replacing glycine with silaproline (Sip) in position 9 of SP leads to a potent analogue exhibiting an increased resistance to angiotensin-converting enzyme hydrolysis.

  18. The influence of certain plant substances and their chemopreventive activity in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kujawski, Radosław; Dziekan, Karolina; Wolski, Hubert; Barlik, Magdalena; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2015-06-01

    A steadily growing number of studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of plant-derived substances (preparations) on the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for ovarian cancer. A prior or parallel application of plant-derived substances and chemotherapy could be the way to strengthen the classic pharmacological treatment. Our paper presents several plant-derived substances with proven antiproliferative activities, in which phenolic and flavonoid bioactive compounds dominate, with particular emphasis on ovarian cancer cells. We are of the opinion that our paper will contribute to better understanding of the molecular basis for the positive interaction effect of concomitant application of the abovementioned plant substances with certain cytostatics. Also, this work may increase the number of preclinical in vivo experiments using these and other phenolic, flavonoid-rich plant substances to better understand their efficacy and safety and, in the future, to initiate clinical trials in this field.

  19. Evaluation of activity monitors in manual wheelchair users with paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Ding, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of SenseWear® (SW) and RT3 activity monitors (AMs) in estimating energy expenditure (EE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with paraplegia for a variety of physical activities. Methods Twenty-four subjects completed four activities including resting, wheelchair propulsion, arm-ergometry exercise, and deskwork. The criterion EE was measured by a K4b2 portable metabolic cart. The EE estimated by the SW and RT3 were compared with the criterion EE by the absolute differences and absolute percentage errors. Intraclass correlations and the Bland and Altman plots were also used to assess the agreements between the two AMs and the metabolic cart. Correlations between the criterion EE and the estimated EE and sensors data from the AMs were evaluated. Results The EE estimation errors for the AMs varied from 24.4 to 125.8% for the SW and from 22.0 to 52.8% for the RT3. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the criterion EE and the EE estimated by the two AMs for each activity and all activities as a whole were considered poor with all the ICCs smaller than 0.75. Except for deskwork, the EE from the SW was more correlated to the criterion EE than the EE from the RT3. Conclusion The results indicate that neither of the AMs is an appropriate tool for quantifying physical activity in MWUs with paraplegia. However, the accuracy of EE estimation could be potentially improved by building new regression models based on wheelchair-related activities. PMID:21528634

  20. Semipurification and ice recrystallization inhibition activity of ice-active substances associated with Antarctic photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J A; Fritsen, C H

    2001-08-01

    Ice-active substances (IASs), i.e., macromolecular substances that modify the shape of growing ice crystals, were previously found to be associated with various terrestrial and aquatic photosynthetic organisms from Antarctica, but their chemical nature and function are unknown. In this study, we used the ice-binding properties of the IASs to semipurify IASs from a cyanobacterial mat, a eukaryotic green alga (Prasiola sp.), and a moss (Bryum sp.) and examined the ice recrystallization inhibition (RI) activities of the semipure materials. The semipure materials contain both protein and carbohydrate in which the carbohydrate accounted for 73, 52, and 37%, respectively, of the total carbohydrate + protein. The IASs had RI activity at concentrations of 1.4, 0.05, and 0.01 microg ml-1, respectively. RI activity was greatly reduced by heat treatment, suggesting that the IASs inhibit recrystallization through a specific interaction with ice. These results raise the possibility that the IASs increase freezing tolerance of their respective organisms by preventing the recrystallization of ice.

  1. Plasma Concentrations of BDNF and IGF-1 in Abstinent Cocaine Users with High Prevalence of Substance Use Disorders: Relationship to Psychiatric Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Araos, Pedro; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Barrios, Vicente; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie Ann; Argente, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael; Santín, Luis Javier; Villanúa, María Ángeles; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified biomarkers related to the severity and pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and common comorbid psychiatric disorders. Monitoring these plasma mediators may improve the stratification of cocaine users seeking treatment. Because the neurotrophic factors are involved in neural plasticity, neurogenesis and neuronal survival, we have determined plasma concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-1 binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in a cross-sectional study with abstinent cocaine users who sought outpatient treatment for cocaine (n = 100) and age/body mass matched controls (n = 85). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview ‘Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders’. Plasma concentrations of these peptides were not different in cocaine users and controls. They were not associated with length of abstinence, duration of cocaine use or cocaine symptom severity. The pathological use of cocaine did not influence the association of IGF-1 with age observed in healthy subjects, but the correlation between IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 was not significantly detected. Correlation analyses were performed between these peptides and other molecules sensitive to addiction: BDNF concentrations were not associated with inflammatory mediators, lipid derivatives or IGF-1 in cocaine users, but correlated with chemokines (fractalkine/CX3CL1 and SDF-1/CXCL12) and N-acyl-ethanolamines (N-palmitoyl-, N-oleoyl-, N-arachidonoyl-, N-linoleoyl- and N-dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-ethanolamine) in controls; IGF-1 concentrations only showed association with IGFBP-3 concentrations in controls; and IGFBP-3 was only correlated with N-stearoyl-ethanolamine concentrations in cocaine users. Multiple substance use disorders and life-time comorbid psychopathologies were common in abstinent cocaine users. Interestingly, plasma BDNF concentrations were exclusively found to be decreased in users diagnosed

  2. Plasma concentrations of BDNF and IGF-1 in abstinent cocaine users with high prevalence of substance use disorders: relationship to psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Martín-Velasco, Ana Isabel; García-Marchena, Nuria; Araos, Pedro; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Barrios, Vicente; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie Ann; Argente, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael; Santín, Luis Javier; Villanúa, María Ángeles; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified biomarkers related to the severity and pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and common comorbid psychiatric disorders. Monitoring these plasma mediators may improve the stratification of cocaine users seeking treatment. Because the neurotrophic factors are involved in neural plasticity, neurogenesis and neuronal survival, we have determined plasma concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-1 binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in a cross-sectional study with abstinent cocaine users who sought outpatient treatment for cocaine (n = 100) and age/body mass matched controls (n = 85). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview 'Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders'. Plasma concentrations of these peptides were not different in cocaine users and controls. They were not associated with length of abstinence, duration of cocaine use or cocaine symptom severity. The pathological use of cocaine did not influence the association of IGF-1 with age observed in healthy subjects, but the correlation between IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 was not significantly detected. Correlation analyses were performed between these peptides and other molecules sensitive to addiction: BDNF concentrations were not associated with inflammatory mediators, lipid derivatives or IGF-1 in cocaine users, but correlated with chemokines (fractalkine/CX3CL1 and SDF-1/CXCL12) and N-acyl-ethanolamines (N-palmitoyl-, N-oleoyl-, N-arachidonoyl-, N-linoleoyl- and N-dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-ethanolamine) in controls; IGF-1 concentrations only showed association with IGFBP-3 concentrations in controls; and IGFBP-3 was only correlated with N-stearoyl-ethanolamine concentrations in cocaine users. Multiple substance use disorders and life-time comorbid psychopathologies were common in abstinent cocaine users. Interestingly, plasma BDNF concentrations were exclusively found to be decreased in users diagnosed

  3. Adolescent Substance Use with Friends: Moderating and Mediating Effects of Parental Monitoring and Peer Activity Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Kiesner, Jeff; Poulin, François; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of using substances with friends on future individual use was examined in the context of parental monitoring rules and the ecology of peer activities. A one-year longitudinal study design included a combined sample of North Italian and French Canadian adolescents (N = 285, 53% girls, M = 14.25 years). Data analyses were conducted using structural equation modeling and multiple regression analyses. As expected, the covariation between parental monitoring and adolescent substance use was mediated by “co-use” with friends. Moreover, the relation between substance use with friends and individual substance use was moderated by parental monitoring rules and the peer activity context. Specifically, the relation between substance co-use with friends and individual substance use was stronger when the level of parental monitoring rules was low and when friends spent their time together primarily in unstructured contexts such as on the street or in park settings. These findings underline the importance of adults’ use of rules to monitor adolescents prone to substance use, and the role of context in facilitating or reducing peer influence. PMID:21165170

  4. Exploring the Link among State of Mind Concerning Childhood Attachment, Attachment in Close Relationships, Parental Bonding, and Psychopathological Symptoms in Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Musetti, Alessandro; Terrone, Grazia; Corsano, Paola; Magnani, Barbara; Salvatore, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the present study, we have explored the link among styles of attachment and psychopathology in drug users. We know that insecure attachment predisposes the individuals the development of drug-addiction and psychopathological symptoms. However, we do not know which attachment is more frequent in drug users and which is related to particular psychopathological symptoms. The aim of the present work is to explore the relationship between childhood attachment state of mind, attachment in close relationships, parental bonding and psychopathology in sample of Italian substance users. Methods: We explored, in a sample of 70 drug users and drug-addicted patients, the childhood attachment state of mind measured by the Adult Attachment Interview, the attachment in close relationships by the Relationship Questionnaire and parental bonding measured by the Parental Bonding Instrument. The Symptom Check-List-90-R (SCL-90-R) measured psychopathological symptoms. Results: We found that parental bonding, rather than state of mind concerning childhood attachment or attachment in close relationships, is related to the psychopathological manifestation of anxiety, hostility, depression, and paranoid ideation in the sample. The latter occurs frequently in our sample, independent of state of mind concerning child attachment, attachment in close relationships, and parental bonding, suggesting its role either as a factor that favors a bad image of the participants’ own relationships or as a direct effect of consuming drugs. Conclusion: These results have clinical implications on suggesting ways of interventions that prevent drug-addiction, which should include the evaluation of attachment in the prodromic phases of substance use onset or rehabilitation programs to prevent and manage psychotic-like symptoms. PMID:27555832

  5. Ice-Active Substances from the Infective Juveniles of the Freeze Tolerant Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freezing tolerant nematode, that can withstand intracellular ice formation. We investigated recrystallization inhibition, thermal hysteresis and ice nucleation activities in the infective juveniles of S. feltiae. Both the splat cooling assay and optical recrystallometry indicate the presence of ice active substances that inhibit recrystallization in the nematode extract. The substance is relatively heat stable and largely retains the recrystallization inhibition activity after heating. No thermal hysteresis activity was detected but the extract had a typical hexagonal crystal shape when grown from a single seed crystal and weak ice nucleation activity. An ice active substance is present in a low concentration, which may be involved in the freezing survival of this species by inhibiting ice recrystallization. PMID:27227961

  6. Ice-Active Substances from the Infective Juveniles of the Freeze Tolerant Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A

    2016-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freezing tolerant nematode, that can withstand intracellular ice formation. We investigated recrystallization inhibition, thermal hysteresis and ice nucleation activities in the infective juveniles of S. feltiae. Both the splat cooling assay and optical recrystallometry indicate the presence of ice active substances that inhibit recrystallization in the nematode extract. The substance is relatively heat stable and largely retains the recrystallization inhibition activity after heating. No thermal hysteresis activity was detected but the extract had a typical hexagonal crystal shape when grown from a single seed crystal and weak ice nucleation activity. An ice active substance is present in a low concentration, which may be involved in the freezing survival of this species by inhibiting ice recrystallization.

  7. Substance use disorders in Arab countries: research activity and bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders, which include substance abuse and substance dependence, are present in all regions of the world including Middle Eastern Arab countries. Bibliometric analysis is an increasingly used tool for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research productivity in the field of substance use disorders in Arab countries using bibliometric indicators. Methodology Original or review research articles authored or co-authored by investigators from Arab countries about substance use disorders during the period 1900 – 2013 were retrieved using the ISI Web of Science database. Research activity was assessed by analyzing the annual research productivity, contribution of each Arab country, names of journals, citations, and types of abused substances. Results Four hundred and thirteen documents in substance use disorders were retrieved. Annual research productivity was low but showed a significant increase in the last few years. In terms of quantity, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (83 documents) ranked first in research about substance use disorders while Lebanon (17.4 documents per million) ranked first in terms of number of documents published per million inhabitants. Retrieved documents were found in different journal titles and categories, mostly in Drug and Alcohol Dependence Journal. Authors from USA appeared in 117 documents published by investigators from Arab countries. Citation analysis of retrieved documents showed that the average citation per document was 10.76 and the h - index was 35. The majority of retrieved documents were about tobacco and smoking (175 documents) field while alcohol consumption and abuse research was the least with 69 documents. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that research in this field was largely neglected in the past. However, recent research interest was observed. Research output on tobacco and smoking was relatively high compared to other substances of abuse like illicit drugs

  8. Young adolescents' perceived activity space risk, peer networks, and substance use.

    PubMed

    Mason, Michael; Mennis, Jeremy; Way, Thomas; Light, John; Rusby, Julie; Westling, Erika; Crewe, Stephanie; Flay, Brian; Campbell, Leah; Zaharakis, Nikola; McHenry, Chantal

    2015-07-01

    Adolescent substance use is a developmentally contingent social practice that is constituted within the routine social-environment of adolescents' lives. Few studies have examined peer networks, perceived activity space risk (risk of substance use at routine locations), and substance use. We examined the moderating influence of peer network characteristics on the relationship between perceived activity space risk and substance use among a sample of 250 urban adolescents. Significant interactions were found between peer networks and perceived activity space risk on tobacco and marijuana use, such that protective peer networks reduced the effect of activity place risk on substance use. A significant 3-way interaction was found on marijuana use indicating that gender moderated peer network's effect on activity space risk. Conditional effect analysis found that boys' peer networks moderated the effect of perceived activity space risk on marijuana use, whereas for girls, the effect of perceived activity space risk on marijuana use was not moderated by their peer networks. These findings could advance theoretical models to inform social-environmental research among adolescents.

  9. Combining Users' Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    PubMed Central

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant. PMID:25856329

  10. Combining users' activity survey and simulators to evaluate human activity recognition systems.

    PubMed

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-04-08

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant.

  11. Social Network Strategies to Address HIV Prevention and Treatment Continuum of Care Among At-risk and HIV-infected Substance Users: A Systematic Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debarchana; Krishnan, Archana; Gibson, Britton; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Latkin, Carl A; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-04-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) and social network-based interventions (SNI) are important analytical tools harnessing peer and family influences critical for HIV prevention and treatment among substance users. While SNA is an effective way to measure social network influences, SNI directly or indirectly involves network members in interventions. Even though these methods have been applied in heterogeneous ways, leading to extensive evidence-based practices, systematic reviews are however, lacking. We searched five bibliographic databases and identified 58 studies involving HIV in substance users that had utilized SNA or SNI as part of their methodology. SNA was used to measure network variables as inputs in statistical/mathematical models in 64 % of studies and only 22 % of studies used SNI. Most studies focused on HIV prevention and few addressed diagnosis (k = 4), care linkage and retention (k = 5), ART adherence (k = 2), and viral suppression (k = 1). This systematic review highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of social network approaches for HIV prevention and treatment and gaps in its use for HIV care continuum.

  12. Images by the vineyard: images of addiction and substance users in the media and other culture sites/sights.

    PubMed

    Allamani, Allaman; Mattiacci, Silvia

    2015-03-01

    This article constitutes a discovery journey into the world of drinking images, the pleasures and harms related to consuming alcoholic beverages, as well as the relationships between drinking and spirituality. These aspects are described historically and globally, over time through a series of snapshots and mini-discussions about both visual and mental images from art, classical literature and operatic music.The images are interpreted according to how they represent the drinking culture within which they were created and sustained, and how they are able to involve the spectator and the user in terms of either empathizing, accepting and including or distancing, stigmatizing and marginalizing the user.

  13. Use of benzylglycinamide by a HIV-seropositive polysubstance user: The changing pattern of novel psychoactive substance use among youths.

    PubMed

    Caloro, Matteo; Calabrò, Giuseppa; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Cuomo, Ilaria; Corkery, John M; Vento, Alessandro Emiliano; Lionetto, Luana; De Filippis, Sergio; Ranieri, Valentina; Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo Alessandro; de Pisa, Eleonora; Di Tommaso, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Schifano, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    A 24-year old woman with multisubstance use since the age of 13, including opioids and cocaine, and long-standing HIV/HCV seropositivity status, presented with psychosis, agitation, and insomnia at the emergency department of a university hospital. She had been abusive and physically aggressive frequently without specific reasons and was involved in criminal legal cases. She was hospitalized twice. During her first hospital stay she experienced a brief episode of detachment from her environment, similar to episodes reportedly suffered at home. Psychosis had developed following heavy polysubstance abuse. Her mother provided sachets containing benzylglycinamide, a substance with no known psychotropic effects, which were also present in the patient's urine. She was occasionally positive for cannabinoids. She used to buy various novel psychoactive substances (NPSs) from the internet and used experimentally various substances freely made available to her by drug suppliers/dealers. She was unable to explain clearly why she was taking any of the identified NPS. She stated she was taking benzylglycinamide to calm her when smoking synthetic cannabinoids. While it appears that benzylglycinamide is not likely to constitute a novel drug of abuse, her polysubstance use exemplifies trends in NPS use patterns among the youths in the Western world and should alert mental health workers as to the possible dangers of such behavior and its reflection on social behavior and psychopathology.

  14. 75 FR 80536 - Procedures for the Surrender of Unwanted Controlled Substances by Ultimate Users; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... drug abusers) persons age 12 or older abused prescription drugs.\\2\\ \\1\\ Office of National Drug Control... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug... Ultimate Users; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice....

  15. Harms and benefits associated with psychoactive drugs: findings of an international survey of active drug users

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia JA; Noronha, Louise A; Muetzelfeldt, Mark; Fielding, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    There have been several recent efforts in the UK and the Netherlands to describe the harms of psychoactive substances based on ratings of either experts or drug users. This study aimed to assess the perceived benefits as well as harms of widely used recreational drugs, both licit and illicit, in an international sample of drug users. The survey was hosted at https://www.internationaldrugsurvey.org/ and was available in three languages. Residents reported their experience of 15 commonly used drugs or drug classes; regular users then rated their harms and benefits. In all, 5791 individuals from over 40 countries completed the survey, although the majority were from English speaking countries. Rankings of drugs differed across 10 categories of perceived benefits. Skunk and herbal cannabis were ranked consistently beneficial, whilst alcohol and tobacco fell below many classified drugs. There was no correlation at all between users’ harm ranking of drugs and their classification in schedules of the USA or ABC system in the UK. Prescription analgesics, alcohol and tobacco were ranked within the top 10 most harmful drugs. These findings suggest that neither the UK nor US classification systems act to inform users of the harms of psychoactive substances. It is hoped the results might inform health professionals and educators of what are considered to be both the harms and benefits of psychoactive substances to young people. PMID:23438502

  16. Cognitive control dysfunction and abnormal frontal cortex activation in stimulant drug users and their biological siblings

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Jones, P S; Bullmore, E T; Robbins, T W; Ersche, K D

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive and neural abnormalities are known to accompany chronic drug abuse, with impairments in cognition and changes in cortical structure seen in stimulant-dependent individuals. However, premorbid differences have also been observed in the brains and behavior of individuals at risk for substance abuse, before they develop dependence. Endophenotype research has emerged as a useful method for assessing preclinical traits that may be risk factors for pathology by studying patient populations and their undiagnosed first-degree relatives. This study used the color-word Stroop task to assess executive functioning in stimulant-dependent individuals, their unaffected biological siblings and unrelated healthy control volunteers using a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm. Both the stimulant-dependent and sibling participants demonstrated impairments in cognitive control and processing speed on the task, registering significantly longer response latencies. However, the two groups generated very different neural responses, with the sibling participants exhibiting a significant decrease in activation in the inferior frontal gyrus compared with both stimulant-dependent individuals and control participants. Both target groups also demonstrated a decrease in hemispheric laterality throughout the task, exhibiting a disproportionate increase in right hemispheric activation, which was associated with their behavioral inefficiencies. These findings not only suggest a possible risk factor for stimulant abuse of poor inhibitory control and cortical inefficiency but they also demonstrate possible adaptations in the brains of stimulant users. PMID:23673468

  17. Tobacco alkaloids and tobacco-specific nitrosamines in dust from homes of smokeless tobacco users, active smokers, and nontobacco users.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Todd P; Havel, Christopher; Metayer, Catherine; Benowitz, Neal L; Jacob, Peyton

    2015-05-18

    Smokeless tobacco products, such as moist snuff or chewing tobacco, contain many of the same carcinogens as tobacco smoke; however, the impact on children of indirect exposure to tobacco constituents via parental smokeless tobacco use is unknown. As part of the California Childhood Leukemia Study, dust samples were collected from 6 homes occupied by smokeless tobacco users, 6 homes occupied by active smokers, and 20 tobacco-free homes. To assess children's potential for exposure to tobacco constituents, vacuum-dust concentrations of five tobacco-specific nitrosamines, including N'-nitrosonornicotine [NNN] and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone [NNK], as well as six tobacco alkaloids, including nicotine and myosmine, were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We used generalized estimating equations derived from a multivariable marginal model to compare levels of tobacco constituents between groups, after adjusting for a history of parental smoking, income, home construction date, and mother's age and race/ethnicity. The ratio of myosmine/nicotine was used as a novel indicator of the source of tobacco contamination, distinguishing between smokeless tobacco products and tobacco smoke. Median dust concentrations of NNN and NNK were significantly greater in homes with smokeless tobacco users compared to tobacco-free homes. In multivariable models, concentrations of NNN and NNK were 4.8- and 6.9-fold higher, respectively, in homes with smokeless tobacco users compared to tobacco-free homes. Median myosmine/nicotine ratios were lower in homes with smokeless tobacco users (1.8%) compared to homes of active smokers (7.7%), confirming that cigarette smoke was not the predominant source of tobacco constituents in homes with smokeless tobacco users. Children living with smokeless tobacco users may be exposed to carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines via contact with contaminated dust and household surfaces.

  18. Participation in Organized Activities Protects Against Adolescents' Risky Substance Use, Even Beyond Development in Conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Kira O; Modecki, Kathryn L; Barber, Bonnie L

    2016-11-01

    Adolescents are at a significant risk for binge drinking and illicit drug use. One way to protect against these behaviors is through participation in extracurricular activities. However, there is a debate about whether highly conscientious adolescents are more likely to participate in activities, which raises the concern of a confound. To disentangle these relationships, we tested the latent trajectories of substance use and personality across 3 years, with participation in activities and sports as time-varying predictors. We surveyed 687 adolescents (55 % female, 85.4 % Caucasian) in Western Australia schools across 3 years. At Time 1, the students were in Year 10 1 (mean age 15 years). The results showed that participation in activities and conscientiousness are related, but each uniquely predicts slower growth in substance use. Across waves, participation in activities predicted less risky substance use a year later, over and above conscientiousness development. These results suggest that there may be unique benefits of participation in activities that protect against risky substance use.

  19. Activation and modulation of recombinantly expressed serotonin receptor type 3A by terpenes and pungent substances.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Paul M; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Flegel, Caroline; Herbrechter, Robin; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-11-27

    Serotonin receptor type 3 (5-HT3 receptor) is a ligand-gated ion channel that is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The receptor plays an important role in regulating peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract and in functions such as emesis, cognition and anxiety. Therefore, a variety of pharmacologically active substances target the 5-HT3 receptor to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The 5-HT3 receptors are activated, antagonized, or modulated by a wide range of chemically different substances, such as 2-methyl-serotonin, phenylbiguanide, setrones, or cannabinoids. Whereas the action of all of these substances is well described, less is known about the effect of terpenoids or fragrances on 5-HT3A receptors. In this study, we screened a large number of natural odorous and pungent substances for their pharmacological action on recombinantly expressed human 5-HT3A receptors. The receptors were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized by electrophysiological recordings using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. A screening of two odorous mixes containing a total of 200 substances revealed that the monoterpenes, thymol and carvacrol, act as both weak partial agonists and positive modulators on the 5-HT3A receptor. In contrast, the most effective blockers were the terpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as well as the pungent substances gingerol, capsaicin and polygodial. In our study, we identified new modulators of 5-HT3A receptors out of the classes of monoterpenes and vanilloid substances that frequently occur in various plants.

  20. A case study in collaborating with Atlanta-based African-American churches: a promising means for reaching inner-city substance users with rapid HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Whiters, David L; Santibanez, Scott; Dennison, David; Clark, H Westley

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined programmatic data from a federally funded faith-based rapid HIV testing initiative. In 2004, Recovery Consultants of Atlanta, Inc. (RCA, Inc.) began providing rapid HIV testing in collaboration with six Atlanta-based African-American churches. Of the 1,947 persons tested from January 2004 to July 2005, 1,872 (96.1%) were African-American, 1,247 (64%) were male, and 1,612 (82.8%) were between the age of 26 and 56. A total of 85 HIV-infected individuals were identified and 72 were identified as previously undiagnosed cases (positivity rate of 3.7%). This case study highlights and promotes rapid HIV testing offered in partnership with African American churches as a strategy for raising HIV awareness among inner-city substance users.

  1. Flocculating characteristic of activated sludge flocs: interaction between Al(3+)) and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Junxin

    2013-05-01

    Aluminum flocculant can enhance the flocculating performance of activated sludge. However, the binding mechanism of aluminum ion (Al(3+)) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in activated sludge is unclear due to the complexity of EPS. In this work, three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (3DEEM), fluorescence quenching titration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to explore the binding behavior and mechanism between Al(3+) and EPS. The results showed that two fluorescence peaks of tyrosine- and tryptophan-like substances were identified in the loosely bound-extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), and three peaks of tyrosine-, tryptophan- and humic-like substances were identified in the tightly bound-extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS). It was found that these fluorescence peaks could be quenched with Al(3+) at the dosage of 3.0 mg/L, which demonstrated that strong interactions took place between the EPS and Al(3+). The conditional stability constants for Al(3+) and EPS were determined by the Stern-Volmer equation. As to the binding mechanism, the -OH, N-H, C=O, C-N groups and the sulfur- and phosphorus-containing groups showed complexation action, although the groups in the LB-EPS and TB-EPS showed different behavior. The TB-EPS have stronger binding ability to Al(3+) than the LB-EPS, and TB-EPS play an important role in the interaction with Al(3+).

  2. Efficacy evaluation of a multifunctional cosmetic formulation: the benefits of a combination of active antioxidant substances.

    PubMed

    Gianeti, Mirela D; Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G

    2014-11-10

    This study presents the association of active antioxidants substances in a multifunctional cosmetic formulation with established efficacy against signs of aging. A multifunctional cosmetic formulation containing an association of UV filters and antioxidant substances (liposoluble vitamins A, C and E, Ginkgo biloba and Phorphyra umbilicalis extracts) was evaluated. This formulation was submitted to a clinical efficacy study using biophysics techniques and skin images analysis (digital photography imaging systems, 20 MHz ultrasound, and reflectance confocal microscopy). The volunteers applied the formulation containing the UV filters and antioxidant substances during the day and the formulation with antioxidant substances and without the UV filters at night, for 90 days. The formulation increased the hydration and protected the skin barrier function after a single application. At the long term assessment the formulation provided an improvement in skin barrier function and skin hydration to the deeper layers of the epidermis, leading to an improvement in skin appearance by reducing wrinkles and skin roughness. The multifunctional cosmetic formulation studied can be suggested to preventing signs of aging and improving skin conditions. In addition, this study presents the benefits of associating different active antioxidants substances in a single cosmetic formulation to prevent skin aging.

  3. Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Substances Isolated from Wild Berry Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abudoleh, Suha M.; Mahasneh, Adel M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Quorum Sensing (QS) is a mechanism used by bacteria to determine their physiological activities and coordinate gene expression based on cell to cell signaling. Many bacterial physiological functions are under the regulation of quorum sensing such as virulence, luminescence, motility, sporulation and biofilm formation. The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize Quorum Sensing Inhibitory (QSI) substances from epiphytic bacteria residing on wild berries surfaces. Methods: Fifty nine bacterial isolates out of 600 screened bacteria were successfully isolated. These bacteria were obtained from berry surfaces of different plants in the wild forests of Ajloun-Jordan. Screening for QSI activity using Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 monitor strain, resulted in isolating 6 isolates exhibiting QSI activity only, 11 isolates with QSI and antibacterial activity, and 42 isolates with antibacterial activity only. Three potential isolates S 130, S 153, and S 664, were gram positive rods and spore formers, catalase positive and oxidase negative. These were chosen for further testing and characterization. Results: Different solvent extraction of the QSI substances based on polarity indicated that the activity of S 130 was in the butanol extract, S 153 activity in both chloroform and butanol; and for S 664, the activity was detected in the hexane extract. The chloroform extract of S 153 and hexane extract of S 664 were proteinaceous in nature while QSI substances of the butanol extract of S 130 and S 153 were non-proteinaceous. All the tested QSI substances showed a marked thermal stability when subjected at several time intervals to 70°C, with the highest stability observed for the butanol extract of S 153. Assessing the QSI substances using violacein quantification assay revealed varying degrees of activity depending upon the extracting solvent, type of the producer bacteria and the concentration of the substances. Conclusion: This study

  4. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 1215 - Typical User Activity Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Typical User Activity Timeline C Appendix C to Part 1215 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Pt. 1215, App. C Appendix C to Part 1215—Typical User Activity...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 1215 - Typical User Activity Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Typical User Activity Timeline C Appendix C to Part 1215 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Pt. 1215, App. C Appendix C to Part 1215—Typical User Activity...

  6. Substance Use, Criminal Activity, and Mental Health among Violent and Nonviolent Rural Probationers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, J. Matthew; Dickson, Megan F.; Saman, Daniel M.; Mateyoke-Scrivner, Allison; Oser, Carrie B.; Leukefeld, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Differences between violent and nonviolent probationers were examined in the growing, yet understudied, rural probation population. Violent rural probationers had higher rates of substance use, criminal activity, and mental health symptoms than did nonviolent rural probationers. Implications for practitioners are discussed. (Contains 3 tables.)

  7. Trends of Criminal Activity and Substance Use in a Sample of Welfare Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Victoria L.; Montoya, Isaac D.; Dayton-Shotts, Cheryl A.; Carroll-Curtis, Tiffany L.; Riley, Micah A.

    2004-01-01

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 instituted a compulsory work mandate for welfare recipients. However, recipients who experience difficulties finding employment may increase their involvement in criminal activities and their frequency of substance use as a means to deal with changes precipitated…

  8. ENDOCRINE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES AND DOSE-RESPONSE FOR INDIVIDUALS AND POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine Active Substances and Dose-Response for Individuals and Populations
    Hugh A. Barton

    Abstract for IUPAC-SCOPE article

    Dose-response characteristics for endocrine disruption have been major focuses in efforts to understand potential impacts on human and ec...

  9. TRICHLOROETHYLENE ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON PRELOADED WITH HUMIC SUBSTANCES: EFFECTS OF SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. (R828157)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption by activated carbon previously loaded ("preloaded") with humic substances was found to decrease with increasing concentrations of monovalent ions (NaCl), calcium (until solubility was exceeded), or dissolved oxygen in...

  10. Peer Groups and Substance Use: Examining the Direct and Interactive Effect of Leisure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic…

  11. In vitro metabolism and bioavailability tests for the predictive toxicology of endocrine active substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legislation and prospective legislative proposals internationally (may) require that chemicals are tested for their ability to disrupt the hormonal systems of animals. Chemicals found to test positive in vitro are considered to be endocrine active substances (EAS) and may be puta...

  12. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of environmental hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop™ ?‘Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)’ was held from 31st January to 5th February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary aim of the workshop was to provide objective advice, ...

  13. Information System Security: User Authentication Protection at Central Design Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    passwords from an insider attack. One-time passwords from a smart card , token, or encrypted challenge/response dialog offered increased protection...improve user authentication procedures, such as a smart card . The June 7, 2001, Security Wire Digest reports that an attacker gained access to the

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Web-Based vs. Educator-Delivered HIV Prevention for Adolescent Substance Users: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Lisa A.; Guarino, Honoria; Grabinski, Michael J.; Syckes, Cassandra; Dillingham, Elaine T.; Xie, Haiyi; Crosier, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Young people who engage in substance use are at risk for becoming infected with HIV and diseases with similar transmission dynamics. Effective disease prevention programs delivered by prevention specialists exist but are rarely provided in systems of care due to staffing/resource constraints and operational barriers - and are thus of limited reach. Web-based prevention interventions could possibly offer an effective alternative to prevention specialist-delivered interventions and may enable widespread, cost-effective access to evidence-based prevention programming. Previous research has shown the HIV/disease prevention program within the web-based Therapeutic Education System (TES) to be an effective adjunct to a prevention specialist-delivered intervention. The present study was the first randomized, clinical trial to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of this web-based intervention as a standalone intervention relative to a traditional, prevention specialist-delivered intervention. Methods Adolescents entering outpatient treatment for substance use participated in this multi-site trial. Participants were randomly assigned to either a traditional intervention delivered by a prevention specialist (n = 72) or the web-delivered TES intervention (n = 69). Intervention effectiveness was assessed by evaluating changes in participants’ knowledge about HIV, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections, intentions to engage in safer sex, sex-related risk behavior, self-efficacy to use condoms, and condom use skills. Findings Participants in the TES intervention achieved significant and comparable increases in HIV/disease-related knowledge, condom use self-efficacy, and condom use skills and comparable decreases in HIV risk behavior relative to participants who received the intervention delivered by a prevention specialist. Participants rated TES as easier to understand. Conclusion This study indicates that TES is as effective as HIV/disease prevention

  15. Potent cough suppression by physiologically active substance in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Norio; Ito, Yushi; Ogawa, Sachie K; Maeda, Megumi; Wakita, Masahito; Takahama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Kamei, Shintaro; Hamamoto, Takayoshi; Umehashi, Misako; Maeda, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Human plasma contains wide variety of bioactive proteins that have proved essential in therapeutic discovery. However many human plasma proteins remain orphans with unknown biological functions. Evidences suggest that some plasma components target the respiratory system. In the present study we adapted heparin affinity chromatography to fractionate human plasma for functional bioassay. Fractions from pooled human plasma yielded particular plasma fractions with strong cough suppressing effects. Purification yielded a fraction that was finally identified as an activated blood coagulation factor fXIa using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS). The fraction almost completely suppressed coughs induced by either chemical or mechanical stimulation applied to larynx or bifurcation of guinea-pig trachea. Cough suppressing effect of the fraction and commercially available fXIa were one million times stronger than codeine and codeine only partially suppressed the mechanically triggered coughing in animal model. Recent reviews highlighted prominent shortcomings of current available antitussives, including narcotic opioids such as codeine and their unpleasant or intolerable side effects. Therefore, safer and more effective cough suppressants would be welcome, and present findings indicate that fXIa in human plasma as a very promising, new therapeutic candidate for effective antitussive action.

  16. White matter integrity as a link in the association between motivation to abstain and treatment outcome in adolescent substance users.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tammy; Pajtek, Stefan; Clark, Duncan B

    2013-06-01

    Readiness to change constitutes an important treatment target. This study examined white matter (WM) integrity as a possible link in the pathway between motivation to abstain and treatment outcome. Adolescents (age 14-18 years, n = 32) were recruited from intensive outpatient (IOP) substance use treatment and reported on motivation to abstain from alcohol and marijuana shortly after treatment admission (i.e., at baseline). Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected approximately 7 weeks after starting IOP and were used to quantify WM integrity (indexed by fractional anisotropy, FA) using a region of interest (ROI) approach. Treatment outcomes were assessed 6 months after baseline. Indirect effects analyses tested FA in prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal ROIs as a linking variable in the pathway from motivation to abstain to alcohol and marijuana outcomes. Bivariate correlations indicated that greater motivation to abstain from alcohol was associated with lower FA in prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal ROIs and that lower FA in these three ROIs was associated with greater 6-month alcohol problem severity. The indirect effect of FA was significant for the prefrontal ROI in the pathway from motivation to outcome for alcohol. FA values were not associated with motivation to abstain from marijuana or marijuana-related outcomes. Results suggest that lower WM integrity, particularly in the prefrontal brain region, may help to explain greater alcohol problem severity at 6 months despite higher motivation to abstain from alcohol. Interventions that aim to enhance WM integrity warrant attention to improve adolescent treatment outcomes.

  17. Subcortical grey matter alterations in cocaine dependent individuals with substance-induced psychosis compared to non-psychotic cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Willi, Taylor S; Lang, Donna J; Honer, William G; Smith, Geoff N; Thornton, Allen E; Panenka, William J; Procyshyn, Ric M; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Su, Wayne; Vertinsky, A Talia; Leonova, Olga; Rauscher, Alexander; MacEwan, G William; Barr, Alasdair M

    2016-10-01

    After prolonged psychostimulant abuse, transient psychotic symptoms referred to as "substance-induced psychosis" (SIP) can develop - closely resembling symptoms observed in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The comparability in psychotic presentation between SIP and schizophrenias suggests that similar underlying neural deficits may contribute to the expression of psychosis across these disorders. To date, neuroanatomical characterization of grey matter structural alterations in SIP has been limited to methamphetamine associated psychosis, with no studies controlling for potential neurotoxic effects of the psychostimulant that precipitates psychosis. To investigate grey matter subcortical alterations in SIP, a voxel-based analysis of magnetic resonance images (MRI) was performed between a group of 74 cocaine dependent nonpsychotic individuals and a group of 29 individuals with cocaine-associated psychosis. The cocaine-associated psychosis group had significantly smaller volumes of the thalamus and left hippocampus, controlling for age, total brain volume, current methamphetamine dependence, and current marijuana dependence. No differences were present in bilateral caudate structures. The findings of reduced thalamic and hippocampal volumes agree with previous reports in the schizophrenia literature, suggesting alterations of these structures are not specific to schizophrenia, but may be common to multiple forms of psychosis.

  18. Patterns of Substance Use and Correlates of Lifetime and Active Injection Drug Use Among Women in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Loeliger, Kelsey B.; Marcus, Ruthanne; Pillai, Veena; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background While drug use is associated with HIV risk in Southeast Asia, little is known about substance use behaviors among women, including drug injection. Objectives To describe patterns of substance use among women using alcohol and drugs in Malaysia and identify correlates of lifetime and active drug injection, a risk factor for HIV transmission. Methods A survey of 103 women who used drugs in the last 12 months assessed drug use history and frequency, including drug injection and drug use during pregnancy, self-reported HIV-status, childhood and adulthood physical and sexual abuse, and access to and utilization of harm reduction services, including needle-syringe exchange programs (NSEP) and opioid agonist maintenance therapy (OAT). Principal component analyses (PCA) were conducted to assess drug use grouping. Results Amphetamine-type substances (ATS; 82.5%), alcohol (75.7%) and heroin (71.8%) were the most commonly used drugs across the lifetime. Drug injection was reported by 32.0% (n=33) of participants with 21.4% (n=22) having injected in the last 30 days. PCA identified two groups of drug users: opioids/benzodiazepines and club drugs. Lifetime drug injection was significantly associated with lower education, homelessness, prior criminal justice involvement, opioid use, polysubstance use, childhood physical and sexual abuse, and being HIV-infected, but not with prior OAT. Conclusion Women who use drugs in Malaysia report high levels of polysubstance use and injection-related risk behaviors, including sharing of injection equipment and being injected by others. Low OAT utilization suggests the need for improved access to OAT services and other harm reduction measures that prioritize women. PMID:26636885

  19. Reliability of the TTC approach: learning from inclusion of pesticide active substances in the supporting database.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Alexandre; Pinalli, Roberta; Giannetto, Marco; Barlow, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Data on pesticide active substances were used to assess the reliability of the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) approach. Pesticides were chosen as a robust test because of their potential for toxicity. 328 pesticide substances were classified on the basis of their chemical structure, according to the generic scheme proposed by the European Food Safety Authority. 43 carbamates and organophosphates were allocated to the group for neurotoxicity alerts, and 279 substances to Cramer structural Class III. For Class III, the 5th percentile value as calculated from the cumulative distribution curve of the no-observed-effect levels (0.20 mg/kg bw per day), was slightly higher than that determined by Munro (0.15 mg/kg bw per day) from his original database. The difference is explained by the inclusion of carbamates and organophosphates in Munro's Class III. Consideration of the acceptable daily intakes and their underlying toxicity data showed that the TTC approach is conservative for 96.2% of the substances. Overall, this analysis gives added support to the utility of the generic scheme of application of the TTC approach for hazard assessment of substances for which few or no experimental toxicity data are available. A convenient alternative to the Cramer decision tree is proposed.

  20. [Amphibian skin secretions as a new source of antibiotics and biologically active substances].

    PubMed

    Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Zasadowski, Arkadiusz; Bronowicka-Szydełko, Agnieszka; Dzierzba, Katarzyna; Seweryn, Ewa; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Gamian, Andrzej

    2009-11-12

    So far, the main sources of biologically active substances used in medicine have been plants, molds, and propolis. The obtained compounds have either therapeutic features or require additional modification. They are sometimes combined with other pharmacological substances to intensify their therapeutic effect. However, the effectiveness of many drugs has been rapidly decreasing.The overuse of antibiotics in the treatment and prophylaxis of human infections (especially in hospitals) as well as their widespread and often unjustified use in the treatment and prophylaxis of farm animal illnesses contribute to the development of a variety of resistance mechanisms by microorganisms. Because of the increasing ineffectiveness of antibiotics used so far and difficulties in obtaining new drugs, it is necessary to find new sources of these compounds, for example in animal organisms. Research has demonstrated that amphibian skin secretions are rich in a variety of active substances which have strong pharmacological properties. In these compounds we can distinguish, for example, toxins, antimicrobial peptides, opioid peptides, steroids, and alkaloids.These compounds show cytotoxic, antimicrobial, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and even antiviral activities (including anti-HIV). These substances can be used in cell receptor studies and in transmembrane ion transport analysis. Because these compounds are secreted by skin glands,they can be easy obtained without injuring these animals. It is probable that amphibian skin constitutes a potential source of modern drugs.

  1. Nimbolide B and nimbic acid B, phytotoxic substances in neem leaves with allelopathic activity.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Salam, Md Abdus; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2014-05-26

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) has been widely used as a traditional medicine and several bioactive compounds have been isolated from this species, but to date no potent allelopathic active substance has been reported. Therefore, we investigated possible allelopathic property and phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity in neem. An aqueous methanol extract of neem leaves inhibited the growth of roots and shoots of cress, lettuce, alfalfa, timothy, crabgrass, ryegrass, barnyard grass and jungle rice. The extracts were then purified by several chromatographic runs while monitoring the inhibitory activity and two phytotoxic substances were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to correspond to novel compounds, nimbolide B (1) and nimbic acid B (2). Nimbolide B inhibited the growth of cress and barnyard grass at concentrations greater than 0.1‒3.0 μM. Nimbic acid B inhibited the growth of cress and barnyard grass at concentrations greater than 0.3-1.0 μM. These results suggest that nimbolide B and nimbic acid B may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by neem leaves.

  2. Bioactive cotton fabrics containing chitosan and biologically active substances extracted from plants.

    PubMed

    Mocanu, G; Nichifor, M; Mihai, D; Oproiu, L C

    2013-01-01

    The paper studies the obtaining of bioactive textiles using chitosan-coated fabrics, in which biologically active substances contained by Viola Tricolor (VT) - an extract of three Viola species (Violaceae) - were immobilized. Chitosan was applied on cotton fabric or on chemically modified cotton (having reactive -CHO or carboxymethyl groups), as tripolyphosphate (TPP) crosslinked fine particles, or by use of glutaraldehyde crosslinking agent. The amount of VT retained on the fabrics was found to depend on the procedure of chitosan application on the cotton. The obtained bioactive textiles are expected to have antioxidant activity due to the biologically active substances from VT; they can be used for obtaining clothes for people with allergies or other skin problems, assuring a controlled release of biomolecules. The study focuses on the in vitro release of VT retained on the fabrics, as well as on its antioxidant activity.

  3. Modeling users' activity on Twitter networks: validation of Dunbar's number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Bruno; Perra, Nicola; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Microblogging and mobile devices appear to augment human social capabilities, which raises the question whether they remove cognitive or biological constraints on human communication. In this paper we analyze a dataset of Twitter conversations collected across six months involving 1.7 million individuals and test the theoretical cognitive limit on the number of stable social relationships known as Dunbar's number. We find that the data are in agreement with Dunbar's result; users can entertain a maximum of 100-200 stable relationships. Thus, the ``economy of attention'' is limited in the online world by cognitive and biological constraints as predicted by Dunbar's theory. We propose a simple model for users' behavior that includes finite priority queuing and time resources that reproduces the observed social behavior.

  4. Modeling users' activity on twitter networks: validation of Dunbar's number.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Perra, Nicola; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Microblogging and mobile devices appear to augment human social capabilities, which raises the question whether they remove cognitive or biological constraints on human communication. In this paper we analyze a dataset of Twitter conversations collected across six months involving 1.7 million individuals and test the theoretical cognitive limit on the number of stable social relationships known as Dunbar's number. We find that the data are in agreement with Dunbar's result; users can entertain a maximum of 100-200 stable relationships. Thus, the 'economy of attention' is limited in the online world by cognitive and biological constraints as predicted by Dunbar's theory. We propose a simple model for users' behavior that includes finite priority queuing and time resources that reproduces the observed social behavior.

  5. Ranking of hair dye substances according to predicted sensitization potency: quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Søsted, H; Basketter, D A; Estrada, E; Johansen, J D; Patlewicz, G Y

    2004-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis following the use of hair dyes is well known. Many chemicals are used in hair dyes and it is unlikely that all cases of hair dye allergy can be diagnosed by means of patch testing with p-phenylenediamine (PPD). The objectives of this study are to identify all hair dye substances registered in Europe and to provide their tonnage data. The sensitization potential of each substance was then estimated by using a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model and the substances were ranked according to their predicted potency. A cluster analysis was performed in order to help select a number of chemically diverse hair dye substances that could be used in subsequent clinical work. Various information sources, including the Inventory of Cosmetics Ingredients, new regulations on cosmetics, data on total use and ChemId (the Chemical Search Input website provided by the National Library of Medicine), were used in order to identify the names and structures of the hair dyes. A QSAR model, developed with the help of experimental local lymph node assay data and topological sub-structural molecular descriptors (TOPS-MODE), was used in order to predict the likely sensitization potential. Predictions for sensitization potential were made for the 229 substances that could be identified by means of a chemical structure, the majority of these hair dyes (75%) being predicted to be strong/moderate sensitizers. Only 22% were predicted to be weak sensitizers and 3% were predicted to be extremely weak or non-sensitizing. Eight of the most widely used hair dye substances were predicted to be strong/moderate sensitizers, including PPD - which is the most commonly used hair dye allergy marker in patch testing. A cluster analysis by using TOPS-MODE descriptors as inputs helped us group the hair dye substances according to their chemical similarity. This would facilitate the selection of potential substances for clinical patch testing. A patch-test series

  6. A software for managing after-hours activities in research user facilities

    DOE PAGES

    Camino, F. E.

    2017-05-01

    Here, we present an afterhours activity management program for shared facilities, which handles the processes required for afterhours access (request, approval, extension, etc.). It implements the concept of permitted afterhours activities, which consists of a list of well-defined activities that each user can perform afterhours. The program provides an easy and unambiguous way for users to know which activities they are allowed to perform afterhours. In addition, the program can enhance its safety efficacy by interacting with lab and instrument access control systems commonly present in user facilities.

  7. A phytotoxic active substance in the decomposing litter of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2015-03-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific stands throughout the temperate to tropical Asia. The objective of this study was the investigation of allelopathic property and substances of the decomposing litter of the fern to evaluate the possible involvement of its allelopathy in the domination. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica litter inhibited the growth of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum). This result suggests that G. japonica litter contains growth inhibitory substances. The extract was purified by chromatography while monitoring the inhibitory activity, and a growth inhibitory substance was isolated. The chemical structure of the substance was determined by spectral data to be a novel compound, 13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool. This compound inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress and barnyard grass at concentrations ranging from 89.7 to 271 μM for 50% inhibition. In addition, the compound had potent growth inhibitory activity with the soil taken from near the colony. The concentration of the compound in soil under a pure colony of G. japonica was 790 μM, suggesting that the compound may contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this fern.

  8. Active-learning Strategies for Legal Topics and Substance Abuse in a Pharmacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Steinhardt, Sarah J; Clark, John E; Kelly, William N; Hill, Angela M

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To implement active-learning strategies to engage students in learning, applying, and teaching legal and substance abuse topics. Design. Medication Safety course student groups created films on a National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG) using a movie genre and presented them in film festival format. Pharmacogenomics course student groups taught ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) topics through presentation of short stories about comic book characters with genetic mutations. Students in the Drugs of Abuse course composed and performed dances depicting the mechanism of action of a drug in an in-class rave dance format. Assessment. Course evaluations revealed student engagement with subject material and enjoyment of the creative applications, critical thinking, and collaborative aspects of the activities. Students performed well on examination questions and graded assignments. Conclusion. These active-learning strategies facilitated students' abilities to learn, apply, and teach material in medication safety, pharmacogenomics, and substance abuse courses.

  9. Active-learning Strategies for Legal Topics and Substance Abuse in a Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Clark, John E.; Kelly, William N.; Hill, Angela M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To implement active-learning strategies to engage students in learning, applying, and teaching legal and substance abuse topics. Design. Medication Safety course student groups created films on a National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG) using a movie genre and presented them in film festival format. Pharmacogenomics course student groups taught ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) topics through presentation of short stories about comic book characters with genetic mutations. Students in the Drugs of Abuse course composed and performed dances depicting the mechanism of action of a drug in an in-class rave dance format. Assessment. Course evaluations revealed student engagement with subject material and enjoyment of the creative applications, critical thinking, and collaborative aspects of the activities. Students performed well on examination questions and graded assignments. Conclusion. These active-learning strategies facilitated students’ abilities to learn, apply, and teach material in medication safety, pharmacogenomics, and substance abuse courses. PMID:28289294

  10. Phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity may be central to the strong invasive potential of Brachiaria brizantha.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Ai; Ohno, Osamu; Kimura, Fukiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2014-04-15

    The grass Brachiaria brizantha, native to eastern Africa, becomes naturalized and dominant quickly in the non-native areas. It was hypothesized that phytotoxic chemical interaction between this plant and native plants may play an important role in the invasion of B. brizantha. However, no potent phytotoxic substance has been reported in this species. Therefore, we investigated possible allelopathic activity and searched for phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity in B. brizantha. An aqueous methanol extract of B. brizantha inhibited the growth of roots and shoots of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), timothy (Phleum pratense) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) seedlings. The extract was purified by several chromatographic runs and three allelopathically active substances were isolated and identified by spectral analysis as (6R,9R)-3-oxo-α-ionol, (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol and 4-ketopinoresinol. (6R,9R)-3-Oxo-α-ionol and (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress at concentrations greater than 30 and 10 μM, respectively. The activity of (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol was 5.3- to 6.2-fold that of (6R,9R)-3-oxo-α-ionol. The stereochemistry of the hydroxyl group at position C-9 may be important for the inhibitory activities of those compounds. 4-Ketopinoresinol inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress at concentrations greater than 30 μM. The growth inhibitory activity of (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol was the greatest and followed by 4-ketopinoresinol and (6R,9R)-3-oxo-α-ionol. These results suggest that those phytotoxic substances may contribute to the allelopathic effect caused by B. brizantha and may be involved in the invasion of B. brizantha.

  11. Toward a typology of technology users: how older people experience technology's potential for active aging.

    PubMed

    Gjevjon, Edith Roth; Oderud, Tone; Wensaas, Gro H; Moen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines an emerging typology of older users of information and communication technology (ICT) to facilitate active aging. Through inductive data analysis from focus groups, iterative workshops, and personal interviews, we suggest three types of technology users. These types are "the Excluded," "the Entertained," and "the Networker." Clearly, ICT offers several benefits to those who are enthusiastic and frequent users, exemplified as the Entertained and the Networker. Hence, our findings support the notion of technology as a tool to maintain or increase an older person's engagement and activity level. Conversely, for those reluctant, uninterested, or incapable of using ICT, such potentials are limited and imply fewer opportunities for participation in activities.

  12. Effect of wet oxidation on the fingerprints of polymeric substances from an activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Urrea, José Luis; Collado, Sergio; Oulego, Paula; Díaz, Mario

    2016-11-15

    Thermal pre-treatments of activated sludge involve the release of a high amount of polymeric substances into the bulk medium. The molecular size of these polymers will largely define the subsequent biological treatment of the liquid effluent generated. In this work, the effects of wet oxidation treatment (WO) on the fingerprints of the polymeric substances which compose the activated sludge, were analysed. For a better understanding of these transformations, the sludge was separated into its main fractions: soluble microbial products (SMP), loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS) and naked cells, and then each one was subjected to WO separately (190 °C and 65 bar), determining the fingerprints evolution by size exclusion technique. Results revealed a fast degradation of larger molecules (over 500 kDa) during the first minutes of treatment (40 min). WO also increases the absorptive properties of proteins (especially for 30 kDa), which is possibly due to the hydroxylation of phenylalanine amino acids in their structure. WO of naked cells involved the formation of molecules between 23 and 190 kDa, which are related to the release of cytoplasmic polymers, and more hydrophobic polymers, probably from the cell membrane. The results allowed to establish a relationship between the location of polymeric material and its facility to become oxidised; thus, the more internal the polymeric material in the cell, the easier its oxidation. When working directly with the raw sludge, hydrolysis mechanisms played a key role during the starting period. Once a high degree of solubilisation was reached, the molecules were rapidly oxidised into other compounds with refractory characteristics. The final effluent after WO showed almost 90% of low molecular weight solubilised substances (0-35 kDa).

  13. The Influence of Interfering Substances on the Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Paula A; Lemos, Madalena; Mergulhão, Filipe; Melo, Luís; Simões, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Standard cleaning processes may not remove all the soiling typically found in food industry, such as carbohydrates, fats, or proteins. Contaminants have a high impact in disinfection as their presence may reduce the activity of disinfectants. The influence of alginic acid, bovine serum albumin, yeast extract, and humic acids was assessed on the antimicrobial activities of benzalkonium chloride and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide against Bacillus cereus vegetative cells and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The bacteria (single and consortium) were exposed to surfactants (single and combined) in the absence and presence of potential disinfection interfering substances. The antimicrobial effects of the surfactants were assessed based on the bacterial respiratory activity measured by oxygen uptake rate due to glucose oxidation. The tested surfactants were efficient against both bacteria (single and consortium) with minimum bactericidal concentrations ranging from 3 to 35 mg·L(-1). The strongest effect was caused by humic acids that severely quenched antimicrobial action, increasing the minimum bactericidal concentration of the surfactants on P. fluorescens and the consortium. The inclusion of the other interfering substances resulted in mild interferences in the antibacterial activity. This study clearly demonstrates that humic acids should be considered as an antimicrobial interfering substance in the development of disinfection strategies.

  14. Mechanism of anti-Vibrio activity of marine probiotic strain Bacillus pumilus H2, and characterization of the active substance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi-Yan; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Li, Er-Wei; Hou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2017-12-01

    Vibriosis is a major epizootic disease that impacts free-living and farmed fish species worldwide. Use of probiotics is a promising approach for prevention of Vibrio infections in aquaculture. A probiotic anti-Vibrio strain, Bacillus pumilus H2, was characterized, and the mechanism of its effect was investigated. All 29 Vibrio strains tested were growth-inhibited by H2. The anti-Vibrio substance present in cell-free supernatant of H2 was purified and characterized by reversed-phase HPLC. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the purified substance, determined in liquid media for various Vibrio strains, ranged from 0.5 to 64 µg/ml. Addition of the purified substance to Vibrio vulnificus culture inhibited cell growth (estimated by OD600). Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that surface structure of V. vulnificus cells was damaged by the purified substance, as reflected by presence of membrane holes, disappearance of cellular contents, and formation of cell cavities. The major mechanism of this anti-Vibrio activity appeared to involve disruption of cell membranes, and consequent cell lysis. The purified anti-Vibrio substance was shown to be structurally identical to amicoumacin A by MS and NMR analysis. Our findings indicate that B. pumilus H2 has strong potential for prevention or treatment of fish vibriosis in the aquaculture industry.

  15. Neural activation during response inhibition is associated with adolescents’ frequency of risky sex and substance use

    PubMed Central

    Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.; Houck, Jon M.; Bryan, Angela D.

    2015-01-01

    While many have identified the important role of the developing brain in youth risk behavior, few have examined the relationship between salient cognitive factors (response inhibition) and different types of real-world adolescent health risk behaviors (substance use and risky sex) within the same sample of youth. We therefore sought to examine these relationships with 95 high-risk youth (ages 14-18; M age = 16.29 years). We examined the relationship between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to an fMRI-based cognitive task designed to assess response inhibition (Go/NoGo) and past month risk behavior (number of substance use days; number of unprotected sex days). For this sample of youth, we found significant negative correlations between past month substance use and response inhibition within the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and right insula (uncorrected p < .001; extent threshold ≥ 10 voxels). In addition, in the same contrast, we found significant positive correlations between past month risky sex and activation within the right IFG and left middle occipital gyrus (uncorrected p < .001; extent threshold ≥ 10 voxels). These results suggest the particular relevance of these regions in this compelling, albeit slightly different pattern of response for adolescent substance use and risky sex. PMID:25532443

  16. "Who Has the Same Substance that I Have?": A Blueprint for Collaborative Learning Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Brian P.; Lawton, Richard G.

    1995-12-01

    Differential classification and categorization are core activities in all disciplines. Although the methods used to collect and identify information vary widely, the fundamental sameness of or difference between many types of samples is a common objective. We have developed this idea in a set of activities we call "Who Has the Same Substance that I Have?", which not only serves as a design for chemistry laboratory tasks, but also as a generic blueprint for any discipline. In our first-term chemistry laboratory course, students learn about chromatographic, spectroscopic, and chemical techniques as tools for collecting information. They work collaboratively to answer the "Who Has the Same Substance that I Have?" question for groups of powdered white solids and again for clear colorless liquids. A number of others have adapted this idea to their own context.

  17. Social Activity, School-Related Activity, and Anti-Substance Use Media Messages on Adolescent Tobacco and Alcohol Use.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Seek; Rao, Uma

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the effects of three hypothesized protective factors: social activities, school-related activities, and anti-substance use media messages on adolescent tobacco and alcohol use. Data were drawn from the "Monitoring the Future" (MTF) research project, which was conducted by the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. The sample included 2,551 twelfth-grade students. The results of the structural equation model showed that exposure to media anti-drug messages had an indirect negative effect on tobacco and alcohol use through school-related activity and social activity. The results suggest that comprehensive ecological interventions encompassing media, family, and school can increase on the preventive effects of adolescent's substance use.

  18. Search for related substances in market products containing enalapril maleate as the active principle.

    PubMed

    Pilatti, C; Ercolano, I; Torre, M C; Chiale, C; Spinetto, M

    1999-06-01

    This study's main object was the determination of substances, by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), that are related to enalapril maleate in medicinal tablets. The research was on products containing a 20 mg active principle with a 12-month delta t and on those batches near their expiration date with an enalapril maleate concentration of 10, 5, and 2.5 mg.

  19. A note on the utilization of common support activities and relapse following substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, E; Herringer, L G

    1993-01-01

    We examined the relationship between involvement with three common social support activities and abstinence rates among former patients (N = 50) of an inpatient substance abuse treatment facility. Attendance at aftercare meetings and attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous meetings were significantly related to posttreatment abstinence, whereas family participation in recovery did not, by itself, significantly predict continued abstinence. Examining these factors together, we found that the abstinence rate increased linearly as more supports were used.

  20. 77 FR 14809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Biosimilars User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Biosimilars User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA 3792 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an...

  1. A laboratory-based study of the relationship between childhood abuse and experiential avoidance among inner-city substance users: the role of emotional nonacceptance.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Kim L; Bornovalova, Marina A; Delany-Brumsey, Ayesha; Nick, Bettina; Lejuez, C W

    2007-09-01

    Despite the theorized centrality of experiential avoidance in abuse-related psychopathology, empirical examinations of the relationship between childhood abuse and experiential avoidance remain limited. The present study adds to the extant literature on this relationship, providing a laboratory-based investigation of the relationships between childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse, experiential avoidance (indexed as unwillingness to persist on 2 psychologically distressing laboratory tasks), and self-reported emotional nonacceptance among a sample of 76 inner-city treatment-seeking substance users. As hypothesized, results provide evidence for heightened experiential avoidance and emotional nonacceptance among individuals with moderate-severe sexual, physical, and emotional abuse (compared to individuals reporting none-low abuse). However, although emotional nonacceptance was associated with increased risk for experiential avoidance, it mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and experiential avoidance only for emotional abuse. As such, results suggest that one mechanism through which emotional abuse in particular leads to experiential avoidance is emotional nonacceptance. Findings suggest the utility of interventions aimed at decreasing experiential avoidance and promoting emotional acceptance among abused individuals.

  2. Understanding the heterogeneity of BPD symptoms through latent class analysis: initial results and clinical correlates among inner-city substance users.

    PubMed

    Bornovalova, Marina A; Levy, Roy; Gratz, Kim L; Lejuez, C W

    2010-06-01

    The current study investigated the heterogeneity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms in a sample of 382 inner-city, predominantly African American male substance users through the use of latent class analysis. A 4-class model was statistically preferred, with 1 class interpreted to be a baseline class, 1 class interpreted to be a high-BPD class, and 2 classes interpreted as intermediate classes. As a secondary goal, we examined the resulting BPD classes with respect to relevant clinical correlates, including temperamental vulnerabilities (affective instability, impulsivity, and interpersonal instability), childhood emotional abuse, drug choice, and co-occurring mood and anxiety disorders. The high-BPD class evidenced the highest levels of the temperamental vulnerabilities and environmental stressors, the baseline class evidenced the lowest levels, and the 2 intermediate classes fell in between. In addition, the high-BPD class had a higher probability of cocaine and alcohol dependence, as well as mood and anxiety disorders, than did the baseline class. Rates of alcohol use and mood disorders for the intermediate classes fell in between the high-BPD and the baseline classes. Results are discussed in relation to the current diagnostic conceptualization of BPD.

  3. Measuring collaboration and integration activities in criminal justice and substance abuse treatment agencies.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Bennett; Lehman, Wayne; Wexler, Harry; Melnick, Gerald; Taxman, Faye; Young, Douglas

    2009-08-01

    Individuals with substance abuse problems who are involved in the criminal justice system frequently need community-based drug and alcohol abuse treatment and other services. To reduce the risk of relapse to illicit drugs and criminal recidivism, criminal justice agencies may need to establish collaborations with substance abuse treatment and other community-based service providers. Although there are many variations of interorganizational relationships, the nature of these interagency collaborations among justice agencies and treatment providers has received little systematic study. As a first step,we present an instrument to measure interagency collaboration and integration activities using items in the National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices Surveys conducted as part of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies(CJ-DATS). Collaboration and integration activities related to drug-involved offenders were examined between substance abuse treatment providers, correctional agencies, and the judiciary. The measurement scale reliably identified two levels of collaboration: less structured, informal networking and coordination and more structured and formalized levels of cooperation and collaboration. An illustration of the use of the systems integration tool is presented.

  4. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior and Substance Use among Adolescents in Slovenian Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    LESJAK, Vesna; STANOJEVIĆ-JERKOVIĆ, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies of the relationship between leisure time physical activity, sedentary behaviour and substance use among adolescents report contradictory results. The aim of our study was to examine the association between self-reported leisure time physical activity, sedentary behaviour and alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use among adolescents in Slovenia. Methods Subjects consisted of 822 school children aged from 14 to 16 years, living in urban area of Ljubljana and Maribor. The data was collected using the EURO URHIS 2 survey. Logistic regressions were conducted to assess the correlation between the independent variables of physical activity; time spent watching television and using the computer, and each of the five substance use dependent variables. Results Frequency of daily smoking was significantly associated with leisure time physical activity, while alcohol and cannabis use were not. Watching TV ≥ 2 hours per day was associated with heavy episodic drinking in the past month, no associations were found for smoking and cannabis use. Using the computer ≥ 2 hours per day was positively associated with daily smoking, drinking alcohol in the past month, heavy episodic drinking in the past month and ever being intoxicated, while cannabis use was not. Conclusions These findings suggest that leisure time physical activity is associated with daily cigarette smoking, and leisure time sedentary behaviour is associated with alcohol and tobacco use among adolescents. The results of our study show the need for the formation of suitable preventive measures concerning reduced sitting time as well as leisure time physical activity targeted to adolescents. PMID:27646724

  5. Detection of physical activities using a physical activity monitor system for wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Intille, Stephen S; Kelleher, Annmarie; Cooper, Rory A; Ding, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Availability of physical activity monitors for wheelchair users can potentially assist these individuals to track regular physical activity (PA), which in turn could lead to a healthier and more active lifestyle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate algorithms for a physical activity monitoring system (PAMS) to detect wheelchair based activities. The PAMS consists of a gyroscope based wheel rotation monitor (G-WRM) and an accelerometer device (wocket) worn on the upper arm or on the wrist. A total of 45 persons with spinal cord injury took part in the study, which was performed in a structured university-based laboratory environment, a semi-structured environment at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games, and in the participants' home environments. Participants performed at least ten PAs, other than resting, taken from a list of PAs. The classification performance for the best classifiers on the testing dataset for PAMS-Arm (G-WRM and wocket on upper arm) and PAMS-Wrist (G-WRM and wocket on wrist) was 89.26% and 88.47%, respectively. The outcomes of this study indicate that multi-modal information from the PAMS can help detect various types of wheelchair-based activities in structured laboratory, semi-structured organizational, and unstructured home environments.

  6. Amygdala Activation and Emotional Processing in Adolescents at Risk for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Dawn L.; Pajtek, Stefan; Tarter, Ralph; Long, Elizabeth C.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2011-01-01

    Studies are needed that examine neurobiological characteristics in high risk individuals prior to substance use disorder (SUD) development. In this pilot study, 4 adolescent subjects at high risk (having at least 1 parent with a SUD) for SUD were compared with 4 adolescent reference subjects on a corticolimbic reactivity paradigm, where they were presented with affect-laden faces or geometric shapes. FMRI was used to measure cortical activation in response to these stimuli. High risk subjects, compared to low risk, exhibited greater left amygdala activation (t=3.60, df=6, p=0.01), suggesting they may exhibit hyper-responsivity of the amygdala in response to emotional stimuli. PMID:24748761

  7. Abnormal Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activity in Heavy Cannabis Users During Conscious Emotional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lile, Joshua A.; Hanlon, Colleen A.; Porrino, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Long-term heavy cannabis users (cannabis users) who are not acutely intoxicated have diminished subconscious neural responsiveness to affective stimuli. Objective This study sought to determine if abnormal processing extends to the conscious evaluation of emotional stimuli. Methods Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to examine brain activity as cannabis users (N=16) and non-cannabis using controls (N=17) evaluated and categorized standardized International Affective Picture System (IAPS) stimuli. Individual judgments were used to isolate activity during the evaluation of emotional (i.e., emotional evaluation) or neutral (i.e., neutral evaluation) stimuli. Within- and between-group analyses were performed. Results Both groups judged the same stimuli as emotional and had activations in visual, midbrain, and middle cingulate cortices during emotional evaluation, relative to neutral. Within-group analyses also revealed amygdalar and inferior frontal gyrus activations in controls, but not cannabis users, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) deactivations in cannabis users, but not controls, during emotional evaluation, relative to neutral. Between-group comparisons found that mPFC activity during positive and negative evaluation was significantly hypoactive in cannabis users, relative to controls. Conclusions Abnormal neural processing of affective content extends to the level of consciousness in cannabis users. The hypoactive mPFC responses observed resembles the attenuated mPFC responses found during increased non-affective cognitive load in prior research. These findings suggest that abnormal mPFC singling in cannabis users during emotional evaluation might be associated with increased non-affective cognitive load. PMID:26690589

  8. Dissemination activities: a critical new role for substance abuse treatment organizations.

    PubMed

    Fields, Dail; Blum, Terry C; Roman, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for integration of substance abuse treatment into medical care via medical homes and continuing specialty care. For this integration to occur in the substance abuse treatment field, substantial sharing and dissemination of information by treatment providers is required. This study explored the determinants of organizational activities directed at disseminating evidence-based practices (EBPs) undertaken by 193 community treatment programs who are members of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network. Using factor analysis, the research identified two generic categories reflecting different motivations for dissemination activities and explored both treatment center leadership and organizational characteristics as determinants of these different types of dissemination activities. Organizational characteristics predicting treatment center dissemination activities included size, previous involvement in research protocols, linkages with other providers, and having non-profit status. The treatment center leader's membership in professional organizations was also a significant determinant. Organization variables account for a larger portion of the variance in treatment center dissemination activities. The results suggest that the willingness of treatment providers to help disseminate EBPs within the industry may be heavily influenced through shared network connections with other treatment organizations.

  9. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Marcelo; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70–95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early nineteenth century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next two decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin, and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity. PMID:26483815

  10. Dissemination Activities: A Critical New Role for Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Terry C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for integration of substance abuse treatment into medical care via medical homes and continuing specialty care. For this integration to occur in the substance abuse treatment field, substantial sharing and dissemination of information by treatment providers is required. This study explored the determinants of organizational activities directed at disseminating evidence-based practices (EBP) undertaken by 193 community treatment programs who are members of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network. Using factor analysis, the research identified two generic categories reflecting different motivations for dissemination activities, and explored both treatment center leadership and organizational characteristics as determinants of these different types of dissemination activities. Organizational characteristics predicting treatment center dissemination activities included size, previous involvement in research protocols, linkages with other providers, and having non-profit status. The treatment center leader's membership in professional organizations was also a significant determinant. Organization variables account for a larger portion of the variance in treatment center dissemination activities. The results suggest that the willingness of treatment providers to help disseminate EBPs within the industry may be heavily influenced through shared network connections with other treatment organizations. PMID:24722825

  11. High altitude simulation, substance P and airway rapidly adapting receptor activity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, R; Yasir, A; Vashisht, A; Kulshreshtha, R; Singh, S B; Ravi, K

    2011-09-15

    To investigate whether there is a change in airway rapidly adapting receptor (RAR) activity during high altitude exposure, rabbits were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure, 429 mm Hg). With 12 h exposure, when there was pulmonary congestion, an increase in basal RAR activity was observed. With 36 h exposure, when there was alveolar edema, there was a further increase in basal RAR activity. In these backgrounds, there was an increase in the sensitivity of the RARs to substance P (SP). To assess whether there was an increase in lung SP level, neutral endopeptidase activity was determined which showed a decrease in low barometric pressure exposed groups. It is concluded that along with the SP released, pulmonary congestion and edema produced, respectively by different durations of low barometric pressure exposure cause a progressive increase in RAR activity which may account for the respiratory symptoms reported in climbers who are unacclimatized.

  12. Transdermal Nicotine Administration and the Electroencephalographic Activity of Substance Abusers in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Natalie A.; Tivis, Rick; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives It is widely recognized that individuals with alcohol or illicit substance abuse disorders often smoke cigarettes. However, few studies have examined the direct effects of nicotine among substance abuse subgroups. The current study examined patterns of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in alcohol-dependent (AD), stimulant-dependent (StimD), alcohol- and stimulant-dependent (ASD) participants, as well as community controls (CC). All participants were regular smokers. Methods After overnight nicotine abstinence, subjects were administered either a high (14 or 21 mg) or low (7mg) dose transdermal nicotine patch. EEG data were collected during a 2 minute eyes open and 5 minute eyes closed baseline recording session, which occurred as part of a larger study of brain electrophysiology. Results The most interesting finding was a differential pattern of nicotine dose effects by group. EEGs of Controls and ASD participants did not distinguish between high and low nicotine doses; whereas, nicotine administration in the AD and StimD groups resulted in opposite findings across a range of spectral bands. Conclusions Although further research is warranted, these results may have implications for the study of smoking cessation and attentional functioning among substance abusers in treatment. These data suggest that nicotine–related changes in neurophysiology may be associated with specific brain areas and/or specific drug histories and reinforce the need for caution in generalizing among such groups. PMID:19347067

  13. Increased activity of digoxin-like substance in low-renin hypertension in acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Soszynski, P.; Slowinska-Srzednicka, J.; Zgliczynski, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is common in acromegaly, but the pathogenesis of this complication remains unknown. To determine the role of an endogenous Na,K pump inhibitor/digoxin-like substance (DLS) in the pathogenesis of hypertension in acromegaly 76 subjects: 28 with acromegaly, 20 with essential hypertension and 28 healthy controls were studied. Serum DLS was measured with the use of radioimmunoassay and bioassay by the inhibition of digoxin-sensitive erythrocyte 86-Rb uptake. In acromegaly, the activity of DLS was significantly increased and plasma renin activity decreased in the hypertensive group, as compared with that of the normotensive group and controls. Moreover, DLS was elevated in the low-renin group of essential hypertension, as compared with that of the normal/high-renin group or controls. The activity of DLS correlated positively with mean arterial pressure and negatively with plasma renin activity, but not with growth hormone levels. In conclusion, an endogenous sodium pump inhibitor/digoxin-like substance may play a role in the pathogenesis of low-renin hypertension in acromegaly.

  14. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances.

    PubMed

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T; Biever, Ronald C; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D; Dreier, David A; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop(®) "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS-not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  15. How different types of users develop trust in technology: a qualitative analysis of the antecedents of active and passive user trust in a shared technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Le, Kim; Deitermann, Annika; Montague, Enid

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antecedents of trust in technology for active users and passive users working with a shared technology. According to the prominence-interpretation theory, to assess the trustworthiness of a technology, a person must first perceive and evaluate elements of the system that includes the technology. An experimental study was conducted with 54 participants who worked in two-person teams in a multi-task environment with a shared technology. Trust in technology was measured using a trust in technology questionnaire and antecedents of trust were elicited using an open-ended question. A list of antecedents of trust in technology was derived using qualitative analysis techniques. The following categories emerged from the antecedent: technology factors, user factors, and task factors. Similarities and differences between active users and passive user responses, in terms of trust in technology were discussed.

  16. How different types of users develop trust in technology: A qualitative analysis of the antecedents of active and passive user trust in a shared technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Le, Kim; Deitermann, Annika; Montague, Enid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antecedents of trust in technology for active users and passive users working with a shared technology. According to the prominence-interpretation theory, to assess the trustworthiness of a technology, a person must first perceive and evaluate elements of the system that includes the technology. An experimental study was conducted with 54 participants who worked in two-person teams in a multi-task environment with a shared technology. Trust in technology was measured using a trust in technology questionnaire and antecedents of trust were elicited using an open-ended question. A list of antecedents of trust in technology was derived using qualitative analysis techniques. The following categories emerged from the antecedent: technology factors, user factors, and task factors. Similarities and differences between active users and passive user responses, in terms of trust in technology were discussed. PMID:24882059

  17. Using the decision ladder to understand road user decision making at actively controlled rail level crossings.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Christine M; Salmon, Paul M; Beanland, Vanessa; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-09-01

    Rail level crossings (RLXs) represent a key strategic risk for railways worldwide. Despite enforcement and engineering countermeasures, user behaviour at RLXs can often confound expectations and erode safety. Research in this area is limited by a relative absence of insights into actual decision making processes and a focus on only a subset of road user types. One-hundred and sixty-six road users (drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians) completed a diary entry for each of 457 naturalistic encounters with RLXs when a train was approaching. The final eligible sample comprised 94 participants and 248 encounters at actively controlled crossings where a violation of the active warnings was possible. The diary incorporated Critical Decision Method probe questions, which enabled user responses to be mapped onto Rasmussen's decision ladder. Twelve percent of crossing events were non-compliant. The underlying decision making was compared to compliant events and a reference decision model to reveal important differences in the structure and type of decision making within and between road user groups. The findings show that engineering countermeasures intended to improve decision making (e.g. flashing lights), may have the opposite effect for some users because the system permits a high level of flexibility for circumvention. Non-motorised users were more likely to access information outside of the warning signals because of their ability to achieve greater proximity to the train tracks and the train itself. The major conundrum in resolving these issues is whether to restrict the amount of time and information available to users so that it cannot be used for circumventing the system or provide more information to help users make safe decisions.

  18. Screening for new antitrichomonal substances of microbial origin and antitrichomonal activity of trichostatin A.

    PubMed

    Otoguro, K; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y; Tanaka, H; Omura, S

    1988-04-01

    In vitro and in vivo screening methods for new antitrichomonal substances were established. Primary screening is based on in vitro antitrichomonal activities of culture broths of actinomycetes isolated from soil. With secondary screening, after crude materials obtained from the cultured broths were administered orally to mice, excretion of antitrichomonal activity into urine was examined. Tertiary screening was done by examining therapeutic activity for experimental trichomoniasis in mice with Trichomonas foetus. Using the screening systems, a new antibiotic (setamycin)-producing strain was picked out among about six thousands soil isolates, and the therapeutic efficacy of KM-3851, which was identified as trichostatin A, was found. It was active against T. foetus both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. [Influence of n-hexane on vascular endothelial active substances in brain tissue in mice].

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Zhang, Z Q; Zhang, C Z

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the influence of n-hexane on vascular endothelial active substances in brain tissue in mice and its significance. Methods: A total of 48 healthy Kunming mice were randomly divided into high-dose exposure group, middle-dose exposure group, low-dose exposure group, and control group, with 12 mice in each group. All groups except the control group were exposed to n-hexane via static inhalation (0.035 g/L, 0.018 g/L, and 0.009 g/L for the high-, middle-, and low-dose exposure groups, respectively) 4 hours a day for 21 days. the mice in the control groups were not exposed to n-hexane. After the exposure, the lev-els of endothelin-1 (ET-1) , nitric oxide (NO) , and angiotensin II (Ang II) in brain tissue were measured in all groups. Results: There were significant differences in the levels of ET-1, NO, and Ang II between the three ex-posure groups and the control group (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the high-and middle-dose expo-sure group had significant increases in the levels of ET-1 and Ang II and the high-dose exposure group had a sig-nificant reduction in the level of NO (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: n-Hexane can affect the vascular endothe-lial active substances in brain tissue in mice, and the changes and imbalance in vascular endothelial active sub-stances may be one of the reasons for central nervous system impairment caused by n-hexane.

  20. Study the properties of activated carbon and oxyhydroxide aluminum as sorbents for removal humic substances from natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiyan, L. N.; Machekhina, K. I.; Gryaznova, E. N.

    2016-02-01

    The present work relates to the problem of high-quality drinking water supply using processes of adsorption on activated carbon and aluminum oxyhydroxide for removal humic- type organic substances. Also the paper reports on sorbtion properties of the activeted carbon Norit SA UF and oxyhydroxide aluminum for removal humic substances. It was found out that the maximum adsorption capacity of activated carbon to organic substances is equal to 0.25 mg/mg and aluminum oxyhydroxide is equal to 0.3 mg/mg. It is shown that the maximum adsorption capacity of activated carbon Norit SA UF to iron (III) ions is equal to 0.0045 mg/mg and to silicon ions is equal to 0.024 mg/mg. Consequently, the aluminum oxyhydroxide has better adsorption characteristics in comparison with the activated carbon for removal of humic substances, iron and silicon ions. It is associated with the fact that activated carbon has a large adsorption surface, and this is due to its porous structure, but not all molecules can enter into these pores. Therefore, the fibrous structure of aluminum oxyhydroxide promotes better sorption capacity. The presented results suggest that activated carbon Norit SA UF and aluminum oxyhydroxide can be used as sorbents for removal humic substances or other organic substances from groundwater and natural waters.

  1. Examining the effect of the Life Enhancement Treatment for Substance Use (LETS ACT) on residential substance abuse treatment retention.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Gorka, Stephanie M; MacPherson, Laura; Hopko, Derek R; Blanco, Carlos; Lejuez, C W; Daughters, Stacey B

    2011-06-01

    Effective, parsimonious behavioral interventions that target reinforcement are needed for substance users with depression to improve mood as well as treatment retention. The Life Enhancement Treatment for Substance Use (LETS ACT; Daughters et al., 2008) is a behavioral activation-based approach tailored to increase levels of positive reinforcement among depressed substance users while in substance abuse treatment. The current study tested the efficacy of LETS ACT compared to a contact-time matched control condition, supportive counseling (SC), examining effects on depressed mood, substance abuse treatment retention, and behavioral activation outcomes. Fifty-eight adult substance users in residential substance abuse treatment presenting with depressive symptoms (BDI≥12) were randomly assigned to LETS ACT or SC. Assessments were administered at pre- and post-treatment and included assessment of DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses, depression severity, treatment motivation, overall activation, environmental reward, and substance abuse treatment retention. Patients in LETS ACT had significantly higher rates of substance abuse treatment retention and significantly greater increases in activation on the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) compared to those in SC. Both groups had decreased depression severity at post-treatment, although the group by time interaction was not significant. This study was the first to compare LETS ACT to a contact-time matched control treatment to evaluate effects on substance abuse treatment retention and two distinct measures of behavioral activation: overall activation and environmental reward. Findings suggest preliminary support for the feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation-based protocol that may be particularly useful to improve substance abuse treatment retention.

  2. John Henryism Active Coping as a Cultural Correlate of Substance Abuse Treatment Participation Among African American Women.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Knighton, Joi-Sheree'; Allen, Kristin; Fisher, Sycarah; Crowell, Candice; Mahaffey, Carlos; Leukefeld, Carl; Oser, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    The rates of illicit drug use among African American women are increasing, yet African American women are least likely to participate in treatment for substance use disorders when compared to women of other racial groups. The current study examined family history of substance use, perceived family support, and John Henryism Active Coping (JHAC) as correlates to seeking treatment for substance abuse. The underlying theoretical frame of JHAC (James et al., 1983) suggests that despite limited resources and psychosocial stressors, African Americans believe that hard work and self-determination are necessary to cope with adversities. The current study is a secondary data analyses of 206 drug-using African American women (N=104 urban community women with no criminal justice involvement and N=102 women living in the community on supervised probation) from urban cities in a southern state. It was expected that African American women with a family history of substance abuse, higher levels of perceived family support, and more active coping skills would be more likely to have participated in substance abuse treatment. Step-wise logistic regression results reveal that women on probation, had children, and had a family history of substance abuse were significantly more likely to report participating in substance abuse treatment. Perceived family support and active coping were significant negative correlates of participating in treatment. Implication of results suggests coping with psychosocial stressors using a self-determined and persistent coping strategy may be problematic for drug-using women with limited resources.

  3. Influence of Space-Flight Factors on the Properties of Microorganisms, Producers of Biologically Active Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikova, T. K.; Kanaeva, E. N.; Ukraintsev, A. D.; Smolyanaya, G. L.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Shcherbakov, G. Ya.

    2001-07-01

    The following substances were isolated under the influence of space-flight factors in cosmic experiments aboard the Mirorbital station: an MIB-90 monoisolant, which is distinguished by its morphological and biochemical properties and enhanced productivity, was isolated from the Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. Kurstaki var. Z-52culture, which is a producer of the plant protection agent Lepidocide; and MIA-74 and MIP-89 monoisolants, which are highly active toward heavy petroleum fractions (C23 C33), were isolated from the Arthrobacter OC-1culture, which is a producer of biodegradants for petroleum.

  4. Spectroscopic methods for the determination of surface-active substances in water (a review)

    SciTech Connect

    Subbotina, E.I.; Dedkov, Yu.M.

    1987-12-01

    Synthetic surfactants, for their ability to mingle with and transform chemicals more toxic in nature such as petroleum products, oils, pesticides, and chlorinated hydrocarbons into substances that easily permeate and move through the hydrosphere into water reservoirs and other exposure pathways, pose a grave danger to water quality control. This paper reviews predominantly the spectrophotometric procedures available for monitoring these surfactants but also discusses fluorimetric, infrared spectroscopic, and atomic absorption procedures, and compares a wide range of solvents and reagents for the extraction and preparatory activation of the surfactants.

  5. How does active substance use at psychiatric admission impact suicide risk and hospital length-of-stay?

    PubMed

    Miller, Keith A; Hitschfeld, Mario J; Lineberry, Timothy W; Palmer, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Despite their high prevalence, little is known about the effects of substance use disorders and active substance use on the suicide risk or length-of-stay of psychiatric inpatients. This study examines the relationship between active substance use at the time of psychiatric hospitalization and changes in suicide risk measures and length-of-stay. Admission and discharge ratings on the Suicide Status Form-II-R, diagnoses, and toxicology data from 2,333 unique psychiatric inpatients were examined. Data for patients using alcohol, tetrahydrocannabinol, methamphetamines, cocaine, benzodiazepines, opiates, barbiturates, phencyclidine, and multiple substances on admission were compared with data from 1,426 admissions without substance use. Patients with substance use by toxicology on admission had a 0.9 day shorter length-of-stay compared to toxicology-negative patients. During initial nurse evaluation on the inpatient unit, these patients reported lower suicide measures (i.e., suicidal ideation frequency, overall suicide risk, and wish-to-die). No significant between-group differences were seen at discharge. Patients admitted with a substance use disorder diagnosis had a 1.0 day shorter length-of-stay than those without, while those with a substance use disorder diagnosis and positive toxicology reported the lowest measures of suicidality on admission. These results remained independent of psychiatric diagnosis. For acute psychiatric inpatients, suicide risk is higher and length-of-stay is longer in patients with substance use disorders who are NOT acutely intoxicated compared with patients without a substance use disorder. Toxicology-positive patients are less suicidal on admission and improve faster than their toxicology-negative counterparts. This study gives support to the clinical observation that acutely intoxicated patients may stabilize quickly with regard to suicidal urges and need for inpatient care.

  6. Functional Activation and Effective Connectivity Differences in Adolescent Marijuana Users Performing a Simulated Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kimberly L.; Hines, Christina S.; Li, Karl; Dawes, Michael A.; Mathias, Charles W.; Dougherty, Donald M.; Laird, Angela R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adolescent marijuana use is associated with structural and functional differences in forebrain regions while performing memory and attention tasks. In the present study, we investigated neural processing in adolescent marijuana users experiencing rewards and losses. Fourteen adolescents with frequent marijuana use (>5 uses per week) and 14 nonuser controls performed a computer task where they were required to guess the outcome of a simulated coin flip while undergoing magnetic resonance imaging. Results. Across all participants, “Wins” and “Losses” were associated with activations including cingulate, middle frontal, superior frontal, and inferior frontal gyri and declive activations. Relative to controls, users had greater activity in the middle and inferior frontal gyri, caudate, and claustrum during “Wins” and greater activity in the anterior and posterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, insula, claustrum, and declive during “Losses.” Effective connectivity analyses revealed similar overall network interactions among these regions for users and controls during both “Wins” and “Losses.” However, users and controls had significantly different causal interactions for 10 out of 28 individual paths during the “Losses” condition. Conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate adolescent marijuana users have enhanced neural responses to simulated monetary rewards and losses and relatively subtle differences in effective connectivity. PMID:25692068

  7. [Liver regeneration after its mechanical injury in rats receiving biologically active substances "Trepel" and "Suvar"].

    PubMed

    Romanova, L P; Malysheva, I I

    2011-01-01

    The effect of biologically active substances (BAS) "Trepel" and "Suvar" on liver regeneration 1-30 days after its mechanical injury was studied using histological and morphometric methods in 110 rat pups aged 18 days. The control group comprised 90 animals that received no treatment following liver injury. It was shown that both BAS studied inhibited the inflammatory reaction around the injury focus, suppressed collagenogenesis and activated hepatocyte proliferation.This resulted in the significant substitution of the damaged area by the hepatocytes, that was absent in the control animals. In animals treated with BAS, the numbers of binucleated and mitotically dividing hepatocytes was increased, while the amount of hepatocytes with dystrophic changes was reduced. Authors associate the positive effect of BAS on liver structure regeneration with their growth-promoting activity, resulting in the hypertrophy of different organs, including the thyroid and the adrenal glands, that is accompanied by an excessive production of the respective hormones displaying their physiological actions.

  8. Antitumor activity of palmitic acid found as a selective cytotoxic substance in a marine red alga.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hideki; Yamashita, Uki; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Fukushi, Eri; Kawabata, Jun; Kamei, Yuto

    2002-01-01

    In a previous report, we discussed an extract from a marine red alga, Amphiroa zonata, which shows selective cytotoxic activity to human leukemic cells, but no cytotoxicity to normal human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells in vitro. In this study, we identified palmitic acid, a selective cytotoxic substance from the marine algal extract, and investigated its biological activities. At concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 micrograms/ml, palmitic acid shows selective cytotoxicity to human leukemic cells, but no cytotoxicity to normal HDF cells. Furthermore, palmitic acid induces apoptosis in the human leukemic cell line MOLT-4 at 50 micrograms/ml. Palmitic acid also shows in vivo antitumor activity in mice. One molecular target of palmitic acid in tumor cells is DNA topoisomerase I, however, interestingly, it does not affect DNA topoisomerase II, suggesting that palmitic acid may be a lead compound of anticancer drugs.

  9. The active comparator, new user study design in pharmacoepidemiology: historical foundations and contemporary application.

    PubMed

    Lund, Jennifer L; Richardson, David B; Stürmer, Til

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of biases related to selective prescribing of, and adherence to, preventive treatments has led to improvements in the design and analysis of pharmacoepidemiologic studies. One influential development has been the "active comparator, new user" study design, which seeks to emulate the design of a head-to-head randomized controlled trial. In this review, we first discuss biases that may affect pharmacoepidemiologic studies and describe their direction and magnitude in a variety of settings. We then present the historical foundations of the active comparator, new user study design and explain how this design conceptually mitigates biases leading to a paradigm shift in pharmacoepidemiology. We offer practical guidance on the implementation of the study design using administrative databases. Finally, we provide an empirical example in which the active comparator, new user study design addresses biases that have previously impeded pharmacoepidemiologic studies.

  10. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02.

    PubMed

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid.

  11. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid. PMID:27069906

  12. Perspectives on Physical Activity Among People with Multiple Sclerosis Who Are Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Rice, Ian M.; Ostler, Teresa; Rice, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS) are less physically active than those with milder forms of the disease, and wheelchair use has a negative association with physical activity participation. Thus, wheelchair users with MS are doubly disadvantaged for accruing the benefits of physical activity and exercise. Appropriate physical activity and exercise interventions are needed for this population. Methods: We undertook a qualitative study to explore the meanings, motivations, and outcomes of physical activity in wheelchair users with MS. We sought to understand daily opportunities to accumulate physical activity and exercise, and to identify perceived barriers, facilitators, and benefits that might inform the design of future interventions. Results: We interviewed 15 wheelchair users (mean age, 52 ± 8.8 years; n = 12 women). Data were transcribed and analyzed to identify and explore common themes. Our first theme was the reduced opportunity to participate in physical activity due to participants' dependence on mobility devices, environmental adaptations, and tangible support. Our second theme was the importance of incorporating physical activity and exercise into the everyday environment, highlighting the need for adaptive exercise and accessible environments. This indicated the need to incorporate behavior change modulators into physical activity and exercise interventions for those with advanced MS. Health-care professionals played an important role in promoting increased physical activity and exercise participation in those with advanced MS. Conclusions: Our findings may inform future interventions to increase initiation and maintenance of physical activity and exercise among people with advanced MS. PMID:26052256

  13. Molecular catchers for pharmacologically active substances in wastewaters, a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Valencia, P. J.; Pérez Merchancano, S. T.; Paredes, H.; Bolívar Marinez, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    A basic and pressing need in the treatment of residual waste waters for urban and rural centers is the removal of pharmacological active residues from them, these resides are originated in a wide array of domestic, agricultural and industrial sources and can't be removed in the residual waters treatment plants by conventional methods, the result is the incorporation of them into the ecosystem altering the physiology and behavior of living organisms. Among the most active pharmacological substances found in very high concentration in residual waters is paracetamol, an analgesic of very wide excessive use due to its ease of access and low cost [1]. No pharmacological substance is entirely absorbed by the human organism and therefore a wide family of molecular residues is excreted by the urinary tract. In this work we have used the AM1 (Austin Model 1), PM3 (Parametric Method 3) and ZINDO/CI semiempirical methods, from the NDO (Neglect Differential Overlap) family [2] to study and observe the structural, electronic and optical characteristics of paracetamol while immersed in different basic and acidic aqueous environments, either alone or interacting with lignosulphonates. We have previously found that lignosulphonates, a lignin derivatives of wide industrial applications, can be engineered as a binding and flocculant agent and acts as molecular catchers therefore showing the potential to be used as a mean to filter and eliminate molecular residues from the residual waters [3].

  14. The divide within: Older active ICT users position themselves against different 'Others'.

    PubMed

    Kania-Lundholm, Magdalena; Torres, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Although research into older people's internet usage patterns is rapidly growing, their understandings of digital technologies, particularly in relation to how these are informed by their understandings of aging and old age, remain unexplored. This is the case because research on older active ICT users tends to regard old age as an empirically interesting part of the life-course as opposed to a theoretically profuse source of information about why and how older people engage with digital technologies. This article explores - through focus group interviews with 30 older adults (aged 66-89) - the ways in which the social position of old age is used by older active ICT users in order to make sense of how and why they engage with these technologies. In this article, positioning theory is used to shed light on how the older people interviewed positioned themselves as 'active older users' in the interviews. The analysis brings to the fore the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against different types of ICT users and non-users (young and old) when describing how and why they engage with digital technologies.

  15. Influence of Environmental Factors on the Active Substance Production and Antioxidant Activity in Potentilla fruticosa L. and Its Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Yin, Dongxue; Li, Na; Hou, Xiaogai; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Dengwu; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors may influence types and contents of active substances. This study investigated the influence of environmental factors on the active substance contents and antioxidant activity of Potentilla fruticosa L. from different regions of China. Also, HPLC fingerprint similarity analysis (SA) coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and discriminant analysis (DA) were further introduced for the accurate classification and quality assessment of P. fruticosa. The results showed that altitude was significantly and negatively correlated to the content of tannin (P < 0.05). Annual sunshine duration and altitude were significantly and positively correlated to the flavonoids content, rutin content and antioxidant activity (P < 0.05). Annual mean temperature was significantly and negatively correlated to the content of total phenolics, while altitude was significantly and positively correlated to the content of total phenolics (P < 0.05). Eight samples were unambiguously separated into three groups. Two types of discriminant functions with a 100% discrimination ratio were constructed. All data consistently supported the conclusion that P. fruticosa produced from Kangding, Sichuan Province had high quality among all samples, therefore, Kangding in Sichuan Province with favorable environmental conditions is recommended as a preferable production location. PMID:27373366

  16. Online Social Networks That Connect Users to Physical Activity Partners: A Review and Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Passarella, Ralph Joseph; Appel, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Background The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified a lack of encouragement, support, or companionship from family and friends as a major barrier to physical activity. To overcome this barrier, online social networks are now actively leveraging principles of companion social support in novel ways. Objective The aim was to evaluate the functionality, features, and usability of existing online social networks which seek to increase physical activity and fitness among users by connecting them to physical activity partners, not just online, but also face-to-face. Methods In September 2012, we used 3 major databases to identify the website addresses for relevant online social networks. We conducted a Google search using 8 unique keyword combinations: the common keyword “find” coupled with 1 of 4 prefix terms “health,” “fitness,” “workout,” or “physical” coupled with 1 of 2 stem terms “activity partners” or “activity buddies.” We also searched 2 prominent technology start-up news sites, TechCrunch and Y Combinator, using 2 unique keyword combinations: the common keyword “find” coupled with 1 of 2 stem terms “activity partners” and “activity buddies.” Sites were defined as online social health activity networks if they had the ability to (1) actively find physical activity partners or activities for the user, (2) offer dynamic, real-time tracking or sharing of social activities, and (3) provide virtual profiles to users. We excluded from our analysis sites that were not Web-based, publicly available, in English, or free. Results Of the 360 initial search results, we identified 13 websites that met our complete criteria of an online social health activity network. Features such as physical activity creation (13/13, 100%) and private messaging (12/13, 92%) appeared almost universally among these websites. However, integration with Web 2.0 technologies such as Facebook and Twitter (9/13, 69%) and the option of

  17. 3D Brain Segmentation Using Dual-Front Active Contours with Optional User Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yezzi, Anthony; Cohen, Laurent D.

    2006-01-01

    Important attributes of 3D brain cortex segmentation algorithms include robustness, accuracy, computational efficiency, and facilitation of user interaction, yet few algorithms incorporate all of these traits. Manual segmentation is highly accurate but tedious and laborious. Most automatic techniques, while less demanding on the user, are much less accurate. It would be useful to employ a fast automatic segmentation procedure to do most of the work but still allow an expert user to interactively guide the segmentation to ensure an accurate final result. We propose a novel 3D brain cortex segmentation procedure utilizing dual-front active contours which minimize image-based energies in a manner that yields flexibly global minimizers based on active regions. Region-based information and boundary-based information may be combined flexibly in the evolution potentials for accurate segmentation results. The resulting scheme is not only more robust but much faster and allows the user to guide the final segmentation through simple mouse clicks which add extra seed points. Due to the flexibly global nature of the dual-front evolution model, single mouse clicks yield corrections to the segmentation that extend far beyond their initial locations, thus minimizing the user effort. Results on 15 simulated and 20 real 3D brain images demonstrate the robustness, accuracy, and speed of our scheme compared with other methods. PMID:23165037

  18. Integrative rodent models for assessing male reproductive toxicity of environmental endocrine active substances

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jacques; Eustache, Florence; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In the present review, we first summarize the main benefits, limitations and pitfalls of conventional in vivo approaches to assessing male reproductive structures and functions in rodents in cases of endocrine active substance (EAS) exposure from the postulate that they may provide data that can be extrapolated to humans. Then, we briefly present some integrated approaches in rodents we have recently developed at the organism level. We particularly focus on the possible effects and modes of action (MOA) of these substances at low doses and in mixtures, real-life conditions and at the organ level, deciphering the precise effects and MOA on the fetal testis. It can be considered that the in vivo experimental EAS exposure of rodents remains the first choice for studies and is a necessary tool (together with the epidemiological approach) for understanding the reproductive effects and MOA of EASs, provided the pitfalls and limitations of the rodent models are known and considered. We also provide some evidence that classical rodent models may be refined for studying the multiple consequences of EAS exposure, not only on the reproductive axis but also on various hormonally regulated organs and tissues, among which several are implicated in the complex process of mammalian reproduction. Such models constitute an interesting way of approaching human exposure conditions. Finally, we show that organotypic culture models are powerful complementary tools, especially when focusing on the MOA. All these approaches have contributed in a combinatorial manner to a better understanding of the impact of EAS exposure on human reproduction. PMID:24369134

  19. Activation of vagus nerve by semapimod alters substance P levels and decreases breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Erin, Nuray; Duymuş, Ozlem; Oztürk, Saffet; Demir, Necdet

    2012-11-10

    Chronic inflammation is involved in initiation as well as in progression of cancer. Semapimod, a tetravalent guanylhydrazon and formerly known as CNI-1493, inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines from activated macrophages and this effect is partly mediated by the vagus nerve. Our previous findings demonstrated that inactivation of vagus nerve activity as well sensory neurons enhanced visceral metastasis of 4THM breast carcinoma. Hence semapimod by activating vagus nerve may inhibit breast cancer metastasis. Here, effects of semapimod on breast cancer metastasis, the role of vagal sensory neurons on this effect and changes in mediators of the neuroimmune connection, such as substance P (SP) as well as neprilysin-like activity, were examined. Vagotomy was performed on half of the control animals that were treated with semapimod following orthotopic injection of 4THM breast carcinoma cells. Semapimod decreased lung and liver metastases in control but not in vagotomized animals with an associated increased SP levels in sensory nerve endings. Semapimod also increased neprilysin-like activity in lung tissue of control animals but not in tumor-bearing animals. This is the first report demonstrating that semapimod enhances vagal sensory nerve activity and may have anti-tumoral effects under in-vivo conditions. Further studies, however, are required to elucidate the conditions and the mechanisms involved in anti-tumoral effects of semapimod.

  20. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen’s temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home. PMID:26007738

  1. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-05-21

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  2. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 1215 - Typical User Activity Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Typical User Activity Timeline C Appendix C to Part 1215 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA...(a)) Request NASA Headquarters perform study to determine availability of TDRSS. If accepted as...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 1215 - Typical User Activity Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Typical User Activity Timeline C Appendix C to Part 1215 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA...(a)) Request NASA Headquarters perform study to determine availability of TDRSS. If accepted as...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 1215 - Typical User Activity Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Typical User Activity Timeline C Appendix C to Part 1215 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA...(a)) Request NASA Headquarters perform study to determine availability of TDRSS. If accepted as...

  5. Polyvinylpyrrolidone induced artefactual prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin times in intravenous drug users with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, A H; Bjånes, T K; Jordal, S; Leh, S; Leh, F; Svarstad, E

    2016-05-01

    Essentials Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) were found in drug users with renal failure. An oral methadone solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) had been injected intravenously. Spiking normal plasma with increasing concentrations of PVP resulted in artifically prolonged APTT. APTT prolongation may indicate PVP deposits as underlying cause in patients with renal failure.

  6. Activity-Based Costing in User Services of an Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis-Newman, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The rationale for using Activity-Based Costing (ABC) in a library is to allocate indirect costs to products and services based on the factors that most influence them. This paper discusses the benefits of ABC to library managers and explains the steps involved in implementing ABC in the user services area of an Australian academic library.…

  7. Substance P spinal signaling induces glial activation and nociceptive sensitization after fracture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Sun, Yuan; Wei, Tzuping; Clark, David J; Kingery, Wade S

    2015-01-01

    Tibia fracture in rodents induces substance P (SP)-dependent keratinocyte activation and inflammatory changes in the hindlimb, similar to those seen in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In animal pain models spinal glial cell activation results in nociceptive sensitization. This study tested the hypothesis that limb fracture triggers afferent C-fiber SP release in the dorsal horn, resulting in chronic glia activation and central sensitization. At 4 weeks after tibia fracture and casting in rats, the cast was removed and hind paw allodynia, unweighting, warmth, and edema were measured, then the antinociceptive effects of microglia (minocycline) or astrocyte (LAA) inhibitors or an SP receptor antagonist (LY303870) were tested. Immunohistochemistry and PCR were used to evaluate microglia and astrocyte activation in the dorsal horn. Similar experiments were performed in intact rats after brief sciatic nerve electric stimulation at C-fiber intensity. Microglia and astrocytes were chronically activated at 4 weeks after fracture and contributed to the maintenance of hind paw allodynia and unweighting. Furthermore, LY303870 treatment initiated at 4 weeks after fracture partially reversed both spinal glial activation and nociceptive sensitization. Similarly, persistent spinal microglial activation and hind paw nociceptive sensitization were observed at 48 hours after sciatic nerve C-fiber stimulation and this effect was inhibited by treatment with minocycline, LAA, or LY303870. These data support the hypothesis that C-fiber afferent SP signaling chronically supports spinal neuroglia activation after limb fracture and that glial activation contributes to the maintenance of central nociceptive sensitization in CRPS. Treatments inhibiting glial activation and spinal inflammation may be therapeutic for CRPS. PMID:26386297

  8. An Acute Bout of Barefoot Running Alters Lower-limb Muscle Activation for Minimalist Shoe Users.

    PubMed

    Snow, N J; Basset, F A; Byrne, J

    2016-05-01

    Despite the abundance of barefoot running-related research, there have been no electromyography studies evaluating the effects of this mode of exercise on habitual users of minimalist footwear. The present study investigated differences in muscle activation during acute bouts of barefoot and shod running, in minimalist shoe users. 8 male participants ran on a motorized treadmill for 10 min under both conditions, at 70% maximal aerobic speed. Electromyographic data were sampled from the biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, gastrocnemius medialis, tibialis anterior, and vastus lateralis during both swing and stance. Root-mean-square analysis of electromyographic data was conducted to compare muscle activation between conditions. During stance, barefoot running resulted in greater muscle activity in gastrocnemius medialis and gluteus maximus, and lower muscle activity in tibialis anterior. During swing, barefoot running resulted in increased muscle activity in vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius medialus. These results indicate that, for minimalist shoe users, an acute bout of barefoot running results in significantly different lower-limb muscle activity. Increased activation in the above muscles presents a possible mechanism for injury, which should be considered during exercise prescription.

  9. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and... drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees for... applications in the backlog as of October 1, 2012, on finished dosage form (FDF) and active...

  10. User-centric design of a personal assistance robot (FRASIER) for active aging.

    PubMed

    Padir, Taşkin; Skorinko, Jeanine; Dimitrov, Velin

    2015-01-01

    We present our preliminary results from the design process for developing the Worcester Polytechnic Institute's personal assistance robot, FRASIER, as an intelligent service robot for enabling active aging. The robot capabilities include vision-based object detection, tracking the user and help with carrying heavy items such as grocery bags or cafeteria trays. This work-in-progress report outlines our motivation and approach to developing the next generation of service robots for the elderly. Our main contribution in this paper is the development of a set of specifications based on the adopted user-centered design process, and realization of the prototype system designed to meet these specifications.

  11. The human Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LA1 secretes a nonbacteriocin antibacterial substance(s) active in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet-Camard, M F; Liévin, V; Brassart, D; Neeser, J R; Servin, A L; Hudault, S

    1997-01-01

    The adhering human Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LA1 inhibits the cell association and cell invasion of enteropathogens in cultured human intestinal Caco-2 cells (M. F. Bernet, D. Brassard, J. R. Neeser, and A. L. Servin, Gut 35:483-489, 1994). Here, we demonstrate that strain LA1 developed its antibacterial activity in conventional or germ-free mouse models orally infected by Salmonella typhimurium. We present evidence that the spent culture supernatant of strain LA1 (LA1-SCS) contained antibacterial components active against S. typhimurium infecting the cultured human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The LA1-SCS antibacterial activity was observed in vitro against a wide range of gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, S. typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae. By contrast, no activity was observed against species of the normal gut flora, such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. The LA1-SCS antibacterial activity was insensitive to proteases and independent of lactic acid production. PMID:9212421

  12. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A F; Motta, Amanda S; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g(-1)) previously inoculated with a suspension of 10(2) cfu g(-1) of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  13. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A.F.; Motta, Amanda S.; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g−1) previously inoculated with a suspension of 102 cfu g−1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products. PMID:24688506

  14. Extracellular polymeric substances and dewaterability of waste activated sludge during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fenxia; Liu, Xinwen; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge was conducted to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying change in sludge dewaterability during its anaerobic digestion. Unexpectedly, the results indicated that sludge dewatering properties measured by capillary suction time only deteriorated after 10 days of anaerobic digestion, after which dewaterability recovered and remained stable. The loosely bound extracellular polymeric substance (LB-EPS) content increased three-fold after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, and did not change significantly during the remaining 30 days. The tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) content reduced slightly after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, and stabilized during the last 30 days. Polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PN) content in LB-EPS increased after 10 days of anaerobic digestion. However, PS and PN contents in TB-EPS decreased slightly. The relationship analysis showed that only LB-EPS correlated with dewaterability of the sludge during anaerobic digestion.

  15. Activating Humans with Humor——A Dialogue System That Users Want to Interact with

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybala, Pawel; Ptaszynski, Michal; Rzepka, Rafal; Araki, Kenji

    The topic of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) has been gathering more and more scientific attention of late. A very important, but often undervalued area in this field is human engagement. That is, a person's commitment to take part in and continue the interaction. In this paper we describe work on a humor-equipped casual conversational system (chatterbot) and investigate the effect of humor on a user's engagement in the conversation. A group of users was made to converse with two systems: one with and one without humor. The chat logs were then analyzed using an emotive analysis system to check user reactions and attitudes towards each system. Results were projected on Russell's two-dimensional emotiveness space to evaluate the positivity/negativity and activation/deactivation of these emotions. This analysis indicated emotions elicited by the humor-equipped system were more positively active and less negatively active than by the system without humor. The implications of results and relation between them and user engagement in the conversation are discussed. We also propose a distinction between positive and negative engagement.

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report... the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, the reporting agency must include information on the type...

  17. Are the Twelve Steps more acceptable to drug users than to drinkers? A comparison of experiences of and attitudes to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) among 200 substance misusers attending inpatient detoxification.

    PubMed

    Best, D W; Harris, J C; Gossop, M; Manning, V C; Man, L H; Marshall, J; Bearn, J; Strang, J

    2001-07-01

    The present study is a cross-sectional interview-based investigation comparing experiences of and attitudes towards Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) in a sample of 200 patients attending inpatient substance misuse detoxification services. Two hundred consecutive admissions were recruited; 100 each from one drug and one alcohol in-patient treatment service in which attendance at AA/NA was a voluntary adjunct to a generic treatment programme. Although there were no differences in the history of AA/NA attendance, the drug users (who were on average younger) reported significantly more positive attitudes towards AA/NA, more willingness to attend during their in-patient treatment and greater intention to attend following completion of their detoxification. In particular, despite no differences in spiritual/religious orientation, the drug users reported more positive views of the Twelve Steps. As AA/NA remain popular and accessible forms of substance misuse support, it is critical that we develop a clearer understanding of their impact and of the scope for their integration with generic forms of substance misuse treatment.

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on the blood brain barrier permeability to pharmacologically active substances

    SciTech Connect

    Trnovec, T.; Kallay, Z.; Bezek, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can impair the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Data on early and late damage after brain irradiation are usually reported separately, yet a gradual transition between these two types has become evident. Signs appearing within 3 weeks after irradiation are considered to be early manifestations. The mechanism of radiation-effected integrity impairment of the BBB is discussed in relation to changes in morphological structures forming the BBB, the endothelium of intracerebral vessels, and in the surrounding astrocytes. Alterations in the function of the BBB are manifested in the endothelium by changes in the ultrastructural location of the activity of phosphatases and by the activation of pinocytotic vesicular transport, and in astrocyte cytoplasm by glycogen deposition. The changes in ultrastructure were critically surveyed with regard to increasing doses of radiation to the brain in the range of 5 Gy to 960 Gy. The qualitative as well as the semiquantitative and quantitative observations on the passage of substances across the damaged BBB were treated separately. Qualitative changes are based mainly on findings of extravasation of vital stains and of labelled proteins. The quantitative studies established differences in radiation-induced changes in the permeability of the BBB depending on the structure and physico-chemical properties of the barrier penetrating tracers. Indirect evaluation of radiation-induced BBB changes is based on studies of pharmacological effects of substances acting on the CNS. In conclusion, radiation impairs significantly the integrity of the BBB following single irradiation of the brain with a dose exceeding 10-15 Gy. The response of the BBB to ionizing radiation is dependent both on the dose to which the brain is exposed and on specific properties of the tracer. 68 references.

  19. Addiction and treatment experiences among active methamphetamine users recruited from a township community in Cape Town, South Africa: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Towe, Sheri L.; Watt, Melissa H.; Lion, Ryan R.; Myers, Bronwyn; Skinner, Donald; Kimani, Stephen; Pieterse, Desiree

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2000, there has been a dramatic increase in methamphetamine use in South Africa, but little is known about the experiences of out-of-treatment users. This mixed-methods study describes the substance use histories, addiction symptoms, and treatment experiences of a community-recruited sample of methamphetamine users in Cape Town. Methods Using respondent driven sampling, 360 methamphetamine users (44% female) completed structured clinical interviews to assess substance abuse and treatment history and computerized surveys to assess drug-related risks. A sub-sample of 30 participants completed in-depth interviews to qualitatively explore experiences with methamphetamine use and drug treatment. Results Participants had used methamphetamine for an average of 7.06 years (SD=3.64). They reported using methamphetamine on an average of 23.49 of the past 30 days (SD=8.90); 60% used daily. The majority (90%) met ICD-10 criteria for dependence, and many reported severe social, financial, and legal consequences. While only 10% had ever received drug treatment, 90% reported that they wanted treatment. In the qualitative interviews, participants reported multiple barriers to treatment, including beliefs that treatment is ineffective and relapse is inevitable in their social context. They also identified important motivators, including desires to be drug free and improve family functioning. Conclusion This study yields valuable information to more effectively respond to emerging methamphetamine epidemics in South Africa and other low- and middle-income countries. Interventions to increase uptake of evidence-based services must actively seek out drug users and build motivation for treatment, and offer continuing care services to prevent relapse. Community education campaigns are also needed. PMID:25977205

  20. [Analysis of surface-active substances in Sapindus mukurossi by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, X C

    2001-11-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry method has been developed for the analysis of surface-active substances (hederagenin saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides) in the extracts of the pericarp of Sapindus mukurossi. The method consists of the separation of surface-active substances using C18 HPLC column, followed by detection using a diode-array detector at 210 nm and then on-line mass spectrometry. Hederagenin saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides were characterized as [M - H]- or [M + Na]+. Based on the relative molecular mass, established by mass spectrometry and the structure induced by in-source CID technology, three components that had not been reported in Sapindus mukurossi before were identified. Several surface-active substances were obtained by means of semi-preparative HPLC. Their structures were further confirmed by NMR spectrometry as mukurozi-saponin Y2, mukurozi-saponin X, mukurozioside I a and mukurozioside II a.

  1. Inter and intraindividual variations in plasma cholinesterase activity and substance concentration in employees of an organophosphorus insecticide factory.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, A

    1991-01-01

    During a period of 10 months, inter and intraindividual variations in plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity were studied in 331 employees of an organophosphorus insecticide factory, and in 193 healthy volunteers without occupational exposure to known ChE inhibitors. Repeated (n = 6) measurements of ChE activity and ChE substance concentration were performed in 410 subjects. The study showed substantial intraindividual variations of ChE activity and ChE substance concentration (up to 40%) in the employees and in the reference group. When effects due to sex, ChE-1 phenotype, body weight, and height were considered, one subgroup of employees of the organophosphorus insecticide factory showed a significantly lower average ChE activity than other subgroups; as ChE substance concentrations were found to be proportionally decreased, it was concluded that the low ChE activity was unrelated to occupational exposure. A combined determination of ChE activity and ChE substance concentration is recommended as a rational diagnostic tool when an unexpected decrease of plasma ChE activity is registered in people joining organophosphorus insecticide health surveillance programmes. PMID:1878314

  2. Influences of influent carbon source on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and physicochemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fenxia; Peng, Ge; Li, Ying

    2011-08-01

    It is necessary to understand the bioflocculation, settling and dewatering characteristics in the activated sludge process in order to establish more efficient operational strategies. The influences of carbon source on the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and flocculation, settling and dewatering properties of the activated sludge were investigated. Laboratory-scale completely mixed activated sludge processes were used to grow the activated sludge with different carbon sources of starch, glucose and sodium acetate. The sludge fed with acetate had highest loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and that fed with starch lowest. The amount of tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), protein content in LB-EPS, polysaccharide content and protein contents in TB-EPS, were independent of the influent carbon source. The polysaccharide content in LB-EPS of the activated sludge fed with sodium acetate was lower slightly than those of starch and glucose. The sludge also had a nearly consistent flocs size and the sludge volume index (SVI) value. ESS content of the sludge fed with sodium acetate was higher initially, although it was similar to those fed with glucose and starch finally. However, the specific resistance to filtration and normalized capillary suction time fluctuated first, but finally were stable at around 5.0×10(8)mkg(-1) and 3.5 s Lg(-1) SS, respectively. Only the protein content in LB-EPS weakly correlated with the flocs size and SVI of the activated sludge. But there was no correlation between any other EPS contents or components and the physicochemical properties of the activated sludge.

  3. Injuries among wheeled shoe users: A comparison with other nonmotorized wheeled activities

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Siddharth; Tram, Janna; Hagel, Brent E; Kyle, Tania; Senger, Trudi; Belanger, Francois

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Nonmotorized wheeled activities are popular among children. However, these activities can result in significant injury if effective injury prevention measures are not taken. Recently, nonmotorized wheeled shoes have become increasingly popular among children. Preliminary research shows that these activities also result in significant injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the injury profiles of nonmotorized wheeled activities among Canadian children presenting to the emergency department. METHODS: A two-year retrospective study was conducted using data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program database, specific to the Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta. Data were analyzed using cross tabulations of the type and nature of injury, helmet use, age and sex, with type of nonmotorized wheeled activity. RESULTS: The most common mechanism of injury for a nonmotorized wheeled activity was bicycling (66.9%), while wheeled shoe use produced the fewest injuries (2.7%). The upper extremity was the most frequently injured body region in all groups, comprising more than 75% of the injuries in wheeled shoe users and approximately 50% of the injuries in participants of other nonmotorized wheeled activities. Forearm fractures were the most common type of injury. Wheeled shoe users had the greatest proportion of forearm fractures. Helmet use was most prevalent in bicyclists (84.6%) and least prevalent in wheeled shoe users (4.7%). DISCUSSION: Nonmotorized wheeled activities can result in significant morbidity. Results from the present study suggest that wheeled shoe and push scooter activities can result in upper extremity injuries. Protective equipment, particularly wrist guards and helmets, should be used when participating in these activities. PMID:20885801

  4. The physico-chemical properties and biostimulative activities of humic substances regenerated from lignite.

    PubMed

    David, Jan; Smejkalová, Daniela; Hudecová, Sárka; Zmeškal, Oldřich; von Wandruszka, Ray; Gregor, Tomáš; Kučerík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The positive effect of humic acids on the growth of plant roots is well known, however, the mechanisms and role of their physical structure in these processes have not been fully explained yet. In this work, South-Moravian lignite was oxidized by means of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to produce a set of regenerated humic acids. The elemental composition, solid state stability and solution characteristics were determined and correlated in vitro with their biological activity. A modified hydroponic method was applied to determine the effects of their potassium salts on Zea mays seedlings roots with respect to the plant weight, root length, root division, and starch and protein content. The relations between the determined parameters were evaluated through Principal Component Analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The results indicated that the most important factor determining the biological activity of South-Moravian lignite potassium humates is related to the nature of self-assemblies, while the chemical composition had no direct connection with the root growth of Zea mays seedlings. It was demonstrated a controlled processing that provided humic substances with different chemical and physicochemical properties and variable biological activity.

  5. The impact of ozone treatment on changes in biologically active substances of cardamom seeds.

    PubMed

    Joanna Brodowska, Agnieszka; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Agnieszka; Brodowska, Katarzyna; Catthoor, Rik; Czyżowska, Agata

    2014-09-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop a decontamination method against microorganisms in cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton) seeds using ozone as a decontaminating agent. Ozone treatment was conducted 3 times, at 24-h intervals, and the parameters of the process were determined assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols): ozone concentration 160 to 165.0 g/m(3) ; flow rate 0.1 L/min; pressure 0.5 atm; time 30 min. After each step of decontamination, the microbiological profile of the cardamom seeds was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the total polyphenol content (TPC), composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were determined. This study shows that extract from cardamom seeds after ozone treatment is characterized by a better radical scavenging activity (IC(50) = 24.18 ± 0.04 mg/mL) than the control sample (IC(50) = 31.94 ± 0.05 mg/mL). The extract from cardamom seeds after ozone treatment showed an improved FRAP activity as well (613.64 ± 49.79 mmol TE/g compared to 480.29 ± 30.91 mmol TE/g of control sample). The TPC and the total antioxidant capacity were negatively affected, respectively, 41.2% and 16.2%, compared to the control sample.

  6. Neural Activation During Risky Decision-Making in Youth at High Risk for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hulvershorn, Leslie A.; Hummer, Tom A.; Fukunaga, Rena; Leibenluft, Ellen; Finn, Peter; Cyders, Melissa A.; Anand, Amit; Overhage, Lauren; Dir, Allyson; Brown, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Risky decision-making, particularly in the context of reward-seeking behavior, is strongly associated with the presence of substance use disorders (SUDs). However, there has been little research on the neural substrates underlying reward-related decision-making in drug-naïve youth who are at elevated risk for SUDs. Participants comprised 23 high-risk (HR) youth with a well-established SUD risk phenotype and 27 low-risk healthy comparison (HC) youth, aged 10–14. Participants completed the balloon analog risk task (BART), a task designed to examine risky decision-making, during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The HR group had faster reaction times, but otherwise showed no behavioral differences from the HC group. HR youth experienced greater activation when processing outcome, as the chances of balloon explosion increased, relative to HC youth, in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). As explosion probability increased, group-by-condition interactions in the ventral striatum/anterior cingulate and the anterior insula showed increasing activation in HR youth, specifically on trials when explosions occurred. Thus, atypical activation increased with increasing risk of negative outcome (i.e., balloon explosion) in a cortico-striatal network in the HR group. These findings identify candidate neurobiological markers of addiction risk in youth at high familial and phenotypic risk for SUDs. PMID:26071624

  7. Surface-active substances in a laboratory simulated Titan's organic haze: Prebiotic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagota, Seema; Kawai, Jun; Deamer, David; McKay, Christopher; Khare, Bishun; Beeler, David

    2014-11-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, is a key planetary body for astrobiological studies due to its active organic chemistry, hydrocarbon lakes and possible subsurface water-ammonia liquids. We have investigated the physicochemical properties of organic compounds synthesized in a simulated Titan atmosphere. A laboratory analog of Titan's aerosols, called tholin, was produced by irradiation of a nitrogen/methane gas mixture. The primary aim was to determine whether tholin represent possible sources of surface-active substances that could have been involved in the formation of prebiotic structures. A tholin sample was extracted with chloroform-methanol and the chloroform soluble material was separated by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. Fluorescence excited by UV light was used to identify the major components on the plates. After being scraped from the TLC plate, the components were eluted as specific fractions and investigated by surface chemical methods, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Fractions 1 and 2 were strongly fluorescent and surface active, producing films at air-water interfaces. When exposed to aqueous phases, components in fraction 1 form spherical microstructures resembling prebionts. The prebionts are precursor structures that might have evolved into the first living cells.

  8. Substance P induces CCN1 expression via histone deacetylase activity in human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David Q; Hing, Tressia C; Chen, Jeremy; Ho, Samantha; Zhao, Dezheng; Targan, Stephan R; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2011-11-01

    We have shown that substance P (SP) and its neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) regulate intestinal angiogenesis by increasing expression of protein CYR61 (the cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61, or CCN1) in colonic epithelial cells. However, the mechanism involved in SP-induced CCN1 expression has not been studied, and the outcome of increased CCN1 expression in the development of colitis is not fully understood. Because histone deacetylase (HDAC) modulates transcription of several genes involved in inflammation, we investigated participation of HDAC in SP-induced CCN1 expression in human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells overexpressing NK-1R (NCM460-NK-1R) and in primary colonocytes. SP increased HDAC activity with deacetylation and dephosphorylation of nucleosome protein histone H3 in NCM460-NK-1R and/or primary colonocytes. Histone deacetylation and dephosphorylation was observed in colonic mucosa from irritable bowel disease patients. Similarly, colonic mucosal tissues from mice exposed to dextran sulfate sodium showed histone H3 deacetylation and dephosphorylation and increased HDAC activity that was reversed by the NK-1R antagonist CJ-12255. SP-induced increased CCN1 expression in NCM460-NK-1R cells was abolished by pharmacological HDAC inhibition. HDAC overexpression activated basal and SP-induced CCN1 promoter activity. Intracolonic CCN1 overexpression significantly ameliorated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, with reduction of proinflammatory cytokine expression in mice. Thus, SP-mediated CCN1 expression in the inflamed human and mouse colon involves increased HDAC activity. Our results strongly suggest that increased CCN1 expression may be involved in mucosal healing during colitis.

  9. 75 FR 8959 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Substances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins... requirements for this collection of information concerning substances prohibited from use in animal food or feed and animal proteins prohibited in ruminant feed. DATES: Submit written or electronic comments...

  10. 78 FR 28852 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Substances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins... on the existing recordkeeping requirements for this information collection, regarding animal proteins... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food or...

  11. Spectroscopy study of silver nanoparticles fabrication using synthetic humic substances and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Valentina A; Minaev, Boris F

    2013-05-01

    In this present study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized using synthetic humic substances (HSs) as reducing and stabilizing agents. Preference of synthetic HSs over natural humic matter is determined by a standardization problem resolution of the product due to the strict control of conditions of the synthetic HSs formation. It allows to receive the silver nanoparticles with the standardized biologically-active protective shell that is very important for their use, mainly in medicine. The concentration of sodium hydroxide, synthetic HSs, silver nitrate and temperature employed in the synthesis process are optimized to attain better yield, controlled size and stability by means of UV-visible technique. In the optimal reaction conditions the concentrated silver colloids (55 mM) with 99.99% yield are obtained which were stable for more than 1 year under ambient conditions. The received silver nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles against fungal and bacterial strains is also shown.

  12. Spectroscopy study of silver nanoparticles fabrication using synthetic humic substances and their antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Valentina A.; Minaev, Boris F.

    2013-05-01

    In this present study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized using synthetic humic substances (HSs) as reducing and stabilizing agents. Preference of synthetic HSs over natural humic matter is determined by a standardization problem resolution of the product due to the strict control of conditions of the synthetic HSs formation. It allows to receive the silver nanoparticles with the standardized biologically-active protective shell that is very important for their use, mainly in medicine. The concentration of sodium hydroxide, synthetic HSs, silver nitrate and temperature employed in the synthesis process are optimized to attain better yield, controlled size and stability by means of UV-visible technique. In the optimal reaction conditions the concentrated silver colloids (55 mM) with 99.99% yield are obtained which were stable for more than 1 year under ambient conditions. The received silver nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles against fungal and bacterial strains is also shown.

  13. Substance use, education, employment, and criminal activity outcomes of adolescents in outpatient chemical dependency programs.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ana I; Homer, Jenny F; French, Michael T; Weisner, Constance M

    2009-01-01

    Although the primary outcome of interest in clinical evaluations of addiction treatment programs is usually abstinence, participation in these programs can have a wide range of consequences. This study evaluated the effects of treatment initiation on substance use, school attendance, employment, and involvement in criminal activity at 12 months post-admission for 419 adolescents (aged 12 to 18) enrolled in chemical dependency recovery programs in a large managed care health plan. Instrumental variables estimation methods were used to account for unobserved selection into treatment by jointly modeling the likelihood of participation in treatment and the odds of attaining a certain outcome or level of an outcome. Treatment initiation significantly increased the likelihood of attending school, promoted abstinence, and decreased the probability of adolescent employment, but it did not significantly affect participation in criminal activity at the 12-month follow-up. These findings highlight the need to address selection in a non-experimental study and demonstrate the importance of considering multiple outcomes when assessing the effectiveness of adolescent treatment.

  14. Substance P stimulates bone marrow stromal cell osteogenic activity, osteoclast differentiation, and resorption activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Zhao, Rong; Shi, Xiaoyou; Wei, Tzuping; Halloran, Bernard P.; Clark, David J.; Jacobs, Christopher R.; Kingery, Wade S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction SP is a neuropeptide distributed in the sensory nerve fibers that innervate the medullar tissues of bone, as well as the periosteum. Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of neuropeptide signaling after capsaicin treatment resulted in a loss of bone mass and we hypothesized that SP contributes to bone integrity by stimulating osteogenesis. Materials and Methods Osteoblast precursors (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and osteoclast precursors (bone marrow macrophages, BMMs) derived from C57BL/6 mice were cultured. Expression of the SP receptor (NK1) was detected by using immunocytochemical staining and PCR. Effects of SP on proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were studied by measuring BrdU incorporation, gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin and Runx2 protein levels with EIA and western blot assays, respectively. Effects of SP on BMMs were determined using a BrdU assay, counting multinucleated cells staining positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP+), measuring pit erosion area, and evaluating RANKL protein production and NF-κB activity with ELISA and western blot. Results The NK1 receptor was expressed in both BMSCs and BMMs. SP stimulated the proliferation of BMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10−12 M) of SP stimulated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression, increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and up-regulated Runx2 protein levels, and higher concentrations of SP (10−8 M) enhanced mineralization in differentiated BMSCs. SP also stimulated BMSCs to produce RANKL, but at concentrations too low to evoke osteoclastogenesis in co-culture with macrophages in the presence of SP. SP also activated NF-κB in BMMs and directly facilitate RANKL induced macrophage osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity. Conclusions NK1 receptors are expressed by osteoblast and osteoclast precursors and SP stimulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in

  15. Abnormal frontostriatal activity in recently abstinent cocaine users during implicit moral processing

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Brendan M.; Harenski, Carla L.; Harenski, Keith A.; Fede, Samantha J.; Steele, Vaughn R.; Koenigs, Michael R.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into the neurobiology of moral cognition are often done by examining clinical populations characterized by diminished moral emotions and a proclivity toward immoral behavior. Psychopathy is the most common disorder studied for this purpose. Although cocaine abuse is highly co-morbid with psychopathy and cocaine-dependent individuals exhibit many of the same abnormalities in socio-affective processing as psychopaths, this population has received relatively little attention in moral psychology. To address this issue, the authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to record hemodynamic activity in 306 incarcerated male adults, stratified into regular cocaine users (n = 87) and a matched sample of non-cocaine users (n = 87), while viewing pictures that did or did not depict immoral actions and determining whether each depicted scenario occurred indoors or outdoors. Consistent with expectations, cocaine users showed abnormal neural activity in several frontostriatial regions during implicit moral picture processing compared to their non-cocaine using peers. This included reduced moral/non-moral picture discrimination in the vACC, vmPFC, lOFC, and left vSTR. Additionally, psychopathy was negatively correlated with activity in an overlapping region of the ACC and right lateralized vSTR. These results suggest that regular cocaine abuse may be associated with affective deficits which can impact relatively high-level processes like moral cognition. PMID:26528169

  16. Antimicrobial activity and partial characterization of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by Lactobacillus spp. isolated from artisanal Mexican cheese.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Castro, Priscilia Y; Méndez-Romero, José I; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Acedo-Félix, Evelia; González-Córdova, Aarón F; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus spp. from Mexican Cocido cheese were shown to produce bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) active against Staphylococcus aureus,Listeria innocua,Escherichia coli, andSalmonella typhimurium by using the disk diffusion method. Crude extracts of Lactobacillus fermentum showed strong inhibitory activity against Staph. aureus, L. innocua, E. coli, and Salmonella cholerae. Complete inactivation of antimicrobial activity was observed after treatment of crude extracts with proteinase K, pronase, papain, trypsin, and lysozyme, confirming their proteinaceous nature. However, antimicrobial activity was partly lost for some of the crude extracts when treated with α-amylase, indicating that carbohydrate moieties were involved. The antimicrobial activity of the crude extracts was stable at 65°C for 30min over a wide pH range (2-8), and addition of potassium chloride, sodium citrate, ethanol, and butanol did not affect antibacterial activity. However, antimicrobial activity was lost after heating at 121°C for 15min, addition of methanol or Tween 80. Fourteen out of 18 Lactobacillus spp. showed antimicrobial activity against different test microorganisms, and 12 presented bacteriocin-like substances. Generation time and growth rate parameters indicated that the antimicrobial activity of crude extracts from 3 different strains was effective against the 4 indicator microorganisms. One of the crude extracts showed inhibition not only against gram-positive but also against gram-negative bacteria. Bacteriocin-like substances produced by this specific Lactobacillus strain showed potential for application as a food biopreservative.

  17. 46 CFR 162.060-32 - Testing and evaluation requirements for active substances, preparations, and relevant chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (FIFRA) for use in ballast water treatment prior to submission to the Coast Guard for approval of the... APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-32 Testing and evaluation requirements for active substances, preparations, and relevant chemicals. (a) A ballast water management...

  18. 46 CFR 162.060-32 - Testing and evaluation requirements for active substances, preparations, and relevant chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (FIFRA) for use in ballast water treatment prior to submission to the Coast Guard for approval of the... APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-32 Testing and evaluation requirements for active substances, preparations, and relevant chemicals. (a) A ballast water management...

  19. 46 CFR 162.060-32 - Testing and evaluation requirements for active substances, preparations, and relevant chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (FIFRA) for use in ballast water treatment prior to submission to the Coast Guard for approval of the... APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-32 Testing and evaluation requirements for active substances, preparations, and relevant chemicals. (a) A ballast water management...

  20. In vitro metabolism and bioavailability tests for endocrine active substances: What is needed next for regulatory purposes?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legistation and prospective legislative proposals internationally (may) require that chemicals be tested for their ability to disrupt the hormonal systems of mammals. Chemicals found to test positive in vitro are considered to be endocrine active substances (EAS) and may be puta...

  1. Pattern of active and inactive sequences of diabetes self-monitoring in mobile phone and paper diary users.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Nikhil S; Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    In a pilot randomized controlled trial involving overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes, we find that smartphone users have sharply higher adherence to self-monitoring of diet, physical activity, blood glucose, and body weight, as compared to paper diary users. By characterizing the pattern of adherence with the probability of continuation of active and inactive sequences of self-monitoring, we find that smartphone users have longer active sequences of self-monitoring of all four behaviors that were being monitored. Smartphone users are also quicker to resume self-monitoring of diet and physical activity after a lapse in self-monitoring, whereas paper diary users have shorter inactive sequences for monitoring blood glucose and body weight. The findings are informative for data collection methodology in this burgeoning area of research.

  2. Tuberculosis screening and compliance with return for skin test reading among active drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Malotte, C K; Rhodes, F; Mais, K E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the independent and combined effects of different levels of monetary incentives and a theory-based educational intervention on return for tuberculosis (TB) skin test reading in a sample of active injection drug and crack cocaine users. Prevalence of TB infection in this sample was also determined. METHODS: Active or recent drug users (n = 1004), recruited via street outreach techniques, were skin tested for TB. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 levels of monetary incentive ($5 and $10) provided at return for skin test reading, alone or in combination with a brief motivational education session. RESULTS: More than 90% of those who received $10 returned for skin test reading, in comparison with 85% of those who received $5 and 33% of those who received no monetary incentive. The education session had no impact on return for skin test reading. The prevalence of a positive tuberculin test was 18.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Monetary incentives dramatically increase the return rate for TB skin test reading among drug users who are at high risk of TB infection. PMID:9585747

  3. Enterococcus faecium isolated from honey synthesized bacteriocin-like substances active against different Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Ibarguren, Carolina; Raya, Raúl R; Apella, María C; Audisio, M Carina

    2010-02-01

    Four Enterococcus faecium strains, isolated from honeycombs (C1 and M2d strains) and feral combs (Mori1 and M1b strains) secreted antimicrobial substances active against fourteen different Listeria spp. strains. The antimicrobial compound(s) present in the cell free supernatant were highly thermostable (121 degrees C for 15 min) and inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, but not by alpha-amylase and lipase, thus suggesting a peptidic nature. Since the structural bacteriocin gene determinants of enterocins A and B were PCR amplified from the four E. faecium isolates, only the bacteriocin produced by strain C1 was further characterized: it showed a broad band of approximately 4.0-7.0 kDa in SDS-PAGE and was bactericidal (4 log decrease) against L. monocytogenes 99/287. L. monocytogenes 99/287R, a clone spontaneously resistant to the enterocin produced by E. avium DSMZ17511 (ex PA1), was not inhibited by the enterocin-like compounds produced by strain C1. However, it was inhibited in mixed culture fermentations by E. faecium C1 and a bacteriostatic effect was observed. The bacteriocin-producer Enterococcus strains were not haemolytic; gelatinase negative and sensitive to vancomycin and other clinically relevant antibiotics.

  4. Enacting Conceptual Metaphor through Blending: Learning activities embodying the substance metaphor for energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Hunter G.; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that a particular blended learning space is especially productive in developing understanding of energy transfers and transformations. In this blended space, naturally occurring learner interactions like body movement, gesture, and metaphorical speech are blended with a conceptual metaphor of energy as a substance in a class of activities called Energy Theater. We illustrate several mechanisms by which the blended aspect of the learning environment promotes productive intellectual engagement with key conceptual issues in the learning of energy, including distinguishing among energy processes, disambiguating matter and energy, identifying energy transfer, and representing energy as a conserved quantity. Conceptual advancement appears to be promoted especially by the symbolic material and social structure of the Energy Theater environment, in which energy is represented by participants and objects are represented by areas demarcated by loops of rope, and by Energy Theater's embodied action, including body locomotion, gesture, and coordination of speech with symbolic spaces in the Energy Theater arena. Our conclusions are (1) that specific conceptual metaphors can be leveraged to benefit science instruction via the blending of an abstract space of ideas with multiple modes of concrete human action, and (2) that participants' structured improvisation plays an important role in leveraging the blend for their intellectual development.

  5. Environmental risk assessment on capsaicin used as active substance for antifouling system on ships.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Shi, Ting; Yang, Xiaoling; Han, Wenya; Zhou, Yunrui

    2014-06-01

    Biodegradation experiments were carried out with capsaicin to evaluate its degradability. The results show that capsaicin was readily biodegradable under aerobic conditions. The values of Kow and the calculated bioconcentration factor indicate that capsaicin have a low potential for bioconcentration. The fish acute toxicity tests conducted with Brachydanio rerio show LC50 for capsaicin was 5.98 mg L(-1). The tests of alga growth inhibition conducted with Selenastrum capricornutum suggest EC50 for capsaicin was 114 mg L(-1). The calculated PNEC (Predicted No Effect Concentration) was 4.9×10(-4) mg L(-1). The average PEC (Predicted Environmental Concentration) for OECD-EU commercial harbor and marina were 3.99×10(-6) and 2.49×10(-5) mg L(-1), respectively. These indicate that the PEC was much less than the PNEC for capsaicin. The low Kp value of capsaicin suggests the data about the risk of capsaicin to sediment organisms can be waived. According to the results from the analysis of the degradation, bioaccumulation, toxicity and accumulation in sediment, it can be concluded that capsaicin used as active substance for antifouling system on ships poses relatively low risk to marine environment.

  6. Substance P Exacerbates Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration through Neurokinin-1 Receptor-Independent Activation of Microglial NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Jiang, Lulu; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Although dysregulated substance P (SP) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), how SP affects the survival of dopaminergic neurons remains unclear. Here, we found that mice lacking endogenous SP (TAC1−/−), but not those deficient in the SP receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor, NK1R), were more resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced nigral dopaminergic neurodegeneration than wild-type controls, suggesting a NK1R-independent toxic action of SP. In vitro dose–response studies revealed that exogenous SP enhanced LPS- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a bimodal manner, peaking at submicromolar and subpicomolar concentrations, but was substantially less effective at intermediate concentrations. Mechanistically, the actions of submicromolar levels of SP were NK1R-dependent, whereas subpicomolar SP-elicited actions required microglial NADPH oxidase (NOX2), the key superoxide-producing enzyme, but not NK1R. Subpicomolar concentrations of SP activated NOX2 by binding to the catalytic subunit gp91phox and inducing membrane translocation of the cytosolic subunits p47phox and p67phox. The importance of NOX2 was further corroborated by showing that inhibition or disruption of NOX2 blocked subpicomolar SP-exacerbated neurotoxicity. Together, our findings revealed a critical role of microglial NOX2 in mediating the neuroinflammatory and dopaminergic neurodegenerative effects of SP, which may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:25209287

  7. Improved PVDF membrane performance by doping extracellular polymeric substances of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yan-Fang; Huang, Bao-Cheng; Qian, Chen; Wang, Long-Fei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-04-15

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane has been widely applied in water and wastewater treatment because of its high mechanical strength, thermal stability and chemical resistance. However, the hydrophobic nature of PVDF membrane makes it readily fouled, substantially reducing water flux and overall membrane rejection ability. In this work, an in-situ blending modifier, i.e., extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from activated sludge, was used to enhance the anti-fouling ability of PVDF membrane. Results indicate that the pure water flux of the membrane and its anti-fouling performance were substantially improved by blending 8% EPS into the membrane. By introducing EPS, the membrane hydrophilicity was increased and the cross section morphology was changed when it interacted with polyvinl pyrrolidone, resulting in the formation of large cavities below the finger-like pores. In addition, the fraction of pores with a size of 100-500 nm increased, which was also beneficial to improving membrane performance. Surface thermodynamic calculations indicate the EPS-functionalized membrane had a higher cohesion free energy, implying its good pollutant rejection and anti-fouling ability. This work provides a simple, efficient and cost-effective method to improve membrane performance and also extends the applications of EPS.

  8. The Relationship between Housing Status and HIV Risk among Active Drug Users: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Hilario, Helena; Convey, Mark; Corbett, A. Michelle; Weeks, Margaret; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between housing status and HIV risk using longitudinal, qualitative data collected in 2004-2005, from a purposeful sample of 65 active drug users in a variety of housed and homeless situations in Hartford, Connecticut. These data were supplemented with observations and in-depth interviews regarding drug use behavior collected in 2001-2005 to evaluate a peer-led HIV prevention intervention. Data reveal differences in social context within and among different housing statuses that affect HIV risky or protective behaviors including the ability to carry drug paraphernalia and HIV prevention materials, the amount of drugs in the immediate environment, access to subsidized and supportive housing, and relationships with others with whom drug users live. Policy implications of the findings, limitations to the data and future research are discussed. PMID:19142817

  9. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI): a user guide.

    PubMed

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier; Asmussen, Karsten; Jacobsen, Soren; Bartoloni, Elena; Gerli, Roberto; Bijlsma, Johannes Wj; Kruize, Aike A; Bombardieri, Stefano; Bookman, Arthur; Kallenberg, Cees; Meiners, Petra; Brun, Johan G; Jonsson, Roland; Caporali, Roberto; Carsons, Steven; De Vita, Salvatore; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Devauchelle, Valerie; Saraux, Alain; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Sibilia, Jean; Hachulla, Eric; Illei, Gabor; Isenberg, David; Jones, Adrian; Manoussakis, Menelaos; Mandl, Thomas; Jacobsson, Lennart; Demoulins, Frederic; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nishiyama, Sumusu; Omdal, Roald; Parke, Ann; Praprotnik, Sonja; Tomsic, Matjia; Price, Elizabeth; Scofield, Hal; L Sivils, Kathy; Smolen, Josef; Laqué, Roser Solans; Steinfeld, Serge; Sutcliffe, Nurhan; Sumida, Takayuki; Valesini, Guido; Valim, Valeria; Vivino, Frederick B; Vollenweider, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in use as a gold standard to measure disease activity in clinical studies, and as an outcome measure, even a primary outcome measure, in current randomised clinical trials. Therefore, ensuring an accurate and reproducible rating of each domain, by providing a more detailed definition of each domain, has emerged as an urgent need. The purpose of the present article is to provide a user guide for the ESSDAI. This guide provides definitions and precisions on the rating of each domain. It also includes some minor improvement of the score to integrate advance in knowledge of disease manifestations. This user guide may help clinicians to use the ESSDAI, and increase the reliability of rating and consequently of the ability to detect true changes over time. This better appraisal of ESSDAI items, along with the recent definition of disease activity levels and minimal clinically important change, will improve the assessment of patients with primary SS and facilitate the demonstration of effectiveness of treatment for patients with primary SS.

  10. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI): a user guide

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in use as a gold standard to measure disease activity in clinical studies, and as an outcome measure, even a primary outcome measure, in current randomised clinical trials. Therefore, ensuring an accurate and reproducible rating of each domain, by providing a more detailed definition of each domain, has emerged as an urgent need. The purpose of the present article is to provide a user guide for the ESSDAI. This guide provides definitions and precisions on the rating of each domain. It also includes some minor improvement of the score to integrate advance in knowledge of disease manifestations. This user guide may help clinicians to use the ESSDAI, and increase the reliability of rating and consequently of the ability to detect true changes over time. This better appraisal of ESSDAI items, along with the recent definition of disease activity levels and minimal clinically important change, will improve the assessment of patients with primary SS and facilitate the demonstration of effectiveness of treatment for patients with primary SS. PMID:26509054

  11. Toxic substances alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  12. [The influence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 surface-active substances on the efficiency of microbial destruction of oil pollutants].

    PubMed

    Pyroh, T P; Antoniuk, S I; Sorokina, A I

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of the use of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 surface-active substances (SAS) for water purification from oil was shown. The efficiency of oil degradation (2.6 g/l) in the presence of SAS preparations (5-15 %) in the form of postfermentation of cultural liquid or its supernatant was established to be 81-95 %. Intensification of oil destruction was determined by SAS affecting the activity of oil-oxidizing microbial population.

  13. Thyroid Histopathology Assessments for the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay to Detect Thyroid-active Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA) Test Guideline for the detection of substances that interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, a document was developed that provides a standardized appro...

  14. Substance P excites GABAergic neurons in the mouse central amygdala through neurokinin 1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sosulina, L.; Strippel, C.; Romo-Parra, H.; Walter, A. L.; Kanyshkova, T.; Sartori, S. B.; Lange, M. D.; Singewald, N.

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is implicated in stress regulation and affective and anxiety-related behavior. Particularly high expression has been found in the main output region of the amygdala complex, the central amygdala (CE). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms of SP in CE in vitro, taking advantage of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knockin mice that yield a reliable labeling of GABAergic neurons, which comprise 95% of the neuronal population in the lateral section of CE (CEl). In GFP-positive neurons within CEl, SP caused a membrane depolarization and increase in input resistance, associated with an increase in action potential firing frequency. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the SP-specific membrane current reversed at −101.5 ± 2.8 mV and displayed inwardly rectifying properties indicative of a membrane K+ conductance. Moreover, SP responses were blocked by the neurokinin type 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist L-822429 and mimicked by the NK1R agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]-SP. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed localization of NK1R in GFP-positive neurons in CEl, predominantly in PKCδ-negative neurons (80%) and in few PKCδ-positive neurons (17%). Differences in SP responses were not observed between the major types of CEl neurons (late firing, regular spiking, low-threshold bursting). In addition, SP increased the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic events in CEl neurons depending on upstream spike activity. These data indicate a NK1R-mediated increase in excitability and GABAergic activity in CEl neurons, which seems to mostly involve the PKCδ-negative subpopulation. This influence can be assumed to increase reciprocal interactions between CElon and CEloff pathways, thereby boosting the medial CE (CEm) output pathway and contributing to the anxiogenic-like action of SP in the amygdala. PMID:26334021

  15. Assessment of quantitative structure-activity relationship of toxicity prediction models for Korean chemical substance control legislation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Yon; Shin, Seong Eun; No, Kyoung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For successful adoption of legislation controlling registration and assessment of chemical substances, it is important to obtain sufficient toxicological experimental evidence and other related information. It is also essential to obtain a sufficient number of predicted risk and toxicity results. Particularly, methods used in predicting toxicities of chemical substances during acquisition of required data, ultimately become an economic method for future dealings with new substances. Although the need for such methods is gradually increasing, the-required information about reliability and applicability range has not been systematically provided. Methods There are various representative environmental and human toxicity models based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Here, we secured the 10 representative QSAR-based prediction models and its information that can make predictions about substances that are expected to be regulated. We used models that predict and confirm usability of the information expected to be collected and submitted according to the legislation. After collecting and evaluating each predictive model and relevant data, we prepared methods quantifying the scientific validity and reliability, which are essential conditions for using predictive models. Results We calculated predicted values for the models. Furthermore, we deduced and compared adequacies of the models using the Alternative non-testing method assessed for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals Substances scoring system, and deduced the applicability domains for each model. Additionally, we calculated and compared inclusion rates of substances expected to be regulated, to confirm the applicability. Conclusions We evaluated and compared the data, adequacy, and applicability of our selected QSAR-based toxicity prediction models, and included them in a database. Based on this data, we aimed to construct a system that can be used

  16. Increased ventral striatal BOLD activity during non-drug reward anticipation in cannabis users

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Liam; Hester, Robert; Garavan, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increased understanding of the pharmacology and long-term cognitive effects of cannabis in humans, there has been no research to date examining its chronic effects upon reward processing in the brain. Motivational theories regarding long-term drug use posit contrasting predictions with respect to how drug users are likely to process non-drug incentives. The reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) of addiction posits that there are deficits in dopamine (DA) motivational circuitry for non-drug rewards, such that only drugs of abuse are capable of normalizing DA in the ventral striatum (VS). Alternatively, the opponent process theory (OPT) holds that in individuals prone to drug use, there exists some form of mesolimbic hyperactivity, in which there is a bias towards reward-centred behaviour concomitant with impulsivity. The current study examined BOLD responses during reward and loss anticipation and their outcome deliveries in 14 chronic cannabis users and 14 drug-naïve controls during a monetary incentive delay (MID) task. Despite no significant behavioural differences between the two groups, cannabis users had significantly more right VS BOLD activity during reward anticipation. Correlation analyses demonstrated that this right VS BOLD response was significantly correlated with life-time use and reported life-time cannabis joints consumed. No correlations between cannabis abstinence and BOLD responses were observed. We also observed a number of group differences following outcome deliveries, most notably hypoactivity in the left insula cortex in response to loss and loss avoidance outcome notifications in the cannabis group. These results may suggest hypersensitivity during instrumental response anticipation for non-drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to loss outcomes in chronic cannabis users; the implications of which are discussed with respect to the potentially sensitizing effects of cannabis for other rewards. PMID:19631753

  17. Online Discussion on #KidneyStones: A Longitudinal Assessment of Activity, Users and Content

    PubMed Central

    Bultitude, Matthew; Fritsche, Hans-Martin; Haferkamp, Axel; Heidenreich, Axel; Miernik, Arkadiusz; Neisius, Andreas; Knoll, Thomas; Thomas, Christian; Tsaur, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Twitter is a popular microblogging platform for the rapid dissemination of information and reciprocal exchange in the urological field. We aimed to assess the activity, users and content of the online discussion, #KidneyStones, on Twitter. Methods We investigated the Symplur Signals analytics tool for Twitter data distributed via the #KidneyStones hashtag over a one year period. Activity analysis reflected overall activity and tweet enhancements. We assessed users’ geolocations and performed an influencer analysis. Content analysis included the most frequently used words, tweet sentiment and shares for top tweets. Results 3,426 users generated over 10,333 tweets, which were frequently accompanied by links (49%), mentions (30%) and photos (13%). Users came from 106 countries across the globe and were most frequently from North America (63%) and Europe (16%). Individual and organisational healthcare professionals made up 56% of the influencers of the Twitter discussion on #KidneyStones. Besides the words ‘kidney’ (used 4,045 times) and ‘stones’ (3,335), ‘pain’ (1,233), ‘urine’ (1,158), and ‘risk’ (1,023) were the most frequently used words. 56% of tweets had a positive sentiment. The median (range) number of shares was 85 (62–587) for the top 10 links, 45.5 (17–94) for the top 10 photos, and 44 (22–95) for the top 10 retweets. Conclusion The rapidly growing Twitter discussion on #KidneyStones engaged multiple stakeholders in the healthcare sector on a global scale and reached both professionals and laypeople. When used effectively and responsibly, the Twitter platform could improve prevention and medical care of kidney stone patients. PMID:27537406

  18. A Qualitative Analysis of User Experiences With a Self-Tracker for Activity, Sleep, and Diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent increase in chronic diseases and an aging population warrant the necessity of health self-management. As small electronic devices that track one’s activity, sleep, and diet, called self-trackers, are being widely distributed, it is prudent to investigate the user experience and the effectiveness of these devices, and use the information toward engineering better devices that would result in increased efficiency and usability. Objective The aim of this study was to abstract the constructs that constitute the user experiences of the self-tracker for activity, sleep, and diet. Additionally, we aimed to develop and verify the Health Information Technology Acceptance Model-II (HITAM-II) through a qualitative data analysis approach. Methods The study group consisted of 18 female college students who participated in an in-depth interview after completing a 3-month study of utilizing a self-tracker designed to monitor activity, sleep, and diet. The steps followed in the analysis were: (1) extraction of constructs from theoretical frameworks, (2) extraction of constructs from interview data using a qualitative methodology, and (3) abstraction of constructs and modeling of the HITAM-II. Results The constructs that constitute the HITAM-II are information technology factors, personal factors, social factors, attitude, behavioral intention, and behavior. These constructs are further divided into subconstructs to additionally support the HITAM-II. Conclusions The HITAM-II was found to successfully describe the health consumer’s attitude, behavioral intention, and behavior from another perspective. The result serves as the basis for a unique understanding of the user experiences of HIT. PMID:24594898

  19. Interface map as a user-driven and activity-driven interoperability standards portfolio.

    PubMed

    Virkanen, Hannu; Mykkänen, Juha; Tuomainen, Mika

    2013-01-01

    Use of interoperability specifications such as standards and their implementation guides is currently hindered by lack of systematic directories. It is difficult for potential users of standards to locate potential specifications which could be useful for their specific development needs. We introduce a multi-directory interface map approach which supports systematic description of healthcare interoperability specifications through consistent metadata and complementary classifications. The approach is built on basic premises of standards portfolios in enterprise architectures as well as activity-driven and interoperability paradigm-based classifications. We illustrate the approach through a case project in Finland.

  20. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P.

    2015-04-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL-1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL-1 to 450 mg dL-1. The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from -6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from -1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices.

  1. Quantification of potential exposure of gray partridge (Perdix perdix) to pesticide active substances in farmlands.

    PubMed

    Bro, Elisabeth; Millot, Florian; Decors, Anouk; Devillers, James

    2015-07-15

    Estimating exposure of wild birds to plant protection products is of key importance in the risk assessment process evaluating their harmful potential. In this paper, we propose an ecologically-relevant methodology to estimate potential exposure to active substances (ASs) of a farmland focal bird, the gray partridge Perdix perdix. It is based on bird habitat use of fields at the time of pesticide applications. It accounts for spatio-temporal heterogeneity at population and landscape scales. We identify and quantify the potential exposure to 179 ASs of 140 clutches during pre-laying, laying, and incubation phases, and of 75 coveys. The data come from a large scale field study combining radiotelemetry and a farmer survey. They were collected in 12 different representative sites. The proportion of clutches potentially exposed to a given chemical was ≥5% for 32 ASs; prothioconazole and epoxiconazole ranking first. 71% of clutches were potentially exposed to ≥1 AS and 67% to ≥2 ASs. Mixtures involved 2 to 22 ASs. They emerged from commercial formulations, tank mixtures, bird habitat use, and combinations. ASs were fungicides (53%), herbicides (25%), and insecticides (16%) used on a variety of crops in April-June, when ground-nesting birds are breeding. The European Food Safety Authority conclusions report a long-term first-tier toxicity-to-exposure ratio (TERlt) <5 for 11 out of 19 documented ASs, and higher-tier TERlt <5 for 5 out of 10 ASs. This suggests a potential risk for bird reproduction in farmlands. Globally 13% of coveys were potentially exposed to 18 ASs during the first month (1-4 coveys per AS). The use of our field data in future research and risk assessment is discussed.

  2. The Effect of Deployment on the Rate of Major Depression and Substance Abuse in Active Duty Military from 2001-2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Major Depression , Rates of Substance Abuse, Deployment Effects, OEF, OIF, Comorbidity, Mental Health Illness 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...health illness . This thesis evaluates the effects of deployment history on major depression and substance abuse in the active duty population from...trend in mental health illness , depression , and substance abuse being the top two diagnoses. Mental health illness affects readiness, and the cost of

  3. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  4. Kinetics of Evaporation and Growth of Drops of Aqueous Solutions of Surface Active Substances at Negative Temperatures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    the numerous experiments at the present time it is established that surface-active substances (SAS), both soluble and insoluble, substantially slow...3.5 10 The matter is more complex with the investigation of soluble SAS. Some authors [3, 4] consider that the slowing of the evaporation rate, as in... soluble SAS is different than for drops with insoluble SAS. In the opinion of V. G. Morachevskiy and others [7], the slowing of the evaporation rate is

  5. Rapid and efficient assembly of transcription activator-like effector genes by USER cloning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Li, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Hu, Baoyang

    2014-06-20

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that were related to bacteria immune system have lately been employed in a promising approach of precise gene targeting. Because of the repetitive characteristics of TALEs, existing TALE assembly methods are either very complicated, time-consuming, or too tricky to be handled in common labs. Here, we reported a rapid, efficient and easy method for TALE assembly. This method takes advantage of uracil-specific excision reagent (USER), an enzyme that can cleave DNA constructs and create long, unique single-strand DNA overhangs. Upon USER treatment, the overhangs on each individual TALE repeat unit can be rejoined hierarchically to form pentamers in a ligation-independent manner. Eventually, three pentamers are assembled into a full TALE construct by Golden Gate cloning. TALE nucleases (TALENs) generated with this method exhibit high genome-editing activity in human cells such as HEK293FT cells. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized three TALEN pairs targeting endogenous Tet1 locus, and proved that all can specifically target Tet1 gene, though in various degree. Comparing to other methods of TALEN assembly, this one is much less labor intensive and fairly faster, and positive clones can be obtained at high efficiency within only two days. We thus contribute to an easier approach for effective TALENs synthesis, which may highly facilitate the wide application of TALEN technology in genome editing, especially for human cells that require precise targeting.

  6. Decisions during Negatively-Framed Messages Yield Smaller Risk-Aversion-Related Brain Activation in Substance-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Rena; Bogg, Tim; Finn, Peter R.; Brown, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    A sizable segment of addiction research investigates the effects of persuasive message appeals on risky and deleterious behaviors. However, to date, little research has examined how various forms of message framing and corresponding behavioral choices might by mediated by risk-related brain regions. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain regions hypothesized to mediate the influence of message appeals on decision making in substance-dependent (SD) compared to non-substance-dependent (non-SD) individuals. The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) was modified to include positively-framed, negatively-framed, and control messages about long-term deck payoffs. In the positively-framed condition, the SD and non-SD groups showed improved decision-making performance that corresponded to higher risk-aversion-related brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula (AI). In contrast, in the negatively-framed condition, the SD group showed poorer performance that corresponded to lower risk-aversion-related brain activity in the AI region. In addition, only the non-SD group showed a positive association between decision quality and greater risk-related activity in the ACC, regardless of message type. The findings suggest substance-dependent individuals may have reduced neurocognitive sensitivity in the ACC and AI regions involved in risk perception and aversion during decision-making, especially in response to framed messages that emphasize reduced prospects for long-term gains. PMID:23148798

  7. Enacting Conceptual Metaphor through Blending: Learning Activities Embodying the Substance Metaphor for Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Hunter G.; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a particular blended learning space is especially productive in developing understanding of energy transfers and transformations. In this blended space, naturally occurring learner interactions like body movement, gesture, and metaphorical speech are blended with a conceptual metaphor of energy as a substance in a class of…

  8. Amygdala Activation and Emotional Processing in Adolescents at Risk for Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Dawn L.; Pajtek, Stefan; Tarter, Ralph E.; Long, Elizabeth C.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies are needed that examine neurobiological characteristics in high-risk individuals prior to substance use disorder (SUD) development. In this pilot study, 4 adolescent subjects at high risk for SUD (having at least 1 parent with an SUD) were compared with 4 adolescent reference subjects on a cortico-limbic reactivity paradigm, where they…

  9. [Role of biologically active substances in the formation of cardiogenic reflex effects on circulation].

    PubMed

    Pavliuchenko, V B; Moĭbenko, O O; Datsenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the literary and own authors data about the participation some endogenous bioregulators (prostacyclin, bradykinin, nitric oxide) in the cardiogenic depressor reflexes formation is represented in this review. Possibility of chemosensitivity of the vagal afferent fibers for this substances and its role in the formation of cardiogenic effects on circulation is discussed.

  10. Revealing of Biological Activity in Crude Extracts, Seperated Fractions, Groups of Chemical Substance and Individual Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crude extracts, separated fractions, groups of chemical substances, and individual compounds from natural sources are all evaluated stepwise while performing purifications in in-house bioassays. In a stepwise fashion proceeding from crude extracts to fractions and on to pure compounds, decisions ar...

  11. Public Parks in Hong Kong: Characteristics of Physical Activity Areas and Their Users

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Bik C.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Sit, Cindy H. P.

    2016-01-01

    Public parks, salient locations for engaging populations in health promoting physical activity, are especially important in high-density cities. We used the System for Observing Physical Activity in Communities (SOPARC) to conduct the first-ever surveillance study of nine public parks in Hong Kong (288 observation sessions during 36 weekdays and 36 weekend days) and observed 28,585 visitors in 262 diverse areas/facilities. Parks were widely used throughout the day on weekdays and weekend days and across summer and autumn; visitor rates were among the highest seen in 24 SOPARC studies. In contrast to other studies where teens and children dominated park use, most visitors (71%) were adults and seniors. More males (61%) than females used the parks, and they dominated areas designed for sports. Over 60% of visitors were observed engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, a rate higher than other SOPARC studies. Facilities with user fees were less accessible than non-fee areas, but they provided relatively more supervised and organized activities. Assessing parks by age, gender, and physical activity can provide useful information relative to population health. This study not only provides information useful to local administrators for planning and programming park facilities relative to physical activity, but it also provides a baseline for comparison by other high-density cities. PMID:27367709

  12. User experiences of mobile controlled games for activation, rehabilitation and recreation of elderly and physically impaired.

    PubMed

    Sirkka, Andrew; Merilampi, Sari; Koivisto, Antti; Leinonen, Markus; Leino, Mirka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study how aged people experience mobile controlled game as a method of rehabilitation and recreation. The target group contained persons 70+ years of age living in assisted living conditions (N=34). The average age of the participants was 85.9 years. Women (n=17) and men (n=17) were equally presented in the sample group. Only 12 % (n=4) of participants were involved in an active weekly-based rehabilitation, light physical sitting exercises 38% (n=13). Three (n=3) of the participants (9%) used computers (net banking), and 20 (59%) used mobile phones on daily basis. Social activities and physical activation seem to be rather inadequate and traditional in assisted living organizations. The overall experiences of mobile controlled game described in this paper appeared to be a successful experiment also proving that the elderly are not as reluctant to use technical devices or playing virtual games as often thought. The game was reckoned very motivating, interesting, and entertaining both by the aged and the staff. Activation, rehabilitation and recreation in the elderly homes or assisted living organizations could benefit from utilization of new technology providing new ways and solutions that motivate the users and offer also possibilities for measuring and follow-up of the physical impacts. The future goals to improve the game were set according to the feedback given in this survey: a) wider variety of controlling modes for the game, b) developing various difficulty levels, c) developing the game to support different kinds of body movements, d) easily modified according to the individual user's exercising or rehabilitation needs as well as e) emphasizing the social aspects of the game by producing multiplayer versions.

  13. A Smartphone Application Significantly Improved Diabetes Self-Care Activities with High User Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Jin; Byun, Jong Kyu; Park, So Young; Hong, Soo Min; Chin, Sang Ouk; Chon, Suk; Oh, Seungjoon; Woo, Jeong-taek; Kim, Sung Woon; Kim, Young Seol

    2015-01-01

    Background We developed for the first time a smartphone application designed for diabetes self-management in Korea and registered a patent for the relevant algorithm. We also investigated the user satisfaction with the application and the change in diabetes related self-care activities after using the application. Methods We conducted a questionnaire survey on volunteers with diabetes who were using the application. Ninety subjects responded to the questionnaire between June 2012 and March 2013. A modified version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) was used in this study. Results The survey results exhibited a mean subject age of 44.0 years old, and males accounted for 78.9% of the subjects. Fifty percent of the subjects had diabetes for less than 3 years. The majority of respondents experienced positive changes in their clinical course after using the application (83.1%) and were satisfied with the structure and completeness of the application (86.7%). Additionally, the respondents' answers indicated that the application was easy to use (96.7%) and recommendable to others (97.7%) and that they would continue using the application to manage their diabetes (96.7%). After using the Diabetes Notepad application, diabetes related self-care activities assessed by SDSCA displayed statistically significant improvements (P<0.05), except for the number of days of drinking. Conclusion This smartphone-based application can be a useful tool leading to positive changes in diabetes related self-care activities and increase user satisfaction. PMID:26124991

  14. Effectiveness of Couple-Based HIV Counseling and Testing for Women Substance Users and Their Primary Male Partners: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, James M.; Tortu, Stephanie; Pouget, Enrique R.; Torres, Leilani; Rodriguez, William; Hamid, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    A randomized trial was conducted to test the effectiveness of couple-based HIV counseling and testing (CB-HIV-CT) and women-only relationship-focused HIV counseling and testing (WRF-HIV-CT) in reducing HIV risk compared to the National Institute on Drug Abuse HIV-CT standard intervention. Substance using HIV-negative women and their primary heterosexual partner (N = 330 couples) were randomized to 1 of the 3 interventions. Follow-up assessments measuring HIV risk behaviors and other relevant variables were conducted at 3- and 9-months postintervention. Repeated measures generalized linear mixed model analysis was used to assess treatment effects. A significant reduction in HIV risk was observed over the 9-month assessment in the CB-HIV-CT group compared to that of the control group (b = −0.51, t[527] = −3.20, P = 0.002) and compared to that of the WRF-HIV-CT group (b = −0.34, t[527] = −2.07, P = 0.04), but no significant difference was observed between WRF-HIV-CT and controls (b = −0.17, t[527] = −1.09, P = 0.28). A brief couple-based HIV counseling and testing intervention designed to address both drug-related and sexual risk behaviors among substance using women and their primary male partners was shown to be more effective at reducing overall HIV risk compared to a standard HIV-CT intervention in an urban setting. PMID:23555059

  15. Substance P and the neurokinin-1 receptor regulate electroencephalogram non-rapid eye movement sleep slow-wave activity locally.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Karpova, S A; Yang, X; Gerashchenko, D

    2015-01-22

    The neuropeptide substance P is an excitatory neurotransmitter produced by various cells including neurons and microglia that is involved in regulating inflammation and cerebral blood flow--functions that affect sleep and slow-wave activity (SWA). Substance P is the major ligand for the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), which is found throughout the brain including the cortex. The NK-1R is found on sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase whose activity is associated with SWA. We determined the effects of local cortical administration of a NK-1R agonist (substance P-fragment 1, 7) and a NK-1R antagonist (CP96345) on sleep and SWA in mice. The NK-1R agonist significantly enhanced SWA for several hours when applied locally to the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere as the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode but not after application to the contralateral hemisphere when compared to saline vehicle control injections. In addition, a significant compensatory reduction in SWA was found after the NK-1R agonist-induced enhancements in SWA. Conversely, injections of the NK-1R antagonist into the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere of the EEG electrode attenuated SWA compared to vehicle injections but this effect was not found after injections of the NK-1R antagonist into contralateral hemisphere as the EEG electrode. Non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep duration responses after NK-1R agonist and antagonist injections were not significantly different from the responses to the vehicle. Our findings indicate that the substance P and the NK-1R are involved in regulating SWA locally.

  16. Antibacterial and hemolytic activities of linenscin OC2, a hydrophobic substance produced by Brevibacterium linens OC2.

    PubMed

    Boucabeille, C; Mengin-Lecreulx, D; Henckes, G; Simonet, J M; van Heijenoort, J

    1997-08-15

    Linenscin OC2 is an antibacterial substance produced by the orange cheese coryneform bacterium Brevibacterium linens OC2. It inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria but it is inactive against Gram-negative bacteria. The intact outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria was shown to be an effective permeability barrier against linenscin OC2. At high dosage the effect of linenscin OC2 was bacteriolytic on Listeria innocua. Bacteriostasis was observed at low dosage and peptidoglycan biosynthesis was affected at an early step upstream of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. Hemolytic activity of this substance on sheep erythrocytes suggested a common mode of action on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. It also suggested that the cytoplasmic membrane might be the primary target of linenscin OC2.

  17. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces a Yeast Substance that Exhibits Estrogenic Activity in Mammalian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David; Stathis, Peter A.; Hirst, Margaret A.; Price Stover, E.; Do, Yung S.; Kurz, Walter

    1984-06-01

    Partially purified lipid extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain a substance that displaces tritiated estradiol from rat uterine cytosol estrogen receptors. The yeast product induces estrogenic bioresponses in mammalian systems as measured by induction of progesterone receptors in cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and by a uterotrophic response and progesterone receptor induction after administration to ovariectomized mice. The findings raise the possibility that bakers' yeast may be a source of environmental estrogens.

  19. Contingent reinforcement of personal goal activities for adolescents with substance use disorders during post-residential continuing care.

    PubMed

    Godley, Susan H; Godley, Mark D; Wright, Kelli L; Funk, Rodney R; Petry, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) is efficacious in improving outcomes of substance-abusing patients, but CM studies are relatively rare in adolescents. CM approaches can reinforce both abstinence and adherence to treatment-related goal areas. This paper describes 1,739 different activities in 10 goal areas (e.g., education, family/friends, and social/recreational) chosen by 86 adolescents who were participating in a multiple week CM study that reinforced both abstinence and adherence with goal-related activities. The mean activities selected was 20, and the mean completed was 13. Overall, 1,114 or 64% of chosen activities were completed. The clinical feasibility of activity incentive programs for adolescents is discussed.

  20. Impact of contextual factors and substance characteristics on perspectives toward cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Sebastian; Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Eric; Sauer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive performance with substances--especially prescription drugs--is a fiercely debated topic among scholars and in the media. The empirical basis for these discussions is limited, given that the actual nature of factors that influence the acceptability of and willingness to use cognitive enhancement substances remains unclear. In an online factorial survey, contextual and substance-specific characteristics of substances that improve academic performance were varied experimentally and presented to respondents. Students in four German universities rated their willingness to use and moral acceptance of different substances for cognitive enhancement. We found that the overall willingness to use performance enhancing substances is low. Most respondents considered the use of these substances as morally unacceptable. Situational influences such as peer pressure, policies concerning substance use, relative performance level of peers, but also characteristics of the substance, such as perceptions of substance safety, shape the willingness and acceptability of using a substance to enhance academic performance. Among the findings is evidence of a contagion effect meaning that the willingness was higher when the respondents have more CE drug users in their social network. We also found deterrence effects from strong side effects of using the substance, as well as from policy regulations and sanctions. Regulations might activate social norms against usage and sanctions can be seen as costly to users. Moreover, enhancement substances seem to be most tempting to low performers to catch up with others compared to high performers. By identifying contextual factors and substance characteristics influencing the willingness and acceptability of cognitive enhancers, policy approaches could consider these insights to better manage the use of such substances.

  1. Binding of dicamba to soluble and bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from aerobic activated sludge: a fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiangliang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daoyong; Chen, Xi; Song, Wenjuan; Wu, Fengchang

    2010-05-15

    Binding of dicamba to soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) from aerobic activated sludge was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Two protein-like fluorescence peaks (peak A with Ex/Em=225 nm/342-344 nm and peak B with Ex/Em=275/340-344 nm) were identified in SEPS and BEPS. Humic-like fluorescence peak C (Ex/Em=270-275 nm/450-460 nm) was only found in BEPS. Fluorescence of the peaks A and B for SEPS and peak A for BEPS were markedly quenched by dicamba at all temperatures whereas fluorescence of peaks B and C for BEPS was quenched only at 298 K. A dynamic process dominated the fluorescence quenching of peak A of both SEPS and BEPS. Fluorescence quenching of peak B and C was governed a static process. The effective quenching constants (logK(a)) were 4.725-5.293 for protein-like fluorophores of SEPS and 4.23-5.190 for protein-like fluorophores of BEPS, respectively. LogK(a) for humic-like substances was 3.85. Generally, SEPS had greater binding capacity for dicamba than BEPS, and protein-like substances bound dicamba more strongly than humic-like substances. Binding of dicamba to SEPS and BEPS was spontaneous and exothermic. Electrostatic force and hydrophobic interaction forces play a crucial role in binding of dicamba to EPS.

  2. Effect of salinity on extracellular polymeric substances of activated sludge from an anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Gao, Mengchun; Wang, Zhe; She, Zonglian; Chang, Qingbo; Sun, Changqing; Zhang, Jian; Ren, Yun; Yang, Ning

    2013-11-01

    The effect of salinity on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of activated sludge was investigated in an anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The contents of loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) were positively correlated with the salinity. The polysaccharide (PS) and protein (PN) contents in both LB-EPS and TB-EPS increased with the increase of salinity. With the increase of salinity from 0.5% to 6%, the PN/PS ratios in LB-EPS and TB-EPS decreased from 4.8 to 0.9 and from 2.9 to 1.4, respectively. The four fluorescence peaks in both LB-EPS and TB-EPS identified by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy are attributed to PN-like substances and humic acid-like substances. The Fourier transform infrared spectra of the LB-EPS and TB-EPS appeared to be very similar, but the differences across the spectra were apparent in terms of the relative intensity of some bands with the increase of salinity. The sludge volume index showed a linear correlation with LB-EPS (R(2)=0.9479) and TB-EPS (R(2)=0.9355) at different salinities, respectively.

  3. Sunglint effects on the characterization of optically active substances in high spatial resolution airborne hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streher, A. S.; Faria Barbosa, C. Clemente; Soares Galvão, L.; Goodman, J. A.; Silva, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    Sunglint, also known as the specular reflection of light from water surfaces, is a component of sensor-received radiance that represents a confounding factor on the characterization of water bodies by remote sensing. In airborne remote sensing images, the effect of sunglint can be minimized by optimizing the flight paths, directing the sensor towards or away from the Sun, and by keeping solar zenith angles between 30° and 60°. However, these guidelines cannot always be applied, often due to the irregular spatial pattern of lakes, estuaries and coastlines. The present study assessed the impact of sunglint on the relationship between the optically active substances (OAS) concentration, in optically complex waters, and the spectral information provided by an airborne high spatial resolution hyperspectral sensor (SpecTIR). The Ibitinga reservoir, located in southeastern Brazil (state of São Paulo), was selected as the study area because of its meandering shape. As a result, there is demanding constant changes in data acquisition geometry to achieve complete coverage, therefore not allowing sunglint conditions to be minimized during image acquisition. Field data collection was carried out on October 23 and 24, 2011. During these two days, 15 water stations along the reservoir were sampled, concurrently with the SpecTIR image acquisition in 357 bands (398-2455 nm) and at 3 m spatial resolution. Chlorophyll, pheophytin, total suspended solids, organic and inorganic suspended solids and colored dissolved matter were determined in laboratory. The images were corrected for the atmospheric effects using the Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) algorithm and then geometrically corrected. In order to evaluate the sunglint effects on the OAS characterization, the images were corrected for such effects using the deglint algorithm from Goodman et al. (2008). The SpecTIR 662-nm band reflectance was selected to be correlated to the OAS due to

  4. Detection of “Bath Salts” and Other Novel Psychoactive Substances in Hair Samples of Ecstasy/MDMA/“Molly” Users

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Salomone, Alberto; Vincenti, Marco; Cleland, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ecstasy (MDMA) in the US is commonly adulterated with other drugs, but research has not focused on purity of ecstasy since the phenomenon of “Molly” (ecstasy marketed as pure MDMA) arose in the US. Methods We piloted a rapid electronic survey in 2015 to assess use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) and other drugs among 679 nightclub/festival-attending young adults (age 18–25) in New York City. A quarter (26.1%) of the sample provided a hair sample to be analyzed for the presence of select synthetic cathinones (“bath salts”) and some other NPS. Samples were analyzed using fully validated UHPLC-MS/MS methods. To examine consistency of self-report, analyses focused on the 48 participants with an analyzable hair sample who reported lifetime ecstasy/MDMA/Molly use. Results Half (50.0%) of the hair samples contained MDMA, 47.9% contained butylone, and 10.4% contained methylone. Of those who reported no lifetime use of “bath salts”, stimulant NPS, or unknown pills or powders, about four out of ten (41.2%) tested positive for butylone, methylone, alpha-PVP, 5/6-APB, or 4-FA. Racial minorities were more likely to test positive for butylone or test positive for NPS after reporting no lifetime use. Frequent nightclub/festival attendance was the strongest predictor of testing positive for MDMA, butylone, or methylone. Discussion Results suggest that many ecstasy-using nightclub/festival attendees may be unintentionally using “bath salts” or other NPS. Prevention and harm reduction education is needed for this population and “drug checking” (e.g., pill testing) may be beneficial for those rejecting abstinence. PMID:26883685

  5. A novel algorithm for detecting active propulsion in wheelchair users following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Popp, Werner L; Brogioli, Michael; Leuenberger, Kaspar; Albisser, Urs; Frotzler, Angela; Curt, Armin; Gassert, Roger; Starkey, Michelle L

    2016-03-01

    Physical activity in wheelchair-bound individuals can be assessed by monitoring their mobility as this is one of the most intense upper extremity activities they perform. Current accelerometer-based approaches for describing wheelchair mobility do not distinguish between self- and attendant-propulsion and hence may overestimate total physical activity. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an inertial measurement unit based algorithm to monitor wheel kinematics and the type of wheelchair propulsion (self- or attendant-) within a "real-world" situation. Different sensor set-ups were investigated, ranging from a high precision set-up including four sensor modules with a relatively short measurement duration of 24 h, to a less precise set-up with only one module attached at the wheel exceeding one week of measurement because the gyroscope of the sensor was turned off. The "high-precision" algorithm distinguished self- and attendant-propulsion with accuracy greater than 93% whilst the long-term measurement set-up showed an accuracy of 82%. The estimation accuracy of kinematic parameters was greater than 97% for both set-ups. The possibility of having different sensor set-ups allows the use of the inertial measurement units as high precision tools for researchers as well as unobtrusive and simple tools for manual wheelchair users.

  6. Evaluating the online activity of users of the e-Bug web site.

    PubMed

    de Quincey, Ed; Kostkova, Patty; Jawaheer, Gawesh; Farrell, David; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Weinberg, Julius

    2011-06-01

    Web server log analysis is being increasingly used to evaluate the user behaviour on healthcare resource web sites due to the detailed record of activity that they contain. This study aimed to use this information to evaluate the e-Bug web site, a healthcare resource that provides a range of educational resources about microbes, hand and respiratory hygiene, and antibiotics. This evaluation was conducted by analysing the web server logs of the e-Bug web site for the period January 2008 to November 2009, using a proprietary application named Sawmill. The e-Bug web site has had >900,000 page views generated from >88,000 users, with an increase in May 2009 during the swine flu epidemic and a further increase in September 2009 following the official launch of e-Bug. The majority of visitors were from the UK, but visits were recorded from 190 different countries. Word(®) document resources were downloaded >169,000 times, with the most popular being a swine flu factsheet. PowerPoint(®) document resources were downloaded >36,000 times, with the most popular relating to the 'chain of infection'. The majority of visitor referrals originated from search engines, with the most popular referral keywords being variations on the e-Bug name. The most common non-search engine referrals were from other healthcare resources and agencies. Use of the site has increased markedly since the official launch of e-Bug, with average page views of >200,000 per month, from a range of countries, illustrating the international demand for a teaching resource for microbes, hygiene and antibiotics.

  7. Improved Aqueous Solubility and Antihypercholesterolemic Activity of Ezetimibe on Formulating with Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Hydrophilic Auxiliary Substances.

    PubMed

    Srivalli, Kale Mohana Raghava; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the aqueous solubility, dissolution, and pharmacodynamic properties of a BCS class II drug, ezetimibe (Eze) by preparing ternary cyclodextrin complex systems. We investigated the potential synergistic effect of two novel hydrophilic auxiliary substances, D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) and L-ascorbic acid-2-glucoside (AA2G) on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) solubilization of poorly water-soluble hypocholesterolemic drug, Eze. In solution state, the binary and ternary systems were analyzed by phase solubility studies and Job's plot. The solid complexes prepared by freeze-drying were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The log P values, aqueous solubility, dissolution, and antihypercholesterolemic activity of all systems were studied. The analytical techniques confirmed the formation of inclusion complexes in the binary and ternary systems. HPBCD complexation significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the log P and improved the solubility, dissolution, and hypocholesterolemic properties of Eze, and the addition of ternary component produced further significant improvement (p < 0.05) even compared to binary system. The remarkable reduction in log P and enhancement in solubility, dissolution, and antihypercholesterolemic activity due to the addition of TPGS or AA2G may be attributed to enhanced wetting, dispersibility, and complete amorphization. The use of TPGS or AA2G as ternary hydrophilic auxiliary substances improved the HPBCD solubilization and antihypercholesterolemic activity of Eze.

  8. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  9. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide {sup 252}Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world`s largest inventory of compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of {le} 10{sup 11} neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at the sample. Total flux of {ge}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the {sup 252}Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis.

  10. Do ePortfolios Contribute to Learners' Reflective Thinking Activities? : A Preliminary Study of Nursing Staff Users.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Wen-Sheng; Kuo, Kuang-Ming; Talley, Paul C; Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study are threefold: 1) to find out what characteristics are required for the successful use of ePortfolios; 2) to discover what activities best represent reflective thinking during the use of ePortfolios; and, 3) to investigate the interrelationship between nursing staff users' perceived success levels with ePortfolios and with their reflective thinking activities. Survey methodology was used to gather responses from 78 nurses from a medical center located in southern Taiwan via questionnaires. Factor analysis and canonical correlation analysis were used to analyze the collected data. The results demonstrated that system quality, information quality, and user satisfaction are important variables in successful ePortfolio usage; while habitual action, understanding, reflection, and critical reflection are major variables of reflective thinking. Further, we found a significant relationship exists between the relative success of ePortfolios and reflective thinking activities of ePortfolios users. The subject hospital should pay special attention to important characteristics including system quality, information quality, and user satisfaction when employing ePortfolios to help nursing staff users to achieve their learning goals through this form of reflective thinking.

  11. Association Between User-Generated Commuting Data and Population-Representative Active Commuting Surveillance Data - Four Cities, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Geoffrey P; Ussery, Emily N; Riordan, Brian; Wendel, Arthur M

    2016-09-16

    Creating environments that support all types of physical activity, including active transportation, is a public health priority (1). Public health surveillance that identifies the locations where community members walk and bicycle (i.e., engage in active transportation) can inform such efforts. Traditional population-representative active transportation surveillance incurs a considerable time lag between data collection and dissemination, and often lacks geographic specificity (2). Conversely, user-generated active transportation data from Global Positioning System (GPS)-based activity tracking devices and mobile applications can provide near real-time information, but might be subject to self-selection bias among users. CDC analyzed the association between GPS-based commuting data from a company that allows tracking of activity with a mobile application (Strava, Inc., San Francisco, California) and population-representative commuting data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS) (3) for four U.S. cities. The level of analysis was the Census block group. The number of GPS-tracked commuters in Strava was associated with the number of ACS active commuters (Spearman's rho = 0.60), suggesting block groups were ranked similarly based on these distinct but related measurements. The correlation was higher in high population density areas. User-generated active transportation data might complement traditional surveillance systems by providing near real-time, location-specific information on where active transportation occurs.

  12. Decreasing toxic and mutagenic activity of soils through the application of humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorova Alla, I.; Pavlichenko Artem, 2.; Klimkina Iryna, 3.

    2009-04-01

    Based on an example of conditions on mining industry land adjacent to the Dnepr River in the Dnepropetrovsk Region (Ukraine), the ecological quality of the soils was evaluated by cytogenetic methods and, in parallel, the efficiency of using humates obtained from brown coal of the Alexandria deposit was also researched. During an ecological monitoring programme from 1997 to 2007, the genetic characteristics of soils at 12 locations in Dnepropetrovsk, and at 33 locations in four other industrial mining areas in the region, was studied. A theoretical basis for the use of humic substances for blocking the migration paths of ecological toxic-matter within a soil-to-plant system was reasoned, namely that introducing natrium humate into the soil would promote a normalization of the cell division processes and a reduction in the chromosome aberration rate in the root meristem of the biological indicators. Laboratory tests involved growing seeds of an indicator plant (Pisum sativum L.) in the different soils, to some of which humic substances had been added. The data showed evidence that the soils of the region display a rather patchy picture in terms of toxic and mutagen features. This was obvious from the variety of levels on the mitotic index, as well as from the increase of 5 to 24 times the frequency of aberrant chromosomes. Introducing 0.01per cent of a Christecol water solution into a substratum for growing the indicator plant apparently reduced (P<0,01) the level of the chromosome aberrations in the meristem cells of the test material. The mutagenic rates of the soils during the test was reduced by 1.5 to 4 times and, at the same time, a reduction of the soil toxic rates was also observed. The reduction in chromosome aberration levels in the cells of the tested materials for the soils in the different city districts, varied from 2.9 to 12.4 times. Importantly, a reliable reduction in the genetic damage under the influence of humic substances was observed in all test

  13. Impact of Contextual Factors and Substance Characteristics on Perspectives toward Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Sebastian; Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Éric; Sauer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive performance with substances–especially prescription drugs–is a fiercely debated topic among scholars and in the media. The empirical basis for these discussions is limited, given that the actual nature of factors that influence the acceptability of and willingness to use cognitive enhancement substances remains unclear. In an online factorial survey, contextual and substance-specific characteristics of substances that improve academic performance were varied experimentally and presented to respondents. Students in four German universities rated their willingness to use and moral acceptance of different substances for cognitive enhancement. We found that the overall willingness to use performance enhancing substances is low. Most respondents considered the use of these substances as morally unacceptable. Situational influences such as peer pressure, policies concerning substance use, relative performance level of peers, but also characteristics of the substance, such as perceptions of substance safety, shape the willingness and acceptability of using a substance to enhance academic performance. Among the findings is evidence of a contagion effect meaning that the willingness was higher when the respondents have more CE drug users in their social network. We also found deterrence effects from strong side effects of using the substance, as well as from policy regulations and sanctions. Regulations might activate social norms against usage and sanctions can be seen as costly to users. Moreover, enhancement substances seem to be most tempting to low performers to catch up with others compared to high performers. By identifying contextual factors and substance characteristics influencing the willingness and acceptability of cognitive enhancers, policy approaches could consider these insights to better manage the use of such substances. PMID:23940757

  14. 76 FR 37773 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; FNS User Access...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... the electronic form FNS 674, titled ``FNS User Access Request.'' This form will continue to allow...: 0584-0532. Form Number: FNS 674. Expiration Date: November 30, 2011. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Abstract: The FNS 674 is designed to collect user information required...

  15. Neuropeptide Substance-P-Conjugated Chitosan Nanofibers as an Active Modulator of Stem Cell Recruiting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sup; Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Wheemoon; Gu, Bon Kang; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The goal to successful wound healing is essentially to immobilize and recruit appropriate numbers of host stem or progenitor cells to the wound area. In this study, we developed a chitosan nanofiber-immobilized neuropeptide substance-P (SP), which mediates stem cell mobilization and migration, onto the surfaces of nanofibers using a peptide-coupling agent, and evaluated its biological effects on stem cells. The amount of immobilized SP on chitosan nanofibers was modulated over the range of 5.89 ± 3.27 to 75.29 ± 24.31 ng when reacted with 10 to 500 ng SP. In vitro migration assays showed that SP-incorporated nanofibers induced more rapid migration of human mesenchymal stem cells on nanofibers compared to pristine samples. Finally, the conjugated SP evoked a minimal foreign body reaction and recruited a larger number of CD29- and CD44-positive stem cells into nanofibers in a mouse subcutaneous pocket model. PMID:26751441

  16. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  17. Effects of Repetitive Shoulder Activity on the Subacromial Space in Manual Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Sheng; Boninger, Michael; Worobey, Lynn; Farrokhi, Shawn; Koontz, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated (1) the effect of repetitive weight-relief raises (WR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) on the acromiohumeral distance (AHD) among manual wheelchair users (MWUs) and (2) the relationship between shoulder pain, subject characteristics, and AHD changes. Twenty-three MWUs underwent ultrasound imaging of the nondominant shoulder in an unloaded baseline position and while holding a WR position before and after the WR/ER tasks. Paired t-tests and Spearman correlational analysis were used to assess differences in the AHD before and after each task and the relationships between pain, subject characteristics, and the AHD measures. A significant reduction in the subacromial space (P < 0.01) occurred when subjects performed a WR position compared to baseline. Individuals with increased years of disability had greater AHD percentage narrowing after WR (P = 0.008). Increased shoulder pain was associated with AHD percentage narrowing after ER (P ≤ 0.007). The results support clinical practice guidelines that recommend MWUs limit WR to preserve shoulder function. The isolated repetitive shoulder activity did not contribute to the changes of subacromial space in MWUs. The ultrasonographic measurement of the AHD may be a target for identifying future interventions that prevent pain. PMID:25215283

  18. Uncertainties in biological responses that influence hazard and risk approaches to the regulation of endocrine active substances.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Joanne L; Bjerregaard, Poul; Brugger, Kristin E; Gray, L Earl; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah M; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R

    2017-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting substances (EDS) may have certain biological effects including delayed effects, multigenerational effects, and may display nonmonotonic dose-response (NMDR) relationships that require careful consideration when determining environmental hazards. Endocrine disrupting substances can have specific and profound effects when exposure occurs during sensitive windows of the life cycle (development, reproduction). This creates the potential for delayed effects that manifest when exposure has ceased, possibly in a different life stage. This potential underscores the need for testing in appropriate (sensitive) life stages and full life cycle designs. Such tests are available in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) tool box and should be used to derive endpoints that can be considered protective of all life stages. Similarly, the potential for effects to be manifest in subsequent generations (multigenerational effects) has also been raised as a potential issue in the derivation of appropriate endpoints for EDS. However, multigenerational studies showing increasing sensitivity of successive generations are uncommon. Indeed this is reflected in the design of new higher tier tests to assess endocrine active substances (EAS) that move to extended one-generation designs and away from multi-generational studies. The occurrence of NMDRs is also considered a limiting factor for reliable risk assessment of EDS. Evidence to date indicates NMDRs are more prevalent in in vitro and mechanistic data, not often translating to adverse apical endpoints that would be used in risk assessment. A series of steps to evaluate NMDRs in the context of endocrine hazard and risk assessment procedures is presented. If careful consideration of delayed, multigenerational effects and NMDRs is made, it is feasible to assess environmental endocrine hazards and derive robust apical endpoints for risk assessment procedures ensuring a high level of environmental

  19. Ice binding, recrystallization inhibition, and cryoprotective properties of ice-active substances associated with Antarctic sea ice diatoms.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A; Knight, Charles A

    2003-04-01

    Extracellular macromolecules associated with Antarctic sea ice diatoms were previously shown to have ice-binding activities. The function of these ice-active substances (IASs) has not been identified. Here we show that two of the IASs have a strong ability to inhibit the recrystallization of ice, possibly signifying a cryoprotectant function. To test this possibility, two species of marine diatom (one Antarctic and one temperate) were subjected to a single freeze-thaw cycle (approximately 20h at -4 or -5 degrees C) in the presence or absence of IAS. Viability, based on a double staining technique, was 15-29% higher in the presence of IAS. Etching of single crystal ice hemispheres grown from dilute IAS solutions indicated that the IASs bind to specific faces of ice and are incorporated into the ice lattice. Together, these results suggest that the IASs acts as a cryoprotectant, probably through some ice-binding mechanism.

  20. A MATLAB-based graphical user interface for the identification of muscular activations from surface electromyography signals.

    PubMed

    Mengarelli, Alessandro; Cardarelli, Stefano; Verdini, Federica; Burattini, Laura; Fioretti, Sandro; Di Nardo, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a graphical user interface (GUI) built in MATLAB® environment is presented. This interactive tool has been developed for the analysis of superficial electromyography (sEMG) signals and in particular for the assessment of the muscle activation time intervals. After the signal import, the tool performs a first analysis in a totally user independent way, providing a reliable computation of the muscular activation sequences. Furthermore, the user has the opportunity to modify each parameter of the on/off identification algorithm implemented in the presented tool. The presence of an user-friendly GUI allows the immediate evaluation of the effects that the modification of every single parameter has on the activation intervals recognition, through the real-time updating and visualization of the muscular activation/deactivation sequences. The possibility to accept the initial signal analysis or to modify the on/off identification with respect to each considered signal, with a real-time visual feedback, makes this GUI-based tool a valuable instrument in clinical, research applications and also in an educational perspective.

  1. Effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, bound extracellular polymeric substances and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xun; Wang, Peifang; Chen, Bin; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have occurred in various water bodies during recent decades and made serious health hazards to plants, animals and humans. Iron is an important micronutrient for algal growth and recently, the concentration of which has increased remarkably in freshwaters. In this paper, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 was cultivated under non-iron (0μM), iron-limited (10μM) and iron-replete (100μM) conditions to investigate the effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, EPS and microcystin production. The results showed that algal cell density and chlorophyll-a content were maximal at the highest iron concentration. Antioxidant enzymes activity increased notably under all three conditions in the early stage of experiment, of which the SOD activity recovered soon from oxidative stress in 10μM group. The productions of some protein-like substances and humic acid-like substances of bound EPS were inhibited in iron-containing groups in the early stage of experiment while promoted after the adaptation period of Microcystis aeruginosa. Iron addition is a factor affecting the formation of cyanobacterial blooms through its impact on the content of LB-EPS and the composition of TB-EPS. The intracellular MC-LR concentration and the productivity potential of MC-LR were the lowest in 0μM group and highest in 10μM group. No obvious extracellular release of MC-LR was observed during the cultivation time. Therefore, iron addition can promote the physiological activities of M. aeruginosa, but a greater harm could be brought into environment under iron-limited (10μM) condition than under iron-replete (100μM) condition.

  2. Substance abuse and child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kathryn

    2009-04-01

    Pediatricians and other medical providers caring for children need to be aware of the dynamics in the significant relationship between substance abuse and child maltreatment. A caregiver's use and abuse of alcohol, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and other drugs place the child at risk in multiple ways. Members of the medical community need to understand these risks because the medical community plays a unique and important role in identifying and caring for these children. Substance abuse includes the abuse of legal drugs as well as the use of illegal drugs. The abuse of legal substances may be just as detrimental to parental functioning as abuse of illicit substances. Many substance abusers are also polysubstance users and the compounded effect of the abuse of multiple substances may be difficult to measure. Often other interrelated social features, such as untreated mental illness, trauma history, and domestic violence, affect these families.

  3. Across the health-social care divide: elderly people as active users of health care and social care.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K

    2001-03-01

    Several ways in which elderly people may assume an active role when using welfare services are discussed here. Selected findings are presented from a study that explored the experience and behaviour of elderly people on discharge from inpatient care with regard to criteria indicating user influence or control (namely participation, representation, access, choice, information and redress). Data were collected via semistructured interviews with service users (n = 30) soon after their return home from hospital. A number of differences were revealed between health care and social care in relation to users being provided with opportunities to assume an active role and in being willing and able to assume an active role. These differences were manifest in elderly service users accessing services, seeking information, exercising choice and acting independently of service providers. It appeared paradoxical that contact points were more easily defined with regard to health care yet users were more likely to exercise choice and act independently in securing social care. It is suggested that social care needs and appropriate service delivery are more easily recognised than making the link between perceived health care needs and appropriate services. In addition, it appeared that informal and private providers are more widely available and accessible for social care. If comprehensive continuing care is to be provided, incorporating both health and social care elements, greater uniformity appears to be required across the welfare sector. Lessons for social care provision from the delivery of health care suggest the clear definition of contact points to facilitate service use. Making health care more accessible, however, does not appear to be easily attainable due to the monopoly provision of health care and the lack of direct purchasing power by potential users.

  4. Everyday activities and social contacts among older deaf sign language users: relationships to health and well-being.

    PubMed

    Werngren-Elgström, Monica; Brandt, Ase; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the everyday activities and social contacts among older deaf sign language users, and to investigate relationships between these phenomena and the health and well-being within this group. The study population comprised deaf sign language users, 65 years or older, in Sweden. Data collection was based on interviews in sign language, including open-ended questions covering everyday activities and social contacts as well as self-rated instruments measuring aspects of health and subjective well-being. The results demonstrated that the group of participants was homogeneous in their productive and leisure activities, regardless of gender and age. The number of productive activities was related to all aspects of health, while the number of leisure activities was related to perceived health and subjective well-being. No significant relationship was found between aspects of health and subjective well-being and the frequency of social contacts with family/relatives or visiting the deaf club and meeting friends. It is concluded that the variety of activities at the deaf clubs are important for the subjective well-being of older deaf sign language users. Further research should investigate the importance and perceived value of the various activities at the deaf clubs. When evaluating the results of this study, the fact that the total number of participants was small, and the dropout rate was high, has to be borne in mind.

  5. Phytochemical studies of the phenolic substances in Aster glehni extract and its sedative and anticonvulsant activity.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Agung; Kim, Myung-Hoe; Choi, Jongwon; Choi, Jae Sue; Jung, Won Tae; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2012-03-01

    On high performance liquid chromatography, the caffeoylquinic acid (CQ) occupying the highest proportion of the water-ethanol (7:3) extract of Aster glehni (Compositae) leaves was 3-Op-coumaroylquinic acid (46.10 ± 4.22 mg/g of dried weight) among CQs tested. The IC₅₀ of the water-ethanol (7:3) extract was 4.23 ± 0.24 μg/mL in the peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-scavenging assay. Phytochemical isolation from A. glehni extract yielded three kaempferol glycosides. The water-ethanol (7:3) extract and both p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid, phenylpropanoid moieties of CQs, had sedative effects in pentobarbital-induced sleeping time in mice and anticonvulsant effects in pentylenetetrazole-induced mice. Furthermore, the phenolic substance-rich W-E (7:3) extract of A. glehni could be used to treat anxiety or convulsion partly due to its peroxynitrite-scavenging mechanism.

  6. Ecological risk assessment of substances with suspected estrogenic activity using standard laboratory fish tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gimeno, S.; Bowmer, C.T.

    1999-07-01

    The assessment of risks to the aquatic environment in the European Union is generally based on a comparison of Predicted Environmental Concentrations (PEC) with Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNEC) for surrogate, or representative, organisms of the receiving waters. Such risk assessments are required for new and priority existing chemicals, pesticides, and, in the near future, biocides; they are dependent on robust in vivo test data. Current strategies for ecological risk assessment were not designed to assess the risk of endocrine disrupters. The selection of suitable fish species and practical in vivo end points for determining endocrine disruption in fish are discussed, including the adaptation of some existing guidelines. This paper is partly based on a series of experiments conducted at the laboratory to look at the effects of a model alkylphenol (4-tert-pentylphenol), an industrial chemical intermediate, acting as a pseudo-estrogen on an all-male population of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Exposure to the test substance occurred at critical life stages for endocrine disruption. Biochemical parameters as well as histological parameters were applied, and their suitability to be used in ecological risk assessment is discussed.

  7. Structure-Property-Function Relationship in Humic Substances to Explain the Biological Activity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    García, Andrés Calderín; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrosio; Pereira, Marcos Gervasio; Castro, Rosane Nora; García-Mina, José María; Zonta, Everaldo; Lisboa, Francy Junior Gonçalves; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationship of humic substances (HSs) is key for understanding their role in soil. Despite progress, studies on this topic are still under discussion. We analyzed 37 humic fractions with respect to their isotopic composition, structural characteristics, and properties responsible for stimulating plant root parameters. We showed that regardless of the source of origin of the carbon (C3 or C4), soil-extracted HSs and humic acids (HAs) are structurally similar to each other. The more labile and functionalized HS fraction is responsible for root emission, whereas the more recalcitrant and less functionalized HA fraction is related to root growth. Labile structures promote root stimulation at lower concentrations, while recalcitrant structures require higher concentrations to promote a similar stimulus. These findings show that lability and recalcitrance, which are derived properties of humic fractions, are related to the type and intensity of their bioactivity. In summary, the comparison of humic fractions allowed a better understanding of the relationship between the source of origin of plant carbon and the structure, properties, and type and intensity of the bioactivity of HSs in plants. In this study, scientific concepts are unified and the basis for the agronomic use of HSs is established. PMID:26862010

  8. Notebook computer use with different monitor tilt angle: effects on posture, muscle activity and discomfort of neck pain users.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Wen-Ko; Chou, Wei-Ying; Chen, Bi-Hui

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the posture, muscle activities, and self reported discomforts of neck pain notebook computer users on three monitor tilt conditions: 100°, 115°, and 130°. Six subjects were recruited in this study to completed typing tasks. Results showed subjects have a trend to show the forward head posture in the condition that monitor was set at 100°, and the significant less neck and shoulder discomfort were noted in the condition that monitor was set at 130°. These result suggested neck pain notebook user to set their monitor tilt angle at 130°.

  9. Creating accessible science museums with user-activated environmental audio beacons (ping!).

    PubMed

    Landau, Steven; Wiener, William; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Giusti, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, Touch Graphics Company carried out research on a new invention that promises to improve accessibility to science museums for visitors who are visually impaired. The system, nicknamed Ping!, allows users to navigate an exhibit area, listen to audio descriptions, and interact with exhibits using a cell phone-based interface. The system relies on computer telephony, and it incorporates a network of wireless environmental audio beacons that can be triggered by users wishing to travel to destinations they choose. User testing indicates that the system is effective, both as a way-finding tool and as a means of providing accessible information on museum content. Follow-up development projects will determine if this approach can be successfully implemented in other settings and for other user populations.

  10. CHAD User's Guide: Extracting Human Activity Information from CHAD on the PC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    User manual that includes tutorials, what's inside the CHAD databases, background on individuals studies in CHAD, using data form individual studies, caveats, problems, notes, and database design and development.

  11. Toxic Substances in the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of toxic substances, examining pesticides and herbicides, heavy metals, industrial chemicals, and household substances. Includes a list of major toxic substances (indicating what they are, where they are found, and health concerns) and a student activity on how pesticides enter the food chain. (JN)

  12. The Xchange Point: A Drop-In Center for African American Active Injection Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMaster, Samuel A.; Vail, Kenneth A.; Neff, James Alan

    2002-01-01

    Notes the rise of the harm-reduction model in the provision of substance abuse services and the history and success of syringe exchange programs. Describes the Xchange Point, a nonprofit community-based AIDS services organization founded in 1996 as a street-based outreach and syringe exchange program. (Contains 15 references.) (GCP)

  13. A Preliminary Study of Functional Brain Activation among Marijuana Users during Performance of a Virtual Water Maze Task

    PubMed Central

    Sneider, Jennifer Tropp; Gruber, Staci A.; Rogowska, Jadwiga; Silveri, Marisa M.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported neurocognitive impairments associated with chronic marijuana use. Given that the hippocampus contains a high density of cannabinoid receptors, hippocampal-mediated cognitive functions, including visuospatial memory, may have increased vulnerability to chronic marijuana use. Thus, the current study examined brain activation during the performance of a virtual analogue of the classic Morris water maze task in 10 chronic marijuana (MJ) users compared to 18 nonusing (NU) comparison subjects. Imaging data were acquired using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI at 3.0 Tesla during retrieval (hidden platform) and motor control (visible platform) conditions. While task performance on learning trials was similar between groups, MJ users demonstrated a deficit in memory retrieval. For BOLD fMRI data, NU subjects exhibited greater activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus and cingulate gyrus compared to the MJ group for the Retrieval-Motor Control contrast (NU > MJ). These findings suggest that hypoactivation in MJ users may be due to differences in the efficient utilization of neuronal resources during the retrieval of memory. Given the paucity of data on visuospatial memory function in MJ users, these findings may help elucidate the neurobiological effects of marijuana on brain activation during memory retrieval. PMID:23951549

  14. Elucidating the mechanisms linking early pubertal timing, sexual activity, and substance use for maltreated versus nonmaltreated adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test models linking pubertal timing, peer substance use, sexual behavior, and substance use for maltreated versus comparison adolescents. Three theoretical mechanisms were tested: 1) peer influence links early pubertal timing to later sexual behavior and substance use, 2) early maturers engage in substance use on their own and then select substance-using friends, or 3) early maturers initiate sexual behaviors which leads them to substance-using peers. Methods The data came from a longitudinal study of the effects of child maltreatment on adolescent development (303 maltreated and 151 comparison adolescents; age: 9–13 years at initial wave). Multiple-group structural equation models tested the hypotheses across three timepoints including variables of pubertal timing, perception of peer substance use, sexual behavior, and self-reported substance use. Results Early pubertal timing was associated with substance-using peers only for maltreated adolescents, indicating the mediation path from early pubertal timing through substance-using peers to subsequent adolescent substance use and sexual behavior only holds for maltreated adolescents. Mediation via sexual behavior was significant for both maltreated and comparison adolescents. This indicates that sexual behavior may be a more universal mechanism linking early maturation with risky friends regardless of adverse life experiences. Conclusions The findings are a step toward elucidating the developmental pathways from early puberty to risk behavior and identifying early experiences that may alter mediation effects. PMID:26003577

  15. Influence of Accelerometer Type and Placement on Physical Activity Energy Expenditure Prediction in Manual Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Tom Edward; Walhin, Jean-Philippe; Thompson, Dylan; Bilzon, James Lee John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the validity of two accelerometer devices, at two different anatomical locations, for the prediction of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs). Methods Seventeen MWUs (36 ± 10 yrs, 72 ± 11 kg) completed ten activities; resting, folding clothes, propulsion on a 1% gradient (3,4,5,6 and 7 km·hr-1) and propulsion at 4km·hr-1 (with an additional 8% body mass, 2% and 3% gradient) on a motorised wheelchair treadmill. GT3X+ and GENEActiv accelerometers were worn on the right wrist (W) and upper arm (UA). Linear regression analysis was conducted between outputs from each accelerometer and criterion PAEE, measured using indirect calorimetry. Subsequent error statistics were calculated for the derived regression equations for all four device/location combinations, using a leave-one-out cross-validation analysis. Results Accelerometer outputs at each anatomical location were significantly (p < .01) associated with PAEE (GT3X+-UA; r = 0.68 and GT3X+-W; r = 0.82. GENEActiv-UA; r = 0.87 and GENEActiv-W; r = 0.88). Mean ± SD PAEE estimation errors for all activities combined were 15 ± 45%, 14 ± 50%, 3 ± 25% and 4 ± 26% for GT3X+-UA, GT3X+-W, GENEActiv-UA and GENEActiv-W, respectively. Absolute PAEE estimation errors for devices varied, 19 to 66% for GT3X+-UA, 17 to 122% for GT3X+-W, 15 to 26% for GENEActiv-UA and from 17.0 to 32% for the GENEActiv-W. Conclusion The results indicate that the GENEActiv device worn on either the upper arm or wrist provides the most valid prediction of PAEE in MWUs. Variation in error statistics between the two devices is a result of inherent differences in internal components, on-board filtering processes and outputs of each device. PMID:25955304

  16. Influence of religiosity on HIV risk behaviors in active injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, M; Sinacore, J M; Mensah, E K; Levy, J A

    2005-10-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive relationship between religiosity and the practice or adoption of protective health behaviors, including reduction of illicit drug use among hard-core injecting drug users (IDUs). The purpose of this study was to examine the role of religiosity in predicting HIV high-risk drug and sexual practices among a sample of IDUs in Chicago, USA. We hypothesized that high religiosity would be associated with a lower likelihood of IDUs engaging in risky behaviors for HIV transmission. Snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 1,095 active IDUs for HIV testing, counseling and partner notification. Data were analyzed from 880 subjects who self-identified with one of three religions, Christianity, Islam or Judaism. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between religiosity (based on self-reports of personal strength of religious belief: very strong; somewhat strong; not at all), independent of specific religion, and HIV risk behaviors (defined as 12 unsafe sex- and drug-related practices) as well as HIV serostatus. Contrary to our hypothesis, subjects with stronger religiosity were more likely to engage in four risk behaviors related to sharing injection paraphernalia. Compared to those who self-reported having no religiosity, subjects who stated that their lives were strongly influenced by religious beliefs were significantly more likely to share injection outfits, cookers, cotton and water. The association of certain HIV risk behaviors with higher religiosity has implications for HIV prevention and warrants further research to explore IDUs' interpretation of religious teachings and the role of religious education in HIV prevention programs.

  17. [Preclinical study of immunocorrection action of the sum of active substances of Coluria geoides (Pall.) Ledeb. (Rosaceae)].

    PubMed

    Dutova, S V; Karpova, M R; Myadelets, M A; Myasnaya, N V; Sherstoboev, E Yu

    2015-01-01

    A preclinical study of the immunocorrection action of the sum of active substances isolated from ethereal-oil plants Coluria geoides (Pall.) Ledeb. (Rosaceae family) with respect to experimental immunodeficiency showed that preparations relieve symptoms of immunodeficiency caused by the administration of cyclophosphan: suppressed synthesis of anti-erythrocyte antibodies (agglutinine) and proliferative processes in the spleen. Under the influence of C. geoides preparations, the absolute numbers of cariocytes and antibody forming cells in spleen significantly increased (compared to the group of animals with experimental immunodeficiency) and in some cases reached the background level. The drugs studied produced a more pronounced stimulating effect on the synthesis of specific immunoglobulins and proliferation of antibody forming cells of spleen as compared to the effect of Echinacea tincture. Preparation C-2 (extract from underground organs and grass of C. geoides obtained by percolation method with 70% ethanol) is most promising for in-depth research and the development of new effective drugs with immunocorrecting properties.

  18. "New drug" designations for new therapeutic entities: new active substance, new chemical entity, new biological entity, new molecular entity.

    PubMed

    Branch, Sarah K; Agranat, Israel

    2014-11-13

    This Perspective addresses ambiguities in designations of "new drugs" intended as new therapeutic entities (NTEs). Designation of an NTE as a new drug is significant, as it may confer regulatory exclusivity, an important incentive for development of novel compounds. Such designations differ between jurisdictions according to their drug laws and drug regulations. Chemical, biological, and innovative drugs are addressed in turn. The terms new chemical entity (NCE), new molecular entity (NME), new active substance (NAS), and new biological entity (NBE) as applied in worldwide jurisdictions are clarified. Differences between them are explored through case studies showing why new drugs have different periods of exclusivity in different jurisdictions or none at all. Finally, this Perspective recommends that in future, for the purpose of new drug compilations, NME is used for a new chemical drug, NBE for a new biological drug, and the combined designation NTE should refer to either an NME or an NBE.

  19. Contribution of stratified extracellular polymeric substances to the gel-like and fractal structures of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Yuan, D Q; Wang, Y L; Feng, J

    2014-06-01

    The gel-like and fractal structures of activated sludge (AS) before and after extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction as well as different EPS fractions were investigated. The contributions of individual components in different EPS fractions to the gel-like behavior of sludge samples by enzyme treatment were examined as well. The centrifugation and ultrasound method was employed to stratify the EPS into slime, loosely and tightly bound EPS (LB- and TB-EPS). It was observed that all samples behaved as weak gels with weak-link. TB-EPS and AS after LB-EPS extraction showed the strongest elasticity in higher concentrations and highest mass fractal dimension, which may indicate the key role of TB-EPS in the gel-like and fractal structures of the sludge. Effects of protease or amylase on the gel-like property of sludge samples differed in the presence of different EPS fractions.

  20. Adolescents' Time Use: Effects on Substance Use, Delinquency and Sexual Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Grace M.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Welte, John W.; Farrell, Michael P.; Dintcheff, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    Using an integration of social control theory and the routine activity perspective, adolescent time use was examined for effects on problem behaviors. We examined a wide variety of time use categories, including homework, extracurricular activities, sports time, alone time, paid work, housework, television watching, as well as indices of family…

  1. The effects of three commonly used extraction methods on the redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Chang, Ming; Yu, Zhen; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have attracted the attention of scientists due to their associated environmental significance, such as organic pollutant (e.g. nitroaromatics and substituted nitrobenzenes) degradation and heavy metal (e.g. Cr(VI) and U(VI)) detoxification. Although the separation of EPS from bacterial cells is more often the first step in studies on EPS, and studies have demonstrated that extraction procedures can influence the sorption properties of EPS, few attempts have been made to investigate how separation methods affect the redox properties of the obtained EPS. In this study, three common extraction approaches, that is, centrifugation, formaldehyde+NaOH and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), were employed to extract EPS from activated sludge, and the obtained EPS were evaluated for their redox properties using electrochemical means, including cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. In addition, spectroscopic techniques were utilized to explore the structural characteristics and composition of EPS. The results indicated that EPS extracted by EDTA clearly displayed reversible oxidation-reduction peaks in cyclic voltammograms and significantly higher electron-accepting capacity compared with EPS extracted using the other two approaches. Fourier transform infrared spectra and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix spectra suggested that the EPS extracted with EDTA presented better redox properties because of the effective and efficient extraction of the humic substances, which are important components of the EPS of activated sludge. Therefore, extraction method has an impact on the composition and redox properties of EPS and should be chosen according to research purpose and EPS source.

  2. [Genetic rat models of type 2 diabetes for evaluation the effectiveness of minor biologically active food substances].

    PubMed

    Mazo, V K; Murashev, A N; Sidorova, Yu S; Zorin, S N; Kochetkova, A A

    2014-01-01

    The purposeful use of plant minor biologically active food substances (with demonstrated evident hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant action) in the composition of specialized dietary products can become the inno- vative approach for the dietary treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical testing of minor biologically active food substances of plant origin and their further use in the composition of specialized dietary products should be preceded by the stage of complex physiological and biochemical studies in vivo. It all turns on the question: to which extent the results obtained with the biomodel can be extrapolated on the human body. Hence, this review comparatively evaluates the rat models of type 2 diabetes. In this paper, we overview the most frequently used monogenic models of obesity with the damage of the leptin signaling path- way, when the animal loses control over saturation, hyperphagia and subsequent obesity appear. We describe polygenic models of obesity-related diabetes with fatty rats, which are more approximated to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. The characteristic of the type 2 diabetes model without obesity is given in the article: the SDT (Spontaneously Diabetic Torii) rats are genetically predisposed to glucose intolerance. Spontaneously Diabetic Torii-fa/fa (SDT fatty) rat is a new model of obese type 2 diabetes. Both male and female SDT fatty rats show overt obesity, and hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia are observed at a younger age as compared with SDTrats. In conclusion, the SDT fatty rats are useful as a model for the development of new drugs and/or specialized dietary products to reduce body fat mass.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in root canals

    PubMed Central

    VALERA, Marcia Carneiro; MAEKAWA, Lilian Eiko; de OLIVEIRA, Luciane Dias; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; SHYGEI, Érika; CARVALHO, Cláudio Antonio Talge

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. Material and Methods: Seventy-two human tooth roots were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days. The groups were divided according to the auxiliary chemical substance into: G1) 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), G2) 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX), G3) castor oil, G4) glycolic Aloe vera extract, G5) glycolic ginger extract, and G6) sterile saline (control). The samples of the root canal were collected at different intervals: confirmation collection, at 21 days after contamination; 1st collection, after instrumentation; and 2nd collection, seven days after instrumentation. Microbiological samples were grown in culture medium and incubated at 37º C for 48 hours. Results: The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn (5%) statistical tests. NaOCl and CHX completely eliminated the microorganisms of the root canals. Castor oil and ginger significantly reduced the number of CFU of the tested bacteria. Reduction of CFU/mL at the 1st and 2nd collections for groups G1, G2, G3 and G4 was greater in comparison to groups G5 and G6. Conclusion: It was concluded that 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine gel were more effective in eliminating C. albicans and E. faecalis, followed by the castor oil and glycolic ginger extract. The Aloe vera extract showed no antimicrobial activity. PMID:23739849

  4. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Reporting Manufactured Chemical Substances from Metal Mining and Related Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides guidance on the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requirements related to the reporting of mined metals, intermediates, and byproducts manufactured during metal mining and related activities.

  5. Current limitations and recommendations to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine-active chemicals are described, and associated challenges discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across organizatio...

  6. Immortelle (Xeranthemum annuum L.) as a natural source of biologically active substances.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Milan S; Radojevic, Ivana D; Stefanovic, Olgica D; Topuzovic, Marina D; Comic, Ljiljana R; Brankovic, Snežana R

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects, total phenolic content and flavonoid concentrations of methanolic, acetone and ethyl acetate extracts from Xeranthemum annuum L. were investigated in this study. The total phenolic content was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and ranged between 101.33 to 159.48 mg GA/g. The concentration of flavonoids in various X.annuum extracts was determined using spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and the results varied from 22.25 to 62.42 mg RU/g. Antioxidant activity was monitored spectrophotometrically using DPPH reagent and expressed in terms of IC50 (µg/ml), and it ranged from 59.25 to 956.81 µg/ml. The highest phenolic content and capacity to neutralize DPPH radicals were found in the acetone extract. In vitro antimicrobial activity was determined by microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) have been determined. Testing was conducted against 24 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria (standard and clinical strains) and 9 species of fungi. Statistically significant difference in activity between the extracts of X. annuum L. was observed and the acetone extract was found most active. The activity of acetone extract was in accordance with total phenol content and flavonoid concentration measured in this extract. The tested extracts showed significant antibacterial activity against G+ bacteria and weak to moderate activity against other microorganisms. Based on the obtained results, X. annuum can be considered as a rich natural source of polyphenolic compounds with very good antioxidant and antimicrobial activity.

  7. Great horsetail (Equisetum telmateia Ehrh.): Active substances content and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Radojevic, Ivana D; Stankovic, Milan S; Stefanovic, Olgica D; Topuzovic, Marina D; Comic, Ljiljana R; Ostojic, Aleksandar M

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity, total phenolic content and concentrations of flavonoids of Equisetum telmateia extracts. Total phenolic content was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and it ranged between 129.0 to 262.7 mg GA/g. The concentration of flavonoids in various extracts of E. telmateia was determined using spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and obtained results varied from 112.6 to 199.8 mg RU/g. Antioxidant activity was monitored spectrophotometrically and expressed in terms of IC50 (µg/ml), and its values ranged from 33.4 to 982.2 µg/ml. The highest phenolic content, concentrations of flavonoids and capacity to neutralize DPPH radicals were found in the acetone extract. In vitro antimicrobial activity was determined using microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) were also determined. Testing was performed on 22 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria (standard and clinical strains) and 7 species of fungi. There were statistically significant differences in activity between the extracts of E. telmateia. Different effects were noticed against the bacteria and the methanol extract appeared to be most efficient. All the extracts showed significant antibacterial activity against G+ bacteria and weak to moderate activity against other microorganisms.

  8. Beta-band activity in auditory pathways reflects speech localization and recognition in bilateral cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Senkowski, Daniel; Pomper, Ulrich; Fitzner, Inga; Engel, Andreas Karl; Kral, Andrej

    2014-07-01

    In normal-hearing listeners, localization of auditory speech involves stimulus processing in the postero-dorsal pathway of the auditory system. In quiet environments, bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users show high speech recognition performance, but localization of auditory speech is poor, especially when discriminating stimuli from the same hemifield. Whether this difficulty relates to the inability of the auditory system to translate binaural electrical cues into neural signals, or to a functional reorganization of auditory cortical pathways following long periods of binaural deprivation is unknown. In this electroencephalography study, we examined the processing of auditory syllables in postlingually deaf adults with bilateral CIs and in normal-hearing adults. Participants were instructed to either recognize ("recognition" task) or localize ("localization" task) the syllables. The analysis focused on event-related potentials and oscillatory brain responses. N1 amplitudes in CI users were larger in the localization compared with recognition task, suggesting an enhanced stimulus processing effort in the localization task. Linear beamforming of oscillatory activity in CI users revealed stronger suppression of beta-band activity after 200 ms in the postero-dorsal auditory pathway for the localization compared with the recognition task. In normal-hearing adults, effects for longer latency event-related potentials were found, but no effects were observed for N1 amplitudes or beta-band responses. Our study suggests that difficulties in speech localization in bilateral CI users are not reflected in a functional reorganization of cortical auditory pathways. New signal processing strategies of cochlear devices preserving unambiguous binaural cues may improve auditory localization performance in bilateral CI users.

  9. Adhesive Properties and Acid-Forming Activity of Lactobacilli and Streptococci Under Inhibitory Substances, Such as Nitrates.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, L; Harutyunyan, K; Harutyunyan, N; Melik-Andreasyan, G; Trchounian, A

    2016-06-01

    One of the main requirements for probiotics is their ability to survive during passage through gastrointestinal tract and to maintain their activity at different adverse conditions. The aim of the study was to look for the strains of lactobacilli and streptococci with high adhesive properties even affected by inhibitory substances, such as nitrates (NO3 (-)). To study the adhesion properties hemagglutination reaction of bacterial cells with red blood cells of different animals and humans was used. The acid formation ability of bacteria was determined by the method of titration after 7 days of incubation in the sterile milk. These properties were investigated at different concentrations of NO3 (-). The high concentration (mostly ≥2.0 %) NO3 (-) inhibited the growth of both lactobacilli and streptococci, but compared with streptococcal cultures lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus Ep 317/402, have shown more stability and higher adhesive properties. In addition, the concentrations of NO3 (-) of 0.5-2.0 % decreased the acid-forming activity of the strains, but even under these conditions they coagulated milk and, in comparison to control, formed low acidity in milk. Thus, the L. acidophilus Ep 317/402 with high adhesive properties has demonstrated a higher activity of NO3 (-) transformation.

  10. Creating Accessible Science Museums with User-Activated Environmental Audio Beacons (Ping!)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Steven; Wiener, William; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Giusti, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, Touch Graphics Company carried out research on a new invention that promises to improve accessibility to science museums for visitors who are visually impaired. The system, nicknamed Ping!, allows users to navigate an exhibit area, listen to audio descriptions, and interact with exhibits using a cell phone-based interface. The system…

  11. PUMA project: Active involving of end users to achieve a smart solution to prevent pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Laparra-Hernández, José; Chicote, Juan Carlos; Medina, Enrique; Barberà, Ricard; Durà-Gil, Juan V; Lozano, Vicente; Gil, Ángel; Bermejo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the benefits to include spinal cord injury users and the other stakeholders during the development of a new system to prevent pressure ulcers. The complementary of information has been key and has enhanced the possibility to achieve market acceptance and introduction.

  12. 77 FR 43844 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ...) and final dosage form (FDF) facilities; fees for new ANDAs and prior approval supplements (PASs); and... Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA 3794 AGENCY: Food and Drug... response to the notice. This notice solicits comments concerning collection of information using Form...

  13. Molluscicidal activity of some marine substances against the snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca, Planorbidae).

    PubMed

    Miyasato, P A; Kawano, T; Freitas, J C; Berlinck, R G S; Nakano, E; Tallarico, L F

    2012-05-01

    Freshwater snails of the genus Biomphalaria play a major role as intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, the etiologic agent of schistosomiasis. While Biomphalaria spp. control by molluscicides is one of the main strategies to reduce the snail population in infected areas, there are few effective molluscicides commercially available. Natural products may be considered as potentially useful and safe molluscicides. We have evaluated the molluscicidal activity of 12 extracts from ten marine organisms on adult and embryonic stages of Biomphalaria glabrata. Only extracts of the red algae Liagora farinosa and of the sponge Amphimedon viridis presented molluscicidal activity. Lethal concentration (LC)(50) values obtained were 120 μg/mL for L. farinosa CH(2)Cl(2) extract (apolar fraction) and 20 μg/mL for A. viridis extract and halitoxin. The polar alga fraction and halitoxin had no effect on B. glabrata embryos. The algae apolar fraction was active on B. glabrata in all embryonic development stages, with LC(50) values for blastulae at 42 μg/mL, gastrulae at 124 μg/mL, trochophore at 180 μg/mL, and veliger at 222 μg/mL. This is the first report of extracts from marine organisms which presented molluscicidal activity.

  14. Current limitations and recommendations to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances.

    PubMed

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D; Holbech, Henrik; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Krueger, Hank; Levine, Steven L; Maack, Gerd; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Ankley, Gerald T

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine active chemicals are described, and associated challenges are discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or to the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro, and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine hazard and risk. These limitations include a lack of certainty regarding: 1) adequately sensitive species and life stages; 2) mechanistic endpoints that are diagnostic for endocrine pathways of concern; and 3) the linkage between mechanistic responses and apical, adverse outcomes. Furthermore, some existing test methods are resource intensive with regard to time, cost, and use of animals. However, based on recent experiences, there are opportunities to improve approaches to and guidance for existing test methods and to reduce uncertainty. For example, in vitro high-throughput screening could be used to prioritize chemicals for testing and provide insights as to the most appropriate assays for characterizing hazard and risk. Other recommendations include adding endpoints for elucidating connections between mechanistic effects and adverse outcomes, identifying potentially sensitive taxa for which test methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid

  15. Chemical composition and biological activity of the Yersinia pestis envelope substance.

    PubMed Central

    Głosnicka, R; Gruszkiewicz, E

    1980-01-01

    Purification of the envelope antigen of Yersinia pestis EV with passive hemagglutination activity is described. The purification procedure consisted of pancreatin digestion, chromatography on human erythrocyte stroma set on Celite, and rechromatography on Sephadex G-200. Chemical, physical, and biological properties of this antigen were investigated. The results show the lipid-polysaccharide structure of the isolated antigen. The carbohydrate moiety of the galactolipid antigen consists of galactose and fucose. The lipid fraction contained phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. The preparation showed high specificity in the hemagglutination reaction and in Y. pestis phage receptor activity. In two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, the isolated pancreatic envelope digest antigen appeared as a single line. Two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis was modified for tandem separation and was employed to electrophoretically identify the pancreatic envelope digest, trypsin envelope digest preparation, and F1 envelope antigen of Y. pestis. Related or identical antigens showed confluence of peaks with reactions of identity. Images Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7002800

  16. Comparative Solid-State Stability of Perindopril Active Substance vs. Pharmaceutical Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Valentina; Andor, Minodora; Ledeti, Adriana; Ledeti, Ionut; Vlase, Gabriela; Vlase, Titus; Cristescu, Carmen; Voicu, Mirela; Suciu, Liana; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained after studying the thermal stability and decomposition kinetics of perindopril erbumine as a pure active pharmaceutical ingredient as well as a solid pharmaceutical formulation containing the same active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Since no data were found in the literature regarding the spectroscopic description, thermal behavior, or decomposition kinetics of perindopril, our goal was the evaluation of the compatibility of this antihypertensive agent with the excipients in the tablet under ambient conditions and to study the effect of thermal treatment on the stability of perindopril erbumine. ATR-FTIR (Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared) spectroscopy, thermal analysis (thermogravimetric mass curve (TG—thermogravimetry), derivative thermogravimetric mass curve (DTG), and heat flow (HF)) and model-free kinetics were chosen as investigational tools. Since thermal behavior is a simplistic approach in evaluating the thermal stability of pharmaceuticals, in-depth kinetic studies were carried out by classical kinetic methods (Kissinger and ASTM E698) and later with the isoconversional methods of Friedman, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa. It was shown that the main thermal degradation step of perindopril erbumine is characterized by activation energy between 59 and 69 kJ/mol (depending on the method used), while for the tablet, the values were around 170 kJ/mol. The used excipients (anhydrous colloidal silica, microcrystalline cellulose, lactose, and magnesium stearate) should be used in newly-developed generic solid pharmaceutical formulations, since they contribute to an increased thermal stability of perindopril erbumine. PMID:28098840

  17. Biologically active antimicrobial and antioxidant substances in the Helianthus annuus L. bee pollen.

    PubMed

    Fatrcová-Šramková, Katarína; Nôžková, Janka; Máriássyová, Magda; Kačániová, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the content of flavonoids, polyphenols, and carotenoids in the Helianthus annuus L. bee pollen. It was also to evaluate the ability of the dried, frozen, and freeze-dried extracts of sunflower (H. annuus) pollen, its scavenged free radicals and reducing action. Another aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial in vitro action of the H. annuus pollen extracts against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. All pollen extracts showed medium antiradical activity and reductive ability. The most effective was the freeze-dried extract in both evaluation systems. The evaluation of the protective effects of DNA using a biosensor showed an opposite trending-frozen ˃ dried ˃ freeze-dried pollen. For the evaluation of antiradical activity, the DPPH method was used, and reductive ability was assessed by means of phosphomolybdic complex formation. The comparison of the polyphenols content shows higher values in freeze-dried bee pollen than in the dried and frozen pollen. The highest content of flavonoids was found in the frozen samples and the most carotenoids were present in the dried samples. In our study, the best antibacterial effects of the dried sunflower bee pollen extracts were found against Paenibacillus larvae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus raffinosus. The best inhibitory properties of the frozen sunflower bee pollen extracts were found against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Paenibacillus larvae. Very good inhibitory effects of freeze-dried sunflower bee pollen were found against Paenibacillus larvae, Brochotrix thermosphacta, and Enterococcus raffinosus. The best antifungal activity of the sunflower bee pollen was found in the frozen bee pollen extracts against Aspergillus ochraceus and freeze-dried bee pollen extracts against Aspergillus niger.

  18. [Biologically active substances of plant origin. Flavonols and flavones: prevalence, dietary sourses and consumption].

    PubMed

    Tutel'ian, V A; Lashneva, N V

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids are the most numerous group of natural polyphenolic compounds, the secondary metabolites of plants that may play an important role in human health protection. Flavonols and flavones constitute the main two classes of flavonoids, whose antioxidant properties and high biological activity have been proofed both in vitro and in vivo. This review summarizes data, concerning the structure, occurrence and content of the main flavonols (quercetin, kaempherol, myricetin, isorhamnetin) and flavones (apigenin, luteolin) in some most widely consumed foodstuffs, including vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts, beverages and other products of plant origin. The products with high content of these biologically active food compounds--the major dietary sources of them--are noted. Forms of flavonols and flavones more often distributed among edible plants are characterized and some of their known glycosides occurred in foods are enumerated. Some peculiarities, characteristic to flavonol sand flavones glycosilation (O- and/or C-glycosides formation) are described. The data for flavonol and flavone glycosides composition (profiles) of some commonly consumed commodities rich by these flavonoids (onions, cabbage, apples at al.) are shown. Information about levels of daily dietary intake of total and individual flavonols and flavones in several countries is presented. The questions about dietary habits and lifestyle factors and the contribution of certain foods to flavonols and flavones in daily dietary consumption values are also discussed.

  19. Zinc polycarboxylate dental cement for the controlled release of an active organic substance: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Naseem; Edwards, Mark; Nicholson, John W

    2010-04-01

    The potential of employing zinc polycarboxylate dental cement as a controlled release material has been studied. Benzalkonium chloride was used as the active ingredient, and incorporated at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3% by mass within the cement. At these levels, there was no observable effect on the speed of setting. Release was followed using an ion-selective electrode to determine changes in chloride ion concentration with time. This technique showed that the additive was released when the cured cement was placed in water, with release occurring by a diffusion mechanism for the first 3 h, but continuing beyond that for up to 1 week. Diffusion coefficients were in the range 5.62 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 1% concentration) to 10.90 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 3% concentration). Up to 3% of the total loading of benzalkonium chloride was released from the zinc polycarboxylate after a week, which is similar to that found in previous studies with glass-ionomer cement. It is concluded that zinc polycarboxylate cement is capable of acting as a useful material for the controlled release of active organic compounds.

  20. [The effect of aryloxyaminopropanol substances on the photosynthetic activity of chloroplasts in Spinacia oleracea L].

    PubMed

    Cizmáriková, R; Kráĺová, K; Sersen, F

    2000-01-01

    The effect of 18 compounds of the aryloxyaminopropanol type--potential beta-adrenolytics (differing each from other by modifications in the hydrophilic and lipophilic part of the molecule) on the inhibition of oxygen evolution rate in spinach chloroplasts has been investigated. The compounds with n-octyloxymethyl and n-nonyloxymethyl group in position 3 of aromatic ring were found to exhibit the highest inhibitory activity (IC50 = 67, resp. 120 mumol dm-3). The compounds containing a heterocycle or the dimethylamino group in the hydrophilic part of the molecule and with propoxymethyl group on the aromatic ring were not active. Using EPR spectroscopy it was found that the studied compounds interact with Z+/D+ intermediates, i.e. tyrosine radicals TyrZ and TyrD situated in D1 and D2 proteins on the donor side of photosystem 2. Higher concentrations of the studied inhibitors cause release of Mn2+ ions from the oxygen evolving complex which is situated in photosystem 2. The interaction of the tested compounds with chlorophyll occurring in the photosynthetic centres has been confirmed by fluorescence measurements as well.

  1. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated with Unwanted Sexual Contact among U.S. Active Duty Service Women

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B.; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57–2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  2. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries.

    PubMed

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Agnieszka; Czyżowska, Agata; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols) and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L.)) berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3) and times (30, 60, 90 min). After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC), composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB) and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered.

  3. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries

    PubMed Central

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Agnieszka; Czyżowska, Agata; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols) and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L.)) berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3) and times (30, 60, 90 min). After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC), composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB) and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered. PMID:26659905

  4. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis of Test Endpoints for Detecting the Effects of Endocrine Active Substances in Fish Full Life Cycle Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish full life cycle (FFLC) tests are increasingly required in the ecotoxicological assessment of endocrine active substances. However, FFLC tests have not been internationally standardized or validated, and it is currently unclear how such tests should best be designed to provid...

  5. Design and Test of a Hybrid Foot Force Sensing and GPS System for Richer User Mobility Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals. PMID:24189333

  6. Design and test of a hybrid foot force sensing and GPS system for richer user mobility activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  7. New insights into dietary supplements used in sport: active substances, pharmacological and side effects.

    PubMed

    Koncic, Marijana Zovko; Tomczyk, Michal

    2013-08-01

    As a society we are increasingly concerned about our physical appearance. For example, as much as 24% of people in developed countries admittedly exercise to improve their performance. Professional sportsmen and amateurs alike are in a constant search for new means that will enable them better sport results in shorter time. Among those means, a prominent place belongs to dietary supplements. However, the producers often advertise products whose use in sports is neither scientifically founded nor safe. This brings on an irrational use of herbal supplements which sometimes leads to unwanted side effects, but is more often of little use. Thus, the aim of this review will be to systematically evaluate some of the herbal supplements that are used as adaptogenic and ergogenic aids in sport. The review will include available data on Rhodiola rosea, Withania somnifera, Schisandra chinensis, Tribulus terrestris, Vitis vinifera, Citrus aurantium, and others. Their effects, active ingredients as well as possible adverse effects will be discussed with special focus on clinical studies.

  8. The endocrine and reproductive system: adverse effects of hormonally active substances?

    PubMed

    Greim, Helmut A

    2004-04-01

    Chemicals that have the intrinsic property to modulate or even disrupt the endocrine system are present in the human environment. Because it is the potency of such chemicals that determines the toxicologic relevance, assessment of the risk to human health must consider both the endocrine disrupting potential and the potency. Usually in vitro assays are applied to detect the potential of a hormone-like effect, and such data are considered useful to set priorities for additional testing and for mechanistic studies. However, such data allow only determination of relative potency of a chemical as compared with other xenobiotics, natural compounds, or endogenous hormones. Relevant information on the endocrine-disrupting potency can be taken only from in vivo assays, eg, the Hershberger (male reproductive organs) and uterotrophic (female reproductive organs) assays, the updated versions of the 28- and 90-day toxicity studies in rodents, and the 2-generation studies in rodents. With the use of this information and the concentration of these chemicals in humans, the potency of the effect as compared with endogenous hormone activity can be estimated. So far, the relative potencies of chemicals tested in in vitro systems as compared with estradiol are several orders of magnitude smaller, whereas potency of the phytoestrogen, eg, isoflavones such as genistein or daidzein, can even exceed that of estradiol, especially in infants who are fed soy-based formula as a sole source of nutrition. Although there are still open questions regarding in utero or early postnatal exposure, the low potencies and concentrations of manmade chemicals as compared with the endogenous hormones in humans make it unlikely that adverse effects occur at common exposure.

  9. Surface-active Substances in the biomass burning and atmospheric particles in the North China Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhijun; Bai, Yao; Liu, Yuechen; Wang, Yujue; Qiao, Kai; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min

    2016-04-01

    Surface active materials, such as HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS), play an important role in particle hygroscopicity and activation by taking up water and acting as surfactants. They account for large proportions of water soluble organic carbon. Currently, the information on the chemical composition, hygroscopicity, and surface active properties of HULIS is still very scarce in china, which is suffering from heavy air pollution. Therefore, we promoted this study to investigate the hygroscopic growth and CCN activity of HULIS particles using hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser and condensation cloud nuclei counter and surface tension depression using contact angle meter (KRÜSS GmbH). Two different types of particles were investigated in our study. One is the particles emitted from biomass burning. The wheat and corn straw residuals were burned in a lab burning simulator. The PM2.5 samples were collected onto quartz filters. Another is PM2.5 taken during the heavy hazy days. The HULIS were isolated from PM2.5 samples by water exaction, C18 solid phase extraction (SPE), CH3OH elution, and N2 drying. Then, the water solution of HULIS was generated to particles using TSI atomizer. The hygroscopicity of HULIS particles were detected by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer. The temperature dependency of HULIS surface tension was detected using contact angle meter. The primary results showed that PM2.5 consists of a large amount of surface active materials during severe air pollution episodes. A clear temperature dependency of surface tension was observed. At temperature of 20 degree, the surface tension of HULIS exacted from ambient samples is around 50 N/m2, which is much lower than that of pure water. The future investigations will include the effects of burning conditions on the HULIS concentration and surface tensions. In the presentation, a full picture of the hygroscopicity and CCN activity, and surface active properties of HULIS will

  10. Latent Class Analysis of Gambling Activities in a Sample of Young Swiss Men: Association with Gambling Problems, Substance Use Outcomes, Personality Traits and Coping Strategies.

    PubMed

    Studer, Joseph; Baggio, Stéphanie; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Simon, Olivier; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard; Gmel, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to identify different patterns of gambling activities (PGAs) and to investigate how PGAs differed in gambling problems, substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies. A representative sample of 4989 young Swiss males completed a questionnaire assessing seven distinct gambling activities, gambling problems, substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies. PGAs were identified using latent class analysis (LCA). Differences between PGAs in gambling and substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies were tested. LCA identified six different PGAs. With regard to gambling and substance use outcomes, the three most problematic PGAs were extensive gamblers, followed by private gamblers, and electronic lottery and casino gamblers, respectively. By contrast, the three least detrimental PGAs were rare or non-gamblers, lottery only gamblers and casino gamblers. With regard to personality traits, compared with rare or non-gamblers, private and casino gamblers reported higher levels of sensation seeking. Electronic lottery and casino gamblers, private gamblers and extensive gamblers had higher levels of aggression-hostility. Extensive and casino gamblers reported higher levels of sociability, whereas casino gamblers reported lower levels of anxiety-neuroticism. Extensive gamblers used more maladaptive and less adaptive coping strategies than other groups. Results suggest that gambling is not a homogeneous activity since different types of gamblers exist according to the PGA they are engaged in. Extensive gamblers, electronic and casino gamblers and private gamblers may have the most problematic PGAs. Personality traits and coping skills may predispose individuals to PGAs associated with more or less negative outcomes.

  11. Enterococcus faecalis Bearing Aggregation Substance Is Resistant to Killing by Human Neutrophils despite Phagocytosis and Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rakita, Robert M.; Vanek, Natalie N.; Jacques-Palaz, Karen; Mee, Mee; Mariscalco, M. Michele; Dunny, Gary M.; Snuggs, Mark; Van Winkle, W. Barry; Simon, Scott I.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance (AS) mediates efficient bacterium-bacterium contact to facilitate plasmid exchange as part of a bacterial sex pheromone system. We have previously determined that AS promotes direct, opsonin-independent binding of E. faecalis to human neutrophils (PMNs) via complement receptor type 3 and other receptors on the PMN surface. We have now examined the functional consequences of this bacterium-host cell interaction. AS-bearing E. faecalis was phagocytosed and internalized by PMNs, as determined by deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. However, these bacteria were not killed by PMNs, and internalized bacteria excluded propidium iodide, indicating intact bacterial membranes. Resistance to killing occurred despite activation of PMNs, as indicated by an increase in both functional and total surface Mac-1 expression, shedding of l-selectin, and an increase in PMN extracellular superoxide and phagosomal oxidant production. Deconvolution fluorescence microscopy also revealed that phagosomes containing AS-bearing bacteria were markedly larger than phagosomes containing opsonized E. faecalis, suggesting that some modification of phagosomal maturation may be involved in AS-induced resistance to killing. PMN phagosomal pH was significantly higher after ingestion of nonopsonized AS-bearing E. faecalis than after that of opsonized bacteria. The novel ability of AS to promote intracellular survival of E. faecalis inside PMNs suggests that AS may be a virulence factor used by strains of E. faecalis. PMID:10531268

  12. Interpersonal Guilt and Substance Use in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Geoffrey W.; Shilkret, Robert; Everett, Joyce E.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2016-01-01

    The college years are a time for developing independence and separating from one’s family, and it is also a time in which substance use often escalates. This study examined the relationships between use of substances and interpersonal guilt, an emotion that can arise from feelings about separation, among 1,979 college students. Regular users of alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, and other illicit drugs were compared with non-regular users of each substance. Sequential linear regression, controlling for confounding variables, examined relationships between regular use of each substance and scores on a guilt index. Risky drinkers and daily smokers had significantly more interpersonal guilt than their peers who did not regularly use these substances. In contrast, regular cannabis users had significantly less guilt than non-regular cannabis users. These data suggest that substance use among college students may be related to interpersonal guilt and family separation issues, and this relationship may vary across substances. PMID:24579980

  13. The action of alcohols and other non-ionic surface active substances on the sodium current of the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, D A; Urban, B W

    1983-01-01

    The effects of several n-alkanols and n-alkyl oxyethylene alcohols, methyl octanoate, glycerol 1-monooctanoate and dioctanoyl phosphatidylcholine on the ionic currents and electrical capacity of the squid giant axon membrane have been examined. The peak inward current in voltage-clamped axons was reduced reversibly by each substance. For n-pentanol to n-decanol the concentrations required to suppress the peak inward current by 50% were determined. From these data, it was estimated that the standard free energy per CH2 for adsorption to the site of action was -3.04 kJ mole-1, as compared with -3.11 kJ mole-1 for adsorption into phospholipid bilayers or an n-alkane/aqueous solution interface. The membrane capacity at 100 kHz was not greatly by any of the test substances at concentrations which reduced the inward current by 50%. Na currents under voltage clamp were recorded in intracellularly perfused axons before, during and sometimes after exposure to the test substances and the records were fitted with equations similar to those proposed by Hodgkin & Huxley (1952). Shifts in the curves of the steady-state activation and inactivation parameters (m infinity and h infinity) against membrane potential, changes in the peak heights of the activation and inactivation time constants (tau m and tau h) and reductions in the maximum Na conductance (gNa) have been tabulated. All of the test substances shifted the voltage dependence of the steady-state activation in the depolarizing direction and lowered the peak time constants for both activation and inactivation. The origins of these effects, and of the differences in the present results from those of the hydrocarbons (Haydon & Urban, 1983), have been discussed in terms of the physico-chemical properties of the two groups of substances and with reference to their effects on artificial membranes. PMID:6312030

  14. Influence of Ecological Factors on the Production of Active Substances in the Anti-Cancer Plant Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) T.S. Ying

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Yin, Dongxue; Zhao, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    The quality of traditional Chinese herbal medicine, which plays a very important role in the health system of China, is determined by the active substances produced by the plants. The type, content, and proportion of these substances may vary depending on ecological factors in areas where the plants are grown. Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) T.S. Ying, an endangered plant species with great medical value, was investigated in eight production locations representative of its natural geographical distribution range in China. The correlation between the contents of the active ingredients extracted from the roots and rhizomes of S. hexandrum and the ecological factors were evaluated step-by-step using a series of computational biology methodologies. The results showed that ecological factors had significant effects on the contents but not on the types of the active ingredients in eight production locations. The primary ecological factors influencing the active substances included the annual average precipitation, July mean temperature, frost-free period, sunshine duration, soil pH, soil organic matter, and rapidly available potassium in the soil. The annual average precipitation was the most important determinant factor and was significantly and negatively correlated with the active ingredient contents (P < 0.001). In contrast, organic matter was the most important limiting factor and was significantly and positively correlated with the active substances. These ecological factors caused 98.13% of the total geographical variation of the active ingredient contents. The climate factors contributed more to the active ingredient contents than did the soil factors. It was concluded that from the view of the contents of the secondary metabolites and ecological factors of each growing location, in Jingyuan, Ningxia Province, and Yongdeng, Gansu Province, conditions were favorable to the production of podophyllotoxin and lignans, whereas in Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, and

  15. Social network and census tract-level influences on substance use among emerging adult males: An activity spaces approach

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Crystal; Perley, Lauren; Bailey, Jonathan; Barbour, Russell; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-01-01

    Social network and area level characteristics have been linked to substance use. We used snowball sampling to recruit 90 predominantly African American emerging adult men who provided typical locations visited (n=510). We used generalized estimating equations to examine social network and area level predictors of substance use. Lower social network quality was associated with days of marijuana use (B=-0.0037, p<0.0001) and problem alcohol use (B=-0.0050, p=0.0181). The influence of area characteristics on substance use differed between risky and non-risky spaces. Peer and area influences are important for substance use among men, and may differ for high and low risk places. PMID:26176810

  16. Gauging state-level and user group views of oyster reef restoration activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Nix, Ashby; Laborde, Luke; Piazza, Bryan P.

    2012-01-01

    Successful oyster reef restoration, like many conservation challenges, requires not only biological understanding of the resource, but also stakeholder cooperation and political support. To measure perceptions of oyster reef restoration activities and priorities for future restoration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, a survey of 1500 individuals representing 4 user groups (oyster harvesters, shrimpers, environmental organization members, professionals), across 5 states (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) was conducted in 2011. All respondents highly supported reef restoration efforts, but there was a dichotomy in preferred restoration goals with commercial fishermen more likely to support oyster reef restoration for stock enhancement, while professionals and environmental organization members were more likely to support oyster reef restoration to enhance ecosystem services. All user groups identified enforcement, funding, and appropriate site selection as basic requirements for successful reef restoration. For management of restored oyster reefs, oyster harvesters and shrimpers were less likely to support options that restricted the use of reefs, including gear restrictions and permanent closures, but did support rotating annual reef closures, while other stakeholders were willing to consider all options, including annual reef closures and sanctuary reefs. Overall, there were clear differences in management and communication preferences across user groups, but few differences across states. Understanding these key differences in stakeholder support for, and willingness to accept specific management actions is critical in moving management and restoration forward while minimizing conflict.

  17. Influence of biologically-active substances on {sup 137}Cs and heavy metals uptake by Barley plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, Stanislav; Filipas, Alexander

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: When solving the problem of contaminated agricultural lands rehabilitation, most of attention is concentrated on the effective means which allow the obtaining of ecologically safe production. The minimization of radionuclides and heavy metals (HM) content in farm products on the basis of their migration characteristics in agro-landscapes and with the regard for different factors influencing contaminants behavior in the soil-plant system is of great significance. Our investigation has shown that the effect of biologically active substances (BAS) using for seeds treatment on {sup 137}Cs transfer to barley grown on Cd contaminated soil was dependent on their properties and dosage, characteristics of soil contamination and biological peculiarities of plants, including stage of plants development. Seeds treatment by plant growth regulator Zircon resulted in a significant increase in {sup 137}Cs activity in harvest (40- 50%), increase in K concentration and significant reduction in Ca concentration. Increased Cd content in soil reduced {sup 137}Cs transfer to barley plants by 30-60% (p<0,05) and Zircon application further reduced its concentration. Ambiol and El also reduced {sup 137}Cs uptake by roots and Cd and Pb phyto-toxicity. The experimental data do not make it possible to link the BAS effect on inhibition of {sup 137}Cs absorption by plants directly with their influence on HM phyto-toxicity. The dependence of Concentration Ratio of {sup 137}Cs on the Ambiol and El dose was not proportional and the most significant decrease in the radionuclide uptake by plants was reported with the use of dose showing the most pronounced stimulating effect on the barley growth and development. The pre-sowing seed treatment with Ambiol increased Pb absorption by 35-50% and, on the contrary, decreased Cd uptake by plants by 30-40%. (authors)

  18. Engaging in job-related activities is associated with reductions in employment problems and improvements in quality of life in substance abusing patients.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Andrade, Leonardo F; Rash, Carla J; Cherniack, Martin G

    2014-03-01

    Reinforcement-based interventions are highly efficacious in the treatment of substance use disorders, and their benefits can extend to other areas of functioning as well. In particular, reinforcing participation in job-related activities may be useful for improving employment outcomes, which in turn may enhance quality of life and decrease substance use. These secondary analyses compared substance abusing patients randomized with reinforcement interventions (N = 185) who selected and completed two or more job-related activities during treatment versus those who did not. Patients who completed two or more job-related activities during treatment had significantly greater reductions in employment-related problems and improvements in quality of life than those who completed only one or no job-related activities, even after controlling for baseline differences that may impact employment outcomes. Further, patients who completed employment activities remained in treatment significantly longer and achieved greater durations of abstinence than those who did not. These data suggest that reinforcing job-attainment activities may have broad beneficial effects. Reinforcement interventions should be considered for enhancing employment skills training acquisition more generally.

  19. Coping with Loneliness: Young Adult Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami; Orzeck, Tricia

    Since there appears to be a connection between substance use (and abuse) and loneliness it is of theoretical and clinical interest to explore the differences of coping with loneliness which drug users employ. The present study examined the manner in which MDMA (Ecstasy) users in comparison with non-MDMA (Non-Ecstasy) users and the general…

  20. Comparison of movement-to-music, rhythm activities, and competitive games on depression, stress, anxiety, and anger of females in substance abuse rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cevasco, Andrea M; Kennedy, Roy; Generally, Natalie Ruth

    2005-01-01

    Over the past several decades the number of females using addictive substances has continuously increased. Females have different reasons for initiating substance abuse and specific treatment needs that differ from males. Researchers suggested gender specific drug rehabilitation treatment, in which female clients developed or improved functional behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 3 different types of music therapy interventions on levels of depression, stress, anxiety, and anger of female clients in substance abuse rehabilitation. Ten females in an outpatient substance abuse rehabilitation program participated twice a week for 6 weeks in a music therapy program, participating in movement-to-music activities, rhythm activities, and competitive games for 2 weeks, 4 sessions each. After each intervention state-trait anxiety and levels of anger were measured. A repeated-measures ANOVA indicated no significant differences for the three types of music therapy interventions; however, data collected on daily scores, immediately before and after each session, indicated that individuals reported a decrease in depression, stress, anxiety, and anger immediately following the music therapy sessions.

  1. Activation of silent mechanoreceptive cat C and Adelta sensory neurons and their substance P expression following peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, G Y; Huang, L Y; Zhao, Z Q

    2000-10-15

    The effect of inflammation on the excitability and the level of substance P (SP) in cat mechanoreceptive C and Adelta dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were studied in vivo using intracellular recording and immunocytochemical techniques. Following injections of carrageenan (Carg) into the cat hindpaw, the percentage of C neurons exhibiting spontaneous activity increased from 7.2 to 20.7% and the percentage of Adelta neurons increased from 6.9 to 18.6%. In contrast to most cells from normal cats, which fired regularly below 10 Hz, many cells from Carg-treated cats fired at higher frequencies or in bursts. Inflammation (Carg treatment) also depolarized membrane potentials, increased membrane input resistance, caused the disappearance of inward rectifying currents and lowered the mean current thresholds of tibial nerve-evoked responses in DRG neurons. With inflammation, the percentage of C or Adelta neurons responding to low threshold mechanoreceptive stimuli increased (C neurons: normal, 13%; inflamed, 41%; Adelta neurons: normal, 13 %; inflamed, 39 %), while the percentage of C or Adelta neurons responding to high threshold mechanoreceptive stimuli remained unchanged. Some receptive field (RF)-responsive cells were injected with Lucifer Yellow and their SP immunoreactivity was determined. Following Carg treatment, substantially higher percentages of RF-responsive cells were SP positive (C neurons: normal, 35.7%; inflamed, 60%; Adelta neurons: normal, 18.2%; inflamed, 66.7%). These combined increases in the excitability of DRG neurons and SP-containing RF-responsive neurons could lead to sensitization of sensory neurons, thus contributing to the development of hyperalgesia.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance 3′,4′-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR)

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V.; Power, John D.; Twamley, Brendan; O’Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Dowling, Geraldine; Mahony, Olivia; Brandt, Simon D.; Patrick, Julian; Archer, Roland P.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    The recent occurrence of deaths associated with the psychostimulant cis-4,4′-dimethylaminorex (4,4′-DMAR) in Europe indicated the presence of a newly emerged psychoactive substance on the market. Subsequently, the existence of 3,4-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR) has come to the authors’ attention and this study describes the synthesis of cis- and trans-MDMAR followed by extensive characterization by chromatographic, spectroscopic, mass spectrometric platforms and crystal structure analysis. MDMAR obtained from an online vendor was subsequently identified as predominantly the cis-isomer (90%). Exposure of the cis-isomer to the mobile phase conditions (acetonitrile/water 1:1 with 0.1% formic acid) employed for high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an artificially induced conversion to the trans-isomer, which was not observed when characterized by gas chromatography. Monoamine release activities of both MDMAR isomers were compared with the non-selective monoamine releasing agent (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as a standard reference compound. For additional comparison, both cis- and trans-4,4′-DMAR, were assessed under identical conditions. cis-MDMAR, trans-MDMAR, cis-4,4′-DMAR and trans-4,4′-DMAR were more potent than MDMA in their ability to function as efficacious substrate-type releasers at the dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in rat brain tissue. While cis-4,4′-DMAR, cis-MDMAR and trans-MDMAR were fully efficacious releasing agents at the serotonin transporter (SERT), trans-4,4′-DMAR acted as a fully efficacious uptake blocker. Currently, little information is available about the presence of MDMAR on the market but the high potency of ring-substituted methylaminorex analogues at all three monoamine transporters investigated here might be relevant when assessing the potential for serious side-effects after high dose exposure. PMID:25331619

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance 3',4'-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR).

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D; Twamley, Brendan; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Dowling, Geraldine; Mahony, Olivia; Brandt, Simon D; Patrick, Julian; Archer, Roland P; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    The recent occurrence of deaths associated with the psychostimulant cis-4,4'-dimethylaminorex (4,4'-DMAR) in Europe indicated the presence of a newly emerged psychoactive substance on the market. Subsequently, the existence of 3,4-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR) has come to the authors' attention and this study describes the synthesis of cis- and trans-MDMAR followed by extensive characterization by chromatographic, spectroscopic, mass spectrometric platforms and crystal structure analysis. MDMAR obtained from an online vendor was subsequently identified as predominantly the cis-isomer (90%). Exposure of the cis-isomer to the mobile phase conditions (acetonitrile/water 1:1 with 0.1% formic acid) employed for high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an artificially induced conversion to the trans-isomer, which was not observed when characterized by gas chromatography. Monoamine release activities of both MDMAR isomers were compared with the non-selective monoamine releasing agent (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as a standard reference compound. For additional comparison, both cis- and trans-4,4'-DMAR, were assessed under identical conditions. cis-MDMAR, trans-MDMAR, cis-4,4'-DMAR and trans-4,4'-DMAR were more potent than MDMA in their ability to function as efficacious substrate-type releasers at the dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in rat brain tissue. While cis-4,4'-DMAR, cis-MDMAR and trans-MDMAR were fully efficacious releasing agents at the serotonin transporter (SERT), trans-4,4'-DMAR acted as a fully efficacious uptake blocker. Currently, little information is available about the presence of MDMAR on the market but the high potency of ring-substituted methylaminorex analogues at all three monoamine transporters investigated here might be relevant when assessing the potential for serious side-effects after high dose exposure.

  4. Perindopril increases the swallowing reflex by inhibiting substance P degradation and tyrosine hydroxylase activation in a rat model of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun-ichi; Kojima, Natsuki; Saeki, Kohji; Ishihara, Miki; Takayama, Makoto

    2015-01-05

    Patients with hypertension have a high risk of ischemic stroke and subsequent stroke-associated pneumonia. Stroke-associated pneumonia is most likely to develop in patients with dysphagia. The present study was designed to compare the ameliorative effects of different treatments in rat model of dysphagia. Spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) to induce chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causing disorders of the swallowing reflex. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (perindopril, imidapril and enalapril), an angiotensin II type 1-receptor blocker (losartan), a vasodilator (hydralazine) and an indirect dopamine agonist (amantadine) were dissolved in drinking water and administered to the rats for six weeks. The blood pressure, the swallowing reflex under anesthesia, the substance P content in the striatum and the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the substantial nigra were measured. Compared to the vehicle control, the decrease in the swallowing reflex induced by BCAO was attenuated significantly by enalapril, imidapril and perindopril, but only slightly by losartan. Hydralazine had no effect on the swallowing reflex. Amantadine significantly attenuated the decreased swallowing reflex but increased the blood pressure. Cerebral hypoperfusion for six weeks decreased the TH expression and substance P level. Perindopril improved both the TH expressions and substance P level, but imidapril, enalapril and amantadine only improved the substance P level. The present findings indicate that perindopril could be useful for preventing dysphagia in the chronic stage of stroke by attenuating the decrease in TH expression and the decrease in the substance P level.

  5. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  6. The Relationship among User, Activity and Space of Street Furniture Placed at Kanuni Campus - Karadeniz Technical University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurdoğlu, B. C.; Çelik, K. T.; Konakoğlu, S. S. Kurt; Erbaş, Y. S.

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study, 2369 street furniture at the campus mentioned to the thesis study named "Generating a GIS-Based Campus Street Furniture Information System (YEDBIS): Example of Kanuni Campus - Karadeniz Technical University" are to question the harmony statuses of space form, actual activity in space, space size, natural materials used space, usage density of space, surface materials of space, users, and the other of them. The harmony statuses of the street furniture were fixed by observation works and field determinations at the campus. Findings obtained observations were recorded to identification cards by writing "0" value for disharmony, "1" value for partly harmony and "2" value for harmony. Then, the data were analyzed in YEDBIS, which is based on GIS. Then, the data were analyzed in YEDBIS, which is based on GIS, by using ArcMap 10.0 programme. However, due to the absence of web support generated for the YEDBIS, with current data querying and analysis of this data was carried out only in a computer where YEDBIS is located. The results of the analysis indicates that 2369 street furniture were found to be disharmony with space form, with surface materials of space, with natural materials used space and with other street furniture in space, and to be partly harmony actual activity in space, space size, usage density of space and users. Also, the regions and nearby around of the buildings at the campus where were disharmony, partly harmony and harmony of the street furniture were established by using YEDBIS.

  7. Science and Technology Librarians: User Engagement and Outreach Activities in the Area of Scholarly Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Lutishoor; Speer, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the findings of a survey completed by ACRL/STS [Association of College and Research Libraries/Science and Technology Section] members on scholarly communication issues. In particular it identifies the percentage of their daily activities that are spent in support of scholarly communication activities; extent of change of job…

  8. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of methylene blue active substances by spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Cinotto, Pete J.; Frahm, Galen W.; Woodworth, Mark T.; Pritt, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of methylene blue active substances in whole-water samples by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometric detection is described. Sulfate and sulfonate-based surfectants are reacted with methylene blue to form a blue-colored complex. The complex is extracted into chloroform, back-washed with an acidified phosphate-based buffer solution, and measured against external standards with a probe spectrophotometer. The method detection limt for routine analysis is 0.02 milligram per liter. The precision is plus/minus 10 percent relative standard deviation. The positive bias from nitrate and chloride and U.S. Geological Survey method O-3111-83 for methylene blue active substances is minized by adding a back-washing step.

  9. Prenatal cocaine exposure, illicit-substance use and stress and craving processes during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Sarah W.; Lacadie, Cheryl M.; Sinha, Rajita; Mayes, Linda C.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with increased rates of illicit-substance use during adolescence. In addition, both PCE and illicit-substance use are associated with alterations in cortico-striato-limbic neurocircuitry, development of which is ongoing throughout adolescence. However, the relationship between illicit-substance use, PCE and functional neural responses has not previously been assessed concurrently. Methods Sixty-eight adolescents were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study of childhood and adolescent development. All participants had been followed since birth. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired during presentation of personalized stressful, favorite-food and neutral/relaxing imagery scripts and compared between 46 PCE and 22 non-prenatally-drug-exposed (NDE) adolescents with and without lifetime illicit-substance use initiation. Data were analyzed using multi-level ANOVAs (pFWE<.05). Results There was a significant three-way interaction between illicit-substance use, PCE status and cue condition on neural responses within primarily cortical brain regions, including regions of the left and right insula. Among PCE versus NDE adolescents, illicit-substance use was associated with decreased subcortical and increased cortical activity during the favorite-food condition, whereas the opposite pattern of activation was observed during the neutral/relaxing condition. Among PCE versus NDE adolescents, illicit-substance use during stress processing was associated with decreased activity in cortical and subcortical regions including amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Neural activity within cortico-striato-limbic regions was significantly negatively associated with subjective ratings of anxiety and craving among illicit-substance users, but not among non-users. Conclusions These findings suggest different neural substrates of experimentation with illicit drugs between adolescents with and

  10. Truancy, Grade Point Average, and Sexual Activity: A Meta-Analysis of Risk Indicators for Youth Substance Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallfors, Denise; Vevea, Jack L.; Iritani, Bonita; Cho, HyunSan; Khatapoush, Shereen; Saxe, Leonard

    2002-01-01

    Compared three risk measures associated with adolescent substance use (truancy, grade point average, and recent sexual intercourse) to assess the reliability of risk measures across different survey instruments, communities, and points in time. Truancy appeared superior because of its strong predictive value, particularly among younger children,…

  11. PAD-MAC: Primary User Activity-Aware Distributed MAC for Multi-Channel Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Piran, Md. Jalil; Kim, Hansoo; Yun, Jihyeok; Suh, Doug Young

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) has emerged as a promising technology to solve problems related to spectrum scarcity and provides a ubiquitous wireless access environment. CR-enabled secondary users (SUs) exploit spectrum white spaces opportunistically and immediately vacate the acquired licensed channels as primary users (PUs) arrive. Accessing the licensed channels without the prior knowledge of PU traffic patterns causes severe throughput degradation due to excessive channel switching and PU-to-SU collisions. Therefore, it is significantly important to design a PU activity-aware medium access control (MAC) protocol for cognitive radio networks (CRNs). In this paper, we first propose a licensed channel usage pattern identification scheme, based on a two-state Markov model, and then estimate the future idle slots using previous observations of the channels. Furthermore, based on these past observations, we compute the rank of each available licensed channel that gives SU transmission success assessment during the estimated idle slot. Secondly, we propose a PU activity-aware distributed MAC (PAD-MAC) protocol for heterogeneous multi-channel CRNs that selects the best channel for each SU to enhance its throughput. PAD-MAC controls SU activities by allowing them to exploit the licensed channels only for the duration of estimated idle slots and enables predictive and fast channel switching. To evaluate the performance of the proposed PAD-MAC, we compare it with the distributed QoS-aware MAC (QC-MAC) and listen-before-talk MAC schemes. Extensive numerical results show the significant improvements of the PAD-MAC in terms of the SU throughput, SU channel switching rate and PU-to-SU collision rate. PMID:25831084

  12. Learning SVM Ranking Functions from User Feedback Using Document Metadata and Active Learning in the Biomedical Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, Robert

    Information overload is a well-known problem facing biomedical professionals. MEDLINE, the biomedical bibliographic database, adds hundreds of articles daily to the millions already in its collection. This overload is exacerbated by the lack of relevance-based ranking for search results, as well as disparate levels of search skill and domain experience of professionals using systems designed to search MEDLINE. We propose to address these problems through learning ranking functions from user relevance feedback. Simple active learning techniques can be used to learn ranking functions using a fraction of the available data, with performance approaching that of functions learned using all available data. Furthermore, ranking functions learned using metadata features from the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms associated with MEDLINE citations greatly outperform functions learned using textual features. An in-depth investigation is made into the effect of a number of variables in the ranking round, while further investigation is made into peripheral issues such as users providing inconsistent data.

  13. Determination of the biologically active flavour substances thujone and camphor in foods and medicines containing sage (Salvia officinalis L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The sage plant Salvia officinalis L. is used as ingredient in foods and beverages as well as in herbal medicinal products. A major use is in the form of aqueous infusions as sage tea, which is legal to be sold as either food or medicine. Sage may contain two health relevant substances, thujone and camphor. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an analytical methodology to determine these active principles of sage and give a first overview of their concentrations in a wide variety of sage foods and medicines. Results A GC/MS procedure was applied for the analysis of α- and β-thujone and camphor with cyclodecanone as internal standard. The precision was between 0.8 and 12.6%, linearity was obtained from 0.1 - 80 mg/L. The recoveries of spiked samples were between 93.7 and 104.0% (average 99.1%). The time of infusion had a considerable influence on the content of analytes found in the teas. During the brewing time, thujone and camphor show an increase up to about 5 min, after which saturation is reached. No effect was found for preparation with or without a lid on the pot used for brewing the infusion. Compared to extracts with ethanol (60% vol), which provide a maximum yield, an average of 30% thujone are recovered in the aqueous tea preparations. The average thujone and camphor contents were 4.4 mg/L and 16.7 mg/L in food tea infusions and 11.3 mg/L and 25.4 mg/L in medicinal tea infusions. Conclusions The developed methodology allows the efficient determination of thujone and camphor in a wide variety of sage food and medicine matrices and can be applied to conduct surveys for exposure assessment. The current results suggest that on average between 3 and 6 cups of sage tea could be daily consumed without reaching toxicological thresholds. PMID:21777420

  14. US Activities in Making Life Cycle Inventory Data More Available to Users

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demand for LCA studies continues to grow, although, the lack of reliable, transparent Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data is hampering the wide-spread application of LCA. This paper will present activities related to the development and accessibility of process LCI data in the U...

  15. Developing a User Oriented Design Methodology for Learning Activities Using Boundary Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fragou, ?lga; Kameas, Achilles

    2013-01-01

    International Standards in High and Open and Distance Education are used for developing Open Educational Resources (OERs). Current issues in e-learning community are the specification of learning chunks and the definition of describing designs for different units of learning (activities, units, courses) in a generic though expandable format.…

  16. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission and opportunities for applications users

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. Set to launch in 2014, SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements will have an accuracy, resolution, and glob...

  17. Weather effects on the patterns of people's everyday activities: a study using GPS traces of mobile phone users.

    PubMed

    Horanont, Teerayut; Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W; Sekimoto, Yoshihide; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree) at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy). When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM-1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics.

  18. Comparison of Trial Participants and Open Access Users of a Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention Regarding Adherence, Attrition, and Repeated Participation

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Diener, Eva; Bauer, Georg; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Martin, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions are popular for promoting healthy lifestyles such as physical activity. However, little is known about user characteristics, adherence, attrition, and predictors of repeated participation on open access physical activity websites. Objective The focus of this study was Active-online, a Web-based individually tailored physical activity intervention. The aims were (1) to assess and compare user characteristics and adherence to the website (a) in the open access context over time from 2003 to 2009, and (b) between trial participants and open access users; and (2) to analyze attrition and predictors of repeated use among participants in a randomized controlled trial compared with registered open access users. Methods Data routinely recorded in the Active-online user database were used. Adherence was defined as: the number of pages viewed, the proportion of visits during which a tailored module was begun, the proportion of visits during which tailored feedback was received, and the time spent in the tailored modules. Adherence was analyzed according to six one-year periods (2003-2009) and according to the context (trial or open access) based on first visits and longest visits. Attrition and predictors of repeated participation were compared between trial participants and open access users. Results The number of recorded visits per year on Active-online decreased from 42,626 in 2003-2004 to 8343 in 2008-2009 (each of six one-year time periods ran from April 23 to April 22 of the following year). The mean age of users was between 38.4 and 43.1 years in all time periods and both contexts. The proportion of women increased from 49.5% in 2003-2004 to 61.3% in 2008-2009 (P< .001). There were differences but no consistent time trends in adherence to Active-online. The mean age of trial participants was 43.1 years, and 74.9% were women. Comparing contexts, adherence was highest for registered open access users. For open access users, adherence

  19. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis in active intravenous drug users: a justified procedure?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infective endocarditis is a life threatening complication of intravenous drug abuse, which continues to be a major burden with inadequately characterised long-term outcomes. We reviewed our institutional experience of surgical treatment of infective endocarditis in active intravenous drug abusers with the aim of identifying the determinants long-term outcome of this distinct subgroup of infective endocarditis patients. Methods A total of 451 patients underwent surgery for infective endocarditis between January 1993 and July 2013 at the University Hospital of Heidelberg. Of these patients, 20 (7 female, mean age 35 ± 7.7 years) underwent surgery for infective endocarditis with a history of active intravenous drug abuse. Mean follow-up was 2504 ± 1842 days. Results Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen detected in preoperative blood cultures. Two patients (10%) died before postoperative day 30. Survival at 1, 5 and 10 years was 90%, 85% and 85%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation was 100%. Higher NYHA functional class, higher EuroSCORE II, HIV infection, longer operating time, postoperative fever and higher requirement for red blood cell transfusion were associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusions In active intravenous drug abusers, surgical treatment for infective endocarditis should be performed as extensively as possible and be followed by an aggressive postoperative antibiotic therapy to avoid high mortality. Early surgical intervention is advisable in patients with precipitous cardiac deterioration and under conditions of staphylococcal endocarditis. However, larger studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:24661344

  20. Users Guide to BellhopDRDC_V4: Active and Passive Versions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    l’interpolation linéaire de distance du profil de vitesse du son (PVS) et l’interpolation curvilinéaire de la bathymétrie sont ajoutés aux choix...exigences des programmes de commande de l’Environment Modeling Manager. Le présent document constitue un guide d’utilisation des versions active et...passive de la version 4 RDDC du Bellhop ainsi que du programme de perte de transmission aux limites, et décrit certaines routines de traçage permettant

  1. Prevalence of Axis-1 psychiatric (with focus on depression and anxiety) disorder and symptomatology among non-medical prescription opioid users in substance use treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Goldner, Elliot M; Lusted, Anna; Roerecke, Michael; Rehm, Jürgen; Fischer, Benedikt

    2014-03-01

    Non-medical prescription opioid use (NMPOU) constitutes a substantial clinical and public health concern in North America. Although there is evidence of elevated rates of mental health problems among people with NMPOU, the extent of these correlations specifically in treatment samples has not been systematically assessed. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted for Axis-1 psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms with a principal focus on depression and anxiety disorders in substance use treatment samples reporting NMPOU at admission to treatment (both criteria within past 30days). 11 unique studies (all from either the United States or Canada) met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of 'any' mental health problems (both diagnosis and symptoms) among substance abuse treatment patients reporting NMPOU was 43% (95% CI: 32%-54%; I(2) for inter-study heterogeneity: 99.5%). The pooled prevalence of depression diagnosis among substance abuse treatment patients reporting NMPOU was 27% (95% CI: 9%-45%; I(2): 99.2%); the pooled prevalence of anxiety diagnosis in the sample was 29% (95% CI: 14%-44%; I(2): 98.7%). The prevalence rates of psychiatric problems (both diagnosis and symptoms), depression diagnosis and anxiety diagnosis are disproportionately high in substance use treatment samples reporting NMPOU relative to general population rates. Adequate and effective clinical strategies are needed to address co-occurring NMPOU and mental health in substance use treatment systems, especially given rising treatment demand for NMPOU. Efforts are needed to better understand the temporal and causal relationships among NMPOU, mental health problems, and treatment seeking in order to improve interventions.

  2. A Study of Substance non-use

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Vasantha; Anandaram, T.S.J.; Balan, Anand; Bashyam, V.S.P

    2003-01-01

    120 persons belonging to the four different groups namely, students, unskilled workers, skilled workers and professionals were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule on subsunce non-use. Results were analysed using SPSS 7.5 version. 65% of the sample used, at least, one of the substances during their lifetime. Alcohol (55.8%) and nicotine (45%) were the commonly used substances and paan (21.7%) was used to some extent. The non-users were questioned on the reasons for nonuse, with respect to each of the substances, namely, nicotine, alcohol, paan, cannabis, sedatives, opioids and others. Familial values, disinterest, effects of the substance, adverse effects due to substances, moral values, responsibilities and being a role model were the commonly attributed reasons for substance non-use. PMID:21206853

  3. A theory of adolescent substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Spotts, J V; Shontz, F C

    1985-01-01

    This report applies a theory of psychological individuation to inferences drawn from an 8-year series of clinical studies of men who practice heavy, chronic use of different drugs. Each man was studied intensively over a period of 4-5 months, using interviews and a comprehensive battery of dimensional and morphogenic assessment procedures. Users of barbiturates and sedative hypnotics were found to be least mature, followed by users of opiates, users of amphetamine, users of cocaine, and nonusers of drugs, who were found to be most mature. A theory is described which conceives adolescent substance abuse as rooted in dysfunctional relationships with parental figures which block or delay the normal individuation process. Comparable sets of representative case studies of heavy, chronic users of alcohol and marihuana are recommended to facilitate the development of treatment programs that take into account the special needs of persons who practice heavy, chronic use of different substances.

  4. Intentional Medication Non-Adherence Due to Interactive Toxicity Beliefs among HIV Positive Active Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Kalichman, Moira O.; Cherry, Charsey; Hoyt, Ginger; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi

    2015-01-01

    Drug use poses significant challenges to medical management of HIV infection. While most research has focused on the influence of intoxication on unintentional adherence to HIV treatment, drug use may also lead to intentional non-adherence, particularly when individuals believe that mixing medications with drugs is harmful. This study examined whether interactive toxicity beliefs predict non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) over a prospective period of adherence monitoring. Men and women living with HIV who screened positive for drug use and were being treated with ART (N=530) completed computerized self-interviews, three prospective unannounced pill counts to measure ART adherence, provided urine specimens for drug screening, and HIV viral load results from medical records. Results showed that 189 (35%) participants indicated that they intentionally miss their ART when they are using drugs. These participants also reported common beliefs regarding the perceived hazards of mixing HIV medications with alcohol and other drugs. Multivariable models that controlled for demographic and health characteristics, as well as frequency of alcohol use, showed that intentional non-adherence predicted poorer ART adherence over the prospective month and also predicted poorer treatment outcomes as indexed by unsuppressed HIV viral load. These findings extend previous research to show that interactive toxicity beliefs and intentional non-adherence play a significant role in medication non-adherence for a substantial number of people living with HIV and should be actively addressed in HIV clinical care. PMID:26226250

  5. Space shuttle atmospheric revitalization subsystem/active thermal control subsystem computer program (users manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A shuttle (ARS) atmosphere revitalization subsystem active thermal control subsystem (ATCS) performance routine was developed. This computer program is adapted from the Shuttle EC/LSS Design Computer Program. The program was upgraded in three noteworthy areas: (1) The functional ARS/ATCS schematic has been revised to accurately synthesize the shuttle baseline system definition. (2) The program logic has been improved to provide a more accurate prediction of the integrated ARS/ATCS system performance. Additionally, the logic has been expanded to model all components and thermal loads in the ARS/ATCS system. (3) The program is designed to be used on the NASA JSC crew system division's programmable calculator system. As written the new computer routine has an average running time of five minutes. The use of desk top type calculation equipment, and the rapid response of the program provides the NASA with an analytical tool for trade studies to refine the system definition, and for test support of the RSECS or integrated Shuttle ARS/ATCS test programs.

  6. MBAS (Methylene Blue Active Substances) and LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonates) in Mediterranean coastal aerosols: Sources and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, S.; Ghedini, C.; Peeters, S.; Rottiers, A.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Chiari, M.; Jalba, A.; Despiau, S.; Dayan, U.; Temara, A.

    2011-12-01

    Methylene Blue Active Substances (MBAS) and Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonates (LAS) concentrations, together with organic carbon and ions were measured in atmospheric coastal aerosols in the NW Mediterranean Basin. Previous studies have suggested that the presence of surfactants in coastal aerosols may result in vegetation damage without specifically detecting or quantifying these surfactants. Coastal aerosols were collected at a remote site (Porquerolles Island-Var, France) and at a more anthropised site (San Rossore National Park-Tuscany, Italy). The chemical data were interpreted according to a comprehensive local meteorological analysis aiming to decipher the airborne source and transport processes of these classes of compounds. The LAS concentration (anthropogenic surfactants) was measured in the samples using LC-MS/MS, a specific analytical method. The values were compared with the MBAS concentration, determined by a non-specific analytical method. At Porquerolles, the MBAS concentration (103 ± 93 ng m -3) in the summer samples was significantly higher than in the winter samples. In contrast, LAS concentrations were rarely greater than in the blank filters. At San Rossore, the mean annual MBAS concentration (887 ± 473 ng m -3 in PM10) contributed about 10% to the total atmospheric particulate organic matter. LAS mean concentration in these same aerosol samples was 11.5 ± 10.5 ng m -3. A similar MBAS (529 ± 454 ng m -3) - LAS (7.1 ± 4.1 ng m -3 LAS) ratio of ˜75 was measured in the fine (PM2.5) aerosol fraction. No linear correlation was found between MBAS and LAS concentrations. At San Rossore site the variation of LAS concentrations was studied on a daily basis over a year. The LAS concentrations in the coarse fraction (PM10-2.5) were higher during strong sea storm conditions, characterized by strong air flow coming from the sea sector. These events, occurring with more intensity in winter, promoted the formation of primary marine aerosols containing LAS

  7. Innate Activation of MDC and NK Cells in High-risk HIV-1 Exposed, Sero-Negative (HESN) IV-Drug Users that Share Needles When Compared to Low-risk Non-sharing IV-Drug User Controls

    PubMed Central

    Tomescu, Costin; Seaton, Kelly E.; Smith, Peter; Taylor, Mack; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Metzger, David S.; Montaner, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described increased innate immune activation in HIV-1 exposed, sero-negative intra-venous drug users (HESN-IDU), but have not addressed the independent role of injected drugs and/or repeated injections in driving immune activation. Methods Here, we investigated innate (NK cells and dendritic cells) and adaptive (HIV-specific antibody and CD8+ T cell) immune parameters among a high-risk cohort of needle-sharing HESN-IDU subjects and compared them to low-risk non-sharing IDU subjects (NS-IDU) and non drug-user controls. Results We observed that HIV-specific antibody and CD8+ T cell responses were not detected in HESN-IDU subjects, yet innate immune cell activation was found to be significantly increased on NK cells (CD69 and CD107a upregulation) and MDCs (CD40 and CD83 upregulation) when compared to NS-IDU subjects or non drug-user controls (p<0.01, and p<0.05, respectively). HESN-IDU subjects maintained strong NK cell CD107a degranulation and cytokine (IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and MIP-1 beta) production following target cell-incubation suggesting that constitutive innate activation does not induce functional exhaustion of innate cells in HESN-IDU subjects. NK activation in HESN-IDU subjects was independent of drug use patterns but was durable over time and correlated with plasma levels of IP-10 by Luminex analysis (rho=0.5073, p=0.0059, n=28). Conclusions Our results indicate that heightened innate immune cell activation in HESN-IDU subjects is not the result of the IV-drugs and repeated injection practice itself, but to repeated exposure to factors intrinsic to sharing needles (i.e., exposure to pathogens or heterologous cells among donor blood). PMID:25514793

  8. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  9. Cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders show dysfunctional brain activation and connectivity in the emotional regulation networks during negative emotion maintenance and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Asensio, Samuel; Martínez-González, José Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine dependence often co-occurs with Cluster B personality disorders. Since both disorders are characterized by emotion regulation deficits, we predicted that cocaine comorbid patients would exhibit dysfunctional patterns of brain activation and connectivity during reappraisal of negative emotions. We recruited 18 cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders, 17 cocaine users without comorbidities and 21 controls to be scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance on a reappraisal task in which they had to maintain or suppress the emotions induced by negative affective stimuli. We followed region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain approaches to investigate brain activations and connectivity associated with negative emotion experience and reappraisal. Results showed that cocaine users with comorbid personality disorders had reduced activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex during negative emotion maintenance and increased activation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala during reappraisal. Amygdala activation correlated with impulsivity and antisocial beliefs in the comorbid group. Connectivity analyses showed that in the cocaine comorbid group the subgenual cingulate was less efficiently connected with the amygdala and the fusiform gyri and more efficiently connected with the anterior insula during maintenance, whereas during reappraisal the left orbitofrontal cortex was more efficiently connected with the amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex was less efficiently connected with the dorsal striatum. We conclude that cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders have distinctive patterns of brain activation and connectivity during maintenance and reappraisal of negative emotions, which correlate with impulsivity and dysfunctional beliefs.

  10. Vitellogenin synthesis in primary cultures of fish liver cells as endpoint for in vitro screening of the (anti)estrogenic activity of chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Navas, José M; Segner, Helmut

    2006-10-25

    Concern over possible adverse effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds on fish has caused the development of appropriate testing methods. In vitro screening assays may provide initial information on endocrine activities of a test compound and thereby may direct and optimize subsequent testing. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) is used as a biomarker of exposure of fish to estrogen-active substances. Since VTG induction can be measured not only in vivo but also in fish hepatocytes in vitro, the use of VTG induction response in isolated fish liver cells has been suggested as in vitro screen for identifying estrogenic-active substances. The main advantages of the hepatocyte VTG assay are considered its ability to detect effects of estrogenic metabolites, since hepatocytes in vitro remain metabolically competent, and its ability to detect both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. In this article, we critically review the current knowledge on the VTG response of cultured fish hepatocytes to (anti)estrogenic substances. In particular, we discuss the sensitivity, specificity, and variability of the VTG hepatocyte assay. In addition, we review the available data on culture factors influencing basal and induced VTG production, the response to natural and synthetic estrogens as well as to xenoestrogens, the detection of indirect estrogens, and the sources of assay variability. The VTG induction in cultured fish hepatocytes is clearly influenced by culture conditions (medium composition, temperature, etc.) and culture system (hepatocyte monolayers, aggregates, liver slices, etc.). The currently available database on estrogen-mediated VTG induction in cultured teleost hepatocytes is too small to support conclusive statements on whether there exist systematic differences of the VTG response between in vitro culture systems, VTG analytical methods or fish species. The VTG hepatocyte assay detects sensitively natural and synthetic estrogens, whereas the response to

  11. Increased Forebrain Activations in Youths with Family Histories of Alcohol and Other Substance Use Disorders Performing a Go/No Go Task

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, Ashley; Tagaments, Malle; Rowland, Laura M.; Mathias, Charles W.; Wright, Susan N.; Hong, L. Elliot; Kochunov, Peter; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders (FH+) are at a greater risk of developing substance use disorders than their peers with no such family histories (FH−), and this increased risk may be related to impaired maturation of forebrain circuitry. FH+ individuals have shown altered forebrain activity at rest and while performing cognitive tasks. However, it is not fully understood how forebrain activity is altered in FH+ individuals and ultimately how these alterations may contribute to substance use disorder risk. Methods In the present study, we tested 72 FH+ and 32 FH− youths performing a go/no-go task and examined activations in blocks with only go trials (Go Only), blocks with 50% go and 50% no go trials (Go/NoGo), and a contrast of those 2 blocks. Results FH+ youths had significantly greater cerebral activations in both the Go and Go/NoGo blocks than FH− youths in regions including the posterior cingulate/precuneus, bilateral middle/superior temporal gyrus, and medial superior frontal gyrus with no significant group differences in the subtraction between Go Only and Go/NoGo blocks. Additionally, FH+ youths had moderately slower reaction times on go trials in the Go Only blocks. Conclusions Our findings suggest that global activation increases in FH+ youths are modulated by FH density and are not specific to the inhibitory components of the task. This pattern of increased activations in FH+ youths may be at least partially due to impaired forebrain white matter development leading to greater activations/less efficient neural communication during task performance. PMID:25406902

  12. Mediators of interpersonal violence and drug addiction severity among methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hobkirk, Andréa L; Watt, Melissa H; Green, Kimberly T; Beckham, Jean C; Skinner, Donald; Meade, Christina S

    2015-03-01

    South Africa has high rates of interpersonal violence and a rapidly growing methamphetamine epidemic. Previous research has linked experiences of interpersonal violence to higher rates of substance use, and identified mental health constructs as potential mediators of this association. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal violence and addiction severity among active methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa, and to explore symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use coping as mediators of this relationship. A community sample of 360 methamphetamine users was recruited through respondent driven sampling and surveyed on their experiences of violence, mental health, coping, and drug use and severity. A series of one-way ANOVAs were conducted to examine the relationship of self-reported interpersonal violence with drug addiction severity, and multiple mediation analyses were used to determine if PTSD symptoms and substance use coping mediated this relationship. The majority (87%) of the sample reported experiencing at least one instance of interpersonal violence in their lifetime, and the number of violent experiences was associated with increased drug addiction severity. PTSD and substance use coping were significant mediators of this association. Only the indirect effect of substance use coping remained significant for the female sample when the mediation model was conducted separately for men and women. The findings point to the need for integrated treatments that address drug use and PTSD for methamphetamine users in South Africa and highlight the importance of coping interventions for women.

  13. Children's Impact on Adults' Substance Use Problem Awareness and Treatment Optimism: The Role of Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droege, Jocelyn R.; Stevens, Edward B.; Jason, Leonard A.

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is associated with a host of harmful consequences to the substance user as well as other individuals and society as a whole. Although harm is an integral component of substance abuse, there is a dearth of research that investigates the relationship between harm and substance use problems. The goal of this study was to explore…

  14. Role of humic substances in the degradation pathways and residual antibacterial activity during the photodecomposition of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin in water.

    PubMed

    Porras, Jazmín; Bedoya, Cristina; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Santamaría, Alexander; Fernández, Jhon J; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the photo-transformation, in presence of humic substances (HSs), of ciprofloxacin (CIP), a commonly-used fluoroquinolone antibiotic whose presence in aquatic ecosystems is a health hazard for humans and other living organisms. HSs from the International Humic Substances Society (Elliott humic acid and fulvic acid, Pahokee peat humic acid and Nordic lake) and a humic acid extracted from modified coal (HACM) were tested for their ability to photodegrade CIP. Based on kinetic and analytical studies, it was possible to establish an accelerating effect on the rate of CIP decomposition caused by the humic substances. This effect was associated with the photosensitized capacity of the HSs to facilitate energy transfer from an excited humic state to the ground state of ciprofloxacin. Except for Nordic lake, which experienced a lower positive effect, no significant differences in the CIP transformation were found among the different humic acids examined. The photochemistry of CIP can be modified by parameters such as pH, CIP or oxygen concentration. The irradiation of this antibiotic in the presence of HACM showed that antimicrobial activity was negligible after 14 h for E. coli and 24 h for S. aureus. In contrast, the antimicrobial activity was only slightly decreased after 24 h of irradiation by direct photolysis. Although mineralization of CIP irradiation in the presence of a HACM solution was not achieved, biodegradability was achieved after 12 h of irradiation, indicating that microorganisms within the environment can easily degrade CIP photochemical by-products.

  15. Composition analysis of fractions of extracellular polymeric substances from an activated sludge culture and identification of dominant forces affecting microbial aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) appear to play a critical role in the formation of bioaggregates, such as sludge flocs, in activated sludge processes. Here, we systematically investigated the composition and chemical structure of various EPS fractions excreted from an activated sludge culture using multi-analysis techniques to examine the ability of the sludge to aggregate. Chemical analysis was used with a three-dimensional excitation emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, applying inter-particle forces theory. The combined findings revealed that hydrophobic groups, especially protein-related N–H, were present in a greater proportion in tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). This result, which explained the specificity of TB-EPS in the chemical structure, was consistent with data indicating that TB-EPS contained a large amount of protein-like substances (86.7 mg/g of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids, 39.7% of the total EPS). Subsequently, a novel experimental procedure was developed to pinpoint key inter-particle forces in sludge aggregation. The result revealed that hydrogen bonds are the predominant triggers that promote sludge aggregation. This comprehensive analysis indicated that hydrophobic proteins in TB-EPS are responsible for the critical role played by hydrogen bonds in sludge formation. Our findings highlight the need to elucidate the mechanisms of TB-EPS-mediated flocculation in future efforts.

  16. Composition analysis of fractions of extracellular polymeric substances from an activated sludge culture and identification of dominant forces affecting microbial aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) appear to play a critical role in the formation of bioaggregates, such as sludge flocs, in activated sludge processes. Here, we systematically investigated the composition and chemical structure of various EPS fractions excreted from an activated sludge culture using multi-analysis techniques to examine the ability of the sludge to aggregate. Chemical analysis was used with a three-dimensional excitation emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, applying inter-particle forces theory. The combined findings revealed that hydrophobic groups, especially protein-related N–H, were present in a greater proportion in tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). This result, which explained the specificity of TB-EPS in the chemical structure, was consistent with data indicating that TB-EPS contained a large amount of protein-like substances (86.7 mg/g of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids, 39.7% of the total EPS). Subsequently, a novel experimental procedure was developed to pinpoint key inter-particle forces in sludge aggregation. The result revealed that hydrogen bonds are the predominant triggers that promote sludge aggregation. This comprehensive analysis indicated that hydrophobic proteins in TB-EPS are responsible for the critical role played by hydrogen bonds in sludge formation. Our findings highlight the need to elucidate the mechanisms of TB-EPS-mediated flocculation in future efforts. PMID:27311788

  17. Activity and purification of linenscin OC2, an antibacterial substance produced by Brevibacterium linens OC2, an orange cheese coryneform bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maisnier-Patin, S; Richard, J

    1995-05-01

    An orange cheese coryneform bacterium isolated from the surface of Gruyère of Comté and identified as Brevibacterium linens produces an antimicrobial substance designated linenscin OC2. This compound inhibits gram-positive food-borne pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes but is not active against gram-negative bacteria. Linenscin OC2 caused viability loss and lysis of the test organism, Listeria innocua. Electron microscopy showed that linenscin OC2 induces protoplast formation and cell lysis. The native substance is resistant to proteolytic enzymes, heat, and organic solvents and stable over a wide range of pH. The molecular weight of the native linenscin OC2 was estimated by gel chromatography to be over 285,000. Linenscin OC2 was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, 2-propanol extraction, and reverse-phase chromatography. Direct detection of antimicrobial activity on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel suggested an apparent molecular mass under 2,412 Da. Molecular mass was determined to be 1,196.7 Da by mass spectrometry. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that linenscin OC2 may contain 12 residues.

  18. In General, the Total Voltammetric Current from a Mixture of Redox-Active Substances will Not be the Sum of the Currents that Each Substance would Produce Independently at the Same Concentration as in the Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Oh, Woon Su; Gao, Xue-Rong; Rawashdeh, Abdel Monem M.

    2003-01-01

    At the potential range where both decamethylferrocene (dMeFc) and ferrocene (Fc) are oxidized with rates controlled by linear diffusion, electrogenerated Fc(+) radicals diffusing outwards from the electrode react quantitatively (K23 C=5.8 x 10(exp 8) with dMeFc diffusing towards the electrode and produce Fc and dMeFc. That reaction replaces dMeFc with Fc, whose diffusion coefficient is higher than that of dMeFc(+), and the total mass-transfer limited current from the mixture is increased by approximately 10%. Analogous observations are made when mass-transfer is controlled by convective-diffusion as in RDE voltammetry. Similar results have been obtained with another, and for all practical purposes randomly selected pair of redox-active substances, [Co(bipy)3](2+) and N - methylphenothiazine (MePTZ); reaction of MePTZ(+) with [Co(bipy)3](2+) replaces the latter with MePTZ, which diffuses faster and the current increases by approximately 20%. The experimental voltammograms have been simulated numerically and the role of (a) the rate constant of the homogeneous reaction; (b) the relative concentrations; and, (c) the diffusion coefficients of all species involved have been studied in detail. Importantly, it was also identified that within any given redox system the dependence of the mass-transfer limited current on the bulk concentrations of the redox-active species is expected to be non-linear. These findings are discussed in terms of their electroanalytical implications.

  19. In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, Annika

    2012-03-22

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  20. In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

    2016-07-12

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  1. The Development of a Mobile Monitoring and Feedback Tool to Stimulate Physical Activity of People With a Chronic Disease in Primary Care: A User-Centered Design

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Renée; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Tange, Huibert; van der Weijden, Trudy; de Witte, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is an important aspect in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type-2 diabetes. A monitoring and feedback tool combined with guidance by a primary care provider might be a successful method to enhance the level of physical activity in these patients. As a prerequisite for useful technology, it is important to involve the end-users in the design process from an early stage. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the user requirements for a tool to stimulate physical activity, embedded in primary care practice. The leading principle of this tool is to change behavior by self-monitoring, goal-setting, and feedback. Methods The research team collected qualitative data among 15 patients, 16 care professionals, and several experts. A prototype was developed in three stages. In stage 1, the literature was searched to identify end-users and context. In stage 2, the literature, experts and patient representatives were consulted to set up a use case with the general idea of the innovation. In stage 3, individual interviews and focus groups were held to identify the end-user requirements. Based on these requirements a prototype was built by the engineering team. Results The development process has led to a tool that generally meets the requirements of the end-users. A tri-axial activity sensor, worn on the hip, is connected by Bluetooth to a smartphone. In an app, quantitative feedback is given about the amount of activity and goals reached by means of graphical visualization, and an image shows a sun when the goal is reached. Overviews about activity per half an hour, per day, week, and month are provided. In the menu of the app and on a secured website, patients can enter information in individual sessions or read feedback messages generated by the system. The practice nurse can see the results of all patients on a secure webpage and can then discuss the results and set personalized goals in

  2. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  3. User-friendly minimization technology of three-dimensional crosstalk in three-dimensional liquid crystal display televisions with active shutter glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Jong-Man; Cho, Youngmin; Jung, Yongsik; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new three-dimensional (3-D) crosstalk minimization method for the active shutter glasses-type 3-D liquid crystal displays (LCD) television (TV). The crosstalk was reduced from 43% to 10% on average with the proposed technology. Furthermore, we propose a user-friendly method to reduce the 3-D crosstalk without any measurement equipment, which enables consumers to make their TVs crosstalk free. It is found that the results of the proposed crosstalk minimization method and user-friendly method are matched well. Thus, 3-D TV consumers can easily minimize the 3-D crosstalk with their eyes only.

  4. Regularly Drinking Alcohol Before Sexual Activity in a Nationally Representative Sample: Prevalence, Sociodemographics, and Associations With Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ronald G.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Goldstein, Risë B.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We addressed regular drinking before sex and its associated risk factors. Methods. From the wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative adult US sample (fielded 2004–2005), we determined the 12-month prevalence of regularly drinking alcohol before sexual activity. Among 17 491 sexually active drinkers, we determined the sociodemographic, psychiatric, and substance use correlates of regularly drinking before sex. Results. Regular presex drinking’s 12-month prevalence was 1.8%. Significant bivariate sociodemographic correlates were age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, family income, marital status, and employment status. Generalized anxiety disorder and alcohol dependence were associated with significantly increased odds of being a regular presex drinker after controlling for covariates. Conclusions. We estimate that 4.3 million American adults are regular presex drinkers. Future research should examine this public health issue at the population level, with particular focus on pathways that link it to psychopathology. PMID:25973812

  5. Chlorpromazine oligomer is a potentially active substance that inhibits human D-amino acid oxidase, product of a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Iwana, Sanae; Kawazoe, Tomoya; Park, Hwan Ki; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Ono, Koji; Yorita, Kazuko; Sakai, Takashi; Kusumi, Takenori; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2008-12-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), a potential risk factor for schizophrenia, has been proposed to be involved in the decreased glutamatergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Here we show the inhibitory effect of an antipsychotic drug, chlorpromazine, on human DAO, which is consistent with previous reports using porcine DAO, although human DAO was inhibited to a lesser degree (K(i) = 0.7 mM) than porcine DAO. Since chlorpromazine is known to induce phototoxic or photoallergic reactions and also to be transformed into various metabolites, we examined the effects of white light-irradiated chlorpromazine on the enzymatic activity. Analytical methods including high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that irradiation triggered the oligomerization of chlorpromazine molecules. The oligomerized chlorpromazine showed a mixed type inhibition with inhibition constants of low micromolar range, indicative of enhanced inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that oligomerized chlorpromazine could act as an active substance that might contribute to the therapeutic effects of this drug.

  6. Study of the effect of formulation variables on the characteristics of combination tablets containing enalapril maleate and indapamide as active substances using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán-István; Székely-Szentmiklósi, Blanka; Deák, Boglárka; Székely-Szentmiklósi, István; Kovács, Béla; Zöldi, Katalin; Sipos, Emese

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of different variables on tablet formulations containing enalapril maleate and indapamide as active substances, two separate experimental designs were employed: one for evaluating powder properties and the other for tablet characteristics. Because of the low active pharmaceutical ingredient content, it was hypothesized that both powder and tablet properties could be determined only by the characteristics of excipients. In order to test this assumption, both experimental designs were done with placebo mixtures. The optimized formulation was then evaluated both with and without APIs. Results indicated that filler and lubricant percentage, along with compression force, were the most important variables during the formulation study. The optimized formulation showed similar characteristics in both cases for all responses, except for angle of repose and friability where only minor differences were observed. The combination of the applied approaches (using placebo composition and fractional experimental design) proved to be efficient, cost effective and time saving.

  7. Effectiveness of the back school program for the performance of activities of daily living in users of a basic health unit in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Patrícia Thurow; Vieira, Adriane; Noll, Matias; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Primary care is considered the gateway to the Brazilian public health system and is responsible for managing the most prevalent problems in the population. In this study, the effects of Back School on pain, functionality, and the performance of activities of daily living (ADL) in users with chronic musculoskeletal pain were evaluated. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four users (33 females and 11 males) participated in Back School, with five two-hour theoretical and practical meetings held once a week. The assessment instruments used were as follows: (a) a circuit evaluation of posture dynamics recorded on video, (b) an observational instrument of ADL using video, (c) anamnesis, (d) the visual analogue scale, and (e) the Oswestry Disability Index. [Results] The results showed decreased pain intensity, improved functionality, and the recovery of ADL. [Conclusion] The Back School program is an effective health education strategy for users with chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27799699

  8. The Role of Biotechnology for Conservation and Biologically Active Substances Production of Rhodiola rosea: Endangered Medicinal Species

    PubMed Central

    Tasheva, Krasimira; Kosturkova, Georgina

    2012-01-01

    At present, more than 50 000 plant species are used in phytotherapy and medicine. About 2/3 of them are harvested from nature leading to local extinction of many species or degradation of their habitats. Biotechnological methods offer possibilities not only for faster cloning and conservation of the genotype of the plants but for modification of their gene information, regulation, and expression for production of valuable substances in higher amounts or with better properties. Rhodiola rosea is an endangered medicinal species with limited distribution. It has outstanding importance for pharmaceutical industry for prevention and cure of cancer, heart and nervous system diseases, and so forth. Despite the great interest in golden root and the wide investigations in the area of phytochemistry, plant biotechnology remained less endeavoured and exploited. The paper presents research on initiation of in vitro cultures in Rhodiola rosea and some other Rhodiola species. Achievements in induction of organogenic and callus cultures, regeneration, and micropropagation varied but were a good basis for alternative in vitro synthesis of the desired metabolites and for the development of efficient systems for micropropagation for conservation of the species. PMID:22666097

  9. A stability-indicating HPLC method for the determination of bazedoxifene acetate and its related substances in active pharmaceutical ingredient.

    PubMed

    Visweswara Rao, Karri; Reddy, Kesareddy Padmaja; Kumari, Kondapaturu Siva; Srinivas, Mudigonda

    2013-03-01

    A simple, cost effective, stability-indicating reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the quantitative determination of bazedoxifene acetate (BAZ) drug substance in the presence of its impurities and degradation products. The method was developed using an X-terra RP-18, 150 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 μm column with a mobile phase containing solvent A, a mixture of 10 mM K(2)HPO(4) (pH 8.3) and acetonitrile in the ratio of 70:30 (v/v); and solvent B, a mixture of water and acetonitrile in the ratio 10:90 (v/v). The eluted compounds were monitored at 220 nm, and within a short run time of 18 min, BAZ and its impurities were satisfactorily separated with resolution more than 2.0. BAZ was subjected to stress degradation and found to be sensitive towards acidic, basic, oxidative, thermal and hydrolytic stress conditions and stable in photo degradation conditions. The degradation products were well resolved from BAZ peak and its impurities; the mass balance in each case was more than 99.5%, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity (correlation coefficient > 0.9994), limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy (recovery range 96.3 to 102.1%), precision (relative standard deviation < 2.8%) and robustness.

  10. School Victimization and Substance Use among Adolescents in California

    PubMed Central

    Astor, Ron A.; Estrada, Joey N.; Benbenishty, Rami; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use and violence co-occur among adolescents. However, the extant literature focuses on the substance use behaviors of perpetrators of violence and not on victims. This study identifies patterns of school victimization and substance use and how they co-occur. The California Healthy Kids Survey was used to identify latent classes/clusters of school victimization patterns and lifetime and frequency of recent (past month) alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use (N =419,698). Demographic characteristics (age, gender, and race/ethnicity) were included as predictors of latent class membership. Analyses revealed four latent classes of school victimization: low victimization (44.4 %), moderate victimization (22.3 %), verbal/relational victimization (20.8 %), and high victimization (with physical threats; 12.5 %). There were also four classes of substance use: non-users (58.5 %), alcohol experimenters (some recent alcohol use; 25.8 %), mild poly-substance users (lifetime use of all substances with few days of recent use; 9.1 %), and frequent poly-substance users (used all substances several times in the past month; 6.5 %). Those in the high victimization class were twice as likely to be frequent poly-substance users, and mild poly-substance use was most salient for those in the verbal victimization class. Few studies have explored latent patterns of substance use and violence victimization concurrently. The findings indicate substantial heterogeneity in victimization and substance use among youth in California schools with implications for targeted and tailored interventions. Understanding how certain types of victimization are associated with particular patterns of substance use will provide schools with opportunities to screen for concurrent behavioral health problems among youth. PMID:24482139

  11. Getting by with a little help from your friends: the impact of peer networks on criminality in a cohort of treatment-seeking drug users.

    PubMed

    Best, David; Hernando, Rosa; Gossop, Michael; Sidwell, Clare; Strang, John

    2003-04-01

    This study investigates the links between social networks of drug users and criminal activity. Opiate misusers (n=128) receiving in-patient treatment were interviewed about substance use, social networks, and crime in the month before treatment. Almost 60% of participants reported an average of more than 70 crimes each. Less than one-fifth of the subjects spent no time with other users, while just over half spent either "quite a lot" or "a lot" of time with drug users. Time with users increased the risk of crime. Spending no time with users provided a protective effect. Time with criminally involved drug users was associated with greater levels of crime. Social networks represent an important marker for integration in criminal networks in treatment-seeking drug users and a long-term barrier to rehabilitation.

  12. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under...

  13. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under...

  14. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under...

  15. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under...

  16. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under...

  17. Substance Abuse Treatment in Persons with HIV/AIDS: Challenges in Managing Triple Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Durvasula, Ramani; Miller, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the current literature addressing substance abuse treatment in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Clinical management of HIV must account for the “triple diagnosis” of HIV, psychiatric diagnosis, and substance use disorders and requires integrated treatment services that focus beyond just mitigation of substance use and psychiatric and medical symptoms but also address other health behaviors. Because clinical management of HIV/AIDS has shifted significantly with the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) in the mid 1990's, a literature review focusing on literature published since 2000, and using relevant key words was conducted using a wide range of literature search databases. This literature review was complemented by studies to expand on specific treatment modalities for which there was a dearth of literature addressing HIV infected cohorts and to provide discussion of issues around substance abuse treatment as an HIV prevention tool. Existing models of substance abuse treatment including cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing have proven to be useful for enhancing adherence and reducing substance use in outpatient populations, while methadone maintenance and directly observed treatment have been useful with specific subgroups of users. Contextualization of services heightens the likelihood of successful outcomes and relapse prevention. PMID:24274175

  18. In vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of extracts, fractions and a substance isolated from the Amazonian plant Tachia grandiflora (Gentianaceae).

    PubMed

    Silva, Luiz Francisco Rocha e; Lima, Emerson Silva; Vasconcellos, Marne Carvalho de; Aranha, Ellen Suzany Pereira; Costa, David Siqueira; Mustafa, Elba Vieira; Morais, Sabrina Kelly Reis de; Alecrim, Maria das Graças Costa; Nunomura, Sergio Massayoshi; Struwe, Lena; de Andrade-Neto, Valter Ferreira; Pohlit, Adrian Martin

    2013-06-01

    Tachia sp. are used as antimalarials in the Amazon Region and in vivo antimalarial activity of a Tachia sp. has been previously reported. Tachia grandiflora Maguire and Weaver is an Amazonian antimalarial plant and herein its cytotoxicity and antimalarial activity were investigated. Spectral analysis of the tetraoxygenated xanthone decussatin and the iridoid aglyone amplexine isolated, respectively, from the chloroform fractions of root methanol and leaf ethanol extracts was performed. In vitro inhibition of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum Welch was evaluated using optical microscopy on blood smears. Crude extracts of leaves and roots were inactive in vitro. However, chloroform fractions of the root and leaf extracts [half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 10.5 and 35.8 µg/mL, respectively] and amplexine (IC50= 7.1 µg/mL) were active in vitro. Extracts and fractions were not toxic to type MRC-5 human fibroblasts (IC50> 50 µg/mL). Water extracts of the roots of T. grandiflora administered by mouth were the most active extracts in the Peters 4-day suppression test in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. At 500 mg/kg/day, these extracts exhibited 45-59% inhibition five to seven days after infection. T. grandiflora infusions, fractions and isolated substance have potential as antimalarials.

  19. In vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of extracts, fractions and a substance isolated from the Amazonian plant Tachia grandiflora (Gentianaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Francisco Rocha e; Lima, Emerson Silva; de Vasconcellos, Marne Carvalho; Aranha, Ellen Suzany Pereira; Costa, David Siqueira; Mustafa, Elba Vieira; de Morais, Sabrina Kelly Reis; Alecrim, Maria das Graças Costa; Nunomura, Sergio Massayoshi; Struwe, Lena; de Andrade-Neto, Valter Ferreira; Pohlit, Adrian Martin

    2013-01-01

    Tachia sp. are used as antimalarials in the Amazon Region and in vivo antimalarial activity of a Tachia sp. has been previously reported. Tachia grandiflora Maguire and Weaver is an Amazonian antimalarial plant and herein its cytotoxicity and antimalarial activity were investigated. Spectral analysis of the tetraoxygenated xanthone decussatin and the iridoid aglyone amplexine isolated, respectively, from the chloroform fractions of root methanol and leaf ethanol extracts was performed. In vitro inhibition of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum Welch was evaluated using optical microscopy on blood smears. Crude extracts of leaves and roots were inactive in vitro. However, chloroform fractions of the root and leaf extracts [half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 10.5 and 35.8 µg/mL, respectively] and amplexine (IC50= 7.1 µg/mL) were active in vitro. Extracts and fractions were not toxic to type MRC-5 human fibroblasts (IC50> 50 µg/mL). Water extracts of the roots of T. grandiflora administered by mouth were the most active extracts in the Peters 4-day suppression test in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. At 500 mg/kg/day, these extracts exhibited 45-59% inhibition five to seven days after infection. T. grandiflora infusions, fractions and isolated substance have potential as antimalarials. PMID:23827996

  20. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulate human osteoblast osteogenic activity by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle “cross talk” between the nervous system and “osteo-neuromediators” that control bone remodeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of interactions between neuropeptides and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) on human osteoblasts. We also investigated the effects of neuropeptides and hBMP2 on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Osteoblasts were treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), or hBMP2 at three concentrations. At various intervals after treatment, cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. In addition, cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin were determined by colorimetric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effects of NPY, SP and hBMP on GJIC were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The viability of cells treated with neuropeptides and hBMP2 increased significantly in a time-dependent manner, but was inversely associated with the concentration of the treatments. ALP activity and osteocalcin were both reduced in osteoblasts exposed to the combination of neuropeptides and hBMP2. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly increased by the neuropeptides and hBMP2. These results suggest that osteoblast activity is increased by neuropeptides and hBMP2 through increased GJIC. Identification of the GJIC-mediated signal transduction capable of modulating the cellular activities of bone cells represents a novel approach to studying the biology of skeletal innervation. PMID:25714881

  1. QMRPACK user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.W.; Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  2. Numerical analysis of the influence of surface-active substance in the melt on the distribution of modifying particles and crystallization at the treatment of metal surface by a laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Popov, V. N.

    2014-06-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for the process of modifying the metal surface layer by refractory nano-size particles with the aid of the pulse laser radiation, which accounts for the surface tension dependence on the presence of surface-active substance in the melt. Numerical modeling has been carried out, from the results of which the influence of the surface -active admixture on the character of forming flows, distribution of particles of the modifying substance in the metal, and the melt crystallization process have been estimated.

  3. Striatal activity and reduced white matter increase frontal activity in youths with family histories of alcohol and other substance-use disorders performing a go/no-go task

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, Ashley; Tagamets, Malle A; Winkler, Anderson; Rowland, Laura M; Mathias, Charles W; Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Kochunov, Peter; Dougherty, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders (FH+) are at greater risk of developing substance-use disorders relative to those with no such family histories (FH−). We previously reported that FH+ youths have elevated activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and dorsal striatum while performing go/no-go tasks and have reduced frontal white matter integrity. A better understanding of relationships between these variables would provide insight into how frontostriatal circuitry is altered in FH+ youths, which may be an important contributor to their elevated risk. Methods In this study, we used structural equation modeling (SEM) to test interactions between activity in the SMA and dorsal striatum in 72 FH+ and 32 FH− youths during go/no-go task performance and to determine whether increased activity in these regions in FH+ youths can be at least partially explained by reduced frontal white matter integrity, as indexed by anterior corona radiata fractional anisotropy and N-acetylaspartate. Results Increased dorsal striatum activity explained most (∽75%) of the elevated SMA activity in FH+ youths, and the combined contributions of increased dorsal striatal activity, and decreased white matter integrity fully explained the elevated SMA activity. Conclusions These results suggest the elevated frontal cortical activity in FH+ youths is driven both by their increased striatal activity via downstream projections and reduced white matter integrity in frontal cortical projections, the latter likely increasing frontal cortical activity due to increased energy demands required for action potential propagation. As part of our ongoing longitudinal studies we will examine how these frontostriatal alterations relate to risk for developing substance-use disorders. PMID:26221573

  4. Substance abuse precedes Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, p<0.001). Because students with a high risk for internet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction.

  5. [Biochemical adaptation of the barley root cells to toxic substances. 1. Effect of aluminum on the phosphohydrolase activity].

    PubMed

    Tikhaia, N I; Fedorovskaia, M D

    2000-01-01

    Acid phosphatase (AP) and two nucleotidases with a top affinity to ATP and Ca (AN1) or AMP and Mg (AN2) were found among acid phosphohydrolases of the apoplast. After 15 min aluminum chloride at 100 microM induced activity of both membrane-bound and soluble phosphohydrolases. The highest induction of the enzymes by aluminum was observed at pH 4.5. A relatively high concentration of aluminum chloride (2 mM) stimulated AN2 and inhibited AN1, while AP activity remained unaltered. We propose that they activation of membrane-bound and soluble acid phosphohydrolases is one of the protective mechanisms of barley root apoplast against the toxic effect of aluminum chloride.

  6. Anticancer substances of mushroom origin.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T S; Krupodorova, T A; Barshteyn, V Y; Artamonova, A B; Shlyakhovenko, V A

    2014-06-01

    The present status of investigations about the anticancer activity which is inherent to medicinal mushrooms, as well as their biomedical potential and future prospects are discussed. Mushroom products and extracts possess promising immunomodulating and anticancer effects, so the main biologically active substances of mushrooms responsible for immunomodulation and direct cytoto-xicity toward cancer cell lines (including rarely mentioned groups of anticancer mushroom proteins), and the mechanisms of their antitumor action were analyzed. The existing to date clinical trials of mushroom substances are mentioned. Mushroom anticancer extracts, obtained by the different solvents, are outlined. Modern approaches of cancer treatment with implication of mushroom products, including DNA vaccinotherapy with mushroom immunomodulatory adjuvants, creation of prodrugs with mushroom lectins that can recognize glycoconjugates on the cancer cell surface, development of nanovectors etc. are discussed. The future prospects of mushroom anticancer substances application, including chemical modification of polysaccharides and terpenoids, gene engineering of proteins, and implementation of vaccines are reviewed.

  7. [Kinetic characteristics of microsomal NAD-glycohydrolase natural and solubilized with a non-ionic surface-active substance].

    PubMed

    Sestini, S; Cinci, G; Ricci, C

    1982-04-30

    Microsomal rat spleen NAD-glycohydrolase was solubilized by Nonidet P40. The solubilized enzyme shows Nicotinamide inhibition and pH dependence at the same extent as unsolubilized microsomal one. It differs from the latter in having a higher affinity for NAD and NADP, and in showing two peaks, instead of one, on electrofocusing: the former with a pH 5 pI without any activity, the latter with a pH 4, 1 pI with a high NAD-ase activity.

  8. Oral health of substance-dependent individuals: impact of specific substances.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Meredith M; Cheng, Debbie M; Kressin, Nancy R; Jones, Judith; Samet, Jeffrey H; Winter, Michael; Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about how different types of substances affect oral health. Our objective was to examine the respective effects of alcohol, stimulants, opioids, and marijuana on oral health in substance-dependent persons. Using self-reported data from 563 substance-dependent individuals, we found that most reported unsatisfactory oral health, with their most recent dental visit more than 1 year ago. In multivariable logistic regressions, none of the substance types were significantly associated with oral health status. However, opioid use was significantly related to a worse overall oral health rating compared to 1 year ago. These findings highlight the poor oral health of individuals with substance dependence and the need to address declining oral health among opioid users. General health and specialty addiction care providers should be aware of oral health problems among these patients. In addition, engagement into addiction and medical care may be facilitated by addressing oral health concerns.

  9. Prescribers' expectations and barriers to electronic prescribing of controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Meelee; McDonald, Ann; Kreiner, Peter; Kelleher, Stephen J; Blackman, Michael B; Kaufman, Peter N; Carrow, Grant M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To better understand barriers associated with the adoption and use of electronic prescribing of controlled substances (EPCS), a practice recently established by US Drug Enforcement Administration regulation. Materials and methods Prescribers of controlled substances affiliated with a regional health system were surveyed regarding current electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) activities, current prescribing of controlled substances, and expectations and barriers to the adoption of EPCS. Results 246 prescribers (response rate of 64%) represented a range of medical specialties, with 43.1% of these prescribers current users of e-prescribing for non-controlled substances. Reported issues with controlled substances included errors, pharmacy call-backs, and diversion; most prescribers expected EPCS to address many of these problems, specifically reduce medical errors, improve work flow and efficiency of practice, help identify prescription diversion or misuse, and improve patient treatment management. Prescribers expected, however, that it would be disruptive to practice, and over one-third of respondents reported that carrying a security authentication token at all times would be so burdensome as to discourage adoption. Discussion Although adoption of e-prescribing has been shown to dramatically reduce medication errors, challenges to efficient processes and errors still persist from the perspective of the prescriber, that may interfere with the adoption of EPCS. Most prescribers regarded EPCS security measures as a small or moderate inconvenience (other than carrying a security token), with advantages outweighing the burden. Conclusion Prescribers are optimistic about the potential for EPCS to improve practice, but view certain security measures as a burden and potential barrier. PMID:21946239

  10. An fMRI Study of the Influence of a History of Substance Abuse on Working Memory-Related Brain Activation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wojtalik, Jessica A.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There has been little investigation of the effects of past substance abuse (SA) on working memory (WM) impairments in schizophrenia. This study examined the behavioral and neurobiological impact of past SA (6 months or longer abstinence period) on WM in schizophrenia. Thirty-seven schizophrenia patients (17 with past SA and 20 without) and 32 controls (12 with past SA and 20 without) completed two versions of a two-back WM task during fMRI scanning on separate days. Analyses focused on regions whose patterns of activation replicated across both n-back tasks. Schizophrenia patients were significantly less accurate than controls on both n-back tasks. No main effects or interactions with past SA on WM performance were observed. However, several fronto-parietal-thalamic regions showed an interaction between diagnostic group and past SA. These regions were significantly more active in controls with past SA compared to controls without past SA. Schizophrenia patients with or without past SA either showed no significant differences, or patients with past SA showed somewhat less activation compared to patients without past SA during WM. These results suggest robust effects of past SA on WM brain functioning in controls, but less impact of past SA in schizophrenia. This is consistent with previous literature indicating less impaired neurocognition in schizophrenia with SA. PMID:24478729

  11. Functional effects of polymorphisms on glucocorticoid receptor modulation of human anxiogenic substance-P gene promoter activity in primary amygdala neurones.

    PubMed

    Hay, Colin W; Shanley, Lynne; Davidson, Scott; Cowie, Philip; Lear, Marissa; McGuffin, Peter; Riedel, Gernot; McEwan, Iain J; MacKenzie, Alasdair

    2014-09-01

    Expression or introduction of the neuropeptide substance-P (SP; encoded by the TAC1 gene in humans and Tac1 in rodents) in the amygdala induces anxiety related behaviour in rodents. In addition, pharmacological antagonism of the main receptor of SP in humans; NK1, is anxiolytic. In the current study, we show that the Tac1 locus is up-regulated in primary rat amygdala neurones in response to activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR); a classic component of the stress response. Using a combination of bioinformatics, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and reporter plasmid magnetofection into rat primary amygdala neurones we identified a highly conserved GR response sequence (2GR) in the human TAC1 promoter that binds GR in response to dexamethasone (Dex) or forskolin. We also identified a second GR binding site in the human promoter that was polymorphic and whose T-allele is only found in Japanese and Chinese populations. We present evidence that the T-allele of SNPGR increases the activity of the TAC1 promoter through de-sequestration or de-repression of 2GR. The identification of Dex/forskolin response elements in the TAC1 promoter in amygdala neurones suggests a possible link in the chain of molecular events connecting GR activation and anxiety. In addition, the discovery of a SNP which can alter this response may have implications for our understanding of the role of regulatory variation in susceptibility to stress in specific populations.

  12. Current limitations and a path forward to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances-presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the hazards and risks of possible endocrine active chemicals (EACs), there is a need for robust, validated test methods that detect perturbations of endocrine pathways and provide reliable information for evaluating potential adverse effects on apical endpoints. One iss...

  13. Current limitations and a path forward to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the hazards and risks of possible endocrine active chemicals (EACs) there is a need for robust, validated test methods that detect perturbation of endocrine pathways of concern and provide insights reliable information as to assess to potential adverse effects on apical...

  14. Diminished error-related brain activity as a promising endophenotype for substance-use disorders: evidence from high-risk offspring.

    PubMed

    Euser, Anja S; Evans, Brittany E; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Huizink, Anja C; Franken, Ingmar H A

    2013-11-01

    One of the core features of individuals with a substance-use disorder (SUD) is the reduced ability to successfully process errors and monitor performance, as reflected by diminished error-related negativities (ERN). However, whether these error-related brain abnormalities are caused by chronic substance use or rather predates it remains unclear. The present study elucidated whether hypoactive performance monitoring represents an endophenotypic vulnerability marker for SUD by using a high-risk paradigm. We assessed the behavioral components of error-processing, as well as the amplitude of the ERN in the event-related brain potential (ERP) during performance of the Eriksen Flanker Task among high-risk adolescents of parents with a SUD (HR; n = 28) and normal-risk controls (NR; n = 40). Results revealed that HR offspring were characterized by a higher prevalence of internalizing symptoms and more frequent cannabis use, the latter having a significant influence on the ERN. Interestingly, risk group uniquely predicted the negativity amplitude in response to error trials above and beyond confounding variables. Moreover, we found evidence of smaller ERN amplitudes in (cannabis use-naïve) HR offspring, reflecting impaired early processing of error information and suboptimal performance monitoring, whereas no robust group differences were found for overall behavioral performance. This effect was independent of an overall reduction in brain activity. Taken together, although we cannot rule out alternative explanations, the results of our study may provide evidence for the idea that diminished error-processing represents a promising endophenotype for SUD that may indicate a vulnerability to the disorder.

  15. Substance use and multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Adrian, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews intercultural variability of substance use behaviors, including availability of international statistics on consumption of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the use of drugs available locally only. Within a conceptual framework of intercultural relations, it considers the history of transcultural spread of substance use behaviors and possible reactions to the introduction of new drugs within a culture or jurisdiction, including illustrations of the "law of alien poisons." Although intercultural views of substance use have generally concentrated on majority groups' views of substance use in minority groups, minority and non-Western views of substance use need to be considered in the context of increasing international and intercultural communications that increase the rate at which substance use behaviors spread. Both Western and non-Western experiences with substance use and misuse must be taken into account so that better interventions can be developed to deal with addictions and other substance-related problems.

  16. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD.

  17. Antitumor activities of a new indolocarbazole substance, NB-506, and establishment of NB-506-resistant cell lines, SBC-3/NB.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, F; Nishio, K; Kubota, N; Saijo, N

    1995-07-01

    The novel anticancer glucosyl derivative of indolo-carbazole (NB-506), an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase I, exhibited strong in vitro cytotoxicity against various human cancer cell lines. In order to elucidate its cytotoxic mechanisms, we established nine NB-506-resistant sublines with different resistance ratios from human small cell lung cancer cells (SBC-3/P) by stepwise and brief exposure (24 h) to NB-506. Among them, SBC-3/NB#9 was 454 times more resistant to NB-506 than the parent cell line. The SBC-3/NB#9 cells showed cross-resistance only to topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as 11,7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino] carbonyloxycamptothecia and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin, and not to other anticancer drugs, such as vincristine, vinblastine, Adriamycin, etoposide, and teniposide. These results indicate that the difference on the effect of topoisomerase I was considered to be related to a resistance mechanism. The topoisomerase I activities of nuclear extracts eluted from SBC-3/NB#9 cells was only one-tenth of the parent cell activity. A Western blotting study indicated that this lower activity was due to a lower amount of DNA topoisomerase I. Furthermore, we found correlations between topoisomerase I activity and sensitivity to NB-506 in sublines with different degrees of resistance. Accumulation of 3H-labeled NB-506 by SBC-3/NB#9 cells was only one-fifth of that by the parent cells, whereas intracellular accumulation of 3H-labeled camptothecin by both cell lines did not differ. The reduction of accumulation was specific to NB-506, and this result may explain why the resistance ratio for NB-506 was higher than those for 11,7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino] carbonyloxycamptothecin and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin.

  18. Phenolic substance characterization and chemical and cell-based antioxidant activities of 11 lentils grown in the northern United States.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2010-02-10

    Chemical and cellular antioxidant activities and phenolic profiles of 11 lentil cultivars grown in the cool northern parts of the United States were investigated. Individual phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids, flavan-3-ols, flavones, and anthocyanins, were further quantitatively investigated by HPLC. Cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) and peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PRSC) were evaluated by fluorescence microplate reader. Cultivar Morton exhibited the highest individual flavan-3-ols (catechin and epicatechin) and total flavonoids, as well as the highest antioxidant properties (PRSC and CAA) among all lentils tested. Five phenolic acids of the benzoic types and their derivates (gallic, protocatechuic, 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and protocatechualdehyde) and four phenolic acids of the cinnamic type (chlorogenic, p-coumaric, m-coumaric, and sinapic acid) were detected in all lentil cultivars. Two flavan-3-ols [(+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin] and one flavone (luteolin) were detected in all lentil cultivars. Among all phenolic compounds detected, sinapic acid was the predominant phenolic acid, and (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin were the predominant flavonoids. These results showed that different phenotype lentils possessed considerable variations in their individual phenolic compounds, as well as chemical and cellular antioxidant activities. Caffeic acid, catechin, epicatechin, and total flavonoids significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with peroxyl radical scavenging assay. Cellular antioxidant assay significantly correlated with chemical antioxidant assay ORAC. The results from this study could be very interesting for breeding programs to improve lentils for use as functional foods.

  19. Ergonomics in designing process: dialogue between designers, executors and users in the maintenance activity of radars in an oil refinery.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Fabrício Augusto; Rodrigues, Daniela da Silva; Fontes, Andréa Regina Martins; Menegon, Nilton Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the role of ergonomics in design process using the dialogue developed by designers, implementers and users in an oil refinery. It was possible to identify the need of minimizing the postural constraints, risk of accidents, mechanical shocks and to enlarge safety perception in the access and permanency of the users at the workspace. It has been determined and validated by workers and managers to implement different deadlines depending on programming, viability and execution time for the improvements proposed. In a long-term: it was proposed the substitution of the ladders with time planning according to the maintenance program of the tanks; in a short-time: it was suggested the expansion of the existing platforms, implementation of a walkway connection provided with guardrails between the upper access of the side ladder and the repositioning of radar set and aerial aiming at the usage by workers at the workstation of the new platform. It was also elaborated eight typologies of intervention, according to the request, type of tank, material stored, and its setting place. The design process arises from ergonomics workplace analysis that presents concepts for solutions which was a mediator tool to be settled between users and implementers.

  20. Substance abuse among individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Carroll Chapman, Shawna L; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities are a growing population that confronts multiple disadvantages from social and environmental determinants of health. In particular, the 7-8 million people in the U.S. with an intellectual disability (ID) suffer disproportionately from substance use problems, largely because of a lack of empirical evidence to inform prevention and treatment efforts for them. Although available research could inform future research efforts, studies are scattered across disciplines with the last review synthesizing findings written more than five years ago. To consider more recent findings with earlier works, PubMed, PsychINFO, and Google Scholar were searched and produced 37 peer-reviewed texts across multiple disciplines, 15 from 2006 or later. While the prevalence of alcohol and illicit drug use in this population are low, the risk of having a substance-related problem among ID substance users is comparatively high. Gaps in the research and population subgroups that warrant special attention are identified, such as individuals with borderline and mild ID, individuals with co-occurring mental illness, and individuals who are incarcerated. Compared with substance abusers without ID, ID substance abusers are less likely to receive substance abuse treatment or remain in treatment. Research is needed to better gauge the magnitude of substance use problems, identify prevention strategies, and specify treatment components that meet the unique needs of individuals with ID.

  1. Marijuana and Other Substance Use Among Motor Vehicle Operators: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Michael; Harrell, Paul; Romano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The deleterious effect of multiple-substance use on driving performance is well established, but relatively little research has examined the patterns of drug use among multiple-substance users and its relationship to both alcohol use and adverse driving outcomes. Method: The current study used latent class analysis to examine subgroups of substance users among a population of drivers who screened positively for 2 or more of 13 substances other than alcohol (N = 250). A series of logistic regression analyses was conducted to examine demographic predictors of latent class assignment and class association with adverse driving outcomes. Results: Four distinct subclasses of users were identified among multiple-substance-using drivers: Class 1 consisted of individuals who demonstrated high levels of all substances indicators (5%). The second class demonstrated high levels of marijuana and cocaine use and lower levels of all other substances (27%). The third class screened high for marijuana and nonmedical prescription opiate analgesics use (36%), whereas the last class demonstrated high nonmedical prescription opiate analgesics and benzodiazepine use (32%). Drivers in Class 2 (marijuana and cocaine users) were more likely to be younger and have a positive breath alcohol concentration than drivers in any other class. Conclusions: Because multidrug users show dissimilar characteristics, the propensity of researchers to lump all multiple-substance users together may either erroneously attribute the potentially profound impact of those in the marijuana and cocaine use class to all multiple-substance users or dilute their specific contribution to crash risk. PMID:26562599

  2. An acute post-rape intervention to prevent substance use and abuse.

    PubMed

    Acierno, Ron; Resnick, Heidi S; Flood, Amanda; Holmes, Melisa

    2003-12-01

    The trauma of rape is routinely associated with extreme acute distress. Such peri-event anxiety increases risk of developing psychopathology and substance use or abuse post-rape, with the degree of initial distress positively predicting future problems. Unfortunately, the nature of post-rape forensic evidence collection procedures may exacerbate initial distress, thereby potentiating post-rape negative emotional sequelae. Consequently, substance use may increase in an effort to ameliorate this distress. To address this, a two-part video intervention was developed for use in acute post-rape time frames to (a) minimize anxiety during forensic rape examinations, thereby reducing risk of future emotional problems, and (b) prevent increased post-rape substance use and abuse. Pilot study data with 124 rape victims indicated that the low-cost, easily administered intervention was effective in reducing risk of marijuana abuse at 6 weeks. Nonstatistically significant trends also were evident for reduced marijuana use. Trends were also noted in favor of the intervention in the subgroup of women who were actively using substances pre-rape (among pre-rape alcohol users, 28% viewers vs. 43% nonviewers met criteria for post-rape alcohol abuse; among pre-rape marijuana users, the rates of post-marijuana use were 17% vs. 43%).

  3. Antiallergic activity of unripe Citrus hassaku fruits extract and its flavanone glycosides on chemical substance-induced dermatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kimihisa; Masuda, Megumi; Naruto, Shunsuke; Murata, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-10-01

    Oral administration of a 50% ethanolic extract (CH-ext) obtained from unripe Citrus hassaku fruits collected in July exhibited a potent dose-dependent inhibition of IgE (immunoglobulin E)-mediated triphasic cutaneous reaction at 1 h [immediate phase response (IPR)], 24 h [late phase response (LPR)] and 8 days [very late phase response (vLPR)] after dinitrofluorobenzene challenge in mice. Naringin, a major flavanone glycoside component of CH-ext, showed a potent dose-dependent inhibition against IPR, LPR and vLPR. Neohesperidin, another major glycoside component of CH-ext, showed an inhibition against vLPR. The effect of CH-ext on type IV allergic reaction was examined by determining inhibitory activity against ear swelling in mice by using the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis (PC-CD) model. Oral administration (p.o.) of CH-ext and subcutaneous administration (s.c.) of prednisolone inhibited ear swelling during the induction phase of PC-CD. The inhibitory activities of combinations of CH-ext (p.o.) and prednisolone (s.c.) against PC-CD in mice were more potent than those of CH-ext alone and prednisolone alone, without enhancing the adverse effects. Other combinations of prednisolone (s.c.) and flavanone glycoside (p.o.) components of CH-ext, i.e. naringin and neohesperidin, exerted similar synergistic effects.

  4. Rapid start-up of the anammox process: Effects of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances on the activity of anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Sihui; Lian, Jing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liu, Yunman; Song, Yuanyuan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the rapid start-up of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) strategy by inoculating different biomass ratios of denitrifying granular sludge and anammox bacteria. The results demonstrated that two reactors (R1 and R2) were rapidly and successfully started-up on days 25 and 28, respectively, with nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) of 0.70kg/(m(3)·d) and 0.72kg/(m(3)·d) at biomass ratios of 10:1 (R1) and 50:1 (R2). The explanation for rapid start-up was found by examining the effect of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on the activity of anammox bacteria in the batch experiments. Batch experiments results first demonstrated that the denitrification sludge EPS (DS-EPS) enhanced the anammox bacteria activity the most, and NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N removal rates were 1.88- and 1.53-fold higher than the control with optimal DS-EPS volume of 10mL. The rapid start-up strategy makes possible the application of anammox to practical engineering.

  5. User Centric Policy Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  6. EREP users handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Revised Skylab spacecraft, experiments, and mission planning information is presented for the Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP) users. The major hardware elements and the medical, scientific, engineering, technology and earth resources experiments are described. Ground truth measurements and EREP data handling procedures are discussed. The mission profile, flight planning, crew activities, and aircraft support are also outlined.

  7. TR's Role in Treating Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunstler, Robin

    1992-01-01

    Therapeutic recreation is important in treating substance abuse problems. It addresses attitudes and behaviors leading to substance abuse (inability to experience pleasure or control). It encourages participation in activities that help abusers cope and obtain enjoyable states, reducing reliance on drugs. The article discusses the theory of flow…

  8. From substance use to homelessness or vice versa?

    PubMed

    McVicar, Duncan; Moschion, Julie; van Ours, Jan C

    2015-07-01

    Homelessness is associated with substance use, but whether substance use precedes or follows homelessness is unclear. We investigate the nature of the relationship between homelessness and substance use using data from the unique Australian panel dataset Journeys Home collected in 4 surveys over the period from October 2011 to May 2013. Our data refer to 1325 individuals who were homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. We investigate dynamics in homelessness and substance use over the survey period. We find that the two are closely related: homeless individuals are more likely to be substance users and substance users are more likely to be homeless. These relationships, however, are predominantly driven by observed and unobserved individual characteristics which cause individuals to be both more likely to be homeless and to be substance users. Once we take these personal characteristics into account it seems that homelessness does not affect substance use, although we cannot rule out that alcohol use increases the probability that an individual becomes homeless. These overall relationships also hide some interesting heterogeneity by 'type' of homelessness.

  9. Substance use and sexual behaviour among female students in Nigerian universities.

    PubMed

    Oye-Adeniran, B A; Aina, O F; Gbadegesin, A; Ekanem, E E

    2014-01-01

    Substance use continues to constitute social and health problems, more so among adolescents and young adults. One consequence is risky sexual behavior, a major problem in sub-Saharan Africa already facing the synergistic problems of poverty and HIV/AIDS. This study of female students aged ≥ 18 years in two universities in Nigeria uses a multi-stage stratified random sampling method, and each subject that gave consent to the study was administered with a structured questionnaire by trained interviewers; 2,408 female students were studied (1,854 from the University of Ibadan and 554 from the Bayero University, Kano). The mean age of the respondents was 21.6 (SD = 2.9), and about two-thirds (65.7%) were aged between 20-24, with 2,204 (91.5%) being single and 4.3% married. In all, 23.4% of the subjects used one form of substance. Alcoholic drinks of palm wine, alcoholic wine, and beer were the most common of substances used (22.7%), followed by tobacco (2%) and cannabis (1%). Substance use was significantly associated with religious affiliation of the students (p < 0.001), as the prevalence of substance use was least among Muslim students (11.7%) and highest among those who professed traditional religion (39.4%). Alcohol use was also positively associated with sexual activity (p < 0.001). Among the 547 students who used alcohol, 147 (26.9%) had sex in the 4 weeks prior to the survey, while among the 1,861 non-users, only 8.9% did so. The practice of unprotected sex was found not to be associated with substance use: a slightly lower proportion (29.5% vs. 36.6%) of substance users engaged in unprotected sex in their last encounter compared to non-users. There is need to scale up public health education on the dangers of substance use and its associated sexual risk behavior.

  10. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  11. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified as the most frequently cited ... victim and/or the perpetrator who has the substance abuse problem. Substance abuse is believed to be a ...

  12. Playing video games while using or feeling the effects of substances: associations with substance use problems.

    PubMed

    Ream, Geoffrey L; Elliott, Luther C; Dunlap, Eloise

    2011-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that playing video games while using or feeling the effects of a substance--referred to herein as "concurrent use"-is related to substance use problems after controlling for substance use frequency, video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby, and demographic factors. Data were drawn from a nationally representative online survey of adult video gamers conducted by Knowledge Networks, valid n = 2,885. Problem video game playing behavior was operationalized using Tejeiro Salguero and Bersabé Morán's 2002 problem video game play (PVP) measure, and measures for substance use problems were taken from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Separate structural equation modeling analyses were conducted for users of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. In all four models, concurrent use was directly associated with substance use problems, but not with PVP. Video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby was associated with substance use problems via two indirect paths: through PVP for all substances, and through concurrent use for caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol only. Results illustrate the potential for "drug interaction" between self-reinforcing behaviors and addictive substances, with implications for the development of problem use.

  13. The Relationship Between Controlled Substances and Violence.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Emma E; Choksy, Seema; Wintemute, Garen J

    2016-01-01

    A causal relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence has been widely assumed in the United States, and federal law prohibits individuals who are "unlawful users of or addicted to any controlled substance" from purchasing or possessing firearms (68 FR 3750. 2003. Codified at 27 CFR §478.11). However, the law does a poor job of defining "unlawful users," resulting in recent calls for a revised, actionable definition. Such a definition should be informed by research evidence, but to date the epidemiologic research on the relationship between controlled substances and violence has not been comprehensively reviewed. The initial goal of this review was to summarize the best available evidence on the relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence, but only 1 study specific to firearm violence was identified. We therefore reviewed studies of this relationship using broader measures of interpersonal violence and suicide, all of which included but were not limited to firearm violence, and measures of illicit firearm carrying. Prospective longitudinal studies (n = 22) from 1990 to 2014 were identified by using searches of online databases and citation tracking. Information was extracted from each study by using a standardized protocol. Quality of evidence was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Aggregate measures of controlled substance use were associated with increased interpersonal violence and suicide, but evidence regarding the relationship between specific substances and violence was mixed. Involvement in illegal drug sales was consistently associated with interpersonal violence. To effectively revise extant federal law and delineate appropriate prohibiting criteria, more research is needed to understand the relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence.

  14. An analogy between effects of ultra-low doses of biologically active substances on biological objects and properties of spin supercurrents in superfluid 3He-B.

    PubMed

    Boldyreva, Liudmila B

    2011-07-01

    The effects of ultra-low doses (ULDs) of biologically active substances (BASs) (with concentrations of 10(-13)M or lower) on biological objects (BOs), such as cells, organisms, etc., and the properties of spin supercurrents in superfluid (3)He-B are discussed. It is shown that the effects of ULDs of BASs on biologic objects can be specified by the same set of physical characteristics and described by the same mathematical relations as those used for the specification and description of the properties of spin supercurrents between spin structures in superfluid (3)He-B. This is based on the up-to-date physical concepts: 1) the physical vacuum has the properties of superfluid (3)He-B; 2) all quantum entities (hence, the BAS and the BO, which consist of such entities) produce spin structures in the physical vacuum. The photon being a quantum entity, the features of the effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on BOs can be explained using the same approach.

  15. Enhanced dewatering of excess activated sludge through decomposing its extracellular polymeric substances by a Fe@Fe2O3-based composite conditioner.

    PubMed

    He, Dong-Qin; Luo, Hong-Wei; Huang, Bao-Cheng; Qian, Chen; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Efficient sludge dewatering methods are highly desired by municipal wastewater treatment plants. In this study, Fe@Fe2O3 nanomaterial, combined with polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDMDAAC) and H2SO4, was used for sludge dewatering. This composite conditioner exhibited an excellent dewatering capability. By using uniform design, the optimized dosages of Fe@Fe2O3, H2SO4 and PDMDAAC were determined to be 40, 136 and 4.8mg/gDS (dry solids), respectively. The moisture content of sludge cake decreased from 78.1% to 64.8%, and the capillary suction time from 56 to 21s. The sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were decomposed, resulting in greater conversion of the bound water into free water and the release of free water. The electron spin resonance results show that the molecular oxygen activation process induced by Fe@Fe2O3 produced hydroxyl radicals, which were mainly responsible for the EPS decomposition. In this way, an efficient composite conditioner for enhancing sludge dewatering was developed.

  16. Substance P Activates Ca2+-Permeable Nonselective Cation Channels through a Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C Signaling Pathway in nNOS-Expressing GABAergic Neurons in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiaki; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Komatsu, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    To understand the functions of the neocortex, it is essential to characterize the properties of neurons constituting cortical circuits. Here, we focused on a distinct group of GABAergic neurons that are defined by a specific colocalization of intense labeling for both neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and substance P (SP) receptor [neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors]. We investigated the mechanisms of the SP actions on these neurons in visual cortical slices obtained from young glutamate decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein knock-in mice. Bath application of SP induced a nonselective cation current leading to depolarization that was inhibited by the NK1 antagonists in nNOS-immunopositive neurons. Ruthenium red and La(3+), transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers, suppressed the SP-induced current. The SP-induced current was mediated by G proteins and suppressed by D609, an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), but not by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC, adenylate cyclase or Src tyrosine kinases. Ca(2+) imaging experiments under voltage clamp showed that SP induced a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) that was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca(2+) but not by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. These results suggest that SP regulates nNOS neurons by activating TRP-like Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels through a PC-PLC-dependent signaling pathway.

  17. Substance abuse treatment in persons with HIV/AIDS: challenges in managing triple diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Durvasula, Ramani; Miller, Theodore R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of HIV must account for the "triple diagnosis" of HIV, psychiatric diagnosis, and substance use disorders and requires integrated treatment services that focus beyond just mitigation of substance use and psychiatric and medical symptoms but also address other health behaviors. Because clinical management of HIV/AIDS has shifted significantly with the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) in the mid 1990s, a literature review focusing on literature published since 2000, and using relevant key words was conducted using a wide range of literature search databases. This literature review was complemented by studies to expand on specific treatment modalities for which there was a dearth of literature addressing HIV infected cohorts and to provide discussion of issues around substance abuse treatment as an HIV prevention tool. Existing models of substance abuse treatment including cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing have proven to be useful for enhancing adherence and reducing substance use in outpatient populations, while methadone maintenance and directly observed treatment have been useful with specific subgroups of users. Contextualization of services heightens the likelihood of successful outcomes and relapse prevention.

  18. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care.

  19. Antithrombotic activity of a new P2Y1 receptor antagonist, substance Sbt-119, on experimental models of thromboses in rats.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, D S; Spasov, A A; Bukatina, T M; Smirnov, A V; Suzdalev, K F

    2014-11-01

    Antithrombotic properties of a new P2Y1 receptor antagonist N-[(1-morpholinopropyl-amino)- carbonyl-2-(1-ethyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-vinyl]-4-methylphenyl-amide hydrochloride, substance Sbt-119, and reference drug ticlopidine were studied on experimental models of arterial and systemic thromboses. Substance Sbt-119 was 39.9% (p<0.05) more potent than ticlopidine in producing the antithrombotic effect. Moreover, substance Sbt-119 was shown to increase the survival rate of animals after systemic treatment with ADP (by 20%, p<0.0001). This substance decreased the number of mural thrombi and reduced the severity of hemodynamics disturbances in the organs during systemic thrombosis.

  20. A brief screening tool to assess the risk of contracting HIV infection among active injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dawn K.; Pan, Yi; Rose, Charles E.; Pals, Sherri L.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Herbst, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To incorporate preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and other biomedical or intensive behavioral interventions into the care of injection drug users, healthcare providers need validated, rapid, risk screening tools for identifying persons at highest risk of incident HIV infection. Methods To develop and validate a brief screening tool for assessing the risk of contracting HIV (ARCH), we included behavioral and HIV test data from 1904 initially HIV-uninfected men and women enrolled and followed in the ALIVE prospective cohort study between 1988 and 2008. Using logistic regression analyses with generalized estimating equations (GEE), we identified significant predictors of incident HIV infection, then rescaled and summed their regression coefficients to create a risk score. Results The final logistic regression model included age, engagement in a methadone maintenance program, and a composite injection risk score obtained by counting the number of the following five behaviors reported during the past six months: injection of heroin, injection of cocaine, sharing a cooker, sharing needles, or visiting a shooting gallery. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.720, possible scores on index ranged from 0 to 100 and a score ≥46 had a sensitivity of 86.2% and a specificity of 42.5%, appropriate for a screening tool. Discussion We developed an easy to administer 7-question screening tool with a cutoff that is predictive of incident HIV infection in a large prospective cohort of injection drug users in Baltimore. The ARCH-IDU screening tool can be used to prioritize persons who are injecting illicit drugs for consideration of PrEP and other intensive HIV prevention efforts. PMID:25961495

  1. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casajus Ramo, A.; Sapunov, M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  2. Analysis of the reaction of subcutaneous tissues in rats and the antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide paste used in association with different substances.

    PubMed

    Midena, Raquel Zanin; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Marciano, Marina Angélica; Minotti, Paloma Gagliardi; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Andrade, Flaviana Bombarda de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the subcutaneous tissue response in rats and the antimicrobial activity of intracanal calcium hydroxide dressings mixed with different substances against E. faecalis. Fifty four rats were divided into three experimental groups according to the vehicle in the calcium hydroxide treatment: 0.4% chlorohexidine in propylene glycol (PG),Casearia sylvestris Sw in PG and calcium hydroxide+PG (control group). The pastes were placed into polyethylene tubes and implanted into the subcutaneous tissue. After 7, 14 and 30 days, the samples were processed and histologically evaluated (hematoxylin and eosin). The tissue surface in contact with the material was analyzed, and the quantitative analysis determined the volume density occupied by the inflammatory infiltrate (giant cells, polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells), fibroblasts, collagen fibers and blood vessels. For the antimicrobial analysis, 20 dentin blocks infected with E. faecalis were treated with calcium hydroxide pastes in different vehicles; 0.4% chlorhexidine in PG, PG, extract from Casearia sylvestris Sw in PG and a positive control (infection and without medication) for 7 days. The efficiency of the pastes was evaluated by the live/dead technique and confocal microscopy. The results showed that 0.4% chlorhexidine induced a higher inflammatory response than the other groups. The Casearia sylvestris Sw extract showed satisfactory results in relation to the intensity of the inflammatory response. In the microbiological test, there were no statistical differences between the evaluated intracanal dressings and the percentage of bacterial viability was between 33 and 42%. The control group showed an 86% viability. Antimicrobial components such as chlorhexidine or Casearia sylvestris Sw did not improve the antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis in comparison to the calcium hydroxide+PG treatment. In addition, the incorporation of chlorhexidine in the calcium hydroxide

  3. Analysis of the reaction of subcutaneous tissues in rats and the antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide paste used in association with different substances

    PubMed Central

    MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; GARCIA, Roberto Brandão; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; MARCIANO, Marina Angélica; MINOTTI, Paloma Gagliardi; ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; WECKWERTH, Paulo Henrique; de ANDRADE, Flaviana Bombarda; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the subcutaneous tissue response in rats and the antimicrobial activity of intracanal calcium hydroxide dressings mixed with different substances against E. faecalis. Fifty four rats were divided into three experimental groups according to the vehicle in the calcium hydroxide treatment: 0.4% chlorohexidine in propylene glycol (PG), Casearia sylvestris Sw in PG and calcium hydroxide+PG (control group). The pastes were placed into polyethylene tubes and implanted into the subcutaneous tissue. After 7, 14 and 30 days, the samples were processed and histologically evaluated (hematoxylin and eosin). The tissue surface in contact with the material was analyzed, and the quantitative analysis determined the volume density occupied by the inflammatory infiltrate (giant cells, polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells), fibroblasts, collagen fibers and blood vessels. For the antimicrobial analysis, 20 dentin blocks infected with E. faecalis were treated with calcium hydroxide pastes in different vehicles; 0.4% chlorhexidine in PG, PG, extract from Casearia sylvestris Sw in PG and a positive control (infection and without medication) for 7 days. The efficiency of the pastes was evaluated by the live/dead technique and confocal microscopy. The results showed that 0.4% chlorhexidine induced a higher inflammatory response than the other groups. The Casearia sylvestris Sw extract showed satisfactory results in relation to the intensity of the inflammatory response. In the microbiological test, there were no statistical differences between the evaluated intracanal dressings and the percentage of bacterial viability was between 33 and 42%. The control group showed an 86% viability. Antimicrobial components such as chlorhexidine or Casearia sylvestris Sw did not improve the antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis in comparison to the calcium hydroxide+PG treatment. In addition, the incorporation of chlorhexidine in the calcium hydroxide

  4. Synthesis, characterization and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance mexedrone and its N-methoxy positional isomer, N-methoxymephedrone

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V.; Power, John D.; Dowling, Geraldine; Twamley, Brendan; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Walther, Donna; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Brandt, Simon D.

    2017-01-01

    3-Methoxy-2-(methylamino)-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one (mexedrone) appeared in 2015 and was advertised by UK Internet retailers as a non-controlled mephedrone derivative (2-(methylamino)-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one), which was of particular interest to countries who operate generic drugs legislation. This study describes the synthesis and analytical characterization of mexedrone and the differentiation from its isomer, N-methoxymephedrone, which was predicted to be a suitable candidate before the identity of mexedrone was revealed. A full analytical characterization is described using various chromatographic, spectroscopic and mass spectrometric platforms and X-ray crystal structure analysis. The analytical data obtained for a vendor sample were consistent with the synthesized mexedrone reference standard and analytical differentiation between the mexedrone and N-methoxymephedrone positional isomers was achieved. Furthermore, α-chloromethylmephedrone was identified as a by-product during mexedrone synthesis. All three substances were also studied for their uptake and releasing properties at dopamine transporters (DAT), norepinephrine transporters (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) using in vitro monoamine transporter assays in rat brain synaptosomes and compared to mephedrone. Mexedrone was a weak non-selective uptake blocker with IC50 values in the low μM range. It was also devoid of releasing activity at DAT and NET but displayed weak releasing activity at SERT (EC50= 2.5 μM). The isomer N-methoxymephedrone was found to be a weak uptake blocker at DAT, NET and SERT, as well as a fully efficacious substrate-type releasing agent across all three transporters with EC50 values in the low micromolar range. The synthesis by-product α-chloromethylmephedrone was inactive in all assays. PMID:27524685

  5. Interrelations between virtual-world and real-world activities: comparison of genders, age groups, and pathological and nonpathological Internet users.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Fatih; Amca, Hasan

    2012-05-01

    After the Internet Revolution, people have started to spend most of their everyday time online carrying out virtual activities. A limited number of studies tried to answer whether virtual activities match our real-world (RW) activities. Moreover, to our knowledge, there was no study that dealt with these interrelations between virtual and RW activities among the pathological and nonpathological users of the Internet (i.e. PIUs and NPIUs). The primary aim of this study was to fill this gap and to investigate the correlations between virtual-world (VW) and RW activities among PIUs and NPIUs. The secondary aim was to examine the perceptions of the Internet and motivations to go online for PIUs and NPIUs. The third aim was to compare virtual and RW activities across gender and age groups. The results indicated that correlations between most of the activities in RW and VW were high among men and women, among age groups, and also among PIUs and NPUs. However, beyond these similarities, perceptions of the Internet and motivations to browse into VW were differed among PIUs and NPIUs. In other words, PIUs, but not NPIUs, perceived VW activities more gratified and had motivations to go online for gratified functions.

  6. Substance use - inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - inhalants; Drug abuse - inhalants; Drug use - inhalants; Glue - inhalants ... symptoms and may include: Strong cravings for the drug Having mood swings from feeling depressed to agitated ...

  7. Substance use - amphetamines

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - amphetamines; Drug abuse - amphetamines; Drug use - amphetamines ... Amphetamine: goey, louee, speed, uppers, whiz Dextroamphetamine (ADHD medicine used illegally): dexies, kiddie-speed, pep pills, uppers; ...

  8. Justine user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  9. Disposal of controlled substances. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-09

    This rule governs the secure disposal of controlled substances by registrants and ultimate users. These regulations will implement the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010 by expanding the options available to collect controlled substances from ultimate users for the purpose of disposal, including: Take-back events, mail-back programs, and collection receptacle locations. These regulations contain specific language allowing law enforcement to voluntarily continue to conduct take-back events, administer mail-back programs, and maintain collection receptacles. These regulations will allow authorized manufacturers, distributors, reverse distributors, narcotic treatment programs (NTPs), hospitals/clinics with an on-site pharmacy, and retail pharmacies to voluntarily administer mail-back programs and maintain collection receptacles. In addition, this rule expands the authority of authorized hospitals/clinics and retail pharmacies to voluntarily maintain collection receptacles at long-term care facilities. This rule also reorganizes and consolidates previously existing regulations on disposal, including the role of reverse distributors.

  10. Substance Flow Analysis of Mercury in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, L. M.; Wang, S.; Zhang, L.; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies, the emission of anthropogenic atmospheric Hg in China as well as single sector have been examined a lot. However, there might have been more Hg released as solid wastes rather than air. Hg stored in solid wastes may be released to air again when the solid wastes experience high temperature process or cause local pollution if the solid wastes are stacked casually for a long time. To trace the fate of Hg in China, this study developed the substance flow of Hg in 2010 covering all the sectors summarized in table 1. Below showed in Figure 1, the total Hg input is 2825t. The unintentional input of Hg, mined Hg, and recycled Hg account for 57%, 32% and 11% respectively. Figure 2 provides the detail information of substance flow of Hg. Byproducts from one sector may be used as raw materials of another, causing cross Hg flow between sectors. The Hg input of cement production is 303 t, of which 34% comes from coal and limestone, 33% comes from non-ferrous smelting, 23% comes from coal combustion, 7% comes from iron and steel production and 3% comes from mercury mining. Hg flowing to recycledHg production is 639 t, mainly from Hg contained in waste active carbon and mercuric chloride catalyst from VCM production and acid sludge from non-ferrous smelting. There are 20 t mercury flowing from spent mercury adding products to incineration. Figure1 and Figure 2 also show that 46% of the output Hg belongs to "Lagged release", which means this part of mercury might be released later. The "Lagged release" Hg includes 809 t Hg contained in stacked byproducts form coal combustion, non-ferrous smelting, iron and steel production, Al production, cement production and mercury mining, 161t Hg stored in the pipeline of VCM producing, 10 t Hg in fluorescent lamps that are in use and 314 t mercury stored in materials waiting to be handled with in recycled mercury plants. There is 112 t Hg stored in landfill and 129 t Hg exported abroad with the export of mercury adding

  11. Novel psychoactive substances of interest for psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Orsolini, Laura; Duccio Papanti, G; Corkery, John M

    2015-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances include synthetic cannabinoids, cathinone derivatives, psychedelic phenethylamines, novel stimulants, synthetic opioids, tryptamine derivatives, phencyclidine-like dissociatives, piperazines, GABA-A/B receptor agonists, a range of prescribed medications, psychoactive plants/herbs, and a large series of performance and image enhancing drugs. Users are typically attracted by these substances due to their intense psychoactive effects and likely lack of detection in routine drug screenings. This paper aims at providing psychiatrists with updated knowledge of the clinical pharmacology and psychopathological consequences of the use of these substances. Indeed, these drugs act on a range of neurotransmitter pathways/receptors whose imbalance has been associated with psychopathological conditions, including dopamine, cannabinoid CB1, GABA-A/B, 5-HT2A, glutamate, and k opioid receptors. An overall approach in terms of clinical management is briefly discussed. PMID:25655145

  12. The Influence of Recency of Use on fMRI Response During Spatial Working Memory in Adolescent Marijuana Users

    PubMed Central

    Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Schweinsburg, Brian C.; Medina, Krista Lisdahl; McQueeny, Tim; Brown, Sandra A.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Some neurocognitive recovery occurs within a month of abstinence from heavy marijuana use, yet functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed altered activation among recent and abstinent adult users. Here, we compared fMRI response during a spatial working memory (SWM) task between adolescent marijuana users with brief and sustained durations of abstinence. Participants were 13 recent users (2 – 7 days abstinent), 13 abstinent users (27 – 60 days abstinent), and 18 non-using controls, all ages 15 – 18. Groups were similar on demographics, had no psychiatric or medical disorders, and user groups were similar on substance histories. Teens performed a 2-back SWM task during fMRI. Groups performed similarly on the task, but recent users showed greater fMRI response in medial and left superior prefrontal cortices, as well as bilateral insula. Abstinent users had increased response in the right precentral gyrus (clusters ≥1328 μl, p<.05). This cross-sectional study did not examine changes in brain response among the same participants over time. Yet results suggests that adolescents who recently used marijuana show increased brain activity in regions associated with working memory updating and inhibition, compared to users with weeks to months of abstinence. This study preliminarily suggests that (1) recent marijuana use may disrupt neural connections associated with SWM and result in compensatory brain response, and (2) sustained abstinence from marijuana may be associated with improvements in SWM response among adolescents. PMID:21053763

  13. How to Develop a User Interface That Your Real Users Will Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Donald

    2012-01-01

    A "user interface" is the part of an interactive system that bridges the user and the underlying functionality of the system. But people sometimes forget that the best interfaces will provide a platform to optimize the users' interactions so that they support and extend the users' activities in effective, useful, and usable ways. To look at it…

  14. Alaska Native smokers and smokeless tobacco users with slower CYP2A6 activity have lower tobacco consumption, lower tobacco-specific nitrosamine exposure and lower tobacco-specific nitrosamine bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andy Z X; Binnington, Matthew J; Renner, Caroline C; Lanier, Anne P; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Stepanov, Irina; Watson, Clifford H; Sosnoff, Connie S; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine, the psychoactive ingredient in tobacco, is metabolically inactivated by CYP2A6 to cotinine. CYP2A6 also activates procarcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA). Genetic variation in CYP2A6 is known to alter smoking quantity and lung cancer risk in heavy smokers. Our objective was to investigate how CYP2A6 activity influences tobacco consumption and procarcinogen levels in light smokers and smokeless tobacco users. Cigarette smokers (n = 141), commercial smokeless tobacco users (n = 73) and iqmik users (n = 20) were recruited in a cross-sectional study of Alaska Native people. The participants' CYP2A6 activity was measured by both endophenotype and genotype, and their tobacco and procarcinogen exposure biomarker levels were also measured. Smokers, smokeless tobacco users and iqmik users with lower CYP2A6 activity had lower urinary total nicotine equivalents (TNE) and (methylnitrosamino)-1-(3)pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL) levels (a biomarker of TSNA exposure). Levels of N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), a TSNA metabolically bioactivated by CYP2A6, were higher in smokers with lower CYP2A6 activities. Light smokers and smokeless tobacco users with lower CYP2A6 activity reduce their tobacco consumption in ways (e.g. inhaling less deeply) that are not reflected by self-report indicators. Tobacco users with lower CYP2A6 activity are exposed to lower procarcinogen levels (lower NNAL levels) and have lower procarcinogen bioactivation (as indicated by the higher urinary NNN levels suggesting reduced clearance), which is consistent with a lower risk of developing smoking-related cancers. This study demonstrates the importance of CYP2A6 in the regulation of tobacco consumption behaviors, procarcinogen exposure and metabolism in both light smokers and smokeless tobacco users.

  15. The relationship between substance abuse treatment completion, sociodemographics, substance use characteristics, and criminal history.

    PubMed

    Turan, Reyhan; Yargic, Ilhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a significant relationship exists between the sociodemographics, substance use characteristics, criminal history, and completion of substance abuse treatment. In this study, 115 individuals being monitored for substance abuse treatment on probation at the Probation and Help Center under the Republic of Turkey's Ministry of Justice's Chief Public Prosecutor's Office of Istanbul were included successively between the dates of April 2008 and April 2009. During a 24-week follow-up, individuals whose urine analyses were clean 6 times consecutively were considered to have completed the treatment successfully. To determine the effect of sociodemographic factors and substance use characteristics on treatment completion, a semistructured sociodemographic data survey was used. Also, the participants' criminal records were examined. A total of 115 people participated in the study. One hundred ten (95.7%) of them were male. Sixty-eight (59.1%) of the participants had completed treatment. Age group, education level, age of onset for substance use, number of substances used, employment status, and criminal records showed a significant difference between treatment completers and noncompleters. When a logistic regression analysis was done, only number of substances used and criminal record (other than drug possession) were significantly different for the 2 groups. The current treatment program for polysubstance users and individuals with a criminal record is insufficient. It is necessary that treatment systems be developed so they can be beneficial for these types of patients.

  16. Playing Video Games While Using or Feeling the Effects of Substances: Associations with Substance Use Problems

    PubMed Central

    Ream, Geoffrey L.; Elliott, Luther C.; Dunlap, Eloise

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that playing video games while using or feeling the effects of a substance—referred to herein as “concurrent use”—is related to substance use problems after controlling for substance use frequency, video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby, and demographic factors. Data were drawn from a nationally representative online survey of adult video gamers conducted by Knowledge Networks, valid n = 2,885. Problem video game playing behavior was operationalized using Tejeiro Salguero and Bersabé Morán’s 2002 problem video game play (PVP) measure, and measures for substance use problems were taken from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Separate structural equation modeling analyses were conducted for users of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. In all four models, concurrent use was directly associated with substance use problems, but not with PVP. Video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby was associated with substance use problems via two indirect paths: through PVP for all substances, and through concurrent use for caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol only. Results illustrate the potential for “drug interaction” between self-reinforcing behaviors and addictive substances, with implications for the development of problem use. PMID:22073023

  17. 47 CFR 79.110 - Complaint procedures for user interfaces, menus and guides, and activating accessibility features...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and guides, and activating accessibility features on digital apparatus and navigation devices. 79.110..., and activating accessibility features on digital apparatus and navigation devices. (a) Complaints... entity; (iii) Information sufficient to identify the software or digital apparatus/navigation device...

  18. Purification, characterization, and biological activity of a substance P-related peptide from the gut of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Conlon, J Michael; Joss, Jean M P; Burcher, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A peptide with mammalian substance P (SP)-like immunoreactivity was isolated from an extract of the spiral intestine of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri. The primary structure of this peptide was established as Lys-Pro-Arg-Pro-Asp-Glu-Phe-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Met . NH2, showing 64% identity with mammalian SP. In isolated preparations of lungfish foregut circular muscle, lungfish SP produced a slow, long-lasting tonic contraction, with a pD2 value of 8.19. Lungfish midgut circular muscle preparations responded to lungfish SP rapidly and in a more complex manner. There was an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity (pD2 = 8.76), associated with diminished amplitude of the spontaneous contractions (pD2 = 9.24), also coupled in some preparations with a tonic contraction (pD2 = 8.43). The response patterns of foregut and midgut circular muscle to acetylcholine (ACh) were very similar to those seen to lungfish SP. Lungfish SP and ACh, however, had very weak effects on both foregut and midgut longitudinal muscle. These data demonstrate that lungfish SP may be a physiologically important regulator of gastrointestinal motility in Neoceratodus. This study further confirmed that the structures of SP-related peptides have been strongly conserved under the pressure of vertebrate evolution, particularly in preserving the functionally important sequence, Phe-Xaa-Gly-Leu-Met . amide, at the C-terminus. The sequence of lungfish SP is identical to that of bufokinin, a SP-related peptide previously isolated from the intestine of the cane toad, Bufo marinus, supporting the hypothesis that lungfishes and amphibians share a common ancestor.

  19. Stability indicating LC method for rapid determination of related substances of O-desmethyl venlafaxine in active pharmaceutical ingredients and pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Rao, Karri Visweswara; Reddy, Kesareddy Padmaja; Kumar, Yelavarthi Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    A simple, precise and accurate stability-indicating reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the quantitative determination of O-desmethyl venlafaxine (ODV) and its related substances in active pharmaceutical ingredient and pharmaceutical formulation. The method was developed using YMC-pack ODS-A (150 × 4.6 mm, 3 μm) column with mobile phase containing a gradient mixture of solvents A and B. Solvent A contained a mixture of buffer and acetonitrile in the ratio of 85:15 (v/v). The buffer consisted of 10 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate and 2 mM 1-octane sulfonic acid sodium salt (pH adjusted to 6.0 by using diluted potassium hydroxide solution). Solvent B contained a mixture of water and acetonitrile in the ratio of 20:80 (v/v). The eluted compounds were monitored at 230 nm. ODV and its six impurities were well separated within 14 min run time. It was subjected under the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, water, thermal and photolytic degradation. It was sensitive towards acidic, basic, oxidative and water stress conditions, stable in photolytic and thermal degradation conditions. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, the mass balance in each case was >99.0%, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines with respect to its specificity, linearity (correlation coefficient >0.9996), limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy (recovery range 97.1-103.2%), precision (% relative standard deviation ≤1.9%) and robustness.

  20. Substance Abuse Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzolino, Robert

    This brochure outlines the substance abuse policy for students at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM/Pennsylvania). Noted are the dangers of substance abuse during the stressful time of medical training and later for the doctor and clients during professional practice. The policy's five goals are briefly stated. Described next…

  1. The ambulatory treatment of noncompulsive users of psychoactive substances.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gomez, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of "La Casa" Programme, a center of the University of Los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) aimed at prevention, treatment, and research in the fields of drug addiction and AIDS. The multimodal strategy at "La Casa", ambulatory and almost free of charge, has constituted a unique approach in Colombia. The country has a heavy and specific drug consumption problem: in the last ten years the number of regular consumers of a mixture of alcohol, coca paste ("basuco")/cocaine and marihuana has increased to almost 500,000 people; state facilities and human resources are scarce, thus the importance of an appropriate use of them and search for alternatives.

  2. Choosing a behavioral therapy platform for pharmacotherapy of substance users

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral therapy platforms have become virtual requirements in pharmacotherapy trials due to their utility in reducing noise variability, preventing differential medication adherence and protocol attrition, enhancing statistical power and addressing ethical issues in placebo-controlled trials. Selecting an appropriate behavioral platform for a particular trial requires study-specific tailoring, taking into account both the stage of development of the medication being evaluated, as well as the specific strengths and weaknesses of a broad array of available empirically supported behavioral therapies and the range of their possible targets (e.g., enhancing medication adherence, preventing attrition, addressing co-morbid problems, fostering abstinence, and targeting specific weaknesses of the pharmacologic agent). Choosing a suitable behavioral pl