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Sample records for active sulfate reduction

  1. Sulfate Reduction at a Lignite Seam: Microbial Abundance and Activity.

    PubMed

    Detmers, J.; Schulte, U.; Strauss, H.; Kuever, J.

    2001-10-01

    In a combined isotope geochemical and microbiological investigation, a setting of multiple aquifers was characterized. Biologically mediated redox processes were observed in the aquifers situated in marine sands of Tertiary age and overlying Quaternary gravel deposits. Intercalated lignite seams define the aquitards, which separate the aquifers. Bacterial oxidation of organic matter is evident from dissolved inorganic carbon characterized by average carbon isotope values between ?18.4 per thousand and ?15.7 per thousand (PDB). Strongly positive sulfur isotope values of up to +50 per thousand (CTD) for residual sulfate indicate sulfate reduction under closed system conditions with respect to sulfate availability. Both, hydrochemical and isotope data are thus consistent with the recent activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Microbiological investigations revealed the presence of an anaerobic food chain in the aquifers. Most-probable-number (MPN) determinations for SRB and fermenting microorganisms reached highest values at the interface between aquifer and lignite seam (1.5 x 103 cells/g sediment dry mass). Five strains of SRB were isolated from highest MPN dilutions. Spore-forming bacteria appeared to dominate the SRB population. Sulfate reduction rates were determined by the 35S-radiotracer method. A detailed assessment indicates an increase in the reduction rate in proximity to the lignite seam, with a maximum turnover of 8.4 mM sulfate/a, suggesting that lignite-drived compounds represent the substrate for sulfate reduction.

  2. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  3. [Effect of permeabilization on sulfate reduction activity of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells in the presence of different electron donors].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Wei; Zhang, Xu; Li, Li-Ming; Zheng, Guang-Jie; Li, Guang-He

    2013-01-01

    The Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) cells permeabilized with ethanol were used as biocatalysts to enhance hydrogenotrophic sulfate conversion. The effect of permeabilization extent of DvH cells on sulfate reduction was studied in the presence of different electron donors. When hydrogen was used as an electron donor, the highest level of sulfate reduction activity attained in cells treated with 10% ethanol (V/V), followed by 15% -ethanol treated cells. Furthermore, sulfate reduction activity markedly decreased when the ethanol concentration exceeded 15%. However, when lactate was used as the electron donor, the optimum ethanol concentration of the permeabilizing reagent was 20%, followed by 15% and 10%. Even when ethanol concentration reached 25%, DvH cells remained their partial activity with lactate. In a word, sulfate reduction activity of DvH cells responded differently in the presence of different donors. This was because the oxidation process of H2 and lactate occurred at different positions in DvH cells, and consequently intracellular electron transport pathway differed. To ensure the integrity of the electron transport chain between the donor and the accepter was a key factor for determining the permeabilization extent and for the application of cell permeabilization technology.

  4. Revisiting the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A S; Leavitt, W D; Johnston, D T

    2011-09-01

    Sulfur isotopes in the geological record integrate a combination of biological and diagenetic influences, but a key control on the ratio of sulfur isotopes in sedimentary materials is the magnitude of isotope fractionation imparted during dissimilatory sulfate reduction. This fractionation is controlled by the flux of sulfur through the network of chemical reactions involved in sulfate reduction and by the isotope effect associated with each of these chemical reactions. Despite its importance, the network of reactions constituting sulfate reduction is not fully understood, with two principle networks underpinning most isotope models. In this study, we build on biochemical data and recently solved crystal structures of enzymes to propose a revised network topology for the flow of sulfur through the sulfate reduction metabolism. This network is highly branched and under certain conditions produces results consistent with the observations that motivated previous sulfate reduction models. Our revised network suggests that there are two main paths to sulfide production: one that involves the production of thionate intermediates, and one that does not. We suggest that a key factor in determining sulfur isotope fractionation associated with sulfate reduction is the ratio of the rate at which electrons are supplied to subunits of Dsr vs. the rate of sulfite delivery to the active site of Dsr. This reaction network may help geochemists to better understand the relationship between the physiology of sulfate reduction and the isotopic record it produces.

  5. A rapid and simple method for estimating sulfate reduction activity and quantifying inorganic sulfides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulrich, G.A.; Krumholz, L.R.; Suflita, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified passive extraction procedure for quantifying reduced inorganic sulfur compounds from sediments and water is presented. This method may also be used for the estimation of sulfate reduction rates. Efficient extraction of FeS, FeS(inf2), and S(sup2-) was obtained with this procedure; however, the efficiency for S(sup0) depended on the form that was tested. Passive extraction can be used with samples containing up to 20 mg of reduced sulfur. We demonstrated the utility of this technique in a determination of both sulfate reduction rates and reduced inorganic sulfur pools in marine and freshwater sediments. A side-by-side comparison of the passive extraction method with the established single-step distillation technique yielded comparable results with a fraction of the effort.

  6. Sulfate reduction in freshwater wetland soils and the effects of sulfate and substrate loading

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; Hsieh, Y.P.

    1998-07-01

    Elevated sulfate and organic C loadings in freshwater wetlands could stimulate dissimilatory sulfate reduction that oxidizes organic C, produces hydrogen sulfide and alkalinity, and sequesters trace metals. The authors determined the extent of sulfate reduction in two freshwater wetland soils, that is black gum (Nyssa biflona) swamp soils and titi (Cliftonia monophylla) swamp soils, in northern Florida. They also investigated the potential of sulfate reduction in the wetland soils by adding sulfate, organic substrate, and lime. Sulfate reduction was found to be an active process in both swamp soils without any amendment, where the pore water pH was as low as 3.6 and sulfate concentration was as low as 5 mg L{sup {minus}1}. Without amendment, 11 to 14% of organic C was oxidized through sulfate reduction in the swamp soils. Sulfate loading, liming, and substrate addition significantly increased sulfate reduction in the black gum swamp soil, but none of those treatments increase sulfate reduction in the titi swamp soil. The limiting factor for sulfate reduction in the titi swamp soil were likely texture and soil aggregate related properties. The results suggested that wastewater loading may increase sulfate reduction in some freshwater wetlands such as the black swamps while it has no stimulating effect on other wetlands such as the titi swamps.

  7. Sulfate reduction in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    Sulfate reduction rates calculated from about 200 DSDP pore water sulfate profiles have been contoured and plotted on a map covering most areas of the world ocean. Rates show a remarkable spatial consistency, with high rates observed near the continental margins, becoming progressively lower toward the central ocean basins. Relatively elevated rates are also found in the eastern equatorial Pacific, a site of upwelling and correspondingly high rates of primary organic production. Overall, the distribution of sulfate reduction in pelagic sediments looks very similar to the distribution of primary organic carbon production. When rates are directly compared, however, the correlation between sulfate reduction and primary production is only moderately strong. Perhaps the most important influence on sulfate reduction is sediment deposition rate and the control this has over the fraction of the sedimentary organic carbon flux that becomes available for sulfate reduction. The slower the rate of sediment deposition the more time for oxic respiration and the less organic carbon that escapes to the zone of sulfate reduction. To predict most accurately sulfate reduction rates, however, the variables of primary production, water depth, and sediment deposition rate must all be integrated.

  8. Sulfate reduction in ground water of southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dockins, William S.; Olson, G.J.; McFeters, G.A.; Turbak, S.C.; Lee, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ground waters in southeastern Montana were investigated to determine if sulfide production was bacterially mediated. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were detected in 25 of 26 groundwater samples in numbers ranging from 20 to greater than 24,000 bacteria per 100 milliliters for those samples containing bacteria. Stable sulfur isotope fractionation studies indicate a biological role in sulfate reduction. However, sulfate-reducing activity as determined by use of a radioactive sulfur isotope was observed in only 1 of 16 samples. Bacterial dissimilatory sulfate reduction is postulated to be responsible for a major part of the sulfide produced in these ground waters. These bacteria are most likely active in the adsorbed state, possibly in subsurface microzones where environmental conditions are conducive to sulfate reduction. (USGS)

  9. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  10. Methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in marine sediments: A new model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterer, Richard M.

    2010-07-01

    A number of studies have shown that methanogens are active in the presence of sulfate under some conditions. This phenomenon is especially exemplified in carbonate sediments of the southern Australian continental margin. Three sites cored during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 182 in the Great Australian Bight have high concentrations of microbially-generated methane and hydrogen sulfide throughout almost 500 m of sediments. In these cores, the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic zones overlap completely; that is, the usual sulfate-methane transition zone is absent. Amino acid racemization data show that the gassy sediments consist of younger carbonates than the low-gas sites. High concentrations of the reduced gases also occur in two ODP sites on the margin of the Bahamas platform, both of which have similar sedimentary conditions to those of the high-gas sites of Leg 182. Co-generation of these reduced gases results from an unusual combination of conditions, including: (1) a thick Quaternary sequence of iron-poor carbonate sediments, (2) a sub-seafloor brine, and (3) moderate amounts of organic carbon. The probable explanation for the co-generation of hydrogen sulfide and methane in all these sites, as well as in other reported environments, is that methanogens are utilizing non-competitive substrates to produce methane within the sulfate-reducing zone. Taken together, these results form the basis of a new model for sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in marine sediments. The biogeochemical end-members of the model are: (1) minimal sulfate reduction, (2) complete sulfate reduction followed by methanogenesis, and (3) overlapping sulfate reduction and methanogenesis with no transition zone.

  11. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, K. L.; Rogers, D.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep fluctuations in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42-, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in a hydrothermal flange recovered from the Grotto vent in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate reducing organisms at Grotto may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate within the complex gradients inherent to hydrothermal deposits.

  12. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  13. Simultaneous sulfate reduction and copper removal by a PVA-immobilized sulfate reducing bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-Feng; Jhuo, Yu-Sheng; Kumar, Mathava; Ma, Ying-Shih; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2010-06-01

    The effect of a sulfate reducing bacteria immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) on simultaneous sulfate reduction and copper removal was investigated. Batch experiments were designed using central composite design (CCD) with two parameters, i.e. the copper concentration (10-100mg/L), and the quantity of immobilized SRB in culture solution (19-235 mg of VSS/L). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to model the experimental data, and to identify optimal conditions for the maximum sulfate reduction and copper removal. Under optimum condition, i.e. approximately 138.5mg VSS/L of sulfate reducing bacteria immobilized in PVA, and approximately 51.5mg/L of copper, the maximum sulfate reduction rate was 1.57 d(-1) as based on the first-order kinetic equation. The data demonstrate that immobilizing sulfate reducing bacteria in PVA can enhance copper removal and the resistance of the bacteria towards copper toxicity.

  14. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 2. Pelagic sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    The epilimnion of hypersaline, alkaline, meromictic Big Soda Lake contains an average 58 mmol sulfate liter−1 and 0.4 µmol dissolved iron liter−1. The monimolimnion, which is permanently anoxic, has a sulfide concentration ranging seasonally from 4 to 7 mmol liter−1. Depth profiles of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, assayed with a 35S tracer technique and in situ incubations, demonstrated that sulfate reduction occurs within the water column of this extreme environment. The average rate of reduction in the monimolimnion was 3 µmol sulfate liter−1 d−1in May compared to 0.9 in October. These values are comparable to rates of sulfate reduction reported for anoxic waters of more moderate environments. Sulfate reduction also occurred in the anoxic zone of the mixolimnion, though at significantly lower rates (0.025–0.090 µmol liter−1 d−1 at 25 m). Additions of FeS (1.0 mmol liter−1) doubled the endogenous rate of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, while MnS and kaolinite had no effect. These results suggest that sulfate reduction in Big Soda Lake is iron limited and controlled by seasonal variables other than temperature. Estimates of the organic carbon mineralized by sulfate reduction exceed measured fluxes of particulate organic carbon sinking from the mixolimnion. Thus, additional sources of electron donors (other than those derived from the sinking of pelagic autotrophs) may also fuel monimolimnetic sulfate reduction in the lake.

  15. Sulfate Reduction in Groundwater: Characterization and Applications for Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Carreon-Diazconti, C.; Johnson, B.

    2012-06-01

    Sulfate is ubiquitous in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sulfate reduction reactions play a significant role in mediating redox conditions and biogeochemical processes for subsurface systems. They also serve as the basis for innovative in-situ methods for groundwater remediation. An overview of sulfate reduction in subsurface environments is provided, with a specific focus on implications for groundwater remediation. A case study presenting the results of a pilot-scale ethanol injection test illustrates the advantages and difficulties associated with the use of electron-donor amendments for sulfate remediation.

  16. Patterns of sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A S; Leavitt, W D; Schmidt, M; Knoll, A H; Girguis, P R; Johnston, D T

    2016-01-01

    Studies of microbial sulfate reduction have suggested that the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation varies with sulfate concentration. Small apparent sulfur isotope fractionations preserved in Archean rocks have been interpreted as suggesting Archean sulfate concentrations of <200 μm, while larger fractionations thereafter have been interpreted to require higher concentrations. In this work, we demonstrate that fractionation imposed by sulfate reduction can be a function of concentration over a millimolar range, but that nature of this relationship depends on the organism studied. Two sulfate-reducing bacteria grown in continuous culture with sulfate concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 6 mm showed markedly different relationships between sulfate concentration and isotope fractionation. Desulfovibrio vulgaris str. Hildenborough showed a large and relatively constant isotope fractionation ((34) εSO 4-H2S ≅ 25‰), while fractionation by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 strongly correlated with sulfate concentration over the same range. Both data sets can be modeled as Michaelis-Menten (MM)-type relationships but with very different MM constants, suggesting that the fractionations imposed by these organisms are highly dependent on strain-specific factors. These data reveal complexity in the sulfate concentration-fractionation relationship. Fractionation during MSR relates to sulfate concentration but also to strain-specific physiological parameters such as the affinity for sulfate and electron donors. Previous studies have suggested that the sulfate concentration-fractionation relationship is best described with a MM fit. We present a simple model in which the MM fit with sulfate concentration and hyperbolic fit with growth rate emerge from simple physiological assumptions. As both environmental and biological factors influence the fractionation recorded in geological samples, understanding their relationship is critical to interpreting the sulfur isotope record

  17. A Demonstration of Bacterial Reduction of Inorganic Sulfate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinard, W. Frank

    1979-01-01

    This experiment demonstrates the reduction of inorganic sulfate to sulfide in the pore water of estuarine muds. Procedures involve the incubation of mud samples for varying amounts of time followed by gravimetric determination. (Author/SA)

  18. Reduction of selenate to selenide by sulfate-respiring bacteria: Experiments with cell suspensions and estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, J.P.; Oremland, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Washed cell suspension of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. aestuarii were capable of reducing nanomolar levels of selenate to selenide as well as sulfate to sulfide. Reduction of these species was inhibited by 1 mM selenate or tungstate. The addition of 1 mM sulfate decreased the reduction of selenate and enhanced the reduction of sulfate. Increasing concentrations of sulfate inhibited rates of selenate reduction but enhanced sulfate reduction rates. Cell suspensions kept in 1 mM selenate were incapable of reducing either selenate or sulfate when the selenate/sulfate ratio was ???0.02, indicating that irreversible inhibition occurs at high selenate concentrations. Anoxic estuarine sediments having an active flora of sulfate-respiring bacteria were capable of a small amount of selenate reduction when ambient sulfate concentrations were low (<4 mM). These results indicate that sulfate is an inhibitor of the reduction of trace qunatitites of selenate. Therefore, direct reduction of traces of selenate to selenide by sulfate-respiring bacteria in natural environments is constrained by the ambient concentration of sulfate ions. The significance of this observation with regard to the role sediments play in sequestering selenium is discussed

  19. A protein trisulfide couples dissimilatory sulfate reduction to energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, André A.; Venceslau, Sofia S.; Grein, Fabian; Leavitt, William D.; Dahl, Christiane; Johnston, David T.; Pereira, Inês A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction has governed Earth’s biogeochemical sulfur cycle for at least 2.5 billion years. However, the enzymatic mechanisms behind this pathway are incompletely understood, particularly for the reduction of sulfite—a key intermediate in the pathway. This critical reaction is performed by DsrAB, a widespread enzyme also involved in other dissimilatory sulfur metabolisms. Using in vitro assays with an archaeal DsrAB, supported with genetic experiments in a bacterial system, we show that the product of sulfite reduction by DsrAB is a protein-based trisulfide, in which a sulfite-derived sulfur is bridging two conserved cysteines of DsrC. Physiological studies also reveal that sulfate reduction rates are determined by cellular levels of DsrC. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction couples the four-electron reduction of the DsrC trisulfide to energy conservation.

  20. A protein trisulfide couples dissimilatory sulfate reduction to energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Santos, André A; Venceslau, Sofia S; Grein, Fabian; Leavitt, William D; Dahl, Christiane; Johnston, David T; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-12-18

    Microbial sulfate reduction has governed Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle for at least 2.5 billion years. However, the enzymatic mechanisms behind this pathway are incompletely understood, particularly for the reduction of sulfite-a key intermediate in the pathway. This critical reaction is performed by DsrAB, a widespread enzyme also involved in other dissimilatory sulfur metabolisms. Using in vitro assays with an archaeal DsrAB, supported with genetic experiments in a bacterial system, we show that the product of sulfite reduction by DsrAB is a protein-based trisulfide, in which a sulfite-derived sulfur is bridging two conserved cysteines of DsrC. Physiological studies also reveal that sulfate reduction rates are determined by cellular levels of DsrC. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction couples the four-electron reduction of the DsrC trisulfide to energy conservation.

  1. Evidence of magnetic isotope effects during thermochemical sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Oduro, Harry; Harms, Brian; Sintim, Herman O; Kaufman, Alan J; Cody, George; Farquhar, James

    2011-10-25

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction experiments with simple amino acid and dilute concentrations of sulfate reveal significant degrees of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation. Enrichments of up to 13‰ for (33)S are attributed to a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with the formation of thiol-disulfide, ion-radical pairs. Observed (36)S depletions in products are explained here by classical (mass-dependent) isotope effects and mixing processes. The experimental data contrasts strongly with multiple sulfur isotope trends in Archean samples, which exhibit significant (36)S anomalies. These results support an origin other than thermochemical sulfate reduction for the mass-independent signals observed for early Earth samples.

  2. Sulfate Reduction Remediation of a Metals Plume Through Organic Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    2003-03-11

    Laboratory testing and a field-scale demonstration for the sulfate reduction remediation of an acidic/metals/sulfate groundwater plume at the Savannah River Site has been conducted. The laboratory testing consisted of the use of anaerobic microcosms to test the viability of three organic substrates to promote microbially mediated sulfate reduction. Based upon the laboratory testing, soybean oil and sodium lactate were selected for injection during the subsequent field-scale demonstration. The field-scale demonstration is currently ongoing. Approximately 825 gallons (3,123 L) of soybean oil and 225 gallons (852 L) of 60 percent sodium lactate have been injected into an existing well system within the plume. Since the injections, sulfate concentrations in the injection zone have significantly decreased, sulfate-reducing bacteria concentrations have significantly increased, the pH has increased, the Eh has decreased, and the concentrations of many metals have decreased. Microbially mediated sulfate reduction has been successfully promoted for the remediation of the acidic/metals/sulfate plume by the injection of soybean oil and sodium lactate within the plume.

  3. Interpreting isotopic analyses of microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, C. G.; Engelbrektson, A. L.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Li, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Coates, J. D.; Conrad, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs is often associated with secondary production of oil where seawater (28 mM sulfate) is commonly injected to maintain reservoir pressure and displace oil. The hydrogen sulfide produced can cause a suite of operating problems including corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks and additional processing costs. We propose that monitoring of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate can be used as early indicators that microbial sulfate reduction is occurring, as this process is well known to cause substantial isotopic fractionation. This approach relies on the idea that reactions with reservoir (iron) minerals can remove dissolved sulfide, thereby delaying the transport of the sulfide through the reservoir relative to the sulfate in the injected water. Changes in the sulfate isotopes due to microbial sulfate reduction may therefore be measurable in the produced water before sulfide is detected. However, turning this approach into a predictive tool requires (i) an understanding of appropriate fractionation factors for oil reservoirs, (ii) incorporation of isotopic data into reservoir flow and reactive transport models. We present here the results of preliminary batch experiments aimed at determining fractionation factors using relevant electron donors (e.g. crude oil and volatile fatty acids), reservoir microbial communities and reservoir environmental conditions (pressure, temperature). We further explore modeling options for integrating isotope data and discuss whether single fractionation factors are appropriate to model complex environments with dynamic hydrology, geochemistry, temperature and microbiology gradients.

  4. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during methane dependent sulfate reduction in high pressure continuous incubation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, C.; Brunner, B.; Holler, T.; Widdel, F.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction in marine sediments is an important sink in the global methane budget. However, many aspects of methane dependent sulfate reduction are not fully understood. We developed a novel high pressure biotechnical system to simulate marine conditions with high concentrations of dissolved gases, e.g. at gas seeps and gas hydrate systems. The system allows for batch, fed-batch and continuous gas-phase free incubation. We employ this system to study the kinetics and isotope fractionation during AOM at varying methane partial pressures up to 10 MPa. We present the results of long-term continuous and fed-batch incubations with highly active naturally enriched biomass from microbial mats from the Black Sea. During these experiments the methane partial pressure was increased stepwise from 0.1 to 10 MPa. The methane dependent sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.1 mmol/l/d to 3.5 mmol/l/d resulting from the increase in methane concentration and microbial growth. Sulfate reduction was negligible in the absence of methane. The sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction was strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved methane. Sulfur isotope fractionation was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations. Relative to sulfate reduction rates, oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations.

  5. SULFATE REDUCTION IN GROUNDWATER: CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATIONS FOR REMEDIATION

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, K. C.; Carreón-Diazconti, C.; Johnson, B.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate is ubiquitous in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sulfate reduction reactions play a significant role in mediating redox conditions and biogeochemical processes for subsurface systems. They also serve as the basis for innovative in-situ methods for groundwater remediation. An overview of sulfate reduction in subsurface environments is provided, along with a brief discussion of characterization methods and applications for addressing acid mine drainage. We then focus on two innovative, in-situ methods for remediating sulfate-contaminated groundwater, the use of zero-valent iron (ZVI) and the addition of electron-donor substrates. The advantages and limitations associated with the methods are discussed, with examples of prior applications. PMID:21947714

  6. Sulfur Isotopes as Indicators of Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Processes Influencing Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, J. L.; Conrad, M. E.; Williams, K. H.; N'guessan, L.; Long, P. E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    An in-situ acetate amendment at a DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site near Rifle, CO demonstrated successful reduction of aqueous U(VI), to less soluble U(IV) through stimulated microbial activity. U(VI) reduction rates were highest during iron reduction and decreased with the onset of sulfate reduction. However, sustained U(IV) attenuation was observed following subsequent termination of the acetate amendment. These findings illustrate the importance of the transition between iron and sulfate reducing conditions in stimulating bioreduction of uranium. The sulfur isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide were measured through this transition in order to explore the utility of these data in tracking the extent of microbial sulfate reduction and to assess the stability of sulfide precipitates. Samples for isotopic analyses and aqueous measurements of sulfate, ferrous iron, U(VI) and acetate were collected in one background well and three monitoring wells down-gradient of the acetate injection. Results show an increase of up to 7‰ in the δ34S of sulfate at the onset of sulfate reduction, followed by a return to background δ34S values of -8‰ following cessation of the acetate amendment. The δ34S values of sulfide increased from roughly -20‰ at the onset of sulfate reduction to a maximum of -0.8‰ during peak sulfate removal, followed by a gradual return to values of roughly -28‰ upon cessation of the acetate amendment. These data present a unique perspective on the processes governing the bioreduction experiment in that the sulfate isotopes are a function of both transport and mixing processes, whereas the sulfide isotopes represent biogenic sulfide that is rapidly removed from the aqueous phase. Thus a comparable enrichment in sulfate isotopic data noted in the closest and furthest wells from the injection gallery suggest bioreduction in both of these locations, while a larger increase in sulfide isotopic values in the closest well

  7. Microbial Sulfate Reduction at Cold Seeps Based on Analysis of Carbonate Associated Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Peng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction and coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) are the dominant biogeochemical processes occurring at cold seeps in marine settings. These processes not only support the growth of chemosynthetic communities but also promote the precipitation of authigenic carbonates. However, investigations of microbial sulfate reduction have been conducted only using porewaters or seep-related barites. The fact is that many seeps are either inactive or do not precipitate any barite minerals. Thus, little is known about the microbial sulfate reduction at these seep environments. The occurrence of authigenic carbonate has been documented at almost all cold seep sites, which provide a unique opportunity to investigate the microbial sulfate reduction using such carbonate. The presentation is focused on the concentrations and isotopic signatures of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS). The aim of the project is to determine the role of sulfate and sulfate reduction during carbonate precipitation at cold seeps. The CAS concentrations are 67-537 ppm in high-Mg calcite, 51-181 ppm in low-Mg calcite, and 116-565 in aragonite. The δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS also vary considerably, ranging from 21.9‰ to 56.2‰ (V-CDT) and from 10.1‰ to 24.8‰ (V-SMOW), respectively. On δ34SCAS versus δ18OCAS plots, both aragonite and calcite show linear trends that project down toward those of open seawater sulfate. The trends suggest that sulfate has been isotopically modified to various degrees in pore fluids before being incorporated into carbonate lattice. The much narrower δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS ranges for aragonite than for calcite suggests a much "pickier" condition for aragonite formation during early diagenesis. Our results suggest that concentration and isotopic composition of CAS in seep carbonates may be controlled by the supply of pore-water sulfate during carbonate precipitation. The reliability of CAS in carbonate of early diagenetic origin as a proxy of

  8. Sulfation and biological activities of konjac glucomannan.

    PubMed

    Bo, Surina; Muschin, Tegshi; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2013-05-15

    The sulfation of konjac glucomannan and its anti-HIV and blood anticoagulant activities were investigated. Konjac glucomannan is a polysaccharide occurring naturally in konjac plant tubers and has high molecular weights. Solubility in water is very low, and the aqueous solutions at low concentrations have high viscosity. Before sulfation, hydrolysis by diluted sulfuric acid was carried out to decrease the molecular weights of M¯n=19.2 × 10(4)-0.2 × 10(4). Sulfation with piperidine-N-sulfonic acid or SO3-pyridine complex gave sulfated konjac glucomannans with molecular weights of M¯n=1.0 × 10(4)-0.4 × 10(4) and degrees of sulfation (DS) of 1.3-1.4. It was found that the sulfated konjac glucomannans had potent anti-HIV activity at a 50% effective concentration, (EC50) of 1.2-1.3 μg/ml, which was almost as high as that of an AIDS drug, ddC, whose EC50=3.2 μg/ml, and moderate blood anticoagulant activity, AA=0.8-22.7 units/mg, compared to those of standard sulfated polysaccharides, curdlan (10 units/mg) and dextran (22.7 units/mg) sulfates. Structural analysis of sulfated konjac glucomannans with negatively charged sulfated groups was performed by high resolution NMR, and the interaction between poly-l-lysine with positively charged amino groups as a model compound of proteins and peptides was measured by surface plasmon resonance measurement, suggesting that the sulfated konjac glucomannans had a high binding stability on immobilized poly-l-lysine. The binding of sulfated konjac glucomannan was concentration-dependent, and the biological activity of the sulfated konjac glucomannans may be due to electrostatic interaction between the sulfate and amino groups.

  9. Arsenic mobilization from sediments in microcosms under sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Quicksall, Andrew N; Chillrud, Steven N; Mailloux, Brian J; Bostick, Benjamin C

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic is often assumed to be immobile in sulfidic environments. Here, laboratory-scale microcosms were conducted to investigate whether microbial sulfate reduction could control dissolved arsenic concentrations sufficiently for use in groundwater remediation. Sediments from the Vineland Superfund site and the Coeur d'Alene mining district were amended with different combination of lactate and sulfate and incubated for 30-40 days. In general, sulfate reduction in Vineland sediments resulted in transient and incomplete arsenic removal, or arsenic release from sediments. Sulfate reduction in the Coeur d'Alene sediments was more effective at removing arsenic from solution than the Vineland sediments, probably by arsenic substitution and adsorption within iron sulfides. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the Vineland sediments initially contained abundant reactive ferrihydrite, and underwent extensive sulfur cycling during incubation. As a result, arsenic in the Vineland sediments could not be effectively converted to immobile arsenic-bearing sulfides, but instead a part of the arsenic was probably converted to soluble thioarsenates. These results suggest that coupling between the iron and sulfur redox cycles must be fully understood for in situ arsenic immobilization by sulfate reduction to be successful.

  10. Immunological detection of enzymes for sulfate reduction in anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia.

    PubMed

    Milucka, Jana; Widdel, Friedrich; Shima, Seigo

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) at marine gas seeps is performed by archaeal-bacterial consortia that have so far not been cultivated in axenic binary or pure cultures. Knowledge about possible biochemical reactions in AOM consortia is based on metagenomic retrieval of genes related to those in archaeal methanogenesis and bacterial sulfate reduction, and identification of a few catabolic enzymes in protein extracts. Whereas the possible enzyme for methane activation (a variant of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, Mcr) was shown to be harboured by the archaea, enzymes for sulfate activation and reduction have not been localized so far. We adopted a novel approach of fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin (0.3-0.5 μm) cryosections to localize two enzymes of the SR pathway, adenylyl : sulfate transferase (Sat; ATP sulfurylase) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) in microbial consortia from Black Sea methane seeps. Both Sat and Dsr were exclusively found in an abundant microbial morphotype (c. 50% of all cells), which was tentatively identified as Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus-related bacteria. These results show that ANME-2 archaea in the Black Sea AOM consortia did not express bacterial enzymes of the canonical sulfate reduction pathway and thus, in contrast to previous suggestions, most likely cannot perform canonical sulfate reduction. Moreover, our results show that fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin cryosections which to our knowledge has been so far only applied on cell tissues, is a powerful tool for intracellular protein detection in natural microbial associations.

  11. Large sulfur isotope fractionations associated with Neoarchean microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhelezinskaia, Iadviga; Kaufman, Alan J; Farquhar, James; Cliff, John

    2014-11-07

    The minor extent of sulfur isotope fractionation preserved in many Neoarchean sedimentary successions suggests that sulfate-reducing microorganisms played an insignificant role in ancient marine environments, despite evidence that these organisms evolved much earlier. We present bulk, microdrilled, and ion probe sulfur isotope data from carbonate-associated pyrite in the ~2.5-billion-year-old Batatal Formation of Brazil, revealing large mass-dependent fractionations (approaching 50 per mil) associated with microbial sulfate reduction, as well as consistently negative Δ(33)S values (~ -2 per mil) indicative of atmospheric photochemical reactions. Persistent (33)S depletion through ~60 meters of shallow marine carbonate implies long-term stability of seawater sulfate abundance and isotope composition. In contrast, a negative Δ(33)S excursion in lower Batatal strata indicates a response time of ~40,000 to 150,000 years, suggesting Neoarchean sulfate concentrations between ~1 and 10 μM.

  12. A 'rare biosphere' microorganism contributes to sulfate reduction in a peatland.

    PubMed

    Pester, Michael; Bittner, Norbert; Deevong, Pinsurang; Wagner, Michael; Loy, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Methane emission from peatlands contributes substantially to global warming but is significantly reduced by sulfate reduction, which is fuelled by globally increasing aerial sulfur pollution. However, the biology behind sulfate reduction in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood and the key players for this process as well as their abundance remained unidentified. Comparative 16S rRNA gene stable isotope probing (SIP) in the presence and absence of sulfate indicated that a Desulfosporosinus species, which constitutes only 0.006% of the total microbial community 16S rRNA genes, is an important sulfate reducer in a long-term experimental peatland field site. Parallel SIP using dsrAB (encoding subunit A and B of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase) identified no additional sulfate reducers under the conditions tested. For the identified Desulfosporosinus species a high cell-specific sulfate reduction rate of up to 341 fmol SO₄²⁻ cell⁻¹ day⁻¹ was estimated. Thus, the small Desulfosporosinus population has the potential to reduce sulfate in situ at a rate of 4.0-36.8 nmol (g soil w. wt.)⁻¹ day⁻¹, sufficient to account for a considerable part of sulfate reduction in the peat soil. Modeling of sulfate diffusion to such highly active cells identified no limitation in sulfate supply even at bulk concentrations as low as 10 μM. Collectively, these data show that the identified Desulfosporosinus species, despite being a member of the 'rare biosphere', contributes to an important biogeochemical process that diverts the carbon flow in peatlands from methane to CO₂ and, thus, alters their contribution to global warming.

  13. Effects of Sulfate Reduction on Trichloroethene Dechlorination by Dehalococcoides-Containing Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinwei; Polasko, Alexandra; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2017-04-15

    In order to elucidate interactions between sulfate reduction and dechlorination, we systematically evaluated the effects of different concentrations of sulfate and sulfide on reductive dechlorination by isolates, constructed consortia, and enrichments containing Dehalococcoides sp. Sulfate (up to 5 mM) did not inhibit the growth or metabolism of pure cultures of the dechlorinator Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195, the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, or the syntroph Syntrophomonas wolfei In contrast, sulfide at 5 mM exhibited inhibitory effects on growth of the sulfate reducer and the syntroph, as well as on both dechlorination and growth rates of D. mccartyi Transcriptomic analysis of D. mccartyi 195 revealed that genes encoding ATP synthase, biosynthesis, and Hym hydrogenase were downregulated during sulfide inhibition, whereas genes encoding metal-containing enzymes involved in energy metabolism were upregulated even though the activity of those enzymes (hydrogenases) was inhibited. When the electron acceptor (trichloroethene) was limiting and an electron donor (lactate) was provided in excess to cocultures and enrichments, high sulfate concentrations (5 mM) inhibited reductive dechlorination due to the toxicity of generated sulfide. The initial cell ratio of sulfate reducers to D. mccartyi (1:3, 1:1, or 3:1) did not affect the dechlorination performance in the presence of sulfate (2 and 5 mM). In contrast, under electron donor limitation, dechlorination was not affected by sulfate amendments due to low sulfide production, demonstrating that D. mccartyi can function effectively in anaerobic microbial communities containing moderate sulfate concentrations (5 mM), likely due to its ability to outcompete other hydrogen-consuming bacteria and archaea.IMPORTANCE Sulfate is common in subsurface environments and has been reported as a cocontaminant with chlorinated solvents at various concentrations. Inconsistent results for the effects of sulfate

  14. Oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of pore water sulfate in the deep biosphere: Dominance of isotope exchange reactions with ambient water during microbial sulfate reduction (ODP Site 1130)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortmann, Ulrich G.; Chernyavsky, Boris; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Brunner, Benjamin; Böttcher, Michael E.; Swart, Peter K.

    2007-09-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction affects the isotopic composition of dissolved and solid sulfur species in marine sediments. Experiments and field data show that the δ18O composition is also modified in the presence of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. This has been attributed either to a kinetic isotope effect during the reduction of sulfate to sulfite, cell-internal exchange reactions between enzymatically-activated sulfate (APS), and/or sulfite with cytoplasmic water. The isotopic fingerprint of these processes may be further modified by the cell-external reoxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur, and the subsequent disproportionation to sulfide and sulfate or by the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Here we report δ18O values from interstitial water samples of ODP Leg 182 (Site 1130) and provide the mathematical framework to describe the oxygen isotope fractionation of sulfate during microbial sulfate reduction. We show that a purely kinetic model is unable to explain our δ18O data, and that the data are well explained by a model using oxygen isotope exchange reactions. We propose that the oxygen isotope exchange occurs between APS and cytoplasmic water, and/or between sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) during APS formation. Model calculations show that cell external reoxidation of reduced sulfur species would require up to 3000 mol/m 3 of an oxidant at ODP Site 1130, which is incompatible with the sediment geochemical data. In addition, we show that the volumetric fluxes required to explain the observed δ18O data are on average 14 times higher than the volumetric sulfate reduction rates (SRR) obtained from inverse modeling of the porewater data. The ratio between the gross sulfate flux into the microbes and the net sulfate flux through the microbes is depth invariant, and independent of sulfide concentrations. This suggests that both fluxes are controlled by cell density and that cell-specific sulfate reduction rates remain constant with depth.

  15. Sulfate reduction in the salt marshes at Sapelo Island, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.W.; Giblin, A.

    1983-01-01

    Sulfate reduction rates were measured in stands of Spartina alterniflora at Sapelo Island, Georgia, in November 1980 by injecting tracer amounts of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ into cores, incubating overnight, and analyzing for the incorporation of /sup 35/S into reduced sulfur compounds. Qualitatively, sulfate reduction in the Georgia marsh is very similar to that in the Massachusetts marshes the authors have studied: FeS/sup 2/ (pyrite or marcasite) is the major end product. Lesser amounts of soluble sulfides, iron monosulfides, and elemental sulfur are also formed. The rate of sulfate reduction (determined by the same method)is significantly lower during November in Georgia than in the Great Sippewissett Marsh in Massachusetts, 0.090 vs. 0.27 moles SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/xm/sup -2/xd/sup -1/ in stands of short Spartina. The lower rates in Georgia may reflect a lower rate of organic carbon input by below ground production. Sulfate reduction appears to be the major form of respiration in the sediments of salt marshes in Georgia as well as in Massachusetts.

  16. Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity

    SciTech Connect

    McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A.; Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D.

    1996-12-09

    Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

  17. Ambient aerosols remain highly acidic despite dramatic sulfate reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead

    2016-04-01

    The pH of fine particles has many vital environmental impacts. By affecting aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity, particle pH is linked to regional air quality and climate, and adverse effects on human health. Sulfate is often the main acid component that drives pH of fine particles (i.e., PM2.5) and is neutralized to varying degrees by gas phase ammonia. Sulfate levels have decreased by approximately 70% over the Southeastern United States in the last fifteen years, but measured ammonia levels have been fairly steady implying the aerosol may becoming more neutral. Using a chemically comprehensive data set, combined with a thermodynamic analysis, we show that PM2.5 in the Southeastern U.S. is highly acidic (pH between 0 and 2), and that pH has remained relatively unchanged throughout the past decade and a half of decreasing sulfate. Even with further sulfate reductions, pH buffering by gas-particle partitioning of ammonia is expected to continue until sulfate drops to near background levels, indicating that fine particle pH will remain near current levels into the future. These results are non-intuitive and reshape expectations of how sulfur emission reductions impact air quality in the Southeastern U.S. and possibly other regions across the globe.

  18. Impact of sulfation and desulfation on NOx reduction using Cu-chabazite SCR catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Brookshear, Daniel William; Nam, Jeong -Gil; Nguyen, Ke; ...

    2015-06-05

    This bench reactor study investigates the impact of gaseous sulfur on the NOx reduction activity of Cu-chabazite SCR (Cu-CHA) catalysts at SO2 concentrations representative of marine diesel engine exhaust. After two hours of 500 ppm SO2 exposure at 250 and 400 °C in the simulated diesel exhaust gases, the NOx reduction activity of the sulfated Cu-CHA SCR catalysts is severely degraded at evaluation temperatures below 250 °C; however, above 250 °C the impact of sulfur exposure is minimal. EPMA shows that sulfur is located throughout the washcoat and along the entire length of the sulfated samples. Interestingly, BET measurements revealmore » that the sulfated samples have a 20% decrease in surface area. Moreover, the sulfated samples show a decrease in NOx/nitrate absorption during NO exposure in a DRIFTS reactor which suggests that Cu sites in the catalyst are blocked by the presence of sulfur. SO2 exposure also results in an increase in NH3 storage capacity, possibly due to the formation of ammonium sulfate species in the sulfated samples. In all cases, lean thermal treatments as low as 500 °C reverse the effects of sulfur exposure and restore the NOx reduction activity of the Cu-CHA catalyst to that of the fresh condition.« less

  19. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Measured by an Automated Electrical Impedance Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical impedance measurements are used to investigate the rates of sulfate reduction by pure cultures of and sediments containing sulfur-reducing bacteria. Changes in the electrical impedance ratios of pure cultures of Desulfovibrio aestuarii and samples of reduced sediments from San Francisco Bay were measured by a Bactometer 32, and sulfate reduction was followed by measuring the incorporation of (S-35) sulfate into metal sulfides. The growth of the bacteria in pure culture is found to result in an increase of 0.2200 in the impedance ratio within 24 h, accompanied by increases in protein, ATP, sulfide and absorptance at 660 nm, all of which are inhibited by the addition of molybdate. Similar responses were observed in the sediments, although impedance ratio responses were not completely inhibited upon the addition of molybdate, due to the presence of nonsulfate-respiring microorganisms. Experiments conducted with sterile media and autoclaved sediments indicate that the presence of H2S together with iron is responsible for the impedance effect, and sulfate reduction rates ranging between 0.85 and 1.78 mmol/l per day are estimated for the sediments by the impedance technique.

  20. Elevated sulfate reduction in metal-contaminated freshwater lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, H.L.; Dahl, A.L.; Tribou, E.; Noble, P.A.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-01-06

    Although sulfate-reducing prokaryotes have long been studied as agents of metals bioremediation, impacts of long-term metals exposure on biologically mediated sulfur cycling in natural systems remains poorly understood. The effects of long-term exposure to metal stress on the freshwater sulfur cycle were studied, with a focus on biologic sulfate reduction using a combination of microbial and chemical methods. To examine the effects after decades of adaptation time, a field-based experiment was conducted using multiple study sites in a natural system historically impacted by a nearby zinc smelter (Lake DePue, Illinois). Rates were highest at the most metals-contaminated sites (-35 {mu}mol/cm{sup 3}/day) and decreased with decreased pore water zinc and arsenic contamination levels, while other environmental characteristics (i.e., pH, nutrient concentrations and physical properties) showed little between-site variation. Correlations were established using an artificial neural network to evaluate potentially non-linear relationships between sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and measured environmental variables. SRR in Lake DePue were up to 50 times higher than rates previously reported for lake sediments and the chemical speciation of Zn was dominated by the presence of ZnS as shown by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These results suggest that long-term metal stress of natural systems might alter the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur by contributing to higher rates of sulfate reduction.

  1. D-Area Sulfate Reduction Studty Comprehensive Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M

    2005-02-11

    An acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume emanates from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), due to the contaminated runoff the basin receives from the D-Area coal pile. A Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP) (WSRC 2001) was implemented to evaluate the potential for the sulfate reduction remediation of the DCPRB acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume. The following studies, implemented as part of the TSWP, are documented herein: Bacteria Population and Organic Selection Laboratory Testing; DTT-1 Trench Evaluation; DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 1; and DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. Evaluation of sulfate reduction applicability actually began with a literature search and feasibility report in mid 2001, which fed into the TSWP. Physical completion of TSWP work occurred in late 2004 with the completion of the DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. The following are the primary conclusions drawn based upon this 3-year effort: (1) Pure soybean oil provides a long-term, indirect, SRB carbon source that floats on top of the water table (by indirect it means that the soybean oil must be degraded by other microbes prior to utilization by SRB) for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Soybean oil produces no known SRB inhibitory response and therefore large quantities can be injected. (2) Sodium lactate provides a short-term, immediately available, direct, SRB carbon source that is miscible with the groundwater and therefore flows with the groundwater until it has been completely utilized for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Lactate at elevated concentrations (greater than 6 g/L) does produce a SRB inhibitory response and therefore small quantities must be injected frequently. (3) The use of limestone to buffer the contaminated groundwater facilitates sulfate reduction remediation through the injection of organic substrate. Additionally conclusions and

  2. INHIBITION OF REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION BY SULFATE REDUCTION IN MICROCOSMS (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High sulfate (>1,000 mg/L) concentrations are potentially problematic for field implementation of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes because its reduction competes for electron donor with reductive dechlorination. As a result of this competition, reductive dechl...

  3. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Potential in Coal-Bearing Sediments Down to ~2.5 km below the Seafloor off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan.

    PubMed

    Glombitza, Clemens; Adhikari, Rishi R; Riedinger, Natascha; Gilhooly, William P; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Inagaki, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate reduction is the predominant anaerobic microbial process of organic matter mineralization in marine sediments, with recent studies revealing that sulfate reduction not only occurs in sulfate-rich sediments, but even extends to deeper, methanogenic sediments at very low background concentrations of sulfate. Using samples retrieved off the Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337, we measured potential sulfate reduction rates by slurry incubations with (35)S-labeled sulfate in deep methanogenic sediments between 1276.75 and 2456.75 meters below the seafloor. Potential sulfate reduction rates were generally extremely low (mostly below 0.1 pmol cm(-3) d(-1)) but showed elevated values (up to 1.8 pmol cm(-3) d(-1)) in a coal-bearing interval (Unit III). A measured increase in hydrogenase activity in the coal-bearing horizons coincided with this local increase in potential sulfate reduction rates. This paired enzymatic response suggests that hydrogen is a potentially important electron donor for sulfate reduction in the deep coalbed biosphere. By contrast, no stimulation of sulfate reduction rates was observed in treatments where methane was added as an electron donor. In the deep coalbeds, small amounts of sulfate might be provided by a cryptic sulfur cycle. The isotopically very heavy pyrites (δ(34)S = +43‰) found in this horizon is consistent with its formation via microbial sulfate reduction that has been continuously utilizing a small, increasingly (34)S-enriched sulfate reservoir over geologic time scales. Although our results do not represent in-situ activity, and the sulfate reducers might only have persisted in a dormant, spore-like state, our findings show that organisms capable of sulfate reduction have survived in deep methanogenic sediments over more than 20 Ma. This highlights the ability of sulfate-reducers to persist over geological timespans even in sulfate-depleted environments. Our study

  4. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S??, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 ??C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (???6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (???0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  5. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  6. Key factors influencing rates of heterotrophic sulfate reduction in hydrothermal massive sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, D.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Despite sulfate reduction's ubiquity in marine systems, relatively little is known about how environmental or ecological factors influence rates of sulfate reduction. While numerous studies have considered how sulfate reduction and methanogenesis compete for reductants in natural and human-made systems, less is known about how temperature or metabolite concentration, such as sulfate and sulfide concentrations, affects rates of sulfate reduction. Here we use a factorial experimental design to evaluate the effects of key variables on sulfate reduction kinetics in sulfide deposits recovered from hydrothermal vents in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca ridge. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured by 35-S tracer techniques over a range of environmentally relevant chemical conditions (pH, H2S, SO42-, and organic carbon concentrations) and temperatures (4, 50 and 90°C). Maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C, and sulfate reduction rates had significant positive correlations with increasing sulfide, pH and sulfate. However, sulfate reduction rates did not correlate to exogenous dissolved organic carbon, implicating exogenous hydrogen or endogenous organic matter as the reductant (or even sulfur disproportionation). This research presents an opportunity to better understand the key variables that influence the rates of microbial sulfate reduction in hydrothermal environments and provides a framework for modeling sulfate reduction in mid-ocean ridge systems.

  7. Potential for Sulfate Reduction in Mangrove Forest Soils: Comparison between Two Dominant Species of the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Melike; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2016-01-01

    Avicennia and Rhizophora are globally occurring mangrove genera with different traits that place them in different parts of the intertidal zone. It is generally accepted that the oxidizing capacity of Avicennia roots is larger than that of Rhizophora roots, which initiates more reduced conditions in the soil below the latter genus. We hypothesize that the more reduced conditions beneath Rhizophora stands lead to more active sulfate-reducing microbial communities compared to Avicennia stands. To test this hypothesis, we measured sulfate reduction traits in soil samples collected from neighboring Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle stands at three different locations in southern Florida. The traits measured were sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in flow-through reactors containing undisturbed soil layers in the absence and presence of easily degradable carbon compounds, copy numbers of the dsrB gene, which is specific for sulfate-reducing microorganisms, and numbers of sulfate-reducing cells that are able to grow in liquid medium on a mixture of acetate, propionate and lactate as electron donors. At the tidal locations Port of the Islands and South Hutchinson Islands, steady state SRR, dsrB gene copy numbers and numbers of culturable cells were higher at the A. germinans than at the R. mangle stands, although not significantly for the numbers at Port of the Islands. At the non-tidal location North Hutchinson Island, results are mixed with respect to these sulfate reduction traits. At all locations, the fraction of culturable cells were significantly higher at the R. mangle than at the A. germinans stands. The dynamics of the initial SRR implied a more in situ active sulfate-reducing community at the intertidal R. mangle stands. It was concluded that in agreement with our hypothesis R. mangle stands accommodate a more active sulfate-reducing community than A. germinans stands, but only at the tidal locations. The differences between R. mangle and A. germinans stands

  8. Microbial sulfate reduction within the Iheya North subseafloor hydrothermal system constrained by quadruple sulfur isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Shinnosuke; Nishizawa, Manabu; Takai, Ken; Ueno, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    support the significant contribution of subseafloor microbial sulfate reduction, potentially corresponding to approximately 20% of the total sulfide mineral formation. Active microbial sulfate reduction below the seafloor may be promoted by significant input of seawater to the habitats through the vigorous hydrothermal circulation in vicinity of Iheya North field.

  9. Coupled sulfur and oxygen isotope insight into bacterial sulfate reduction in the natural environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Rennie, Victoria; Herut, Barak; Sivan, Orit

    2013-10-01

    We present new sulfur and oxygen isotope data in sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4, respectively), from globally distributed marine and estuary pore fluids. We use this data with a model of the biochemical steps involved in bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) to explore how the slope on a δ18OSO4 vs. δ34SSO4 plot relates to the net sulfate reduction rate (nSRR) across a diverse range of natural environments. Our data demonstrate a correlation between the nSRR and the slope of the relative evolution of oxygen and sulfur isotopes (δ18OSO4 vs. δ34SSO4) in the residual sulfate pool, such that higher nSRR results in a lower slope (sulfur isotopes increase faster relative to oxygen isotopes). We combine these results with previously published literature data to show that this correlation scales over many orders of magnitude of nSRR. Our model of the mechanism of BSR indicates that the critical parameter for the relative evolution of oxygen and sulfur isotopes in sulfate during BSR in natural environments is the rate of intracellular sulfite oxidation. In environments where sulfate reduction is fast, such as estuaries and marginal marine environments, this sulfite reoxidation is minimal, and the δ18OSO4 increases more slowly relative to the δ34SSO4. In contrast, in environments where sulfate reduction is very slow, such as deep sea sediments, our model suggests sulfite reoxidation is far more extensive, with as much as 99% of the sulfate being thus recycled; in these environments the δ18OSO4 increases much more rapidly relative to the δ34SSO4. We speculate that the recycling of sulfite plays a physiological role during BSR, helping maintain microbial activity where the availability of the electron donor (e.g. available organic matter) is low.

  10. Thermodynamic Constraints on Sulfate Reduction and Methanogenesis in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Marquart, K. A.; Wilson, B. H.; Flynn, T. M.; Vinson, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we consider how commercial natural gas production could affect sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in coal-bearing sediments of the Cherokee Basin, Kansas, USA. Controls on the activity of these two groups of microbes are important to understand because their activity and interactions may influence methane formation and retention in unconventional reservoirs. During November 2013, we collected water and gas samples from 16 commercial gas wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. Results indicate that methane in the coalbeds formed biologically and that both methanogens and sulfate reducers are present. Gas samples consisted almost entirely of methane (C1/(C2+C3) = 2638 on avg.) and the δD and δ13C of methane averaged -222‰ VSMOW and -61‰ VPDB, respectively. Archaeal sequences in our samples were nearly all classified within groups of methanogens (avg. 91%) and cultivable methanogens were present in all water samples. On average, 6% of the bacterial sequences from our samples were classified in groups of sulfate reducers and sulfate available to support their activity ranged up to 110 μM in concentration. Any interaction that occurs between these groups may be influenced by the energetics of their metabolic reactions. Thermodynamic calculations show that methanogens hold an energy advantage over sulfate reducers if dissolved methane concentrations are low. Under current conditions, methanogens see between 12 and 16 kJ mol-1 more usable free energy than sulfate reducers, if we assume a minimal methane concentration (1 μM). However, usable energy for methanogens would equal that available to sulfate reducers at methane concentrations ranging between 144 and 831 μM, well below saturation levels. Production activities that hold methane concentration below these levels, therefore, would help maintain an energy advantage for methanogens. In contrast, if production activities cause sulfate concentrations to increase, sulfate reducers would

  11. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.; Rittmann, B. E.; Reed, D. T.

    1999-10-21

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility.

  12. Changes in Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic Speciation Associated with Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in Ferrihydrite-Rich Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saalfield, S.; Bostick, B

    2009-01-01

    Biologically mediated redox processes have been shown to affect the mobility of iron oxide-bound arsenic in reducing aquifers. This work investigates how dissimilatory sulfate reduction and secondary iron reduction affect sulfur, iron, and arsenic speciation. Incubation experiments were conducted with As(III/V)-bearing ferrihydrite in carbonate-buffered artificial groundwater enriched with lactate (10 mM) and sulfate (0.08-10 mM) and inoculated with Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757, formerly D. desulfuricans), which reduces sulfate but not iron or arsenic. Sulfidization of ferrihydrite led to formation of magnetite, elemental sulfur, and trace iron sulfides. Observed reaction rates imply that the majority of sulfide is recycled to sulfate, promoting microbial sulfate reduction in low-sulfate systems. Despite dramatic changes in Fe and S speciation, and minimal formation of Fe or As sulfides, most As remained in the solid phase. Arsenic was not solubilized in As(V)-loaded incubations, which experienced slow As reduction by sulfide, whereas As(III)-loaded incubations showed limited and transient As release associated with iron remineralization. This suggests that As(III) production is critical to As release under reducing conditions, with sulfate reduction alone unlikely to release As. These data also suggest that bacterial reduction of As(V) is necessary for As sequestration in sulfides, even where sulfate reduction is active.

  13. The possible role of sulfate-reduction kinetics in the formation of hydrothermal uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, Charles S.

    1981-01-01

    Sulfate is known to be an active oxidizing agent at high temperatures; however, both experimental and geologic evidence indicate that as a hydrothermal solution cools (to about 200 degrees C, depending on pH) kinetic factors slow the rate at which sulfate enters into redox reactions. This retardation of sulfate reduction diminishes the effectiveness of sulfate as an oxidizing agent. Consequently, as cooling proceeds, the reducing effect of H2S (and other reduced species) is not balanced with the oxidizing effect of SO (super -2) 4 to the same extent as at higher temperatures. The result is a progressively more reducing solution, which is precisely what is needed to precipitate reduced uranium minerals and to generate the paragenetic sequence observed in these deposits. The same mechanism may apply to other types of epithermal deposits.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emission control by aerobic sulfate reduction in landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yuyang; Fang, Yuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Feng, Huajun; Chen, Ting

    2016-12-01

    H2S emissions from landfill sites resulting from sulfate reduction has become a serious human health and ecological safety issue. This study investigated H2S emission behavior and sulfate metabolism occurring in simulated landfills under different operating conditions. Under aerobic conditions, great attenuation of the original sulfate content (from around 6000 mg kg‑1 dropped to below 800 mg kg‑1) with corresponding accumulation of sulfides and elemental sulfur were observed, indicating that sulfate reduction processes were intense under such conditions. Analysis of the bacterial community in these landfills showed great abundance (1.10%) and diversity of sulfur reducing types, confirming their active involvement in this process. In particular, the total abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria increased nearly 30 times under aerobic conditions, leading to the transformation of sulfate to sulfide and other reduced sulfur species. Although exposure to air promoted the accumulation of sulfide, it did not lead to an increase in H2S release in these landfills.

  15. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emission control by aerobic sulfate reduction in landfill

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yuyang; Fang, Yuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Feng, Huajun; Chen, Ting

    2016-01-01

    H2S emissions from landfill sites resulting from sulfate reduction has become a serious human health and ecological safety issue. This study investigated H2S emission behavior and sulfate metabolism occurring in simulated landfills under different operating conditions. Under aerobic conditions, great attenuation of the original sulfate content (from around 6000 mg kg−1 dropped to below 800 mg kg−1) with corresponding accumulation of sulfides and elemental sulfur were observed, indicating that sulfate reduction processes were intense under such conditions. Analysis of the bacterial community in these landfills showed great abundance (1.10%) and diversity of sulfur reducing types, confirming their active involvement in this process. In particular, the total abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria increased nearly 30 times under aerobic conditions, leading to the transformation of sulfate to sulfide and other reduced sulfur species. Although exposure to air promoted the accumulation of sulfide, it did not lead to an increase in H2S release in these landfills. PMID:27909309

  17. Linkage of High Rates of Sulfate Reduction in Yellowstone Hot Springs to Unique Sequence Types in the Dissimilatory Sulfate Respiration Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fishbain, Susan; Dillon, Jesse G.; Gough, Heidi L.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Diversity, habitat range, and activities of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes within hot springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized using endogenous activity measurements, molecular characterization, and enrichment. Five major phylogenetic groups were identified using PCR amplification of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes (dsrAB) from springs demonstrating significant sulfate reduction rates, including a warm, acidic (pH 2.5) stream and several nearly neutral hot springs with temperatures reaching 89°C. Three of these sequence groups were unrelated to named lineages, suggesting that the diversity and habitat range of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes exceeds that now represented in culture. PMID:12788778

  18. Periplasmic Cytochrome c(3) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km 220 uM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate.

  19. Periplasmic Cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 220 μM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate- or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate. PMID:14711670

  20. Rates of microbial sulfate reduction control the sizes of biogenic iron sulfide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Sulfide minerals occur widely in freshwater and marine sediments as byproducts of microbial sulfate reduction and as end products of heavy metal bioremediation. They form when metals in the environments combine with sulfide produced from the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria. We used chemostat bioreactors to study sizes and crystal structures of iron sulfide (FeS) minerals produced by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. desulfuricans strain G20, and subspecies desulfuricans. FeS nanoparticles and their aggregates are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). FeS nanoparticles produced by sulfate reducing bacteria are extremely small, usually less than around 10 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles do not occur as individual nanoparticles, but as aggregates. The sizes of FeS aggregates are affected by sulfate reduction rates, Fe(II) concentration, pH, ionic strength, organic matter concentration, bacterial species, etc. Aggregate size ranges from about 500 nm at very large sulfate reduction rates to about 1,500 nm at very small rates. Variations in Fe(II) concentration also lead to a difference up to 500 nm in FeS aggregate size. Different bacterial species produce nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes under similar growth conditions. For example, D. vulgaris produces FeS aggregates with sizes 500 nm smaller than those by strain G20. The inverse relationship between FeS aggregate sizes and sulfate reduction rates is important in evaluating metal bioremediation strategies. Previous approaches have focused on stimulating microbial activities in natural environments. However, our experimental results suggest that increasing metabolic rates may decrease the aggregate size, increasing the mobility of colloidal aggregates. Therefore, the balance between microbial activities and sizes of biogenic aggregates may be an important consideration in the design and

  1. Combined 34S, 33S and 18O isotope fractionations record different intracellular steps of microbial sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Ono, Shuhei; Sivan, Orit; Bosak, Tanja

    2017-04-01

    Several enzymatic steps in microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) fractionate the isotope ratios of 33S/32S, 34S/32S and 18O/16O in extracellular sulfate, but the effects of different intracellular processes on the isotopic composition of residual sulfate are still not well quantified. We measured combined multiple sulfur (33S/32S, 34S/32S) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope ratios of sulfate in pure cultures of a marine sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio sp. DMSS-1 grown on different organic substrates. These measurements are consistent with the previously reported correlations of oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionations with the cell-specific rate of MSR: faster reduction rates produced smaller isotopic fractionations for all isotopes. Combined isotope fractionation of oxygen and multiple sulfur isotopes are also consistent with the relationship between the rate limiting step during microbial sulfate reduction and the availability of the DsrC subunit. These experiments help reconstruct and interpret processes that operate in natural pore waters characterized by high 18O/16O and moderate 34S/32S ratios and suggest that some multiple isotope signals in the environment cannot be explained by microbial sulfate reduction alone. Instead, these signals support the presence of active, but slow sulfate reduction as well as the reoxidation of sulfide.

  2. Characterizing the distribution and rates of microbial sulfate reduction at Middle Valley hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Daniel R; Olins, Heather C; Vidoudez, Charles; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-07-01

    Few studies have directly measured sulfate reduction at hydrothermal vents, and relatively little is known about how environmental or ecological factors influence rates of sulfate reduction in vent environments. A better understanding of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be achieved by integrating ecological and geochemical data with metabolic rate measurements. Here we present rates of microbially mediated sulfate reduction from three distinct hydrothermal vents in the Middle Valley vent field along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, as well as assessments of bacterial and archaeal diversity, estimates of total biomass and the abundance of functional genes related to sulfate reduction, and in situ geochemistry. Maximum rates of sulfate reduction occurred at 90 °C in all three deposits. Pyrosequencing and functional gene abundance data revealed differences in both biomass and community composition among sites, including differences in the abundance of known sulfate-reducing bacteria. The abundance of sequences for Thermodesulfovibro-like organisms and higher sulfate reduction rates at elevated temperatures suggests that Thermodesulfovibro-like organisms may have a role in sulfate reduction in warmer environments. The rates of sulfate reduction presented here suggest that--within anaerobic niches of hydrothermal deposits--heterotrophic sulfate reduction may be quite common and might contribute substantially to secondary productivity, underscoring the potential role of this process in both sulfur and carbon cycling at vents.

  3. Characterizing the distribution and rates of microbial sulfate reduction at Middle Valley hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Daniel R; Olins, Heather C; Vidoudez, Charles; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have directly measured sulfate reduction at hydrothermal vents, and relatively little is known about how environmental or ecological factors influence rates of sulfate reduction in vent environments. A better understanding of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be achieved by integrating ecological and geochemical data with metabolic rate measurements. Here we present rates of microbially mediated sulfate reduction from three distinct hydrothermal vents in the Middle Valley vent field along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, as well as assessments of bacterial and archaeal diversity, estimates of total biomass and the abundance of functional genes related to sulfate reduction, and in situ geochemistry. Maximum rates of sulfate reduction occurred at 90 °C in all three deposits. Pyrosequencing and functional gene abundance data revealed differences in both biomass and community composition among sites, including differences in the abundance of known sulfate-reducing bacteria. The abundance of sequences for Thermodesulfovibro-like organisms and higher sulfate reduction rates at elevated temperatures suggests that Thermodesulfovibro-like organisms may have a role in sulfate reduction in warmer environments. The rates of sulfate reduction presented here suggest that—within anaerobic niches of hydrothermal deposits—heterotrophic sulfate reduction may be quite common and might contribute substantially to secondary productivity, underscoring the potential role of this process in both sulfur and carbon cycling at vents. PMID:23535916

  4. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Roden, E.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve enough energy to support growth from this reaction. However, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans metabolized H2 down to lower concentrations with Fe(III) or U(VI) as the electron acceptor than with sulfate, suggesting that these metals may be preferred electron acceptors at the low H2 concentrations present in most marine sediments. Molybdate did not inhibit Fe(III) reduction by D. desulfuricans. This indicates that the inability of molybdate to inhibit Fe(III) reduction in marine sediments does not rule out the possibility that SRB are important catalysts for Fe(III) reduction. The results demonstrate that although SRB were previously considered to reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) indirectly through the production of sulfide, they may also directly reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) through enzymatic mechanisms. These findings, as well as our recent discovery that the So-reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans can reduce Fe(III), demonstrate that there are close links between the microbial sulfur, iron, and uranium cycles in anaerobic marine sediments. ?? 1993.

  5. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: I. KINETIC STUDIES AND EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six anaerobic chemostats containing mixed microbial cultures were used to investigate the interactions between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis for three substrates: acetic acid, methanol and formic acid. Sulfate reducers outcompeted methanogens in acetate-fed chemostats whil...

  6. [Sulfate reduction and microbial processes of the methane cycle in the sediments of the Sevastopol bay].

    PubMed

    Pimenov, N V; Egorov, V N; Kanapatskiĭ, T A; Malakhova, T V; Artemov, Iu G; Sigalevich, P A; Malakhova, L V

    2013-01-01

    The rates of microbial processes of sulfate reduction and of the methane cycle were measured in the bottom sediments of the Sevastopol basin, where seeps of gaseous methane have been previously found. Typically for marine environments, sulfate reduction played the major role in the terminal phase of decomposition of organic matter (OM) in reduced sediments of this area. The rate of this process depended on the amount of available OM. The rate of methanogenesis in the sediments increased with depth, peaking in the subsurface horizons, where decreased sulfate concentration was detected in the pore water. The highest rates of sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation were found close to the methane-sulfate transition zone as is typical of most investigated marine sediments. The data on the carbon isotopic composition of gaseous methane from the seeps and dissolved CH4 from the bottom sediments, as well as on the rates of microbial methanogenesis and methane oxidation indicate that the activity of the methane seeps results from accumulation of biogenic methane in the cavities of the underlying geological structures with subsequent periodic release of methane bubbles into the water column.

  7. Methanogenesis and sulfate reduction: Competitive and noncompetitive substrates in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Polcin, Sandra

    1982-01-01

    Sulfate ions did not inhibit methanogenesis in estuarine sediments supplemented with methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine. However, sulfate greatly retarded methanogenesis when hydrogen or acetate was the substrate. Sulfate reduction was stimulated by acetate, hydrogen, and acetate plus hydrogen, but not by methanol or trimethylamine. These results indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria will outcompete methanogens for hydrogen, acetate, or both, but will not compete with methanogens for compounds like methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine, thereby allowing methanogenesis and sulfate reduction to operate simultaneously within anoxic, sulfate-containing sediments.

  8. Sulfate assimilation mediates tellurite reduction and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, Lars-Göran; Logg, Katarina; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Sunnerhagen, Per; Käll, Mikael; Blomberg, Anders; Warringer, Jonas

    2010-10-01

    Despite a century of research and increasing environmental and human health concerns, the mechanistic basis of the toxicity of derivatives of the metalloid tellurium, Te, in particular the oxyanion tellurite, Te(IV), remains unsolved. Here, we provide an unbiased view of the mechanisms of tellurium metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring deviations in Te-related traits of a complete collection of gene knockout mutants. Reduction of Te(IV) and intracellular accumulation as metallic tellurium strongly correlated with loss of cellular fitness, suggesting that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity are causally linked. The sulfate assimilation pathway upstream of Met17, in particular, the sulfite reductase and its cofactor siroheme, was shown to be central to tellurite toxicity and its reduction to elemental tellurium. Gene knockout mutants with altered Te(IV) tolerance also showed a similar deviation in tolerance to both selenite and, interestingly, selenomethionine, suggesting that the toxicity of these agents stems from a common mechanism. We also show that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity in yeast is partially mediated via a mitochondrial respiratory mechanism that does not encompass the generation of substantial oxidative stress. The results reported here represent a robust base from which to attack the mechanistic details of Te(IV) toxicity and reduction in a eukaryotic organism.

  9. Impact of clay minerals on sulfate-reducing activity in aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, D.; Suflita, J.M.; McKinley, J.P.; Krumholz, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sulfate-reduction activity occurs in a heterogeneous manner throughout the terrestrial subsurface. Low-activity regions are often observed in the presence of clay minerals. Here we report that clays inhibit sulfate reduction activity in sediments and in a pure culture of Desulfovibriovulgaris. Clay minerals including bentonite and kaolinite inhibited sulfate reduction by 70–90% in sediments. Intact clays and clay colloids or soluble components, capable of passing through a 0.2-µm filter, were also inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Other adsorbent materials, including anion or cation exchangers and a zeolite, did not inhibit sulfate reduction in sediments, suggesting that the effect of clays was not due to their cation-exchange capacity. We observed a strong correlation between the Al2O3content of clays and their relative ability to inhibit sulfate reduction in sediments (r2 = 0.82). This suggested that inhibition might be a direct effect of Al3+ (aq) on the bacteria. We then tested pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and showed it to act in a similar manner to clay. As dissolved aluminum is known to be toxic to a variety of organisms at low concentrations, our results suggest that the effects of clay on sulfate-reducing bacteria may be directly due to aluminum. Thus, our experiments provide an explanation for the lack of sulfate-reduction activity in clay-rich regions and presents a mechanism for the effect.

  10. A New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D; Wall, Judy D.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the encoding gene, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycAor the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase, QrcABCD transmembrane complex. In contrast to the wild type, neither CycA and QrcA mutants do not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are essential D. alaskensis components for transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  11. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Keller, Kimberly L; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  12. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J.; Semkiw, Elizabeth S.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-02-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  13. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  14. Hexavalent chromium reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough causes transitory inhibition of sulfate reduction and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Klonowska, A; Clark, M E; Thieman, S B; Giles, B J; Wall, J D; Fields, M W

    2008-04-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a well-studied sulfate reducer that can reduce heavy metals and radionuclides [e.g., Cr(VI) and U(VI)]. Cultures grown in a defined medium had a lag period of approximately 30 h when exposed to 0.05 mM Cr(VI). Substrate analyses revealed that although Cr(VI) was reduced within the first 5 h, growth was not observed for an additional 20 h. The growth lag could be explained by a decline in cell viability; however, during this time small amounts of lactate were still utilized without sulfate reduction or acetate formation. Approximately 40 h after Cr exposure (0.05 mM), sulfate reduction occurred concurrently with the accumulation of acetate. Similar amounts of hydrogen were produced by Cr-exposed cells compared to control cells, and lactate was not converted to glycogen during non-growth conditions. D. vulgaris cells treated with a reducing agent and then exposed to Cr(VI) still experienced a growth lag, but the addition of ascorbate at the time of Cr(VI) addition prevented the lag period. In addition, cells grown on pyruvate displayed more tolerance to Cr(VI) compared to lactate-grown cells. These results indicated that D. vulgaris utilized lactate during Cr(VI) exposure without the reduction of sulfate or production of acetate, and that ascorbate and pyruvate could protect D. vulgaris cells from Cr(VI)/Cr(III) toxicity.

  15. Effects of copper on sulfate reduction in bacterial consortia enriched from metal-contaminated and uncontaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Drever, James I; Colberg, Patricia J S

    2007-02-01

    The effects of copper amendments on bacterial sulfate reduction in enrichment cultures obtained from two types of freshwater sediment were examined. Sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) consortia were enriched from pond sediment with no known history of metal contamination (uncontaminated) and from reservoir sediment with a well-documented history of metal contamination (metal-contaminated). The rates and extent of sulfate reduction in each sediment type in the absence of added copper were indistinguishable. With amendments of 0.8 mg/L copper, no inhibitory effects on sulfate reduction were observed in either consortium type. At 8.0 mg/L copper, activity in uncontaminated SRB consortia was significantly inhibited, as evidenced by a delay in and decreased rate of sulfate reduction; sulfidogenesis in metal-contaminated consortia was apparently unaffected. When the dissolved copper concentration was 30.0 mg/L, sulfidogenic activity in pond sediment consortia was completely inhibited. The rate of sulfate reduction temporarily decreased in the metal-contaminated enrichments but recovered after a short time. In active microcosms, copper was precipitated as CuS. The results of this study suggest that SRB from metal-contaminated environments have a markedly higher metal tolerance than those enriched from uncontaminated environments. The most significant inference from this work is that metal sulfide formation alone does not explain observed differences in metal tolerance between SRB consortia enriched from uncontaminated sediments and those that are derived from metal-contaminated sediments.

  16. Effect of sulfide removal on sulfate reduction at pH 5 in a hydrogen fed gas-lift bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Bijmans, Martijn F M; Dopson, Mark; Ennin, Frederick; Lens, Piet N L; Buisman, Cees J N

    2008-11-01

    Biotechnological treatment of sulfate- and metal-ionscontaining acidic wastewaters from mining and metallurgical activities utilizes sulfate-reducing bacteria to produce sulfide that can subsequently precipitate metal ions. Reducing sulfate at a low pH has several advantages above neutrophilic sulfate reduction. This study describes the effect of sulfide removal on the reactor performance and microbial community in a high-rate sulfidogenic gas-lift bioreactor fed with hydrogen at a controlled internal pH of 5. Under sulfide removal conditions, 99% of the sulfate was converted at a hydraulic retention time of 24 h, reaching a volumetric activity as high as 51 mmol sulfate/l/d. Under nonsulfide removal conditions, <25% of the sulfate was converted at a hydraulic retention time of 24 h reaching volumetric activities of <13mmol sulfate/l/d. The absence of sulfide removal at a hydraulic retention time of 24 h resulted in an average H2S concentration of 18.2 mM (584 mg S/l). The incomplete sulfate removal was probably due to sulfide inhibition. Molecular phylogenetic analysis identified 11 separate 16S rRNA bands under sulfide stripping conditions, whereas under nonsulfide removal conditions only 4 separate 16S rRNA bands were found. This shows that a less diverse population was found in the presence of a high sulfide concentration.

  17. The effects of acid deposition on sulfate reduction and methane production in peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Georgia L.; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Peatlands, as fens and bods, make up a large percentage of northern latitude terrestrial environments. They are organic rich and support an active community of anaerobic bacteria, such as methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The end products of these microbial activities, methane and hydrogen sulfide, are important components in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. Since these two bacterial groups compete for nutritional substrates, increases in sulfate deposition due to acid rain potentially can disrupt the balance between these processes leading to a decrease in methane production and emission. This is significant because methane is a potent greenhouse gas that effects the global heat balance. A section of Mire 239 in the Experimental Lakes Area, in Northwestern Ontario, was artificially acidified and rates of sulfate reduction and methane production were measured with depth. Preliminary results suggested that methane production was not affected immediately after acidification. However, concentrations of dissolved methane decreased and dissolved sulfide increased greatly after acidification and both took several days to recover. The exact mechanism for the decrease in methane was not determined. Analyses are under way which will be used to determine rates of sulfate reduction. These results will be available by Spring and will be discussed.

  18. Modeling sulfate reduction in methane hydrate-bearing continental margin sediments: Does a sulfate-methane transition require anaerobic oxidation of methane?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malinverno, A.; Pohlman, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition (SMT), a biogeochemical zone where sulfate and methane are metabolized, is commonly observed at shallow depths (1-30 mbsf) in methane-bearing marine sediments. Two processes consume sulfate at and above the SMT, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulfate reduction (OSR). Differentiating the relative contribution of each process is critical to estimate methane flux into the SMT, which, in turn, is necessary to predict deeper occurrences of gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. To evaluate the relative importance of these two sulfate reduction pathways, we developed a diagenetic model to compute the pore water concentrations of sulfate, methane, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). By separately tracking DIC containing 12C and 13C, the model also computes ??13C-DIC values. The model reproduces common observations from methane-rich sediments: a well-defined SMT with no methane above and no sulfate below and a ??13C-DIC minimum at the SMT. The model also highlights the role of upward diffusing 13C-enriched DIC in contributing to the carbon isotope mass balance of DIC. A combination of OSR and AOM, each consuming similar amounts of sulfate, matches observations from Site U1325 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311, northern Cascadia margin). Without AOM, methane diffuses above the SMT, which contradicts existing field data. The modeling results are generalized with a dimensional analysis to the range of SMT depths and sedimentation rates typical of continental margins. The modeling shows that AOM must be active to establish an SMT wherein methane is quantitatively consumed and the ??13C-DIC minimum occurs. The presence of an SMT generally requires active AOM. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Abundant carbon substrates drive extremely high sulfate reduction rates and methane fluxes in Prairie Pothole Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dalcin Martins, Paula; Hoyt, David W; Bansal, Sheel; Mills, Christopher T; Tfaily, Malak; Tangen, Brian A; Finocchiaro, Raymond G; Johnston, Michael D; McAdams, Brandon C; Solensky, Matthew J; Smith, Garrett J; Chin, Yu-Ping; Wilkins, Michael J

    2017-01-24

    Inland waters are increasingly recognized as critical sites of methane emissions to the atmosphere, but the biogeochemical reactions driving such fluxes are less well understood. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is one of the largest wetland complexes in the world, containing millions of small, shallow wetlands. The sediment pore waters of PPR wetlands contain some of the highest concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and sulfur species ever recorded in terrestrial aquatic environments. Using a suite of geochemical and microbiological analyses, we measured the impact of sedimentary carbon and sulfur transformations in these wetlands on methane fluxes to the atmosphere. This research represents the first study of coupled geochemistry and microbiology within the PPR and demonstrates how the conversion of abundant labile DOC pools into methane results in some of the highest fluxes of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere ever reported. Abundant DOC and sulfate additionally supported some of the highest sulfate reduction rates ever measured in terrestrial aquatic environments, which we infer to account for a large fraction of carbon mineralization in this system. Methane accumulations in zones of active sulfate reduction may be due to either the transport of free methane gas from deeper locations or the co-occurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. If both respiratory processes are concurrent, any competitive inhibition of methanogenesis by sulfate-reducing bacteria may be lessened by the presence of large labile DOC pools that yield noncompetitive substrates such as methanol. Our results reveal some of the underlying mechanisms that make PPR wetlands biogeochemical hotspots, which ultimately leads to their critical, but poorly recognized role in regional greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. Lead removal and toxicity reduction from industrial wastewater through biological sulfate reduction process.

    PubMed

    Teekayuttasakul, Paphungkorn; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2008-10-01

    The practicability of lead removal from sulfate-rich wastewater through biological sulfate reduction process with hydrogen as electron donor was investigated. Sulfide, which was converted from sulfate by a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in a gas-lift reactor, was used to remove lead as lead sulfide precipitate. Furthermore, the toxicity of wastewater in terms of whole effluent toxicity (WET) before and after treatment was analyzed by using Microtox analyzer. The experiment was divided into three stages as follows: Stage I, startup and operation of sulfidogenic process fed with synthetic wastewater in a gas-lift reactor; Stage II, operation of sulfidogenic process fed with real wastewater in the same reactor and analysis of toxicity; and Stage III, separation of lead from wastewater. In stage I, the volumetric sulfate-sulfur loading rate was gradually increased from 1.0 g/L.d until no improvement of sulfide-sulfur production efficiency was evident at 2.58 g/L.d and maximum sulfide-sulfur concentration was set to 340 mg/L. In stage II, the results showed that the laboratory scale reactor could treat a real wastewater without inhibition or any remarkable problem. The produced sulfide-sulfur, 200 mg/L, was a little less in comparison with that of the previous stage. It could be due to the higher concentration of total dissolved solid (TDS). However, the sulfate concentration was still reduced by approximately 30%. The WET test by Microtox showed that toxicity was reduced more than 13 times. In stage III, the effluent from the reactor containing sulfide-sulfur of about 200 mg/L and lead-containing solution of 20 mg/L were fed with sulfide to lead ratio 3 moles: 1 mole into the precipitation chamber in which the optimum pH for lead sulfide precipitation of 8.0 was maintained. It was found that lead removal of 99% was attained.

  1. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Bela; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schreck, Katharina; Tringe, Susannah G; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands is sustained by a cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16-174 nmol cm(-3) per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (⩾0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. Most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems.

  2. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Hausmann, Bela; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schreck, Katharina; Tringe, Susannah G.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael

    2016-03-25

    A cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways sustains dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16–174 nmol cm–3 per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (greater than or equal to0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. The most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems.

  3. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms

    DOE PAGES

    Hausmann, Bela; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schreck, Katharina; ...

    2016-03-25

    A cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways sustains dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16–174 nmol cm–3 per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (greater than or equal to0.1%more » estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. The most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems.« less

  4. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, Bela; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schreck, Katharina; Tringe, Susannah G; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands is sustained by a cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16–174 nmol cm–3 per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (⩾0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. Most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems. PMID:27015005

  5. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Potential in Coal-Bearing Sediments Down to ~2.5 km below the Seafloor off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Glombitza, Clemens; Adhikari, Rishi R.; Riedinger, Natascha; Gilhooly, William P.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Inagaki, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate reduction is the predominant anaerobic microbial process of organic matter mineralization in marine sediments, with recent studies revealing that sulfate reduction not only occurs in sulfate-rich sediments, but even extends to deeper, methanogenic sediments at very low background concentrations of sulfate. Using samples retrieved off the Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337, we measured potential sulfate reduction rates by slurry incubations with 35S-labeled sulfate in deep methanogenic sediments between 1276.75 and 2456.75 meters below the seafloor. Potential sulfate reduction rates were generally extremely low (mostly below 0.1 pmol cm−3 d−1) but showed elevated values (up to 1.8 pmol cm−3 d−1) in a coal-bearing interval (Unit III). A measured increase in hydrogenase activity in the coal-bearing horizons coincided with this local increase in potential sulfate reduction rates. This paired enzymatic response suggests that hydrogen is a potentially important electron donor for sulfate reduction in the deep coalbed biosphere. By contrast, no stimulation of sulfate reduction rates was observed in treatments where methane was added as an electron donor. In the deep coalbeds, small amounts of sulfate might be provided by a cryptic sulfur cycle. The isotopically very heavy pyrites (δ34S = +43‰) found in this horizon is consistent with its formation via microbial sulfate reduction that has been continuously utilizing a small, increasingly 34S-enriched sulfate reservoir over geologic time scales. Although our results do not represent in-situ activity, and the sulfate reducers might only have persisted in a dormant, spore-like state, our findings show that organisms capable of sulfate reduction have survived in deep methanogenic sediments over more than 20 Ma. This highlights the ability of sulfate-reducers to persist over geological timespans even in sulfate-depleted environments. Our study

  6. Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in organic-rich sediments.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K S; Canfield, D E

    1997-12-01

    Isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated in the cyanobacterial microbial mats of Solar Lake, Sinai and the sediments of Logten Lagoon sulfuretum, Denmark. Fractionation was measured at different sediment depths, sulfate concentrations, and incubation temperatures. Rates of sulfate reduction varied between 0.1 and 37 micromoles cm-3 d-1, with the highest rates among the highest ever reported from natural sediments. The depletion of 34S during dissimilatory sulfate reduction ranged from 16% to 42%, with the largest 34S-depletions associated with the lowest rates of sulfate reduction and the lowest 34S-depletions with the highest rates. However, at high sulfate reduction rates (>10 micromoles cm-3 d-1) the lowest fractionation was 20% independent of the rates. Overall, there was a similarity between the fractionation obtained by the natural populations of sulfate reducers and previous measurements from pure cultures. This was somewhat surprising given the extremely high rates of sulfate reduction in the experiments. Our results are explained if we conclude that the fractionation was mainly controlled by the specific rate of sulfate reduction (mass cell-1 time-1) and not by the absolute rate (mass volume-1 time-1). Sedimentary sulfides (mainly FeS2) were on average 40% depleted in 34S compared to seawater sulfate. This amount of depletion was more than could be explained by the isotopic fractionations that we measured during bacterial sulfate reduction. Therefore, additional processes contributing to the fractionation of sulfur isotopes in the sediments are indicated. From both Solar Lake and Logten Lagoon we were able to enrich cultures of elemental sulfur-disproportionating bacteria. We suggest that isotope fractionation accompanying elemental sulfur disproportionation contributes to the 34S depletion of sedimentary sulfides at our study sites.

  7. Kinetics of uncatalyzed thermochemical sulfate reduction by sulfur-free paraffin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Amrani, Alon; Tang, Yongchun

    2012-01-01

    To determine kinetic parameters of sulfate reduction by hydrocarbons (HC) without the initial presence of low valence sulfur, we carried out a series of isothermal gold-tube hydrous-pyrolysis experiments at 320, 340, and 360 °C under a constant confined pressure of 24.1 MPa. The reactants used consisted of saturated HC (sulfur-free) and CaSO4 in an aqueous solution buffered to three different pH conditions without the addition of elemental sulfur (S8) or H2S as initiators. H2S produced in the course of reaction was proportional to the extent of the reduction of CaSO4 that was initially the only sulfur-containing reactant. Our results show that the in situ pH of the aqueous solution (herein, in situ pH refers to the calculated pH value of the aqueous solution at certain experimental conditions) can significantly affect the rate of the thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) reaction. A substantial increase in the TSR reaction rate was observed with a decrease in the in situ pH. Our experimental results show that uncatalyzed TSR is a first-order reaction. The temperature dependence of experimentally measured H2S yields from sulfate reduction was fit with the Arrhenius equation. The determined activation energy for HC (sulfur-free) reacting with View the MathML sourceHSO4− in our experiments is 246.6 kJ/mol at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 3.5, which is slightly higher than the theoretical value of 227.0 kJ/mol using ab initio quantum chemical calculations on a similar reaction. Although the availability of reactive sulfate significantly affects the rate of reaction, a consistent rate constant was determined by accounting for the HSO4− ion concentration. Our experimental and theoretical approach to the determination of the kinetics of TSR is further validated by a reevaluation of several published experimental TSR datasets without the initial presence of native sulfur or H2S. When the effect of reactive sulfate concentration is appropriately accounted for, the

  8. Impact of sulfation and desulfation on NOx reduction using Cu-chabazite SCR catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshear, Daniel William; Nam, Jeong -Gil; Nguyen, Ke; Toops, Todd J.; Binder, Andrew J.

    2015-06-05

    This bench reactor study investigates the impact of gaseous sulfur on the NOx reduction activity of Cu-chabazite SCR (Cu-CHA) catalysts at SO2 concentrations representative of marine diesel engine exhaust. After two hours of 500 ppm SO2 exposure at 250 and 400 °C in the simulated diesel exhaust gases, the NOx reduction activity of the sulfated Cu-CHA SCR catalysts is severely degraded at evaluation temperatures below 250 °C; however, above 250 °C the impact of sulfur exposure is minimal. EPMA shows that sulfur is located throughout the washcoat and along the entire length of the sulfated samples. Interestingly, BET measurements reveal that the sulfated samples have a 20% decrease in surface area. Moreover, the sulfated samples show a decrease in NOx/nitrate absorption during NO exposure in a DRIFTS reactor which suggests that Cu sites in the catalyst are blocked by the presence of sulfur. SO2 exposure also results in an increase in NH3 storage capacity, possibly due to the formation of ammonium sulfate species in the sulfated samples. In all cases, lean thermal treatments as low as 500 °C reverse the effects of sulfur exposure and restore the NOx reduction activity of the Cu-CHA catalyst to that of the fresh condition.

  9. Thermophilic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis with methanol in a high rate anaerobic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Pol, L.W.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2000-02-05

    Sulfate reduction outcompeted methanogenesis at 65 C and pH 7.5 in methanol and sulfate-fed expanded granular sludge bed reactors operated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 14 and 2.5 h, both under methanol-limiting and methanol-overloading conditions. After 100 and 50 days for the reactors operated at 14 and 3.5 h, respectively, sulfide production accounted for 80% of the methanol-COD consumed by the sludge. The specific methanogenic activity on methanol of the sludge from a reactor operated at HRTs of down to 3.5 h for a period of 4 months gradually decreased from 0.83 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} at the start to a value of less than 0.05 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1}, showing that the relative number of methanogens decreased and eventually became very low. By contrast, the increase of the specific sulfidogenic activity of sludge from 0.22 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} to a final value of 1.05 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} showed that sulfate reducing bacteria were enriched. Methanol degradation by a methanogenic culture obtained from a reactor by serial dilution of the sludge was inhibited in the presence of vancomycin, indicating that methanogenesis directly from methanogenic culture obtained from a reactor by serial dilution of the sludge was inhibited in the presence of vancomycin, indicating that methanogenesis directly from methanol was not important. H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate, but not acetate, were degraded to methane in the presence of vancomycin. These results indicated that methanol degradation to methane occurs via the intermediates H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate. The high and low specific methanogenic activity of sludge on H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate, respectively, indicated that the former substrate probably acts as the main electron donor for the methanogens during methanol degradation. As

  10. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  11. Eutrophication, microbial-sulfate reduction and mass extinctions

    PubMed Central

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Ghaderi, Abbas; Strauss, Harald; Korn, Dieter; Korte, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In post-Cambrian time, life on Earth experienced 5 major extinction events, likely instigated by adverse environmental conditions. Biodiversity loss among marine taxa, for at least 3 of these mass extinction events (Late Devonian, end-Permian and end-Triassic), has been connected with widespread oxygen-depleted and sulfide-bearing marine water. Furthermore, geochemical and sedimentary evidence suggest that these events correlate with rather abrupt climate warming and possibly increased terrestrial weathering. This suggests that biodiversity loss may be triggered by mechanisms intrinsic to the Earth system, notably, the biogeochemical sulfur and carbon cycle. This climate warming feedback produces large-scale eutrophication on the continental shelf, which, in turn, expands oxygen minimum zones by increased respiration, which can turn to a sulfidic state by increased microbial-sulfate reduction due to increased availability of organic matter. A plankton community turnover from a high-diversity eukaryote to high-biomass bacterial dominated food web is the catalyst proposed in this anoxia-extinction scenario and stands in stark contrast to the postulated productivity collapse suggested for the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. This cascade of events is relevant for the future ocean under predicted greenhouse driven climate change. The exacerbation of anoxic “dead” zones is already progressing in modern oceanic environments, and this is likely to increase due to climate induced continental weathering and resulting eutrophication of the oceans. PMID:27066181

  12. Eutrophication, microbial-sulfate reduction and mass extinctions.

    PubMed

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Ghaderi, Abbas; Strauss, Harald; Korn, Dieter; Korte, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In post-Cambrian time, life on Earth experienced 5 major extinction events, likely instigated by adverse environmental conditions. Biodiversity loss among marine taxa, for at least 3 of these mass extinction events (Late Devonian, end-Permian and end-Triassic), has been connected with widespread oxygen-depleted and sulfide-bearing marine water. Furthermore, geochemical and sedimentary evidence suggest that these events correlate with rather abrupt climate warming and possibly increased terrestrial weathering. This suggests that biodiversity loss may be triggered by mechanisms intrinsic to the Earth system, notably, the biogeochemical sulfur and carbon cycle. This climate warming feedback produces large-scale eutrophication on the continental shelf, which, in turn, expands oxygen minimum zones by increased respiration, which can turn to a sulfidic state by increased microbial-sulfate reduction due to increased availability of organic matter. A plankton community turnover from a high-diversity eukaryote to high-biomass bacterial dominated food web is the catalyst proposed in this anoxia-extinction scenario and stands in stark contrast to the postulated productivity collapse suggested for the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. This cascade of events is relevant for the future ocean under predicted greenhouse driven climate change. The exacerbation of anoxic "dead" zones is already progressing in modern oceanic environments, and this is likely to increase due to climate induced continental weathering and resulting eutrophication of the oceans.

  13. Evolution of the Microbial Community Structure and Iron Reduction Rate in a Column Biostimulation Experiment During the Transition From Iron to Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Elbishlawi, H.; Hettich, R. L.; Kerkhof, L.; Komlos, J.; Kukkadapu, R. P.; Lipton, M. S.; Long, P. E.; McGuinness, L.; Moon, H.; Peacock, A. D.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Williams, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    During the biostimulation of iron reducers for the purpose of concurrent biological reduction of U(VI), it has been postulated that iron reduction proceeds while bioavailable iron is present, after which the system switches to sulfate reduction if sulfate is present. Field experiments from the Rifle Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site in Colorado showing that the onset of sulfate reduction has been associated with decreased removal of U(VI) from groundwater support this hypothesis. However, column experiments using sediments from the Rifle site and synthetic groundwater with comparable (7 mM) sulfate levels as in the field, showed that the onset of sulfate reduction occurred within a month with no negative effect on U(VI) reduction. Separate column experiments using low (9 uM) sulfate concentrations showed that iron reduction can be maintained for over 200 days with no indication of iron limitations. To address the discrepancy between field and column experiments, an experiment is being conducted to determine the activity of iron reducers before and after the onset of sulfate reduction. Since Fe(II) buildup is difficult to quantify in the presence of sulfate reduction, the sediments were augmented with Fe- 57 goethite. Minute changes in the Fe-57 goethite can be detected via Mössbauer spectroscopy. Ten columns (2.5 cm internal diameter and 15 cm in length), loaded with sediment from the Rifle site, have been set up and are being operated at 17 °C. Groundwater from the Rifle site, amended with 3mM acetate and 20 μM U(VI), is pumped through the columns at a rate of 0.035 ml/min. Column effluent concentrations are being monitored for acetate, Fe(II), U(VI), and sulfate. Columns are sacrificed at 10 day intervals and the sediment samples are analyzed for Fe(II), U(IV), and acid volatile sulfides using standard analytical procedures. Changes in Fe-57 goethite measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy during biostimulation of the native microorganisms at 10-day

  14. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, C.D.; Wilkin, R.T.; Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Blaine, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 ??? heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. ?? 2007 Church et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. In Situ Rates of Sulfate Reduction in Response to Geochemical Perturbations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kneeshaw, T.A.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Smith, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    Rates of in situ microbial sulfate reduction in response to geochemical perturbations were determined using Native Organism Geochemical Experimentation Enclosures (NOGEEs), a new in situ technique developed to facilitate evaluation of controls on microbial reaction rates. NOGEEs function by first trapping a native microbial community in situ and then subjecting it to geochemical perturbations through the introduction of various test solutions. On three occasions, NOGEEs were used at the Norman Landfill research site in Norman, Oklahoma, to evaluate sulfate-reduction rates in wetland sediments impacted by landfill leachate. The initial experiment, in May 2007, consisted of five introductions of a sulfate test solution over 11 d. Each test stimulated sulfate reduction with rates increasing until an apparent maximum was achieved. Two subsequent experiments, conducted in October 2007 and February 2008, evaluated the effects of concentration on sulfate-reduction rates. Results from these experiments showed that faster sulfate-reduction rates were associated with increased sulfate concentrations. Understanding variability in sulfate-reduction rates in response to perturbations may be an important factor in predicting rates of natural attenuation and bioremediation of contaminants in systems not at biogeochemical equilibrium. Copyright ?? 2011 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2011 National Ground Water Association.

  16. Hexavalent chromium reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough causes transitory inhibition of sulfate reduction and cellgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Klonowska, A.; Clark, M.E.; Thieman, S.B.; Giles, B.J.; Wall,J.D.; Fields, M.W.

    2008-01-07

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a well-studiedsulfate reducer that can reduce heavy metals and radionuclides [e.g.,Cr(VI) and U(VI)]. Cultures grown in a defined medium had a lag period ofapproximately 30 h when exposed to 0.05 mM Cr(VI). Substrate analysesrevealed that although Cr(VI) was reduced within the first 5 h, growthwas not observed for an additional 20 h. The growth lag could beexplained by a decline in cell viability; however, during this time smallamounts of lactate were still utilized without sulfate reduction oracetate formation. Approximately 40 h after Cr exposure (0.05 mM),sulfate reduction occurred concurrently with the accumulation of acetate.Similar amounts of hydrogen were produced by Cr-exposed cells compared tocontrol cells, and lactate was not converted to glycogen duringnon-growth conditions. D. vulgaris cells treated with a reducing agentand then exposed to Cr(VI) still experienced a growth lag, but theaddition of ascorbate at the time of Cr(VI) addition prevented the lagperiod. In addition, cells grown on pyruvate displayed more tolerance toCr(VI) compared to lactate-grown cells. These results indicated that D.vulgaris utilized lactate during Cr(VI) exposure without the reduction ofsulfate or production of acetate, and that ascorbate and pyruvate couldprotect D. vulgaris cells from Cr(VI)/Cr(III) toxicity.

  17. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  18. Bacterial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate and sulfate in meromictic Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Dowdle, P.R.; Hoeft, S.; Sharp, J.O.; Schaefer, J.K.; Miller, L.G.; Switzer, Blum J.; Smith, R.L.; Bloom, N.S.; Wallschlaeger, D.

    2000-01-01

    The stratified (meromictic) water column of alkaline and hypersaline Mono Lake, California, contains high concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic (~200 ??mol/L). Arsenic speciation changes from arsenate [As (V)] to arsenite [As (III)] with the transition from oxic surface waters (misolimnion) to anoxic bottom waters (monimolimnion). A radioassay was devised to measure the reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) and tested using cell suspensions of the As (V)-respiring Bacillus selenitireducens, which completely reduced the 73As (V). In field experiments, no significant activity was noted in the aerobic mixolimnion waters, but reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) was observed in all the monimolimnion samples. Rate constants ranged from 0.02 to 0.3/day, with the highest values in the samples from the deepest depths (24 and 28 m). The highest activities occurred between 18 and 21 m, where As (V) abundant (rate, ~5.9 ??mol/L per day). In contrast, sulfate reduction occurred at depths below 21 m, with the highest rates attained at 28 m (rate, ~2.3 ??mol/L per day). These results indicate that As (V) ranks second in importance, after sulfate, as an electron acceptor for anaerobic bacterial respiration in the water column. Annual arsenate respiration may mineralize as much as 14.2% of the pelagic photosynthetic carbon fixed during meromixis. When combined with sulfate-reduction data, anaerobic respiration in the water column can mineralize 32-55% of this primary production. As lakes of this type approach salt saturation, As (V) can become the most important electron acceptor for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. Bacterial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate and sulfate in meromictic Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Dowdle, Philip R.; Hoeft, Shelly; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Schaefer, Jeffra K.; Miller, Laurence G.; Switzer Blum, Jodi; Smith, Richard L.; Bloom, Nicholas S.; Wallschlaeger, Dirk

    2000-09-01

    The stratified (meromictic) water column of alkaline and hypersaline Mono Lake, California, contains high concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic (˜200 μmol/L). Arsenic speciation changes from arsenate [As (V)] to arsenite [As (III)] with the transition from oxic surface waters (mixolimnion) to anoxic bottom waters (monimolimnion). A radioassay was devised to measure the reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) and tested using cell suspensions of the As (V)-respiring Bacillus selenitireducens, which completely reduced the 73As (V). In field experiments, no significant activity was noted in the aerobic mixolimnion waters, but reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) was observed in all the monimolimnion samples. Rate constants ranged from 0.02 to 0.3/day, with the highest values in the samples from the deepest depths (24 and 28 m). The highest activities occurred between 18 and 21 m, where As (V) was abundant (rate, ˜5.9 μmol/L per day). In contrast, sulfate reduction occurred at depths below 21 m, with the highest rates attained at 28 m (rate, ˜2.3 μmol/L per day). These results indicate that As (V) ranks second in importance, after sulfate, as an electron acceptor for anaerobic bacterial respiration in the water column. Annual arsenate respiration may mineralize as much as 14.2% of the pelagic photosynthetic carbon fixed during meromixis. When combined with sulfate-reduction data, anaerobic respiration in the water column can mineralize 32-55% of this primary production. As lakes of this type approach salt saturation, As (V) can become the most important electron acceptor for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon.

  20. Sulfate reduction and iron sulfide mineral formation in the southern East China Sea continental slope sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Huang, Kuo-Ming; Chen, Shin-Kuan

    2002-10-01

    Sulfate reduction rate, organic carbon and sulfide burial rate; organic carbon, carbonate carbon, and reactive iron contents; grain size; and sedimentation rate were determined in sediments of the southern East China Sea continental slope. The results show high sulfate reduction and pyrite sulfur burial rates in slope areas with high organic carbon and sedimentation rates. Unusually high rates of organic carbon deposition enhance sulfate reduction and pyrite sulfide burial in the region. Both sulfate reduction rates and pyrite sulfur burial rates increased linearly with increasing organic carbon burial rate, indicating that deposition of organic carbon on the slope is the primary controlling factor for pyrite formation. Abundant reactive iron indicated that iron is not limiting pyrite formation. Pyrite is the predominant sulfide mineral; however, acid volatile sulfide constituted up to 50% of total sulfide at some stations. Up to 240 μmol/g of pyrite sulfur and 5 mmol/m 2/day of sulfate reduction rates were found in the slope sediment. Sulfate reduction rate and pyrite sulfur did not decrease with increasing overlying water depth. High organic carbon burial rates enhanced the sulfate reduction rate and subsequently the rate of pyrite sulfur burial in the slope region. As a result, the southern East China Sea continental slope environment is an efficient pyrite sulfur burial environment.

  1. Regulation of Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction by Herbicide Safeners in Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Farago, S; Brunold, C

    1990-12-01

    Effects of the herbicide safeners N,N-diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide and 4-dichloroacetyl-3,4-dihydro-3-methyl-2H-1,4-benzooxazin (CGA 154281) on the contents in cysteine and glutathione, on the assimilation of (35)SO(4) (2-), and on the enzymes of assimilatory sulfate reduction were analyzed in roots and primary leaves of maize (Zea mays) seedlings. Both safeners induced an increase in cysteine and glutathione. In labeling experiments using (35)SO(4) (2-), roots of plants cultivated in the presence of safeners contained an increased level of radioactivity in glutathione and cysteine as compared with controls. A significant increase in uptake of sulfate was only detected in the presence of CGA 154281. One millimolar N,N-diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide applied to the roots for 6 days increased the activity of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase about 20- and threefold in the roots and leaves, respectively, compared with controls. CGA 154281 at 10 micromolar caused a sevenfold increase of this enzyme activity in the roots, but did not affect it significantly in the leaves. A significant increase in ATP-sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4) activity was only detected in the roots cultivated in the presence of 10 micromolar CGA 154281. Both safeners had no effect on the activity of sulfite reductase (EC 1.8.7.1) and O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase (EC 4.2.99.8). The herbicide metolachlor alone or combined with the safeners induced levels of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase, which were higher than those of the appropriate controls. Taken together these results show that the herbicide safeners increased both the level of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase activity and of the thiols cysteine and glutathione. This indicates that these safeners may be involved in eliminating the previously proposed regulatory mechanism, in which increased concentrations of thiols regulate assimilatory sulfate reduction by decreasing the activities of the enzymes involved.

  2. EFFECT OF BACTERIAL SULFATE REDUCTION ON IRON-CORROSION SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron-sulfur geochemistry is important in many natural and engineered environments including drinking water systems. In the anaerobic environment beneath scales of corroding iron drinking water distribution system pipes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulfide from natura...

  3. Microbial manganese and sulfate reduction in Black Sea shelf sediments.

    PubMed

    Thamdrup, B; Rosselló-Mora, R; Amann, R

    2000-07-01

    The microbial ecology of anaerobic carbon oxidation processes was investigated in Black Sea shelf sediments from mid-shelf with well-oxygenated bottom water to the oxic-anoxic chemocline at the shelf-break. At all stations, organic carbon (C(org)) oxidation rates were rapidly attenuated with depth in anoxically incubated sediment. Dissimilatory Mn reduction was the most important terminal electron-accepting process in the active surface layer to a depth of approximately 1 cm, while SO(4)(2-) reduction accounted for the entire C(org) oxidation below. Manganese reduction was supported by moderately high Mn oxide concentrations. A contribution from microbial Fe reduction could not be discerned, and the process was not stimulated by addition of ferrihydrite. Manganese reduction resulted in carbonate precipitation, which complicated the quantification of C(org) oxidation rates. The relative contribution of Mn reduction to C(org) oxidation in the anaerobic incubations was 25 to 73% at the stations with oxic bottom water. In situ, where Mn reduction must compete with oxygen respiration, the contribution of the process will vary in response to fluctuations in bottom water oxygen concentrations. Total bacterial numbers as well as the detection frequency of bacteria with fluorescent in situ hybridization scaled to the mineralization rates. Most-probable-number enumerations yielded up to 10(5) cells of acetate-oxidizing Mn-reducing bacteria (MnRB) cm(-3), while counts of Fe reducers were <10(2) cm(-3). At two stations, organisms affiliated with Arcobacter were the only types identified from 16S rRNA clone libraries from the highest positive MPN dilutions for MnRB. At the third station, a clone type affiliated with Pelobacter was also observed. Our results delineate a niche for dissimilatory Mn-reducing bacteria in sediments with Mn oxide concentrations greater than approximately 10 micromol cm(-3) and indicate that bacteria that are specialized in Mn reduction, rather than

  4. Microbial Links between Sulfate Reduction and Metal Retention in Uranium- and Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E.; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42− radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of ≤142 ± 20 nmol cm−3 day−1. Concentrations of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that ∼80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [13C]acetate- and [13C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined ≤100% during anoxic soil incubations. In contrast to results in other studies, soluble uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching ≤1,407 nM in solution. Our results suggest that (i) ongoing sulfate reduction in contaminated soil resulted in in situ metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems. PMID:20363796

  5. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Michael; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO42- reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 μm) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO42- or organic substrate increased as a result of deepening of the sulfate reduction zone or an increase in the sulfate reduction intensity, respectively. PMID:16348687

  6. Dominance of sulfur-fueled iron oxide reduction in low-sulfate freshwater sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Colleen M; Lentini, Chris J; Tang, Yuanzhi; Johnston, David T; Wankel, Scott D; Jardine, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    A central tenant in microbial biogeochemistry is that microbial metabolisms follow a predictable sequence of terminal electron acceptors based on the energetic yield for the reaction. It is thereby oftentimes assumed that microbial respiration of ferric iron outcompetes sulfate in all but high-sulfate systems, and thus sulfide has little influence on freshwater or terrestrial iron cycling. Observations of sulfate reduction in low-sulfate environments have been attributed to the presumed presence of highly crystalline iron oxides allowing sulfate reduction to be more energetically favored. Here we identified the iron-reducing processes under low-sulfate conditions within columns containing freshwater sediments amended with structurally diverse iron oxides and fermentation products that fuel anaerobic respiration. We show that despite low sulfate concentrations and regardless of iron oxide substrate (ferrihydrite, Al-ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite), sulfidization was a dominant pathway in iron reduction. This process was mediated by (re)cycling of sulfur upon reaction of sulfide and iron oxides to support continued sulfur-based respiration—a cryptic sulfur cycle involving generation and consumption of sulfur intermediates. Although canonical iron respiration was not observed in the sediments amended with the more crystalline iron oxides, iron respiration did become dominant in the presence of ferrihydrite once sulfate was consumed. Thus, despite more favorable energetics, ferrihydrite reduction did not precede sulfate reduction and instead an inverse redox zonation was observed. These findings indicate that sulfur (re)cycling is a dominant force in iron cycling even in low-sulfate systems and in a manner difficult to predict using the classical thermodynamic ladder. PMID:25871933

  7. Effect of 57Fe-goethite Amendment on Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics During the Transition from Iron to Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, H.; McGuiness, L.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Peacock, A.; Komlos, J.; Kerkhof, L.; Long, P. E.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2009-12-01

    Due to an increasing interest in microbial biostimulation for the purpose of U(VI) bioreduction, which proceeds via iron reduction, there is a growing need for a better understanding of the associated biogeochemical dynamics. This includes Fe(III) availability as well as the microbial community changes, including the activity of iron-reducers during the biostimulation period even after the onset of sulfate reduction. An up-flow column experiment was conducted with Old Rifle site sediments, where half of the columns had sediment that was augmented with 57Fe-goethite to track minute goethite changes after the onset of sulfate reduction, and to study the effects of increased Fe(III) levels on the overall biostimulation dynamics. The addition of the 57Fe-goethite did not delay the onset of sulfate reduction, but slightly suppressed the overall rate of sulfate reduction and hence acetate utilization. Mossbauer analyses confirmed that there was bioavailable iron present after the onset of sulfate reduction and that iron was still being reduced during sulfate reduction. Addition of the 57Fe-goethite to the sediment had a noticeable effect on the overall composition of the microbial population. 16S rRNA analyses of biostimulatd sediment using TRFLP showed that Geobacter sp. were still active and replicating after sulfate reduction had occurred for over 30 days. DNA fingerprints of the sediment-attached microbial communities were dominated by 5 TRFs, that comprised 25-57 % of the total profile. Augmentation of sediments with the 57Fe-goethite resulted in somewhat higher numbers of Geobacter-like species throughout the experiment, and during sulfate reduction slightly lower numbers of sulfate reducers. These columns also had a slightly improved U(VI) removal efficiency, which might be attributed to the higher Geobacter-like numbers.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF SULFATE REDUCTION RATES IN LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two successful field demonstrations of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) bioreactors showed needs for research: 1) improve the understanding of the processes in the bioreactor and its longetivity and 2) improve and quantify the design of the bioreactors. An important component of t...

  9. Microbial reduction of sulfate injected to gas condensate plumes in cold groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Armstrong, James; Mayer, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    Despite a rapid expansion over the past decade in the reliance on intrinsic bioremediation to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater, significant research gaps remain. Although it has been demonstrated that bacterial sulfate reduction can be a key electron accepting process in many petroleum plumes, little is known about the rate of this reduction process in plumes derived from crude oil and gas condensates at cold-climate sites (mean temperature < 10 °C), and in complex hydrogeological settings such as silt/clay aquitards. In this field study, sulfate was injected into groundwater contaminated by gas condensate plumes at two petroleum sites in Alberta, Canada to enhance in-situ bioremediation. In both cases the groundwater near the water table had low temperature (6-9 °C). Monitoring data had provided strong evidence that bacterial sulfate reduction was a key terminal electron accepting process (TEAP) in the natural attenuation of dissolved hydrocarbons at these sites. At each site, water with approximately 2000 mg/L sulfate and a bromide tracer was injected into a low-sulfate zone within a condensate-contaminant plume. Monitoring data collected over several months yielded conservative estimates for sulfate reduction rates based on zero-order kinetics (4-6 mg/L per day) or first-order kinetics (0.003 and 0.01 day - 1 ). These results favor the applicability of in-situ bioremediation techniques in this region, under natural conditions or with enhancement via sulfate injection.

  10. Post-translational modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough sulfate reduction pathway proteins.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Sara P; Redding, Alyssa M; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D; Singh, Anup K

    2008-06-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspect of cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit (DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  11. Biodegradation of BTEX and Other Petroleum Hydrocarbons by Enhanced and Controlled Sulfate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jin

    2007-07-01

    High concentrations of sulfide in the groundwater at a field site near South Lovedale, OK, were inhibiting sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BTEX). Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms were initially amended with FeCl{sub 2} to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, reduce sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of BTEX was observed within 39 days in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments. Results indicate that elevated concentration of sulfide is a limiting factor to BTEX biodegradation at this site, and that treating the groundwater with FeCl{sub 2} is an effective remedy to facilitate and enhance BTEX degradation by the indigenous SRB population. On another site in Moore, OK, studies were conducted to investigate barium in the groundwater. BTEX biodegradation by SRB is suspected to mobilize barium from its precipitants in groundwater. Data from microcosms demonstrated instantaneous precipitation of barium when sulfate was added; however, barium was detected redissolving for a short period and precipitating eventually, when active sulfate reduction was occurring and BTEX was degraded through the process. SEM elemental spectra of the evolved show that sulfur was not present, which may exclude BaSO{sub 4} and BaS as a possible precipitates. The XRD analysis suggests that barium probably ended in BaS complexing with other amorphous species. Results from this study suggest that SRB may be able to use the sulfate from barite (BaSO{sub 4}) as an electron acceptor, resulting in the release of free barium ions (Ba{sup 2+}), and re-precipitate it in BaS, which exposes more toxicity to human and ecological health.

  12. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  13. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  14. Effects of Iron and Nitrogen Limitation on Sulfur Isotope Fractionation during Microbial Sulfate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shuhei; Bosak, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbes utilize sulfate as an electron acceptor and produce sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. Thus, the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sediments can trace microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and it also has the potential to reflect the physiology of sulfate-reducing microbes. This study investigates the relationship between the availability of iron and reduced nitrogen and the magnitude of S-isotope fractionation during MSR by a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium, DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio species, isolated from salt marsh in Cape Cod, MA. Submicromolar levels of iron increase sulfur isotope fractionation by about 50% relative to iron-replete cultures of DMSS-1. Iron-limited cultures also exhibit decreased cytochrome c-to-total protein ratios and cell-specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), implying changes in the electron transport chain that couples carbon and sulfur metabolisms. When DMSS-1 fixes nitrogen in ammonium-deficient medium, it also produces larger fractionation, but it occurs at faster csSRRs than in the ammonium-replete control cultures. The energy and reducing power required for nitrogen fixation may be responsible for the reverse trend between S-isotope fractionation and csSRR in this case. Iron deficiency and nitrogen fixation by sulfate-reducing microbes may lead to the large observed S-isotope effects in some euxinic basins and various anoxic sediments. PMID:23001667

  15. Effects of iron and nitrogen limitation on sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Bosak, Tanja

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbes utilize sulfate as an electron acceptor and produce sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. Thus, the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sediments can trace microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and it also has the potential to reflect the physiology of sulfate-reducing microbes. This study investigates the relationship between the availability of iron and reduced nitrogen and the magnitude of S-isotope fractionation during MSR by a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium, DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio species, isolated from salt marsh in Cape Cod, MA. Submicromolar levels of iron increase sulfur isotope fractionation by about 50% relative to iron-replete cultures of DMSS-1. Iron-limited cultures also exhibit decreased cytochrome c-to-total protein ratios and cell-specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), implying changes in the electron transport chain that couples carbon and sulfur metabolisms. When DMSS-1 fixes nitrogen in ammonium-deficient medium, it also produces larger fractionation, but it occurs at faster csSRRs than in the ammonium-replete control cultures. The energy and reducing power required for nitrogen fixation may be responsible for the reverse trend between S-isotope fractionation and csSRR in this case. Iron deficiency and nitrogen fixation by sulfate-reducing microbes may lead to the large observed S-isotope effects in some euxinic basins and various anoxic sediments.

  16. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  17. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42− ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation. PMID:27731395

  18. Sulfate reduction in peat from a new jersey pinelands cedar swamp.

    PubMed

    Spratt, H G; Morgan, M D; Good, R E

    1987-07-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction rates in acidic peat from a New Jersey Pine Barrens cedar swamp in 1986 were similar to sulfate reduction rates in freshwater lake sediments. The rates ranged from a low of 1.0 nmol cm day in February at 7.5- to 10.0-cm depth to 173.4 nmol cm day in July at 5.0- to 7.5-cm depth. The presence of living Sphagnum moss at the surface generally resulted in reduced rates of sulfate reduction. Pore water sulfate concentrations and water table height also apparently affected the sulfate reduction rate. Concentrations of sulfate in pore water were nearly always higher than those in surface water and groundwater, ranging from 26 to 522 muM. The elevated pore water sulfate levels did not result from the evapotranspiratory concentration of infiltrating stream water or groundwater, but probably resulted from oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds, hydrolysis of ester sulfates present in the peat, or both. The total sulfur content of peat that had no living moss at the surface was 164.64 +/- 1.5 and 195.8 +/- 21.7 mumol g (dry weight) for peat collected from 2.5 to 5.0 and 7.5 to 10.0 cm, respectively. Organosulfur compounds accounted for 84 to 88% of the total sulfur that was present in the peat. C-bonded sulfur accounted for 91 to 94% of the organic sulfur, with ester sulfate being only a minor constituent. Reduced inorganic sulfur species in peat from 2.5 to 7.5 cm were dominated by H(2)S-FeS (68%), while pyritic sulfide was the predominant inorganic sulfur species in the peat from depths of 7.5 to 10.0 cm (75%).

  19. Sulfate Reduction in Peat from a New Jersey Pinelands Cedar Swamp †

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Henry G.; Morgan, Mark D.; Good, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction rates in acidic peat from a New Jersey Pine Barrens cedar swamp in 1986 were similar to sulfate reduction rates in freshwater lake sediments. The rates ranged from a low of 1.0 nmol cm−3 day−1 in February at 7.5- to 10.0-cm depth to 173.4 nmol cm−3 day−1 in July at 5.0- to 7.5-cm depth. The presence of living Sphagnum moss at the surface generally resulted in reduced rates of sulfate reduction. Pore water sulfate concentrations and water table height also apparently affected the sulfate reduction rate. Concentrations of sulfate in pore water were nearly always higher than those in surface water and groundwater, ranging from 26 to 522 μM. The elevated pore water sulfate levels did not result from the evapotranspiratory concentration of infiltrating stream water or groundwater, but probably resulted from oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds, hydrolysis of ester sulfates present in the peat, or both. The total sulfur content of peat that had no living moss at the surface was 164.64 ± 1.5 and 195.8 ± 21.7 μmol g (dry weight)−1 for peat collected from 2.5 to 5.0 and 7.5 to 10.0 cm, respectively. Organosulfur compounds accounted for 84 to 88% of the total sulfur that was present in the peat. C-bonded sulfur accounted for 91 to 94% of the organic sulfur, with ester sulfate being only a minor constituent. Reduced inorganic sulfur species in peat from 2.5 to 7.5 cm were dominated by H2S-FeS (68%), while pyritic sulfide was the predominant inorganic sulfur species in the peat from depths of 7.5 to 10.0 cm (75%). PMID:16347371

  20. A comparative study of metal oxide and sulfate catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Zhong, Zhaoping; Yang, Han; Wang, Chunhua

    2017-05-01

    The properties and characteristics of metal oxide and sulfate catalysts with different active elements for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 were investigated. Cerium-based oxide catalyst showed the widest temperature window for NO x removal and manganese-based oxide catalyst exhibited the best catalytic performance at low temperature. For all the catalysts, the SCR activities at low temperature were directly related with the redox abilities of catalysts. The existence of sulfate groups inhibited the redox abilities of active species for sulfate catalysts compared with the metal oxide catalysts. The catalytic activities of CeWTi-S and MnWTi-S were seriously decreased in contrast to CeWTi-N and MnWTi-N. The temperature window of CuWTi-S was shifted toward higher temperature comparing with CuWTi-N. The FeWTi-N and FeWTi-S catalysts both showed high NO x conversion in the temperature range between 300°C and 400°C and N2O concentrations for iron-based samples were least among the same kind of catalysts. The abundance of acid sites and weak stability of surface sulfate groups for iron- and copper-based sulfate catalysts might be the main reasons accounting for the better NO x conversion in the medium-temperature range.

  1. Changes in organic matter biodegradatility influencing sulfate reduction in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Steve H.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    In situ experiments were conducted to measure sulfate reduction rates and identify rate-limiting factors in a shallow, alluvial aquifer contaminated with municipal landfill leachate. Single-well, push–pull tests conducted in a well adjacent to the landfill with >8 mM dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exhibited a sulfate reduction rate of 3.2 μmol SO4−2 (L sediment)−1 day−1, a value in close agreement with laboratory-derived estimates. Identical tests conducted in wells located 90 m downgradient where DOC levels remained high (>3 mM) showed no detectable sulfate consumption, and laboratory assays confirmed this observation. However, the rates of sulfate reduction in sediment samples obtained from this site were three times larger when they were amended with filter-sterilized groundwater from the upgradient location. The effect of various amendments on sulfate reduction rates was further examined in laboratory incubations using sediment collected from the downgradient site amended with 35S sulfate. Unamended sediments showed only weak conversion of the tracer to 35S sulfide (5 to 7 cpm/cm2), whereas the addition of Desulfovibrio cells increased 35S sulfide production to 44 cpm/cm2. However, the application of heat-killed Desulfovibrio had a similar stimulatory effect, as did a lactate amendment. Collectively, these findings indicate that the lack of measurable sulfate reduction at the downgradient site was not due to the absence of the necessary metabolic potential, the presence of lower sulfate concentration, or the quantity of electron donor, but by its biodegradability. The findings also indicate that field bioaugmentation attempts should be interpreted with caution.

  2. A biofilm model to understand the onset of sulfate reduction in denitrifying membrane biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Youneng; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Chen; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2013-03-01

    This work presents a multispecies biofilm model that describes the co-existence of nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the H(2)-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). The new model adapts the framework of a biofilm model for simultaneous nitrate and perchlorate removal by considering the unique metabolic and physiological characteristics of autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria that use H(2) as their electron donor. To evaluate the model, the simulated effluent H(2), UAP (substrate-utilization-associated products), and BAP (biomass-associated products) concentrations are compared to experimental results, and the simulated biomass distributions are compared to real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) data in the experiments for parameter optimization. Model outputs and experimental results match for all major trends and explain when sulfate reduction does or does not occur in parallel with denitrification. The onset of sulfate reduction occurs only when the nitrate concentration at the fiber's outer surface is low enough so that the growth rate of the denitrifying bacteria is equal to that of the sulfate-reducing bacteria. An example shows how to use the model to design an MBfR that achieves satisfactory nitrate reduction, but suppresses sulfate reduction.

  3. Effects of thermal sulfate reduction on permeability distributions of the Norphlet Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.L.; Surdam, R.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Framework grain coatings are common in the Norphlet. Clay coatings are present throughout the depth range (16,000 to 22,000 ft) over which significant variations of permeability occur. Pyrobitumen coatings occur within the deep, low-permeability interval (approximately 18,000-20,000 ft) and the deeper (greater than 20,000 ft), more permeable interval. Both types of coatings may be important in preserving porosity during portions of the burial history of the Norphlet sandstones; however, their occurrence does not correlate with observed variations in permeability. Diagenetic reactions associated with thermal sulfate reduction provide a mechanism for the dissolution of carbonate cements in deep zones characterized by enhanced permeabilities. Protons generated from dissociation of H{sub 2}S produced during sulfate reduction results in the dissolution of carbonate cements. To be effective, this process must remove cements that precipitated after grain coatings. Uncoated quartz grains produce quartz overgrowths. Vertical permeability distributions within the Norphlet suggest that early and intermediate diagenetic carbonate and sulfate cements, sourced from the intercalated, interdunal pond strata, were redistributed throughout the dune sands. Portions of carbonate cements were either dissolved or the extent of their precipitation was reduced as thermal decarboxylation was closely followed by the initiation of sulfate reduction. Hence, variations in Norphlet permeability distributions are in part the result of diagenetic reactions associated with thermal sulfate reduction and, therefore, can be predicted using kinetic modeling of sulfate reaction.

  4. Sulfate reduction and oxic respiration in marine sediments: implications for organic carbon preservation in euxinic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.; DeVincenzi, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Compilations have been made of sulfate reduction rates and oxic respiration rates over the entire range of marine sedimentation rates, and sedimentary environments, including several euxinic sites. These data show, consistent with the findings of Jorgensen (1982, Nature, 296, 643-645), that sulfate reduction and oxic respiration oxidize equal amounts of organic carbon in nearshore sediments. As sedimentation rates decrease, oxic respiration, becomes progressively more important, and in deep-sea sediments 100-1000 times more organic carbon is oxidized by oxic respiration than by sulfate reduction. By contrast, nearly as much organic carbon is oxidized by sulfate reduction in euxinic sediments as is oxidized by the sum of sulfate reduction and oxic respiration in normal marine sediments of similar deposition rate. This observation appears at odds with the enhanced preservation of organic carbon observed in euxinic sediments. However, only small reductions in (depth-integrated) organic carbon decomposition rates (compared to normal marine) are required to give both high organic carbon concentrations and enhanced carbon preservation in euxinic sediments. Lower rates of organic carbon decomposition (if only by subtle amounts) are explained by the diminished ability of anaerobic bacteria to oxidize the full suite of sedimentary organic compounds.

  5. Antiquity and evolutionary status of bacterial sulfate reduction: sulfur isotope evidence.

    PubMed

    Schidlowski, M

    1979-09-01

    The presently available sedimentary sulfur isotope record for the Precambrian seems to allow the following conclusions: (1) In the Early Archaean, sedimentary delta 34S patterns attributable to bacteriogenic sulfate reduction are generally absent. In particular, the delta 34S spread observed in the Isua banded iron formation (3.7 x 10(9) yr) is extremely narrow and coincides completely with the respective spreads yielded by contemporaneous rocks of assumed mantle derivation. Incipient minor differentiation of the isotope pattersn notably of Archaean sulfates may be accounted for by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria rather than by sulfate reducers. (2) Isotopic evidence of dissimilatory sulfate reduction is first observed in the upper Archaean of the Aldan Shield, Siberia (approximately 3.0 x 10(9) yr) and in the Michipicoten and Woman River banded iron formations of Canada (2.75 x 10(9) yr). This narrows down the possible time of appearance of sulfate respirers to the interval 2.8--3.1 x 10(9) yr. (3) Various lines of evidence indicate that photosynthesis is older than sulfate respiration, the SO4(2-) Utilized by the first sulfate reducers deriving most probably from oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria. Sulfate respiration must, in turn, have antedated oxygen respiration as O2-respiring multicellular eucaryotes appear late in the Precambrian. (4) With the bulk of sulfate in the Archaean oceans probably produced by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria, the accumulation of SO4(2-) in the ancient seas must have preceded the buildup of appreciable steady state levels of free oxygen. Hence, the occurrence of sulfate evaporites in Archaean sediments does not necessarily provide testimony of oxidation weathering on the ancient continents and, consequently, of the existence of an atmospheric oxygen reservoir.

  6. Volumetric determination of uranium titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.; Skinner, D.L.; Rader, L.F.

    1957-01-01

    Need for a more rapid volumetric method for the routine determination of uranium in uranium-rich materials has led to the development of a method that uses titanous sulfate as a reductant before oxidimetric titration. Separation of the hydrogen sulfide group is not necessary. Interfering elements precipitated by cupferron are removed by automatic filtrations made simultaneously rather than by the longer chloroform extraction method. Uranium is reduced from VI to IV by addition of an excess of titanous sulfate solution, cupric ion serving as an indicator by forming red metallic copper when reduction is complete. The copper is reoxidized by addition of mercuric perchlorate. The reduced uranium is then determined by addition of excess ferric sulfate and titration with ceric sulfate. The method has proved to be rapid, accurate, and economical.

  7. Regulation of Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction by Herbicide Safeners in Zea mays L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Farago, S.; Brunold, C.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of the herbicide safeners N,N-diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide and 4-dichloroacetyl-3,4-dihydro-3-methyl-2H-1,4-benzooxazin (CGA 154281) on the contents in cysteine and glutathione, on the assimilation of 35SO42−, and on the enzymes of assimilatory sulfate reduction were analyzed in roots and primary leaves of maize (Zea mays) seedlings. Both safeners induced an increase in cysteine and glutathione. In labeling experiments using 35SO42−, roots of plants cultivated in the presence of safeners contained an increased level of radioactivity in glutathione and cysteine as compared with controls. A significant increase in uptake of sulfate was only detected in the presence of CGA 154281. One millimolar N,N-diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide applied to the roots for 6 days increased the activity of adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase about 20- and threefold in the roots and leaves, respectively, compared with controls. CGA 154281 at 10 micromolar caused a sevenfold increase of this enzyme activity in the roots, but did not affect it significantly in the leaves. A significant increase in ATP-sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4) activity was only detected in the roots cultivated in the presence of 10 micromolar CGA 154281. Both safeners had no effect on the activity of sulfite reductase (EC 1.8.7.1) and O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase (EC 4.2.99.8). The herbicide metolachlor alone or combined with the safeners induced levels of adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase, which were higher than those of the appropriate controls. Taken together these results show that the herbicide safeners increased both the level of adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase activity and of the thiols cysteine and glutathione. This indicates that these safeners may be involved in eliminating the previously proposed regulatory mechanism, in which increased concentrations of thiols regulate assimilatory sulfate reduction by decreasing the activities of the enzymes involved. PMID

  8. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  9. Microbially mediated re-oxidation of sulfide during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by Desulfobacter latus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, T.; Brunner, B.; Edwards, E. A.; Wortmann, U. G.

    2011-06-01

    Enzymatic reactions during dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) are often treated as unidirectional with respect to dissolved sulfide. However, quantitative models describing kinetic sulfur isotope fractionations during DSR consider the individual enzymatic reactions as reversible ( Rees, 1973). Brunner and Bernasconi (2005) extended this line of thought, and suggested that as long as cell external sulfide (CES) concentrations are high enough, CES may diffuse back across the cytoplasmic cell membrane and may subsequently be re-oxidized to sulfate. Here, we test this hypothesis by measuring the time evolution of the δ34S-sulfate signal during DSR in closed system experiments under different levels of sulfide stress (0-20 mM and 0-40 mM total dissolved sulfide). Our results show that the measured δ34S-sulfate signal is markedly different in the latter case and that the observed sulfate S-isotope time-evolution is incompatible with a Rayleigh type fractionation model. In contrast, our results are consistent with a sulfate reduction and fractionation model that allows for a cell internal oxidation of dissolved sulfide by a sulfate reducer.

  10. Assessing sulfate reduction and methane cycling in a high salinity pore water system in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Downer, R.; Coffin, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Pore waters extracted from 18 piston cores obtained on and near a salt-cored bathymetric high in Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico contain elevated concentrations of chloride (up to 838 mM) and have pore water chemical concentration profiles that exhibit extensive departures (concavity) from steady-state (linear) diffusive equilibrium with depth. Minimum ??13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) values of -55.9??? to -64.8??? at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) strongly suggest active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) throughout the study region. However, the nonlinear pore water chemistry-depth profiles make it impossible to determine the vertical extent of active AOM or the potential role of alternate sulfate reduction pathways. Here we utilize the conservative (non-reactive) nature of dissolved chloride to differentiate the effects of biogeochemical activity (e.g., AOM and/or organoclastic sulfate reduction) relative to physical mixing in high salinity Keathley Canyon sediments. In most cases, the DIC and sulfate concentrations in pore waters are consistent with a conservative mixing model that uses chloride concentrations at the seafloor and the SMT as endmembers. Conservative mixing of pore water constituents implies that an undetermined physical process is primarily responsible for the nonlinearity of the pore water-depth profiles. In limited cases where the sulfate and DIC concentrations deviated from conservative mixing between the seafloor and SMT, the ??13C-DIC mixing diagrams suggest that the excess DIC is produced from a 13C-depleted source that could only be accounted for by microbial methane, the dominant form of methane identified during this study. We conclude that AOM is the most prevalent sink for sulfate and that it occurs primarily at the SMT at this Keathley Canyon site.

  11. Genomic markers of ancient anaerobic microbial pathways: sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; Dhillon, Ashita; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2003-04-01

    Genomic markers for anaerobic microbial processes in marine sediments-sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and anaerobic methane oxidation-reveal the structure of sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and methane-oxidizing microbial communities (including uncultured members); they allow inferences about the evolution of these ancient microbial pathways; and they open genomic windows into extreme microbial habitats, such as deep subsurface sediments and hydrothermal vents, that are analogs for the early Earth and for extraterrestrial microbiota.

  12. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Cummins, Renata; Schmidt, Marian L.; Sim, Min S.; Ono, Shuhei; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reduction (MSRs) may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate) is very large (34ε ~ 30‰) while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite (34ε < 10‰): a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate), especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved. PMID:25505449

  13. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Cummins, Renata; Schmidt, Marian L; Sim, Min S; Ono, Shuhei; Bradley, Alexander S; Johnston, David T

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reduction (MSRs) may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate) is very large ((34)ε ~ 30‰) while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite ((34)ε < 10‰): a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate), especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved.

  14. Sulfate reduction and other sedimentary biogeochemistry in a northern New England salt marsh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Knollmeyer, Stephen L.; Tugel, Joyce B.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfate reduction rates, dissolved iron and sulfide concentrations, and titration alkalinity were measured in salt marsh soils along a transect that included areas inhabited by both the tall and short forms of Spartina alterniflora and by Spartina patens. Pore waters were collected with in situ 'sippers' to acquire temporal data from the same location without disturbing plant roots. During 1984, data collected at weekly intervals showed rapid temporal changes in belowground biogeochemical processes that coincided with changes in S. alterniflora physiology. Rates of SO4(-2) reduction increased fivefold (to greater than 2.5 micromol ml(sup -1)d(sup -1)) when plants began elongating aboveground yet decreased fourfold upon plant flowering. This rapid increase in rates of SO4(-2) reduction must have been fueled by dissolved organic matter released from roots only during active growth. Once plants flowered, the supply of oxidants to the soil decreased and sulfide and alkalinity concentrations increased despite decreases in SO4(-2) reduction and increases in SO4(-2):Cl(-) ratios. Sulfide concentrations were highest in soils inhabited by tallest plants. During 1985, S. alterniflora became infested with fly larvae (Chaetopsis apicalis John) and aboveground growth ceased in late June. This cessation was accompanied by decreased rates of SO4(-2) reduction similar to those noted during the previous year when flowering occurred. After the fly infestation, the pore-water chemical profiles of these soils resembled profiles of soils inhabited by the short form of S. alterniflora. The SO4(-2) reduction rates in S. patens soils are the first reported. Rates were similar to those in S. alterniflora except that they did not increase greatly when S. patens was elongating. Tidal and rainfall events produced desiccation-saturation cycles that altered redox conditions in the S. patens soils, resulting in rapid changes in the dissolution and precipitation of iron and in the magnitude and

  15. Role of sedimentary organic matter in bacterial sulfate reduction: the G model tested

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, J.T.; Berner, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    Laboratory study of the bacterial decomposition of Long Island Sound plankton in oxygenated seawater over a period of 2 years shows that the organic material undergoes decomposition via first-order kinetics and can be divided into two decomposable fractions, of considerably different reactivity, and a nonmetabolized fraction. This planktonic material, after undergoing varying degrees of oxic degradation, was added in the laboratory to anoxic sediment taken from a depth of 1 m at the NWC site of Long Island Sound and the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in the sediment measured by the /sup 35/S radiotracer technique. The stimulated rate of sulfate reduction was in direct proportion to the amount of planktonic carbon added. This provides direct confirmation of the first-order decomposition, or G model, for marine sediments and proves that the in situ rate of sulfate reduction is organic-matter limited. Slower sulfate reduction rates resulted when oxically degraded plankton rather than fresh plankton was added, and the results confirm the presence of the same two fractions of organic matter deduced from the oxic degradation studies. Near-surface Long Island Sound sediment, which already contains abundant readily decomposable organic matter, was also subjected to anoxic decomposition by bacterial sulfate reduction. The decrease in sulfate reduction rate with time parallels decreases in the amount of organic matter, and these results also indicate the presence of two fractions of organic carbon of distinctly different reactivity. From plots of the log of reduction rate vs. time two first-order rate constants were obtained that agree well with those derived from the plankton addition experiment. Together, the two experiments confirm the use of a simple multi-first-order rate law for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments.

  16. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  17. Sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in extremely steep salinity gradients formed by freshwater springs emerging into the Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Häusler, Stefan; Weber, Miriam; Siebert, Christian; Holtappels, Moritz; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; De Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-12-01

    Abundant microbial mats, recently discovered in underwater freshwater springs in the hypersaline Dead Sea, are mostly dominated by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. We investigated the source of sulfide and the activity of these communities. Isotopic analysis of sulfide and sulfate in the spring water showed a fractionation of 39-50‰ indicative of active sulfate reduction. Sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in the spring sediment (< 2.8 nmol cm(-3) day(-1)) are too low to account for the measured sulfide flux. Thus, sulfide from the springs, locally reduced salinity and O2 from the Dead Sea water are responsible for the abundant microbial biomass around the springs. The springs flow is highly variable and accordingly the local salinities. We speculate that the development of microbial mats dominated by either Sulfurimonas/Sulfurovum-like or Thiobacillus/Acidithiobacillus-like sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, results from different mean salinities in the microenvironment of the mats. SRR of up to 10 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) detected in the Dead Sea sediment are surprisingly higher than in the less saline springs. While this shows the presence of an extremely halophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria community in the Dead Sea sediments, it also suggests that extensive salinity fluctuations limit these communities in the springs due to increased energetic demands for osmoregulation.

  18. Sulfation of tea polysaccharides: synthesis, characterization and hypoglycemic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Peng, Yonghua; Wei, Xinlin; Yang, Zhiwei; Xiao, Jianbo; Jin, Zhengyu

    2010-03-01

    Neutral polysaccharides (NTPS) and acid polysaccharides (ATPS) from tea leaves were obtained on a D315 macroporous anion-exchange resin column chromatography. NTPS and ATPS were sulfated by the pyridine-sulfonic acid method to obtain NTPS-S and ATPS-S. It was found that NTPS was easier sulfated than ATPS. There are strong characteristic absorption peaks located in 1258 cm(-1), 1146 cm(-1), 832 cm(-1) and 617 cm(-1) in the FTIR spectra of sulfated polysaccharides. Sulfation of polysaccharides also affected the endothermic and exothermic peaks via the DSC scan analysis. The appearance of exothermic peaks in both NTPS-S and ATPS-S indicated that the redox reaction might happen. The comparative study of hypoglycemic effect on mice showed that the sulfation of polysaccharides significantly improved hypoglycemic activity.

  19. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ahmad, Ward Said; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-01-01

    Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and provide important mechanistic details about the overall TSR process.

  20. Evidence for Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in a Fissured-porous Karst System in Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsiedl, F.; Mayer, B.

    2005-12-01

    Twenty five percent of the world's population uses karst water as drinking water resources. Since karst groundwater systems are highly vulnerable to contamination, groundwater protection and self purification is a major challenge. Up to now research in karst groundwater systems has predominantly concentrated on hydrodynamic processes. Little is known about anoxic processes in oxygen dominated, fracture-matrix diffusion controlled karst aquifers. Isotope measurements comprise a promising tool to identify biogeochemical processes such as bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction in karstic aquifers. The goal of this study was to determine the sources and the processes affecting sulfate in an oxygen-rich karst aquifer in southern Germany and their dependence on hydrogeological parameters. This was achieved by interpreting tritium data with a simple lumped parameter approach and assessing variations in concentrations and isotopic compositions of sulfate and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with respect to groundwater age. Young groundwater (<30 years) was characterized by comparatively high sulfate concentrations (0.36 mM) and δ34S values similar to those of recent atmospheric deposition (1.5‰). In contrast groundwater with mean residence times >60 years had significantly lower sulfate concentrations (0.08 mM) and markedly higher δ34S values (7.5‰). These results indicate that in karst systems with matrix porosity, bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction may occur. This process has the potential to contribute to long-term biodegradation of contaminants in the porous rock matrix representing the dominant water reservoir in fissured-porous karst aquifers.

  1. In situ assessment of microbial sulfate reduction in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer using push-pull tests and stable sulfur isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Schroth, M H; Kleikemper, J; Bolliger, C; Bernasconi, S M; Zeyer, J

    2001-10-01

    Anaerobic microbial activities such as sulfate reduction are important for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) in contaminated aquifers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of single-well push-pull tests in combination with stable sulfur isotope analyses for the in situ quantification of microbial sulfate reduction. A series of push-pull tests was performed in an existing monitoring well of a PHC-contaminated aquifer in Studen (Switzerland). Sulfate transport behavior was evaluated in a first test. In three subsequent tests, we injected anoxic test solutions (up to 1000 l), which contained 0.5 mM bromide (Br-) as conservative tracer and 1 mM sulfate (SO4(2-)) as reactant. After an initial incubation period of 42.5 to 67.9 h, up to 1100 l of test solution/groundwater mixture was extracted in each test from the same location. During the extraction phases, we measured concentrations of relevant species including Br-, SO4(2-) and sulfide (S(-II)), as well as stable sulfur isotope ratios (delta 34S) of extracted, unconsumed SO4(2-) and extracted S(-II). Results indicated sulfate reduction activity in the vicinity of the test well. Computed first-order rate coefficients for sulfate reduction ranged from 0.043 +/- 0.013 to 0.130 +/- 0.015 day-1. Isotope enrichment factors (epsilon) computed from sulfur isotope fractionation of extracted, unconsumed SO4(2-) ranged from 20.2 +/- 5.5@1000 to 22.8 +/- 3.4@1000. Together with observed fractionation in extracted S(-II), isotope enrichment factors provided strong evidence for microbially mediated sulfate reduction. Thus, push-pull tests combined with stable sulfur isotope analyses proved useful for the in situ quantification of microbial sulfate reduction in a PHC-contaminated aquifer.

  2. D-Area Sulfate Reduction DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    2003-01-12

    An acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume emanates from the diarrhea Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), due to the contaminated runoff the basin receives from the D-Area coal pile. From a previous feasibility evaluation and laboratory testing, it was concluded that the plume could be remediated with sulfate reduction remediation combined with monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Additionally these previous studies recommended that soybean oil and sodium lactate be utilized as organic substrates for sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) during a subsequent sulfate reduction, pilot scale, field demonstration. The soybean oil was to be tested as a long-term, slow release, organic substrate, and the sodium lactate was to be tested as a short-term, immediately available, organic substrate. The subsequent sulfate reduction, pilot scale, field demonstration consisted of the following: (1) Approximately 825 gallons of soybean oil was injected into both the south and north wings of the existing D-Area interceptor well. (2) Approximately 227.5 gallons of sodium lactate and 1169 gallons of groundwater from a background well were injected into the south wing only. The groundwater was used to reduce the viscosity of the sodium lactate for injection, to flush the sodium lactate out of the injection point screen zones, and to provide bioaugmentation (i.e. the addition of SRB). Both pre-injection and post-injection monitoring and sampling and analysis were conducted in order to evaluate the impact of organic substrate injection on soluble organic, sulfate, nutrient, microbe, hydrogen sulfide, pH, Eh, and metal concentrations (i.e. the ability to promote sulfate reduction remediation of the plume). Overall it is clear from this field demonstration that both soybean oil and sodium lactate provided a suitable organic substrate to promote SRB growth. The SRB growth promoted by both soybean oil and sodium lactate resulted in sulfate reduction

  3. Removal of Persistent Organic Contaminants by Electrochemically Activated Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Ali; Keller, Jurg; Tait, Stephan; Radjenovic, Jelena

    2015-12-15

    Solutions of sulfate have often been used as background electrolytes in the electrochemical degradation of contaminants and have been generally considered inert even when high-oxidation-power anodes such as boron-doped diamond (BDD) were employed. This study examines the role of sulfate by comparing electro-oxidation rates for seven persistent organic contaminants at BDD anodes in sulfate and inert nitrate anolytes. Sulfate yielded electro-oxidation rates 10-15 times higher for all target contaminants compared to the rates of nitrate anolyte. This electrochemical activation of sulfate was also observed at concentrations as low as 1.6 mM, which is relevant for many wastewaters. Electrolysis of diatrizoate in the presence of specific radical quenchers (tert-butanol and methanol) had a similar effect on electro-oxidation rates, illustrating a possible role of the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) in the anodic formation of sulfate radical (SO4(•-)) species. The addition of 0.55 mM persulfate increased the electro-oxidation rate of diatrizoate in nitrate from 0.94 to 9.97 h(-1), suggesting a nonradical activation of persulfate. Overall findings indicate the formation of strong sulfate-derived oxidant species at BDD anodes when polarized at high potentials. This may have positive implications in the electro-oxidation of wastewaters containing sulfate. For example, the energy required for the 10-fold removal of diatrizoate was decreased from 45.6 to 2.44 kWh m(-3) by switching from nitrate to sulfate anolyte.

  4. Biomolecular and Isotopic Signatures Related to Cr(VI) Reduction by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from the Hanford 100H Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Geller, J. T.; Chakraborty, R.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium contamination of groundwater is widespread within the Dept. of Energy (DOE) complex. At DOE's Hanford 100H area, we have conducted Cr bioremediation (in situ reductive immobilization) studies involving injection of a lactate-containing polymer, and have observed sequential use of the dissolved electron acceptors present in groundwater (namely, oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate). Sulfate-reducing bacteria are of particular interest for chromate reduction because they can reduce Cr(VI) enzymatically (e.g., using cytochrome c3 or thioredoxin reductase) and abiotically with hydrogen sulfide, the end product of their respiration. In this poster, we use studies of a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Hanford 100H aquifer, Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1, to explore (a) isotopic signatures that might allow us to distinguish between enzymatic and sulfide-mediated Cr(VI) reduction and (b) biomolecular signatures (gene or transcript copy number of diagnostic genes) that might be used as proxies of in situ metabolic rates. In order to differentiate between the mechanisms of Cr reduction by sulfate reducers, we analyzed the isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by strain RCH1. Cell suspension studies of strain RCH1 demonstrated that Cr(VI) reduction could occur in the presence of lactate (electron donor) alone or with both lactate and sulfate. Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of lactate and sulfate was 25-30% more rapid than enzymatic Cr reduction when only lactate was added, suggesting that biogenic hydrogen sulfide increases the specific rate of Cr(VI) reduction beyond purely enzymatic activity. Cr isotopic measurements showed different fractionation behavior for the lactate-only and lactate+sulfate systems, with fractionation (epsilon) values of 2.3 and 1.66 per mil, respectively. In order to determine whether gene or transcript copy number for diagnostic sulfate and chromate reduction genes could serve as proxies to estimate in situ metabolic

  5. Combined S-33 and O-18 Isotope Tracing of Intracellular Sulfur Metabolism during Microbial Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Gilad; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei; Sivan, Orit; Turchyn, Alexandra V.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a key player in the global carbon cycle, oxidizing nearly 50% of organic matter in marine sediments. The biochemical pathway of microbial sulfate reduction fractionates sulfur and oxygen isotopes and these fractionations can be used to reconstruct S cycling in sediments. Sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction, which partitions lighter sulfur (32S) into sulfide and heavier sulfur (33S and 34S) into the residual sulfate, can be as high as 72o for 34S/32S. The availability and type of organic substrate control the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation by influencing the fluxes of and the transfer of electrons to different S species. The partitioning of oxygen in sulfate during microbial sulfate reduction appears to be strongly influenced by the oxygen isotopic composition of water in which the bacteria grow, but its magnitude also seems to correlate with the magnitude of 34S/32S isotope fractionation. In addition, the fractionation of 33S/32S is thought to reflect the reversibility of some intercellular fluxes. We wanted to investigate whether the 18O/16O, 34S/32S and 33S/32S isotope fractionations in sulfate are controlled by the same intracellular processes and conditions. This was done by investigating the combined sulfur and oxygen isotope partitioning by a marine Desulfovibrio sp. grown in pure culture on different organic substrates and in water with different isotopic composition of oxygen. The isotope fractionations of oxygen and sulfur correlated with the cell specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), where slower rates yielded higher sulfur fractionation (as high as 60) and higher oxygen isotope fractionation. The trends in 33S/32S and 34S/32S with the changing csSRR was similar to the trends in 18O/16O with the csSRR, suggesting that the same intercellular pathways controlled both oxygen and sulfur isotope signatures during microbial sulfate reduction. The use of water with different isotopic

  6. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: II. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive dynamic model is presented that simulates methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This model incorporates the complex chemistry of anaerobic systems. A salient feature of the model is its ability to predict the effluent ...

  7. Acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Finke, Niko; Vandieken, Verona; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of volatile fatty acids (VFA) as e(-)-donors for anaerobic terminal oxidation of organic carbon through iron and sulfate reduction was studied in Arctic fjord sediment. Dissolved inorganic carbon, Fe(2+), VFA concentrations, and sulfate reduction were monitored in slurries from the oxidized (0-2 cm) and the reduced (5-9 cm) zone. In the 0-2 cm layer, 2/3 of the mineralization could be attributed to sulfate reduction and 1/3 to iron reduction. In the 5-9 cm layer, sulfate reduction was the sole mineralization process. Acetate and lactate turnover rates were measured by radiotracer. Inhibition of sulfate reduction with selenate resulted in the accumulation of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate. The acetate turnover rates determined by radiotracer and accumulation after inhibition were similar. VFA turnover accounted for 21% and 52% of the mineralization through sulfate reduction in the 0-2 and 5-9 cm layer, respectively. Acetate and lactate turnover in the inhibited 0-2 cm slurry was attributed to iron reduction and accounted for 10% and 2% of the iron reduction. Therefore, 88% and 79% of the iron and sulfate reduction in the 0-2 cm layer, respectively, must be fueled by alternative e(-)-donors. The accumulation of VFA in the selenate-inhibited 0-2 cm slurry did not enhance iron reduction, indicating that iron reducers were not limited by VFA availability.

  8. Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Hee Sun; McGuinness, L.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Komlos, John; Kerkhoff, Lee; Long, Philip E.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2010-07-01

    There is a growing need for a better understanding of the biogeochemical dynamics involved in microbial U(VI) reduction due to an increasing interest in using biostimulation via electron donor addition as a means to remediate uranium contaminated sites. U(VI) reduction has been observed to be maximized during iron reducing conditions and to decrease upon commencement of sulfate reducing conditions. There are many unknowns regarding the impact of iron/sulfate biogeochemistry on U(VI) reduction. This includes Fe(III) availability as well as the microbial community changes, including the activity of iron-reducers during the uranium biostimulation period even after the onset of sulfate reduction. Up-flow column experiments were conducted with Old Rifle site sediments containing Fe-oxides, Fe-clays, and sulfate rich groundwater. Half of the columns had sediment that was augmented with small amounts of small-particle 57Fe-goethite to track continuously minute goethite changes, and to study the effects of increased Fe(III) levels on the overall biostimulation dynamics. The addition of the 57Fe-goethite did not delay the onset of sulfate reduction, but slightly suppressed the overall rate of sulfate reduction and hence acetate utilization, it did not affect the bacterial numbers of Geobacter-like species throughout the experiment, but did lower the numbers of sulfate reducers in the sediments. 57Fe-Mössbauer analyses (a 57Fe-specific technique) confirmed that there was bioavailable iron present after the onset of sulfate reduction and that iron was still being reduced during sulfate reduction. Addition of the 57Fe-goethite to the sediment had a noticeable effect on the overall composition of the microbial population. 16S rRNA analyses of biostimulated sediment using TRFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) showed that Geobacter sp. (a known Fe-reducer) was still active and replicating during the period of significant sulfate reduction. DNA fingerprints of

  9. Selective catalytic reduction system and process using a pre-sulfated zirconia binder

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.

    2010-06-29

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system, the catalyst system comprising (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4, palladium, and a pre-sulfated zirconia binder. The inclusion of a pre-sulfated zirconia binder substantially increases the durability of a Pd-based SCR catalyst system. A system for implementing the disclosed process is further provided.

  10. Effect of NO2(-) on stable isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Einsiedl, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The effects of low NO2(-) concentrations on stable isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by strain Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were investigated. Nitrite, formed as an intermediate during nitrification and denitrification processes in marine and freshwater habitats, inhibits the reduction of the sulfuroxy intermediate SO3(2-) to H2S even at low concentrations. To gain an understanding of the inhibition effect of the reduction of the sulfuroxy intermediate on stable isotope fractionation in sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction, nitrite was added in the form of short pulses. In the batch experiments that contained 0.02, 0.05, and 0.1 mM nitrite, sulfur enrichment factors epsilon of -12 +/- 1.6, -15 +/- 1.1, and -26 +/- 1.3 per thousand, respectively were observed. In the control experiment (no addition of nitrite) a sulfur enrichment factor epsilon of around -11 per thousand was calculated. In the experiments that contained no 18O enriched water (delta18O: -10 per thousand) and nitrite concentrations of 0.02, 0.05, and 0.1 mM, delta18O values in the remaining sulfate were fairly constant during the experiments (delta18O sulfate: approximately equal to 10 per thousand) and were similar to those obtained from the control experiment (no nitrite and no enriched water). However, in the batch experiments that contained 18O enriched water (+700 per thousand) and nitrite concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 mM increasing delta18O values in the remaining sulfate from around 15 per thousand to approximately 65 and 85 per thousand, respectively, were found. Our experiments that contained isotopic enriched water and nitrite show clear evidence that the ratio of forward and backward fluxes regulated by adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APSR) controls the extent of sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in strain Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Since the metabolic sulfuroxy intermediate SO3(2-) exchanges with water

  11. Selenium isotope fractionation during reduction by Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide-sulfate (green rust)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, T.M.; Bullen, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    We have determined the extent of Se isotope fractionation induced by reduction of selenate by sulfate interlayered green rust (GRSO4), a Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide-sulfate. This compound is known to reduce selenate to Se(0), and it is the only naturally relevant abiotic selenate reduction pathway documented to date. Se reduction reactions, when they occur in nature, greatly reduce Se mobility and bioavailability. Se stable isotope analysis shows promise as an indicator of Se reduction, and Se isotope fractionation by various Se reactions must be known in order to refine this tool. We measured the increase in the 80Se/76Se ratio of dissolved selenate as lighter isotopes were preferentially consumed during reduction by GRSO4. Six different experiments that used GRSO4 made by two methods, with varying solution compositions and pH, yielded identical isotopic fractionations. Regression of all the data yielded an instantaneous isotope fractionation of 7.36 ?? 0.24???. Selenate reduction by GRSO4 induces much greater isotopic fractionation than does bacterial selenate reduction. If selenate reduction by GRSO4 occurs in nature, it may be identifiable on the basis of its relatively large isotopic fractionation. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Peer HA; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons JM; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with 13C-labeled CH4 (13CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, 13C-labeled CO2 (13CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with 13CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for 13CO2 production from 13CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  13. Volumetric determination of uranium using titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, James S.; Skinner, Dwight L.; Rader, Lewis F.

    1956-01-01

    A new method for determining uranium in samples containing 0.05 percent or more U3O8, using titanous sulfate as reducing agent, is much shorter, faster, and has fewer interferences than conventional methods using reductor columns. The sample is dissolved with sulfuric, nitric, perchloric, and hydrofluoric acids. Elements that would otherwise form insoluble fluorides are kept in solution by complexing the fluoride ion with boric acid. A precipitation is made with cupferron to remove interfering elements. The solution is filtered to remove the precipitated cupferrates instead of extracting them with chloroform as is usually done. Filtration is preferred to extraction because any niobium that may be in solution forms an insoluble cupferrate that may be removed by filtering but is very difficult to extract with chloroform. Excess cupferron is destroyed by oxidizing with nitric and perchloric acids, and evaporating to dense fumes of sulfuric acid. The uranium is reduced to U(IV) by the addition of titanous sulfate, with cupric sulfate used as an indicator of the completeness of the reduction. Metallic copper is formed when all the uranium is reduced. The reduced copper is then reoxidized by the addition of mercuric perchlorate, an excess of ferric sulfate added, and the solution titrated immediately with standard ceric sulfate with ferroin as an indicator. Precision of the method compared favorable with methods in common use, both for uranium ores and for most types of uranium-rich materials.

  14. Thermophilic nitrate-reducing microorganisms prevent sulfate reduction in cold marine sediments incubated at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchaya, Yana; Rezende, Julia; Hubert, Casey

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen sulphide produced during metabolism of sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) is toxic, corrosive and causes detrimental oil reservoir souring. During secondary oil recovery, injecting oil reservoirs with seawater that is rich in sulphate and that also cools high temperature formations provides favourable growth conditions for SRM. Nitrate addition can prevent metabolism of SRM by stimulating nitrate-reducing microorganisms (NRM). The investigations of thermophilic NRM are needed to develop mechanisms to control the metabolism of SRM in high temperature oil field ecosystems. We therefore established a model system consisting of enrichment cultures of cold surface marine sediments from the Baltic Sea (Aarhus Bay) that were incubated at 60°C. Enrichments contained 25 mM nitrate and 40 mM sulphate as potential electron acceptors, and a mixture of the organic substrates acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate (5 mM each) and yeast extract (0.01%) as potential carbon sources and electron donors. Slurries were incubated at 60°C both with and without initial pasteurization at 80°C for 2 hours. In the enrichments containing both nitrate and sulphate, the concentration of nitrate decreased indicating metabolic activity of NRM. After a four-hour lag phase the rate of nitrate reduction increased and the concentration of nitrate dropped to zero after 10 hours of incubation. The concentration of nitrite increased as the reduction of nitrate progressed and reached 16.3 mM after 12 hours, before being consumed and falling to 4.4 mM after 19-day of incubation. No evidence for sulphate reduction was observed in these cultures during the 19-day incubation period. In contrast, the concentration of sulphate decreased up to 50% after one week incubation in controls containing only sulphate but no nitrate. Similar sulfate reduction rates were seen in the pasteurized controls suggesting the presence of heat resistant SRM, whereas nitrate reduction rates were lower in the

  15. Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation During Dissimilatory Sulfate Reduction from the Perspective of an Entire Microbial Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, B.; Lau, L.; Wing, B.

    2009-05-01

    Whether in the investigation of the most ancient life on Earth, examination of surface oxidation properties across geological timescales, or the estimation of microbial metabolism in inaccessible environments, dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) constrains biogeochemical processes in a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Pioneering work in the 1970s established the importance of DSR to biogeochemical processes and its potential as a geochemical tracer, and models for biological controls of DSR were published from empirical results of in vitro microbial cultures. Recent efforts have expanded upon this body of work and further extended toward multiple sulfur isotopes and through the more precise definition of the biological processes themselves. Resulting from these recent efforts is an rigorous description of DSR of the sulfur metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria. However, despite these efforts, the exact mechanisms of DSR within the scope of a complex system such as microbial metabolism remain incomplete and obscure. We will be presenting ongoing work coupling together recent mathematical models of isotopic fractionation with a flux-oriented, genomically-derived software model of the metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a patent sulfate-reducing bacterium. Our presentation will explore the effects on isotopic fractionation throughout the sulfate reduction pathway of D. vulgaris by a multitude of separate and distinct biological pathways within the bacterial metabolism. Further, we will be discussing both the pitfalls and promise of such an approach and its implications for future research.

  16. Sulfate reduction and copper precipitation by a Citrobacter sp. isolated from a mining area.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rongliang; Zhao, Benliang; Liu, Jinling; Huang, Xiongfei; Li, Qingfei; Brewer, Eric; Wang, Shizhong; Shi, Ning

    2009-05-30

    A strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria, designated strain 'DBM', was isolated from sediments of a mining area. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that it was related to members of the genus Citrobacter, with C. AzoR-4, C. freundii, C. braakii and C. werkmanii being the most closely related species (sequence similarity up to 98%). Few studies have been done on sulfate reduction ability in Citrobacter. Electron microscopy studies showed that the morphology of the strain DBM was rod-shaped. Strain DBM reduced 10mM of sulfate completely to sulfide within 7d, and it recovered its sulfate reduction ability after 7d of aerobic growth. Furthermore, strain DBM effectively precipitated 0.40 mM copper during its growth. Elemental composition of the resulting microbial precipitate was studied using electro-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and it was found that the ratio of S:Cu was 1.07. The result was consistent with the formation of copper sulfide. Heavy metal precipitation by Citrobacter sp. strain DBM was a phenomenon that may be useful in the bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

  17. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California.

    PubMed

    Kulp, T R; Hoeft, S E; Miller, L G; Saltikov, C; Murphy, J N; Han, S; Lanoil, B; Oremland, R S

    2006-10-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (approximately 90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (approximately 340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As]arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h(-1)) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h(-1)), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S]sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 x10(4) to 3.2 x 10(-6) h(-1)) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake.

  18. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Hoeft, S.E.; Miller, L.G.; Saltikov, C.; Murphy, J.N.; Han, S.; Lanoil, B.; Oremland, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (???90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (???340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As] arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h-1) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h-1), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S] sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 ?? 104 to 3.2 ?? 10-6 h-1) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Origin of secondary sulfate minerals on active andesitic stratovolcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimbelman, D.R.; Rye, R.O.; Breit, G.N.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfate minerals in altered rocks on the upper flanks and summits of active andesitic stratovolcanoes result from multiple processes. The origin of these sulfates at five active volcanoes, Citlalte??petl (Mexico), and Mount Adams, Hood, Rainier, and Shasta (Cascade Range, USA), was investigated using field observations, petrography, mineralogy, chemical modeling, and stable-isotope data. The four general groups of sulfate minerals identified are: (1) alunite group, (2) jarosite group, (3) readily soluble Fe- and Al-hydroxysulfates, and (4) simple alkaline-earth sulfates such as anhydrite, gypsum, and barite. Generalized assemblages of spatially associated secondary minerals were recognized: (1) alunite+silica??pyrite??kaolinite?? gypsum??sulfur, (2) jarosite+alunite+silica; (3) jarosite+smectite+silica??pyrite, (4) Fe- and Al-hydroxysulfates+silica, and (5) simple sulfates+silica??Al-hydroxysulfates??alunite. Isotopic data verify that all sulfate and sulfide minerals and their associated alteration assemblages result largely from the introduction of sulfur-bearing magmatic gases into meteoric water in the upper levels of the volcanoes. The sulfur and oxygen isotopic data for all minerals indicate the general mixing of aqueous sulfate derived from deep (largely disproportionation of SO2 in magmatic vapor) and shallow (oxidation of pyrite or H2S) sources. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data of alunite indicate the mixing of magmatic and meteoric fluids. Some alunite-group minerals, along with kaolinite, formed from sulfuric acid created by the disproportionation of SO2 in a condensing magmatic vapor. Such alunite, observed only in those volcanoes whose interiors are exposed by erosion or edifice collapse, may have ??34S values that reflect equilibrium (350??50 ??C) between aqueous sulfate and H2S. Alunite with ??34S values indicating disequilibrium between parent aqueous sulfate and H2S may form from aqueous sulfate created in higher level low

  20. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  1. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R; Adams, Melissa M; Joye, Samantha B; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2-C5) and longer alkanes. C2-C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1-C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ(13)C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (-3.5 and -6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1-C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3-C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial community

  2. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2–5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2–5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>−10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3

  3. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-08-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2-5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2-5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>-10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3) and

  4. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, M. F.; Moraes, M. C. F.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay.

  5. Fucans, but not fucomannoglucuronans, determine the biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria saccharina brown seaweed.

    PubMed

    Croci, Diego O; Cumashi, Albana; Ushakova, Natalia A; Preobrazhenskaya, Marina E; Piccoli, Antonio; Totani, Licia; Ustyuzhanina, Nadezhda E; Bilan, Maria I; Usov, Anatolii I; Grachev, Alexey A; Morozevich, Galina E; Berman, Albert E; Sanderson, Craig J; Kelly, Maeve; Di Gregorio, Patrizia; Rossi, Cosmo; Tinari, Nicola; Iacobelli, Stefano; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Nifantiev, Nikolay E

    2011-02-28

    Sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria saccharina (new name: Saccharina latissima) brown seaweed show promising activity for the treatment of inflammation, thrombosis, and cancer; yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties remain poorly understood. The aim of this work was to characterize, using in vitro and in vivo strategies, the anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant, anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumor activities of two main sulfated polysaccharide fractions obtained from L. saccharina: a) L.s.-1.0 fraction mainly consisting of O-sulfated mannoglucuronofucans and b) L.s.-1.25 fraction mainly composed of sulfated fucans. Both fractions inhibited leukocyte recruitment in a model of inflammation in rats, although L.s.-1.25 appeared to be more active than L.s.-1.0. Also, these fractions inhibited neutrophil adhesion to platelets under flow. Only fraction L.s.-1.25, but not L.s.-1.0, displayed anticoagulant activity as measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time. Investigation of these fractions in angiogenesis settings revealed that only L.s.-1.25 strongly inhibited fetal bovine serum (FBS) induced in vitro tubulogenesis. This effect correlated with a reduction in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels in L.s.-1.25-treated endothelial cells. Furthermore, only parent sulfated polysaccharides from L. saccharina (L.s.-P) and its fraction L.s.-1.25 were powerful inhibitors of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induced pathways. Consistently, the L.s.-1.25 fraction as well as L.s.-P successfully interfered with fibroblast binding to human bFGF. The incorporation of L.s.-P or L.s.-1.25, but not L.s.-1.0 into Matrigel plugs containing melanoma cells induced a significant reduction in hemoglobin content as well in the frequency of tumor-associated blood vessels. Moreover, i.p. administrations of L.s.-1.25, as well as L.s.-P, but not L.s.-1.0, resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth when inoculated into syngeneic mice. Finally, L

  6. Activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria under simulated reservoir conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnes, J.T.; Graue, A.; Lien, T. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that have been isolated from hot oilfield waters from subsea oil reservoirs in the North Sea. Experiments with these bacteria in a reservoir simulator indicate that SRB may maintain their activity in the conditions found in most North Sea reservoirs and, if precautions are not taken, may contribute to souring of the oil and gas.

  7. Sulfate reduction, molecular diversity, and copper amendment effects in bacterial communities enriched from sediments exposed to copper mining residues.

    PubMed

    Pavissich, Juan P; Silva, Macarena; González, Bernardo

    2010-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacterial communities from coastal sediments with a long-term exposure to copper (Cu)-mining residues were studied in lactate enrichments. The toxicity of excess copper may affect sulfate-reducing bacterial communities. Sulfate reduction was monitored by sulfate and organic acid measurements. Molecular diversity was analyzed by 16S rRNA, dissimilatory sulfate reduction dsrAB, and Cu translocating phospho-type adenosine triphosphatases (P-ATPases) cop-like gene sequence profiling. The influence of Cu amendment was tested in these enrichments. Results showed fast sulfate reduction mostly coupled to incomplete organic carbon oxidation and partial sulfate reduction inhibition due to copper amendment. The 16S rRNA clonal libraries analysis indicated that delta- and gamma-Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides dominated the enrichments. The dsrAB libraries revealed the presence of Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfovibrionaceae families-related sequences. Copper produced significant shifts (i.e., a decrease in the relative abundance of sulfate-reducing microorganisms) in the enriched bacterial community structure as determined by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling and multivariate analyses. Clonal libraries of cop-like sequences showed low richness in the enriched microbial communities, and a strong effect of copper on its relative abundance. Novel Cu-P(IB)-ATPase sequences encoding Cu resistance were detected. The present study indicates that Cu does not significantly affect sulfate reduction and genetic diversity of taxonomic and dissimilatory sulfate-reduction molecular markers. However, the diversity of Cu resistance genetic determinants was strongly modified by this toxic metal.

  8. Microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea sediments at the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent area: Influence of temperature and substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Isaksen, Mai F.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Alayse, Anne-Marie; Jannasch, Holger W.

    1994-08-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction was studied by a 35S tracer technique in sediments from the hydrothermal vent site in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico. In situ temperatures ranged from 2.7°C in the overlying seawater to > 120°C at 30 cm depth in the hydrothermal sediment. Sulfate reduction was measured in intact cores of hydrothermal sediment at 3°, 20°, 35°, 50°, 70°, and 90°C. The maximum rates of sulfate reduction were found in the upper 0-2 cm of the sediment and ranged from 32 nmol cm -3 d -1 at 90°C to 1563 nmol cm -3 d -1 at 70°C. The rates of sulfate reduction rapidly decreased with depth in the upper 0-10 cm of the sediment and the maximal depth-integrated rate (0-10 cm) was 70.3 mmol SO 42- m -2 d -1 at 70°C. In comparison, the sulfate reduction rate in nonhydrothermal sediment from the vent area was 0.85 mmol m -2 d -1 at the in situ temperature of about 3°C. The high subsurface rates of sulfate reduction in the hydrothermal vent area was attributed to an enhanced local substrate availability. In slurries of hydrothermal sediment, incubated at 10-120°C, microbial sulfate reduction extended to 102°C, and different temperature groups of microbial sulfate reducers had optimum temperatures at around 34°, 70°, and 80-88°C. The overall temperature response of thermophilic sulfate reduction was similar in hydrothermal sediment sampled at different sites. Addition of short-chain fatty acids and yeast extract to the sediment slurries stimulated sulfate reduction rates at all incubation temperatures. No sulfate reduction was detected in the temperature range from 102-120°C. Microbial rather than thermochemical sulfate reduction could be a possible source of H 2S in sulfide deposits with formation temperatures at about 100°C.

  9. Influence of sulfate reduction rates on the Phanerozoic sulfur isotope record

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Halevy, Itay; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Phanerozoic levels of atmospheric oxygen relate to the burial histories of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur. The sulfur cycle remains poorly constrained, however, leading to concomitant uncertainties in O2 budgets. Here we present experiments linking the magnitude of fractionations of the multiple sulfur isotopes to the rate of microbial sulfate reduction. The data demonstrate that such fractionations are controlled by the availability of electron donor (organic matter), rather than by the concentration of electron acceptor (sulfate), an environmental constraint that varies among sedimentary burial environments. By coupling these results with a sediment biogeochemical model of pyrite burial, we find a strong relationship between observed sulfur isotope fractionations over the last 200 Ma and the areal extent of shallow seafloor environments. We interpret this as a global dependency of the rate of microbial sulfate reduction on the availability of organic-rich sea-floor settings. However, fractionation during the early/mid-Paleozoic fails to correlate with shelf area. We suggest that this decoupling reflects a shallower paleoredox boundary, primarily confined to the water column in the early Phanerozoic. The transition between these two states begins during the Carboniferous and concludes approximately around the Triassic–Jurassic boundary, indicating a prolonged response to a Carboniferous rise in O2. Together, these results lay the foundation for decoupling changes in sulfate reduction rates from the global average record of pyrite burial, highlighting how the local nature of sedimentary processes affects global records. This distinction greatly refines our understanding of the S cycle and its relationship to the history of atmospheric oxygen. PMID:23733944

  10. Influence of sulfate reduction rates on the Phanerozoic sulfur isotope record.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Halevy, Itay; Bradley, Alexander S; Johnston, David T

    2013-07-09

    Phanerozoic levels of atmospheric oxygen relate to the burial histories of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur. The sulfur cycle remains poorly constrained, however, leading to concomitant uncertainties in O2 budgets. Here we present experiments linking the magnitude of fractionations of the multiple sulfur isotopes to the rate of microbial sulfate reduction. The data demonstrate that such fractionations are controlled by the availability of electron donor (organic matter), rather than by the concentration of electron acceptor (sulfate), an environmental constraint that varies among sedimentary burial environments. By coupling these results with a sediment biogeochemical model of pyrite burial, we find a strong relationship between observed sulfur isotope fractionations over the last 200 Ma and the areal extent of shallow seafloor environments. We interpret this as a global dependency of the rate of microbial sulfate reduction on the availability of organic-rich sea-floor settings. However, fractionation during the early/mid-Paleozoic fails to correlate with shelf area. We suggest that this decoupling reflects a shallower paleoredox boundary, primarily confined to the water column in the early Phanerozoic. The transition between these two states begins during the Carboniferous and concludes approximately around the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, indicating a prolonged response to a Carboniferous rise in O2. Together, these results lay the foundation for decoupling changes in sulfate reduction rates from the global average record of pyrite burial, highlighting how the local nature of sedimentary processes affects global records. This distinction greatly refines our understanding of the S cycle and its relationship to the history of atmospheric oxygen.

  11. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, A.-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  12. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-04

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  13. Biological sulfate reduction using gas-lift reactors fed with hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Houten, R.T. van; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lettinga, G. . Dept. of Environmental Technology)

    1994-08-20

    Feasibility and engineering aspects of biological sulfate reduction in gas-lift reactors were studied. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide were used as energy and carbon source. Attention was paid to biofilm formation, sulfide toxicity, sulfate conversion rate optimization, and gas-liquid mass transfer limitations. Sulfate-reducing bacteria formed stable biofilms on pumice particles. Biofilm formation was not observed when basalt particles were used. However, use of basalt particles led to the formation of granules of sulfate-reducing biomass. The sulfate-reducing bacteria, grown on pumice, easily adapted to free H[sub 2]S concentrations up to 450 mg/L. Biofilm growth rate then equilibrated biomass loss rate. These high free H[sub 2]S concentrations caused reversible inhibition rather than acute toxicity. When free H[sub 2]S concentrations were kept below 450 mg/L, a maximum sulfate conversion rate of 30 g SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  14. Degradation of dissolved organic monomers and short-chain fatty acids in sandy marine sediment by fermentation and sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The decay of a wide range of organic monomers (short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA's), amino acids, glucose and a pyrimidine) was studied in marine sediments using experimental plug flow-through reactors. The reactions were followed in the presence and absence of 10 mM SO 42-. Degradation stoichiometry of individual monomers (inflow concentration of 6 mM organic C) was traced by measuring organic (VFA's, amino acids) and inorganic (CO 2, NH 4+, SO 42-) compounds in the outflow. Fermentation of amino acids was efficient and complete during passage through anoxic sediment reactors. Aliphatic amino acids (alanine, serine and glutamate) were primarily recovered as CO 2 (24-34%), formate (3-22%) and acetate (41-83%), whereas only ˜1/3 of the aromatic amino acid (tyrosine) was recovered as CO 2 (13%) and acetate (20%). Fermentation of glucose and cytosine was also efficient (78-86%) with CO 2 (30-35%), formate (3%) and acetate (28-33%) as the primary products. Fermentation of VFA's (acetate, propionate and butyrate), on the other hand, appeared to be product inhibited. The presence of SO 42- markedly stimulated VFA degradation (29-45% efficiency), and these compounds were recovered as CO 2 (17% for butyrate to 100% for acetate) and acetate (51% and 82% for propionate and butyrate, respectively). When reaction stoichiometry during fermentation is compared with compound depletion during sulfate reduction, the higher proportion CO 2 recovery is consistent with lower acetate and formate accumulation. Our results therefore suggest that fermentation reactions mediate the initial degradation of added organic compounds, even during active sulfate reduction. Fermentative degradation stoichiometry also suggested significant H 2 production, and >50% of sulfate reduction appeared to be fuelled by H 2. Furthermore, our results suggest that fermentation was the primary deamination step during degradation of the amino acids and cytosine.

  15. Effects of imposed salinity gradients on dissimilatory arsenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and other microbial processes in sediments from two California soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Kulp, T R; Han, S; Saltikov, C W; Lanoil, B D; Zargar, K; Oremland, R S

    2007-08-01

    Salinity effects on microbial community structure and on potential rates of arsenate reduction, arsenite oxidation, sulfate reduction, denitrification, and methanogenesis were examined in sediment slurries from two California soda lakes. We conducted experiments with Mono Lake and Searles Lake sediments over a wide range of salt concentrations (25 to 346 g liter(-1)). With the exception of sulfate reduction, rates of all processes demonstrated an inverse relationship to total salinity. However, each of these processes persisted at low but detectable rates at salt saturation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes amplified from As(V) reduction slurries revealed that distinct microbial populations grew at low (25 to 50 g liter(-1)), intermediate (100 to 200 g liter(-1)), and high (>300 g liter(-1)) salinity. At intermediate and high salinities, a close relative of a cultivated As-respiring halophile was present. These results suggest that organisms adapted to more dilute conditions can remain viable at high salinity and rapidly repopulate the lake during periods of rising lake level. In contrast to As reduction, sulfate reduction in Mono Lake slurries was undetectable at salt saturation. Furthermore, sulfate reduction was excluded from Searles Lake sediments at any salinity despite the presence of abundant sulfate. Sulfate reduction occurred in Searles Lake sediment slurries only following inoculation with Mono Lake sediment, indicating the absence of sulfate-reducing flora. Experiments with borate-amended Mono Lake slurries suggest that the notably high (0.46 molal) concentration of borate in the Searles Lake brine was responsible for the exclusion of sulfate reducers from that ecosystem.

  16. Effects of imposed salinity gradients on dissimilatory arsenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and other microbial processes in sediments from two California soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Han, S.; Saltikov, C.W.; Lanoil, B.D.; Zargar, K.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Salinity effects on microbial community structure and on potential rates of arsenate reduction, arsenite oxidation, sulfate reduction, denitrification, and methanogenesis were examined in sediment slurries from two California soda lakes. We conducted experiments with Mono Lake and Searles Lake sediments over a wide range of salt concentrations (25 to 346 g liter-1). With the exception of sulfate reduction, rates of all processes demonstrated an inverse relationship to total salinity. However, each of these processes persisted at low but detectable rates at salt saturation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes amplified from As(V) reduction slurries revealed that distinct microbial populations grew at low (25 to 50 g liter-1), intermediate (100 to 200 g liter-1), and high (>300 g liter-1) salinity. At intermediate and high salinities, a close relative of a cultivated As-respiring halophile was present. These results suggest that organisms adapted to more dilute conditions can remain viable at high salinity and rapidly repopulate the lake during periods of rising lake level. In contrast to As reduction, sulfate reduction in Mono Lake slurries was undetectable at salt saturation. Furthermore, sulfate reduction was excluded from Searles Lake sediments at any salinity despite the presence of abundant sulfate. Sulfate reduction occurred in Searles Lake sediment slurries only following inoculation with Mono Lake sediment, indicating the absence of sulfate-reducing flora. Experiments with borate-amended Mono Lake slurries suggest that the notably high (0.46 molal) concentration of borate in the Searles Lake brine was responsible for the exclusion of sulfate reducers from that ecosystem. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-1 (CSGalNAcT-1) involved in chondroitin sulfate initiation: Impact of sulfation on activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Gulberti, Sandrine; Jacquinet, Jean-Claude; Chabel, Matthieu; Ramalanjaona, Nick; Magdalou, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Ouzzine, Mohamed; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2012-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assembly initiates through the formation of a linkage tetrasaccharide region serving as a primer for both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) chain polymerization. A possible role for sulfation of the linkage structure and of the constitutive disaccharide unit of CS chains in the regulation of CS-GAG chain synthesis has been suggested. To investigate this, we determined whether sulfate substitution of galactose (Gal) residues of the linkage region or of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) of the disaccharide unit influences activity and specificity of chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-1 (CSGalNAcT-1), a key glycosyltransferase of CS biosynthesis. We synthesized a series of sulfated and unsulfated analogs of the linkage oligosaccharide and of the constitutive unit of CS and tested these molecules as potential acceptor substrates for the recombinant human CSGalNAcT-1. We show here that sulfation at C4 or C6 of the Gal residues markedly influences CSGalNAcT-1 initiation activity and catalytic efficiency. Kinetic analysis indicates that CSGalNAcT-1 exhibited 3.6-, 1.6-, and 2.2-fold higher enzymatic efficiency due to lower K(m) values toward monosulfated trisaccharides substituted at C4 or C6 position of Gal1, and at C6 of Gal2, respectively, compared with the unsulfated oligosaccharide. This highlights the critical influence of Gal substitution on both CSGalNAcT-1 activity and specifity. No GalNAcT activity was detected toward sulfated and unsulfated analogs of the CS constitutive disaccharide (GlcA-β1,3-GalNAc), indicating that CSGalNAcT-1 was involved in initiation but not in elongation of CS chains. Our results strongly suggest that sulfation of the linkage region acts as a regulatory signal in CS chain initiation.

  18. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations.

  19. Intracellular phosphorous compounds and the reversibility of dissimilatory sulfate reduction: what do we learn from oxygen isotopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, B.

    2012-12-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) leads to an overprint of the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate by the oxygen isotope composition of water. This overprint is assumed to occur via cell-internally formed sulfuroxy intermediates in the sulfate reduction pathway. Unlike sulfate, the sulfuroxy intermediates can readily exchange oxygen isotopes with water. Subsequent to the oxygen isotope exchange, these intermediates, e.g. sulfite, are re-oxidized by reversible enzymatic reactions to sulfate, incorporating the oxygen used for the re-oxidation of the sulfur intermediates. Consequently, the rate and expression of DSR-mediated oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water depends not only on the oxygen isotope exchange between sulfuroxy intermediates and water, but also on cell-internal forward and backward reactions. The latter are the very same processes that control the extent of sulfur isotope fractionation expressed by DSR. In the stepwise reduction of sulfate to sulfide, intracellular phosphorous compounds are pivotal for the conversion of intracellular sulfate to sulfite. Because of thermodynamics, the concentration of thereby produced intracellular phosphorous compounds affects the reversibility of this reduction step and thereby impacts the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate. Consequently, there should be a link between cell-internal management of phosphorous pools and the expression of sulfur and oxygen isotope effects. The measurement of multiple sulfur isotope fractionation has successfully been applied to obtain information on the reversibility of individual enzymatically catalyzed steps in DSR. Similarly, also the oxygen isotope signature of sulfate reveals information on the reversibility of DSR. High reversibility (i.e. large isotope effects) is generally assumed to be tied to low energy availability. This raises the question if and how cell-internal management of phosphorous pools could be tied to survival strategies under energy limitation.

  20. Characterization, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of sulfated derivatives of a water-insoluble polysaccharides from Dictyophora indusiata.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Xu, Jingjing; Fu, Haitian; Chen, Jinghua; Xu, Xin

    2015-04-01

    The present study described the characterization and biological properties of water‑soluble sulfated polysaccharides prepared from water‑insoluble polysaccharide (DIP), which were extracted from Dictyophora indusiata. The sulfation of DIP was performed using the chlorosulfonic acid‑pyridine method. The water solubilities of the sulfated derivatives were measured at room temperature according to the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. The scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals and 1,1‑diphenyl‑2‑picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) as determined, together with the reduction ability of the sulfated polysaccharides. The cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects of DIP and the sulfated derivatives on MCF‑7 and B16 cells were then determined using an MTT assay. The substitution degrees of the sulfated polysaccharides were 0.584 (S1‑DIP), 0.989 (S2‑DIP) and 1.549 (S3‑DIP) according to barium chloride‑gelatin nephelometry. Infrared spectroscopy and 13C‑nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that the substitution of S‑DIP occurred mainly at the C‑6 position, followed by the C‑4 and C‑2 positions. A significant increase was noted in the antioxidant activity of the sulfated derivatives compared with that of DIP. In addition, the S‑DIPs exhibited a more marked reducing capacity and clearing activity of hydroxyl radicals and DPPH. This indicated that the antioxidant capacity of the polysaccharides was significantly higher following sulfation. Furthermore, in in vitro cell investigations, DIP exhibited no inhibitory effects on the growth of the B16 or MCF‑7 tumor cells. However, the sulfated derivatives exerted marked inhibitory effects on these cell lines. Sulfate modification may therefore contribute to an improvement in water solubility and in the antioxidant and antitumor activities of natural DIP.

  1. Temperature effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by two strains of the hyperthermophilic Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kristen; Heyer, Anne; Canfield, Donald E; Hoek, Joost; Habicht, Kirsten S

    2009-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by two strains of the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (strains VC-16 and Z) was explored over the entire temperature range of growth. The optimal cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (14 fmol cell(-1) h(-1)) was found at 82-84 degrees C but growth was measured as low as 54 degrees C. The fractionation ranged between 0.52 per thousand and 27 per thousand, with largest fractionations were found at intermediate temperatures and the smallest fractionations at the lowest and highest temperatures. There was an inverse relationship between the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate and fractionation, and the cell-specific rate was a good indicator of the expected fractionations regardless of whether temperature or substrate concentrations controlled the rate. Comparison of the fractionation trend found in this study with similar measurements for seven other sulfate-reducers showed that sulfate-reducing organisms respond to temperature in three different ways and this correlated with their maximum fractionation value, but not with the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate. A sulfur isotope model was used to reproduce the observed variation of fractionation with temperature. This approach predicted the rate of internal sulfur transformations as having the major influence on the observed fractionations in the intermediate temperature range, whereas the exchange of sulfate across the cell membrane controls fractionation at low and high temperatures.

  2. Experimental investigation on thermochemical sulfate reduction by H2S initiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, T.; Amrani, A.; Ellis, G.S.; Ma, Q.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to catalyze thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by hydrocarbons (HC), but the reaction mechanism remains unclear. To understand the mechanism of this catalytic reaction, a series of isothermal gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted at 330 ??C for 24 h under a constant confining pressure of 24.1 MPa. The reactants used were saturated HC (sulfur-free) and CaSO4 in the presence of variable H2S partial pressures at three different pH conditions. The experimental results showed that the in-situ pH of the aqueous solution (herein, in-situ pH refers to the calculated pH of aqueous solution under the experimental conditions) can significantly affect the rate of the TSR reaction. A substantial increase in the TSR reaction rate was recorded with a decrease in the in-situ pH value of the aqueous solution involved. A positive correlation between the rate of TSR and the initial partial pressure of H2S occurred under acidic conditions (at pH ???3-3.5). However, sulfate reduction at pH ???5.0 was undetectable even at high initial H2S concentrations. To investigate whether the reaction of H2S(aq) and HSO4- occurs at pH ???3, an additional series of isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted with CaSO4 and variable H2S partial pressures in the absence of HC at the same experimental temperature and pressure conditions. CaSO4 reduction was not measurable in the absence of paraffin even with high H2S pressure and acidic conditions. These experimental observations indicate that the formation of organosulfur intermediates from H2S reacting with hydrocarbons may play a significant role in sulfate reduction under our experimental conditions rather than the formation of elemental sulfur from H2S reacting with sulfate as has been suggested previously (Toland W. G. (1960) Oxidation of organic compounds with aqueous sulphate. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 82, 1911-1916). Quantification of labile organosulfur compounds (LSC), such as thiols

  3. Reduction of Hexavalent Uranium from Organic Complexes by Sulfate- and Iron-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, R.; Robinson, K. G.; Reed, G. D.; Sayler, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of organic-hexavalent-uranium [U(VI)] complexation on U(VI) reduction by a sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and an iron-reducing bacterium (Shewanella alga) was evaluated. Four aliphatic ligands (acetate, malonate, oxalate, and citrate) and an aromatic ligand (tiron [4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid]) were used to study complexed-uranium bioavailability. The trends in uranium reduction varied with the nature and the amount of U(VI)-organic complex formed and the type of bacteria present. D. desulfuricans rapidly reduced uranium from a monodentate aliphatic (acetate) complex. However, reduction from multidentate aliphatic complexes (malonate, oxalate, and citrate) was slower. A decrease in the amount of organic-U(VI) complex in solution significantly increased the rate of reduction. S. alga reduced uranium more rapidly from multidentate aliphatic complexes than from monodentate aliphatic complexes. The rate of reduction decreased with a decrease in the amount of multidentate complexes present. Uranium from an aromatic (tiron) complex was readily available for reduction by D. desulfuricans, while an insignificant level of U(VI) from the tiron complex was reduced by S. alga. These results indicate that selection of bacteria for rapid uranium reduction will depend on the organic composition of waste streams. PMID:16535729

  4. Gas souring by thermochemical sulfate reduction at 140{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, R.H.; Smalley, P.C.; Oxtoby, N.H.

    1995-06-01

    Natural gas in the Permian-Triassic Khuff Formation of Abu Dhabi contains variable amounts of H{sub 2}S. Gas souring occurred through thermochemical sulfate reduction of anhydrite by hydrocarbon gases. Sour gas is observed only in reservoirs hotter than a critical reaction temperature: 140{degrees}C. Petrographic examination of core from a wide depth range showed that the anhydrite reactant has been replaced by calcite reaction product only in samples deeper than 4300 m. Gas composition data show that only reservoirs deeper than 4300 m contain large quantities of H{sub 2}S (i.e., >10%). At present-day geothermal gradients, 4300 m is equivalent to 140{degrees}C. Fluid inclusion analysis of calcite reaction product has shown that calcite growth only became significant at temperatures greater than 140{degrees}C. Thus, three independent indicators all show that 140{degrees}C is the critical temperature above which gas souring by thermochemical sulfate reduction begins. The previously suggested lower temperature thresholds for other sour gas provinces (80-130{degrees}C) derive from gas composition data that may not allow adequately either for the reservoir temperature history or for the migration of gas generated at higher temperatures into present traps. Conversely, published proposals for higher threshold temperature (180-200{degrees}C) derive from short duration experimental data that are not easily extrapolated to geologically realistic temperatures and time scales. Therefore, the temperature of 140{degrees}C derived from our study of the Khuff Formation may be the best estimate of temperature required for in-situ thermochemical sulfate reduction to produce the high H{sub 2}S concentrations encountered in deep carbonate gas reservoirs.

  5. Benthic sulfate reduction along the Chesapeake Bay central channel. I. Spatial trends and controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Capone, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    Factors controlling the spatial distribution of benthic sulfate reduction (SR) were investigated at 3 stations [upper (UB), mid (MB) and lower bay (LB)] along the Chesapeake Bay (eastern USA) central channel from early spring through late fall, 1989 to 1994. Annual rates of 0 to 12 cm depth-integrated SR were 0.96, 9.62 and 6.33 mol S m-2 yr-1 for UB, MB and LB, respectively, as calculated from 35SO42- incubations. SR was carbon limited at UB, LB, and at the sediment surface at MB, and SO42- limited at depth at MB. Temperature explained 33 to 68% of the variability in annual rates, with an apparent influence on SR which increased in the seaward direction in surface sediments. We speculate that the enhanced response of SR to temperature in LB surface sediments was linked to seasonal variations in macrofaunal activity associated with temperature. Estimates of reduced-S burial indicated that only 4 to 8% of sulfur reduced annually was buried as Fe-S minerals at MB and LB, with the remainder presumably being reoxidized. In contrast, >50% of the sulfur reduced annually was buried at UB, due to comparatively low SR rates and the high concentration of reactive iron in the oligohaline region. SR mineralized 18 to 32% of the annual primary production. Our results indicate that organic quality may be more important than the absolute quantity of organic loading in dictating the magnitude of benthic SR rates along an estuarine gradient. Spatial trends in SR reflected the combined influence of deposited organic matter quality and quantity, SO42- availability, the presence or absence of benthic macrofauna, overlying water dissolved O2 conditions, reduced-S reoxidation dynamics, and iron-sulfide mineral formation.

  6. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  7. Short-term endproducts of sulfate reduction in a salt marsh: Formation of acid volatile sulfides, elemental sulfur, and pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Gary M.; Howes, B. L.; Dacey, J. W. H.

    1985-07-01

    Rates of sulfate reduction, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production in sediments from a short Spartina alterniflora zone of Great Sippewissett Marsh were measured simultaneously during late summer. Surface sediments (0-2 cm) were dominated by aerobic metabolism which accounted for about 45% of the total carbon dioxide production over 0-15 cm. Rates of sulfate reduction agreed well with rates of total carbon dioxide production below 2 cm depth indicating that sulfate reduction was the primary pathway for sub-surface carbon metabolism. Sulfate reduction rates were determined using a radiotracer technique coupled with a chromous chloride digestion and carbon disulfide extraction of the sediment to determine the extent of formation of radiolabelled elemental sulfur and pyrite during shortterm (48 hr) incubations. In the surface 10 cm of the marsh sediments investigated, about 50% of the reduced radiosulfur was recovered as dissolved or acid volatile sulfides, 37% as carbon disulfide extractable sulfur, and only about 13% was recovered in a fraction operationally defined as pyrite. Correlations between the extent of sulfate depletion in the marsh sediments and the concentrations of dissolved and acid volatile sulfides supported the results of the radiotracer work. Our data suggest that sulfides and elemental sulfur may be major short-term end-products of sulfate reduction in salt marshes.

  8. Synthesis and anticoagulant activity of polyureas containing sulfated carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongshun; Shaw, Maureen A; Mullins, Eric S; Kirley, Terence L; Ayres, Neil

    2014-12-08

    Polyurea-based synthetic glycopolymers containing sulfated glucose, mannose, glucosamine, or lactose as pendant groups have been synthesized by step-growth polymerization of hexamethylene diisocyanate and corresponding secondary diamines. The obtained polymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nonsulfated polymers showed similar results to the commercially available biomaterial polyurethane TECOFLEX in a platelet adhesion assay. The average degree of sulfation after reaction with SO3 was calculated from elemental analysis and found to be between three and four -OSO3 groups per saccharide. The blood-compatibility of the synthetic polymers was measured using activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, anti-IIa, and anti-Xa assays. Activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and thrombin time results indicated that the mannose and lactose based polymers had the highest anticoagulant activities among all the sulfated polymers. The mechanism of action of the polymers appears to be mediated via an anti-IIa pathway rather than an anti-Xa pathway.

  9. Synthesis and Anticoagulant Activity of Polyureas Containing Sulfated Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyurea-based synthetic glycopolymers containing sulfated glucose, mannose, glucosamine, or lactose as pendant groups have been synthesized by step-growth polymerization of hexamethylene diisocyanate and corresponding secondary diamines. The obtained polymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nonsulfated polymers showed similar results to the commercially available biomaterial polyurethane TECOFLEX in a platelet adhesion assay. The average degree of sulfation after reaction with SO3 was calculated from elemental analysis and found to be between three and four −OSO3 groups per saccharide. The blood-compatibility of the synthetic polymers was measured using activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, anti-IIa, and anti-Xa assays. Activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and thrombin time results indicated that the mannose and lactose based polymers had the highest anticoagulant activities among all the sulfated polymers. The mechanism of action of the polymers appears to be mediated via an anti-IIa pathway rather than an anti-Xa pathway. PMID:25329742

  10. Glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: activation by ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Kazumi; Ueno, Yoshie; Oda, Kohei

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) gene from Lactobacillus brevis IFO12005 (Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 61, 1168-1171 (1997)), was cloned and expressed. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 99.6% and 53.1% identity with GAD of L. brevis ATCC367 and L. lactis respectively. The His-tagged recombinant GAD showed an optimum pH of 4.5-5.0, and 54 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The GAD activity and stability was significantly dependent on the ammonium sulfate concentration, as observed in authentic GAD. Gel filtration showed that the inactive form of the GAD was a dimer. In contrast, the ammonium sulfate-activated form was a tetramer. CD spectral analyses at pH 5.5 revealed that the structures of the tetramer and the dimer were similar. Treatment of the GAD with high concentrations of ammonium sulfate and subsequent dilution with sodium glutamate was essential for tetramer formation and its activation. Thus the biochemical properties of the GAD from L. brevis IFO12005 were significantly different from those from other sources.

  11. Sulfur and oxygen isotope study of sulfate reduction in experiments with natural populations from Fællestrand, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, James; Canfield, Don E.; Masterson, Andrew; Bao, Huiming; Johnston, David

    2008-06-01

    This study investigates the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionations of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and works to reconcile the relationships between the oxygen and sulfur isotopic and elemental systems. We report results of experiments with natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria using sediment and seawater from a marine lagoon at Fællestrand on the northern shore of the island of Fyn, Denmark. The experiments yielded relatively large magnitude sulfur isotope fractionations for dissimilatory sulfate reduction (up to approximately 45‰ for 34S/32S) with higher δ18O accompanying higher δ34S, similar to that observed in previous studies. The seawater used in the experiments was spiked by addition of 17O-labeled water and the 17O content of residual sulfate was found to depend on the fraction of sulfate reduced in the experiments. The 17O data provides evidence for recycling of sulfur from metabolic intermediates and for an 18O/16O fractionation of ∼25-30‰ for dissimilatory sulfate reduction. The close correlation between the 17O data and the sulfur isotope data suggests that isotopic exchange between cell water and external water (reactor water) was rapid under experimental conditions. The molar ratio of oxygen exchange to sulfate reduction was found to be about 2.5. This value is slightly lower than observed in studies of natural ecosystems [e.g., Wortmann U. G., Chernyavsky B., Bernasconi S. M., Brunner B., Böttcher M. E. and Swart P. K. (2007) Oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of pore water sulfate in the deep biosphere: dominance of isotope exchange reactions with ambient water during microbial sulfate reduction (ODP Site 1130). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta71, 4221-4232]. Using recent models of sulfur isotope fractionations we find that our combined sulfur and oxygen isotopic data places constraints on the proportion of sulfate recycled to the medium (78-96%), the proportion of sulfur intermediate sulfite that was recycled by way of APS to sulfate

  12. Benthic sulfate reduction along the Chesapeake Bay central channel. II. Temporal controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Boynton, W.R.; Capone, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual controls of benthic sulfate reduction (SR) were examined at 3 sites (upper [UB], mid- [MB] and lower [LB] bay) along the Chesapeake Bay central channel, from early spring through fall, for 6 yr (1989 to 1994). The combined influences of temperature, sulfate, organic loading and bioturbation affected seasonal SR rates differently in the 3 regions. Consistently low SR rates at UB resulted from low overlying-water sulfate concentrations and the dominance of refractory organic terrestrial material. Combined seasonal variation in temperature and sulfate accounted for 50% of the annual variability in 0 to 2 cm depth interval SR rates, while sediment organic content had no significant seasonal influence. In contrast, MB and LB sites had high rates of SR fostered by high levels of overlying water SO42- and organic input dominated by labile phytoplankton detritus. New organic loading (measured as chl a) stimulated 0 to 2 cm SR during spring at both sites. Combined organic quantity (as particulate C and/or N) and temperature accounted for > 75% of the variability in 0 to 2 cm SR at MB during spring and fall. Molecular diffusion supplied 25 to 45% of the SO 42- needed to fuel 0 to 12 cm depth interval SR at MB, with the balance presumably supplied by S-recycling. Interannual differences in summertime SR rates were linked to the extent of freshwater flow during spring, with high-flow years associated with high SR rates at UB and MB, and low rates at LB. The negative trend between benthic SR and river flow at LB may result from the up-estuary transport of senescing organic matter in bottom water, which increases in the lower reach of the estuary with increasing freshwater inflow.

  13. Structure and biological activity of a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from the sea cucumber Cucumaria japonica.

    PubMed

    Ustyuzhanina, Nadezhda E; Bilan, Maria I; Dmitrenok, Andrey S; Shashkov, Alexander S; Kusaykin, Mikhail I; Stonik, Valentin A; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Usov, Anatolii I

    2016-05-01

    A fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS) was isolated from the body wall of Pacific sea cucumber Cucumaria japonicaby extraction in the presence of papain followed by Cetavlon precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. FCS was shown to contain D-GalNAc, D-GlcA, L-Fuc and sulfate in molar proportions of about 1:1:1:4.5. Structure of FCS was elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and methylation analysis of the native polysaccharide and products of its desulfation and carboxyl reduction. The polysaccharide was shown to contain a typical chondroitin core → 3)-β-D-GalNAc-(1 → 4)-β-D-GlcA-(1 →. Sulfate groups in this core occupy O-4 and the majority of O-6 of GalNAc. Fucosyl branches are represented by 3,4- and 2,4-disulfated units in a ratio of 4:1 and are linked to O-3 of GlcA. In addition, ∼ 33% of GlcA are 3-O-sulfated, and hence, the presence of short fucooligosaccharide chains side by side with monofucosyl branches cannot be excluded. FCS was shown to inhibit platelets aggregation in vitro mediated by collagen and ristocetin, but not adenosine diphosphate, and demonstrated significant anticoagulant activity, which is connected with its ability to enhance inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa by antithrombin III, as well as to influence von Willebrand factor activity. The latest property significantly distinguished FCS from low-molecular-weight heparin.

  14. Structure and anti-metapneumovirus activity of sulfated galactans from the red seaweed Cryptonemia seminervis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gabriella S; Duarte, Maria E R; Colodi, Franciely G; Noseda, Miguel D; Ferreira, Luciana G; Berté, Siliane D; Cavalcanti, Jéssica F; Santos, Norma; Romanos, Maria T V

    2014-01-30

    The anti-HMPV (human metapneumovirus) activity was determined for sulfated dl-hybrid galactans obtained from the red seaweed Cryptonemia seminervis and their depolymerized products obtained by reductive partial hydrolysis. Structural studies carried out in three homogeneous depolymerized fractions DS-1, DS-2e and DS-3 (Mw of 51.6-63.8 kDa) showed that these galactans present different chemical characteristics, as monosaccharide composition, content of sulfate groups (14.1-29.9%) and agaran:carrageenan molar ratio diads, 2.7:1 for DS-1 and DS-2e and 1:1 for DS-3. The sulfate groups are located principally on C-2 of β-d-galactopyranose and 4,6-O-(1'-carboxyethylidene)-β-d-galactopyranose residues and on C-6 of α-galactose residues. Sulfated dl-galactans and their depolymerized products exhibited antiviral activity at a very early stage of the viral infection cycle. All fractions, except DS-2e inhibited HMPV replication by binding to the viral particle. Besides depolymerized galactans DS-2e and DS-3 inhibited the recognition of cell receptor by HMPV and penetration to the host cell, respectively.

  15. Mercury methylation and sulfate reduction rates in mangrove sediments, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: The role of different microorganism consortia.

    PubMed

    Correia, Raquel Rose Silva; Guimarães, Jean Remy Davée

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown Hg methylation in mangrove sediments, however, little is known about the different microorganism consortia involved. We investigated the participation of prokaryotes in general, iron-reducing bacteria-IRB, sulfate-reducing bacteria-SRB, methanogens and fungi in Hg methylation and sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in mangrove sediments using iron amendments for IRB and specific inhibitors for the other microorganisms. Sediment samples were collected from two mangrove zones, tidal flat and mangrove forest (named root sediments). Samples were incubated with (203)Hg or (35)SO4(2-) and Me(203)Hg/(35)Sulfur were measured by liquid scintillation. Methylmercury (MeHg) formation was significantly reduced when SRB (87.7%), prokaryotes (76%) and methanogens (36.5%) were inhibited in root sediments, but only SRB (51.6%) and prokaryotes (57.3%) in tidal flat. However, in the tidal flat, inhibition of methanogens doubled Hg methylation (104.5%). All inhibitors (except fungicide) significantly reduced SRR in both zones. In iron amended tidal flat samples, Hg methylation increased 56.5% at 100 μg g(-1) and decreased at 500 and 1000 μg g(-1) (57.8 and 82%). In the roots region, however, MeHg formation gradually decreased in response to Fe amendments from 100 μg g(-1) (37.7%) to 1000 μg g(-1) (93%). SRR decreased in all iron amendments. This first simultaneous evaluation of Hg methylation and sulfate-reduction and of the effect of iron and inhibitors on both processes suggest that SRB are important Hg methylators in mangrove sediments. However, it also suggests that SRB activity could not explain all MeHg formation. This implies the direct or indirect participation of other microorganisms such as IRB and methanogens and a complex relationship among these groups.

  16. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K.

    2014-01-28

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl{sub 2}⋅8H{sub 2}O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  17. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl2ṡ8H2O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  18. Structural evolution of an alkali sulfate activated slag cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of sodium sulfate content and curing duration (from fresh paste up to 18 months) on the binder structure of sodium sulfate activated slag cements was evaluated. Isothermal calorimetry results showed an induction period spanning the first three days after mixing, followed by an acceleration-deceleration peak corresponding to the formation of bulk reaction products. Ettringite, a calcium aluminium silicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) phase, and a hydrotalcite-like Mg-Al layered double hydroxide have been identified as the main reaction products, independent of the Na2SO4 dose. No changes in the phase assemblage were detected in the samples with curing from 1 month up to 18 months, indicating a stable binder structure. The most significant changes upon curing at advanced ages observed were growth of the AFt phase and an increase in silicate chain length in the C-A-S-H, resulting in higher strength.

  19. Hexavalent molybdenum reduction to mo-blue by a sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-degrading Klebsiella oxytoca strain DRY14.

    PubMed

    Halmi, M I E; Zuhainis, S W; Yusof, M T; Shaharuddin, N A; Helmi, W; Shukor, Y; Syed, M A; Ahmad, S A

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria with the ability to tolerate, remove, and/or degrade several xenobiotics simultaneously are urgently needed for remediation of polluted sites. A previously isolated bacterium with sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS-) degrading capacity was found to be able to reduce molybdenum to the nontoxic molybdenum blue. The optimal pH, carbon source, molybdate concentration, and temperature supporting molybdate reduction were pH 7.0, glucose at 1.5% (w/v), between 25 and 30 mM, and 25°C, respectively. The optimum phosphate concentration for molybdate reduction was 5 mM. The Mo-blue produced exhibits an absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. None of the respiratory inhibitors tested showed any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting that the electron transport system of this bacterium is not the site of molybdenum reduction. Chromium, cadmium, silver, copper, mercury, and lead caused approximately 77, 65, 77, 89, 80, and 80% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. Ferrous and stannous ions markedly increased the activity of molybdenum-reducing activity in this bacterium. The maximum tolerable concentration of SDS as a cocontaminant was 3 g/L. The characteristics of this bacterium make it a suitable candidate for molybdenum bioremediation of sites cocontaminated with detergent pollutant.

  20. Hexavalent Molybdenum Reduction to Mo-Blue by a Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulfate-Degrading Klebsiella oxytoca Strain DRY14

    PubMed Central

    Halmi, M. I. E.; Zuhainis, S. W.; Yusof, M. T.; Shaharuddin, N. A.; Helmi, W.; Shukor, Y.; Syed, M. A.; Ahmad, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria with the ability to tolerate, remove, and/or degrade several xenobiotics simultaneously are urgently needed for remediation of polluted sites. A previously isolated bacterium with sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS-) degrading capacity was found to be able to reduce molybdenum to the nontoxic molybdenum blue. The optimal pH, carbon source, molybdate concentration, and temperature supporting molybdate reduction were pH 7.0, glucose at 1.5% (w/v), between 25 and 30 mM, and 25°C, respectively. The optimum phosphate concentration for molybdate reduction was 5 mM. The Mo-blue produced exhibits an absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. None of the respiratory inhibitors tested showed any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting that the electron transport system of this bacterium is not the site of molybdenum reduction. Chromium, cadmium, silver, copper, mercury, and lead caused approximately 77, 65, 77, 89, 80, and 80% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. Ferrous and stannous ions markedly increased the activity of molybdenum-reducing activity in this bacterium. The maximum tolerable concentration of SDS as a cocontaminant was 3 g/L. The characteristics of this bacterium make it a suitable candidate for molybdenum bioremediation of sites cocontaminated with detergent pollutant. PMID:24383052

  1. Sulfur in serpentinized oceanic peridotites: Serpentinization processes and microbial sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    The mineralogy, contents, and isotopic compositions of sulfur in oceanic serpentinites reflect variations in temperatures and fluid fluxes. Serpentinization of <1 Ma peridotites at Hess Deep occurred at high temperatures (200??-400??C) and low water/rock ratios. Oxidation of ferrous iron to magnetite maintained low fO2and produced a reduced, low-sulfur assemblage including NiFe alloy. Small amounts of sulfate reduction by thermophilic microbes occurred as the system cooled, producing low-??34S sulfide (1.5??? to -23.7???). In contrast, serpentinization of Iberian Margin peridotites occurred at low temperatures (???20??-200??C) and high water/rock ratios. Complete serpentinization and consumption of ferrous iron allowed evolution to higher fO2. Microbial reduction of seawater sulfate resulted in addition of low-??34S sulfide (-15 to -43???) and formation of higher-sulfur assemblages that include valleriite and pyrite. The high SO4/total S ratio of Hess Deep serpentinites (0.89) results in an increase of total sulfur and high ??34S of total sulfur (mean ??? 8???). In contrast, Iberian Margin serpentinites gained large amounts of 34S-poor sulfide (mean total S = 3800 ppm), and the high sulfide/total S ratio (0.61) results in a net decrease in ??34S of total sulfur (mean ??? -5???). Thus serpentinization is a net sink for seawater sulfur, but the amount fixed and its isotopic composition vary significantly. Serpentinization may result in uptake of 0.4-14 ?? 1012 g S yr-1 from the oceans, comparable to isotopic exchange in mafic rocks of seafloor hydrothermal systems and approaching global fluxes of riverine sulfate input and sedimentary sulfide output.

  2. Sulfate reduction and microbial abundance in saline, alkaline Lake Van (Eastern Anatolia, Turkey) - ICDP Expedition 5034

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Glombitza, C.; PaeloVAN Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    Lake Van is the fourth lagest terminal lake in the world. It is located on the Eastern Anatolian High Plateau (Turkey) and surrounded by two semi-active vulcanos (Nemruth Dagi and Syphan Dagi). Evaporation processes, chemical weathering of vulcanic rocks and hydrothermal activity have created an environment of extreme alkalinity (155 m eql-1, pH 9.81) and salinity (21.4 ‰) (Kempe et al., 1991). Sediments of saline and highly alkaline soda lakes, such as Lake Van, represent one of the most extreme environments on Earth (Stam et al., 2010). These sediments host extremophilic microorganisms (alkaliphiles and halophiles) that have adapted their metabolism to these peculiar environmental conditions (Oren et al., 2002) In summer 2010 the ICDP Expedition 5034 (ICDP project PALEOVAN) retrieved long sediment cores at two sites at Lake Van, Northern Basin (5 km offshore, 245 meters below lake level, mbll) and Ahlat Ridge (12 km offshore, 357 mbll) [2]. At both sites, samples from optically undisturbed core catcher material were collected on site to investigate microbial abundance and activity. Close to both drill sites two short gravity cores (ca. 70 cm long) were retrieved to sample the sediment/water interface. We here report the first results from microbiological investigations (porewater chemistry, cell abundance and sulfate reduction rates, SRR) in samples from the two sites at Lake Van. Although the two sites are relatively close to each other, SRR differ significantly. The sedimentary microbial ecosystem in Lake Van is apparently more sensitive to environmental conditions like water depth and sedimentation rate than marine systems. The shallower Northern Basin site exhibits significantly higher SRR than Ahlat Ridge, which is located 7 km further offshore and ~100 m deeper. Microbial sedimentary abundance is similar at both sites, but cell abundance decreases linearly with depth, as compared to a logarithmic decrease with depth in marine sites. Due to the lack of

  3. Kinetics of sulfate reduction and sulfide precipitation rates in sediments of a bar-built estuary (Pescadero, California).

    PubMed

    Richards, Chandra M; Pallud, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The bar-built Pescadero Estuary in Northern California is a major fish rearing habitat, though recently threatened by near-annual fish kill events, which occur when the estuary transitions from closed to open state. The direct and indirect effects of hydrogen sulfide are suspected to play a role in these mortalities, but the spatial variability of hydrogen sulfide production and its link to fish kills remains poorly understood. Using flow-through reactors containing intact littoral sediment slices, we measured potential sulfate reduction rates, kinetic parameters of microbial sulfate reduction (Rmax, the maximum sulfate reduction rate, and Km, the half-saturation constant for sulfate), potential sulfide precipitation rates, and potential hydrogen sulfide export rates to water at four sites in the closed and open states. At all sites, the Michaelis-Menten kinetic rate equation adequately describes the utilization of sulfate by the complex resident microbial communities. We estimate that 94-96% of hydrogen sulfide produced through sulfate reduction precipitates in the sediment and that only 4-6% is exported to water, suggesting that elevated sulfide concentrations in water, which would affect fish through toxicity and oxygen consumption, cannot be responsible for fish deaths. However, the indirect effects of sulfide precipitates, which chemically deplete, contaminate, and acidify the water column during sediment re-suspension and re-oxidation in the transition from closed to open state, can be implicated in fish mortalities at Pescadero Estuary.

  4. Reaction mechanisms involved in reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons using sulfated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, S.M.; Cipollone, M.G.; Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the mechanisms and pathways involved in the reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons represented by trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with sulfated iron aqueous media. Results suggested that iron sulfide acted as the dehalogenation center. Zero-valent iron acted as a generator for molecular hydrogen through its reaction with water. Results of experiments in which iron sulfide was replaced by other transition metal sulfides and experiments in which zero-valent iron was replaced by other sources of molecular hydrogen will be reported. The main reduction product of chloroethylene derivatives was ethyne which under the catalytic reaction of zero-valent iron was reduced further to ethene and finally to ethane. Intermediate products were identified using GC-MS. Mechanisms and pathways will be presented.

  5. 34S/32S fractionation during sulfate reduction in groundwater treatment systems: reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Blair D; Amos, Richard T; Blowes, David W

    2011-04-01

    Isotope ratio measurements provide a tool for indicating the relative significance of biogeochemical reactions and for constraining estimates of the extent and rate of reactions in passive treatment systems. In this paper, the reactive transport model MIN3P is used to evaluate sulfur isotope fractionation in column experiments designed to simulate treatment of contaminated water by microbially mediated sulfate reduction occurring within organic carbon-based and iron and carbon-based permeable reactive barriers. A mass dependent fractionation model was used to determine reaction rates for 32S and 34S compounds during reduction, precipitation, and dissolution reactions and to track isotope-dependent mass transfer during SO4 removal. The δ34S values obtained from the MIN3P model were similar to those obtained from the Rayleigh equation, indicating that there was not a significant difference between the conceptual models. Differences between the MIN3P derived α value and the Rayleigh equation derived value were attributed to minor changes in the dissolution and precipitation rate of gypsum and mathematical differences in the fitting models. The results indicated that the prediction of δ34S was fairly insensitive to differences in the fractionation factor at the concentration ranges measured in the current study. However, more significant differences would be expected at low sulfate conditions.

  6. Measuring Substantial Reductions in Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Charles; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The case definitions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) each include a disability criterion requiring substantial reductions in activity in order to meet diagnostic criteria. Difficulties have been encountered in defining and operationalizing the substantial reduction disability criterion within these various illness definitions. The present study sought to relate measures of past and current activities in several domains including the SF-36, an objective measure of activity (e.g. actigraphy), a self-reported quality of life scale, and measures of symptom severity. Results of the study revealed that current work activities had the highest number of significant associations with domains such as the SF-36 subscales, actigraphy, and symptom scores. As an example, higher self-reported levels of current work activity were associated with better health. This suggests that current work related activities may provide a useful domain for helping operationalize the construct of substantial reductions in activity. PMID:25584524

  7. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sanz, Jose Luis; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2014-03-30

    Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed.

  8. [NO3-/NO2- inhibits sulfate-reducing activity of the enrichment culture of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes from an off-shore oil reservoir at Bohai Bay, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Yu; Shi, Rong-Jiu; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ying-Yue; Yu, Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Tan, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Long-term injection of sulfate-rich water into oil reservoirs stimulates the proliferation of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) therein and results in production of a great amount of H2S, leading to souring in oil reservoirs and related environmental problems. In this study, we first, using modified API RP 38 medium, enriched SRP present in production water from a producing well at Bohai Bay, China, and then examined the inhibitory effects of nitrate or nitrite on sulfate reduction activity of the SRP. Results showed that the enriched SRP culture exhibited a high sulfate reduction activity as indicated by a sulfate-reducing rate of 10.4 mmol SO4(2-) x d(-1) x g(-1) dry cell. In presence of 0.4, 0.8, 1.8, and 4.2 mmol x L(-1) nitrate, sulfate reduction was inhibited for 5, 9, 20, and over 35 days, respectively. With the addition of 0.6, 0.9, 1.4, 2.6 and 4.6 mmol x L(-1) of nitrite, the inhibitory period lasted 3, 12, 22, and over 39 days, respectively. The SRP enrichment culture could dissimilatorily reduce nitrate to ammonium. When sulfate, nitrate and nitrite coexisted, nitrate or nitrite was preferentially used over sulfate as electron acceptor by the enriched SRP. This competitive use of electron acceptor and the strong inhibitory effect of nitrite possibly accounted for the suppression of nitrate and nitrite on the sulfate-reducing activity of the enriched SRP cultures from offshore oil reservoir at Bohai Bay.

  9. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

  10. Evaluating enhanced sulfate reduction and optimized volatile fatty acids (VFA) composition in anaerobic reactor by Fe (III) addition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-17

    Anaerobic reactors with ferric iron addition have been experimentally demonstrated to be able to simultaneously improve sulfate reduction and organic matter degradation during sulfate-containing wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the impact of ferric iron addition on sulfate reduction and organic carbon removal as well as the volatile fatty acids (VFA) composition in anaerobic reactor. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using independent long-term experimental data sets from the anaerobic reactor with Fe (III) addition under different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the sulfate reduction, organic carbon removal and VFA production. Results show Fe (III) addition induces the microbial reduction of Fe (III) by iron reducing bacteria (IRB), which significantly enhances sulfate reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and subsequently changes the VFA composition to acetate-dominating effluent. Simultaneously, the produced Fe (II) from IRB can alleviate the inhibition of undissociated H2S on microorganisms through iron sulfide precipitation, resulting in further improvement of the performance. In addition, the enhancement on reactor performance by Fe (III) is found to be more significantly favored at relatively low organic carbon/SO4(2-) ratio (e.g., 1.0) than at high organic carbon/SO4(2-) ratio (e.g., 4.5). The Fe (III)-based process of this work can be easily integrated with a commonly used strategy for phosphorus recovery, with the produced sulfide being recovered and then deposited into conventional chemical phosphorus removal sludge (FePO4) to achieve FeS precipitation for phosphorus recovery while the required Fe (III) being acquired from the waste ferric sludge of drinking water treatment process, to enable maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving high-rate sulfate removal.

  11. Empirical and Theoretical Evidence for the Role of MgSO4 Contact Ion-Pairs in Thermochemical Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, G. S.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Q.; Tang, Y.

    2006-12-01

    While the process of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) has been recognized by geochemists for nearly fifty years, it has proven extremely difficult to simulate in the laboratory under conditions resembling those encountered in nature. Published estimates of the kinetic parameters that describe the rate of the TSR reaction vary widely and are inconsistent with geologic observations. Consequently, the prediction of the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation potential of a reservoir prior to drilling remains a major challenge for the oil industry. New experimental and theoretical evidence indicate that magnesium plays a significant role in controlling the rate of TSR in petroleum reservoirs. A novel reaction pathway for TSR is proposed that involves the reduction of sulfate as aqueous MgSO4 contact ion-pairs prior to the H2S-catalyzed TSR mechanism that is generally accepted. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been applied to this model in order to locate a potential transition state and to determine the activation energy for the contact ion- pair reaction (56 kcal/mol). Detailed experimental work shows that the rate of TSR increases significantly with increasing concentration of H2S, which may help to explain why previous estimates of TSR activation energies were so divergent. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that H2S catalysis of TSR is a multi-step process, involving the formation of labile organic sulfur compounds that, in turn, generate sulfur radicals upon thermal decomposition. A new conceptual model for understanding the process of TSR in geologic environments has been developed that involves an H2S-threshold concentration required to sustain rapid sulfate reduction rates. Although this approach appears to be more consistent with field observations than previous mechanisms, validation of this model requires detailed integration with other geologic data in basin models. These findings may explain the common association of H2S-rich petroleum

  12. In Vitro Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Derivatives of Polysaccharides Extracted from Auricularia auricular

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Lin; Yang, Xin; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Zhi

    2011-01-01

    In this research, two types of sulfated polysaccharide derivatives were successfully synthesized. Their antioxidant activities were investigated by employing various established in vitro systems. In addition, the degree of sulfation was evaluated using ion-chromatography and IR spectra. The results verify that, when employing scavenging superoxide radical tests, both the sulfation of acid Auricularia auricular polysaccharides (SAAAP) and the sulfation of neutral Auricularia auricular polysaccharides (SNAAP) derivatives possessed considerable antioxidant activity and had a more powerful antioxidant competence than that of the native non-sulfated polysaccharides (AAAP and NAAP). On the other hand, AAAP and NAAP exhibited stronger activity on scavenging both the hydroxyl radical and lipid peroxidation. Available data obtained with in vitro measurements indicates that the sulfated groups of AAAP and NAAP played an important role on antioxidant activity. In sum, the research demonstrates that the antioxidant activity of sulfated polysaccharide derivatives in vitro has a potential significance for seeking new natural antioxidant protective agents. PMID:21686185

  13. In vitro antioxidant activities of sulfated derivatives of polysaccharides extracted from Auricularia auricular.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Lin; Yang, Xin; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Zhi

    2011-01-01

    In this research, two types of sulfated polysaccharide derivatives were successfully synthesized. Their antioxidant activities were investigated by employing various established in vitro systems. In addition, the degree of sulfation was evaluated using ion-chromatography and IR spectra. The results verify that, when employing scavenging superoxide radical tests, both the sulfation of acid Auricularia auricular polysaccharides (SAAAP) and the sulfation of neutral Auricularia auricular polysaccharides (SNAAP) derivatives possessed considerable antioxidant activity and had a more powerful antioxidant competence than that of the native non-sulfated polysaccharides (AAAP and NAAP). On the other hand, AAAP and NAAP exhibited stronger activity on scavenging both the hydroxyl radical and lipid peroxidation. Available data obtained with in vitro measurements indicates that the sulfated groups of AAAP and NAAP played an important role on antioxidant activity. In sum, the research demonstrates that the antioxidant activity of sulfated polysaccharide derivatives in vitro has a potential significance for seeking new natural antioxidant protective agents.

  14. Galvanic interpretation of self-potential signals associated withmicrobial sulfate-reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-05-02

    We have evaluated the usefulness of the self-potential (SP)geophysical method to track the onset and location of microbialsulfate-reduction in saturated sediments during organic carbon amendment.Following stimulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) by addition oflactate, anomalous voltages exceeding 600 mV correlated in space and timewith the accumulation of dissolved sulfide. Abiotic experiments in whichthe sulfide concentration at the measurement electrode was systematicallyvaried showed a positive correlation between the magnitude of the SPanomaly and differences in the half-cell potential associated with themeasurement and reference electrodes. Thus, we infer that the SPanomaliesresulted from electrochemical differences that developedbetween sulfide-rich regions and areas having higher oxidation potential.In neither experiment did generation of an SP anomaly require thepresence of an in situ electronic conductor, as is required by othermodels. These findings emphasize the importance of incorporation ofelectrochemical effects at electrode surfaces in interpretation of SPdata from geophysical studies. We conclude that SP measurements provide aminimally invasive means for monitoring stimulated sulfate-reductionwithin saturated sediments.

  15. High sulfate reduction efficiency in a UASB using an alternative source of sulfidogenic sludge derived from hydrothermal vent sediments.

    PubMed

    García-Solares, Selene Montserrat; Ordaz, Alberto; Monroy-Hermosillo, Oscar; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Guerrero-Barajas, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Sulfidogenesis in reactors is mostly achieved through adaptation of predominantly methanogenic granular sludge to sulfidogenesis. In this work, an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor operated under sulfate-reducing conditions was inoculated with hydrothermal vent sediments to carry out sulfate reduction using volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as substrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD)/SO4 (-2) ratios between 0.49 and 0.64. After a short period of adaptation, a robust non-granular sludge was capable of achieving high sulfate reduction efficiencies while avoiding competence with methanogens and toxicity to the microorganisms due to high sulfide concentration. The highest sulfide concentration (2,552 mg/L) was obtained with acetate/butyrate, and sulfate reduction efficiencies were up to 98 %. A mixture of acetate/butyrate, which produced a higher yielding of HS(-), was preferred over acetate/propionate/butyrate since the consumption of COD was minimized during the process. Sludge was analyzed, and some of the microorganisms identified in the sludge belong to the genera Desulfobacterium, Marinobacter, and Clostridium. The tolerance of the sludge to sulfide may be attributed to the syntrophy among these microorganisms, some of which have been reported to tolerate high concentrations of sulfide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the analysis of the direct utilization of hydrothermal vent sediments as an alternate source of sludge for sulfate reduction under high sulfide concentrations.

  16. Sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane is dependent on methane concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, Christian; Holler, Thomas; Arnold, Gail L.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Brunner, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Isotope signatures of sulfur compounds are key tools for studying sulfur cycling in the modern environment and throughout earth's history. However, for meaningful interpretations, the isotope effects of the processes involved must be known. Sulfate reduction coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM-SR) plays a pivotal role in sedimentary sulfur cycling and is the main process responsible for the consumption of methane in marine sediments - thereby efficiently limiting the escape of this potent greenhouse gas from the seabed to the overlying water column and atmosphere. In contrast to classical dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR), where sulfur and oxygen isotope effects have been measured in culture studies and a wide range of isotope effects has been observed, the sulfur and oxygen isotope effects by AOM-SR are unknown. This gap in knowledge severely hampers the interpretation of sulfur cycling in methane-bearing sediments, especially because, unlike DSR which is carried out by a single organism, AOM-SR is presumably catalyzed by consortia of archaea and bacteria that both contribute to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. We studied sulfur and oxygen isotope effects by AOM-SR at various aqueous methane concentrations from 1.4±0.6 mM up to 58.8±10.5 mM in continuous incubation at steady state. Changes in the concentration of methane induced strong changes in sulfur isotope enrichment (εS34) and oxygen isotope exchange between water and sulfate relative to sulfate reduction (θO), as well as sulfate reduction rates (SRR). Smallest εS34 (21.9±1.9‰) and θO (0.5±0.2) as well as highest SRR were observed for the highest methane concentration, whereas highest εS34 (67.3±26.1‰) and θO (2.5±1.5) and lowest SRR were reached at low methane concentration. Our results show that εS34, θO and SRR during AOM-SR are very sensitive to methane concentration and thus also correlate with energy yield. In sulfate-methane transition zones, AOM-SR is likely

  17. The nitrogen cycle in anaerobic methanotrophic mats of the Black Sea is linked to sulfate reduction and biomass decomposition.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Michael; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen-Tomm, Martin; Basen, Mirko; Bastida, Felipe; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) mats host methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Little is known about the nitrogen cycle in these communities. Here, we link the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) to the nitrogen cycle in microbial mats of the Black Sea by using stable isotope probing. We used four different (15)N-labeled sources of nitrogen: dinitrogen, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium. We estimated the nitrogen incorporation rates into the total biomass and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Dinitrogen played an insignificant role as nitrogen source. Assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction occurred. High rates of nitrate reduction to dinitrogen were stimulated by methane and sulfate, suggesting that oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfides was necessary for AOM with nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate reduction to dinitrogen occurred also in the absence of methane as electron donor but at six times slower rates. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was independent of AOM. Ammonium was used for biomass synthesis under all conditions. The pivotal enzyme in AOM coupled to sulfate reduction, MCR, was synthesized from nitrate and ammonium. Results show that AOM coupled to sulfate reduction along with biomass decomposition drive the nitrogen cycle in the ANME mats of the Black Sea and that MCR enzymes are involved in this process.

  18. Sulfation and Desulfation Behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx Storage Reduction Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    The comparative study between Pt-BaO/Al2O3 and Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 gives the information about the effect of MgO addition to Al2O3 support on the sulfation and desulfation behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx storage reduction catalyst. The sulfated two samples were analyzed by using element analysis (EA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature programmed reaction (H2 TPRX) and NOx uptake measurement. The amount of sulfur uptake on 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/Al2O3 and 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/MgO-Al2O3 are almost identical as 0.45 and 0.40 of S/Ba, respectively, which yields the drastic decrease in NOx uptake for both sulfated samples. However, after desulfa- tion with H2 at 600 degrees C, the residual sulfur amount on MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst is three times larger than that on Al2O3 supported one, indicating that sulfur species formed on the former are more stable than those on the latter. It is also well corresponding to the H2 TPRX results where the main H2S peak from MgO-Al2O3 supported sample is observed at higher temperature than Al2O3 supported one, resulting in the lower NOx uptake activity of former sample than the latter one. Meanwhile, after desulfation of MgO-Al2O3 supported sample at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C, the activity is recovered more significantly due to the removal of the large amount of sulfur while Al2O3 supported one decreases monotonically due to the sintering of Pt crystallite and the formation of BaAl2O4 phase. It is summarized that MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst enhances the thermal stability of the catalyst, however, forms the stable sulfate species, which needs to be improved to develop the more sulfur resistant NSR catalyst system.

  19. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand T; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C; Tokuda, Joshua M; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W; Crane, Brian R

    2013-12-17

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation.

  20. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  1. Models of oxic respiration, denitrification and sulfate reduction in zones of coastal upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, D. E.

    2006-12-01

    Coastal upwelling zones support some of the highest rates of primary production in the oceans. The settling and subsequent decomposition of this organic matter promotes oxygen depletion. In the Eastern tropical North and South Pacific and the Arabian Sea, large tracts of anoxic water develop, where intensive N 2 production through denitrification and anammox accounts for about 1/3 of the total loss of fixed nitrogen in the marine realm. It is curious that despite extensive denitrification in these waters, complete nitrate removal and the onset of sulfate reduction is extremely rare. A simple box model is constructed here to reproduce the dynamics of carbon, oxygen and nutrient cycling in coastal upwelling zones. The model is constructed with five boxes, where water is exchanged between the boxes by vertical and horizontal mixing and advection. These primary physical drivers control the dynamics of the system. The model demonstrates that in the absence of nitrogen fixation, the anoxic waters in a coastal upwelling system will not become nitrate free. This is because nitrate is the limiting nutrient controlling primary production, and if nitrate concentration becomes too low, primary production rate drops and this reduces rates of nitrate removal through N 2 production. With nitrogen fixation, however, complete nitrate depletion can occur and sulfate reduction will ensue. This situation is extremely rare in coastal upwelling zones, probably because nitrogen-fixing bacteria do not prosper in the high nutrient, turbid waters as typically in these areas. Finally, it is predicted here that the chemistry of the upwelling system will develop in a similar matter regardless whether N 2 production is dominated by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or canonical heterotrophic denitrification.

  2. Geochemical signatures of thermochemical sulfate reduction in controlled hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Walters, C.C.; Kelemen, S.R.; Wang, K.-s.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A series of gold tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted in order to investigate the effect of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) on gas generation, residual saturated hydrocarbon compositional alteration, and solid pyrobitumen formation. The intensity of TSR significantly depends on the H2O/MgSO4 mole ratio, the smaller the ratio, the stronger the oxidizing conditions. Under highly oxidizing conditions (MgSO4/hydrocarbon wt/wt 20/1 and hydrocarbon/H2O wt/wt 1/1), large amounts of H2S and CO2 are generated indicating that hydrocarbon oxidation coupled with sulfate reduction is the dominant reaction. Starting with a mixture of C21-C35 n-alkanes, these hydrocarbons are consumed totally at temperatures below the onset of hydrocarbon thermal cracking in the absence of TSR (400 ??C). Moreover, once the longer chain length hydrocarbons are oxidized, secondarily formed hydrocarbons, even methane, are oxidized to CO2. Using whole crude oils as the starting reactants, the TSR reaction dramatically lowers the stability of hydrocarbons leading to increases in gas dryness and gas/oil ratio. While their concentrations decrease, the relative distributions of n-alkanes do not change appreciably from the original composition, and consequently, are non-diagnostic for TSR. However, distinct molecular changes related to TSR are observed, Pr/n-C17 and Ph/n-C18 ratios decrease at a faster rate under TSR compared to thermal chemical alteration (TCA) alone. TSR promotes aromatization and the incorporation of sulfur and oxygen into hydrocarbons leading to a decrease in the saturate to aromatic ratio in the residual oil and in the generation of sulfur and oxygen rich pyrobitumen. These experimental findings could provide useful geochemical signatures to identify TSR in settings where TSR has occurred in natural systems. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of antimony (Sb(V)) from Sb mine drainage: biological sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation-precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huawei; Chen, Fulong; Mu, Shuyong; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-10-01

    Antimony (Sb(V)) in Sb mine drainage has adverse effects on the receiving water environments. This study for the first time demonstrated the feasibility of using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to convert sulfate ions in SMD into sulfides that reduce Sb(V) to Sb(III) and to form complex with Sb(III) as precipitate. The principal compound in the precipitate was stibnite (Sb2S3) at pH 7 and pH 9. The Sb(V) removal mechanism is sulfate-reduction and sulfide oxidization-precipitation, different from the conventional SRB-precipitation processes for heavy metals. The Sb(V)/sulfate ratio is noted an essential parameter affecting the Sb removal efficiency from SMD.

  4. Analyses of spatial distributions of sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activity in aerobic wastewater biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    1999-11-01

    The vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in aerobic wastewater biofilms grown on rotating disk reactors was investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. To correlate the vertical distribution of SRB populations with their activity, the microprofiles of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2}{minus}, NH{sub 2}{sup +}, and pH were measured with microelectrodes. In addition, a cross-evaluation of the FISH and microelectrode analyses was performed by comparing them with culture-based approaches and biogeochemical measurements. In situ hybridization revealed that a relatively high abundance of the probe SRB385-stained cells were evenly distributed throughout the biofilm, even in the toxic surface. The probe SRB660-stained Desulfobulbus spp. were found to be numerically important members of SRB populations. The result of microelectrode measurements showed that a high sulfate-reducing activity was found in a narrow anaerobic zone located about 150 to 300 {micro}m below the biofilm surface and above which an intensive sulfide oxidation zone was found. The biogeochemical measurements showed that elemental sulfur (S{degree}) was an important intermediate of the sulfide reoxidation in such thin wastewater biofilms, which accounted for about 75% of the total S pool in the biofilm. The contribution of an internal Fe-sulfur cycle to the overall sulfur cycle in aerobic wastewater biofilms was insignificant (less than 1%) due to the relatively high sulfate reduction rate.

  5. Polyguluronate sulfate, polymannuronate sulfate, and their oligosaccharides have antithrombin III- and heparin cofactor II-independent anticoagulant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuan; Lan, Ying; Zeng, Pengjiao; Guo, Zhihua; Hao, Cui; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death. However, the complications can be treated with heparin and heparinoids, such as heparin pentasaccharide Fondaparinux, dermatan sulfate, and PSS made from alginate extracted from brown seaweeds by chemical sulfation. Alginate is composed of a linear backbone of polymannuronate (PM), polyguluronate (PG), and alternate residues of mannuronic acid and guluronic acid. It is unknown if heparin and sulfated PG (PGS)/PM (PMS) have the same or different anticoagulant molecular targets. In the current study, the anticoagulant activities of PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides were directly compared to that of heparin, Fondaparinux, and dermatan sulfate by the activated partial thrombinplastin time (aPTT) assay using normal, antithrombin III (ATIII)-deficient, heparin co-factor II (HCII)-deficient, and ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasmas. Our results showed that PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides had better anticoagulant activity than that of Fondaparinux in all four human plasmas tested. As expected, heparin was the best anticoagulant in normal plasma. Moreover, PGS, PGS6, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than dermatan sulfate in HCII-deficient plasma. Most strikingly, PGS, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than that of heparin in ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasma. The results revealed for the first time that sulfated alginate had ATIII- and HCII-independent anticoagulant activities. Therefore, developing PGS and PMS-based anticoagulants might require to discover their major molecular targets and to develop target-specific anticoagulant assays.

  6. Recharge processes drive sulfate reduction in an alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Christenson, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    Natural attenuation of contaminants in groundwater depends on an adequate supply of electron acceptors to stimulate biodegradation. In an alluvial aquifer contaminated with leachate from an unlined municipal landfill, the mechanism of recharge infiltration was investigated as a source of electron acceptors. Water samples were collected monthly at closely spaced intervals in the top 2 m of the saturated zone from a leachate-contaminated well and an uncontaminated well, and analyzed for ??18O, ??2H, non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC), SO42-, NO3- and Cl-. Monthly recharge amounts were quantified using the offset of the ??18O or ??2H from the local meteoric water line as a parameter to distinguish water types, as evaporation and methanogenesis caused isotopic enrichment in waters from different sources. Presence of dissolved SO42- in the top 1 to 2??m of the saturated zone was associated with recharge; SO42- averaged 2.2??mM, with maximum concentrations of 15??mM. Nitrate was observed near the water table at the contaminated site at concentrations up to 4.6??mM. Temporal monitoring of ??2H and SO42- showed that vertical transport of recharge carried SO42- to depths up to 1.75??m below the water table, supplying an additional electron acceptor to the predominantly methanogenic leachate plume. Measurements of ??34S in SO42- indicated both SO42- reduction and sulfide oxidation were occurring in the aquifer. Depth-integrated net SO42- reduction rates, calculated using the natural Cl- gradient as a conservative tracer, ranged from 7.5 ?? 10- 3 to 0.61??mM??d- 1 (over various depth intervals from 0.45 to 1.75??m). Sulfate reduction occurred at both the contaminated and uncontaminated sites; however, median SO42- reduction rates were higher at the contaminated site. Although estimated SO42- reduction rates are relatively high, significant decreases in NVDOC were not observed at the contaminated site. Organic compounds more labile than the leachate NVDOC may be

  7. Effect of sulfated modification on the molecular characteristics and biological activities of polysaccharides from Hypsizigus marmoreus.

    PubMed

    Bao, HongHui; Choi, Won-Seok; You, SangGuan

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sulfated modification on polysaccharides from Hypsizigus marmoreus was examined by determining their molecular structures and bioactivities. The sulfation, which was implemented by using an orthogonal array design, produced polysaccharides with varying degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 0.11 to 1.06. The sulfated polysaccharides exhibited a lower average molecular weight (M(w)) and considerably higher radius of gyration (R(g)) than those of native polysaccharide, suggesting that the conformation of the sulfated polysaccharides had been changed towards a more extended type. The inhibitory activity toward cancer cell growth was enhanced by treating with the sulfated polysaccharides by up to 34%, as compared to the native polysaccharide. In addition, treating with the sulfated polysaccharides increased the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine (IL-1beta and TNF-alpha) release to levels comparable to those detected in the positive control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), suggesting that the sulfated polysaccharides might have strong immunomodulatory activity.

  8. Sulfation, anticoagulant and antioxidant activities of polysaccharide from green algae Enteromorpha linza.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Zhongshan; Yao, Zhiyun; Zhao, Mingxing; Qi, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides exerted potent biological property which was relative to degree of sulfation, molecular weight, substitution position and chain conformation. In present study, the polysaccharide with low molecular weight (LEP) from Enteromorpha linza was sulfated with chlorosulfuric acid in formamide. The obtained polysaccharide sulfate was selected to evaluate their antioxidant activities and the anticoagulant activity in the coagulation assays, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT). The data obtained in vitro models indicated that high DS and moderate Mw showed the best anticoagulant and antioxidant activities.

  9. Isotopic evidence for water-column denitrification and sulfate reduction at the end-Guadalupian (Middle Permian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Isozaki, Yukio; Nishizawa, Manabu; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Takai, Ken; Yoshida, Naohiro; Matsuo, Motoyuki

    2014-12-01

    The total nitrogen and pyrite sulfur isotopic compositions of the Guadalupian-Lopingian (Middle-Upper Permian) shelf carbonates are analyzed at Chaotian in northern Sichuan, South China, to clarify the environmental changes in the relatively deep disphotic zone (generally deeper than 150 m) in the ocean at the end-Guadalupian, focusing on the possible relationships with the deep-sea oxygen depletion and the shallow-sea extinction. At Chaotian, the Guadalupian Maokou Formation and the Early Lopingian Wujiaping Formation are primarily composed of bioclastic limestone of shallow-water facies, although the topmost part of the Maokou Formation (ca. 11 m thick) is composed of bedded black mudstone and chert that was deposited on the disphotic slope/basin under anoxic conditions. Substantially high δ15N values of total nitrogen (up to + 14‰) in the topmost Maokou Formation of the deep-water facies indicate water-mass denitrification. In the same disphotic interval, the consistently low δ34S values of pyrite (ca. - 37‰) suggest sulfate reduction in the sulfate-rich water column. The new nitrogen and sulfur isotopic records at Chaotian indicate the enhanced anaerobic respiration in the oxygen-depleted disphotic zone in the Late Guadalupian in northwestern South China. The active water-column sulfate reduction likely resulted in the emergence of a sulfidic deep-water mass on the disphotic slope/basin, which is supported by the high proportions of pyrite Fe to highly reactive Fe in the rocks shown using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The anaerobic respiration in the disphotic zone at the end-Guadalupian may have been enhanced by an expansion of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) caused by the increased primary productivity in the surface oceans; the OMZ expansion may have corresponded to the onset of prolonged oxygen depletion in the deep sea. The clear stratigraphic relationship at Chaotian shows the emergence of the sulfidic deep-waters preceding the extinction, implying

  10. Distinguishing solid bitumens formed by thermochemical sulfate reduction and thermal chemical alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, S.R.; Walters, C.C.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Afeworki, M.; Sansone, M.; Freund, H.; Pottorf, R.J.; Machel, H.G.; Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.; Peters, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Insoluble solid bitumens are organic residues that can form by the thermal chemical alteration (TCA) or thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) of migrated petroleum. TCA may actually encompass several low temperature processes, such as biodegradation and asphaltene precipitation, followed by thermal alteration. TSR is an abiotic redox reaction where petroleum is oxidized by sulfate. It is difficult to distinguish solid bitumens associated with TCA of petroleum from those associated with TSR when both processes occur at relatively high temperature. The focus of the present work was to characterize solid bitumen samples associated with TCA or TSR using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a surface analysis conducted on either isolated or in situ (>25 ??m diameter) solid bitumen that can provide the relative abundance and chemical speciation of carbon, organic and inorganic heteroatoms (NSO). In this study, naturally occurring solid bitumens from three locations, Nisku Fm. Brazeau River area (TSR-related), LaBarge Field Madison Fm. (TSR-related), and the Alaskan Brooks range (TCA-related), are compared to organic solids generated during laboratory simulation of the TSR and TCA processes. The abundance and chemical nature of organic nitrogen and sulfur in solid bitumens can be understood in terms of the nature of (1) petroleum precursor molecules, (2) the concentration of nitrogen by way of thermal stress and (3) the mode of sulfur incorporation. TCA solid bitumens originate from polar materials that are initially rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Aromaticity and nitrogen increase as thermal stress cleaves aliphatic moieties and condensation reactions take place. Organic sulfur in TCA organic solids remains fairly constant with increasing maturation (3.5 to ???17 sulfur per 100 carbons) into aromatic structures and to the low levels of nitrogen in their hydrocarbon precursors. Hence, XPS results provide organic chemical composition information that helps to

  11. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Chestnut, L.G.; Watkins, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  12. Long term performance of an AMD treatment bioreactor using chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reduction and ferrous iron precipitation under in situ groundwater conditions.

    PubMed

    Bilek, F; Wagner, S

    2012-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reduction (CSR) was tested to treat natural acid mine drainage influenced groundwaters. The long term behavior was studied for more than 3 years under groundwater conditions (10 °C, autochthonous sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB)) without biomass replenishment in a 190 L bench scale reactor. The process produces water with alkalinity >10 mM. pH can be controlled by p(CO(2)) for all expectable water qualities. SRB were immobilized using an expanded clay bed. After 1.3 years of operation, a constant biomass content and sulfate reduction rate of 0.25-0.30 mmol(so)₄(Lh)⁻¹ were established. The sulfate reduction rate was limited by biomass content. Most of the electrons were used for sulfate reduction (98%). The hydrogen turn over in competing processes like methanogenesis and homoacetogenesis was successfully suppressed by adjusting the sulfate concentration to be >2 mM in the runoff.

  13. Redox transformation, solid phase speciation and solution dynamics of copper during soil reduction and reoxidation as affected by sulfate availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Beate; Voegelin, Andreas; Ehlert, Katrin; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-12-01

    In periodically flooded soils, interactions of Cu with biogenic sulfide formed during soil reduction lead to the precipitation of sparingly soluble Cu-sulfides. In contaminated soils, however, the amounts of Cu can exceed the amount of sulfate available for microbial reduction to sulfide. In laboratory batch experiments, we incubated a paddy soil spiked to ∼4.4 mmol kg-1 (280 mg kg-1) Cu(II) to monitor temporal changes in the concentrations of dissolved Cu and the speciation of solid-phase Cu during 40 days of soil reduction and 28 days of reoxidation as a function of initially available reducible sulfate (0.06, 2.09 or 5.92 mmol kg-1). Using Cu K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, we found that a large fraction of Cu(II) became rapidly reduced to Cu(I) (23-39%) and Cu(0) (7-17%) before the onset of sulfate reduction. Combination with results from sequential Cu extraction and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) data suggested that complexation of Cu(I) by reduced organic S groups (Sorg) may be an important process during this early stage. In sulfate-depleted soil, Cu(0) and Cu(I)-Sorg remained the dominant species over the entire reduction period, whereas in soils with sufficient sulfate, initially formed Cu(0) and (remaining) Cu(II) became transformed into Cu-sulfide during continuing sulfate reduction. The formation of Cu(0), Cu(I)-Sorg, and Cu-sulfide led to an effective decrease in dissolved Cu concentrations. Differences in Cu speciation at the end of soil reduction however affected the dynamics of Cu during reoxidation. Whereas Cu(0) was rapidly oxidized to Cu(II), more than half of the S-coordinated Cu fraction persisted over 14 days of aeration. Our results show that precipitation of Cu(0) and complexation of Cu(I) by reduced organic S groups are important processes in periodically flooded soils if sulfide formation is limited by the amount of available sulfate or the duration of soil flooding. The speciation changes of Cu described in this study may also affect the

  14. The structure-anticoagulant activity relationships of sulfated lacquer polysaccharide: effect of carboxyl group and position of sulfation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhong; Du, Yumin; Huang, Ronghua; Wan, Yunyang; Wen, Yan

    2005-07-01

    Regiospecific oxidation of the primary hydroxyl groups in lacquer polysaccharide (LPL, Mw 6.85 x 10(4)) and its NaIO4 oxidation derivatives (LPLde) to C-6 carboxy groups was achieved with NaOCl in the presence of Tempo and NaBr. Sulfate groups were incorporated into the oxidated polysaccharides using Py.SO3 complex as a reagent. Reactivity of polysaccharide hydroxyl group was C-6 > C-2 > C-4. Sulfate groups were mainly linked to the second hydroxy at C-2 in the products. The results of APTT assay showed after incorporation of carboxyl groups into lacquer polysaccharides, the intrinsic coagulation pathway was promoted, and all sulfated polysaccharides had very weak anticoagulant activity within the scope of studied DS (0.39-1.11). These indicated that carboxyl groups and sulfate groups had the synergistic action. At the same time, the anticoagulant activity increased very slowly with the DS in the second hydroxy. This indicated that 6-O-SO3- in the side chains took an important role in the anticoagulant activity.

  15. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Dong, H; Bishop, M E; Zhang, J; Wang, H; Xie, S; Wang, S; Huang, L; Eberl, D D

    2012-03-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals.

  16. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, D.; Dong, H.; Bishop, M.E.; Zhang, Jiahua; Wang, Hongfang; Xie, S.; Wang, Shaoming; Huang, L.; Eberl, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. High Sulfation and a High Molecular Weight Are Important for Anti-hepcidin Activity of Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Asperti, Michela; Naggi, Annamaria; Esposito, Emiliano; Ruzzenenti, Paola; Di Somma, Margherita; Gryzik, Magdalena; Arosio, Paolo; Poli, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Heparins are efficient inhibitors of hepcidin expression even in vivo, where they induce an increase of systemic iron availability. Heparins seem to act by interfering with BMP6 signaling pathways that control the expression of liver hepcidin, causing the suppression of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. The anti-hepcidin activity persists also when the heparin anticoagulant property is abolished or reduced by chemical reactions of oxidation/reduction (glycol-split, Gs-Heparins) or by high sulfation (SS-Heparins), but the structural characteristics needed to optimize this inhibitory activity have not been studied in detail. To this aim we analyzed three different heparins (Mucosal Heparin, the Glycol split RO-82, the partially desulfated glycol-split RO-68 and the oversulfated SSLMWH) and separated them in fractions of molecular weight in the range 4–16 kD. Since the distribution of the negative charges in heparins contributes to the activity, we produced 2-O- and 6-O-desulfated heparins. These derivatives were analyzed for the capacity to inhibit hepcidin expression in hepatic HepG2 cells and in mice. The two approaches produced consistent results and showed that the anti-hepcidin activity strongly decreases with molecular weight below 7 kD, with high N-acetylation and after 2-O and 6-O desulfation. The high sulfation and high molecular weight properties for efficient anti-hepcidin activity suggest that heparin is involved in multiple binding sites. PMID:26955355

  18. Chemical characteristic and anticoagulant activity of the sulfated polysaccharide isolated from Monostroma latissimum (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenjun; Li, Hongyan; Li, Yi; Zhang, Huijuan; Qi, Xiaohui; Sun, Haihong; Chen, Yin; Guo, Shoudong

    2009-01-01

    A polysaccharide was isolated from marine green algae Monostroma latissimum, and its chemical characteristic and anticoagulant activity were investigated. The results demonstrated that the polysaccharide was high rhamnose-containing sulfated polysaccharide, and was mainly composed of 1,2-linked l-rhamnose residues with sulfate groups substituted at positions C-3 and/or C-4. The sulfated polysaccharide exhibited high anticoagulant activities by assays of the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT). The anticoagulant property of the sulfated polysaccharide was mainly attributed to powerful potentiation thrombin by heparin cofactor II.

  19. Osteoblast-released Matrix Vesicles, Regulation of Activity and Composition by Sulfated and Non-sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes R.; Kliemt, Stefanie; Preissler, Carolin; Moeller, Stephanie; von Bergen, Martin; Hempel, Ute; Kalkhof, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Our aging population has to deal with the increasing threat of age-related diseases that impair bone healing. One promising therapeutic approach involves the coating of implants with modified glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that mimic the native bone environment and actively facilitate skeletogenesis. In previous studies, we reported that coatings containing GAGs, such as hyaluronic acid (HA) and its synthetically sulfated derivative (sHA1) as well as the naturally low-sulfated GAG chondroitin sulfate (CS1), reduce the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts, but they also induce functions of the bone-forming cells, the osteoblasts. However, it remained open whether GAGs influence the osteoblasts alone or whether they also directly affect the formation, composition, activity, and distribution of osteoblast-released matrix vesicles (MV), which are supposed to be the active machinery for bone formation. Here, we studied the molecular effects of sHA1, HA, and CS1 on MV activity and on the distribution of marker proteins. Furthermore, we used comparative proteomic methods to study the relative protein compositions of isolated MVs and MV-releasing osteoblasts. The MV proteome is much more strongly regulated by GAGs than the cellular proteome. GAGs, especially sHA1, were found to severely impact vesicle-extracellular matrix interaction and matrix vesicle activity, leading to stronger extracellular matrix formation and mineralization. This study shows that the regulation of MV activity is one important mode of action of GAGs and provides information on underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26598647

  20. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO4−) and chlorate (ClO3−) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H2S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD+ ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD+ ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD+ ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems. PMID:25405978

  1. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-06-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) and chlorate (ClO(3)(-)) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H(2)S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD(+) ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD(+) ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD(+) ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems.

  2. Mo enrichment in black shale and reduction of molybdate by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Barton, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Lower Cambrian Black shale in Zunyi area of Guizhou Province, Southern China contains significant amount of Mo, As, and sulfide minerals. Additionally, Mo and sulfides are closely associated with organic matter of kerogen. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show pyrite micro-crystals and Mo-As-S-bearing carbon (kerogen). High-resolution TEM image shows that Mo-rich areas are Mo-sulfide (molybdenite) layers that form poorly crystalline structures in organic carbon matrix. X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) indicate composition from the pyrite and the Mo-rich area. The black shale is very unique because of its high Mo concentration. One possible mechanism for enriching Mo from paleo-seawater is the involvement of SRB. Molybdate is an essential trace element required by biological systems including the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB); however, detrimental consequences may occur if molybdate is present in high concentrations in the environment. We followed the growth of Desulfovibrio gigas ATCC 19364, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, D. desulfuricans DSM 642, and D. desulfuricans DSM 27774 in media containing sub-lethal levels of molybdate and observed a red-brown color in the culture fluid. Spectral analysis of the culture fluid revealed absorption peaks at 467 nm, 395 nm and 314 nm and this color is proposed to be a molybdate-sulfide complex. Reduction of molybdate with the formation of molybdate disulfide occurs in the periplasm D. gigas and D. desulfuricans DSM 642. From these results we suggest that the occurrence of poorly crystalline Mo-sulfides in black shale may be a result from SRB reduction and selective enrichment of Mo in paleo-seawater. We suggest that similar SRB mechanism could cause the Mo enrichment in a ~ 2.5 billion years old late Archean McRae Shale, which is related to the great oxidation event of early earth atmosphere.

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation in metalliferous hydrothermal sediments: influence on carbon flux and decoupling from sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Wankel, Scott D; Adams, Melissa M; Johnston, David T; Hansel, Colleen M; Joye, Samantha B; Girguis, Peter R

    2012-10-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a globally significant sink that regulates methane flux from sediments into the oceans and atmosphere. Here we examine mesophilic to thermophilic AOM in hydrothermal sediments recovered from the Middle Valley vent field, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Using continuous-flow sediment bioreactors and batch incubations, we characterized (i) the degree to which AOM contributes to net dissolved inorganic carbon flux, (ii) AOM and sulfate reduction (SR) rates as a function of temperature and (iii) the distribution and density of known anaerobic methanotrophs (ANMEs). In sediment bioreactors, inorganic carbon stable isotope mass balances results indicated that AOM accounted for between 16% and 86% of the inorganic carbon produced, underscoring the role of AOM in governing inorganic carbon flux from these sediments. At 90°C, AOM occurred in the absence of SR, demonstrating a striking decoupling of AOM from SR. An abundance of Fe(III)-bearing minerals resembling mixed valent Fe oxides, such as green rust, suggests the potential for a coupling of AOM to Fe(III) reduction in these metalliferous sediments. While SR bacteria were only observed in cooler temperature sediments, ANMEs allied to ANME-1 ribotypes, including a putative ANME-1c group, were found across all temperature regimes and represented a substantial proportion of the archaeal community. In concert, these results extend and reshape our understanding of the nature of high temperature methane biogeochemistry, providing insight into the physiology and ecology of thermophilic anaerobic methanotrophy and suggesting that AOM may play a central role in regulating biological dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes to the deep ocean from the organic-poor, metalliferous sediments of the global mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vent system.

  4. Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfate)β-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfate)β-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously, we have reported the presence of highly sulfated dermatans in solitary ascidians from the orders Phlebobranchia (Phallusia nigra) and Stolidobranchia (Halocynthia pyriformis and Styela plicata). Despite the identical disaccharide backbone, consisting of [→4IdoA(2S)β-1→3GalNAcβ-1→], those polymers differ in the position of sulfation on the N-Acetyl galactosamine, which can occur at carbon 4 or 6. We have shown that position rather than degree of sulfation is important for heparin cofactor II activity. As a consequence, 2,4- and 2,6-sulfated dermatans have high and low heparin cofactor II activities, respectively. In the present study we extended the disaccharide analysis of ascidian dermatan sulfates to additional species of the orders Stolidobranchia (Herdmania pallida, Halocynthia roretzi) and Phlebobranchia (Ciona intestinalis), aiming to investigate how sulfation evolved within Tunicata. In addition, we analysed how heparin cofactor II activity responds to dermatan sulfates containing different proportions of 2,6- or 2,4-disulfated units. Results Disaccharide analyses indicated a high content of disulfated disaccharide units in the dermatan sulfates from both orders. However, the degree of sulfation decreased from Stolidobranchia to Phlebobranchia. While 76% of the disaccharide units in dermatan sulfates from stolidobranch ascidians are disulfated, 53% of disulfated disaccharides are found in dermatan sulfates from phlebobranch ascidians. Besides this notable difference in the sulfation degree, dermatan sulfates from phlebobranch ascidians contain mainly 2,6-sulfated disaccharides whereas dermatan sulfate from the stolidobranch ascidians contain mostly 2,4-sulfated disaccharides, suggesting that the biosynthesis of dermatan sulfates might be differently regulated during tunicates evolution. Changes in the position of sulfation on N-acetylgalactosamine in the disaccharide [→4IdoA(2-Sulfate)β-1→3GalNAcβ-1→] modulate heparin

  5. Timing the onset of sulfate reduction over multiple subsurface acetate amendments by measurement and modeling of sulfur isotope fractionation.

    PubMed

    Druhan, Jennifer L; Steefel, Carl I; Molins, Sergi; Williams, Kenneth H; Conrad, Mark E; DePaolo, Donald J

    2012-08-21

    Stable isotope fractionations of sulfur are reported for three consecutive years of acetate-enabled uranium bioremediation at the US Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. The data show a previously undocumented decrease in the time between acetate addition and the onset of sulfate reducing conditions over subsequent amendments, from 20 days in the 2007 experiment to 4 days in the 2009 experiment. Increased sulfide concentrations were observed at the same time as δ(34)S of sulfate enrichment in the first year, but in subsequent years elevated sulfide was detected up to 15 days after increased δ(34)S of sulfate. A biogeochemical reactive transport model is developed which explicitly incorporates the stable isotopes of sulfur to simulate fractionation during the 2007 and 2008 amendments. A model based on an initially low, uniformly distributed population of sulfate reducing bacteria that grow and become spatially variable with time reproduces measured trends in solute concentration and δ(34)S, capturing the change in onset of sulfate reduction in subsequent years. Our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized hysteretic effect in the spatial distribution of biomass growth during stimulated subsurface bioremediation.

  6. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples. PMID:22822404

  7. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench.

    PubMed

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples.

  8. The effect of sulfate pre-treatment to improve the deposition of Au-nanoparticles in a gold-modified sulfated g-C3N4 plasmonic photocatalyst towards visible light induced water reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Sulagna; Martha, Satyabadi; Madras, Giridhar; Parida, Kulamani

    2016-10-19

    In continuation of our earlier work on Au-g-C3N4 and to improve its activity further, Au incorporated sulfated carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has been designed by using a simple impregnation cum borohydrate reduction method for the visible light induced water reduction reaction for hydrogen generation. The photocatalysts were characterized using various instrumental methods such as PXRD, UV-Vis DRS, SEM, HR-TEM, XPS, PL and TRPL spectral analysis. Functionalisation by the -HSO3 group and incorporation of AuNPs in the g-C3N4 skeleton lead to the extension of its pi-conjugated system, modification of its semiconductor properties, such as band structure engineering with a tunable bandgap, red-shift of the optical absorption band and promotion of charge migration and separation. The sulfate pre-treated g-C3N4 samples are supposed to have a defected surface due to oxygen vacancies, which increases the adsorption of AuNPs onto the vacant oxygen sites. Thus the AuNPs get adsorbed on the reduced surfaces, increasing the extent and effectiveness of the electronic communication between gold and the g-C3N4 interface. The improved photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of AuNPs, which synergistically facilitates the photocatalysis process. The photocatalytic activity of Au-sulfated g-C3N4 for photocatalytic splitting of water to produce H2 was increased 1.5 times compared to that of Au-g-C3N4, 2.5 times compared to that of sulphated-g-C3N4 and 35 times compared to that of single-phase g-C3N4.

  9. A defect in the metabolic activation of sulfate in a patient with achondrogenesis type IB.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, A

    1994-12-01

    Achondrogenesis type I is a perinatally lethal, short-limb chondrodysplasia. Two types, IA and IB, have been distinguished by radiographic and histological criteria; both types appear to be inherited as autosomal recessive traits. The underlying molecular defects are not known, but histochemical studies have suggested that in achondrogenesis type IB, cartilage matrix is deficient in sulfated proteoglycans. We have studied cartilage extracts of one newborn with achondrogenesis type IB and found that proteoglycans were quantitatively reduced, and, unlike in control cartilage, they did not stain with toluidine blue and did not bind to DEAE. Impaired synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans was observed also in fibroblast cultures of the achondrogenesis IB patient. Radioactive labeling and immunoprecipitation studies indicated that core protein and side chains of proteoglycans were synthesized normally but were not sulfated. Analysis of sulfate metabolism in fibroblast cultures showed, in the patient's cells, normal intracellular levels of free sulfate but markedly reduced levels of the two intermediate compounds in the sulfate activation pathway, adenosine-phosphosulfate and phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate. The results can be explained by deficient activity of one of the enzymes responsible for the biologic activation of sulfate, possibly similar to that observed in cartilage (but not in skin) of the recessive, nonlethal mouse mutant brachymorphic and leading to defective sulfation of macromolecules. Expression of the sulfation defect in cultured fibroblasts may offer a diagnostic tool for the disorder.

  10. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa; Pranzas, P. Klaus; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2013-02-15

    We report a detailed study of structural and chemical transformations of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia-based superacid catalysts. Precipitation pH is shown to be the key factor governing structure, composition and properties of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels and nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia. Increase in precipitation pH leads to substantial increase of surface fractal dimension (up to {approx}2.7) of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels, and consequently to increase in specific surface area (up to {approx}80 m{sup 2}/g) and simultaneously to decrease in sulfate content and total acidity of zirconia catalysts. Complete conversion of hexene-1 over as synthesized sulfated zirconia catalysts was observed even under ambient conditions. - Graphical abstract: Surface fractal dimension of amorphous sulfated zirconia and specific surface area and catalytic activity of crystalline sulfated zirconia as a function of precipitation pH. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural transformation of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH controls surface fractal dimension of amorphous zirconia gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH is the key factor governing properties of sulfated zirconia.

  11. ADVANCES IN BIOTREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND BIORECOVERY OF METALS: 2. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR SYSTEM FOR SULFATE REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is a severe pollution problem attributed to past mining activities. AMD is an acidic, metal-bearing wastewater generated by the oxidation of metal sulfides to sulfates by Thiobacillus bacteria in both the active and abandoned mining operations. The wastew...

  12. Oxidation kinetics of ferrous sulfate over active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Roennholm, M.R.; Waernaa, J.; Salmi, T.; Turunen, I.; Luoma, M.

    1999-07-01

    Catalyzed oxidation kinetics of dissolved Fe{sup 2+} ions to Fe{sup 3+} over active carbon in concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-FeSO{sub 4} solutions was studied with isothermal and isobaric experiments carried out in a laboratory-scale pressurized autoclave. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 60 and 130 C, and the pressure of oxygen (O{sub 2}) was varied between 4 and 10 bar. The kinetic results revealed that the oxidation rate was enhanced by increasing the temperature and pressure and that the catalytic and noncatalytic oxidations proceed as parallel processes. A rate equation was obtained for the catalytic oxidation process, based on the assumption that the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} with adsorbed oxygen is rate determining. The total oxidation rate was simulated by including a previously determined rate equation for the noncatalytic oxidation into the global model, from which the kinetic parameters of the catalytic oxidation rate were determined. A comparison of the model fit with the experimental data revealed that the proposed rate equation is applicable for the prediction of the Fe{sup 2+} oxidation kinetics in acidic ferrous sulfate solutions.

  13. Effect of prophylaxis of magnesium sulfate for reduction of postcardiac surgery arrhythmia: Randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Naghipour, Bahman; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Shadvar, Kamran; Bilehjani, Eissa; Khabaz, Ashkan Heyat; Fakhari, Solmaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arrhythmia is a common complication after heart surgery and is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Aims: This study aimed to study the effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) for reduction of postcardiac surgery arrhythmia. Setting and Design: This study is performed in the cardiac operating room and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Shahid Madani Hospital of Tabriz (Iran) between January 1, 2014, and September 30, 2014. This study is a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: In Group 1 (group magnesium [Mg]), eighty patients received 30 mg/kg MgSO4 in 500 cc normal saline and in Group 2 (group control), eighty patients received 500 cc normal saline alone. Statistical Analysis: The occurrence of arrhythmia was compared between groups by Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. In addition, surgical time, length of ICU stay, and length of hospital stay were compared by independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference in the incidence of arrhythmia between two groups (P = 0.037). The length of ICU stay was 3.4 ± 1.4 and 3.73 ± 1.77 days in group MgSO4 and control group, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between two groups (P = 0.2). Conclusion: Mg significantly decreases the incidence of all type of postcardiac surgery arrhythmia and hospital length of stay at patients undergo cardiac surgery. We offer prophylactic administration of Mg at patients undergo cardiac surgery. PMID:27716697

  14. Anticoagulant and antithrombotic activities of low-molecular-weight propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS).

    PubMed

    Xin, Meng; Ren, Li; Sun, Yang; Li, Hai-hua; Guan, Hua-Shi; He, Xiao-Xi; Li, Chun-Xia

    2016-05-23

    Propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS), a sulfated polysaccharide derivative, has been used as a heparinoid drug to prevent and treat hyperlipidemia and ischemic cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in China for nearly 30 years. To extend the applications of PSS, a series of low-molecular-weight PSSs (named FPs) were prepared by oxidative-reductive depolymerization, and the antithrombotic activities were investigated thoroughly in vitro and in vivo. The bioactivity evaluation demonstrated a positive correlation between the molecular weight and the anticoagulant and antithrombotic activities of FPs. FPs could prolong the APTT and clotting time and reduce platelet aggregation significantly. FPs could also effectively inhibit factor IIa in the presence of AT-III and HC-II. FPs decreased the wet weights and lengths of the thrombus and increased occlusion times in vivo. FP-6k, a PSS fragment with a molecular weight of 6 kDa, is an optimal antithrombotic candidate for further study and showed little chance for hemorrhagic action.

  15. The impact of temperature change on the activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria in arctic versus temperate marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2009-07-01

    Arctic regions may be particularly sensitive to climate warming and, consequently, rates of carbon mineralization in warming marine sediment may also be affected. Using long-term (24 months) incubation experiments at 0°C, 10°C and 20°C, the temperature response of metabolic activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria were studied in the permanently cold sediment of north-western Svalbard (Arctic Ocean) and compared with a temperate habitat with seasonally varying temperature (German Bight, North Sea). Short-term (35)S-sulfate tracer incubations in a temperature-gradient block (between -3.5°C and +40°C) were used to assess variations in sulfate reduction rates during the course of the experiment. Warming of arctic sediment resulted in a gradual increase of the temperature optima (T(opt)) for sulfate reduction suggesting a positive selection of psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, high rates at in situ temperatures compared with maximum rates showed the predominance of psychrophilic SRB even at high incubation temperatures. Changing apparent activation energies (E(a)) showed that increasing temperatures had an initial negative impact on sulfate reduction that was weaker after prolonged incubations, which could imply an acclimatization response rather than a selection process of the SRB community. The microbial community composition was analysed by targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA using catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The results showed the decline of specific groups of SRB and confirmed a strong impact of increasing temperatures on the microbial community composition of arctic sediment. Conversely, in seasonally changing sediment sulfate reduction rates and sulfate-reducing bacterial abundance changed little in response to changing temperature.

  16. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

    2013-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23785357

  17. Sulfate reduction controlled by organic matter availability in deep sediment cores from the saline, alkaline Lake Van (Eastern Anatolia, Turkey)

    PubMed Central

    Glombitza, Clemens; Stockhecke, Mona; Schubert, Carsten J.; Vetter, Alexandra; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2013-01-01

    As part of the International Continental Drilling Program deep lake drilling project PaleoVan, we investigated sulfate reduction (SR) in deep sediment cores of the saline, alkaline (salinity 21.4‰, alkalinity 155 m mEq-1, pH 9.81) Lake Van, Turkey. The cores were retrieved in the Northern Basin (NB) and at Ahlat Ridge (AR) and reached a maximum depth of 220 m. Additionally, 65–75 cm long gravity cores were taken at both sites. SR rates (SRR) were low (≤22 nmol cm-3 day-1) compared to lakes with higher salinity and alkalinity, indicating that salinity and alkalinity are not limiting SR in Lake Van. Both sites differ significantly in rates and depth distribution of SR. In NB, SRR are up to 10 times higher than at AR. SR could be detected down to 19 mblf (meters below lake floor) at NB and down to 13 mblf at AR. Although SRR were lower at AR than at NB, organic matter (OM) concentrations were higher. In contrast, dissolved OM in the pore water at AR contained more macromolecular OM and less low molecular weight OM. We thus suggest, that OM content alone cannot be used to infer microbial activity at Lake Van but that quality of OM has an important impact as well. These differences suggest that biogeochemical processes in lacustrine sediments are reacting very sensitively to small variations in geological, physical, or chemical parameters over relatively short distances. PMID:23908647

  18. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

    2013-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  19. Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction by a sulfate reducing bacterium in NO and SO₂ scrubbing liquor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingxiang; Zhou, Jiti; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xiaojun; Shi, Zhuang; Wang, Xiaowei

    2015-03-01

    A viable process concept, based on NO and SO2 absorption into an alkaline Fe(II)EDTA (EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) solution in a scrubber combined with biological reduction of the absorbed SO2 utilizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and regeneration of the scrubbing liquor in a single bioreactor, was developed. The SRB, Desulfovibrio sp. CMX, was used and its sulfate reduction performances in FeEDTA solutions and Fe(II)EDTA-NO had been investigated. In this study, the detailed regeneration process of Fe(II)EDTA solution, which contained Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction processes in presence of D. sp. CMX and sulfate, was evaluated. Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction processes were primarily biological, even if Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO could also be chemically convert to Fe(II)EDTA by biogenic sulfide. Regardless presence or absence of sulfate, more than 87 % Fe(III)EDTA and 98 % Fe(II)EDTA-NO were reduced in 46 h, respectively. Sulfate and Fe(III)EDTA had no affection on Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction. Sulfate enhanced final Fe(III)EDTA reduction. Effect of Fe(III)EDTA on Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate was more obvious than effect of sulfate on Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate before 8 h. To overcome toxicity of Fe(II)EDTA-NO on SRB, Fe(II)EDTA-NO was reduced first and the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA and sulfate occurred after 2 h. First-order Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate and zero-order Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate were detected respectively before 8 h.

  20. Antiviral and Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Galactomannans from Plants of Caatinga Biome

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Morais, Selene Maia; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Barroso, Naiara Dutra; Pontes Filho, Tadeu Rocha; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Lima, Danielle Malta; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious social and economic public health problem; then trying to contribute to improve its control, the objective of this research was to develop phytoterapics for dengue treatment using natural resources from Caatinga biome. Galactomannans isolated from Adenanthera pavonina L., Caesalpinia ferrea Mart., and Dimorphandra gardneriana Tull were chemically sulfated in order to evaluate the antioxidant, and antiviral activities and the role in the inhibition of virus DENV-2 in Vero cells. A positive correlation between the degree of sulfation, antioxidant and antiviral activities was observed. The sulfated galactomannans showed binding to the virus surface, indicating that they interact with DENV-2. The sulfated galactomannans from C. ferrea showed 96% inhibition of replication of DENV-2 followed by D. gardneriana (94%) and A. pavonina (77%) at 25 µg/mL and all sulfated galactomannans also showed antioxidant activity. This work is the first report of the antioxidant and antiviral effects of sulfated galactomannans against DENV-2. The results are very promising and suggest that these sulfated galactomannans from plants of Caatinga biome act in the early step of viral infection. Thus, sulfated galactomannans may act as an entry inhibitor of DENV-2. PMID:26257815

  1. Antiviral and Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Galactomannans from Plants of Caatinga Biome.

    PubMed

    Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Morais, Selene Maia; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Barroso, Naiara Dutra; Pontes Filho, Tadeu Rocha; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Lima, Danielle Malta; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious social and economic public health problem; then trying to contribute to improve its control, the objective of this research was to develop phytoterapics for dengue treatment using natural resources from Caatinga biome. Galactomannans isolated from Adenanthera pavonina L., Caesalpinia ferrea Mart., and Dimorphandra gardneriana Tull were chemically sulfated in order to evaluate the antioxidant, and antiviral activities and the role in the inhibition of virus DENV-2 in Vero cells. A positive correlation between the degree of sulfation, antioxidant and antiviral activities was observed. The sulfated galactomannans showed binding to the virus surface, indicating that they interact with DENV-2. The sulfated galactomannans from C. ferrea showed 96% inhibition of replication of DENV-2 followed by D. gardneriana (94%) and A. pavonina (77%) at 25 µg/mL and all sulfated galactomannans also showed antioxidant activity. This work is the first report of the antioxidant and antiviral effects of sulfated galactomannans against DENV-2. The results are very promising and suggest that these sulfated galactomannans from plants of Caatinga biome act in the early step of viral infection. Thus, sulfated galactomannans may act as an entry inhibitor of DENV-2.

  2. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C. R.; Salonen, I.; Dale, A. W.; Gier, J.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2013-03-01

    Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N) cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2). Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes, such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2 fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from the Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure nitrogenase activity (NA) and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation) activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2 fixation (approximated from NA) and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively) and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42- respectively), and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively). These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities, and negatively correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm events. Molecular analysis

  3. Modeling the anaerobic digestion of cane-molasses vinasse: extension of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) with sulfate reduction for a very high strength and sulfate rich wastewater.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Ernesto L; Spanjers, Henri; Solon, Kimberly; Amerlinck, Youri; Nopens, Ingmar; Dewulf, Jo

    2015-03-15

    This research presents the modeling of the anaerobic digestion of cane-molasses vinasse, hereby extending the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 with sulfate reduction for a very high strength and sulfate rich wastewater. Based on a sensitivity analysis, four parameters of the original ADM1 and all sulfate reduction parameters were calibrated. Although some deviations were observed between model predictions and experimental values, it was shown that sulfates, total aqueous sulfide, free sulfides, methane, carbon dioxide and sulfide in the gas phase, gas flow, propionic and acetic acids, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and pH were accurately predicted during model validation. The model showed high (±10%) to medium (10%-30%) accuracy predictions with a mean absolute relative error ranging from 1% to 26%, and was able to predict failure of methanogenesis and sulfidogenesis when the sulfate loading rate increased. Therefore, the kinetic parameters and the model structure proposed in this work can be considered as valid for the sulfate reduction process in the anaerobic digestion of cane-molasses vinasse when sulfate and organic loading rates range from 0.36 to 1.57 kg [Formula: see text]  m(-3) d(-1) and from 7.66 to 12 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), respectively.

  4. Structural characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of a polysaccharide fraction from Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changxing; Xiong, Qingping; Li, Songlin; Zhao, Xirong; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2015-01-22

    In the present study, we investigated the preliminary structure, sulfation and antitumor activity of a polysaccharide fraction from Cyclina sinensis (CSPS-1). Results of structural characterization showed that the backbone chain of CSPS-1 was composed of glucose linked by α-(1→4) glycosidic bond, and the branch chain was attached to backbone chain by (1→6) glycosidic bond. CSPS-1 was sulfated by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method under different modification conditions according to the orthogonal test L9(3(4)), affording nine sulfated polysaccharides (CSPS-1-S). The optimal sulfation conditions for CSPS-1 were reaction temperature of 65°C, reaction time of 2h and chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine ratio of 1:4. Structural analysis revealed that sulfation had occurred at position of C-6 in CSPS-1. In addition, CSPS-1-S exhibited significantly higher inhibitory activity in vitro against human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells.

  5. Theoretical estimation of equilibrium sulfur isotope fractionations among aqueous sulfite species: Implications for isotope models of microbial sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, D. L.; Farquhar, J.; Guo, W.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfite (sensu lato), an intermediate in a variety sulfur redox processes, plays a particularly important role in microbial sulfate reduction. It exists intracellularly as multiple species between sets of enzymatic reactions that transform sulfate to sulfide, with the exact speciation depending on pH, T, and ionic strength. However, the complex speciation of sulfite is ignored in current isotope partitioning models of microbial sulfate reduction and simplified solely to the pyramidal SO32- (sulfite sensu stricto), due to a lack of appropriate constraints. We theoretically estimated the equilibrium sulfur isotope fractionations (33S/32S, 34S/32S, 36S/32S) among all documented sulfite species in aqueous solution, including sulfite (SO32-), bisulfite isomers and dimers ((HS)O3-, (HO)SO2-, S2O52-), and SO2(aq), through first principles quantum mechanical calculations. The calculations were performed at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level using cluster models with 30-40 water molecules surrounding the solute. Our calculated equilibrium fractionation factors compare well to the available experimental constraints and suggest that the minor and often-ignored tetrahedral (HS)O3- isomer of bisulfite strongly influences isotope partitioning behavior in the sulfite system under most environmentally relevant conditions, particularly fractionation magnitudes and unusual temperature dependence. For example, we predict that sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfite and bulk bisulfite in solution should have an apparent inverse temperature dependence due to the influence of (HS)O3- and its increased stability at higher temperatures. Our findings highlight the need to appropriately account for speciation/isomerization of sulfur species in sulfur isotope studies. We will also present similar calculation results of other aqueous sulfur compounds (e.g., H2S/HS-, SO42-, S2O32-, S3O62-, and poorly documented SO22- species), and discuss the implication of our results for microbial sulfate

  6. Catalytic synthesis and antioxidant activity of sulfated polysaccharide from Momordica charantia L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Chen, Tong; Hu, Yan; Li, Kexin; Yan, Liushui

    2014-03-01

    Sulfated derivatives of polysaccharide from Momordica charantia L. (MCPS) with different degree of sulfation (DS) were synthesized by chlorosulfonic acid method with ionic liquids as solvent. Fourier transform infrared spectra and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra indicated that C-6 substitution was predominant in MCPS compared with the C-2 position. Compared with the native polysaccharide from Momordica charantia L. (MCP), MCPS exhibited more excellent antioxidant activities in vitro, which indicated that sulfated modification could enhance antioxidant activities of MCP. Furthermore, high DS and moderate molecular weight could improve the antioxidant activities of polysaccharide.

  7. Use of ORP (oxidation-reduction potential) to control oxygen dosing for online sulfide oxidation in anaerobic treatment of high sulfate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khanal, S K; Shang, C; Huang, J C

    2003-01-01

    In this study, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) was used as a controlling parameter to regulate oxygen dosing to the recycled biogas for online sulfide oxidation in an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) system. The UAF was operated with a constant influent COD of 18,000 mg/L, but with different influent sulfates of 1000, 3000 and 6000 mg/L. The reactor was initially operated under a natural ORP of -290 mV (without oxygen injection), and was then followed by oxygenation to raise its ORP by 25 mV above the natural level for each influent sulfate condition. At 6,000 mg/L sulfate without oxygen injection, the dissolved sulfide reached 733.8 mg S/L with a corresponding free sulfide of 250.3 mg S/L, thus showing a considerable inhibition to methanogens. Upon oxygenation to raise its ORP to -265 mV (i.e., a 25 mV increase), the dissolved sulfide was reduced by more than 98.5% with a concomitant 45.9% increase of the methane yield. Under lower influent sulfate levels of 1,000 and 3,000 mg/L, the levels of sulfides produced, even under the natural ORP, did not impose any noticeable toxicity to methanogens. Upon oxygenation to raise the ORP by +25 mV, the corresponding methane yields were actually reduced by 15.5% and 6.2%, respectively. However, such reductions were not due to the adverse impact of the elevated ORP; instead, they were due to a diversion of some organic carbon to support the facultative activities inside the reactor as a result of excessive oxygenation. In other words, to achieve satisfactory sulfide oxidation for the lower influent sulfate conditions, it was not necessary to raise the ORP by as much as +25 mV. The ORP increase actually needed depended on both the influent sulfate and also actual wastewater characteristics. This study had proved that the ORP controlled oxygenation was reliable for achieving consistent online sulfide control.

  8. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C. R.; Salonen, I.; Dale, A. W.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2012-06-01

    Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N) cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2). Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2-fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure N2-fixation and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation) activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, rates of benthic denitrification were also measured and the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2-fixation and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively) and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively), and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively). These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities, and negatively correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm events

  9. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, A.; Ramsing, N.B.; Habicht, K.; Kuever, J.; Joergensen, B.B.; Fukui, Manabu; Cohen, Y.

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 7} cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1}. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO{sub 2} from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO{sub 2} demand of the mat.

  10. Comparison of preparation methods for ceria catalyst and the effect of surface and bulk sulfates on its activity toward NH3-SCR.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huazhen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Shijian; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liang; Wang, Wei; Hao, Jiming

    2013-11-15

    A series of CeO2 catalysts prepared with sulfate (S) and nitrate (N) precursors by hydrothermal (H) and precipitation (P) methods were investigated in selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3 (NH3-SCR). The catalytic activity of CeO2 was significantly affected by the preparation methods and the precursor type. CeO2-SH, which was prepared by hydrothermal method with cerium (IV) sulfate as a precursor, showed excellent SCR activity and high N2 selectivity in the temperature range of 230-450 °C. Based on the results obtained by temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), transmission infrared spectra (IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), the excellent performance of CeO2-SH was correlated with the surface sulfate species formed in the hydrothermal reaction. These results indicated that sulfate species bind with Ce(4+) on the CeO2-SH catalyst, and the specific sulfate species, such as Ce(SO4)2 or CeOSO4, were formed. The adsorption of NH3 was promoted by these sulfate species, and the probability of immediate oxidation of NH3 to N2O on Ce(4+) was reduced. Accordingly, the selective oxidation of NH3 was enhanced, which contributed to the high N2 selectivity in the SCR reaction. However, the location of sulfate on the CeO2-SP catalyst was different. Plenty of sulfate species were likely deposited on CeO2-SP surface, covering the active sites for NO oxidation, which resulted in poor SCR activity in the test temperature range. Moreover, the resistance to alkali metals, such as Na and K, was improved over the CeO2-SH catalyst.

  11. Characterization of microbial activities and U reduction in a shallow aquifer contaminated by uranium mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Elias, D A; Krumholz, L R; Wong, D; Long, P E; Suflita, J M

    2003-07-01

    A characterization of the Shiprock, NM, uranium mill tailing site focused on the geochemical and microbiological factors governing in-situ uranium-redox reactions. Groundwater and aqueous extracts of sediment samples contained a wide concentration range of sulfate, nitrate, and U(VI) with median values of 21.2 mM, 16.1 micro M, and 2.7 micro M, respectively. Iron(III) was not detected in groundwater, but a median value of 0.3 mM in sediment extracts was measured. Bacterial diversity down gradient from the disposal pile reflected the predominant geochemistry with relatively high numbers of sulfate- and nitrate-reducing microorganisms, and smaller numbers of acetogenic, methanogenic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. In aquifer slurry incubations, nitrate reduction was always preferred and had a negative impact on sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U-reduction rates. We also found that sulfate-reduction rates decreased sharply in the presence of clay, while Fe(III)-reduction increased with no clear impact on U reduction. In the absence of clay, iron and sulfate reduction correlated with concentrations of Fe(III) and sulfate, respectively. Rates of U(VI) loss did not correlate with the concentration of any electron acceptor. With the exception of Fe(III), electron donor amendment was largely unsuccessful in stimulating electron acceptor loss over a 2-week incubation period, suggesting that endogenous forms of organic matter were sufficient to support microbial activity. Our findings suggest that efforts to accelerate biological U reduction should initially focus on stimulating nitrate removal.

  12. The Diversity of Sulfide Oxidation and Sulfate Reduction Genes Expressed by the Bacterial Communities of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J.; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Taylor, Craig; Scranton, Mary I.; Taylor, Gordon T.; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y.

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative expression of dissimilative sulfite reductase (dsrA), a key gene in sulfate reduction, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (sqr), a key gene in sulfide oxidation was investigated. Neither of the two could be amplified from mRNA retrieved with Niskin bottles but were amplified from mRNA retrieved by the Deep SID. The sqr and sqr-like genes retrieved from the Cariaco Basin were related to the sqr genes from a Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum, Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, Sulfurimonas autotrophica, Thiorhodospira sibirica and Chlorobium tepidum. The dsrA gene sequences obtained from the redoxcline of the Cariaco Basin belonged to chemoorganotrophic and chemoautotrophic sulfate and sulfur reducers belonging to the class Deltaproteobacteria (phylum Proteobacteria) and the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes). PMID:27651847

  13. The Diversity of Sulfide Oxidation and Sulfate Reduction Genes Expressed by the Bacterial Communities of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Taylor, Craig; Scranton, Mary I; Taylor, Gordon T; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative expression of dissimilative sulfite reductase (dsrA), a key gene in sulfate reduction, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (sqr), a key gene in sulfide oxidation was investigated. Neither of the two could be amplified from mRNA retrieved with Niskin bottles but were amplified from mRNA retrieved by the Deep SID. The sqr and sqr-like genes retrieved from the Cariaco Basin were related to the sqr genes from a Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum, Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, Sulfurimonas autotrophica, Thiorhodospira sibirica and Chlorobium tepidum. The dsrA gene sequences obtained from the redoxcline of the Cariaco Basin belonged to chemoorganotrophic and chemoautotrophic sulfate and sulfur reducers belonging to the class Deltaproteobacteria (phylum Proteobacteria) and the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes).

  14. Characterization and cytotoxic activity of sulfated derivatives of polysaccharides from Agaricus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, F. T. G. S.; Camelini, C. M.; Cordeiro, M. N. S.; Mascarello, A.; Malagoli, B. G.; Larsen, I.; Rossi, M. J.; Nunes, R. J.; Braga, F. C.; Brandt, C.R.; Simões, C. M. O.

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus brasiliensis cell-wall polysaccharides isolated from fruiting body (FR) and mycelium (MI) and their respective sulfated derivatives (FR-S and MI-S) were chemically characterized using elemental analysis, TLC, FT-IR, NMR, HPLC, and thermal analysis. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated against A549 tumor cells by MTT and sulforhodamine assays. The average molecular weight (Mw) of FR and MI was estimated to be 609 and 310 kDa, respectively. FR-S (127 kDa) and MI-S (86 kDa) had lower Mw, probably due to hydrolysis occurred during the sulfation reaction. FR-S and MI-S presented ~14 % sulfur content in elemental analysis. Sulfation of samples was characterized by the appearance of two new absorption bands at 1253 and 810 cm−1 in the infrared spectra, related to S=O and C-S-O sulfate groups, respectively. Through 1H and 13C NMR analysis FR-S was characterized as a (1→6)-(1→3)-β-D-glucan fully sulfated at C-4 and C-6 terminal and partially sulfated at C-6 of (1→3)-β-D-glucan moiety. MI-S was shown to be a (1→3)-β-D-gluco-(1→2)-β-D-mannan, partially sulfated at C-2, C-3, C-4, and C-6, and fully sulfated at C-6 of the terminal residues. The combination of high degree of sulfation and low molecular weight was correlated with the increased cytotoxic activity (48 h of treatment) of both FR-S (EC50=605.6 μg/mL) and MI-S (EC50=342.1 μg/mL) compared to the non-sulfated polysaccharides FR and MI (EC50>1500 μg/mL). PMID:23511057

  15. Characterization and cytotoxic activity of sulfated derivatives of polysaccharides from Agaricus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, F T G S; Camelini, C M; Cordeiro, M N S; Mascarello, A; Malagoli, B G; Larsen, I V; Rossi, M J; Nunes, R J; Braga, F C; Brandt, C R; Simões, C M O

    2013-06-01

    Agaricus brasiliensis cell-wall polysaccharides isolated from fruiting body (FR) and mycelium (MI) and their respective sulfated derivatives (FR-S and MI-S) were chemically characterized using elemental analysis, TLC, FT-IR, NMR, HPLC, and thermal analysis. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated against A549 tumor cells by MTT and sulforhodamine assays. The average molecular weight (Mw) of FR and MI was estimated to be 609 and 310 kDa, respectively. FR-S (127 kDa) and MI-S (86 kDa) had lower Mw, probably due to hydrolysis occurring during the sulfation reaction. FR-S and MI-S presented ~14% sulfur content in elemental analysis. Sulfation of samples was characterized by the appearance of two new absorption bands at 1253 and 810 cm(-1) in the infrared spectra, related to S=O and C-S-O sulfate groups, respectively. Through (1)H and (13)C NMR analysis FR-S was characterized as a (1→6)-(1→3)-β-D-glucan fully sulfated at C-4 and C-6 terminal and partially sulfated at C-6 of (1→3)-β-D-glucan moiety. MI-S was shown to be a (1→3)-β-D-gluco-(1→2)-β-D-mannan, partially sulfated at C-2, C-3, C-4, and C-6, and fully sulfated at C-6 of the terminal residues. The combination of high degree of sulfation and low molecular weight was correlated with the increased cytotoxic activity (48 h of treatment) of both FR-S (EC₅₀=605.6 μg/mL) and MI-S (EC₅₀=342.1 μg/mL) compared to the non-sulfated polysaccharides FR and MI (EC₅₀>1500 μg/mL).

  16. Carbonates and sulfates in CI chondrites - Formation by aqueous activity on the parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredriksson, Kurt; Kerridge, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Compositions and morphologies of dolomites, breunnerites, Ca-carbonates, Ca-sulfates and Mg, Ni, Na-sulfates, and their petrologic interrelations, in four CI chondrites are consistent with their having been formed by aqueous activity on the CI parent body. Radiochronometric data indicate that this activity took place very early in solar-system history. No evidence for original ('primitive') condensates seems to be present. However, alteration apparently took place without change in bulk meteorite composition.

  17. MICROBIAL SULFATE REDUCTION AND METAL ATTENUATION IN PH 4 ACID MINE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing...

  18. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-29

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor.

  19. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor. PMID:27021522

  20. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor.

  1. Depolymerization of Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate with a Modified Fenton-System and Anticoagulant Activity of the Resulting Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-hui; Li, Shan; Zhi, Zi-jian; Yan, Lu-feng; Ye, Xing-qian; Ding, Tian; Yan, Lei; Linhardt, Robert John; Chen, Shi-guo

    2016-01-01

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (fCS) from sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus (fCS-Ib) with a chondroitin sulfate type E (CSE) backbone and 2,4-O-sulfo fucose branches has shown excellent anticoagulant activity although has also show severe adverse effects. Depolymerization represents an effective method to diminish this polysaccharide’s side effects. The present study reports a modified controlled Fenton system for degradation of fCS-Ib and the anticoagulant activity of the resulting fragments. Monosaccharides and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the resulting fragments indicate that no significant chemical changes in the backbone of fCS-Ib and no loss of sulfate groups take place during depolymerization. A reduction in the molecular weight of fCS-Ib should result in a dramatic decrease in prolonging activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time. A decrease in the inhibition of thrombin (FIIa) by antithromin III (AT III) and heparin cofactor II (HCII), and the slight decrease of the inhibition of factor X activity, results in a significant increase of anti-factor Xa (FXa)/anti-FIIa activity ratio. The modified free-radical depolymerization method enables preparation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) oligosaccharides suitable for investigation of clinical anticoagulant application. PMID:27657094

  2. Biochemical characteristics and antioxidant activity of crude and purified sulfated polysaccharides from Gracilaria fisheri.

    PubMed

    Imjongjairak, Siriluck; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok; Laohakunjit, Natta; Tachaapaikoon, Chakrit; Pason, Patthra; Waeonukul, Rattiya

    2016-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from Gracilaria fisheri of Thailand, which were extracted in low-temperature (25 °C) water showed the highest content of phenolic compounds compared with those extracted at high temperature (55 °C). Crude SP antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the DPPH free radical scavenging effect which is directly related to the level of phenolic compounds. The sulfate content, total sugar, and SPs yield were also directly related to the extraction temperature. All extracts contained galactose as a major monosaccharide. High antioxidant activity of crude SP, positively correlated with the phenolic compound contents (R(2) = 0.996) contributed by the existence of sulfate groups and phenolic compounds. In purified SP, F1 fraction exhibited strong radical scavenging ability, but it was not significantly different compared to crude SP extracted at 25 °C. This indicated that the appropriate density and distribution of sulfate groups in the SP extract showed the best antioxidant activity.

  3. Increased Glutathione Synthesis Following Nrf2 Activation by Vanadyl Sulfate in Human Chang Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum Daseul; Zhang, Rui; Kang, Kyoung Ah; You, Ho Jin; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-01-01

    Jeju ground water, containing vanadium compounds, was shown to increase glutathione (GSH) levels as determined by a colorimetric assay and confocal microscopy. To investigate whether the effects of Jeju ground water on GSH were specifically mediated by vanadium compounds, human Chang liver cells were incubated for 10 passages in media containing deionized distilled water (DDW), Jeju ground water (S1 and S3), and vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4). Vanadyl sulfate scavenged superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Vanadyl sulfate effectively increased cellular GSH level and up-regulated mRNA and protein expression of a catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC), which is involved in GSH synthesis. The induction of GCLC expression by vanadyl sulfate was found to be mediated by transcription factor erythroid transcription factor NF-E2 (Nrf2), which critically regulates GCLC by binding to the antioxidant response elements (AREs). Vanadyl sulfate treatment increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the accumulation of phosphorylated Nrf2. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) contributed to ARE-driven GCLC expression via Nrf2 activation. Vanadyl sulfate induced the expression of the active phospho form of ERK. Taken together, these results suggest that the increase in GSH level by Jeju ground water is, at least in part, due to the effects of vanadyl sulfate via the Nrf2-mediated induction of GCLC. PMID:22272109

  4. Sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweeds Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida: isolation, structural characteristics, and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesya S; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N

    2011-12-13

    During the last decade brown seaweeds attracted much attention as a source of polysaccharides, namely laminarans, alginic acids, and sulfated polysaccharides-fucoidans, with various structures and biological activities. In this study, sulfated polysaccharides were isolated from brown seaweeds Saccharina japonica (formerly named Laminaria) and Undaria pinnatifida and their antitumor activity was tested against human breast cancer T-47D and melanoma SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The sulfated polysaccharide form S. japonica was highly branched partially acetylated sulfated galactofucan, built up of (1→3)-α-L-fucose residues. The sulfated polysaccharide from U. pinnatifida was partially acetylated highly sulfated galactofucan consisting of (1→3)- or (1→3);(1→4)-α-L-fucose residues. Fucoidans from S. japonica and U. pinnatifida distinctly inhibited proliferation and colony formation in both breast cancer and melanoma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the use of sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweeds S. japonica and U. pinnatifida might be a potential approach for cancer treatment.

  5. Petroleum alteration by thermochemical sulfate reduction - A comprehensive molecular study of aromatic hydrocarbons and polar compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Clifford C.; Wang, Frank C.; Qian, Kuangnan; Wu, Chunping; Mennito, Anthony S.; Wei, Zhibin

    2015-03-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) alters petroleum composition as it proceeds towards the complete oxidation of hydrocarbons to CO2. The effects of TSR on the molecular and isotopic composition of volatile species are well known; however, the non-volatile higher molecular weight aromatic and polar species have not been well documented. To address this deficiency, a suite of onshore Gulf coast oils and condensates generated from and accumulating in Smackover carbonates was assembled to include samples that experienced varying levels of TSR alteration and in reservoir thermal cracking. The entire molecular composition of aromatic hydrocarbons and NSO species were characterized and semi-quantified using comprehensive GC × GC (FID and CSD) and APPI-FTICR-MS. The concentration of thiadiamondoids is a reliable indicator of the extent of TSR alteration. Once generated by TSR, thiadiamondoids remain thermally stable in all but the most extreme reservoir temperatures (>180 °C). Hydrocarbon concentrations and distributions are influenced by thermal cracking and TSR. With increasing TSR alteration, oils become enriched in monoaromatic hydrocarbons and the distribution of high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons shifts towards more condensed species with a decrease in the number of alkyl carbons. Organosulfur compounds are created by the TSR process. In addition to the increase in benzothiophenes and dibenzothiophenes noted in previous studies, TSR generates condensed species containing one or more sulfur atoms that likely are composed of a single or multiple thiophenic cores. We hypothesize that these species are generated from the partial oxidation of PAHs and dealkylation reactions, followed by sulfur incorporation and condensation reactions. The organosulfur species remaining in the TSR altered oils are "proto-solid bitumen" moieties that upon further condensation, oxidation or sulfur incorporation result in highly sulfur enriched solid bitumen, which is

  6. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur.

  7. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., Fe(II) release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  8. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  9. Sulfated modification of the polysaccharides obtained from defatted rice bran and their antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Zhengxing

    2009-03-01

    Nine sulfated defatted rice bran polysaccharides (sRBPS), with various degrees of sulfation (DS) and carbohydrate content, were prepared by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine (CSA-Pyr) method according to orthogonal test. Nine sulfated derivatives sRBPS were obtained and their antitumor activities were compared by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that when DS within the scope of 0.81-1.29, carbohydrate content in the range of 41.41-78.56%, sulfated derivatives exhibit relatively strong antitumor activity in vitro. The optimum modification conditions were reaction temperature of 70 degrees C, the ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine of 1:4 and the reaction time of 2h.

  10. Simulation of the inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a two-compartment upflow bioreactor subjected to molybdate injection.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, E B; de Andrade Lima, L R P

    2016-08-01

    Souring of oil fields during secondary oil recovery by water injection occurs mainly due to the action of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) adhered to the rock surface in the vicinity of injection wells. Upflow packed-bed bioreactors have been used in petroleum microbiology because of its similarity to the oil field near the injection wells or production. However, these reactors do not realistically describe the regions near the injection wells, which are characterized by the presence of a saturated zone and a void region close to the well. In this study, the hydrodynamics of the two-compartment packing-free/packed-bed pilot bioreactor that mimics an oil reservoir was studied. The packed-free compartment was modeled using a continuous stirred tank model with mass exchange between active and stagnant zones, whereas the packed-bed compartment was modeled using a piston-dispersion-exchange model. The proposed model adequately represents the hydrodynamic of the packed-free/packed-bed bioreactor while the simulations provide important information about the characteristics of the residence time distribution (RTD) curves for different sets of model parameters. Simulations were performed to represent the control of the sulfate-reducing bacteria activity in the bioreactor with the use of molybdate in different scenarios. The simulations show that increased amounts of molybdate cause an effective inhibition of the souring sulfate-reducing bacteria activity.

  11. Effect of sulfation on the surface activity of CaO for N2O decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingnan; Hu, Xiaoying; Qin, Wu; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2015-12-01

    Limestone addition to circulating fluidized bed boilers for sulfur removal affects nitrous oxide (N2O) emission at the same time, but mechanism of how sulfation process influences the surface activity of CaO for N2O decomposition remains unclear. In this paper, we investigated the effect of sulfation on the surface properties and catalytic activity of CaO for N2O decomposition using density functional theory calculations. Sulfation of CaO (1 0 0) surface by the adsorption of a single gaseous SO2 or SO3 molecule forms stable local CaSO3 or CaSO4 on the CaO (1 0 0) surface with strong hybridization between the S atom of SOx and the surface O anion. The formed local CaSO3 increases the barrier energy of N2O decomposition from 0.989 eV (on the CaO (1 0 0) surface) to 1.340 eV, and further sulfation into local CaSO4 remarkably increases the barrier energy to 2.967 eV. Sulfation from CaSO3 into CaSO4 is therefore the crucial step for deactivating the surface activity for N2O decomposition. Completely sulfated CaSO4 (0 0 1) and (0 1 0) surfaces further validate the negligible catalytic ability of CaSO4 for N2O decomposition.

  12. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment.

    PubMed

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G; Tom, Lauren M; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M; Carlson, Hans K; Conrad, Mark E; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved.

  13. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G.; Tom, Lauren M.; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T.; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M.; Carlson, Hans K.; Conrad, Mark E.; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  14. Sulfation of fucogalactan from Agaricus bisporus: Different patterns in the chemical structure and their effects on anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Román Ochoa, Yony; Iacomini, Marcello; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    A fucogalactan from Agaricus bisporus was sulfated by two methodologies based on an optimized sulfation method. The direct action of chlorosulfonic acid and SO3-pyridine complex over the sulfation reaction and its effects on anticoagulant activity were evaluated. The products of chemical sulfations were two sulfated fucogalactans named E100 and ESL respectively. Clotting assays (APTT, PT and TT) showed that both sulfated polysaccharides have anticoagulant activity, and that ESL was more potent compared to E100. The FXa, T and FXIIa activities in the presence of the sulfated polysaccharides were determined. The better anticoagulant activity of ESL could be related to anti-FXIIa activity and also probably to its higher bioavailability. The HPSEC analysis showed similar Mw of 1.08×10(4)gmol(-1) and 1.00×10(4)gmol(-1) for E100 and ESL respectively. NMR and methylation analyses indicated a heterogeneous sulfation pattern for E100, whereas ESL showed conserved unsulfated (1→6)-linked α-d-Galp residues in the main-chain and a more homogeneous sulfation pattern. The DS values of ESL and E100 were 1.0 and 2.8 respectively, indicating that the sulfation pattern is more important for the anticoagulant activity than the amount of sulfate.

  15. Experimental analysis of arsenic precipitation during microbial sulfate and iron reduction in model aquifer sediment reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Roden, Eric E.; Crossey, Laura J.; Brealey, Adrian J.; Spilde, Michael N.

    2010-05-01

    Microbial SO 42- reduction limits accumulation of aqueous As in reducing aquifers where the sulfide that is produced forms minerals that sequester As. We examined the potential for As partitioning into As- and Fe-sulfide minerals in anaerobic, semi-continuous flow bioreactors inoculated with 0.5% (g mL -1) fine-grained alluvial aquifer sediment. A fluid residence time of three weeks was maintained over a ca. 300-d incubation period by replacing one-third of the aqueous phase volume of the reactors with fresh medium every seven days. The medium had a composition comparable to natural As-contaminated groundwater with slightly basic pH (7.3) and 7.5 μM aqueous As(V) and also contained 0.8 mM acetate to stimulate microbial activity. Medium was delivered to a reactor system with and without 10 mmol L -1 synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH). In both reactors, influent As(V) was almost completely reduced to As(III). Pure As-sulfide minerals did not form in the Fe-limited reactor. Realgar (As 4S 4) and As 2S 3(am) were undersaturated throughout the experiment. Orpiment (As 2S 3) was saturated while sulfide content was low (˜50 to 150 μM), but precipitation was likely limited by slow kinetics. Reaction-path modeling suggests that, even if these minerals had formed, the dissolved As content of the reactor would have remained at hazardous levels. Mackinawite (Fe 1 + xS; x ⩽ 0.07) formed readily in the Fe-bearing reactor and held dissolved sulfide at levels below saturation for orpiment and realgar. The mackinawite sequestered little As (<0.1 wt.%), however, and aqueous As accumulated to levels above the influent concentration as microbial Fe(III) reduction consumed goethite and mobilized adsorbed As. A relatively small amount of pyrite (FeS 2) and greigite (Fe 3S 4) formed in the Fe-bearing reactor when we injected a polysulfide solution (Na 2S 4) to a final concentration of 0.5 mM after 216, 230, 279, and 286 days. The pyrite, and to a lesser extent the greigite, that formed

  16. The Role of Geoelectrical Methods in Monitoring Stimulated Sulfate-Reduction: Insights Gained From Field-Scale Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. H.; Kemna, A.; Long, P.; Druhan, J.; Hubbard, S.; Banfield, J.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding how microorganisms influence the physical and chemical properties of the subsurface is hindered by our inability to observe microbial dynamics in real time and with high spatial resolution. Here we investigate the use of time-lapse geoelectrical methods to monitor stimulated sulfate-reduction at the field scale during in-situ acetate amendment at the Rifle, Colorado uranium mill tailings site. Modification of the pore fluid and sediment composition as a result of bisulfide production and mineral precipitation was concomitant with changes in induced polarization (IP) and self-potential (SP) signals. With data collected from both the surface and between boreholes, temporal variations in the IP response were characterized by the development of pronounced phase anomalies related to the precipitation of disordered mackinawite (FeS). Sediment samples recovered from the aquifer showed a close correlation between the location of the IP phase anomalies and the enrichment of acid volatile sulfides. Variations in borehole SP signals closely tracked the onset of sulfate-reduction and primarily resulted from an increase in the concentration of bisulfide adjacent to the measurement electrodes. The magnitude of the SP response was dominated by the galvanic interaction of metallic copper and bisulfide, and it closely approximated the electrochemical cell potential of the anodic and cathodic reactions occurring at the electrode surfaces. Both geolectrical techniques delineated spatially discrete anomalies that appear to reflect the interaction of biostimulation with lithological variability within the aquifer.

  17. Role of oxbow lakes in controlling redox geochemistry of shallow groundwater under a heterogeneous fluvial sedimentary environment in an agricultural field: Coexistence of iron and sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byoung-Young; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to extend the knowledge of the vertical distribution of redox conditions of shallow groundwater in heterogeneous fluvial sediments near oxbow lakes. For this study, we revisited the study area of Kim et al. (2009) to examine the redox zoning in details. Three multi-level samplers were installed along a flow path near two oxbow lakes to obtain vertical profiles of the subsurface geology and hydrochemical and isotopic data (δ(18)O and δD of water, δ(15)N and δ(18)O of nitrate, and δ(34)S of sulfate) of groundwater. Geologic logging showed that characteristics of the heterogeneous subsurface geology are closely related to the pattern of vertical redox zoning. Hydrochemical data in conjunction with nitrogen and sulfur isotope data show that the redox status of groundwater near oxbow lakes is controlled by denitrification, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction. The oxidizing condition of groundwater occurs in the sand-dominant alluvium located in the up-gradient of oxbow lakes, whereas the reducing condition accompanying denitrification, iron reduction, and local sulfate reduction is developed in silt-rich alluvium in and the downgradient of oxbow lakes. The occurrence of sulfate reduction was newly found in this study. However, the vertical profiles of redox-sensitive parameters show that iron reduction and sulfate reduction occur concurrently near oxbow lakes, although the measured redox potentials suggest that thermodynamic conditions are controlled by the stability of Fe(2+)/Fe-oxides. Therefore, this study shows that the redox condition of groundwater in the iron-rich zone should be carefully interpreted. For this purpose, depth-specific sampling and careful examination of sulfur isotope data will be very useful for identifying the redox processes occurring in the zone with overlapping iron reduction and sulfate reduction in heterogeneous fluvial sediments.

  18. Role of oxbow lakes in controlling redox geochemistry of shallow groundwater under a heterogeneous fluvial sedimentary environment in an agricultural field: Coexistence of iron and sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byoung-Young; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to extend the knowledge of the vertical distribution of redox conditions of shallow groundwater in heterogeneous fluvial sediments near oxbow lakes. For this study, we revisited the study area of Kim et al. (2009) to examine the redox zoning in details. Three multi-level samplers were installed along a flow path near two oxbow lakes to obtain vertical profiles of the subsurface geology and hydrochemical and isotopic data (δ18O and δD of water, δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, and δ34S of sulfate) of groundwater. Geologic logging showed that characteristics of the heterogeneous subsurface geology are closely related to the pattern of vertical redox zoning. Hydrochemical data in conjunction with nitrogen and sulfur isotope data show that the redox status of groundwater near oxbow lakes is controlled by denitrification, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction. The oxidizing condition of groundwater occurs in the sand-dominant alluvium located in the up-gradient of oxbow lakes, whereas the reducing condition accompanying denitrification, iron reduction, and local sulfate reduction is developed in silt-rich alluvium in and the downgradient of oxbow lakes. The occurrence of sulfate reduction was newly found in this study. However, the vertical profiles of redox-sensitive parameters show that iron reduction and sulfate reduction occur concurrently near oxbow lakes, although the measured redox potentials suggest that thermodynamic conditions are controlled by the stability of Fe2 +/Fe-oxides. Therefore, this study shows that the redox condition of groundwater in the iron-rich zone should be carefully interpreted. For this purpose, depth-specific sampling and careful examination of sulfur isotope data will be very useful for identifying the redox processes occurring in the zone with overlapping iron reduction and sulfate reduction in heterogeneous fluvial sediments.

  19. In vitro and ex vivo studies of antioxidant activity of carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides from red algae.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, E V; Barabanova, A O; Homenko, V A; Solov'eva, T F; Bogdanovich, R N; Yermak, I M

    2011-02-01

    Antioxidant properties of structurally different sulfated polysaccharides (carrageenans) were studied in vitro and ex vivo. Ferric reducing antioxidant activity of carrageenans and their inhibitory effects on hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anion radicals were demonstrated in vitro. Activity of carrageenans depends on the polysaccharide structure. Carrageenans stimulate catalytic activity of SOD from donor erythrocyte.

  20. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  1. Microwave assisted extraction of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from Ascophyllum nodosum and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Macquarrie, Duncan

    2015-09-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum were extracted by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technology. Different conditions of temperature (90-150°C), extraction time (5-30 min) were evaluated and optimal fucoidan yield was 16.08%, obtained from 120°C for 15 min's extraction. Compositional analysis, GPC, HPAEC and IR analysis were employed for characterization of extracted sulfated polysaccharides. Fucose was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 90°C while glucuronic acid was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 150°C. Both the molecular weight and sulfate content of extracted fucoidan increased with decreasing extraction temperature. All fucoidans exhibited antioxidant activities as measured by DPPH scavenging and reducing power, among which fucoidan extracted at 90°C was highest. This study shows that MAE is an efficient technology to extract sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed and Ascophyllum nodosum could potentially be a resource for natural antioxidants.

  2. Synthesis and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids: structure/activity studies.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Victoria; Murray, Ana P; Maier, Marta S

    2013-11-01

    Disulfated and trisulfated steroids have been synthesized from cholesterol and their acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity has been evaluated. In our studies we have found that the activity was not only dependent on the location of the sulfate groups but on their configurations. 2β,3α,6α-trihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one trisulfate (18) was the most active steroid with an IC50 value of 15.48 μM comparable to that of 2β,3α-dihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one disulfate (1). Both compounds were found to be less active than the reference compound eserine. The butyrylcholinesterase activity of 1 and 18 was one magnitude lower than that against acetylcholinesterase revealing a selective inhibitor profile.

  3. Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans Control the Extracellular Trafficking and the Activity of the Metalloprotease Inhibitor TIMP-3

    PubMed Central

    Troeberg, Linda; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Anower-E-Khuda, Md. Ferdous; Freeman, Craig; Federov, Oleg; Habuchi, Hiroko; Habuchi, Osami; Kimata, Koji; Nagase, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP-3) is an important regulator of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. TIMP-3 binds to sulfated ECM glycosaminoglycans or is endocytosed by cells via low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1). Here, we report that heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate E (CSE) selectively regulate postsecretory trafficking of TIMP-3 by inhibiting its binding to LRP-1. HS and CSE also increased TIMP-3 affinity for glycan-binding metalloproteinases, such as adamalysin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5), by reducing the dissociation rate constants. The sulfation pattern was crucial for these activities because monosulfated or truncated heparin had a reduced ability to bind to TIMP-3 and increase its affinity for ADAMTS-5. Therefore, sulfation of ECM glycans regulates the levels and inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and modulates ECM turnover, and small mimicries of sulfated glycans may protect the tissue from the excess destruction seen in diseases such as osteoarthritis, cancer, and atherosclerosis. PMID:25176127

  4. Effect of dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction on arsenic dynamics in the wetland rhizosphere and its bioaccumulation in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Zhang, Z.; Moon, H. S.; Myneni, S.

    2015-12-01

    The mobility of arsenic in soils is linked to biogeochemical redox processes. The presence of wetland plants in riparian wetlands has a significant impact on the biogeochemical dynamics of the soil/sediment-redoxcline due to the release of root exudates and root turnover and oxygen transfer from the roots into the surrounding sediment. Micro-environmental redox conditions in the rhizosphere affect As, Fe, and S speciation as well as Fe(III) plaque deposition, which affects arsenic transport and uptake by plants. To investigate the dynamics of As coupled to S and Fe cycling in wetlands, mesocosms were operated in a greenhouse under various conditions (high and low Fe, high and low sulfate, with plant and without plants) for four months. Results show that the presence of plants, high Fe, and high SO42- levels enhanced As sequestration in these soils. We hypothesize that this compounding effect is because plants release biodegradable organic carbon, which is used by microorganism to reduce ferrihydrite and SO42- to generate FeS, FeS2, and/or orpiment (As2S3). Over the concentration range studied, As immobilization in soil and uptake by Scirpus actus was mainly controlled by SO42- rather than Fe levels. Under high sulfate levels, As immobilization in soil increased by 50% and As concentrations in plant roots increased by 97%, whereas no significant changes in plant As levels were seen for varying Fe concentrations. More than 80% of As was sequestrated in soils rather than plant uptake. Pore water As speciation analyses indicate that 20% more As(V) was reduced to As(III) under high sulfate as than low sulfate levels and that low Fe was more favorable to the As dissimilatory reduction. More dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria (DARB) under high sulfate were confirmed by quantitative PCR. Arsenic distribution in plant leafs and roots after 30 days of exposure to As was analyzed via Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analyses. The uptake of As by plants was distributed

  5. Seawater sulfate reduction and sulfur isotope fractionation in basaltic systems: interaction of seawater with fayalite and magnetite at 200–350°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.; Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    Systematics of sulfur isotopes in the 250 and 350°C experiments indicate that isotopic equilibrium is reached, and can be modeled as a Rayleigh distillation process. Isotopic composition of hydrothermally produced H2S in natural systems is strongly dependent upon the seawater/basalt ratio in the geothermal system, which controls the relative sulfide contributions from the two important sulfur sources, seawater sulfate and sulfide phases in basalt. Anhydrite precipitation during geothermal heating severely limits sulfate ingress into high temperature interaction zones. Quantitative sulfate reduction can thus be accomplished without producing strongly oxidized rocks and resultant sulfide sulfur isotope values represent a mixture of seawater and basaltic sulfur.

  6. Antiviral Activity of Sulfated Polysaccharide of Adenanthera pavonina against Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Godoi, Ananda Marques; Faccin-Galhardi, Lígia Carla; Lopes, Nayara; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthera pavonina, popularly known as red-bead tree, carolina, pigeon's eye, and dragon's eye, is a plant traditionally used in Brazil for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aimed at evaluating the activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the Adenanthera pavonina (SPLSAp) seeds against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) in HEp-2 cell cultures. The SPLSAp presented a cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 500 μg/mL in HEp-2 cell cultures, evaluated by the dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method (MTT). The SPLSAp exhibited a significant antiviral activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.18 µg/mL, determined by plaque reduction assay and a high selectivity index (SI) of 423. The maximum inhibition (100%) of PV replication was found when the SPLSAp treatment was concomitant with viral infection (time 0 h), at all tested concentrations. The maximal inhibition was also found when the SPLSAp was used 1 h and 2 h postinfection, albeit at 50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL. Therefore, we demonstrated that the SPLSAp inhibited PV growth. We also suggested that SPLSAp inhibited PV in more than one step of the replication, as the mechanism of antiviral action. We, therefore, selected the compound as a potential candidate for further development towards the control of the infection. PMID:25221609

  7. [Inhibition of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in produced water from oil reservoir by nitrate].

    PubMed

    Yang, De-Yu; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Rong-Jiu; Han, Si-Qin; Li, Guang-Zhe; Li, Guo-Qiao; Zhao, Jin-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Growth and metabolic activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can result in souring of oil reservoirs, leading to various problems in aspects of environmental pollution and corrosion. Nitrate addition and management of nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) offer potential solutions to controlling souring in oil reservoirs. In this paper, a facultive chemolithotrophic NRB, designated as DNB-8, was isolated from the produced fluid of a water-flooded oil reservoir at Daqing oilfield. Then the efficacies and mechanisms of various concentrations of nitrate in combination with DNB-8 in the inhibition of the activity of SRB enriched culture were compared. Results showed that 1.0 mmol x L(-1) of nitrate or 0.45 mmol x L(-1) of nitrite inhibited the sulfate-reducing activity of SRB enrichments; the competitive reduction of nitrate by DNB-8 and the nitrite produced were responsible for the suppression. Besides, the SRB enrichment cultures showed a metabolic pathway of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) via nitrite. The SRB cultures could possibly alleviate the nitrite inhibition by DNRA when they were subjected to high-strength nitrate.

  8. Structure of catabolite activator protein with cobalt(II) and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramya R.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2014-04-15

    The crystal structure of E. coli catabolite activator protein with bound cobalt(II) and sulfate ions at 1.97 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure of cyclic AMP–catabolite activator protein (CAP) from Escherichia coli containing cobalt(II) chloride and ammonium sulfate is reported at 1.97 Å resolution. Each of the two CAP subunits in the asymmetric unit binds one cobalt(II) ion, in each case coordinated by N-terminal domain residues His19, His21 and Glu96 plus an additional acidic residue contributed via a crystal contact. The three identified N-terminal domain cobalt-binding residues are part of a region of CAP that is important for transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters. Sulfate anions mediate additional crystal lattice contacts and occupy sites corresponding to DNA backbone phosphate positions in CAP–DNA complex structures.

  9. Effects of sulfate group in red seaweed polysaccharides on anticoagulant activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wanai; Mao, Xuan; Peng, Xiaohui; Tang, Shunqing

    2014-01-30

    In this paper, the structural effects of two main red seaweed polysaccharides (agarose and carrageenan) and their sulfated derivatives on the anticoagulant activity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The substitution position rather than the substitution degree of sulfate groups shows the biggest impact on both the anticoagulant activity and the cell proliferation. Among them, C-2 of 3,6-anhydro-α-d-Galp is the most favorable position for substitution, whereas C-6 of β-d-Galp is the most disadvantageous. Moreover, the secondary structures of glycans also play a key role in biological activities. These demonstrations warrant that the red seaweed polysaccharides should be seriously considered in biomedical applications after carefully tailoring the sulfate groups.

  10. Bacterial sulfate reduction is the driving force for dolomite precipitation: New insights from CAS contents and δ34SCAS signatures of sedimentary dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldermann, Andre; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Strauss, Harald; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying reaction pathways and environmental controls inducing the precipitation of dolomite in mostly marine and early diagenetic sedimentary environments suggest that bacterial activity and bacterial sulfate reduction are key processes during the dolomitization of magnesian CaCO3 precursors at ambient temperatures [1]. However, in evaporitic and marine-anoxic, organic-rich sediments the precipitating dolomite is usually non-stoichiometric, highly disordered and metastable and is thus often referred to as (proto)dolomite. Subsequent multiple recrystallization of the (proto)dolomite during burial diagenesis is currently suggested to result in a more stable (stoichiometric and ordered) type of dolomite. On the basis of (micro)textural and (isotope)geochemical signatures of pure dolostone and partly dolomitized platform carbonates exposed in the Upper Jurassic rock succession at Oker (Northern German Basin), we highlight here the important role of bacterial sulfate reduction on the formation of sedimentary dolomite. Our results indicate that the Oker dolomite has been formed by the early diagenetic replacement of pre-existing magnesian calcite and aragonite precursors through reaction with pristine-marine to slightly evaporitic and reducing seawater at temperatures between 26 °C and 37 °C. The elevated δ34SCAS values, from +17.9 to +19.7 ‰ (V-CDT), of the Oker dolomite, relative to the ambient Upper Jurassic seawater, indicate that bacterial sulfate reduction was active during dolomite precipitation. Moreover, the linear anti-correlation (R² = 0.98) between decreasing CAS content (~1000-2000 ppm) in dolomite and increasing degree of cation order (~0.35 to 0.50) of the dolomite lattice structure suggests that, besides temperature and diagenetically driven recrystallization events, incorporation of CAS during co-precipitation of dolomite significantly affects the composition, structure and stability of modern and

  11. Structural characterization and anticoagulant activity of a sulfated polysaccharide from the green alga Codium divaricatum.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Mao, Wenjun; Yan, Mengxia; Liu, Xue; Xia, Zheng; Wang, Shuyao; Xiao, Bo; Chen, Chenglong; Zhang, Lifang; Cao, Sujian

    2015-05-05

    A sulfated polysaccharide, designated CP2-1, was isolated from the green alga Codium divaricatum by water extraction and purified by anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. CP2-1 is a galactan which is highly sulfated and substituted with pyruvic acid ketals. On the basis of chemical and spectroscopic analyses, the backbone of CP2-1 was mainly composed of (1→3)-β-d-galactopyranose residues, branched by single (1→)-β-d-galactopyranose units attached to the main chain at C-4 positions. The degree of branching was estimated to be about 12.2%. Sulfate groups were at C-4 of (1→3)-β-d-galactopyranose and C-6 of non-reducing terminal galactose residues. In addition, the ketals of pyruvic acid were found at 3,4- of non-reducing terminal galactose residues forming a five-membered ring. CP2-1 possessed a high anticoagulant activity as assessed by the activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time assays. The investigation demonstrated that CP2-1 was an anticoagulant-active sulfated polysaccharide distinguishing from other sulfated polysaccharides from marine green algae.

  12. High H2S contents and other effects of thermochemical sulfate reduction in deeply buried carbonate reservoirs: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöth, S.

    The accumulation of high H2S concentrations in oil and gas fields is usually associated with deeply buried high-temperature carbonate reservoirs and is attributed to the abiological oxidation of hydrocarbons by sulfate - thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). This review aims at providing an overview of the literature and assessing existing uncertainties in the current understanding of TSR processes and their geological significance. Reaction pathways, various reaction products, the autocatalytic nature of TSR, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Furthermore, various criteria for recognizing TSR effects, such as petrographic/diagenetic alterations and stable isotope geochemistry of the inorganic as well as the organic reactants, are summarized and evaluated. There is overwhelming geological evidence of TSR taking place at a minimum temperature of 110-140°C, but the temperature discrepancy between experimental data and nature still exists. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of catalysts which influence TSR are not known. Local H2S variations may reflect steady-state conditions dominated by H2S buildups and flux out of the system. The latter is controlled by lithological and geological factors.

  13. Deep subsurface sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in the Iberian Pyrite Belt revealed through geochemistry and molecular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Puente-Sánchez, F; Moreno-Paz, M; Rivas, L A; Cruz-Gil, P; García-Villadangos, M; Gómez, M J; Postigo, M; Garrido, P; González-Toril, E; Briones, C; Fernández-Remolar, D; Stoker, C; Amils, R; Parro, V

    2014-01-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest of Spain), the largest known massive sulfide deposit, fuels a rich chemolithotrophic microbial community in the Río Tinto area. However, the geomicrobiology of its deep subsurface is still unexplored. Herein, we report on the geochemistry and prokaryotic diversity in the subsurface (down to a depth of 166 m) of the Iberian Pyritic belt using an array of geochemical and complementary molecular ecology techniques. Using an antibody microarray, we detected polymeric biomarkers (lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan) from Gram-positive bacteria throughout the borehole. DNA microarray hybridization confirmed the presence of members of methane oxidizers, sulfate-reducers, metal and sulfur oxidizers, and methanogenic Euryarchaeota. DNA sequences from denitrifying and hydrogenotrophic bacteria were also identified. FISH hybridization revealed live bacterial clusters associated with microniches on mineral surfaces. These results, together with measures of the geochemical parameters in the borehole, allowed us to create a preliminary scheme of the biogeochemical processes that could be operating in the deep subsurface of the Iberian Pyrite Belt, including microbial metabolisms such as sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  14. Characterization of a Marine Microbial Community Used for Enhanced Sulfate Reduction and Copper Precipitation in a Two-Step Process.

    PubMed

    García-Depraect, Octavio; Guerrero-Barajas, Claudia; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Ordaz, Alberto

    2016-11-23

    Marine microorganisms that are obtained from hydrothermal vent sediments present a great metabolic potential for applications in environmental biotechnology. However, the work done regarding their applications in engineered systems is still scarce. Hence, in this work, the sulfate reduction process carried out by a marine microbial community in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was investigated for 190 days under sequential batch mode. The effects of 1000 to 5500 mg L(-1) of SO4(-2) and the chemical oxygen demand (COD)/SO4(-2) ratio were studied along with a kinetic characterization with lactate as the electron donor. Also, the feasibility of using the sulfide produced in the UASB for copper precipitation in a second column was studied under continuous mode. The system presented here is an alternative to sulfidogenesis, particularly when it is necessary to avoid toxicity to sulfide and competition with methanogens. The bioreactor performed better with relatively low concentrations of sulfate (up to 1100 mg L(-1)) and COD/SO4(-2) ratios between 1.4 and 3.6. Under the continuous regime, the biogenic sulfide was sufficient to precipitate copper at a removal rate of 234 mg L(-1) day(-1). Finally, the identification of the microorganisms in the sludge was carried out; some genera of microorganisms identified were Desulfitobacterium and Clostridium.

  15. Effects of environmental factors on the molluscicidal activities of slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane and copper sulfate*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K. Y.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the molluscicidal activities of slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane (TBTO) and copper sulfate under various environmental conditions. Organic materials such as mud and weeds reduced the molluscicidal efficacy of both chemicals. TBTO can be considered a good long-lasting molluscicide but, because of uncertainty as to its general toxic effects, it should not be used in field trials. The molluscicidal activity of slow-release copper sulfate was short-lived in plain lake water and was nil in the presence of mud or weeds at the concentration used. PMID:1088355

  16. Solid-solution partitioning and thionation of diphenylarsinic acid in a flooded soil under the impact of sulfate and iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Lijuan; Wei, Jing; Li, Yuan; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a major organic arsenic (As) compound derived from abandoned chemical weapons. The solid-solution partitioning and transformation of DPAA in flooded soils are poorly understood but are of great concern. The identification of the mechanisms responsible for the mobilization and transformation of DPAA may help to develop effective remediation strategies. Here, soil and Fe mineral incubation experiments were carried out to elucidate the partitioning and transformation of DPAA in anoxic (without addition of sulfate or sodium lactate) and sulfide (with the addition of sulfate and sodium lactate) soil and to examine the impact of sulfate and Fe(III) reduction on these processes. Results show that DPAA was more effectively mobilized and thionated in sulfide soil than in anoxic soil. At the initial incubation stages (0-4weeks), 6.7-74.5% of the total DPAA in sulfide soil was mobilized likely by sorption competition with sodium lactate. At later incubation stage (4-8weeks), DPAA was almost completely released into the solution likely due to the near-complete Fe(III) reduction. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results provide further direct evidence of elevated DPAA release coupled with Fe(III) reduction in sulfide environments. The total DPAA fraction decreased significantly to 24.5% after two weeks and reached 3.4% after eight weeks in sulfide soil, whereas no obvious elimination of DPAA occurred in anoxic soil at the initial two weeks and the total DPAA fraction decreased to 10.9% after eight weeks. This can be explained in part by the enhanced mobilization of DPAA and sulfate reduction in sulfide soil compared with anoxic soil. These results suggest that under flooded soil conditions, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction significantly promote DPAA mobilization and thionation, respectively, and we suggest that it is essential to consider both sulfate and Fe(III) reduction to further our understanding of the environmental fate of DPAA.

  17. Sources of sulfate supporting anaerobic metabolism in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulrich, G.A.; Breit, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Suflita, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Field and laboratory techniques were used to identify the biogeochemical factors affecting sulfate reduction in a shallow, unconsolidated alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate. Depth profiles of 35S-sulfate reduction rates in aquifer sediments were positively correlated with the concentration of dissolved sulfate. Manipulation of the sulfate concentration in samples revealed a Michaelis-Menten-like relationship with an apparent Km and Vmax of approximately 80 and 0.83 ??M SO4-2??day-1, respectively. The concentration of sulfate in the core of the leachate plume was well below 20 ??M and coincided with very low reduction rates. Thus, the concentration and availability of this anion could limit in situ sulfate-reducing activity. Three sulfate sources were identified, including iron sulfide oxidation, barite dissolution, and advective flux of sulfate. The relative importance of these sources varied with depth in the alluvium. The relatively high concentration of dissolved sulfate at the water table is attributed to the microbial oxidation of iron sulfides in response to fluctuations of the water table. At intermediate depths, barite dissolves in undersaturated pore water containing relatively high concentrations of dissolved barium (???100 ??M) and low concentrations of sulfate. Dissolution is consistent with the surface texture of detrital barite grains in contact with leachate. Laboratory incubations of unamended and barite-amended aquifer slurries supported the field observation of increasing concentrations of barium in solution when sulfate reached low levels. At a deeper highly permeable interval just above the confining bottom layer of the aquifer, sulfate reduction rates were markedly higher than rates at intermediate depths. Sulfate is supplied to this deeper zone by advection of uncontaminated groundwater beneath the landfill. The measured rates of sulfate reduction in the aquifer also correlated with the abundance of accumulated iron sulfide

  18. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  19. [Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate do not enhance anticoagulation activity of warfarin in mice in vivo].

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Kaori; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoko; Umegaki, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    As an adverse event, it has been reported that anticoagulation activity of warfarin was enhanced by simultaneous intakes of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. However, it is unclear whether these is a causative relation. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated whether glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate enhanced the anticoagulant action of warfarin in mice in vivo, focusing on hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs)-mediated mechanisms. Mice were fed a diet containing various doses of glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate (0, 0.3, 1% (w/w)) for 2 weeks, and given warfarin by gavage on the last 2 days of the treatment regimen. Doses of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate were 443 mg/kg and 464 mg/kg in the 0.3% diet groups, and 1523 mg/kg and 1546 mg/kg in the 1% diet groups. We found that 1% glucosamine significantly shortened prothrombin time and thrombotest Owen in animals given warfarin. However, the two ingredients did not induce or inhibit hepatic CYPs, including (S)-warfarin hydroxylase. These findings suggest that glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate do not affect the anticoagulation activity of warfarin through hepatic CYP mediated-mechanisms.

  20. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  1. Elevated acetate concentrations in the rhizosphere of Spartina alterniflora and potential influences on sulfate reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Tugel, Joyce B.; Giblin, A. E.; Banta, G. T.; Hobbie, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Acetate is important in anaerobic metabolism of non-vegetated sediments but its role in salt marsh soils was not investigated thoroughly. Acetate concentrations, oxidation (C-14) and SO4(2-) reduction (S-35) were measured in S. alterniflora soils in NH and MA. Pore water from cores contained greater than 0.1 mM acetate and in some instances greater than 1.0 mM. Non-destructive samples contained less than 0.01 mM. Acetate was associated with roots and concentrations were highest during vegetative growth and varied with changes in plant physiology. Acetate turnover was very low whether whole core or slurry incubations were used. Radiotracers injected directly into soils yielded rates of SO4(2-) reduction and acetate oxidation not significantly different from core incubation techniques. Regardless of incubation method, acetate oxidation did not account for a significant percentage of SO4(2-) reduction. These results differ markedly from data for non-vegetated coastal sediments where acetate levels are low, oxidation rate constants are high and acetate oxidation rates greatly exceed rates of SO4(2-) reduction. The discrepancy between rates of acetate oxidation and SO4(2-) reduction in marsh soils may be due either to the utilization of substrates other than acetate by SO4(2-) reducers or artifacts associated with measurements of organic utilization by rhizosphere bacteria.

  2. Adsorption and Aggregation Activity of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Rhamnolipid Mixture.

    PubMed

    Mańko, Diana; Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the surface tension, density and viscosity of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and rhamnolipid (RL) mixtures were carried out in aqueous solution. From the obtained results, composition of mixed surface layer at the water-air interface, mixed micelles, parameter of intermolecular interactions, activity of SDS and RL in the surface layer and micelles, Gibbs standard free energy of adsorption and micellization as well as Gibbs free energy of SDS and RL mixing in the surface layer and micelles were established. These parameters were discussed in the light of independent adsorption of SDS and RL and the size of their molecules as well as the area in contact with water molecules. A correlation between the number of water molecules in contact with those of SDS and RL and standard free energy of adsorption as well as micellization of these surfactants was observed. A correlation between the apparent and partial molar volumes of RL and SDS in their mixture and size of surfactant molecules as well as the average distance between molecules was also found. The parameter of intermolecular interactions indicates that there is a synergetic effect in the reduction of water surface tension and micelle formation.

  3. Arsenic mobility during flooding of contaminated soil: the effect of microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Burton, Edward D; Johnston, Scott G; Kocar, Benjamin D

    2014-12-02

    In floodplain soils, As may be released during flooding-induced soil anoxia, with the degree of mobilization being affected by microbial redox processes such as the reduction of As(V), Fe(III), and SO4(2-). Microbial SO4(2-) reduction may affect both Fe and As cycling, but the processes involved and their ultimate consequences on As mobility are not well understood. Here, we examine the effect of microbial SO4(2) reduction on solution dynamics and solid-phase speciation of As during flooding of an As-contaminated soil. In the absence of significant levels of microbial SO4(2-) reduction, flooding caused increased Fe(II) and As(III) concentrations over a 10 week period, which is consistent with microbial Fe(III)- and As(V)-reduction. Microbial SO4(2-) reduction leads to lower concentrations of porewater Fe(II) as a result of FeS formation. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the newly formed FeS sequestered substantial amounts of As. Bulk and microfocused As K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy confirmed that As(V) was reduced to As(III) and showed that in the presence of FeS, solid-phase As was retained partly via the formation of an As2S3-like species. High resolution transmission electron microscopy suggested that this was due to As retention as an As2S3-like complex associated with mackinawite (tetragonal FeS) rather than as a discrete As2S3 phase. This study shows that mackinawite formation in contaminated floodplain soil can help mitigate the extent of arsenic mobilization during prolonged flooding.

  4. Sulfated polysaccharides from Loligo vulgaris skin: potential biological activities and partial purification.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalek, Baha Eddine; Sila, Assaâd; Krichen, Fatma; Karoud, Wafa; Martinez-Alvarez, Oscar; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Ayadi, Mohamed Ali; Bougatef, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics, biological properties, and purification of sulfated polysaccharides extracted from squid (Loligo vulgaris) skin were investigated. Their chemical and physical characteristics were determined using X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopic analysis. Sulfated polysaccharides from squid skin (SPSS) contained 85.06% sugar, 2.54% protein, 1.87% ash, 8.07% sulfate, and 1.72% uronic acid. The antioxidant properties of SPSS were investigated based on DPPH radical-scavenging capacity (IC50 = 19.42 mg mL(-1)), hydrogen peroxide-scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.91 mg mL(-1)), and β-carotene bleaching inhibition (IC50 = 2.79 mg mL(-1)) assays. ACE-inhibitory activity of SPSS was also investigated (IC50 = 0.14 mg mL(-1)). Further antimicrobial activity assays indicated that SPSS exhibited marked inhibitory activity against the bacterial and fungal strains tested. Those polysaccharides did not display hemolytic activity towards bovine erythrocytes. Fractionation by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography showed three major absorbance peaks. Results of this study suggest that sulfated polysaccharides from squid skin are attractive sources of polysaccharides and promising candidates for future application as dietary ingredients.

  5. Optimization of chemical sulfation, structural characterization and anticoagulant activity of Agaricus bisporus fucogalactan.

    PubMed

    Román, Yony; Iacomini, Marcello; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Cipriani, Thales R

    2016-08-01

    A fucogalactan (E) was isolated from aqueous extract of Agaricus bisporus. The monosaccharide composition, methylation, and NMR analyses showed it is constituted by a (1→6)-linked α-d-Galp main-chain, partially methylated at O-3, and partially substituted at O-2 by non-reducing end-units of α-l-Fucp or α-d-Galp. HPSEC analysis showed it had Mw of 1.28×10(4)gmol(-1). The polysaccharide was sulfated modifying reaction time, molar ratio of sulfation agent to hydroxyl group on the polysaccharide (ηClSO3H/OH ratio), and ratio of total reaction volume to weight of sample (VT/w ratio; μLmg(-1)). The degree of substitution (DS) was evaluated for all sulfated derivatives. The sulfated fucogalactan with the highest DS value (2.83) had the best anticoagulant activity on Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) and Protrombin Time (PT) assays. This sulfated fucogalactan, named E100, was obtained with the optimal conditions of ηClSO3H/OH ratio of 18, VT/w ratio of 100, in 6h of reaction. The results showed that E100 produces a linear increment of APTT for concentrations of 15-45μgmL(-1), whereas PT was almost constant between 20 and 400μgmL(-1), suggesting an anticoagulant activity via inhibition of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. NMR and methylation analyses showed that α-d-Galp units of the main chain were greatly sulfated on 2-O-, 3-O-, and 4-O-positions.

  6. Chemical characteristics and anticoagulant activities of two sulfated polysaccharides from Enteromorpha linza (Chlorophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaohui; Mao, Wenjun; Chen, Yin; Chen, Yanli; Zhao, Chunqi; Li, Na; Wang, Chunyan

    2013-03-01

    Two sulfated polysaccharides, designated MP and SP, were extracted from the marine green alga Enteromorpha linza using hot water and then purified using ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The anticoagulant activities of MP and SP were examined by determination of their activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) using human plasma. Results showed that MP and SP were composed of abundant rhamnose with small amounts of xylose and glucuronic acid, whereas SP also contained a small amount of galactose. Approximate molecular weights of MP and SP were 535 and 502 kDa, respectively. As compared with SP, MP had higher contents of sulfate ester (19.0%) and uronic acid (14.9%). The MP mainly consisted of (1→4)-linked rhamnose residues with partially sulfated groups at the C-3 position, and small amounts of (1→3, 4)-linked rhamnose, (1→2, 4)-linked rhamnose, (1→4)-linked glucuronic acid and (1→4)-linked xylose residues. The SP contained abundant (1→4)-linked rhamnose with minor amounts of (1→3)-linked rhamnose, (1→3, 4)-linked rhamnose, (1→2, 4)-linked rhamnose, (1→4)-linked glucuronic acid, (1→4)-linked xylose, and (1→3)-linked galactose residues. The sulfate groups were mainly located at C-3 of (1→4)-linked rhamnose residues. Both MP and SP, in particular the former, effectively prolonged APTT and TT. This work demonstrates that MP and SP have unique structural characteristics distinct from those of other sulfated polysaccharides from Enteromorpha. The MP is a potential source of anticoagulant, and the difference in anticoagulant activities of the two sulfated polysaccharides is directly linked to the discrepancy of their chemical features.

  7. Bioreactor performance and functional gene analysis of microbial community in a limited-oxygen fed bioreactor for co-reduction of sulfate and nitrate with high organic input.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-jun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Ai-jie; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Xu; Guo, Hong-liang; Yuan, Ye; Lee, Duu-jong; Zhou, Jizhong; Ren, Nan-qi

    2014-08-15

    Limited-oxygen mediated synergistic relationships between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, including nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria NR-SOB) were predicted to simultaneously remove contaminants of nitrate, sulfate and high COD, and eliminate sulfide generation. A lab-scale experiment was conducted to examine the impact of limited oxygen on these oxy-anions degradation, sulfide oxidation and associated microbial functional responses. In all scenarios tested, the reduction of both nitrate and sulfate was almost complete. When limited-oxygen was fed into bioreactors, S(0) formation was significantly improved up to ∼ 70%. GeoChip 4.0, a functional gene microarray, was used to determine the microbial gene diversity and functional potential for nitrate and sulfate reduction, and sulfide oxidation. The diversity of the microbial community in bioreactors was increased with the feeding of limited oxygen. Whereas the intensities of the functional genes involved in sulfate reduction did not show a significant difference, the abundance of the detected denitrification genes decreased in limited oxygen samples. More importantly, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria may alter their populations/genes in response to limited oxygen potentially to function more effectively in sulfide oxidation, especially to elemental sulfur. The genes fccA/fccB from nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), such as Paracoccus denitrificans, Thiobacillus denitrificans, Beggiatoa sp., Thiomicrospira sp., and Thioalkalivibrio sp., were more abundant under limited-oxygen condition.

  8. Cloud condensation nucleus activity of secondary organic aerosol particles mixed with sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephanie M.; Rosenoern, Thomas; Shilling, John E.; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T.

    2007-12-01

    The cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of organic-sulfate particles was investigated using a steady-state environmental chamber. The organic component consisted of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in the dark from 24 +/- 2 ppb α-pinene for conditions of 300 +/- 5 ppb ozone, 40 +/- 2% relative humidity, and 25 +/- 1°C, with the organic mass loading in the chamber ranging from 23 to 37 μg m-3. CCN analysis was performed for 80- to 150-nm particles having variable organic-sulfate volume fractions, which were estimated from the diameter of the organic-sulfate particle relative to that of the seed as well as independently from mass spectra. Critical supersaturation, which increased for greater SOA volume fraction and smaller particle diameter, was well predicted by a Köhler model having two components, one for ammonium sulfate and another for SOA. The entire data set could be successfully modeled by a single suite of effective chemical parameters for SOA. The results suggest that the effects of limited organic solubility in mixed SOA-sulfate particles may be reliably omitted in the treatment of cloud droplet formation.

  9. Benzylsuccinate Formation as a Means of Anaerobic Toluene Activation by Sulfate-Reducing Strain PRTOL1

    PubMed Central

    Beller, H. R.; Spormann, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Permeabilized cells of toluene-mineralizing, sulfate-reducing strain PRTOL1 catalyzed the addition of toluene to fumarate to form benzylsuccinate under anaerobic conditions. Recent in vitro studies with two toluene-mineralizing, denitrifying bacteria demonstrated the same fumarate addition reaction and indicated that it may be the first step of anaerobic toluene degradation. This study with strain PRTOL1 shows that anaerobic toluene activation by fumarate addition occurs in bacteria as disparate as sulfate-reducing and denitrifying species (members of the delta and beta subclasses of the Proteobacteria, respectively). PMID:16535701

  10. Seasonal composition and activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotic communities in seagrass bed sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) play a key role in the carbon and nutrient cycles of coastal marine, vegetated ecosystems, but the interactions of SRP communities with aquatic plants remain little studied. The abundance, activity, and community composition of SRP was studied i...

  11. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter-distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Zane, Grant M; Yen, Huei-che Bill; Wall, Judy D

    2010-08-01

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) complex is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for the DVU0851 protein. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the Delta(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  12. Model-based Characterization of the Parameters of Dissimilatory Sulfate Reduction Under the Effect of Different Initial Density of Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan; Bolis, Marco; Bartos, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design a model of dissimilatory sulfate reduction process using the Verhulst function, with a particular focus on the kinetics of bacterial growth, sulfate and lactate consumption, and accumulation of hydrogen sulfide and acetate. The effect of the initial density (0.12±0.011, 0.25±0.024, 0.5±0.048 and 1.0±0.096 mg cells/ml of medium) of the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 on the growth and dissimilatory sulfate reduction was studied. The exponential growth phase of the D. piger Vib-7 was observed for 72 hours of cultivation at the (0.12 and 0.25 mg/ml) initial concentration of bacterial cells. Sulfate and lactate were consumed incompletely during this time. The increase in the initial concentration of cells to 0.5 and 1 mg/ml led to a shortening of the exponential bacterial growth phase and a shift to the stationary phase of the growth. In the case of 0.5 mg/ml seeding, the stationary growth phase was observed in the 36(th) hour of cultivation. The increase in the initial concentration of cells to 1 mg/ml led to the beginning of the stationary growth phase in 24th hours of cultivation. Under these conditions, sulfate and lactate were consumed completely in the 48th hour of cultivation. The kinetic analysis of the curves of bacterial growth and the process of dissimilatory sulfate reduction by D. piger Vib-7 was carried out.

  13. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  14. Beta-Glucans Supplementation Associates with Reduction in P-Cresyl Sulfate Levels and Improved Endothelial Vascular Reactivity in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Maria; Rocchetti, Maria Teresa; Montemurno, Eustacchio; Maranzano, Valentina; Dalfino, Giuseppe; Manno, Carlo; Zito, Annapaola; Gesualdo, Michele; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Gobbetti, Marco; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2017-01-01

    Background Oat and barley beta-glucans are prebiotic fibers known for their cholesterol-lowering activity, but their action on the human gut microbiota metabolism is still under research. Although the induction of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) following their ingestion has previously been reported, no study has investigated their effects on proteolytic uremic toxins p-cresyl sulfate (pCS) and indoxyl sulfate (IS) levels, while others have failed to demonstrate an effect on the endothelial function measured through flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate whether a nutritional intervention with a functional pasta enriched with beta-glucans could promote a saccharolytic shift on the gut microbial metabolism and improve FMD. Methods We carried out a pilot study on 26 healthy volunteers who underwent a 2-month dietary treatment including a daily administration of Granoro “Cuore Mio” pasta enriched with barley beta-glucans (3g/100g). Blood and urine routine parameters, serum pCS/IS and FMD were evaluated before and after the dietary treatment. Results The nutritional treatment significantly reduced LDL and total cholesterol, as expected. Moreover, following beta-glucans supplementation we observed a reduction of serum pCS levels and an increase of FMD, while IS serum levels remained unchanged. Conclusions We demonstrated that a beta-glucans dietary intervention in healthy volunteers correlates with a saccharolytic shift on the gut microbiota metabolism, as suggested by the decrease of pCS and the increase of SCFA, and associates with an improved endothelial reactivity. Our pilot study suggests, in addition to cholesterol, novel pCS-lowering properties of beta-glucans, worthy to be confirmed in large-scale trials and particularly in contexts where the reduction of the microbial-derived uremic toxin pCS is of critical importance, such as in chronic kidney disease. PMID:28107445

  15. The optimization of sulfation modification conditions for ophiopogonpolysaccharide based on antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Yuanliang; Wang, Deyun; Qin, Tao; Liu, Cui; Liu, Xu; Sheng, Xin; Chang, Shanshan; Fan, Yunpeng; Guo, Liwei; Nguyen, The Luong

    2012-11-01

    Ophiopogonpolysaccharide (OPS) was extracted by water decoction and ethanol precipitation, purified through eliminating protein by trichloroacetic acid method and column chromatography of DEAE-Cellulose-52, then sulfatedly modified by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method according to three-factors, ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine, reaction temperature and reaction time, and three level L₉(3⁴) orthogonal designed to obtain nine sulfated OPSs, sOPS₁-sOPS₉. Their effects on NDV to infect chick embryo fibroblast were compared by MTT assay taking the non-modified OPS as control. The results showed that sulfation modification could significantly enhance the antiviral activity of OPS, sOPS₃ presented best effect and the optimal modification conditions were the ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine of 1:4, the reaction temperature of 60 °C and the reaction time of 2 h.

  16. In vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activity of sulfated polysaccharides from red seaweed Nemalion helminthoides.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Recalde, Mercedes; Matulewicz, María C; Pujol, Carlos A; Carlucci, María J

    2014-02-01

    Water-soluble sulfated polysaccharides from the red seaweed Nemalion helminthoides: two xylomannan fractions (N3 and N4) and a mannan fraction (N6) were investigated to determine their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. N3 and N4 induced in vitro proliferation of macrophages of the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) in the same cells, whereas this response was not observed with the mannan N6. The cytokine production was also stimulated by sulfated xylomannans in vivo in BALB/c mice inoculated intravenously with these polysaccharides. Remarkably, when mice were treated with N3 and N4 for 1 h before being infected with Herpes simplex virus type 2, they remained asymptomatic with no signs of disease. The in vitro and in vivo results suggest that sulfated xylomannans could be strong immunomodulators.

  17. Prokaryotic community structure and sulfate reducer activity in water from high-temperature oil reservoirs with and without nitrate treatment.

    PubMed

    Gittel, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Skovhus, Torben Lund; Ingvorsen, Kjeld; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) cause severe problems like microbial corrosion and reservoir souring in seawater-injected oil production systems. One strategy to control SRP activity is the addition of nitrate to the injection water. Production waters from two adjacent, hot (80 degrees C) oil reservoirs, one with and one without nitrate treatment, were compared for prokaryotic community structure and activity of SRP. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed higher prokaryotic abundance but lower diversity for the nitrate-treated field. The 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from both fields were dominated by sequences affiliated with Firmicutes (Bacteria) and Thermococcales (Archaea). Potential heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Deferribacterales) were exclusively found at the nitrate-treated field, possibly stimulated by nitrate addition. Quantitative PCR of dsrAB genes revealed that archaeal SRP (Archaeoglobus) dominated the SRP communities, but with lower relative abundance at the nitrate-treated site. Bacterial SRP were found in only low abundance at both sites and were nearly exclusively affiliated with thermophilic genera (Desulfacinum and Desulfotomaculum). Despite the high abundance of archaeal SRP, no archaeal SRP activity was detected in [(35)S]sulfate incubations at 80 degrees C. Sulfate reduction was found at 60 degrees C in samples from the untreated field and accompanied by the growth of thermophilic bacterial SRP in batch cultures. Samples from the nitrate-treated field generally lacked SRP activity. These results indicate that (i) Archaeoglobus can be a major player in hot oil reservoirs, and (ii) nitrate may act in souring control-not only by inhibiting SRP, but also by changing the overall community structure, including the stimulation of competitive nitrate reducers.

  18. Antioxidant and anticoagulant activity of sulfated polysaccharide from Gracilaria debilis (Forsskal).

    PubMed

    Sudharsan, Sadhasivam; Subhapradha, Namasivayam; Seedevi, Palaniappan; Shanmugam, Vairamani; Madeswaran, Perumal; Shanmugam, Annaian; Srinivasan, Alagiri

    2015-11-01

    Sulfated polysaccharide was isolated from Gracilaria debilis and purified through gel chromatography and their molecular weight was determined through AGE and PAGE. The total sugars in the crude, fractionated and purified polysaccharide were estimated as 52.65%, 59.70% and 67.60%, respectively. The ash and moisture content of crude and purified polysaccharide was found to be 14.2% and 23.5% and the polysaccharide was free from protein contamination. The sulfate and uronic acid contents in the crude, fractionated and purified were estimated as 14.08%, 15.33% and 16.01% and 10.12%, 13.56%, 16.70%. The elemental composition including carbon (crude - 23.12%, purified - 21.05%), hydrogen (crude - 3.4%, purified - 4.13%) and nitrogen (crude - 1.22%, purified - 0.56%) were also analyzed. The anticoagulant activity of the sulfated polysaccharide through APTT and PT was estimated at 14.11 and 8.23IU/mg. The purified polysaccharide with the molecular mass of 20kDa showed highest antioxidant activity (38.57%, 43.48% and 38.88%) in all the assays tested such as DPPH hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical scavenging activities and the structural property was analyzed through FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectrum. The results together suggest that the isolated low molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide will demonstrate as a enormously available alternative natural source of antioxidant for industrial uses.

  19. TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE USING A MIXED REDUCTANT SOLUTION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a method for disseminating ferrous iron in the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a chromite ore processing solid waste derived from the production of ferrochrome alloy. The method utilizes ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) in combinati...

  20. Nematodes join the family of chondroitin sulfate-synthesizing organisms: Identification of an active chondroitin sulfotransferase in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dierker, Tabea; Shao, Chun; Haitina, Tatjana; Zaia, Joseph; Hinas, Andrea; Kjellén, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are proteins that carry sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). They help form and maintain morphogen gradients, guiding cell migration and differentiation during animal development. While no sulfated GAGs have been found in marine sponges, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) have been identified in Cnidarians, Lophotrocozoans and Ecdysozoans. The general view that nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans, which belong to Ecdysozoa, produce HS but only chondroitin without sulfation has therefore been puzzling. We have analyzed GAGs in C. elegans using reversed-phase ion-pairing HPLC, mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. Our analyses included wild type C. elegans but also a mutant lacking two HS sulfotransferases (hst-6 hst-2), as we suspected that the altered HS structure could boost CS sulfation. We could indeed detect sulfated CS in both wild type and mutant nematodes. While 4-O-sulfation of galactosamine dominated, we also detected 6-O-sulfated galactosamine residues. Finally, we identified the product of the gene C41C4.1 as a C. elegans CS-sulfotransferase and renamed it chst-1 (CarboHydrate SulfoTransferase) based on loss of CS-4-O-sulfation in a C41C4.1 mutant and in vitro sulfotransferase activity of recombinant C41C4.1 protein. We conclude that C. elegans indeed manufactures CS, making this widely used nematode an interesting model for developmental studies involving CS. PMID:27703236

  1. Nematodes join the family of chondroitin sulfate-synthesizing organisms: Identification of an active chondroitin sulfotransferase in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dierker, Tabea; Shao, Chun; Haitina, Tatjana; Zaia, Joseph; Hinas, Andrea; Kjellén, Lena

    2016-10-05

    Proteoglycans are proteins that carry sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). They help form and maintain morphogen gradients, guiding cell migration and differentiation during animal development. While no sulfated GAGs have been found in marine sponges, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) have been identified in Cnidarians, Lophotrocozoans and Ecdysozoans. The general view that nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans, which belong to Ecdysozoa, produce HS but only chondroitin without sulfation has therefore been puzzling. We have analyzed GAGs in C. elegans using reversed-phase ion-pairing HPLC, mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. Our analyses included wild type C. elegans but also a mutant lacking two HS sulfotransferases (hst-6 hst-2), as we suspected that the altered HS structure could boost CS sulfation. We could indeed detect sulfated CS in both wild type and mutant nematodes. While 4-O-sulfation of galactosamine dominated, we also detected 6-O-sulfated galactosamine residues. Finally, we identified the product of the gene C41C4.1 as a C. elegans CS-sulfotransferase and renamed it chst-1 (CarboHydrate SulfoTransferase) based on loss of CS-4-O-sulfation in a C41C4.1 mutant and in vitro sulfotransferase activity of recombinant C41C4.1 protein. We conclude that C. elegans indeed manufactures CS, making this widely used nematode an interesting model for developmental studies involving CS.

  2. Mechanism of electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on copper in acidic sulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Karen L; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2007-09-11

    Hydrogen peroxide is a commonly used oxidizer component in chemical mechanical planarization slurries, used in the processing of Cu metallization in microelectronics applications. We studied the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on Cu in 0.1 M H2SO4 solutions using methods including cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk electrode experiments, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spectroscopy reveals that the hydrogen peroxide molecule is reduced at negative potentials to form a Cu-OH surface species in acidic solutions, a result consistent with the insight from Tafel slope measurements. DFT calculations support the instability of peroxide relative to the surface-coordinated hydroxide on both Cu(111) and Cu(100) surfaces.

  3. Regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide: Solution conformation and antioxidant activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Wen; Tang, YinYing; Xu, Qing; Huang, Shengli; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-01-20

    Regioselective modification is an effective approach to synthesize polysaccharides with different structure features and improved properties. In this study, regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide (SRSASP) was prepared by using triphenylchloromethane (TrCl) as protecting precursor. The decrease in fractal dimension (df) values (1.56-2.04) of SRSASP was observed in size-exclusion chromatography combined with multi angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) analysis. Compared to sample substituted at C-6, SRSASP showed a more expanded conformation of random coil, which was attributed to the breakup of hydrogen bonds and elastic contributions. Circular dichroism (CD), methylene blue (MB) and congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed the conformational transition and stiffness of the chains after sulfation. SRSASP exhibited enhanced antioxidant activities in the DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging assay. Sulfation at C-2 or C-3 was favorable for the chelation which might prevent the generation of hydroxyl radicals. It concluded that the degree of substitution and substitution position were the factors influencing biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides.

  4. Design and preparation of highly active carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and platinum catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huanqiao; Xiao, Pu; Qiu, Xinping; Zhu, Wentao

    A novel electrocatalyst structure of carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and Pt (Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT) is reported. The Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts are prepared by a combination of improved sol-gel and ethylene glycol reduction methods. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the sulfated TiO 2 is amorphous and is coated uniformly on the surface of the CNTs. Pt nanoparticles of about 3.6 nm in size are homogenously dispersed on the sulfated TiO 2 surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis proves that the CNT surfaces are modified with sulfated TiO 2 and a high concentration of SO x, and adsorbed OH species exist on the surface of the sulfated TiO 2. Electrochemical studies are carried out using chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts have much higher catalytic activity and CO tolerance for methanol electrooxidation than Pt/TiO 2/CNTs, Pt/CNTs and commercial Pt/C.

  5. 2-O Heparan Sulfate Sulfation by Hs2st Is Required for Erk/Mapk Signalling Activation at the Mid-Gestational Mouse Telencephalic Midline.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai Kit; Howe, Katherine; Clegg, James M; Guimond, Scott E; Price, David J; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Pratt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a linear carbohydrate composed of polymerized uronate-glucosamine disaccharide units that decorates cell surface and secreted glycoproteins in the extracellular matrix. In mammals HS is subjected to differential sulfation by fifteen different heparan sulfotransferase (HST) enzymes of which Hs2st uniquely catalyzes the sulfation of the 2-O position of the uronate in HS. HS sulfation is postulated to be important for regulation of signaling pathways by facilitating the interaction of HS with signaling proteins including those of the Fibroblast Growth Factor (Fgf) family which signal through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases Erk1/2. In the developing mouse telencephalon Fgf2 signaling regulates proliferation and neurogenesis. Loss of Hs2st function phenocopies the thinned cerebral cortex of mutant mice in which Fgf2 or Erk1/2 function are abrogated, suggesting the hypothesis that 2-O-sulfated HS structures play a specific role in Fgf2/Erk signaling pathway in this context in vivo. This study investigated the molecular role of 2-O sulfation in Fgf2/Erk signaling in the developing telencephalic midline midway through mouse embryogenesis at E12.5. We examined the expression of Hs2st, Fgf2, and Erk1/2 activity in wild-type and Hs2st-/- mice. We found that Hs2st is expressed at high levels at the midline correlating with high levels of Erk1/2 activation and Erk1/2 activation was drastically reduced in the Hs2st-/- mutant at the rostral telencephalic midline. We also found that 2-O sulfation is specifically required for the binding of Fgf2 protein to Fgfr1, its major cell-surface receptor at the rostral telencephalic midline. We conclude that 2-O sulfated HS structures generated by Hs2st are needed to form productive signaling complexes between HS, Fgf2 and Fgfr1 that activate Erk1/2 at the midline. Overall, our data suggest the interesting possibility that differential expression of Hs2st targets the rostral telencephalic

  6. Sulfurization of Fe-Ni-Cu-Co Alloy to Matte Phase by Carbothermic Reduction of Calcium Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eui Hyuk; Nam, Chul Woo; Park, Kyung Ho; Park, Joo Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Calcium sulfate (CaSO4) is proposed as an alternative sulfur source to convert the Fe-Ni-Cu-Co alloy to the matte phase. Solid carbon was used as a reducing agent and the influence of oxide fluxes on the sulfurization efficiency at 1673 K (1400 °C) in a CO-CO2-SO2-Ar atmosphere was investigated. When CaSO4 was equilibrated with the Fe-Ni-Cu-Co alloy without any reducing agent, it was reduced by Fe in the liquid alloy, resulting in the formation of FeS. The sulfurization efficiency was about 56 pct, even though an excess amount of CaSO4 (gypsum equivalent, G eq = 1.7) was added. Adding solid carbon as the reducing agent significantly shortened the equilibration time from 36 to 3.5 hours and increased the sulfurization efficiency from 56 to 91 pct, even though the amount of carbon was lower than the theoretical equivalent for carbothermic reduction of CaSO4, viz. C eq = 0.7. Although CaS (not FeS) was formed as a primary reaction product, it continuously reacted with CaSO4, forming CaO-rich slag. Neither the carbothermic reduction time nor the sulfurization efficiency were affected by the addition of Al2O3 (-SiO2) fluxes, but the equilibration time fell to 2.5 hours with the addition of Al2O3-Fe2O3 flux because the former systems produced primarily calcium silicate and calcium aluminate, which have relatively high melting points, whereas the latter system produced calcium ferrite, which has a lower melting point. Consequently, calcium sulfate (waste gypsum) can replace expensive pure sulfur as a raw material in the sulfurization of Fe-Ni-Cu-Co alloy with small amounts of iron oxide (Fe2O3) as a flux material. The present results can be used to improve the recovery of rare metals, such as Ni and Co, from deep sea manganese nodules.

  7. [Microbial sulfate reduction in sediments of the coastal zone and littoral of the Kandalaksha bay of the White sea].

    PubMed

    Savvichev, A S; Rusanov, I I; Iusupov, S K; Baĭramov, I T; Pimenov, N V; Lein, A Iu; Ivanov, M V

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological and biogeochemical investigations of the coastal zone and the littoral of the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea were carried out. The material for investigations was obtained in the series of expeditions of the Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, in August 1999, 2000, 2001, and in March 2003. The studies were conducted on the littoral and in the water area of the Kandalaksha Preserve, the Moscow University Belomorsk Biological Station, and the Zoological Institute Biological Station, Russian Academy of Sciences, Sediment sampling on the littoral was carried out in the typical microlandscapes differing in the sediment properties and macrobenthos distribution. The maximal sulfate reduction rate (SRR) was shown for the shallow part of the Chemorechenskaya Bay (up to 2550 micrograms S/(dm3 day)) and in the Bab'ye More Bay (up to 3191 micrograms S/(dm3 day)). During the winter season, at a temperature of -0.5-0.5 degrees C, the SRR in the sediments of the Kartesh Bay was 7.9-13 micrograms S/(dm3 day). In the widest limits, the SRR values varied in the sediment cores sampled on the littoral. The minimal values (11 mu]g S/(dm3 day)) were obtained in the core samples on the silt-sandy littoral. The littoral finely dispersed sediments rich in organic matter were characterized by high SRR values (524-1413 micrograms S/(dm3 day)). The maximal SRR values were shown for the sediments present within the stretch of decomposing macrophytes, in local pits at the lower littoral waterline, and in the mouth of a freshwater stream (51-159 mg S/(dm3 day)). A sharp difference in the level of H2S production in the type microlandscapes was shown. The average hydrogen sulfide production in finely dispersed sediments constituted 125 mg S/(m2 day); in stormy discharge deposits, 1950 mg S/(m2 day); in depressions under stones and in silted pits, 4300 mg S/(m2 day). A calculation made with regard to the area of microlandscapes with increased productivity shows

  8. Detection of Microbial sulfate-reduction associated with buried stainless steel coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Delwiche; M. Kay Adler Flitton; Alicia Olson

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of an innovative radioactive isotope method for imaging microbial activity in geological materials to a comprehensive study of metal corrosion. The method was tested on a sample of stainless steel coupons that had been buried as part of a corrosion study initiated by the National Institute of Standards and Testing or NIST (known as National Bureau of Standards prior to 1988) in 1970. The images showed evidence of microbial activity that could be mapped on a millimeter scale to coupon surfaces. A second more conventional isotope tracer method was also used to provide a quantitative measure of the same type of microbial activity in soil proximal to the buried coupons. Together the techniques offer a method for evaluating low metabolic levels of activity that have the potential for significant cumulative corrosion effects. The methods are powerful tools for evaluation of potential for microbial induced corrosion to buried steel components used on pipelines, in the power and communications infrastructure, and in nuclear waste repository containers.

  9. Efficient peroxydisulfate activation process not relying on sulfate radical generation for water pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Wang, Yuru; Le Roux, Julien; Yang, Yang; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2014-05-20

    Peroxydisulfate (PDS) is an appealing oxidant for contaminated groundwater and toxic industrial wastewaters. Activation of PDS is necessary for application because of its low reactivity. Present activation processes always generate sulfate radicals as actual oxidants which unselectively oxidize organics and halide anions reducing oxidation capacity of PDS and producing toxic halogenated products. Here we report that copper oxide (CuO) can efficiently activate PDS under mild conditions without producing sulfate radicals. The PDS/CuO coupled process is most efficient at neutral pH for decomposing a model compound, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 0.55 min, over 90% of 2,4-DCP (initially 20 μM) and 90% of adsorbable organic chlorine (AOCl) can be removed at the PDS/2,4-DCP molar ratio of 1 and 4, respectively. Based on kinetic study and surface characterization, PDS is proposed to be first activated by CuO through outer-sphere interaction, the rate-limiting step, followed by a rapid reaction with 2,4-DCP present in the solution. In the presence of ubiquitous chloride ions in groundwater/industrial wastewater, the PDS/CuO oxidation shows significant advantages over sulfate radical oxidation by achieving much higher 2,4-DCP degradation capacity and avoiding the formation of highly chlorinated degradation products. This work provides a new way of PDS activation for contaminant removal.

  10. In vitro and in vivo anti-coagulant activity and toxicological studies of marine sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Krichen, Fatma; Ghlissi, Zohra; Amor, Ikram Ben; Sayari, Nadhem; Kallel, Rim; Gargouri, Jalel; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Boudawara, Tahia; Bougatef, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize and evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anticoagulant activity of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from the skins of smooth hound (SHSG) and grey triggerfish (GTSG). The analysis of SHSG and GTSG with acetate cellulose electrophoresis in Zn-acetate revealed the presence of hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS). Both glycosaminoglycans were evaluated for their in vitro anticoagulant activities using activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombine time (PT) tests. SHSG and GTSG and calciparin were tested as in vivo anticoagulants by subcutaneous (s.c) injection to adult female Wistar rats in a concentration of 75mg/kg of body weight. The administration of SHSG, GTSG and calciparin to rats induced a significant decrease of platelet rates compared to the control. The aPTT assay of SHSG and GTSG was prolonged 1.3 and 1.23-fold respectively compared with the control. Toxicity studies were performed to investigate whether or not SHSG and GTSG can cause pathological changes in the liver, proteins and DNA. The concentration and catalytic activity of liver oxidative stress markers and enzymes, respectively, as well as the observed hepatic morphological changes indicated that calciparin induced hepatic toxicity and oxidative damage in the liver. The higher activity and lower toxicity of SHSG and GTSG recommended these compounds as a better drug candidate than calciparin.

  11. Use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for reduction of nitrate and sulfate and methanogenesis in microcosms and bioreactors simulating an oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Shen, Yin; An, Dongshan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-27

    Acetate, propionate and butyrate (volatile fatty acids, VFA) occur in oil field waters and are frequently used for microbial growth of oil field consortia. We determined the kinetics of use of these VFA components (3 mM of each) by an anaerobic oil field consortium in microcosms containing 2 mM sulfate and either 0, 4, 6, 8 or 13 mM of nitrate. Nitrate was reduced first with preference for acetate and propionate. Sulfate reduction then proceeded with propionate (not butyrate) as the electron donor, whereas the fermentation of butyrate (not propionate) was associated with methanogenesis. Microbial community analyses indicated Paracoccus-Thauera, Desulfobulbus and Syntrophomonas-Methanobacterium as the dominant taxa catalyzing these three processes. Most probable number assays showed the presence of up to 10(7)/ml of propionate-oxidizing SRB in waters from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field. Bioreactors with the same concentrations of sulfate and VFA responded similarly to increasing concentrations of injected nitrate as observed in the microcosms: sulfide formation was prevented by adding approximately 80% of the nitrate dose needed to completely oxidize VFA to CO2 in both. Thus this work has demonstrated that simple time-dependent observations of the use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in microcosms are a good proxy for these processes in bioreactors of which monitoring is more complex.

  12. In Situ Photochemical Activation of Sulfate for Enhanced Degradation of Organic Pollutants in Water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoshuai; You, Shijie; Tan, Yang; Ren, Nanqi

    2017-02-21

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP) based on SO4(•-) radicals has been receiving growing attention in water and wastewater treatment. Producing SO4(•-) radicals by activation of peroxymonosulfate or persulfate faces the challenges of high operational cost and potential secondary pollution. In this study, we report the in situ photochemical activation of sulfate (i-PCAS) to produce SO4(•-) radicals with bismuth phosphate (BPO) serving as photocatalyst. The prepared BPO rod-like material could achieve remarkably enhanced degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in the presence of sulfate, indicated by the first-order kinetic constant (k = 0.0402 min(-1)) being approximately 2.1 times that in the absence (k = 0.019 min(-1)) at pH-neutral condition. This presented a marked contrast with commercial TiO2 (P25), the performance of which was always inhibited by sulfate. The impact of radical scavenger and electrolyte, combined with electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement, verified the formation of •OH and SO4(•-) radicals during i-PCAS process. According to theoretical calculations, BPO has a sufficiently high valence band potential making it thermodynamically favorable for sulfate oxidation, and weaker interaction with SO4(•-) radicals resulting in higher reactivity toward target organic pollutant. The concept of i-PCAS appears to be attractive for creating new photochemical systems where in situ production of SO4(•-) radicals can be realized by using sulfate originally existing in aqueous environment. This eliminates the need for extrinsic chemicals and pH adjustment, which makes water treatment much easier, more economical, and more sustainable.

  13. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  14. Glucosamine sulfate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glucosamine Sulphate KCl, Glucosamine-6-Phosphate, GS, Mono-Sulfated Saccharide, Poly-(1->3)-N-Acetyl-2-Amino- ... Sulfate de Glucosamine, Sulfate de Glucosamine 2KCl, SG, Sulfated Monosaccharide, Sulfated Saccharide, Sulfato de Glucosamina. Glucosamine Hydrochloride ...

  15. The effect of atmospheric sulfate reductions on diffuse radiation and photosynthesis in the United States during 1995-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel-Aleks, G.; Washenfelder, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been shown to influence the global carbon sink by increasing the fraction of diffuse light, which increases photosynthesis over a greater fraction of the vegetated canopy. Between 1995 and 2013, U.S. SO2 emissions declined by over 70%, coinciding with observed AOD reductions of 3.0 ± 0.6% yr-1 over the eastern U.S. In the Community Earth System Model (CESM), these trends cause diffuse light to decrease regionally by almost 0.6% yr-1, leading to declines in gross primary production (GPP) of 0.07% yr-1. Integrated over the analysis period and domain, this represents 0.5 Pg C of omitted GPP. A separate upscaling calculation that used published relationships between GPP and diffuse light agreed with the CESM model results within 20%. The agreement between simulated and data-constrained upscaling results strongly suggests that anthropogenic sulfate trends have a small impact on carbon uptake in temperate forests due to scattered light.

  16. Evaluating behavior of oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate during recharge and quantifying reduction rates in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Jennifer T.; Long, David T.; Klug, Michael J.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Hyndman, David W.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluates the biogeochemical changes that occur when recharge water comes in contact with a reduced aquifer. It specifically addresses (1) which reactions occur in situ, (2) the order in which these reactions will occur if terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) are introduced simultaneously, (3) the rates of these reactions, and (4) the roles of the aqueous and solid-phase portions of the aquifer. Recharge events of waters containing various combinations of O2, NO3, and SO4 were simulated at a shallow sandy aquifer contaminated with waste fuels and chlorinated solvents using modified push−pull tests to quantify rates. In situ rate constants for aerobic respiration (14.4 day -1), denitrification (5.04−7.44 day-1), and sulfate reduction (4.32−6.48 day-1) were estimated. Results show that when introduced together, NO3 and SO4can be consumed simultaneously at similar rates. To distinguish the role of aqueous phase from that of the solid phase of the aquifer, groundwater was extracted, amended with NO3 and SO4, and monitored over time. Results indicate that neither NO3 nor SO4 was reduced during the course of the aqueous-phase study, suggesting that NO3 and SO4 can behave conservatively in highly reduced water. It is clear that sediments and their associated microbial communities are important in driving redox reactions.

  17. Effect of liming on sulfate transformation and sulfur gas emissions in degraded vegetable soil treated by reductive soil disinfestation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tianzhu; Zhu, Tongbin; Zhang, Jinbo; Cai, Zucong

    2015-10-01

    Reductive soil disinfestation (RSD), namely amending organic materials and mulching or flooding to create strong reductive status, has been widely applied to improve degraded soils. However, there is little information available about sulfate (SO4(2-)) transformation and sulfur (S) gas emissions during RSD treatment to degraded vegetable soils, in which S is generally accumulated. To investigate the effects of liming on SO4(2-) transformation and S gas emissions, two SO4(2-)-accumulated vegetable soils (denoted as S1 and S2) were treated by RSD, and RSD plus lime, denoted as RSD0 and RSD1, respectively. The results showed that RSD0 treatment reduced soil SO4(2-) by 51% and 61% in S1 and S2, respectively. The disappeared SO4(2-) was mainly transformed into the undissolved form. During RSD treatment, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were detected, but the total S gas emission accounted for <0.006% of total S in both soils. Compared to RSD0, lime addition stimulated the conversion of SO4(2-) into undissolved form, reduced soil SO4(2-) by 81% in S1 and 84% in S2 and reduced total S gas emissions by 32% in S1 and 57% in S2, respectively. In addition to H2S, COS and DMS, the emissions of carbon disulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl disulfide were also detected in RSD1 treatment. The results indicated that RSD was an effective method to remove SO4(2-), liming stimulates the conversion of dissolved SO4(2-) into undissolved form, probably due to the precipitation with calcium.

  18. Polysaccharides from Gracilaria corticata: sulfation, chemical characterization and anti-HSV activities.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Ghosh, Tuhin; Pujol, Carlos A; Carlucci, María J; Damonte, Elsa B; Ray, Bimalendu

    2008-11-01

    In this study, we have analyzed water-extracted polysaccharides of Gracilaria corticata. The water extract (WE), a galactan-containing sub-fraction (F3) and their hyper sulfated derivatives (WES1, WES2, F3S1 and F3S2) had anti-HSV activity with inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) from 1.1 to 27.4 microg/ml. Sub-fraction F3, which has a molecular mass of 30 kDa, consists of a backbone of beta-(1-->3) and alpha-(1-->4)-linked-galactopyranosyl residues. This linear galactan contained Gal2Xyl1, Gal2AnGal2, Gal4 and Me-Gal3AnGal2 as oligomeric building subunits. Sulfate group was located at C-4 of (1-->3)-linked galactopyranosyl residues of the native galactan, and appeared to be very important for the anti-herpetic activity.

  19. The cough suppressive activity of sulfated glucuronoxylan from Fagus sylvatica L.

    PubMed

    Nosáľova, G; Jureček, L; Turjan, J; Capek, P; Prisenžňáková, L; Fraňová, S

    2014-06-01

    Hemicellulose polysaccharides represent a large group of natural renewable polymers, however, their application potency is still low. In our study a hardwood 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan was isolated by alkali peroxide extraction of Fagus sylvatica sawdust and modified into sulfated water soluble derivative (MGXS). Highly sulfated MGXS was characterized by HPLC, FTIR and NMR spectroscopies, and tested in vivo on chemically induced cough reflex and smooth muscles reactivity. Farmacological tests revealed an interesting antitussive activity of MGXS. Comparative tests with drug commonly used in a clinical practice revealed that antitussive activity of MGXS was lower than that of opioid receptor agonist codeine, the strongest antitussive drug. Furthermore, the specific reactivity of airways smooth muscle was not significantly affected by MGXS, indicating thus that the polymer is not involved in the bronchodilation process.

  20. Extraction, characterization and antimicrobial activity of sulfated polysaccharides from fish skins.

    PubMed

    Krichen, Fatma; Karoud, Wafa; Sila, Assaâd; Abdelmalek, Baha Eddine; Ghorbel, Raoudha; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Bougatef, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides were extracted from gray triggerfish (GTSP) and smooth hound (SHSP) skins. Their chemical and physical characteristics were determined using X-ray diffraction and Infrared spectroscopic analysis. The antibacterial activities of GTSP and SHSP against Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 43251), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Salmonella enterica (ATCC 43972) and Enterobacter sp were evaluated by determining clear growth inhibition zone diameters and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and by essays in liquid media. GTSP and SHSP were fractionated by a Diethylaminoethyl-cellulose chromatography. Fraction FGII, from GTSP, and fraction FSII, from SHSP, showed the most important inhibitory effects against the tested bacterial species. The sulfated polysaccharides from fish skins did not show hemolytic activity towards bovine erythrocytes. Overall, the results suggested that those polysaccharides could offer promising sources of polysaccharides for future application as dietary ingredients in the nutraceutical industry.

  1. Enhanced performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based biocathode using stainless steel mesh on activated carbon fabric electrode.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohita; Jain, Pratiksha; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Lal, Banwari; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2013-12-01

    An anoxic biocathode was developed using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium on activated carbon fabric (ACF) and the effect of stainless steel (SS) mesh as additional current collector was investigated. Improved performance of biocathode was observed with SS mesh leading to nearly five folds increase in power density (from 4.79 to 23.11 mW/m(2)) and threefolds increase in current density (from 75 to 250 mA/m(2)). Enhanced redox currents and lower Tafel slopes observed from cyclic voltammograms of ACF with SS mesh indicated the positive role of uniform electron collecting points. Differential pulse voltammetry technique was employed as an additional tool to assess the redox carriers involved in bioelectrochemical reactions. SRB biocathode was also tested for reduction of volatile fatty acids (VFA) present in the fermentation effluent stream and the results indicated the possibility of integration of this system with anaerobic fermentation for efficient product recovery.

  2. Sulfated nanozirconia: an investigation on acid-base properties and n-butane isomerization activity.

    PubMed

    Mishra, H K; Dalai, A K; Das, D D; Parida, K M; Pradhan, N C

    2004-04-15

    Hydrated zirconia was synthesized by an organo-inorganic route employing surfactant and was sulfated using aqueous ammonium persulfate, followed by drying at 110 degrees C. The sample thus obtained was calcined at 600 degrees C to obtain sulfated zirconia and was characterized by several physicochemical methods. Crystallite sizes of sulfated zirconia were calculated from X-ray line broadening using the Debye-Scherer equation and were found to be in the range of 25 nm. When pretreated in air, the catalyst was found to exhibit butane isomerization activity at a temperature as low as 35 degrees C under atmospheric pressure. It showed conversion as high as 37% at 100 degrees C under normal pressure when pretreated in air, whereas nitrogen-pretreated catalyst showed zero activity under similar conditions. NH(3) and CO(2) temperature-programmed desorption studies on air- and helium-pretreated samples indicated that the catalyst surface changes appreciably during air pretreatment. Results on butane isomerization in conjunction with TPD studies suggest that zirconium-oxy sites play an important role in butane activation during the reaction.

  3. N-Acetylgalactosamine 4,6-O-sulfate residues mediate binding and activation of heparin cofactor II by porcine mucosal dermatan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, Anna Margrét; Zhang, Lijuan; Tollefsen, Douglas M

    2006-08-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS) accelerates the inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II (HCII). A hexasaccharide consisting of three l-iduronic acid 2-O-sulfate (IdoA2SO3)-->N-acetyl-D-galactosamine 4-O-sulfate (GalNAc4SO3) subunits was previously isolated from porcine skin DS and shown to bind HCII with high affinity. DS from porcine intestinal mucosa has a much lower content of this disaccharide but activates HCII with potency similar to that of porcine skin DS. Therefore, we sought to characterize oligosaccharides from porcine mucosal DS that interact with HCII. DS was partially depolymerized with chondroitinase ABC, and oligosaccharides containing 2-12 monosaccharide units were isolated. The oligosaccharides were then fractionated by anion-exchange and affinity chromatography on HCII-Sepharose, and the disaccharide compositions of selected fractions were determined. We found that the smallest oligosaccharides able to bind HCII were hexasaccharides. Oligosaccharides 6-12 units long that lacked uronic acid (UA)2SO3 but contained one or two GalNAc4,6SO3 residues bound, and binding was proportional to both oligosaccharide size and number of GalNAc4,6SO3 residues. Intact DS and bound dodecasaccharides contained predominantly IdoA but little D-glucuronic acid. Decasaccharides and dodecasaccharides containing one or two GalNAc4,6SO3 residues stimulated thrombin inhibition by HCII and prolonged the clotting time of normal but not HCII-depleted human plasma. These data support the hypothesis that modification of IdoA-->GalNAc4SO3 subunits in the DS polymer by either 2-O-sulfation of IdoA or 6-O-sulfation of GalNAc can generate molecules with HCII-binding sites and anticoagulant activity.

  4. Involvement of the antiplatelet activity of magnesium sulfate in suppression of protein kinase C and the Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, George; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Tzeng-Fu; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate is widely used to prevent seizures in pregnant women with hypertension. The aim of this study was to examine the inhibitory mechanisms of magnesium sulfate in platelet aggregation in vitro. In this study, magnesium sulfate concentration-dependently (0.6-3.0 mM) inhibited platelet aggregation in human platelets stimulated by agonists. Magnesium sulfate (1.5 and 3.0 mM) also concentration-dependently inhibited phosphoinositide breakdown and intracellular Ca+2 mobilization in human platelets stimulated by thrombin. Rapid phosphorylation of a platelet protein of M(r) 47,000 (P47), a marker of protein kinase C activation, was triggered by phorbol-12-13-dibutyrate (PDBu, 50 nM). This phosphorylation was markedly inhibited by magnesium sulfate (3.0 mM). Magnesium sulfate (1.5 and 3.0 mM) further inhibited PDBu-stimulated platelet aggregation in human platelets. The thrombin-evoked increase in pHi was markedly inhibited in the presence of magnesium sulfate (3.0 mM). In conclusion, these results indicate that the antiplatelet activity of magnesium sulfate may be involved in the following two pathways: (1) Magnesium sulfate may inhibit the activation of protein kinase C, followed by inhibition of phosphoinositide breakdown and intracellular Ca+2 mobilization, thereby leading to inhibition of the phosphorylation of P47. (2) On the other hand, magnesium sulfate inhibits the Na+/H+ exchanger, leading to reduced intracellular Ca+2 mobilization, and ultimately to inhibition of platelet aggregation and the ATP-release reaction.

  5. Evaluation of organic substrates to enhance the sulfate-reducing activity in phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Julio; Pérez-López, Rafael; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José M

    2012-11-15

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the activity and growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in a metal-rich culture medium (approx. 250 mg/L Fe, 75 mg/L Zn and Cu, 10mg/L Cd) with phosphogypsum as bacterial inoculum. Phosphogypsum was collected from the stack covering the salt-marshes of the Tinto river (SW Spain). Three organic amendments were used as carbon sources, two low-cost wastes (horse manure and legume compost) and one sample of natural soil (vegetal cover). In the experiments, sulfate was reduced to sulfide during the growth of SRB populations, and concentrations were decreased in the solution. Metal concentrations also decreased to values below the detection limit. Metal removal took place by precipitation of newly-formed sulfides. Pyrite-S was the main sulfide component (approx. 200 μmol/g and 80% of pyritization) and occurred mainly as framboidal grains and rarely as isolated polyhedral crystals. Horse manure was the most successful organic substrate to promote SRB activity (sulfate removal of 61%), followed by vegetal cover (49%) and legume compost (31%). These findings propose the possibility of using naturally-occurring SRB in the phosphogypsum for bioremediation strategies based on natural soil covers with organic amendments.

  6. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity of sulfated CuO-Bi2O3 photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinlu; Zeng, Jun; Zhong, Junbo; Li, Jianzhang

    2015-09-01

    Sulfate (SO4 2-)-modified CuO-Bi2O3 composite photocatalysts with different loadings of SO4 2- were prepared by a facile pore impregnating method using ammonium persulfate (NH4)2S2O8 solution. The surface parameters, structure, morphology, the response ability to light, the binding energy of Bi 4 f and O 1 s, the hydroxyl content on the surface and the separation rate of photoinduced hole-electron pairs were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface photovoltage spectroscopy, respectively. The results reveal that sulfating of CuO-Bi2O3 decreases the band gap, increases the hydroxyl content on the surface, the separation rate of photoinduced hole-electron pairs and the adsorption of Rhodamine B on the sulfated photocatalysts. The photocatalytic activity of SO4 2-/CuO-Bi2O3 for decolorization of Rhodamine B aqueous solution was evaluated. The result shows that when the molar ratio of S/Bi is 5 %, SO4 2-/CuO-Bi2O3 exhibits the best photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation and the possible reason is discussed.

  7. Evidence of the activity of dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in nonsulfidogenic tropical mobile muds.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Vanessa M; Aller, Robert C; Aller, Josephine Y; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2006-08-01

    In spite of the nonsulfidic conditions and abundant reactive iron(III) commonly found in mobile tropical deltaic muds, genes encoding dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) were successfully amplified from the upper approximately 1 m of coastal deposits sampled along French Guiana and in the Gulf of Papua. The dsr sequences retrieved were highly diverse, were generally represented in both study regions and fell into six large phylogenetic groupings: Deltaproteobacteria, Thermodesulfovibrio groups, Firmicutes and three groups without known cultured representatives. The spatial and temporal distribution of dsr sequences strongly supports the contention that the sulfate-reducing prokaryote communities in mobile mud environments are cosmopolitan and stable over a period of years. The decrease in the (35)SO(4) (2-) tracer demonstrates that, despite abundant reactive sedimentary iron(III) ( approximately 350-400 mumol g(-1)), the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes present are active, with the highest levels of sulfide being generated in the upper zones of the cores (0-30 cm). Both the time course of the (35)S-sulfide tracer activity and the lack of reduced sulfur in sediments demonstrate virtually complete anaerobic loss of solid phase sulfides. We propose a pathway of organic matter oxidation involving at least 5-25% of the remineralized carbon, wherein sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes is cyclically oxidized biotically or abiotically by metal oxides.

  8. Four New Sulfated Polar Steroids from the Far Eastern Starfish Leptasterias ochotensis: Structures and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Malyarenko, Timofey V.; Malyarenko (Vishchuk), Olesya S.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I.; Popov, Roman S.; Kicha, Alla A.

    2015-01-01

    Three new sulfated steroid monoglycosides, leptaochotensosides A–C (1–3), and a new sulfated polyhydroxylated steroid (4) were isolated from the alcoholic extract of the Far Eastern starfish Leptasterias ochotensis. The structures of compounds 1–4 were established by extensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) analyses and chemical transformations. Although the isolated compounds did not show any apparent cytotoxicity against melanoma RPMI-7951 and breast cancer T-47D cell lines, leptaochotensoside A (1) demonstrated inhibition of T-47D cell colony formation in a soft agar clonogenic assay at nontoxic doses. In addition, this compound decreased the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced colony formation of mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells. The cancer preventive action of 1 is realized through regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. PMID:26193286

  9. Identification of Triclosan-O-Sulfate and other transformation products of Triclosan formed by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xijuan; Casas, Mònica Escolà; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Wimmer, Reinhard; Bester, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Aerobic degradation experiments of Triclosan were performed in activated sludge to identify possible transformation products for this compound. During 7 days, the formation of biotransformation products such as 2,4-Dichlorophenol, 4-Chlorocatechol, 5-Hydroxy-Triclosan and other Monohydroxy-Triclosan derivatives as well as Dihydroxy-Triclosan-derivatives were observed. The structure of 5-Hydroxy-Triclosan was elucidated by NMR data for the first time in sludge degradation experiments. Additionally the production of a hitherto unknown transformation product in sludge, i.e., Triclosan-O-Sulfate was detected. During the incubations, the concentrations of this transformation product changed from zero to 330 μg L(-1). Based on the analysis of the biodegradation products, three types of reactions were identified: 1) chemical scission of ether bond to form phenols and catechols, 2) addition of OH moieties to the aromatic ring, and 3) adding of methyl or sulfate groups to the original hydroxyl group.

  10. Chemical structure and anticoagulant activity of highly pyruvylated sulfated galactans from tropical green seaweeds of the order Bryopsidales.

    PubMed

    Arata, Paula X; Quintana, Irene; Canelón, Dilsia J; Vera, Beatriz E; Compagnone, Reinaldo S; Ciancia, Marina

    2015-05-20

    Sulfated and pyruvylated galactans were isolated from three tropical species of the Bryopsidales, Penicillus capitatus, Udotea flabellum, and Halimeda opuntia. They represent the only important sulfated polysaccharides present in the cell walls of these highly calcified seaweeds of the suborder Halimedineae. Their structural features were studied by chemical analyses and NMR spectroscopy. Their backbone comprises 3-, 6-, and 3,6-linkages, constituted by major amounts of 3-linked 4,6-O-(1'-carboxy)ethylidene-d-galactopyranose units in part sulfated on C-2. Sulfation on C-2 was not found in galactans from other seaweeds of this order. In addition, a complex sulfation pattern, comprising also 4-, 6-, and 4,6-disulfated galactose units was found. A fraction from P. capitatus, F1, showed a moderate anticoagulant activity, evaluated by general coagulation tests and also kinetics of fibrin formation was assayed. Besides, preliminary results suggest that one of the possible mechanisms involved is direct thrombin inhibition.

  11. Structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero/galactofucan polysaccharides on dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Huaide; Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and more-widespread neuronal changes that cause complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero-polysaccharides (DF1) and sulfated galactofucan polysaccharides (DF2) on dopaminergic neuron in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with samples significantly ameliorated the depletion of both DA and TH-, Bcl-2- and Bax-positive neurons in MPTP-induced PD mice, DF1 showed the highest activity. The in vitro results found that DF1 and DF2 could reverse the decreased mitochondrial activity and the increased LDL release induced by MPP(+) (P<0.01 or P<0.001) which provides further evidence that DF1 and DF2 also exerts a direct protection against the neuronal injury caused by MPP(+). Furthermore, the administration of samples effectively decreased lipid peroxidation and increased the level/activities of GSH, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT in MPTP mice. Thus, the neuron protective effect may be mediated, in part, through antioxidant activity and the prevention of cell apoptosis. The chemical composition of DF1, DF2 and DF differed markedly, the DF1 fraction had the most complex chemical composition and showed the highest neuron protective activity. These results suggest that diverse monosaccharides and uronic acid might contribute to neuron protective activity.

  12. Sulfur cycling of intertidal Wadden Sea sediments (Konigshafen, Island of Sylt, Germany): sulfate reduction and sulfur gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, E.; Bodenbender, J.; Jensen, M. H.; Rennenberg, H.; Jensen, K. M.

    2000-05-01

    Sulfate reduction rates (SRR t) and reduced inorganic sulfur pools (RIS) in Wadden Sea sediment as well as sulfur gas emissions directly to the atmosphere were measured at intervals of 2 to 12 months from 1991 to 1994. Three stations were chosen in the intertidal embayment, Königshafen, representing the range of sediments found in the Wadden Sea: Organic-poor coarse sand, organic-poor and Arenicola marina inhabited medium sand, and organic-rich muddy sand. Maximum SRR t were 2 to 5 times higher in muddy sand than in the sandy sediments. The depth-integrated SRR t varied 12 to 13-fold on a seasonal basis at the three stations. Although temperature controls biochemical processes, the overall control is more complex due to the simultaneous influence of other seasonal factors such as availability of organic matter and oxidation level of surface sediment. The sedimentary RIS pools were low due to iron limitation and contained only 30% acid volatile sulfur (AVS). Muddy sand had up to an order of magnitude more RIS than the two sandy sediments. The turnover of RIS was rapid (turnover time from ˜1 to 32 h), fastest during summer and at the sandy stations. The emission of S-gases was dominated by H 2S during summer (45-67% of the total), and was highest in muddy and lowest in coarse sand. H 2S was less important in early spring (3-49% of the total). Other sulfur gases, such as COS, DMS and CS 2, each accounted for less than 20% of the total sulfur emissions with no specific temporal and spatial pattern. Due to the low content of metals in the sediment, the reduced sulfur pools are cycled rapidly with chemical and biological reoxidation at oxic-anoxic boundaries as a major sink. Thus, the emissions of H 2S account for less than 1‰ of the sulfide produced.

  13. Activation energies of metal atomization and nitrate and sulfate decomposition in concentrated matrices (10 -1 M).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, A.; Le Garrec, H.; Cabon, J. Y.; Guern, Y.

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports on activation energies measured during copper and manganese atomization in a graphite furnace in the presence of large amounts of nitrate and sulfate matrices. It also deals with activation energies corresponding to the decomposition of these matrices and to the atomization of their metal, i.e. Na, Ca or Mg. These results were obtained from Arrhenius-type calculations carried out on specific and non-specific absorbance values. Atomization was achieved under a very high gas flow which allowed us to get to the source function. Some of the calculated energies were compared to reaction energies deduced from tables of thermodynamic data.

  14. Growth and activity of ANME clades with different sulfate and sulfide concentrations in the presence of methane

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Peer H. A.; Widjaja-Greefkes, H. C. A.; Ramiro-Garcia, Javier; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive geochemical data showed that significant methane oxidation activity exists in marine sediments. The organisms responsible for this activity are anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) that occur in consortia with sulfate-reducing bacteria. A distinct zonation of different clades of ANME (ANME-1, ANME-2a/b, and ANME-2c) exists in marine sediments, which could be related to the localized concentrations of methane, sulfate, and sulfide. In order to test this hypothesis we performed long-term incubation of marine sediments under defined conditions with methane as a headspace gas: low or high sulfate (±4 and ±21 mM, respectively) in combination with low or high sulfide (±0.1 and ±4 mM, respectively) concentrations. Control incubations were also performed, with only methane, high sulfate, or high sulfide. Methane oxidation was monitored and growth of subtypes ANME-1, ANME-2a/b, and ANME-2c assessed using qPCR analysis. A preliminary archaeal community analysis was performed to gain insight into the ecological and taxonomic diversity. Almost all of the incubations with methane had methane oxidation activity, with the exception of the incubations with combined low sulfate and high sulfide concentrations. Sulfide inhibition occurred only with low sulfate concentrations, which could be due to the lower Gibbs free energy available as well as sulfide toxicity. ANME-2a/b appears to mainly grow in incubations which had high sulfate levels and methane oxidation activity, whereas ANME-1 did not show this distinction. ANME-2c only grew in incubations with only sulfate addition. These findings are consistent with previously published in situ profiling analysis of ANME subclusters in different marine sediments. Interestingly, since all ANME subtypes also grew in incubations with only methane or sulfate addition, ANME may also be able to perform anaerobic methane oxidation under substrate limited conditions or alternatively perform additional metabolic processes. PMID

  15. Sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding: Effectiveness of organic carbon addition and pH increase depends on soil properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chaolei; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Mosley, Luke M; Marschner, Petra

    2015-11-15

    Sulfuric material is formed upon oxidation of sulfidic material; it is extremely acidic, and therefore, an environmental hazard. One option for increasing pH of sulfuric material may be stimulation of bacterial sulfate reduction. We investigated the effects of organic carbon addition and pH increase on sulfate reduction after re-flooding in ten sulfuric materials with four treatments: control, pH increase to 5.5 (+pH), organic carbon addition with 2% w/w finely ground wheat straw (+C), and organic carbon addition and pH increase (+C+pH). After 36 weeks, in five of the ten soils, only treatment +C+pH significantly increased the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) compared to the control and increased the soil pore water pH compared to treatment+pH. In four other soils, pH increase or/and organic carbon addition had no significant effect on RIS concentration compared to the control. The RIS concentration in treatment +C+pH as percentage of the control was negatively correlated with soil clay content and initial nitrate concentration. The results suggest that organic carbon addition and pH increase can stimulate sulfate reduction after re-flooding, but the effectiveness of this treatment depends on soil properties.

  16. International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodroci, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the ISS requirements and initial design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to reduce risk -- given the determination and commitment to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS. While decades of work went into developing the ISS requirements, there are many things in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: (1) Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) (2) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Level 4 materials, emergency hardware and procedures) (3) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of nearly a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery.

  17. Estrone 3-sulfate mimics, inhibitors of estrone sulfatase activity: homology model construction and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Nicola M; Purohit, Atul; Robinson, James J; Vicker, Nigel; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2002-12-17

    Steroid sulfatase (STS) is a new target for the endocrine therapy of breast cancer. To ascertain some of the requirements for inhibition of estrone sulfatase activity, a number of novel analogues of estrone 3-O-sulfate possessing sulfate surrogates were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of estrone sulfatase (STS) in comparison to a lead inhibitor, estrone-3-O-methylthiophosphonate (E1-3-MTP). Using a selective enzyme digestion, one of the diastereoisomers of this compound, (R(p))-E1-3-MTP, could be prepared and evaluated. From structure-activity studies, we show that chirality at the phosphorus atom, hydrophobicity, basicity, size, and charge all influence the ability of a compound to inhibit estrone sulfatase activity. Of these, hydrophobicity seems to be the most important since simple, active nonsteroidal inhibitors, based on 5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphth-2-ol (THN), can be prepared, provided that they are lipophilic enough to partition into a nonpolar environment. Also, a negatively charged group is favorable for optimal binding, although it appears that the presence of a potentially cleavable group can compensate for lack of charge in certain cases. A homology model of STS has been constructed from the STS sequence, and molecular docking studies of inhibitors have been performed to broaden the understanding of enzyme/inhibitor interactions. This model clearly shows the positions of the key amino acid residues His136, His290, Lys134, and Lys368 in the putative catalytic region of the formylglycine at position 75, with residues Asp35, Asp36, Asp342, and Gln343 as ligands in the coordination sphere of the magnesium ion. Docking studies using the substrate and estrone-3-sulfate mimics that are active inhibitors indicate they are positioned in the area of proposed catalysis, confirming the predictive power of the model.

  18. Anticoagulant activity of native and partially degraded glycoglucuronomannan after chemical sulfation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Barddal, Helyn Priscila; Gracher, Ana Helena Pereira; Simas-Tosin, Fernanda Fogagnoli; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo

    2015-09-01

    Heparin has great clinical importance as anticoagulant and antithrombotic agent. However, because of its risks of causing bleeding and contamination by animal pathogens, several studies aim to obtain alternatives to heparin. In the search for anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents from a non-animal source, a glycoglucuronomannan from the gum exudate of the plant Vochysia thyrsoidea was partially hydrolyzed, and both native and partially degraded polysaccharides were chemically sulfated, yielding VThS and Ph-VThS respectively. Methylation analysis indicated that sulfation occurred preferentially at the O-5 position of arabinose units in the VThS and at the O-6 position of mannose units in Ph-VThS. In vitro aPTT assay showed that VThS and Ph-VThS have anticoagulant activity, which could be controlled by protamine, and ex vivo aPTT assay demonstrated that Ph-VThS is absorbed by subcutaneous route. Like heparin, they were able to inhibit α-thrombin and factor Xa by a serpin-dependent mechanism. In vivo, VThS and Ph-VThS reduced thrombus formation by approximately 50% at a dose of 40 IU/kg, similarly to heparin. The results demonstrated that the chemically sulfated polysaccharides are promising anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents.

  19. Impact of oxygen on the coexistence of nitrification, denitrification, and sulfate reduction in oxygen-based membrane aerated biofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Shuying; Sheng, Zhiya; Yu, Tong; Liu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Membrane aerated biofilms (MABs) are subject to "counter diffusion" of oxygen and substrates. In a membrane aerated biofilm reactor, gases (e.g., oxygen) diffuse through the membrane into the MAB, and liquid substrates pass from the bulk liquid into the MAB. This behavior can result in a unique biofilm structure in terms of microbial composition, distribution, and community activity in the MAB. Previous studies have shown simultaneous aerobic oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification within a single MAB. Using molecular techniques, we investigated the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the oxygen-based MAB attached to a flat sheet membrane. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and functional gene fragments specific for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (amoA), denitrifying bacteria (nirK), and SRB (dsrB) demonstrated the coexistence of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and SRB communities within a single MAB. The functional diversities of SRB and denitrifiers decreased with an increase in the oxygen concentration in the bulk water of the reactor.

  20. Longevity of organic layers of vertical flow ponds for sulfate reduction in treating mine drainages in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Young-Wook; Hur, Won; Yim, Gil-Jae; Ji, Sang-Woo; Yang, Jae-E; Baek, Hwan-Jo; Shim, Yon-Sik

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate longevity of available organic materials used for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity in vertical flow ponds (VFPs) to treat mine drainage in South Korea. Spent mushroom compost samples (SMC) were tested as substrates in VFPs and analyzed for total organic carbon in VFPs, and were collected to analyze total organic carbon (TOC), T-N, T-P, K, metals and residual cellulose to check the longevity assessment. Chemical analysis revealed that the average contents of Fe, Al and Mn in SMC of VFPs were 19,907, 32,137 and 434 mg/kg, respectively. The contents of Fe and Al in SMC of VFPs were much higher than those of the unused SMC (control), but to the contrary, those of Mn showed a reversed tendency. Average TOC content of the controls was 64.19% but in one of the VFP substrates was as low as 15.92%. This might be resulted from SRB consumed the available organic carbon in SMC as VFPs system aged. Contents of T-N in VFPs tended to decrease as VFPs aged. The residual cellulose ranged from 3.88 to 6.72% (g/g). There existed a negative relationship between residual cellulose contents and ages of VFPs. Assuming that SMC in all VFPs had similar compositions when the VFPs were initially established, trend analysis predicted that the amount of carbon source for SRB might be available for 12-15 years further, depending on VFPs.

  1. The comparison of antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CP) and sulfated CP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui; Chen, Jin; Li, Entao; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Deyun; Li, Peng; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Xingying; Qiu, Shulei; Gao, Zhenzhen; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2015-02-01

    Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CP) was extracted, purified and modified by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method to obtain a sulfated CP (sCP). Their antioxidative activities in vitro were compared through the free radical-scavenging test. The results demonstrated that the scavenging capabilities of sCP were significantly stronger than those of CP. In vivo test, the mice hepatic injury model was prepared by BCG/LPS method, then administrated respectively with sCP and CP at three dosages, the biochemical indexes in serum, antioxidative indexes in liver homogenate and histopathological change in liver of the mice were compared. The results showed that in high (200mg/kg) and middle (150mg/kg) dosages of sCP groups, the contents of ALT, AST and TNF-α in serum and MDA in liver homogenate were significantly lower than those in the model group and numerically lower than those in the CP groups, the activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver homogenate were significantly higher than those in the model group and numerically higher than those in the CP groups. In the model group there were obvious pathological changes in the liver, while in the sCP groups were near normal. These results indicate that sCP and CP possess antioxidative activity in vitro and in vivo, the activity of sCP is stronger than that of CP and sulfation modification can enhance the antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide.

  2. Salt Effect on the Antioxidant Activity of Red Microalgal Sulfated Polysaccharides in Soy-Bean Formula.

    PubMed

    Burg, Ariela; Oshrat, Levy-Ontman

    2015-10-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides produced by microalgae, which are known to exhibit various biological activities, may potentially serve as natural antioxidant sources. To date, only a few studies have examined the antioxidant bioactivity of red microalgal polysaccharides. In this research, the effect of different salts on the antioxidant activities of two red microalgal sulfated polysaccharides derived from Porphyridium sp. and Porphyridium aerugineum were studied in a soy bean-based infant milk formula. Salt composition and concentration were both shown to affect the polysaccharides' antioxidant activity. It can be postulated that the salt ions intefer with the polysaccharide chains' interactions and alter their structure, leading to a new three-dimensional structure that better exposes antiooxidant sites in comparison to the polysaccharide without salt supplement. Among the cations that were studied, Ca(2+) had the strongest enhancement effect on antioxidant activities of both polysaccharides. Understanding the effect of salts on polysaccharides' stucture, in addition to furthering knowledge on polysaccharide bioactivities, may also shed light on the position of the antioxidant active sites.

  3. Salt Effect on the Antioxidant Activity of Red Microalgal Sulfated Polysaccharides in Soy-Bean Formula

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Ariela; Oshrat, Levy-Ontman

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides produced by microalgae, which are known to exhibit various biological activities, may potentially serve as natural antioxidant sources. To date, only a few studies have examined the antioxidant bioactivity of red microalgal polysaccharides. In this research, the effect of different salts on the antioxidant activities of two red microalgal sulfated polysaccharides derived from Porphyridium sp. and Porphyridium aerugineum were studied in a soy bean-based infant milk formula. Salt composition and concentration were both shown to affect the polysaccharides’ antioxidant activity. It can be postulated that the salt ions intefer with the polysaccharide chains’ interactions and alter their structure, leading to a new three-dimensional structure that better exposes antiooxidant sites in comparison to the polysaccharide without salt supplement. Among the cations that were studied, Ca2+ had the strongest enhancement effect on antioxidant activities of both polysaccharides. Understanding the effect of salts on polysaccharides’ stucture, in addition to furthering knowledge on polysaccharide bioactivities, may also shed light on the position of the antioxidant active sites. PMID:26492255

  4. Influence of red algal sulfated polysaccharides on blood coagulation and platelets activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina V; Byankina, Anna O; Kalitnik, Alexandra A; Kim, Yong H; Bogdanovich, Larisa N; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Yermak, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The influence of sulfated polysaccharides (λ-, κ-, and κ/β-carrageenan and porphyran) - on platelet activation was studied. Carrageenans were much weaker inhibitors of a coagulation process than heparin, while porphyran had not that effect. Results of the aPTT and PT assays suppose that carrageenans affected mostly intrinsic pathway of coagulation, while their effect on the extrinsic pathway is extremely low (λ and κ/β) or absent (κ, LMW derivative of κ-carrageenan). λ-Carrageenan was the most potent anticoagulant agent in TT, aPTT, PT, and anti-factor Xa activity. This sample was also the strongest inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in PRP. Generally, the correlation of anticoagulant and antithrombotic action in PRP is preserved for carrageenans but not for heparin. Carrageenans and porphyran affected platelet adhesion to collagen by influencing glycoprotein VI. Low molecular weight κ-carrageenan had a similar effect on platelet adhesion mediated with both major collagen receptors: integrin α2 β1 and glycoprotein VI as native polysaccharide had. Carrageenans resulted in activation of platelets under platelet adhesion mediated by integrin αIIb β3 with less degree than heparin. The least sulfated κ/β-carrageenan that possessed an inhibiting effect on thrombin- and collagen-induced aggregation of washed platelets and on the PT test but it had no significant effect on TT was the weakest promoter of integrin αIIb β3 mediated platelet activation. In summary, our study showed that the polysaccharide action was complex, since it depended on its molecular mass, sulfation degree, and monosaccharide contents (3,6-anhydrogalactose).

  5. Sulfur isotope analysis of bitumen and pyrite associated with thermal sulfate reduction in reservoir carbonates at the Big Piney-La Barge production complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Hubert E.; Walters, Clifford C.; Horn, William C.; Zimmer, Mindy; Heines, Maureen M.; Lamberti, William A.; Kliewer, Christine; Pottorf, Robert J.; Macleod, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur isotopes of solid bitumen and associated pyrite from the Madison Limestone in the Big Piney-La Barge production complex were measured using a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method. The solid bitumens, a product of thermochemical sulfate reduction, yielded δ34S values of +18.9 ± 3.9 that are consistent with inferred values for native Mississippian sulfate. In contrast, coarse and fine grain pyrite grains were found to be 34S depleted, with values similar to that of the produced H2S (δ34S ∼ +10‰). We interpret these results to indicate that two different sources of sulfate were involved with TSR within the Madison Limestone-autochthonous anhydrite, which is now completely replaced with calcite, and Permian age sulfate dissolved in the aquifer. While checking for inclusions within the bitumen that could lead to erroneous measurement, we found the bitumen possesses a ∼5 μm rim and internal “worm-like” features enriched in organic sulfur. We hypothesize that the rim is the result of back reaction of the late forming H2S with the solid bitumen and that the <1 μm diameter wormy features may result from liquid-liquid immiscibility occurring at the high temperatures of formation.

  6. Sulfated modification of the polysaccharides from Ganoderma atrum and their antioxidant and immunomodulating activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanxing; Nie, Shaoping; Li, Chang; Xie, Mingyong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, three chemically sulfated polysaccharides (S-PSG) with different degree of sulfate substitution (DS) were derived from Ganoderma atrum. FT-IR and (13)C NMR spectra indicated that the substitution was predominantly on C-6 position compared with the C-2 position. The antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities of S-PSG were further examined to determine the relationship between its structure and bioactivity. The results showed that compared with the native polysaccharide, the S-PSG-2 with moderate DS and molecular weight exhibited the highest immunomodulatory activity by increasing the macrophage phagocytosis capacity and TNF-α production. The DPPH radical scavenging activity was also greatly enhanced by S-PSG in all the groups compared with PSG. However, the reducing power and the antioxidant activities in β-carotene-linoleic acid assay were decreased. These results indicated that except for the DS, some other structural characteristics such as molecular weight, substitution position and chain conformation were also important factors affecting their bioactivities. And the S-PSG-2 we derived could be served as immunomodulator and free-radical inhibitors.

  7. Separation, characterization and anticancer activities of a sulfated polysaccharide from Undaria pinnatifida.

    PubMed

    Han, Yun; Wu, Jun; Liu, Tingting; Hu, Youdong; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Binsheng; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Xia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate separation, characterization and anticancer activities of a sulfated polysaccharide (SPUP) from Undaria pinnatifida. Firstly, polysaccharide from U. pinnatifida was separated by DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephacryl S-400 column chromatography. As results, SPUP was obtained with the yield of 19.42%. Then, SPUP was characterized using chemical analysis, gas chromatography, size-exclusion HPLC chromatography, UV-vis spectra and FT-IR spectrum. The content of total sugar, uronic acid, protein and sulfate radical were 80.48%, 3.21%, 7.12% and 29.14%, respectively. SPUP was a heteropolysaccharide composed of fucose, glucose and galactose in a molar percentage of 27.15:19.34:53.51 with molecular weight of 97.9 kDa. Finally, the strongly against breast cancer activity of SPUP was confirmed by DMBA-induced breast cancer rats model. AS results, SPUP can significantly restrain breast abnormal enlargement, prolong tumor latency and reduced tumor incidence. Immunomodulatory activity and regulating abnormal sex hormones level might contribute to its anticancer activities.

  8. Anticoagulant and FGF/FGFR signal activating activities of the heparinoid propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate and its oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Yiran; Zeng, Yangyang; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Xia

    2016-01-20

    Propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS), prepared by chemical sulfation of alginate, has been used for treating cardiovascular diseases in China for nearly 30 years. In the current study, the PSS was hydrolyzed partially by an environment-friendly solid phase acid degradation method, and then separated by using a Bio-Gel P6 chromatographic column. Thirteen PSS oligosaccharide fractions were obtained and characterized by ESI-MS. The results of different coagulation assays showed that a high molecular weight and a higher degree of sulfation were essential for the anticoagulant activity of the PSS because the PSS oligosaccharides exhibited no detectable anticoagulant activity. In contrast, not only PSS but also certain oligosaccharides showed significant activities in stimulation of FGF1, 2, 7, 8, 9 or 10 induced cell proliferation in FGFR1c-expressing BaF3 cells. Such properties made the PSS and its oligosaccharides promising compounds in the regulation of FGF-dependent development, treatment of cancer, and wound healing processes.

  9. Microwave-assisted digestion using nitric acid for heavy metals and sulfated ash testing in active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Pluhácek, T; Hanzal, J; Hendrych, J; Milde, D

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of inorganic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients plays a crucial role in the quality control of the pharmaceutical production. The heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash methods employing microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid have been demonstrated as alternatives to inappropriate compendial methods recommended in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). The recoveries using the heavy metals method ranged between 89% and 122% for nearly all USP and Ph. Eur. restricted elements as well as the recoveries of sodium sulfate spikes were around 100% in all tested matrices. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion method allowed simultaneous decomposition of 15 different active pharmaceutical ingredients with sample weigh up to 1 g. The heavy metals and sulfated ash procedures were successfully applied to the determination of heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash content in mycophenolate mofetil, nicergoline and silymarin.

  10. SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are rooted in anoxic sediments that support high levels of microbial activity including utilization of sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor which is reduced to sulfide. Sulfate reduction in seagrass bed sediments is stimulated by input of organic carbon through the ...

  11. Sulfated polysaccharides with antioxidant and anticoagulant activity from the sea cucumber Holothuria fuscogliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rongfeng; Yu, Huahua; Yue, Yang; Liu, Song; Xing, Rong'e.; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-08-01

    Sea cucumber is a traditional nutritional food and medicinal resource with many bioactive components in China. Holothuria fuscogliva is a big sea cucumber with a rich of bioactive polysaccharides. To investigate the bioactivities of the polysaccharides from sea cucumber H. fuscogliva, we prepared the sulfated polysaccharides (HfP) from sea cucumber H. fuscogliva using a protease hydrolysis method. Antioxidant activities of HfP were investigated, including hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and superoxide radical scavenging activity. And, the anticoagulant activities of HfP were studied, including the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT). The average molecular weight was 1 867.1 Da, with a sulfate content of 20.7%. In addition, the molar ratio of monosaccharide composition of HfP was Man: Rha: Glc A: Glc: Gal: Xyl: Fuc=0.083 6: 0.437: 0.134: 0: 1.182: 0.748: 1. It had a strong antioxidant activity, the hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activity EC 50 of HfP was 3.74 and 0.037 mg/mL, respectively. It also showed a good anticoagulant activity in our study. The APTT of HfP was much higher than that of heparin sodium, and the PT and TT of HfP was close to that of heparin sodium at a low concentration. Therefore, HfP shows a good antioxidant and anticoagulant activity and it may become a potential candidate of the natural antioxidant and anticoagulant and will have a good application future in health product or medicine industry.

  12. Physico-chemical characterization and pharmacological activities of sulfated polysaccharide from sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Salem, Yosra Ben; Amri, Safa; Hammi, Khaoula Mkadmini; Abdelhamid, Amal; Cerf, Didier Le; Bouraoui, Abderrahman; Majdoub, Hatem

    2017-04-01

    Sulfated polysaccharide (SP) from the eggs of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, extracted by papain digestion, was characterized by size exclusion chromatography coupling on-line with light scattering and viscosity detectors (SEC/MALS/VD/DRI), gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The native molecular mass of the extracted polysaccharide is high (≥22 000 KDa) and it is composed mainly of arabinose, accompanied by other monosaccharides (mostly galactose, glucose and fucose), significant amounts of uronic acids (18.4%) and relatively high proportions of sulfate (22.4%). The pharmacological evaluation of SP showed a significant in vivo anti-inflammatory activity (p<0.001), 3h after injection, the edema inhibition was 75.8% at the dose of 100mg/Kg; a significant peripheral analgesic activity (p<0.001), with 64.9% of writhing inhibition, and a significant increase in the hot plate reaction time in mice indicating central analgesic activity. In addition, an interesting gastroprotective effect was observed with this polysaccharide; the gastric ulcer inhibition was 69.7%, at the dose of 100mg/Kg.

  13. Chemically engineered sulfated glucans from rice bran exert strong antiviral activity at the stage of viral entry.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bimalendu; Hutterer, Corina; Bandyopadhyay, Shruti S; Ghosh, Kanika; Chatterjee, Udipta R; Ray, Sayani; Zeitträger, Isabel; Wagner, Sabrina; Marschall, Manfred

    2013-12-27

    Attachment and entry of many viruses are mediated by their affinity for polysaccharides present on the surface of target cells. In this paper, we demonstrate that sulfated glucans isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) can be utilized as experimental drugs exerting strong antiviral activity. In particular, oleum-DMF-based extraction is described as a procedure for the generation of chemically engineered glucans from commercially available rice bran. The one-step procedure has the potential to provide a spectrum of related glucans with varying molecular masses and modifications, including sulfation. The sulfated glucans P444, P445, and P446 possess increased antiviral activity compared to a previously described glucan (S1G). P444, P445, and P446 were highly active against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), moderately active against other members of the family Herpesviridae, while not active against unrelated viruses. Specific experimentation with HCMV-infected cells provided evidence that antiviral activity was based on inhibition of viral entry and that inhibition occurred in the absence of drug-induced cytotoxicity. These findings underline the high potential of sulfated glucans for antiviral research and drug development. In addition, the procedure described for the efficient transformation of glucan hydroxy groups to sulfate groups may be similarly beneficial for the chemical alteration of other natural products.

  14. Reductions of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium on beef trim by lactic acid, levulinic acid, and sodium dodecyl sulfate treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Ping; Chen, Dong; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; Hung, Yen-Con; Doyle, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Studies were done at 21 °C to determine the bactericidal activity of lactic acid, levulinic acid, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) applied individually and in combination on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in pure culture and to compare the efficacy of lactic acid and levulinic acid plus SDS treatments applied by spray or immersion to inactivate STEC and Salmonella (10(7) CFU/cm2) on beef trim pieces (10 by 10 by 7.5 cm). Application of 3% lactic acid for 2 min to pure cultures was shown to reduce E. coli O26:H11, O45:H2, O111:H8, O103:H2, O121:H2, O145:NM, and O157:H7 populations by 2.1, 0.4, 0.3, 1.4, 0.3, 2.1, and 1.7 log CFU/ml, respectively. Treatment with 0.5% levulinic acid plus 0.05% SDS for <1 min reduced the populations of all STEC strains to undetectable levels (>6 log/ml reduction). Beef surface temperature was found to affect the bactericidal activity of treatment with 3 % levulinic acid plus 2% SDS (LV-SDS). Treating cold (4 °C) beef trim with LV-SDS at 21, 62, or 81 °C for 30 s reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 1.0, 1.1, or 1.4 log CFU/cm2, respectively, whereas treating beef trim at 8 °C with LV-SDS at 12 °C for 0.1, 1, 3, or 5 min reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 1.4, 2.4, 2.5, or 3.3 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Spray treatment of beef trim at 4 °C with 5 % lactic acid only reduced the E. coli O157:H7 population by 1.3 log CFU/cm2. Treating beef trim at 8 °C with LV-SDS for 1, 2, or 3 min reduced Salmonella Typhimurium by 2.1, 2.6, and >5.0 log CFU/cm2, respectively. Hand massaging the treated beef trim substantially reduced contamination of both pathogens, with no detectable E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella Typhimurium (<5 CFU/cm2) on beef trim pieces treated with LV-SDS. Reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium populations was enhanced, but bactericidal activity was affected by the meat temperature.

  15. Optimization, characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of neutral polysaccharides from the fruit of Borojoa sorbilis cuter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangfang; Liao, Kangsheng; Wu, Yunshan; Pan, Qi; Wu, Lilan; Jiao, Hong; Guo, Dean; Li, Ben; Liu, Bo

    2016-10-20

    Extraction optimization, purification, characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of polysaccharides from the fruit body of Borojoa sorbilis cuter were investigated in present study. The optimal Ultrahigh Pressure extraction condition was determined as: extraction once with the solid-liquid ratio of 1:10 in 30°C and 1500Mpa for crude polysaccharide (BP) and experimental yield was 8.28%. Four water-soluble polysaccharides named as BP1-1, BP1-2, BP1-3 and BP1-4, with molecular weight of 35.8, 32.4, 30.1 and 27.7kDa, were purified by DEAE Sepharose and Superdex 200 chromatography. On the basis of chemical and spectroscopic analyses, BP1-1-BP1-4 were found to be neutral β-d-galactan containing a (1→4)-linked backbone. S-BP1s with the DSS of 1.18, was sulfated by chloro-sulfonic acid-pyridine method. Furthermore, S-BP1s exhibited significant in vitro antitumor activity against liver cancer HepG2 and lung cancer A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicated that S-BP1s could be potentially developed as functional antitumor drug.

  16. Influence of alkyl sulfates on waste activated sludge fermentation at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Su; Chen, Yinguang; Zhou, Qi

    2007-09-05

    Alkyl sulfates (AS), such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are widely used in household and industrial products, and can be found in some wastewater and waste activated sludge (WAS). The effect of SDS on the fermentation of WAS at ambient temperature was investigated in this paper. Experimental results showed that the concentrations of protein and carbohydrate in aqueous phase increased with the amount of SDS. The concentrations of both NH(4)(+)-N and PO(4)(3-)-P in fermentation liquor also increased in the presence of SDS. In addition, it was observed that the fermentative short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) concentration was affected by SDS. With the increase of SDS dosage, the maximum SCFAs concentration increased, and the fermentation time before reaching the maximum SCFAs concentration also increased. Further investigation showed that the produced SCFAs consisted of acetic, propionic, n-butyric, iso-butyric, n-valeric and iso-valeric acids, and acetic, iso-valeric and propionic acids were the three main products. The influence of SDS on methanogenesis was also investigated, and the inhibitory effect of SDS on methanogens activity was observed.

  17. Sulfation modification and anticoagulant activity of the polysaccharides obtained from persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Mo, Xiaoyan; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Yali

    2012-12-01

    The optimal conditions for sulfation of polysaccharides from persimmon fruits (PFP) with chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine (CSA-Pyr) method were determined by response surface methodology. Box-Behnken design was applied to evaluate the effects of three independent variables (volume ratio of Pyr to CSA, volume ratio of PFP to SO(3)Pyr and reaction time) on the degree of substitution (DS), molecular weight (MW) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of sulfated polysaccharides (PFP-S). The APTT activity of PFP-S could be improved by application of various volume ratio of Pyr to CSA, volume ratio of PFP to SO(3)Pyr and reaction time, which was possible due to the degradation of polysaccharides to different extent and increasing of DS. The optimal conditions to obtain the strongest APTT of PFP-S were the volume ratio of CSA to Pyr of 1:8, the volume ratio of SO(3)Pyr to PFP of 1:3.6 and the reaction time of 3 h, respectively.

  18. The Key Role of Sulfation and Branching on Fucoidan Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catarina; Ferreira, Andreia S; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Nunes, Cláudia; Pashkuleva, Iva; Neves, Nuno M; Coimbra, Manuel A; Reis, Rui L; Martins, Albino; Silva, Tiago H

    2016-12-20

    There is an urgent need for antitumor bioactive agents with minimal or no side effects over normal adjacent cells. Fucoidan is a marine-origin polymer with known antitumor activity. However, there are still some concerns about its application due to the inconsistent experimental results, specifically its toxicity over normal cells and the mechanism behind its action. Herein, three fucoidan extracts (FEs) have been tested over normal and breast cancer cell lines. From cytotoxicity results, only one of the extracts shows selective antitumor behavior (at 0.2 mg mL(-1) ), despite similarities in sulfation degree and carbohydrates composition. Although the three FEs present different molecular weights, depolymerization of selected samples discarded Mw as the key factor in the antitumor activity. Significant differences in sulfates position and branching are observed, presenting FE 2 the higher branching degree. Based on all these experimental data, it is believed that these last two properties are the ones that influence the cytotoxic effects of fucoidan extracts.

  19. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Milestone, N. B.

    2015-09-01

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction.

  20. NONLINEARITIES IN THE SULFATE SECONDARY FINE PARTICULATE RESPONSE TO NOX EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS AS MODELED BY THE REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Attention is increasingly being devoted to the health effects of fine particulates. In regions that have a large production of sulfate, sulfuric acid and nitric acid compete for the available ammonia to form aerosols. In addition, the available nitric acid is the result of ur...

  1. Application of acidic calcium sulfate and e-polylysine to pre-rigor beef rounds for reduction of pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne illness continues to be a serious public health problem and is a major concern for the United States food industry. This study evaluated the effectiveness of warm solutions of acidic calcium sulfate (ACS), lactic acid (LA), episolon-polylysine (EPL), ACS plus EPL, and sterile distilled wa...

  2. Methionine oxidation within the cerebroside-sulfate activator protein (CSAct or Saposin B).

    PubMed Central

    Whitelegge, J. P.; Penn, B.; To, T.; Johnson, J.; Waring, A.; Sherman, M.; Stevens, R. L.; Fluharty, C. B.; Faull, K. F.; Fluharty, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    The cerebroside-sulfate activator protein (CSAct or Saposin B) is a small water-soluble glycoprotein that plays an essential role in the metabolism of certain glycosphingolipids, especially sulfatide. Deficiency of CSAct in humans leads to sulfatide accumulation and neurodegenerative disease. CSAct activity can be measured in vitro by assay of its ability to activate sulfatide-sulfate hydrolysis by arylsulfatase A. CSAct has seven methionine residues and a mass of 8,845 Da when deglycosylated. Mildly oxidized, deglycosylated CSAct (+16 Da), separated from nonoxidized CSAct by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), showed significant modulation of the in vitro activity. Because oxidation partially protected against CNBr cleavage and could largely be reversed by treatment with dithiothreitol, it was concluded that the major modification was conversion of a single methionine to its sulfoxide. High-resolution RP-HPLC separated mildly oxidized CSAct into seven or more different components with shorter retention times than nonoxidized CSAct. Mass spectrometry showed these components to have identical mass (+16 Da). The shorter retention times are consistent with increased polarity accompanying oxidation of surface-exposed methionyl side chains, in general accordance with the existing molecular model. A mass-spectrometric CNBr mapping protocol allowed identification of five of the seven possible methionine-sulfoxide CSAct oxoforms. The most dramatic suppression of activity occurred upon oxidation of Met61 (26% of control) with other residues in the Q60MMMHMQ66 motif falling in the 30-50% activity range. Under conditions of oxidative stress, accumulation of minimally oxidized CSAct protein in vivo could perturb metabolism of sulfatide and other glycosphingolipids. This, in turn, could contribute to the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disease, especially in situations where the catabolism of these materials is marginal. PMID:11045609

  3. Distinct structures of the α-fucose branches in fucosylated chondroitin sulfates do not affect their anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Gustavo R C; Glauser, Bianca F; Parreiras, Luane A; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2015-10-01

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS) is a glycosaminoglycan found in sea cucumbers. It has a backbone like that of mammalian chondroitin sulfate (4-β-d-GlcA-1→3-β-d-GalNAc-1)n but substituted at the 3rd position of the β-d-glururonic acid residues with α-fucose branches. The structure of these branches varies among FCSs extracted from different species of sea cucumbers, as revealed by solution NMR spectroscopy. Some species (Isostichopus badionotus and Patalus mollis) contain branches formed by single α-fucose residues but with variable sulfation patterns (2,4-, 3,4- and 4-sulfation). FCS from Ludwigothurea grisea is distinguished because it contains preponderant branches formed by disaccharide units containing non-sulfated and 3-sulfated α-fucose units at the reducing and non-reducing ends, respectively. Despite the structural variability on their α-fucose branches, these FCSs have similar anticoagulant action on assays using purified reagents. They have serpin-dependent and serpin-independent effects. Pharmacological assays using experimental animals showed that the three types of FCSs have similar antithrombotic effect and bleeding tendency. They also activate factor XII on the same range of concentration. Based on these observations, we proposed that only few sulfated α-fucose branches along the FCS chain are enough to assure the binding of this glycosaminoglycan to proteins of the coagulation system. Substitution with additional sulfated α-fucose does not increase further the activity. Overall, the use of FCSs with marked variability on their branches of α-fucose allowed us to establish correlations between structures vs biological effects of these glycosaminoglycans on a more refined basis. It opens new avenues for therapeutic intervention using FCSs.

  4. Magnesium sulfate treatment against sarin poisoning: dissociation between overt convulsions and recorded cortical seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Katalan, Shahaf; Lazar, Shlomi; Brandeis, Rachel; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Egoz, Inbal; Grauer, Ettie; Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Raveh, Lily

    2013-02-01

    Sarin, a potent organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor, induces an array of toxic effects including convulsions. Many antidotal treatments contain anticonvulsants to block seizure activity and the ensuing brain damage. Magnesium sulfate (MGS) is used to suppress eclamptic seizures in pregnant women with hypertension and was shown to block kainate-induced convulsions. Magnesium sulfate was evaluated herein as an anticonvulsant against sarin poisoning and its efficacy was compared with the potent anticonvulsants midazolam (MDZ) and caramiphen (CRM). Rats were exposed to a convulsant dose of sarin (96 μg/kg, im) and 1 min later treated with the oxime TMB4 and atropine to increase survival. Five minutes after initiation of convulsions, MGS, CRM, or MDZ were administered. Attenuation of tonic-clonic convulsions was observed following all these treatments. However, radio-telemetric electro-corticography (ECoG) monitoring demonstrated sustained seizure activity in MGS-injected animals while this activity was completely blocked by MDZ and CRM. This disrupted brain activity was associated with marked increase in brain translocator protein levels, a marker for brain damage, measured 1 week following exposure. Additionally, histopathological analyses of MGS-treated group showed typical sarin-induced brain injury excluding the hippocampus that was partially protected. Our results clearly show that MGS demonstrated misleading features as an anticonvulsant against sarin-induced seizures. This stems from the dissociation observed between overt convulsions and seizure activity. Thus, the presence or absence of motor convulsions may be an unreliable indicator in the assessment of clinical status and in directing adequate antidotal treatments following exposure to nerve agents in battle field or terror attacks.

  5. Biotic and a-biotic Mn and Fe cycling in deep sediments across a gradient of sulfate reduction rates along the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mor, A.; Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    The coupling between the biological and a-biotic processes controlling trace metals in deep marine sediments are not well understood, although the fluxes of elements and trace metals across the sediment-water interface can be a major contribution to ocean water. Four marine sediment profiles (ODP leg 167 sites 1011, 1017, 1018 and 1020)were examined to evaluate and quantify the biotic and abiotic reaction networks and fluxes that occur in deep marine sediments. We compared biogeochemical processes across a gradient of sulfate reduction (SR) rates with the objective of studying the processes that control these rates and how they affect major elements as well as trace metal redistribution. The rates of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) were constrained using a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow). Constraints for the model include: sediment and pore water concentrations, as well as %CaCO3, %biogenic silica, wt% carbon and δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC), particulate organic matter (POC) and mineral associated carbon (MAC). The sites are distinguished by the depth of AMO: a shallow zone is observed at sites 1018 (9 to 19 meters composite depth (mcd)) and 1017 (19 to 30 mcd), while deeper zones occur at sites 1011 (56 to 76 mcd) and 1020 (101 to 116 mcd). Sulfate reduction rates at the shallow AMO sites are on the order 1x10-16 mol/L/yr, much faster than rates in the deeper zone sulfate reduction (1-3x10-17 mol/L/yr), as expected. The dissolved metal ion concentrations varied between the sites, with Fe (0.01-7 μM) and Mn (0.01-57 μM) concentrations highest at Site 1020 and lowest at site 1017. The highest Fe and Mn concentrations occurred at various depths, and were not directly correlated with the rates of sulfate reduction and the maximum alkalinity values. The main processes that control cycling of Fe are the production of sulfide from sulfate reduction and the distribution of Fe-oxides. The Mn distribution

  6. Effect of Sulfate on Rhenium Partitioning during Melting of Low-Activity Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    The volatile loss of technetium-99 (99Tc) is a major concern of the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification at Hanford. We investigated the incorporation and volatile loss of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) during batch-to-glass conversion up to 1100°C. The AN-102 feed, which is one of the representative Hanford LAW feeds, containing 0.59 wt% of SO3 (in glass if 100% retained) was used. The modified sulfate-free AN-102_0S feed was also tested to investigate the effect of sulfate on Re partitioning and retention during melting. After heating of the dried melter feed (mixture of LAW simulant and glass forming/modifying additives) to different temperatures, the heat-treated samples were quenched. For each heat-treated sample, the salts (soluble components in room temperature leaching), early glass forming melt (soluble components in 80°C leaching), and insoluble solids were separated by a two-step leaching and the chemical compositions of each phase were quantitatively analyzed. The final retention ratio of AN-102 and AN-102_0S in glass (insoluble solids) are 32% and 63% respectively. The presence of sulfate in the salt phase between 600 and 800°C leads to a significantly higher Re loss via volatilization from the salt layer. At ≥800°C, for both samples, there is no more incorporation of Re into the insoluble phase because: for AN-102_0S there is no salt left i.e., the split into the insoluble and gas phases is complete by 800°C and for AN-102 all the Re contained in the remaining salt phase is lost through volatilization. The present results on the effect of sulfate, although not directly applicable to LAW vitrification in the melter, will be used to understand the mechanism of Re incorporation into glass to eventually develop the methods that can increase the 99Tc retention during LAW vitrification at Hanford.

  7. Anticoagulant Activity of a Unique Sulfated Pyranosic (1→3)-β-l-Arabinan through Direct Interaction with Thrombin*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Paula V.; Quintana, Irene; Cerezo, Alberto S.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Pol-Fachin, Laercio; Verli, Hugo; Estevez, José M.; Ciancia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    A highly sulfated 3-linked β-arabinan (Ab1) with arabinose in the pyranose form was obtained from green seaweed Codium vermilara (Bryopsidales). It comprised major amounts of units sulfated on C-2 and C-4 and constitutes the first polysaccharide of this type isolated in the pure form and fully characterized. Ab1 showed anticoagulant activity by global coagulation tests. Less sulfated arabinans obtained from the same seaweed have less or no activity. Ab1 exerts its activity through direct and indirect (antithrombin- and heparin cofactor II-mediated) inhibition of thrombin. Direct thrombin inhibition was studied in detail. By native PAGE, it was possible to detect formation of a complex between Ab1 and human thrombin (HT). Ab1 binding to HT was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. CD spectra of the Ab1 complex suggested that ligand binding induced a small conformational change on HT. Ab1-thrombin interactions were studied by molecular dynamic simulations using the persulfated octasaccharide as model compound. Most carbohydrate-protein contacts would occur by interaction of sulfate groups with basic amino acid residues on the surface of the enzyme, more than 60% of them being performed by the exosite 2-composing residues. In these interactions, the sulfate groups on C-2 were shown to interact more intensely with the thrombin structure. In contrast, the disulfated oligosaccharide does not promote major conformational modifications at the catalytic site when complexed to exosite 1. These results show that this novel pyranosic sulfated arabinan Ab1 exerts its anticoagulant activity by a mechanism different from those found previously for other sulfated polysaccharides and glycosaminoglycans. PMID:23161548

  8. Anticoagulant activity of a unique sulfated pyranosic (1->3)-β-L-arabinan through direct interaction with thrombin.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Paula V; Quintana, Irene; Cerezo, Alberto S; Caramelo, Julio J; Pol-Fachin, Laercio; Verli, Hugo; Estevez, José M; Ciancia, Marina

    2013-01-04

    A highly sulfated 3-linked β-arabinan (Ab1) with arabinose in the pyranose form was obtained from green seaweed Codium vermilara (Bryopsidales). It comprised major amounts of units sulfated on C-2 and C-4 and constitutes the first polysaccharide of this type isolated in the pure form and fully characterized. Ab1 showed anticoagulant activity by global coagulation tests. Less sulfated arabinans obtained from the same seaweed have less or no activity. Ab1 exerts its activity through direct and indirect (antithrombin- and heparin cofactor II-mediated) inhibition of thrombin. Direct thrombin inhibition was studied in detail. By native PAGE, it was possible to detect formation of a complex between Ab1 and human thrombin (HT). Ab1 binding to HT was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. CD spectra of the Ab1 complex suggested that ligand binding induced a small conformational change on HT. Ab1-thrombin interactions were studied by molecular dynamic simulations using the persulfated octasaccharide as model compound. Most carbohydrate-protein contacts would occur by interaction of sulfate groups with basic amino acid residues on the surface of the enzyme, more than 60% of them being performed by the exosite 2-composing residues. In these interactions, the sulfate groups on C-2 were shown to interact more intensely with the thrombin structure. In contrast, the disulfated oligosaccharide does not promote major conformational modifications at the catalytic site when complexed to exosite 1. These results show that this novel pyranosic sulfated arabinan Ab1 exerts its anticoagulant activity by a mechanism different from those found previously for other sulfated polysaccharides and glycosaminoglycans.

  9. Improved detection of amylase activity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with copolymerized starch.

    PubMed

    Martínez, T F; Alarcón, F J; Díaz-López, M; Moyano, F J

    2000-08-01

    An improved method, based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for detection of amylase activity is described. This method will allow better characterization of certain amylases than that obtained by the Davis technique. The main features of the technique are: (i) identification of amylase bands and molecular mass determination are possible in the same gel; (ii) the hydrolysis of copolymerized substrate during electrophoretic separation is prevented using very low temperatures instead of inactivating agents such as chelating agents; and (iii) the technique is applicable to reveal amylase activity in a wide range of biological samples. The method is not useful for enzymes sensitive to SDS and for high molecular mass amylases.

  10. Effect of the chelation of metal cation on the antioxidant activity of chondroitin sulfates.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Katsumi; Oyanagi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The antioxidant potencies of chondroitin sulfates (CSs) from shark cartilage, salmon cartilage, bovine trachea, and porcine intestinal mucosa were compared by three representative methods for the measurement of the antioxidant activity; DPPH radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. CSs from salmon cartilage and bovine trachea showed higher potency in comparison with CSs from shark cartilage and porcine intestinal mucosa. Next, CS from salmon cartilage chelating with Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+) were prepared, and their antioxidant potencies were compared. CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions showed rather decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity in comparison with CS of H(+) form. In contrast, CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ion showed remarkably enhanced superoxide radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. Moreover, CS chelating with divalent metal ions, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), showed noticeably higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. The present results revealed that the scavenging activities of, at least, superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical were enhanced by the chelation with divalent metal ions.

  11. Heparan sulfate mimetic PG545-mediated antilymphoma effects require TLR9-dependent NK cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Todd V.; Lin, Liwen; Brandstadter, Joshua D.; Rendell, Victoria R.; Dredge, Keith; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which serves as a barrier to tumor invasion and metastasis. Heparanase promotes tumor growth by cleaving HS chains of proteoglycan and releasing HS-bound angiogenic growth factors and facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the ECM. HS mimetics, such as PG545, have been developed as antitumor agents and are designed to suppress angiogenesis and metastasis by inhibiting heparanase and competing for the HS-binding domain of angiogenic growth factors. However, how PG545 exerts its antitumor effect remains incompletely defined. Here, using murine models of lymphoma, we determined that the antitumor effects of PG545 are critically dependent on NK cell activation and that NK cell activation by PG545 requires TLR9. We demonstrate that PG545 does not activate TLR9 directly but instead enhances TLR9 activation through the elevation of the TLR9 ligand CpG in DCs. Specifically, PG545 treatment resulted in CpG accumulation in the lysosomal compartment of DCs, leading to enhanced production of IL-12, which is essential for PG545-mediated NK cell activation. Overall, these results reveal that PG545 activates NK cells and that this activation is critical for the antitumor effect of PG545. Moreover, our findings may have important implications for improving NK cell–based antitumor therapies. PMID:26649979

  12. Weak coupling between sulfate reduction and the anaerobic oxidation of methane in methane-rich seafloor sediments during ex situ incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Marshall W.; Samarkin, Vladimir A.; Bowles, Kathy M.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated coupling between sulfate reduction (SR) and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) by quantifying pore water geochemical profiles, determining rates of microbial processes, and examining microbial community structure at two sites within Mississippi Canyon lease block 118 (MC118) in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Sediments from the northwest seep contained high concentrations of methane while sediments from the southwest seep contained methane, gaseous n-alkanes and liquid hydrocarbons and had abundant surficial accumulations of gas hydrate. Volumetric (21.5 μmol cm -3 day -1) and integrated (1429 mmol m -2 day -1) rates of SR at MC118 in ex situ incubations are the highest reported thus far for seafloor environments. AOM rates were small in comparison, with volumetric rates ranging from 0.1 to 12.6 nmol cm -3 day -1. Diffusion cannot adequately supply the sulfate required to support these high SR rates so additional mechanisms, possibly biological sulfide oxidation and/or downward advection, play important roles in supplying sulfate at these sites. The microbial communities at MC118 included sulfate-reducing bacteria phylogenetically associated with Desulfobacterium anilini, which is capable of complex hydrocarbon degradation. Despite low AOM rates, the majority of archaea identified were phylogenetically related to previously described methane oxidizing archaea. To evaluate whether weak coupling between SR and AOM occurs in habitats lacking the complex hydrocarbon milieu present at MC118, we compiled available SR and AOM rates and found that the global median ratio of SR to AOM was 10.7:1 rather than the expected 1:1. The global median integrated AOM rate was used to refine global estimates for AOM rates at cold seeps; these new estimates are only 5% of the previous estimate.

  13. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  14. Overview on Biological Activities and Molecular Characteristics of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Green Algae in Recent Years

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits. PMID:25257786

  15. Chondroitin sulfate

    MedlinePlus

    ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor. Some people also inject chondroitin sulfate into the ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor seems to reduce arthritis symptoms. However, any symptom ...

  16. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa